13 Burst results for "Dan Lee Benson"

"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

Judaism Unbound

03:31 min | Last month

"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

"Why jewish fiction. Welcome back everyone. I'm dan lee benson. And i've and today we are doing the second episode that is framing a series of episodes that we're going to be doing over the months ahead. It's going to be interspersed with other series that we're doing and this interspersed series is about new jewish books. That are coming out. Most of them are fiction now. All and we're looking at some of the new ideas that are coming out in jewish fiction and nonfiction and also the impulse to write a jewish book. We're looking at that as a form of jewish creativity jewish creation that accords. With a lot of what we've been looking at here in judaism unbound over the years a lot of times that gets looked at organizations but there are other ways to manifest that kind of jewish creativity and that kind of new thinking that this podcast is all about and so this series of episodes. It's going to be looking at how that manifests in the writing of books. Last week we talked to sofia pasternak and aimee lucido about writing books for young readers and our guest today. David hershberg is writing books for older readers otherwise known as adults his latest book. Jacobus rainbow comes out. This coming tuesday may fourth. And it's a historical novel set primarily in new mexico during the period of the free speech student protest movement and the vietnam war it tells the story of jacobo toledano and outsider with a hidden past. And i don't wanna reveal much more than that and spoil the book for you. The author of jacobus rainbow who we know as david hershberg actually writes under a pseudonym which is a question that we're going to discuss in our conversation today before turning to writing. Pseudonymously was an entrepreneur in the biotech field. His first novel my mother son one nine different literary awards including the gold medal for regional fiction in the two thousand eighteen independent publisher book awards and the winner of the best regional fiction from the twenty eighteen. National indie excellence awards. Both books are published by fig tree books and you can buy them wherever books are sold now before we jump into the episode. A quick program note at the end of today's episode after we conclude the interview. We are going to be doing the first answer to listener question. Lex is going to be answering listener. Question remember a few weeks ago. We mentioned that as a reward for listeners who contribute five dollars on a recurring monthly basis or folks who contribute sixty dollars or more annually will have the opportunity to send in questions that we will answer on the air so we're excited to have our first one coming up and with that. Let's turn to our interview with david. Hershberg david hershberg welcome to judaism unbounded so great to have you. Thank you very much. It's nice to be we both of you. Well where starting this kind of series which is distributed through the next few months where we're talking to a number of authors of fiction from a jewish perspective or from a jewish point of view or about the jewish experience Last week we talked to some folks who are earlier in their lives who are writing fiction and this week. We're talking with you. Who is somebody who came to write fiction after a long career as moore. I'm wondering a little bit if you could talk about where that impulse to write. Fiction comes from at this stage of your life and you're trying to do by now becoming a novelist. I spent a career in in biotech developing drugs and about four or five years ago. I decided that i needed something. A second act in. I always wanted to write and fishing was what i wanted to write so.

David hershberg david hershberg david five dollars Lex aimee lucido Last week Hershberg sixty dollars one second episode vietnam war today Both books this week jewish first novel both five years ago twenty eighteen
"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

Judaism Unbound

06:59 min | 2 months ago

"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

"Abraham did kill isaac. Welcome back everyone. I'm dan lee benson. And i'm lex roseburg and as we get towards the conclusion of this series of episodes that we've been doing on the bible although like many of our subject. It's one that will come back to where excited today to be talking to the author of a new book that serves as a great introduction to the way that the bible is studied in the modern academy. But it's so accessible and it so fun to read. There's some classics in this field. That are wonderful books. The bible an earth and david and solomon which are both by israel finkelstein and neil. Usher silberman if anybody's really interested in finding a way into this. Send me an email. Because it's really something that i particularly. Enjoy talking to people about and and helping people find their way into by the way reading. Some of this material and critical bible study has been something that's been discussed by previous guests and judaism down. You would think that people who read about critical bible. Study the idea that the bible was written by numerous as opposed to god or moses that would somehow be damaging to people's faith and maybe for some people it is but for other people whose faith has already been shaken in some of those ideas the opportunity to connect to the bible in a different way and to understand the bible still as a really important and powerful work and having never been introduced. Really to how this book might have come about in a different way. Other than the traditional way that it's been taught can be very liberating for people and very exciting and very invading back into judaism. And that's something that we hope that maybe this series has done a little bit for some of our listeners and some of these books are really amazing opportunities to dive deeper into them. Our guest today. Makia acura is the author of a new book called. Why abraham isaac the first stories of the bible revealed and unlike some of the other books which are more organized chronologically. This one is organized. Almost like an archaeological dig where we're really trying to understand. What was that base. I layer of the bible. And then how. And why was it added onto and we look at that story by story by story. And it's just a new way to present this material. In a way that we found particularly engaging and exciting why abraham murdered isaac will be available as an e book. Starting this coming. Tuesday april eighth. You can get it wherever you get e books and it's not san mateo res- first book on the bible. In fact he has written many of them. You can find them. Listed at a site called modern scriptures. It actually has a different website. It's www dot bible criticism dot com. Where you can see a wide variety of his books which include not only books about the bible. He has also written a series of books on humanist prayer because in addition to having to phd's in bible criticism and instant wisdom literature is also a humanist. Rabbi he hasn't rabbinical ordination from the israeli affiliate of the international institute for a secular humanistic judaism. We've had a number of guests related to the humanistic jewish movement on the podcast over the years and he is now the rabbi of the city congregation of new york which is the humanistic congregation in new york. City san mateo. Welcome to judaism unbounded so great to have you. Thank you very much in this book. You talk a lot about what you call the original bible. Could you tell us a little bit about what that original bible is what you mean by when it when it was written. What is this original bible that you're finding within the bible as we know it what i mean by that is that it's missing the first story from the logically that was written down and then every subsequent story was built upon it So that's what i mean by. The original wide will probably more accurately the original original torah. Tell us a little more about what that means to sort of. Open up a version of the bible that we have which is to say. I don't know the unoriginal early like another version. And what is that like archaeology task. Like where you're sort of a us. Rq because it seems like digging. It's like you're you're looking through layers and the second question who cares. They're a great sentence or two in your book. So one person wrote the bible or twenty five people wrote the bible like so what we have a thing like. What is it. What are the ramifications if multiple people wrote this or if there was an original source or not. I liked the comparison an archaeology. You know it's a productive one. Because i 'cause the way i look at the at the toronto especially is that it's like sediment that cruise i think of layers as opposed to sources posted documents And there's one basic story and then every subsequent author added their own layer to it until it arrived at the tax that we have and so i can i can choose a chapter To choose okay. i'll let me let me just start. Where i started the book. I mean what why. Abraham isaac story of abraham. So let's start with the a chapter twenty one So abraham travelled word the land of the south in live between tradition tour he lived as a foreigner in guar. So you can ask like. Why did i start here. Well it's because it's the first time i identify a particular writer. Why think is is the first writer and identify him here for variety of reasons that actually many other bible scholars agree with me. It's sheer. I where you see elohim rather than other names for god elohim is used beforehand but it is used by a different author an author. Who's very i call. Electric column the accountants very organized. Very you know you see him in genesis one. So he's a very different kind of office so this is the first time i see a story that uses the name. Elohim is really just a story not like a list. Not an accountant. So abraham travelled toward the land of the south between tradition to or he lived as a foreigner in guar abraham said about sarah his wife. She is my sister of king of sent Sarah this is a story other actually three of them. We're a one of the patriarchs. Abraham in two of them and isaac in another at present their wives as their sisters and the monarch in two of the stories takes their sister or wife An another story almost does and so what is the relationship between those three stories than three stories should have relationships. And so which story comes. First story in genesis twelve Which is the first iteration of the story or this story in genesis. Twenty and so for lotteries. I think it's the story in genesis twenty. That came first and over here. This is hard to really fly. Sea in the english but A female king of garage sent.

isaac Abraham neil Makia acura Tuesday april eighth three stories lex roseburg Usher silberman dan lee benson three two guar Twenty first stories Sarah twenty five people abraham judaism first story today
"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

Judaism Unbound

01:39 min | 2 months ago

"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

"San mateo. Welcome to judaism unbounded so great to have you. Thank you very much in this book. You talk a lot about what you call the original bible. Could you tell us a little bit about what that original bible is what you mean by when it when it was written. What is this original bible that you're finding within the bible as we know it what i mean by that is that it's missing the first story from the logically that was written down and then every subsequent story was built upon it So that's what i mean by. The original wide will probably more accurately the original original torah. Tell us a little more about what that means to sort of. Open up a version of the bible that we have which is to say. I don't know the unoriginal early like another version. And what is that like archaeology task. Like where you're sort of a us. Rq because it seems like digging. It's like you're you're looking through layers and the second question who cares. They're a great sentence or two in your book. So one person wrote the bible or twenty five people wrote the bible like so what we have a thing like. What is it. What are the ramifications if multiple people wrote this or if there was an original source or not. I liked the comparison an archaeology. You know it's a productive one. Because i 'cause the way i look at the at the toronto especially is that it's like sediment that cruise i think of layers as opposed to sources posted documents And there's one basic story and then every subsequent author added their own layer

isaac Abraham neil Makia acura Tuesday april eighth three stories lex roseburg Usher silberman dan lee benson three two guar Twenty first stories Sarah twenty five people abraham judaism first story today
"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

Judaism Unbound

09:22 min | 4 months ago

"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

"And kinda interested in talking about the person joshua. He's the title character of this book and he himself from my understanding of scholarly work on biblical criticism or otherwise. He himself has a story like an origin story. That some people think is kind of a retrospection where like after the fact. He's put into the torah in a way that he may not have always been there. And what i'm referring to is specifically. His glory story is that he's one of the two folks in the twelve spies story that goes into the promised land and says This is great all the other ten folks. All land is terrible. Joshua caleb are on the good side that god likes and because it's the land that they're supposed to go to am. I right in my understanding of that. How scholars look at that person joshua and to what extent to we learn more about him in talking about the book that's named after him. Joshua indeed has a book named after him but is one of the flatter hand more hollow biblical characters. I mean for readers. Go in sequence so you know redo romney in which moses in vary tragic psychological terms wrestles with his impending death. And you know even with the existential reality of death itself. so we're going through it moses psyche and when we can turn out of the penza out of the five books of moses when we opened the book of joshua we have an entirely flat character. You know joshua is really characterized by his obedience and interestingly enough has no title right once called the servant of god is not labeled a profit is not labeled a judge is not labeled a king. I mean we get the news of general because he leads these battles but he doesn't even have a title biblical literature does have great literature and just have complex characters. Josh was not one of them. And you can't really do. A lot of psychological depth with an icon in joshua right becomes an icon of this army of this ancient near right to really kind of like a strobe of what i would call. Ancient national is now. I believe that the book of joshua is ultimately synthesized by a group of editors that we call the or novelists they are the ones that are also very smart editors so joshua ends up becoming a kind of a tool that the nommik editors really use to kinda. We've eras together and also to contain a kind of perfect model right. They wanna leader in their language. Who neither the left nor the right right who keeps torah. You know kind of the cuff at all times. And so they give joshua authority by putting him back the times of most read someone who experienced the whole exodus and even while being a member of this desert generation right the generation of the liberated slaves joshua and his spy buddy caleb right are portrayed is the only two who believe in going to war in this land. So i think that's right. I think the shooter anonymous create joshua to be an icon of the kind of unity to which they aspire and one more piece that all add to your question about joshua and caleb who again are depicted is these faithful spies who go against the will of their generation. I love it kinda that the liberated slaves don't want to go to war. I feel like we haven't done enough to really like reclaim that biblical antiwar position expressed by that generation. But you know. John lewis show like i said he's a. He's a tutoring nommik creation. But there's a lot of northern stuff going on with joshua and caleb is a southern figure just as these editors could really say we've always been at war with canaanites. Their system could also absorb later alliances. So kayla who. This southern figure is a canoe. He's a kennedy and the candidates are ultimately a group that gets absorbed under the tribe of judah the twelve tribes structure is very good at pointing to those people who are on the outside who jumped. Don't join the alliance and saying those e mites those canaanites those jebusites there are enemies. But it's also good at absorbing groups that might join the alliance at their own pace and saying. Oh well that's caleb. He's the head of the kennedy clan and that's a sub family of judah so so both things are possible for trying to account for political alliances. Can we situated some of what you're talking about in some sense of historical time to understand sort of when the actual events that are being responded to her happening versus the time where the story is set. What's going on geopolitically. And the time of the israelites when they are making all these alliances. And then if i understand the approximate timeframe here they're basically writing and rewriting these stories that are functionally taking place around five hundred years earlier. Right i mean the so. It almost becomes like their writing and rewriting and massaging this almost like mythic prehistory. It's not just like they're telling a story from fifty years ago differently. They're telling a story from five hundred years ago differently. I'm just curious if you could give us some sense of what was actually going on in in their world at that time that was motivating them to do all this so yes. Speaking about time wine this is the kind of thing. Bible scholars go to conferences to fight of out. So let me kind of breakdown this picture together with a time line let me start somewhere with is a very important piece of poetry and it's important because because of how it serves as a historical in and that's song of deborah and the song of jabra with we believe based on its grammar and syntax is one of the oldest texts in the bible and some people even speak about the year twelve hundred bc. Jabra sings about a war and she sings that some tribes came and fought in the war in some sat home so she disparages the tribes who sat home and she sings the praises of the tribes who k. That's very important to me because it shows that the success or failure of a given tribe in war depended upon their allies. Were so we see major major motivation for these processes of consolidation. Many scholars have shown how end the nine eight century. B c e you've got these policies of consolidating clans in schreiber's into something that looks like a pro donation. This is happening in the region. And it's about war you know. Because if you're national formation right if or if you're a bunch of tribes and you've got a consolidated federation of people's you're gonna lose but then we get you know eighth century b. c. e. the rise of empires in particular syria and the threat of assyria marching. You know or the egyptian empire has its second wind around this time. It's that process. That i think gets people thinking we've got come up. You know with a larger scale organization in army. And so josh. Shaw gives this army which is kind of being configured in real time it gives this army kind of heroic prehistory behind which people can march. And so it means you know that it works and doesn't work because the syrian army takes out the northern kingdom the kingdom of israel in seven twenty two but ends up sparing the kingdom of

Rachel hemlock lex rothberg dan lee benson america rachel havelock jewish last week israel Naomi Today today Heather jesus tenth birthday judaism bible english thousands of years river jordan last decades
"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

Judaism Unbound

07:11 min | 4 months ago

"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

"Welcome back everyone. I'm dan lee benson and lex rothberg and today. We continue our series on the bible on the bible as it was and on the bible as it is last week. We called our episode. The bible alive about the way that the bible has afterlife after it's written it's still continues to live in continues to have influences over the last two thousand plus years. I think all of us know this deep down and yet it's really interesting and important to be able to joe down into a particular story and see it's continuing influences. Today will focus mostly on the book of joshua a less widely read. Perhaps less well known book at least here in america but one that has had a lot of impact in israel our guest. Today rachel heavily has just come out with a book on this subject called the joshua generation israeli occupation and the bible. Rachel hemlock is an associate professor of english and jewish studies at the university of illinois chicago where she directs the usc freshwater lab which generates research and policy on transboundary water systems and climate change adaptation trains a new generation of water leaders and creates public facing media like the freshwater stories and backward river digital platforms. That work on water is connected to rachel. Heather locks earlier book called river jordan. The mythology of a dividing line so you can see how her research on the bible is very much connected to life issues in our world. Today rachel heavily is the co author of women on the biblical road ruth. Naomi and the female journey and she is the writer and director of a hip hop play called from tel aviv to ramallah about the daily lives of young people in the israeli palestinian conflict. She was also the co host of the discovery channel series on the historical jesus. Who was jesus. We are really excited to get into this conversation about the bible and its continuing influences on politics in the world today. So rachel havelock welcome to judaism unbounded so great to have you here. So we're really excited to talk to you. Because as compared to a lot of the folks that talked to in this series and the we've talked to in general and judaism unbound. I feel like your scholarship. Combines the biblical times the sources and figuring out what was really happening back then but also its application and its use in more contemporary times and i want to go deep into that but i wanna start with year recent work on joshua and could you talk a little bit about those connections. The interplay between the story of the book of joshua which a lot of folks might not even know about a little bit of background there and how in particular in in israel in the last decades. That story has been used in political ways. So i spent about ten years of my life immersed in this book and by the accounts of most modern sensibilities. This is the worst book that the bible has on offer. Right celebrates genocide is thrilled about conquest about ethnic cleansing about expropriation of property and puts this under a banner of an ancient version of holy war. So like by all accounts. This is really really a rough book. And part of what's interesting in the history of the book of joshua of course. It is the hebrew bible but for most of the history thousands of years of history of jewish interpretation. Jews barely read it. You know the because of the many diaz settings in which jews find themselves. They really turned away from it. So if you're following a synagogue cycle of reading you're not gonna hear a lot of joshua and that was by design of the rabbis saying but we are gas send various countries of the world celebrating militarism ethnic cleansing holy war. It's not our ethic but it's also not politically wise. So joshua was downplayed in the history of jewish interpretation in bose's right the law giver. The profit became the i call the reason that the book of joshua assumed prominence in modern jewish thought dates back to study group. A biblical study group held in the home of israel's first. Prime minister david benguela juliane during which. Israel's founding fathers as it were in the military in the courts in the ministries in the universities and in the military sat four about a year and a half twice a month in ben gurion's dining room and they poured over the book of joshua. The book of joshua and it's isreaeli interpretation ended up becoming the framework for the public narrative of israel's founding that was celebrated the state of israel's tenth birthday and it was a time when mostly immigrants populus was presented with a package. This is our national story and the book of joshua right this strange and very unsettling ancient book became the framework for that is rarely public narrative. One of the ways that. I understand the current research in the area. The current archaeology for example is that equate definitively demonstrates that the story of the book of joshua is incorrect. So basically just to explain that. The story of the book of joshua happens right after the the wandering in the wilderness. It's the story of what happens right after the israelites. Come into the land of israel and as you were saying like bottom line they go around and kill everybody in you know. Take over their cities and and It because god said that they should you know they got allowed them to and archaeology. As i understand it has found no evidence at all of some kind of mass worry warlike activity where all the cities were sacked around the same time and and it just suggests that never happened so i thought of the book of joshua as something like quentin tarantino movie. Django unchained where. It's kind of a fantasy. A revenge fantasy against the people who oppress written specifically by people. Who never actually did that. And the danger. Is that sometime much much later. You get into a situation where you actually do have the power and you read this story as if it were actually a true story and you say oh yeah. This is what we should do. And now for the first time in history you.

Rachel hemlock lex rothberg dan lee benson america rachel havelock jewish last week israel Naomi Today today Heather jesus tenth birthday judaism bible english thousands of years river jordan last decades
"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

Judaism Unbound

02:00 min | 6 months ago

"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

"I'm dan lee benson and i'm lexie with berg and first of all we want to wish you a happy new year. Happy twenty twenty one. I remember the lead up to twenty twenty thinking that we're going to have all these twenty twenty vision cliches where we were going to be talking about the future based on the year twenty twenty and then everything all went south. It's been a really strange a really bad year with some silver linings. But i think all of us are probably pretty happy to be turning the page and starting a new year so we want to start by just wishing everybody who listens to judaism unbound a healthy year a good year and hopefully a year of renewed activity out in the world at some point at least later this year we're continuing our conversations about jewish philanthropy and looking at how jewish philanthropy is supporting. What's happening now in the jewish world. How jewish philanthropists thinking differently. How they might think differently. And with today's episode we shift our attention from wealthy individuals or families who put their philanthropic dollars into foundations or other vehicles through which they support jewish organizations and other kinds of organizations flowing from their jewish values to new structures of philanthropy that might allow those funds to be assembled in other ways and perhaps a new set of jewish organizations or a new structure of jewish. life really needs a new approach to philanthropy in new vehicles for philanthropy so today our guest is lives fisher. She is the executive director of an organization called amplifier which is dedicated to helping people create and then to supporting what are called giving circles. We're going to talk about that. In our conversation that basically that just means a bunch of people getting together and pooling their money to support what they collectively one is. Support amplifier was originally created by an organization called netane which is basically a large giving circle and now is part of the jewish federations of north america so now it's known as amplifier at j. f. a. a. amplifier at j. Athena uses this catch phrase to describe what they do give better give.

dan lee benson lexie berg fisher north america
"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

Judaism Unbound

04:59 min | 6 months ago

"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

"Everyone i'm dan lee benson and i'm lex report and before we jump into our interview today just first of all want to say that we hope you had a happy. Hanukkah hanukkah is over actually. Today is the last day of hanukkah probably in a lot of people's minds. The last day of hanukkah was yesterday because that was when we let the eighth candle. But technically today is still hanukkah. So happy hannukah. We had a great time having eight different gatherings over hanukkah for our gout razor event. It was a lot of fun. We're really grateful to all the people who participated with us as well as to all the guests to came along with us just because hanukkah goat razor adventure over doesn't necessarily mean that the guilt rates are has to be over and there's two weeks left in the calendar year. A lot of people like to do they're giving at the year end. If you haven't had a chance yet to make a donation to judaism unbound we would be extremely grateful if you would do that. Whatever you're able to give it's super helpful and wonderful and we're so appreciative and the way that you do that as you go to. Www dot judaism unbound dot com slash. Donate the second thing that i wanted to say is that i mentioned in the past that. We're experimenting with these workshops. Trying to help people develop a process to reimagine jewish holidays and this year. We are going to continue to do that. We have plans to do workshops for chabad for purim for passover and beyond but before all that we are doing a workshop that we are calling reaffirming america and the idea is to develop a new american holiday or maybe a new jewish holiday for american. Jews whatever you want to try to experiment with that is going to take place around. January twentieth inauguration day can be other days around there. It could be completely different day and this is just an interesting time to experiment with this but the idea is to create a new holiday that celebrates affirms reaffirms rededicate ourselves to american democracy. You can pay any amount that you want. All the profits from this workshop are going to be donated to nonpartisan organizations that are working to support and reaffirm and reestablishing thicken up american democracy and democracy around the world check out. This is actually on the jewish live website. So check out. Www dot jewish live dot org slash america and you can find all the details there the last announcement that i wanna make it something that we're really excited about. Which is the first new. Podcast stemming out of jewish live has just been released. It's a podcast that jewish education project created on jewish live and they've converted that live streaming video into an audio only podcast. So now it's available on all the podcast apps. So that podcast is called adapting the future of jewish education. And you can find it on any podcast app. So now shifting to the topic of today's interview we have been exploring the topic of jewish philanthropy. What jewish philanthropy really means and how. It's being executed by a variety of kinds of philanthropists. And today we are talking with jay and cheer ruderman from the ruderman family foundation. The ruderman family foundation is a leader in inclusion disability rights advocacy both in the united states and israel. It's a private family foundation. Whose mission statement reads as follows. The foundation believes that inclusion and understanding of all people is essential to a fair and flourishing community guided by our jewish values. We advocate for and advance. The inclusion of people with disabilities throughout our society strengthened the relationship between israel and the american jewish community and model the practice of strategic philanthropy worldwide. We operate as a nonpartisan strategic catalyst in cooperation with government. Private sectors civil society and philanthropies today. The foundation is built around the idea that disability rights are civil rights. Now let me introduce our guest j. ruderman and chiro ruderman j. ruderman is president of the reutemann family foundation. Prior to joining the foundation he was an assistant. District attorney served as liaison between the israel defense forces and espn jury and was leadership director. For a pack in israel he currently serves on the board of directors of the national organization on disability and the university of haifa and he previously served on the board of directors of the jewish funders network and the american jewish joint distribution committee sheera. Ruderman is the executive director of the ruderman family foundation. She also serves as a board member of various organizations and associations in israel and the united states and its currently serving as chairwoman of the fulbright foundation. She represents the new israeli approach to philanthropy which believes in strategic giving involvement and social entrepreneurship. Shira and j ruderman were named on the list of the fifty. Most influential jews in the world by the jerusalem. Post in two thousand sixteen and in two thousand fourteen shiro. Ruderman was named as one of the one hundred. Most influential women in israel by the nauseam journal. We should also mention that jay..

dan lee benson ruderman family foundation ruderman cheer ruderman israel america Private sectors civil society chiro ruderman reutemann family foundation national organization on disab Ruderman jay jewish funders network american jewish joint distribu fulbright foundation espn j ruderman Shira jerusalem nauseam journal
"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

Judaism Unbound

02:52 min | 6 months ago

"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

"Two foundations of jewish life. Welcome back everyone. I'm dan lee benson. And i'm lexie and first of all. We want to wish you a happy hanukkah. This episode of judaism unbound is being released on the morning of the first day of hanukkah that means we let the first candle of hanukkah last night and we had the first gathering of our judaism. Unbound jewish live guilt razor extravaganza eight night hanukkah event last night since we're starting unit on philanthropy today. It would be remiss of me not to suggest that you still have a chance to share some of your hanukkah gelt with us. We're only asking for thirty six dollars. We had a great time last night. We're really excited to have seven more nights of hanukkah together. It happens at all different times so if you want to be with your family in the evening most of the events are at other times so check it out go to. Www dot guilt razor dot com. That's g l. T. razor dot com or you can just head to the judaism unbound dot com homepage and click on the link to the gal razor and you can see all the details so now. Let's shift into the topic of our interview today. Which appropriately enough is philanthropy now. You might think that philanthropy means giving money but in the original greek. It means love of humanity. And so it's a question that we're going to explore. What is that love of humanity. Look like when translated into dollars and cents and like many series and judaism bound. We're not just looking at the topic just so we can learn a little bit more about it. We're constantly on the hunt for the big ideas that we think we should be grappling with as we imagine a jewish future. That's very different from the jewish past and like it or not a lot of that comes down to money because it comes down to whether or not there's going to be money for new experimentation new ways of being jewish if there is going to be money for that through philanthropy through organized giving let's say then bigger experiments might be able to be tried if the money isn't really there for that kind of high risk high reward type of innovation. Then maybe we need to explore another way such as doing things on small scales with our own families. That don't require a lot of outside funding and during the series we're going to explore a number of ways that people have been giving money or are giving money to jewish organizations especially the more innovative and experimental jewish organizations. So today we are really pleased to welcome erin. Dorfman the president of lipman camphor foundation for living torah which has been one of the founders of our work. And as i'm about to the foundation i think you'll be able to understand why base on the way they described themselves and based on what you know about our work at judaism unbound and jewish life. Lemon camphor foundation for living. Torah is a private foundation..

dan lee benson lexie lipman camphor foundation for Dorfman erin Lemon camphor foundation
"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

Judaism Unbound

07:39 min | 7 months ago

"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

"I'm dan lee benson. And i'm lex rothberg and our guest today. Rachel mikva is the author of a new book that was just published called dangerous. Religious ideas the deep roots of self critical faith in judaism christianity and islam. And we thought it would be a really interesting. Follow up conversation to our discussion last week about the election and how jewish ideas their religious ideas in general might or might not have a place in considering what we're going to do as a country and what we might want to support in terms of our politics in the description of the book dangerous religious ideas reveals how faith traditions have always passed down tools for self examination and debate because all religious ideas. Not just extremist. Ones can cause harm even as they also embody important moral teachings our guest today. Rachel mikva is the rabbi e chaman chair and professor of jewish studies and senior faculty fellow of the interreligious institute at the chicago theological seminary before becoming a professor. She was a congregational rabbi for thirteen years her research and teaching focus on interpretation of the hebrew bible exploring how the ideas both shape and reflect the societies in which they unfold. Rachel mikva has rabbinic ordination from the hebrew union college jewish institute of religion. That's the flagship institution of the reform movement and a phd from the jewish theological seminary. That's the flagship institution of the conservative movement. And she now teaches at a school that at least has its roots as a christian theological seminary. Now it's a lot more acoustical. So she certainly has the biography to be able to explore the wide range of religious ideas. And we're excited to talk about the dangerous ones. So rachel mikva welcome to judaism unbounded so great to have you thanks dan. It's great to be here with you and lex. Get your book especially since just last week was the election and we've been talking about various religious ideas that have animated aspects of the election. So i think this is going to be a really great continuation to that conversation. When i opened the book. Actually i listen to the audio book. But when i started listening to it i was getting ready to get a long list of dangerous religious ideas. I was really excited to find out what all of them were. And one of the things. That book says is all religious. Ideas are dangerous. I wanted to start by diving into that to understand a little bit about why you see all religious ideas as dangerous. And how are they dangerous. When i talk about danger. I mean various things. Sometimes danger manifest violence but it can also be social harm psychological harm. And if you think about something as simple as god as dangerous the idea. I'm not packing a bow or at least not talking only about people who kill each other because they think you have the wrong god but the fact that over forty percent of americans think that you have to believe in god in order to be ethical person. That's dangerous. That's dangerous to our social fabric. And so what i talk about in the book is the first time i taught this course. I asked the students what they would put on the board and of course they started with somebody else's for the decide the first Fight within thirty seconds and this is a classroom filled with at the time. They were almost all christian protestant folk studying for a mostly a master of divinity degree so committed christians. They quickly realized that pretty much anything could make the list because at some point in time they'd manifested harm to various people ideas that have power as religious ideas. Do have the potential for danger. Now i talk a lot. In the book. Of course about the great benefit of religion to the the book starts with a quote by swimming kananga that talks about religion sort of being the foundation of some of the greatest good and the greatest harm that he could think but i feel particularly responsible for shepherding the power of religious ideas as a rabbi and scholar religion because all kinds of ideas can fall into that tension of danger and possibility but there are particularities around religious idea that i think we need to grapple with one is ultimately the capacity for religious ideas to override other criteria. We may have for what we think of as just or good or even to deny evidence of countervailing ideas. That's been attention around. Religious ideas of religion resisted the idea that earth rotates around the sun. It's also Religion is woven through every aspect of our psyche in society and that magnified the power and presence of ideas so they're embedded in so many things that aren't religious say but religious ideas get in into it and have power within that politics is a really good example out and then the third thing just mentioned politics that i think we need to grapple with is that in the public square in america today. Religious ideas generally get a pass. Am i think that that the particular problem and we need to think about the protection of religious ideas differently And that religious ideas also need to be critically examined in the public square bringing a religious reason for one political position and shouldn't be allowed to end debate. Okay so religious ideas are dangerous. all of them. This is a good start. Very fun and provocative way to open the podcast. This is going to be fun I really appreciate the way in which you name and frame it. And and just for those who haven't read your book like you're not coming at this as like raw raw guns blazing. Religion is terrible. Like that's actually not the angle you're coming from. You're not coming from the angle. That religion is like inherently amazing. But i just want to make that clear since the title somebody could think it's just you know like a new atheist book or something that it gives you all the lists of how religion is uniquely the worst thing on the planet but all that said what i love is that you take. I don't know if it's attack or like you go in a direction. That is different. From how i hear a lot of my friends and loved ones talk about religion. Which is you do not say. Religion is good and then when it's used for bad it's sort of a warping or a perversion like people are taking something that's inherently just and righteous and because they're using it for whatever evil purpose they have sort of changing what religion is to fit their bad goals. I hear that a lot from well-meaning wonderful people you say something different. Which is there actually is a danger inherent to both. I mean if i'm reading you correctly both to the religious ideas that you listed include an to the very fact of layering any idea with sacred ultimate in the way you talked about that in and of itself almost without respect to the content of the idea means that it's going to be used really passionately really intensely and so i love to hear more from you about that like how should we be thinking about sort of what religious or religion is..

Rachel mikva hebrew union college jewish in lex rothberg dan lee benson chicago theological seminary professor america faculty fellow
"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

Judaism Unbound

06:05 min | 8 months ago

"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

"Welcome back everyone I'm Dan Lee Benson and I'm Lex Roessberg and as I think I've been saying for the last bunch of series or maybe I only said in the last one but I've meant it for many of them. There's this concept in the Tomlin called had drawn When you reach the end of a chapter, you say we will return to you and that's how I've been feeling at the end of a lot of these series that we've been doing because we're only starting to scratch the surface we as a podcast, you're going to keep returning to these subjects. When we've kind of opened it up as a series whether that's through doing another series or just here and there, and we should see these all as a whole series that's taking place over time we're going to organize things that way on our website but in any event, this is the last interview as part of this series on women, the question of feminism and its impact on the past present and future of Judaism and so today we're actually going to close a mini loop in this series because we talked a few weeks ago to Jill Hammer and Ashir the founders of. The Hebrew Priestess Institute, which is one of these organizations that really incredible in some of its reverberations including our interview last week with L. Ken Iraq who has re gender. Torah and so we thought we would talk to somebody who went through that priestess training program and one could say is now representative of the next generation in the priestess movement even as there is another generation coming up and of course, many more to follow our guest today. Kashira, faith is the Oregano. Kayla, which means strictly speaking community weaver of coconut. He preached this institute. She describes herself as a proud Jewish women of color who sprinkles sparkles, disrupts, expectations, and offers blessings wherever she goes in service to the divine to their bright and benevolent ancestors and to those who are coming up after her she as a community weaver reclaiming should practices in ways that are. Resonant and relevant in the modern day in addition to her work at Kohana COSCIA. Faith is the founder and leader of Cashier Pittsburgh and more broadly dominatrix a prayer leader life cycle ceremony officiant ritual Creator ix litter gist songstress, and public speaker. She has lived in both the United States and Australia where she is a dual citizen and now she lives in. Pittsburgh Pennsylvania. She was ordained as a coconut, a Hebrew priestess in July of two thousand seventeen and she studied social history and public policy and management at Carnegie Mellon University in her hometown of Pittsburgh so because your faith welcome to. Judaism unbounded. So great to have you so wonderful to be here with you both. I'd love to hear a little bit about story of how you became a Kohana because we talk to Joe, Hammer and sheer, and we heard about the founding of this new institute this new way of being a Jewish leader and I think in some ways, this is the first time that we have an opportunity to talk to the founders of something new and then to somebody who joined it. When I was five years old and began kindergarten at circle time we were asked to stand up and say what we wanted to be when we grew up and at that time frame of reference is a little smaller than it is now. So I stood up and I said I wanted to be a rabbi. And I was always encouraged in my Jewish practice and Jewish involvement I wasn't always encouraged to pursue a rabbinical path. Fast forward to two thousand eleven I spent most of that year on well in treatment in recovery, and while I was recovering laying around looking out the window using about why young people fall ill, what came to me so strongly was that when I regain my strength and wellness to pursue a life of service and it came through really strongly to revisit this long-standing calling desire. And so at that time I was living in Australia I came back to the United States to check out some rabbinical programs and one of the programs was Aleph the Alliance for Jewish renewal and I found myself at home immediately within the renewal context and yet I still had lingering questions about the rabbinic ordination path. While I was there at the biennial gathering of renewal folks, I met a couple of people who were beginning something called Cohen. I had never heard of it before I went back to my roots and I googled it and was deeply intrigued and I can remember I sent the link to my love who was still in Australia and I said to him. What do you think about this program if I applied and was accepted? Would it be doable for me to participate because it's seven retreats over three years I was living in Sydney it was happening. Isabella. Freedman. And he wrote back immediately and he said you were born for this. So I applied and the rest is history still being made. Can you talk a little bit about why you and perhaps why other people who have ended up going through the Kohana program why they make the decision to do to become a Kohana and not to become a rabbi? I'm particularly curious about the distinction between the two we talked with Joe Hammer and Tadjoura about it again in theory I'm also curious about the practicality of it. I've been intrigued from the very beginning about. This idea of there being alternatives to being rabbi a lot of people feel like if they are really into Judaism and WanNa do something. Then really their options are to go to rabbinical school or to get a PhD in Jewish studies and so I'm so thrilled that there are other alternatives and want there to be more. But can you talk about how people assess those options in what draws them to becoming a Kohana? It might not be exactly the right metaphor but I'll say if you've ever woken up with stiff neck, sometimes you need a chiropractor and sometimes you need a massage therapist there to perfectly legitimate routes to take when looking.

Kohana Kohana COSCIA Joe Hammer Australia Hebrew Priestess Institute United States Pittsburgh Jill Hammer Dan Lee Benson Tomlin Carnegie Mellon University L. Ken Iraq Kashira Lex Roessberg WanNa Kayla Pennsylvania representative Sydney
"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

Judaism Unbound

07:55 min | 11 months ago

"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

"And ideas from across the Jewish world. Learn more at www dot palo, alto JCC, dot org. This. Is Judaism unbound episode two, hundred, thirty, four Jews for racial and economic justice. Welcome back. Everyone I'm Dan, Lee Benson, and I'm. As we continue this series on race and Jews and Judaism in America. We are pleased to be able to speak with the executive director of one of the organizations what of a number of organizations in cities across America that are working from a Jewish point of view for justice for the entire society. Our guest today is Audrey Song. She is the executive director of Jews for racial and Economic Justice, which is an organization that in their words is. A home for Jewish New Yorkers to organize with our neighbors and allies for New York where everyone has the freedom and opportunity to thrive Jews for racial and economic justice. Jay Fridge is one of a number of groups in cities across the United States that are devoted to as they put it transforming the City we love from a playground for the wealthy few into a democracy for all of us and to fight and undo oppressive systems in actors. That target harm and displace our communities Audrey says songs. The first is leader to serve as the organization's executive director for those who don't know me roughly Jews or roughly speaking Jews who trace their ancestry over the last thousand or so years to what we think of as the Middle East and North Africa, and she is an active member of J.. Fridges. Mizraki. Caucus Audrey Society has close to twenty years of broad movement experience as a social worker. Organizer Coalition Builder and Campaign Director on issues ranging from immigrant workers struggles in tenant rights to sustainable economies and racial, justice, Audrey sesame previously served for seven years on the staff at Jewish. World Service, and worked with organized labor most recently as director of Walmart Free NYC before becoming executive director of J Fridge, she served on the board of directors for six years including as board chair Audrey says saw welcome to Judaism unbound. It's so great to have you. Thanks for having me. Well it feels like a lot of what we're talking about in this series and a lot of what's going on in America today kind of puts Jay French. An economic justice in the center of of what we ought to be talking about. So we're really excited about this episode and and really interested in understanding what J. Frejus is doing now, and also how it was established what's its history? So could you take us all the way back to the beginning and and give us a little bit of a brief tour about why was it established and when and what's it up to you now? State Bridge was established thirty years ago so Precisely nineteen ninety so we're in our thirtieth year. And we were established by a group of organizers and activists who were living in organizing in New York. Jewish. Jewish organizers who had a vision around. It would look like for Jews to be more actively involved injustice struggles in the city of New York for more just New York specifically who could show up as Jews. But in coalition with wider movements for justice, the original coalition of juicy together for Fridge, were really rooted and Dwight Kite, which is a yiddish term I can get into a minute but you know they had a vision of doing justice work where you live and so. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety that meant they were you know engaging in fights around housing and labour in anything that has to do with what makes New York both a wonderful city and a difficult city to live at. And at the same time that they were starting to organize. Nelson Mandela was released from prison and he was going on a tour of the the entire world to celebrate his release. The victory of the anti-apartheid Movement of course to those of our founders and he was a hero and someone that we was well deserving of a great honor but it was also the case that established. Jewish. Community was actually not remotely interested Honoring Mandela upon his arrival in you're that prompted the group that was forming that with nieces that was there. That already had a vision is really have its first public event which was to honor Mandela, and to bring together folks including Harry Belafonte and others. Marshall Meyer many many luminaries and others who were involved in justice work to come together and say as Jews me we do stand with you. Nelson Mandela the reason he was snubbed so to speak from the establishment. was because of his relationship to Palestine and for me, I came into this work as board member in two thousand eleven and then was really active in the years that black lives matter emerged on the scene and what we saw then in two thousand, fourteen, twenty, fifteen was similar reaction from the Jewish community that we had seen. You know twenty five years earlier. which was people doing justice where for for the Freedom and liberation of people and for the fight against anti blackness were not welcome in our community because of the solidarity that was express with Palestinians. So in some ways, deeper is an incredibly local organization focused on local fights, but with a with a real international decision that all of our struggles are connected. So. If you could describe in a sense, the the mission, the philosophy, the the point of view that Jay French takes today and particularly this question of the racial and economic justice I mean are those and I don't mean this is a leading question because I actually am curious about how the two are woven together not only in reality but also in how the organization thinks of them, you know how how, how do you think about the connections between Racial Justice Economic Justice and Jews you know how do those those three we've together. We think of our fight as fight against racial capitalism I mean if you WANNA. Look to the source of the problem, we have racial capitalism, which at its root exploits labor and that Labor in particular is black and Brown labor and that those things are connected. In order for the wealthy few to hold onto the power that they will not. That is what they need in order to thrive and continued to live their best life while everyone else struggles at the bottom of the ladder, and so that's very clear to us the what we're confronting and so it's always important for us to connect those dots. One very clear example of this is the fight for the budget in New York City. Right we had a budget fight, which in is an economic justice fight that prior to prior to the protests that erupted in May June across the country here New York, we were already already engaged in a fight to with with our coolish partners with communities united for police reform to say, Hey, we're in. A global pandemic, we're also facing a looming recession, the people who are most going to be impacted and struggle. The most are disproportionately impacted by. Kobe. To begin with as with in terms of health disparities, and also in terms of the economic impact are disproportionately black and Brown folks and we are saying that we're going to slash all of the social services while maintaining the NYPD six billion dollar budget. There is something inherently unjust obviously about that entire setup and those things are connected. We need to move and divest money from the NYPD and into the services that are going to help our communities thrive. That was an economic justice fight and it was a racial justice fight together and we can't separate those. I think also we've you know we've done. At David, we have two core campaigns and those campaigns also could be seen as and their long-standing. We believe in this work sort of longstanding long standing long-term work that you have to be in it and really build trust over time and really build your vision and built power, and that none of that happens overnight. So for many years we've been working. On a campaign, hold the carrying majority. Some people think of that as.

New York City executive director Nelson Mandela America Audrey NYPD Jay French Audrey Song Jay Fridge Audrey Society Campaign Director Audrey sesame State Bridge director Lee Benson Middle East Marshall Meyer Dan United States
"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

Judaism Unbound

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

"Welcome back everyone I'm Dan Lee Benson and I'm. Let's Roessberg and we are here to do a recap episode as we as we do. After a bunch of interviews, I feel like we're trying to get Judaism unbound sort of back on track in a way after the last three months in which we've done these somewhat similar, somewhat different things. Relating to the situation we've had a lot of previous guests talking about things that related directly to Covid, and now we're starting this process of moving back towards what we've been doing all along on Judaism unbound, which is looking at all the things that we should be thinking about in terms of the Jewish future and I. Think it's interesting to think about how that fits with Cova could clearly this is now a new element in the Jewish future that we have to keep in mind while it's going on after it ends, I mean there's a lot you know everything has changed. Changed and yet you I also have this feeling that I want to go back to our conversations that don't always only have to deal with covert or things that are related to that I'm not sure if that's the right answer. Not, but that's kind of where I'm sitting right now before we jump into it I to put out there the the word, the requests that we usually do in these kinds of wrap up episodes, which is that if you're someone who listens to Judaism, inbound regularly and or somebody who's been really appreciating what we've been putting out there through Jewish live. The thing that we really need from folks is financial support just a little bit. It adds that there's a lot of people out there. That are using this stuff. I unfortunately they're not all of sending in their donations, but we imagine a time when when people really will and wanted to and I know. At least a lot of people are sitting at home these. These days, maybe they have a few extra seconds to head over to our website. Which is www dot judaism unbound dot com slash, donate and make a small donation. We really aren't asking for thousands of dollars. We're really saying that if everybody out there was listening was giving a dollar for every episode that you listen to so if you listen to every episode. Episode, you know something like fifty dollars a year that would be a really great way to support a Jewish nonprofit, and these days as things are all changing and a lot of the big nonprofits are really struggling, you know because some of these other business models that are not about being supported by the people who are most actively using what you're what you're doing. Doing are running into some challenges these days, and and so maybe a different business model is really called for now, and we're trying to put that into the world, so let's jump into our conversation. I know that this is a little bit in country. Diction to what I just said about not wanting to talk about covert so much, but we're good contradictions. But I think that it actually it's something on my mind. We talked about it a little. You push back at me a little bit, but I want to put it out there because I think it actually connects to some of what we've been talking about. In particular are amazing conversation with Casper Kyle about his much more amazing book, the power of ritual, which by the way I keep emphasizing I mostly listen to audio books in my life and. The real frustrations for me in wanting to read all these Jewish books is that they often don't come out audio books. I I should note also by the way for for fans out there that the orchard Baio He Brandis, which I translated is going to come out with as an audio book finally after. A couple of years, and that's GonNa becoming this spring, so that's super exciting to me because I love audiobooks and cats, audio comes from the Hebrew words in Ya, which means until God's, so it takes you towards holiness. That's why you love audiobooks so much. That is there is an and so Casper's book is read by Him and if you listen to. The episode a few weeks ago that we did with him. You will know why that is a major selling point of the book so anyway. Kasper's book talks about. About this idea among others that we should be treating the things that we do every day as rituals or as potential rituals that we can make meaning out of the things that we do every day I've actually been thinking about a variant of that. That has to do with things that we may not do every day, but that we ought to do every day, and that may be having them. Become. ritualized is a way to make sure that we do them every day, and perhaps a way that we can influence others. Others and what I'm specifically talking about is wearing a mask because these days as I walk around the streets in my neighborhood I see people that are walking around without masks, and it's not people that are like on a walk on a solo. Walk through the park, and they're not near anybody, and so you could argue you know that's a legitimate you. You just put a mask near near near people and you're not able to socially distanced, but I'm talking about unlike a busy street and a busy pedestrian street and I walk. Walk around and I see a lot of people wearing masks that I also see a lot of people, not wearing masks and I'm thinking that you know you and I have talked about different ways to think about the should, and ought in Judaism, but I kind of aspired to a world in which no Jew could not wear a mask, the idea that that what it means to be a Jew is to wear a mask and I think that the the way I draw some of that that thinking is you know from. Firm pieces of Jewish. Wisdom that are very ancient like the idea that one who saves a single life saves the entire world or the idea of the stranger you know, and the mask is less about protecting yourself and worry about protecting others from you so love. The Stranger feels feels apt to that and I'm thinking about like with there be a way in which a mask could kind of be the new. You know the symbol of being Jew and one that. Wouldn't have religious connotations the way that I perceive keep, it'd be a no. You have a different take on it, but I'm thinking like. Could we somehow create a mask that you would wear it? As kind of an active Judaism and it would be like a lot of the ritual garb that Judaism tends to have like. If we're talking about Kifah or tireless or the the tallest, it goes under your shirt, the the sort of a small version of that many Orthodox Jews where and a lot of times. It's meant to be kind of a reminder to you about these kind of obligations that you've taken on. On and also assigned to others outside that I am Ju- and what it means to be a Jew ideally is that that means I have these values and I and I care about There's etc and I don't actually think necessarily that the ritual garb that we have in Judaism today actually accomplish that, but I think that like a GE mask would, but I am intrigued by the notion of saying. Are there new Jewish rituals that we could create out of things that we ought to do every day even though we may not actually do them every day. That's a little different from what Casper.

Dan Lee Benson Casper Kyle Covid Roessberg Baio He Brandis Casper Cova Kifah Kasper
"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

Judaism Unbound

09:32 min | 1 year ago

"dan lee benson" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

"Welcome back, everyone I'm Dan, Lee Benson and I'm lex. Rothberg and we are here just after the holiday of Chevrolet, which marks on the Jewish calendar, the idea or the time when the Israelites gathered around Mount Sinai and Moses went up there and something happened over the course of forty days and Moses. Then came down with with something that he said now we gotta do this stuff and on Shavuot. We kind of reenact that Sinai moment in a certain way all kinds of ways and these days we're pushing the idea that and we just had this amazing twenty four hour study session. Session on the Internet as a number of other organizations, and so we think there's this idea that Sinai is kind of happening again in our time, and there's a new way in which Sinai might be happening again in our time, it might be that now. That Chevron has passed that holiday that marks when Moses went up to the mountain. This would be the time to sort of be curious about what actually happened there and our guest today. Is that Chemnitz hopefully can give us a little bit of a sense of perhaps what some of that might have been like? He is an. An Orthodox. Rabbi who participated in a study conducted by Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Department at Johns Hopkins University exploring the nature of consciousness and mystical experience, and in that study clergy members from different religions where given high doses of the PSYCHEDELIC, substance that is found in magic mushrooms, and their responses were studied Zach's GonNa. Tell us about that study and its findings and his experiences and his work after the study on the other side of the studies, acas founded an organization, called the Jewish anthea Genyk Society, and he seeking to build Shefa, which is preparing for the time when these substances will. will be legalized, and after that it would provide a Jewish set and setting for individuals to have these experiences with trained guides to integrate these experiences within the context of Jewish, communal life and practice. That wasn't enough Zach is also the founder of the chef podcast network, which focuses on podcasts by embodied and inspiring teachers of cabalistic and Hasidic works in practices, and he's the CO director of beloved Berkeley. A home based experience in Jewish living out of his house. That weaves together steady singing, spiritual practices and delicious meals and fellowship, and he also has a full time day job as the. Director of Jewish living and learning the JCC of San Francisco. I have no idea how he does all these things, but we're excited to speak mostly about his experiences in the Johns Hopkins Study and his work after that. If you're interested in sex personal story, and how he came to be a rabbi, and how he came to do some of these other things that he's done, we would urge you to listen to another show on the Judaism unbound. Jewish life family the Adr our with Joe Schwarz where a few weeks ago Was the guest on that show, and they talked about some of that, and you can find that at www dot Jewish life dot org slash undermanned, so this promises to be a very exciting conversation. It was a longtime in coming. Says that Chemnitz, welcome to Judaism unbound. We are really thrilled to have this conversation with you. I'm excited to be with you today. So if you could just start a little bit by telling, US I guess. How you found out about this Johns Hopkins steady how they found you? Who are you before this? This study happened and and tell us a little bit about what the study was all about. I have been a rabbi since twenty twelve been working in the organized Jewish community in America right after that and working with bb Yo International, and then working with the JC of San Francisco I would say that I was kind of a regular Jewish progressive, Orthodox person who loved texts Love Community. and it was at some point in that. In that time that we had a very hard time. Time, my wife and I with infertility, and if the meaning the the color of the magic of Jewish life and community kind of just drained out, it was also at that time, where of mine sent me a rejection letter from the Johns Hopkins University study that you mentioned saying that he was not eligible to participate in this religious leaders study because she had had a prior experience with psychedelics so. He Ford it's me I wrote to them and I started communicating with one of the program. Managers there about how I would participate it was a very intense process. There were a number of screenings. They flew me out there to Baltimore. I had a medical screening I spoke with a number of guides. Lead researcher, his name's rolling griffiths and it. It was determined that I was I was right for the study, not only my life circumstance, but the fact that I had never experienced psychedelics before, and then they toss a coin. They saw that I would be in one aspect of the study enough the other delayed group and then I scheduled to major experiences with psychedelics six months apart from each other. What is the delayed group? mean the delay group means that you have to wait three months after your initial screening, so I think that's just part of the program design is that they have an immediate group. You are scheduled for the next week or so, and then the delayed group to see are. Is there any difference in the data between the people who immediately go into these experiences versus people who wait the anticipation? Maybe talking about it I. Don't know the precise details by I. think that there's something about about that. So can you give us a little bit of the context of the study? Like what exactly where they trying to find out was there and I. Guess Maybe also a little bit about. Where we might be starting from on this idea of psychedelics like a lot of us think of it as like some naughty anything that was being done in the sixties and. Then and then Timothy leary got in trouble and then it. Kinda was all over. And what's where's this going now? In terms of Science Church so in the fifties and sixties, like as you mentioned Timothy Leary, and also his his study buddy. reported Alpert. Who then became ramdas a these were professors of psychology at Harvard, and they had had direct experiences with these psychedelic mushrooms, as you mentioned and began Harvard suicide and project. They were trying to understand. What is the effects on a on patients who are experiencing PTSD depression? OCD other mental illness, but at the same time we're church, starting to understand something about the nature of consciousness, and as they began to understand consciousness, they looked at different religious traditions that talked about not the psychedelic experience about the mystical experience. Like what happens win. Your consciousness is blown up. Have the whitest picture of the universe, and you're a part in it, and these spiritual masters from various eastern and Western traditions wrote down what they would call these maps of consciousness, so for example the Tibetan book of the dead. Seems to describe when you're when you're going through this process of dying what you see in. What do you feel? And they took that to be at from the direct experiences, and from what others were telling them? Almost a direct parallel from the experience of taking so silence, so they thought there is something here, but the suicide project was shut down and several years later. All of these substances Magic Mushrooms Peyote Mescaline CACTI. they were made illegal under the controlled. Substance Act in the seventy s by Richard Nixon, so all of the research was completely shut down all other countries as well put these in a class of regulation that said there is no human benefit to the research, or even to the use of these things fast forward to two thousand and six a researcher as I. I mentioned griffiths and others out. They got permission from the FDA in the government to see if they could open up this research at Johns, Hopkins to see if they still had efficacy and benefit for people who are suffering from mental illness, and they published this paper called suicide men can occasion mystical type experiences, having substantial and sustained personal meaning and spiritual significance. And so they they ran this test in a controlled environment. With a number of test subjects and saw through data and data collection after giving a major dose of Civil Sivan. to these people after experiencing six hours of this inner journey there in a well-appointed room with guides that the experiences that they were having were just as Timothy leary and others had found mystical in its orientation, but from that initial paper, and you can read it online. You can find it at Hopkins Medicine Dot Org. They then started creating more and more studies to apply Silla..

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