9 Burst results for "Dan O'neill"

"dan oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

Scoops with Danny Mac

04:35 min | 6 months ago

"dan oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

"You know a culture in baseball riding in in the way it's covered. Where there's this new wave of statistical Information and ways of looking at the game and what players did you know with war munch angles and all those things until I've seen. Lists. On the Internet that you can find stories that say that are about you know who who are the players who might not belong in the hall of fame you're on the bubble or the least impressive. Things and usually bronx on that list and. It's amazing to me because you know I sorta judge you can. You can sort of judge players and whether they belong in the hall of fame to a certain extent on how they impacted the game. I'll give you an example, use a different sport. There's always an argument I mean, who's the greatest hockey player in the history of the game? And often. Wayne Gretzky is is talked about I mean he's the great one. He was greatest player ever. I've always felt Bob your the greatest player ever saw because he changed the way the game was great. That's what brock did. And he got to the cardinals and took off and remember the other thing interesting about Lou Brock was he only played one season of class a ball before he was called to the big leagues. So that had a lot to do with him struggling those first couple preseason. and then finally finding himself in a different situation here in Saint. Louis. But he the way the game was played in the National League. You know when he stole I'll give you another example when who stole and nineteen seventy four. when he stole hundred eighteen basis that was more basis than seventeen of the twenty, four Major League teams through. So you know when I think about Lou. Brock, I mean besides the fact that he had three thousand hits. The fact that he still nine hundred, thirty, eight basis and still holds the national record with a one hundred eighteen steals in one season. He was a unique player that changed the way. The game was played in the National League for the next you know ten fifteen years and I and I. Love, that the end is what he did in the World Series 'cause those teams didn't know how to deal with Lou, brock coming and nights and sixty four the New York Yankees never seen anything like. Our wrap it up with this in Danneal is my guest what what is your lasting impression if you had to Kinda seminar what what in somebody asks you by Lou Brock Wha what's going to and it could be off the field on the field all of it what do you think about when you think of Lou? Brock. Well usually think. Bronco. Broiler And he probably would too. Because you'd want to sell you. That's Okay I always wanted to see him take the field with. No just sort of a personal you know I I have a lot of I have several encounters blue and like I said, they're all good. But one I remember was late in my career at the post dispatch I was working on a story. I went over to the Ballpark village during one of the hall of fame ceremonies. There's an opportunity to catch some of those hall of famers and talk to them. And And they have as you know, you're part of it. They have a little private party beforehand upstairs the restaurant. And I went up and I tried to talk to a couple of them and and they were like, I'm not doing that. Not Right now. but I went went up and I caught Lou before he walked into this private party he said sure come on in. So he takes me inside and we sit down and this is a party with his peers guys. He hasn't seen in years maybe. You know fun time and it's a private time. It's not supposed to be a press conference or anything. But he brought me in sat me down on sat there at the table spend twenty, twenty, five minutes with me until I was done and and and then said, okay, you know thank you very much I mean that's the kind of person he was and there weren't a lot of people that I dealt with and my years of sports writing. that were anything like Brooke US Amazing Hey Dan, thanks so much for your time and your recollections of. The Great Lou Brock in always appreciate your work and your books and all your years at the post-dispatch. Thanks so much. Thank Stan always great to be with you buddy. That Stan. O'Neal.

Lou Brock National League New York Yankees Wayne Gretzky hockey Major League Stan Louis Bob cardinals O'Neal Danneal Saint Brooke Dan
"dan oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

Scoops with Danny Mac

08:01 min | 6 months ago

"dan oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

"One of the great writers in. Saint Louis for many many years longtime at the Saint Louis Post dispatch and a guy that had many articles on Lou Brock and wrote one of the articles very recently and I say recently within the last few years and it's why I wanted to get him on is Dan. O'Neill. Dan. It's always great to hear Your Voice I know you've got a bunch of books out on the Blues in the cardinals and we could talk about that. But I WANNA get you on to talk about the late. Great. Lou Brock it's always good to hear your voice. How are you? I'm Gert Dan always good to visit with you my old radio parker absolutely. When when you think Lou Brock what comes to mind for you? Well, you know I, of course, I think a lot of people is. Think of the world series. When you think Lou Brock I mean he was just so incredible. In Three World Series Three, seven game world series had. Just amazing numbers of you know especially in sixty eight, twenty, four, sixty, four, and set a record record with thirteen. Kids in the world series I don't think I've ever seen A more dynamic player everyday player that is not pitcher per se but but in the lineup everyday player. as Lou Brock, and that was especially highlighted in the world series when he helped the cardinals to a significantly chips and lose a heartbreaker and sixty eight and game seven. But you know the most amazing thing about his world series stuff is he did all that in the series. Two teams that won world series and yet because of the presence of Bob, Gibson was never a world series. MVP So. It's pretty amazing when you think about it, here's another amazing thing. I was kind of looking at the stats and. You know when he's still a hundred eighteen basis in nineteen, seventy four. He was He turned thirty five years old that summer. and as it turns out that he stole, he stole nine hundred, Thirty, eight basis in this greer five, hundred and seventy eight of those steals came after his thirtieth birthday incredible and two in two hundred, sixty, two after his thirty fifth birthday, right so that's pretty amazing. stat and. just shows he was a very unique player I i. There's not too many players you can compare them to. He was also dynamic in the fact of what he did in the community and beloved in Saint Louis. You know Gibson is kind of this You know just a hard line. Kinda. Guy Ozzy is a different, Guy? Stan was a different guy in in in different ways not bad good at you know just different Louis beloved and it's just a different way to with all these guys were so in personality, how would you define Lou Brock when you think about him and the community here in Saint Louis in his relationship with the fans? Yeah No, you're. You're absolutely right and I mean I know all those guys you mentioned and they're all good guys. But we were talking as we've talked before but Lou Brock was unconditionally a good guy. It didn't matter what the situation was didn't matter who you were where you were. He was a good guy. You know you take Bob Gibson who I know as a as A. Nice. person good character down deep. But he's a little more cranky and you got to catch them at the right time scandal. alleged. A little edge. Yeah Louis Stand the man I think those to compare really well, they were always good I'll give you a little story about Lou a good friend of mine bumped into Lou Brock one time at the airport. And he was missing granddaughter's birthday. Because he was travelling and they happen to be getting their shoes shined at the airport. So they're sitting right there next to them or next to each other, and he made some conversation with Lou net came up that he was missing his. Granddaughter's birthday. So he had bought him a book are bought his grand granddaughter. I'm sorry a book my friend. and lucid. Well, let me see that book and he said, do you mind if I I wish your granddaughter Happy Birthday. So he opened up the book and the wrote Happy Birthday to my friend's granddaughter by me and signed it Lou Brock. So that's the kind of stuff Lou Brock did you know on a daily basis south mix community? He was a special man when you think about the greatest trades in in baseball history and I, know you love the game of baseball it'll go down as the greatest trading cardinals history. But when you look at it league wide, where, where do you think this one ranks in terms of baseball history? Well it it might be the most famous Dan I mean. There's been another really lopsided traits. and that trade in particular. A Blue Brock coming here for Ernie Braulio. Was An interesting one because almost to a man, the cardinal players in nineteen, sixty four were against that trait. They couldn't believe the cardinals were making that trade. I mean Braulio at one eighteen games, the previous season, and he'd won twenty one games for the cardinals. And he was very popular guy in the clubhouse and and. A leader on that team, and that trade really shocked the cardinal clubhouse and of course, Broccoli and Chicago. Hadn't hadn't really found himself yet. You're still struggling a bit. He was playing center field and right field for the cubs. Hadn't hit over about two fifty eight or you know right around there for two or three seasons. I hadn't really established himself as as the kind of player he would when he came here. And then he comes here and just completely changed. It really changed the baseball and the National League for the next several years I. Mean they're just there wasn't a player like brock on the scene at that time who was a combination of both power and speed I mean you had more wills with the dodgers who had stolen one hundred, four basis. couple of seasons earlier but wheels was pretty much a singles hitter on Bass Bass. Brockett double figure home runs seven times in his career So he was a different different cat you know he could hit the ball out of the park or you to get on base and steal second and He was just a a unique player to completely change the culture for the cardinals. He fit right into you know it was different. Because the cardinals. Had Black players. They had Bob Gibson and Kirk blood, and they were he was a perfect fit here and and they became very close team and took off. Of course, I'm sixty four and you know as we've talked before you name, you can name to three guys who keys to the cardinals success in the sixties and Brock was circling right up there at the top of the list I think you have to go back to. That timeframe to and when he got hit number three thousand and all the steals and then mix in the championships and take a look at the time frame of when he went into the hall of fame in Nineteen eighty-five, he has to be considered at least in my opinion one of the most underrated hall of famers in the history of the game d do you think that's a fair statement? Yeah. Yeah I do because I've seen. You know especially I think the end unless I don't know ten fifteen years. When you had sort of this new wave of statistical.

Lou Brock cardinals Bob Gibson baseball Gert Dan Saint Louis Lou net Lou Saint Louis Post Guy Ozzy O'Neill Ernie Braulio MVP greer Stan Chicago Broccoli cubs
"dan oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

Scoops with Danny Mac

02:08 min | 6 months ago

"dan oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

"Thanks good. Late a big league. Rise Labor look. He's The pictures high. He's Got Five or They would've brought them out shortstop handle the bad. And isn't the folks? Rock has now call eight, hundred, ninety degrees. Historic, here's. An occasion like this goes beyond the momentary thrills of the game. It involves a lifetime of skill and effort. Here. WHO DO BACK BREAKING BALL and. Four. Ladies and gentlemen. Here to. John and all the festivities. And to rub shoulders with some of the greatest players who have ever played major league baseball. You. Know the dream of every professional athlete leaders markup on is chosen sports. Desire American, professional actually is to blatant trail that is so long and why? That, it was a person to perform at a hall of fame level just to Manua. Hall of fame. Has Been described by many as a museum for greatness? Also been described the place where those players who stepped. In to the pressure of the moment and emerged as heroes and that their feet. Transcend their own career and to this day those fees. Still remains. The standards wish the game is played. And I'm proud today the apart..

baseball Manua Rock John
"dan oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

Scoops with Danny Mac

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"dan oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

"One flap down business so forced comes into the game. There's always there's already. A runner on the cardinals are behind four to nothing and ate it. First Guy Faces. Jeffrey Leonard. Drills and motor fastball right shoulder and that was the end of the one flap down stuff absolute came back and won that game Jim Lindemann hitting a big home run so they came back and won that game and a lot of people look back on that as pivotal moment. Mysterious Jeffrey Leonard. Hit another home run in game four but he did not do the one flap down trot so You know I was. That's one thing I always knew I knew by Porsche. Knew he was a leader and things like that but I didn't realize just how big of a presence he was on those cards. What was your favorite part of doing this book? What what did you really enjoy as you as you dug into it? Well to be honest you know what I really enjoyed was getting in touch with these guys. I'm talking to some of these guys who I had talked to in so many years You know guys like Tom. PAG nause and Tom Lawless and Recording who I still see once in a while and You know just a lot of players Ozzy Gave me a couple of stories. Dave Phillips Empire Lives in Saint Louis gave me a couple of stories but That was the fun part I I enjoyed hearing their stories. Because you never knew I in in some instances they would talk about You know that particular instance like Glenn Brummer told me about his steal of home and eighty five and that's such a memorable moment in cardinals history but And some cases time all stolen story about how he left it. cheeseburger third base for Umpire Eric Greg was you know was was a hefty guy and Before a game started one night Thom loss and she jean de someone kinda conspired fire to To do this and so he. Someone gave Lawless a cheeseburger flawless was playing was playing for tasted day so he tried it out. And while the teams are not be left. cheeseburger on Bass for Eric Gregg. Who played along aircraft was such a great guy? I all the players love them. 'cause he was just a good guy but he played along and picked up the cheeseburger and acted like he's taking a bite out of it. Yeah so you know stuff like that is just A. If you're a baseball fan that kind of stuff you don't normally hear about you know being besides all the stats stats and all the the the things like that. It's just kind of fun to I get stories like that now. You also have an event not only to promote with the book but also for fans of those great teams Whitey in the nineteen eighties. Tell us a little bit about that event coming up yeah Dan. I'm hoping to talk you into becoming but it's It's Wednesday night. It's at seven PM at the Grand Dell which is just as nice little intimate theatre a right by the Fox theater or next to the Sheldon Theater off a grand there and The name of events celebration but I'll do my presentation which is about forty minutes. Includes video highlights pictures from some of these things. We've talked about In the nineteen eighties and then once one when I finish up my presentation I'm GonNa Bring why do you. Here's Tom all record in an Andy Van. Slyke out on stage and then we'll do kind of a roundtable discussion and kick it around for another thirty forty minutes And kind of just reminiscent remember What great moments and what great teams they had the eighties? You know people might not realize that. The cardinals had the best record in the National League from nineteen eighty through nineteen. Eighty nine So you know for for a decade as as we talked earlier when when you think about that and then you think about they they had a world series went and they had two other world series. Where they're ahead three two two going into a game six It's amazing you know. And then there was nineteen eighteen. Eighty one Dan. I was saying before it could have been could have been four. That's how you're going there with. What is it could have been five? Because and eighty one. They had the strike that lasted six weeks and the Baseball solution to that was the split. The season in the two so the cardinals actually finished that season That overall season with the best record in their division but they didn't go to the postseason because they didn't finish first in either one of the two segments right and then there was and then there was nineteen eighty-nine you know they're they're writing a check of Go into Chicago and in and then they they. They're in Montreal. Todd were all Closes out a victory forum their game and a half out of first place. But we're we're all got hurt was lost for the rest of the season and a few days later they went into a six game. Losing Streak SORTA fell out of the race. But if we're all doesn't get hurt and eighty nine. They're probably in that all the way to the end. And and maybe they go to another world series about the best places to get the book. Dan and also the tickets for for Wednesday night. Well seconds for Wednesday night or at Metro chicks dot com Dan so they they can just anybody who would like to attend love to have them and and they can go to metro chicks dot com and look for the grand del there and they're.

"dan oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

Scoops with Danny Mac

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"dan oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

"One flap down business so forced comes into the game. There's always there's already. A runner on the cardinals are behind four to nothing and ate it. First Guy Faces. Jeffrey Leonard. Drills and motor fastball right shoulder and that was the end of the one flap down stuff absolute came back and won that game Jim Lindemann hitting a big home run so they came back and won that game and a lot of people look back on that as pivotal moment. Mysterious Jeffrey Leonard. Hit another home run in game four but he did not do the one flap down trot so You know I was. That's one thing I always knew I knew by Porsche. Knew he was a leader and things like that but I didn't realize just how big of a presence he was on those cards. What was your favorite part of doing this book? What what did you really enjoy as you as you dug into it? Well to be honest you know what I really enjoyed was getting in touch with these guys. I'm talking to some of these guys who I had talked to in so many years You know guys like Tom. PAG nause and Tom Lawless and Recording who I still see once in a while and You know just a lot of players Ozzy Gave me a couple of stories. Dave Phillips Umpire Lives in Saint Louis gave me a couple of stories but That was the fun part I I enjoyed hearing their stories. Because you never knew I in in some instances they would talk about You know that particular instance like Glenn Brummer told me about his steal of home and eighty five and that's such a memorable moment in cardinals history but And some cases time all stolen story about how he left it. cheeseburger third base for Umpire Eric Greg was you know was was a hefty guy and Before a game started one night Thom loss and she jean de someone kinda conspired fire to To do this and so he. Someone gave Lawless a cheeseburger flawless was playing was playing for tasted day so he tried it out. And while the teams are not be left. cheeseburger on Bass for Eric Gregg. Who played along aircraft was such a great guy? I all the players love them. 'cause he was just a good guy but he played along and picked up the cheeseburger and acted like he's taking a bite out of it. Yeah so you know stuff like that is just A. If you're a baseball fan that kind of stuff you don't normally hear about you know being besides all the stats stats and all the the the things like that. It's just kind of fun to I get stories like that now. You also have an event not only to promote with the book but also for fans of those great teams Whitey in the nineteen eighties. Tell us a little bit about that event coming up yeah Dan. I'm hoping to talk you into becoming but it's It's Wednesday night. It's at seven PM at the Grand Dell which is just as nice little intimate theatre a right by the Fox theater or next to the Sheldon Theater off a grand there and The name of events celebration but I'll do my presentation which is about forty minutes. Includes video highlights pictures from some of these things. We've talked about In the nineteen eighties and then once one when I finish up my presentation I'm GonNa Bring why do you. Here's Tom all record in an Andy Van. Slyke out on stage and then we'll do kind of a roundtable discussion and kick it around for another thirty forty minutes And kind of just reminiscent remember What great moments and what great teams they had the eighties? You know people might not realize that. The cardinals had the best record in the National League from nineteen eighty through nineteen. Eighty nine So you know for for a decade as as we talked earlier when when you think about that and then you think about they they had a world series went and they had two other world series. Where they're ahead three two two going into a game six It's amazing you know. And then there was nineteen eighteen. Eighty one Dan. I was saying before it could have been could have been four. That's how you're going there with. What is it could have been five? Because and eighty one. They had the strike that lasted six weeks and the Baseball solution to that was the split. The season in the two so the cardinals actually finished that season That overall season with the best record in their division but they didn't go to the postseason because they didn't finish first in either one of the two segments right and then there was and then there was nineteen eighty-nine you know they're they're writing a check of Go into Chicago and and then they they. They're in Montreal. Todd were all Closes out a victory forum their game and a half out of first place. But we're we're all got hurt was lost for the rest of the season and a few days later they went into a six game. Losing Streak SORTA fell out of the race. But if we're all doesn't get hurt and eighty nine. They're probably in that all the way to the end. And and maybe they go to another world series about the best places to get the book. Dan and also the tickets for for Wednesday night. Well seconds for Wednesday night or at Metro chicks dot com Dan so they they can just anybody who would like to attend love to have them and and they can go to metro chicks dot com and look for.

"dan oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

Scoops with Danny Mac

14:38 min | 1 year ago

"dan oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

"A book that is out if you love baseball is celebration. The magic of the cardinals in the nineteen eighties. The author is Dan. O'Neill formerly of the post-dispatch he's written a blues book. And now this cardinals book and joins us on scoops with Danny any MAC dot com is always always and I mean always a pleasure to visit with you. We used to do a radio show together. It was fun when we did that. And now we we have a chance to talk a little baseball again but How are you? I'm good. I'm good in and I I I feel the same way we used to do that. The baseball radio show. It was a lot of fun and I don't get to talk to you or see very much anymore. So it's it's great to visit with you. Miss you down down at the ballpark. But you're still obviously very very connected to sports here in Saint Louis. I I want to start with the book. And then you also have a program coming coming up with some of the guys from those great nineteen eighty teams highlighted and headlined by a Whitey Herzog for an event coming up. But let's talk about this the celebration the magic the cardinals in the nineteen eighties. Why did you want to write this book? Why did you think it would be a good good fit for Karnal fans while you know Dan? I was looking around for another topic. I did the Blues Book A couple of years ago In the book of courses on the history the blues and the Time Line Kinda thing coffee table book so I was just looking for another project and and Bounced a couple ideas around and and I was Kinda surprised to find that there wasn't really a book about the some of the principals have have their individual books. I whitey Herzog's has at least a couple of books out of these Smith as a book that CETERA. But there really wasn't a book the sort of took a look at what I what I think really started the entire Quote Unquote Cardinals Nation. Thing and that was the one thousand nine hundred eighties when the cardinals. Kinda reinvented baseball on Saint Louis and they You know when the decades started they were drawing just over a million fans and by the end of the decade. They were drawing over three night. So is that you know crossroads kind of Decade or point in cardinals history. You know three world series A bunch of colorful characters. Here's and hall of fame players so it was just a natural for me and I love doing those kinds of things. I come cardinals toward the latter part of the decade and Of course I'm a saint. Louis native was always a fan before I became a sportswriter so it was something. I couldn't wait to kind of dive into it really. I'm in total agreement with you. This the start of this really began the cardinal nation and the cardinal way if you will with Whitey coming in cleaning house and just making household changes and introducing this exciting style of baseball and winning and eighty two and eighty five five hundred eighty seven thousand nine hundred eighty two wins the world series. But when you think about the eighty S it's the first name that comes to mind and that's why Herzog yeah without a doubt He was pretty of it. You know it was an interesting transition because the cardinals had had the debt. Great Success Dan in the sixties and then went to back to back world series in the late sixties. Then they want the entire nineteen seventies decade without going through the postseason and even more so the last five seasons of the Seventies. They finished double digit double digit games out of first place. So they they weren't really ever in contention and When the eighties began Ken Boyer was their manager? Manager got off to a tough start in nineteen eighty and and then Got See Bush is still very involved with the team at that point. decided to make the a change And at the same time they were firing. Ken Boyer In between Games of a doubleheader Montreal they were introducing why deserve observe their new manager. Back at grant's farm in nineteen eighty and It took off from there. I mean why that there's never been a more dynamic period in terms of player movement. You know in a year's time from December nineteen eighty summer nineteen eighty one. Why did he move? Thirty one players back and forth and So once the winter of eighty arrive not made a bunch of big trades a lot of new players and really change the change the recipe for the franchise. I mean he took a team. That was the cardinals and a lot of good hitters and in the late seventies season in nineteen eighty they finished that season with six three hundred hitters on their team right and So they had a lot of good. They had talent but but they just didn't have they didn't have it in all the right places. They weren't a good defensive team. They weren't a team that had a lot of speed speed they add Ken reits it their base and teddy sevens behind the plate So they didn't have a lot of speed. Why do you came in not only looked at at Ed Busch Stadium to which was an artificial turf field at the time? Big Big stadium big field but all the steps in pretty much all the stadiums uh-huh and all the fields in the National League at that time were similar kind of ballparks and he He came up with a formula That it was built on speed defense and pitching and by nineteen eighty one. The cardinals were there. I mean you know it's funny. We look back and they. They went to the world series three times in the eighties. They want an eighty two could have been four. Obviously this is where you're going. I'm sure they lie well. They lost game aim seven and eighty five and they lost game seven and eighty seven. And so when you look at it you know they were two games comes from being a team that won three times you know they'd be considered this great dynasty. It had they been able to win two more games but You know that was all based on on a team that was just dramatically different from the kind of baseball they play now. I mean you know. Last year's team two hundred ten home runs. Why did he's team from nineteen eighty one through nineteen ninety getting hit as many as a hundred homerun insight So is different. And you know this Dan because you see you see the game every day The you know back in the eighties the ball was in play. Hey much more than it is now and the cardinals could catch it. Pitch it out. Run it better than any team in baseball at the turn when when you think about when Whitey took hold of also being the GM and and just made all kinds of deals whether it was rollie fingers whether it was walking Andrew Harr Ozzie. Smith Trading Ted Simmons which probably was not a great one when you look back at his tenure but it did work for for both sides you know. What was the turning point when you think about Whitey ball and and getting this thing over the hump and and making it? The excitement that we we saw in terms of the deals that he made well I I mean. I think you'd have to. I point to the deal. I it's funny. You know you mentioned when he did he. He made a ton of deals made a lot of big deals. And really for the most part when you look back at them They weren't great. Deals Appeals But it wasn't it wasn't always about a player for player quality for quality. It was more of. Why do you trying to change the culture culture here because in the late seventies As as that decade came to an end as we talked I mean. The cardinals had some terrific talent. But they just didn't know why did he came in. He wanted him to do two things. Show up on time and work their butts off and the teams in the seventies didn't necessarily necessarily adhere to that formula but he came in and that's that's what he wanted so he changed the culture so he made trades. I I mean you know they weren't. They didn't work out all that great for the cardinals. I mean you look at the trade. He made what Simmons in December nineteen eighty. He sent Ted Simmons Pete Buca Chen Rollie fingers to the brewers and he got back. David Point six Stolis gone on David Greene now. Vuckovich became the sei-hyung award winner for for the brewers in eighty two the American League Cy Young Award winner and fingers was the American exciting young award winner and eighty one and then of course Simmons was there clip hitter for three or four seasons so that was not a trade that wound up being really good for the cardinals but it it was part of a thing thing where he changed. The coulter culture moved a lot of players out and what he moved in where players. Who could run who who who Steal Bases and field and Of course the backbone of all that was Ozzie. Smith when he traded Garry Templeton to the padres as an eighty one and the winner of eighty one and was able to get Ozzie. Smith who comes here once. Thirteen gold gloves seals five hundred. Eighty bases is in an lines up in the hall of fame. So I mean you'd have to say it started with Ozzie. But then when you throw in Trades Bob Sykes to the Yankees for for Young Double A.. outfielder name Willie McGee. Willie McGee comes here. You know becomes a a most valuable player eighty five to time batting champion Had guys like they had so many switch hitters. He calls up timing her as a switch. It or steal deal basis Terry Pendleton which it or steal basis then call Minnesota chitter stole basis. He made the deal for Lonnie Smith who was really either catalyst in eighty two and finished second in the most valuable player voting in the National League another guy who's still basis and disrupt things and they just generated so much they put so much pressure on the other teams defense I that's just something you really don't see happen a lot and today's game. I don't mean that in a way that you know like an old man sitting in sitting in the balcony but it's just the game's changed a lot in the last three years and The cardinals were certainly a different kind of ball club in the eighties. What did what did you learn and doing the book about this decade a baseball? That maybe you didn't know before. Well I think one of the highlights is the book is I did get a hold of a lot of the players and coaches etc.. And what I did was I just ask them to give me. I'm just their own little Vignette or favorite story From the eighties. It didn't necessarily have to be tied to a particular event and that was in the book but but just one of their favorite stories that the one thing I found out the end was just how revered Bob Fourche was on those. Those teams Yeah fourche force was never You know he's never going to be in cooperstown. He wasn't quite on a level with Bob. Gibson or Steve. Carleton or somebody like that. But he was just a consistently good Performer and and just always a a great presence in their clubhouse. I'll give you an example. How he kept guys loose and he and guys just looked up to him? A couple title incidents really You know the story. John Stupor game. I thought maybe he told me a story about nineteen eighty two when he went out pitch game six at push stadium and there were two long rain delays the game there are five hours worth of delays. But he just kept going out out there alarmed up pitching a complete game in the cardinals advanced to game seven. He saved their bullpen but he instead he told me about it. Nineteen eighty-three game. Where or he was gonNA make? He made the start against Fernando Valenzuela in Los Angeles and balanced oil at the time probably the biggest star in the game and it was a national game of the week and Stupor still young pitcher establishing himself and he was all geared up for the game and everything and so He goes out and he can't throw a strike any ends up walking the first four batters without throwing a strike. So why did he's gotTa go out and get them and takes them out of the game. So stupor comes in. The dugout. Goes at the end of the bench as you might imagine just disappointed frustrated madden himself trying to figure out what just happened. And he's not sitting there very long before Bob walks down sits next to him and says you know stupid. I don't know how we can take you out of that game. He had a no hitter going so you know he would do things like that. And and at the same time in nineteen the eighty seven people recall cardinals or an great nationally championship series with the San Francisco giants and the focal point of the series. The first I fee- games with Jeffrey Leonard who hit home runs in each of the first four games and created his one flap down home run trot was just ABS- absolutely infuriated Cardinals fans in Saint Louis and kind of annoyed the heck out of the cardinals as well so they get into game three three in San Francisco. They fall behind Ford and nothing It's the series is one one so it's really a pivotal moment in the series there behind afforded nothing. Why did he goes to the bullpen? He brings in fourche out of the bullpen and before he came in. I was talking to Kim Daily and on the bench and he. I told him if I get a chance. I'M GONNA take care of this..

"dan oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

Scoops with Danny Mac

14:38 min | 1 year ago

"dan oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

"A book that is out if you love baseball is celebration. The magic of the cardinals in the nineteen eighties. The author is Dan. O'Neill formerly of the post-dispatch he's written a blues book. And now this cardinals book and joins us on scoops with Danny any MAC dot com is always always and I mean always a pleasure to visit with you. We used to do a radio show together. It was fun when we did that. And now we we have a chance to talk a little baseball again but How are you? I'm good. I'm good in and I I I feel the same way we used to do that. The baseball radio show. It was a lot of fun and I don't get to talk to you or see very much anymore. So it's it's great to visit with you. Miss you down down at the ballpark. But you're still obviously very very connected to sports here in Saint Louis. I I want to start with the book. And then you also have a program coming coming up with some of the guys from those great nineteen eighty teams highlighted and headlined by a Whitey Herzog for an event coming up. But let's talk about this the celebration the magic the cardinals in the nineteen eighties. Why did you want to write this book? Why did you think it would be a good good fit for Karnal fans while you know Dan? I was looking around for another topic. I did the Blues Book A couple of years ago In the book of courses on the history the blues and the Time Line Kinda thing coffee table book so I was just looking for another project and and Bounced a couple ideas around and and I was Kinda surprised to find that there wasn't really a book about the some of the principals have have their individual books. I whitey Herzog's has at least a couple of books out of these Smith as a book that CETERA. But there really wasn't a book the sort of took a look at what I what I think really started the entire Quote Unquote Cardinals Nation. Thing and that was the one thousand nine hundred eighties when the cardinals. Kinda reinvented baseball on Saint Louis and they You know when the decades started they were drawing just over a million fans and by the end of the decade. They were drawing over three night. So is that you know crossroads kind of Decade or point in cardinals history. You know three world series A bunch of colorful characters. Here's and hall of fame players so it was just a natural for me and I love doing those kinds of things. I come cardinals toward the latter part of the decade and Of course in the Saint Louis Native was always a fan before I became a sportswriter so it was something. I couldn't wait to kind of dive into it really. I'm in total agreement with you. This the start of this really began the cardinal nation and the cardinal way if you will with Whitey coming in cleaning house and just making household changes and introducing this exciting style of baseball and winning and eighty two and eighty five five hundred eighty seven thousand nine hundred eighty two wins the world series. But when you think about the eighty S it's the first name that comes to mind and that's why Herzog yeah without a doubt He was pretty of it. You know it was an interesting transition because the cardinals had had the debt. Great Success Dan in the sixties and then went to back to back world series in the late sixties. Then they want the entire nineteen seventies decade without going through the postseason and even more so the last five seasons of the Seventies. They finished double digit double digit games out of first place. So they they weren't really ever in contention and When the eighties began Ken Boyer was their manager? Manager got off to a tough start in nineteen eighty and and then Got See Bush is still very involved with the team at that point. decided to make the a change And at the same time they were firing. Ken Boyer In between Games of a doubleheader Montreal they were introducing why deserve observe their new manager. Back at grant's farm in nineteen eighty and It took off from there. I mean why that there's never been a more dynamic period in terms of player movement. You know in a year's time from December nineteen eighty summer nineteen eighty one. Why did he move? Thirty one players back and forth and So once the winter of eighty arrive not made a bunch of big trades a lot of new players and really change the change the recipe for the franchise. I mean he took a team. That was the cardinals and a lot of good hitters and in the late seventies season in nineteen eighty they finished that season with six three hundred hitters on their team right and So they had a lot of good. They had talent but but they just didn't have they didn't have it in all the right places. They weren't a good defensive team. They weren't a team that had a lot of speed speed they add Ken reits it their base and teddy sevens behind the plate So they didn't have a lot of speed. Why do you came in not only looked at at Ed Busch Stadium to which was an artificial turf field at the time? Big Big stadium big field but all the steps in pretty much all the stadiums uh-huh and all the fields in the National League at that time were similar kind of ballparks and he He came up with a formula That it was built on speed defense and pitching and by nineteen eighty one. The cardinals were there. I mean you know it's funny. We look back and they. They went to the world series three times in the eighties. They want an eighty two could have been four. Obviously this is where you're going. I'm sure they lie well. They lost game aim seven and eighty five and they lost game seven and eighty seven. And so when you look at it you know they were two games comes from being a team that won three times you know they'd be considered this great dynasty. It had they been able to win two more games but You know that was all based on on a team that was just dramatically different from the kind of baseball they play now. I mean you know. Last year's team two hundred ten home runs. Why did he's team from nineteen eighty one through nineteen ninety getting hit as many as a hundred homerun insight So is different. And you know this Dan because you see you see the game every day The you know back in the eighties the ball was in play. Hey much more than it is now and the cardinals could catch it. Pitch it out. Run it better than any team in baseball at the turn when when you think about when Whitey took hold of also being the GM and and just made all kinds of deals whether it was rollie fingers whether it was walking Andrew Harr Ozzie. Smith Trading Ted Simmons which probably was not a great one when you look back at his tenure but it did work for for both sides you know. What was the turning point when you think about Whitey ball and and getting this thing over the hump and and making it? The excitement that we we saw in terms of the deals that he made well I I mean. I think you'd have to. I point to the deal. I it's funny. You know you mentioned when he did he. He made a ton of deals made a lot of big deals. And really for the most part when you look back at them They weren't great. Deals Appeals But it wasn't it wasn't always about a player for player quality for quality. It was more of. Why do you trying to change the culture culture here because in the late seventies decade came to an end as we talked I mean. The cardinals had some terrific talent. But they just didn't know why did he came in. He wanted him to do two things. Show up on time and work their butts off and the teams in the seventies didn't necessarily necessarily adhere to that formula but he came in and that's that's what he wanted so he changed the culture so he made trades. I I mean you know they weren't. They didn't work out all that great for the cardinals. I mean you look at the trade. He made what Simmons in December nineteen eighty. He sent Ted Simmons Pete Buca Chen Rollie fingers to the brewers and he got back. David Point six Stolis gone on David Greene now. Vuckovich became the sei-hyung award winner for for the brewers in eighty two the American League Cy Young Award winner and fingers was the American exciting young award winner and eighty one and then of course Simmons was there clip hitter for three or four seasons so that was not a trade that wound up being really good for the cardinals but it it was part of a thing thing where he changed. The coulter culture moved a lot of players out and what he moved in where players. Who could run who who who Steal Bases and field and Of course the backbone of all that was Ozzie. Smith when he traded Garry Templeton to the padres as an eighty one and the winner of eighty one and was able to get Ozzie. Smith who comes here once. Thirteen gold gloves seals five hundred. Eighty bases is in an lines up in the hall of fame. So I mean you'd have to say it started with Ozzie. But then when you throw in Trades Bob Sykes to the Yankees for for Young Double A.. outfielder name Willie McGee. Willie McGee comes here. You know becomes a a most valuable player eighty five to time batting champion Had guys like they had so many switch hitters. He calls up timing her as a switch. It or steal deal basis Terry Pendleton which it or steal basis then call Minnesota chitter stole basis. He made the deal for Lonnie Smith who was really either catalyst in eighty two and finished second in the most valuable player voting in the National League another guy who's still basis and disrupt things and they just generated so much they put so much pressure on the other teams defense I that's just something you really don't see happen a lot and today's game. I don't mean that in a way that you know like an old man sitting in sitting in the balcony but it's just the game's changed a lot in the last three years and The cardinals were certainly a different kind of ball club in the eighties. What did what did you learn and doing the book about this decade a baseball? That maybe you didn't know before. Well I think one of the highlights is the book is I did get a hold of a lot of the players and coaches etc.. And what I did was I just ask them to give me. I'm just their own little Vignette or favorite story From the eighties. It didn't necessarily have to be tied to a particular event and that was in the book but but just one of their favorite stories that the one thing I found out the end was just how revered Bob Fourche was on those. Those teams Yeah fourche force was never You know he's never going to be in cooperstown. He wasn't quite on a level with Bob. Gibson or Steve. Carleton or somebody like that. But he was just a consistently good Performer and and just always a a great presence in their clubhouse. I'll give you an example. How he kept guys loose and he and guys just looked up to him? A couple title incidents really You know the story. John Stupor game. I thought maybe he told me a story about nineteen eighty two when he went out pitch game six at push stadium and there were two long rain delays the game there are five hours worth of delays. But he just kept going out out there alarmed up pitching a complete game in the cardinals advanced to game seven. He saved their bullpen but he instead he told me about it. Nineteen eighty-three game. Where or he was gonNA make? He made the start against Fernando Valenzuela in Los Angeles and balanced oil at the time probably the biggest star in the game and it was a national game of the week and Stupor still young pitcher establishing himself and he was all geared up for the game and everything and so He goes out and he can't throw a strike any ends up walking the first four batters without throwing a strike. So why did he's gotTa go out and get them and takes them out of the game. So Stupor comes in. The dugout. Goes at the end of the bench as you might imagine just disappointed frustrated madden himself trying to figure out what just happened. And he's not sitting there very long before Bob walks down sits next to him and says you know stupid. I don't know how we can take you out of that game. He had a no hitter going so you know he would do things like that. And and at the same time in nineteen the eighty seven people recall cardinals or an great nationally championship series with the San Francisco giants and the focal point of the series. The first I fee- games with Jeffrey Leonard who hit home runs in each of the first four games and created his one flap down home run trot was just ABS- absolutely infuriated Cardinals fans in Saint Louis and kind of annoyed the heck out of the cardinals as well so they get into game three three in San Francisco. They fall behind Ford and nothing It's the series is one one so it's really a pivotal moment in the series there behind enforce nothing why did he goes to the bullpen. He brings in fourche out of the bullpen and before he came in. I was talking to Kim Daily and on the bench and he. I told him if I get a chance. I'm GonNa take care of this..

"dan oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

Scoops with Danny Mac

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"dan oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

"Hi I'm Ryan Kelly with the home loan expert Dot Com. The only thing I like better than baseball is saving people money. Start Saving now with a cash-out refinance at the home alone. Expert Dot Com enjoy. The podcast Thanksgiving is just around the corner. Are you all set. You've been piling up. Those Chinooks rewards points all year. What better time to cash them in? You could have schmucks pay for the Thanksgiving Turkey or a Pumpkin Pie from the best bakery in Saint. Louis maybe even your entire holiday meal all because you're a chinooks rewards member whether you're hosting the whole family or bringing a special.

"dan oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

Scoops with Danny Mac

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"dan oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

"Hi I'm Ryan Kelly with the home loan expert Dot Com. The only thing I like better than baseball is saving people money. Start Saving now with a cash-out refinance at the home. The expert dot com enjoy. The podcast. Thanksgiving is just around the corner. Are you all set. You've been piling up. Those Chinooks rewards points all year. What better time to cash them in? You could have schmucks pay for the Thanksgiving Turkey or a Pumpkin pie from the best bakery in Saint. Louis maybe even your entire holiday meal all because you're a chinooks rewards member whether you're hosting the whole family or bringing a special.