5 Burst results for "Dan Lashof"

"dan lashof" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"dan lashof" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

"For the monitor. Talk curbing migration. From latin america has often focused on social ills in the countries of origin. A newly emerging emphasis showing the opportunities that can come with staying put martinez dapple single and in his twenties fits the profile of many guatemalans who head the united states in search of opportunity. He estimates four of his seven. Closest friends have left and he have expected it to do it himself but his family raised him with an emphasis on working the land and connecting to their mayan history and has something else that quits his dream within reach access to land. After years of planning he's built in organic cultural business. Here in the western highlands. My connection to the land helps maintain me. This is what opened opportunities for me he says. Us conversation about halting migrants asylum seekers along its southern border tense dissenter on push pull factors crime. Hunger and limited jobs push migrants away from home while promises of employment family reunification safety and education whole them. North rarely does the conversation focus on learning from cases. Like mr apples. Those who decide they can build a future at home. It's a perspective. Migration experts say could make or break. The success of new us initiatives the biden administration has pledged an additional three hundred and ten million dollars in aid to central america to improve living conditions and lower migration on top of propose four year. Four billion dollar package. This story was reported by jeff. Abbott in zonal guatemala. And whitney you lick in mexico city along touted tool for cutting carbon emissions caps getting left out of us. Policymakers makers toolkit are climate writer unpacked the political and practical reasons for that in the search for practical ways to curb the emissions behind global warming. Policy experts come back to one idea again and again if you tax those emissions businesses and people will find ways to reduce them yet that very policy a carbon tax has been notably missing and president. Joe biden's ambitious climate agenda since he took office. It highlights the roadblocks in the american political system for major environmental action. At a time. When mr biden's goal of including big climate initiatives in an infrastructure bill is also in doubt despite support in the business community carbon. Pricing ideas haven't found substantial support on capitol hill partly. because there were tax is unpopular. There are ways to offset the burden such as by giving tax payers dividends back after pain carbon related fees yet even a centrist policy like carbon pricing becomes buffeted by the political wings of each party. It has bipartisan support. In principle says dan lashof the director of the world resources institute but if you actually try to count up republican members of who have sponsored or cosponsored carbon pricing bill. That's currently in. Congress is pretty thin. This story was reported by stephanie. Haynes.

Joe biden dan lashof Congress mexico stephanie. Haynes Four billion dollar twenties latin america central america each party one idea biden seven united states four four year republican jeff. Abbott three hundred and ten million dollars
"dan lashof" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"dan lashof" Discussed on KCRW

"3rd good to have you with us. We begin today with climate change a top priority in President Biden's administration. Ah, huge problem to tackle to be sure, but there is some low hanging fruit, some relatively easy fixes that do have bipartisan support. Case in point today, the Environmental Protection Agency released a proposed rule to phase down the use of HFCs hydrofluorocarbons. These are chemical refrigerants and products we use every day and they do a lot of damage to the climate. Marketplaces. Kimberly Adams gets us started. The EPA in line with the law, passed late last year, wants to reduce the production and importation of HFCS by about 85% before 2035 Dan Lashof is the U. S director of the World Resource is Institute HFCS, he says they're super pollutants used in refrigeration. Mostly that can have thousands of times the global warming impact of carbon dioxide and says Lashof, citing EPA is numbers. The net benefits of this rule are expected to be about $280 billion through 2050, and that's mostly from reducing global warming impacts. But some of those benefits are from improved efficiency of the new refrigerants and everyday things. David Doniger is with the natural resource is defense counsel HF Caesar and refrigerators air in the air conditioner of your car there inform installations that you might find in the wall. The House and Doniger says most consumers won't really notice the transition kind of like when we phased out CFC's chemicals that damage the ozone layer. We've gone through two generations of these refrigerant changes already, and you can't see the difference in the price of new air conditioners and the industry is on board knowing the plan, even if they'd like some tweaks allows them to plan Helen Walter Taryn Oni is with the Air conditioning, heating and refrigeration Institute. There's been an estimate of 39,000 jobs will be created with the face down of HFCs because all those systems will eventually need to be replaced. And someone has to manufacture the next generation refrigerants. I think that no matter which side of the coin, you look at it, it's kind of a win all around. And you know what? These days. Let's just take the win in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. In the housing news. Mortgage delinquencies are way down as of last week, more than 91% of homeowners had made their April payment the largest share in any month during the pandemic so far That's the latest from mortgage data firm Black Knight. It's yet another sign of the improving economy and the impact of pandemic relief checks. But beneath the headline numbers are some stark disparities. Marketplaces. Amy Scott has more Back in November, Brooke Lauren and her husband paused their mortgage payments. She's a home school teacher and crypto currency trader and Colorado Springs. He'd been out of work for several months and then found a low paying job in HR. We're making late payments so rather than pay $50 a month Late fees every month. He just did it for barracks for three months. Then in March, just as therefore, Barents was about to expire. Their pandemic relief check arrived when her husband found a higher paying job that came in just at the right time. We're actually stood for doing pretty well because he's got two jobs and propels doing pretty well. Tooth Lauren Story is in some ways the story of the economy right now. Andy Waldon with Black Knight credits the combination of government stimulus, a stronger job market and a typical seasonal bump in people's pocketbooks from tax refunds and bonuses. Walden says two thirds of homeowners who were in for parents plans at some point over the past 12 months have now left them over 40% of those homeowners or re performing. Another 15% of paid off their mortgages go through selling their home or through refinancing their mortgage. That leaves more than two million mortgages still in for parents, and the improvement hasn't been equal. The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia found that last month 11% of black homeowners were in for parents compared to just 4.5% of white homeowners. Leanne Adams is with Neighbor Works America, a nonprofit housing and community development group. She says black homeowners could be at higher risk of foreclosure when for parents protections expire. We know from the last crisis that black homeowners were really disproportionately impacted. And she says it took longer for them to recover. I may be Scott for marketplace. On Wall Street today. I'm not saying it's inflation. I'm on Lee, saying Rising prices are leading some companies to record profits. Good amount of green out there today. Details when we do the numbers News today that Verizon is selling Yahoo and AOL well to the private equity firm Apollo Global Management for $5 billion in cash and stocks. That's about four billion less than Verizon paid for those two companies. Not all.

Verizon Leanne Adams Brooke Lauren Andy Waldon Amy Scott David Doniger AOL Dan Lashof $50 Yahoo Kimberly Adams 11% Environmental Protection Agenc March Walden $5 billion Scott Lee Washington Lashof
"dan lashof" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

10:16 min | 3 years ago

"dan lashof" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"I'm sure I'm mispronouncing that and also please join it on the compensation on Twitter as reminder has tag re-energizing. I think some of you have already been doing that. But please keep it up. I wanted to Marianne. So you're beyond coal campaign has a goal of eliminating coal with an eleven years. While the green new deals goal appears to be calling to eliminate all carbon. And that's same timeframe. Are you worried that there's an increasing gap between the rhetoric and goals and reality of what's possible. Visit she's been radio programming from Tuesday. Thank you very much for all your great reporting. And thanks WRI for having me. It's an honor to be here. The Sierra Club. One of our our niches in the environmental movement is we have a democratically elected board of directors elected by our three million members and supporters and they have adopted the goal of getting all fossil fuels off the power grid by twenty thirty. And so the beyond coal campaign has been working for over a decade to first stop a wave of two hundred new coal plants that were proposed about during the George W Bush years, which we again with many many partner organizations with many grassroots folks all over the country who are worried about climate change water pollution, air pollution, public health. I stop those new coal plants, and then turned to the existing fleet of coal plants, and I live in West Virginia. So I very much take to heart of the comments about doing this in a way that doesn't leave people behind. That's an important part of the green new deal. But we are at the point now where we have over half the coal plants in the United States two hundred eighty seven announced to retire and given the urgency of the climate crisis and the pollution that comes not just from coal, but also gas extraction and production and burning we are working in earnest to try to get a electric grid in this country powered with renewable energy by twenty thirty and given the progress that we've made over the past decade. Yes, it's a lofty goal. But I also think it's possible Marian. But how much of the coal retirements were due to the shale natural gas revolution, which I know syrup also opposes. Well. There's no doubt that the gas revolution created a lot of dramatic changes in the electric sector for sure. And a lot of credit a lot of competition for coal. But I think the reality of right now is that we have a race in front of. For who is going to own America's energy future. And we are doing everything we can to make sure that renewable energy and storage win that race because we have the biggest change in. How we make trinity in America. I taking place right now. The biggest change since the industrial revolution. Frankly. And and it's a decision being made in states by cities by state decision makers by grassroots leaders by all the folks who are part of the beyond coal campaign pushing it influences decisions and so the future is up for grabs. And we are doing everything we can to make sure that renewable energy grabs future. Dan. What would you say is a blind spot in his debate of decarbonising both the electricity sector, but also possibly perhaps those are the blind spots, the transportation and the industrial sector. Well, I don't know if it's a blind spot. But I think one of the things that we need to consider is as where decarbonising the trysofi sector. We're probably also going to see a significant increase or need to see a significant increase in total electric demand as we electrify transportation and buildings and eventually industry. So Dan Lashof world Resources Institute. A fifty percent increase in electric, demand or more depending on how successful we are in increasing the efficiency of the existing end-uses of electric c which we should definitely be doing. But if but even with that a range of studies show that transportation and buildings and industry, you're going to mean, more electricity. That's actually can be very good thing. But it's something we have to plan for and that probably means I think one of the big. Friction points might be on transmission as we go to more renewables and the need for more electricity to decarbonised not just the power sector, but the entire Konami. We're going to need more transmission that'll be very cost effective thing to do. There's going to be a lot of issues around citing that perhaps new technology that can help with that if we can use high voltage DC lines that are cost effective to put underground rather than above head. That would really help avoid some of the fights that we're already seeing. But I would say that those are issues that we need to bring into the conversation. Karen, how essential do you think price on carbon is to any climate policy? I think it's crucial to climate policy. Because I think we talk a lot about the different technologies that are going to need to come on board and the need to decarbonised, but it's very hard to predict exactly what the solutions are going to be. And so having a price on carbon as a way to provide an incentive to reduce carbon emissions at various at all margins or wherever they occur. I having said that and it also provides revenue that can be used to dress various concerns that come up with talked about some of them that just transitions issues and also impacts on consumers as well. So there's it creates a body of revenue either through a carbon tax or a cap and trade program that has an auction associated with it. But I also think that we shouldn't necessarily think that that's going to be sufficient, I think particularly given the. The. Ambitiousness of what we need to do. And how how quickly we need to get it done that we're going to need programs related to research and development, and we'll probably also gonna need other types of policies to encourage technology and a carbon tax can provide some revenue for achieving those goals as well. So the good thing about only having one microphone for all four of them is that they can't talk over each other. I think CNN is to try to employ that strategy. So a question for all of you. And we touched on this a little bit in previous conversations but question on carbon capture technology, so former former Vice President Al gore told me at the UN climate conference in Poland last December that he thinks carbon capture technologies quote nonsense. Do you guys agree with that? And why or why not? I don't think it's nonsense. I think it's important to not rule out any particular technology, and to provide incentives through these pricing mechanisms I think. That. There are because there's such a bold challenge right now that we do need to keep a lot of options on the table. So I wouldn't want to rule it out at this point. Yeah. I agree with Karen on that. I think what I would add is I think win carbon capture was initially discussed a decade or so ago, the focus was on coal and keeping the coal industry in the United States alive and it being a pathway for coal. I think that's very unlikely if you had a technology neutral, whether it's a carbon tax or a clean, energy standard or cap, and trade and let these zero carbon technologies compete with each other. We would expect renewables to be the vast majority of the US electric generation. But for the last five percent ten percent. Twenty percent depends on the economics. It's very valuable to have technology that's dispatch -able, and that's where carbon capture could play a really important role. It's m- economics right now suggests that that's likely be on natural gas. The other place where carbon capture could be really crucial is for carbon dioxide removal. We are now if we'd started thirty years ago when we should have we probably wouldn't need to be talking about removing large quantities of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Now, we need to have that conversation. IPC one point five. We report makes that very clear and while there's a lot that we can do with so-called natural climate solutions. Trees are great way to take carbon out of the atmosphere. There's only so much land in the world, and we're going to have to feed ten billion people at the same time that we're trying to solve climate change. So we think there's likely to be a very significant role for technological carbon removal, and then capturing that to to and permanently keeping the atmosphere. Marianne is this something that the Sierra Club is supporting at all. Well, a couple of thoughts on that. From from my perspective. The there are a lot of other problems associated with fossil Fuel Development that carbon capture doesn't address. So if you're the mom of a child with asthma living near a coal plant. If you have coal ash related, lead, arsenic, mercury and your water. If you have a frac gas pipeline threatening your farm if you have fracking waste in your drinking water. There are many many reasons that people are opposed to fossil fuels and supportive of renewable energy that just addressing the carbon problem doesn't doesn't address. Mountains being blown up in Appalachia, for example. So that's that's one one factor. I think the other is we have utilities around the country now who are doing RFP's nips go in Indiana. Excel in Colorado and are finding that new solar was storage. New wind is cheaper than running existing coal plants. So nips go utility in Indiana is going to retire its coal plants, replace them entirely with wind solar with storage and efficiency and demand response..

United States Marianne Sierra Club Karen Twitter America Dan Lashof Indiana Konami RFP
"dan lashof" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"dan lashof" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Tuning it online and those of us here in the room for sticking around. And I wanna thank our panelists and their titles and affiliations are up on the on the screen, but I will also introduce them briefly here immediately to my left eye Cletus policy director of the union of concerned, scientists next Marianne hit beyond coal campaign, director of the beyond coal campaign at the Sierra Club next to her. It's Dan Lashof US director of the world Resources Institute here in the US and next to him is Karen Palmer of resources for the future. She's a senior fellow and director of the future of power initiative. So thank you all for being here today. I hope you've enjoyed the interviews with lawmakers. I want to offer each of you to a couple of minutes to respond to a question for me about what you've been focusing on lately. And Rachel I'll start with you. I was quite interested in a report that you guys released recently on the importance of keeping open existing nuclear reactors to what degree are you comparing? Comparing this message to the. Conveying. This message about nuclear power to the activists and politicians who are pushing the green new deal and other very progressive climate policies. Yeah. So the union of concerned scientists has for a long time been nuclear safety watchdog, we're not an anti-nuclear organization, and one of the things that we try to highlight in this report that you mentioned that nuclear power dilemma. That we released last year is that unfortunately, as a nuclear power plants in the United States are coming onto market fresh primarily because of the low cost of national guests as well as increasing energy efficiency and the full in cost of renewables. We're seeing on you care plans. Either retiring or being under pressure to retire and being replaced in many cases by natural gas, and that means that carbon emissions a growing as these plants are being tired. And are we so interest pointing out that we have a about a third of nuclear plants that right now are on economic under pressure to retire. And if they all were to retire emissions could rise by as much as six percent CO two emissions in the power sector. So from a climate perspective, that's a real challenge. And we point out the need to have a camp full approach that Christ you keep these plans online. Through ensuring that they're operating safely that they're not being given sort of unlimited endless amounts of money, but really open up their financial books and being given money in accordance with what's needed to stay online. And that at the same time, we're putting incentives for energy efficiency and renewable energy to be expanded as well. And that to us is having.

director United States senior fellow Marianne Cletus world Resources Institute Dan Lashof Sierra Club Rachel I six percent
"dan lashof" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

07:15 min | 3 years ago

"dan lashof" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"The world Resources Institute, hosted democratic congresswoman Kathy castor and former Republican congressman Carlos Cabello last week to talk about climate change and the work of the house select committee on the climate crisis. Which congresswoman caster chairs this runs almost And thank you for attending to form on re-energizing climate action on Capitol Hill. By the way, if you were looking for a discussion on clinical symptoms of psychological disorders, you're in the wrong room. Or maybe not my name is Dan Lashof. I am the director for world Resources Institute. I'm just going to give a few minutes of introduction. And framing remarks to today's discussion before turning the stage over to Amy harder of axios who will be interviewing Kathy castor chair of the house select committee on the climate crisis followed by a discussion with Carlos Quebec who founded the bipartisan climate solutions caucus and last year was the first Republican in a decade to introduce a Bill to seriously tack climate change after these opening conversations, we will turn to a panel discussion focusing on what it will take to decarbonised the power sector. A thank chair caster represented CRA Bello and our panel for joining us today. Really appreciate it. We do plan to have some additional four. In the future that will touch on additional topics such as transportation infrastructure and managing the transition for workers and communities will plan to bring in additional perspectives as we do that. So stay tuned for future announcements for those of you who are not familiar with world Resources Institute. We are a nonpartisan global policy research and innovation institute on a mission to foster change that protects earth environment and its capacity to provide for the needs an aspirin. Of current and future generations, we work on seven global challenges all of which link back directly or indirectly to the topic. We're here to discuss today. Our approach is grounded in science and data. Counted we help policymakers from all parties develop an implement innovative solutions, and communicate ideas are ideas to decision makers, and the public change it, and we leverage partnerships to spread approaches that work scale it in the United States w is particularly focused on making progress against climate change by working with business, cities states and the federal government and encouraging them to act at all these levels in ways that support and complement each other. Here inside the beltway. It's sometimes easy to forget the critical role played by these subnational actors, but an analysis done by WRI last year for America's pledge shows that implementing their commitments would lead to about a seventeen percent reduction in US emissions by twenty twenty five with no further action from Washington with deeper and broader commitments we could see reductions of as much as twenty four percent, which is within striking distance of the pledge the United States made as part of the Paris agreement. And in some good news in recent months. We have seen in fact, exciting developments at the subnational level, a growing number of states have set ambitious clean electricity targets such as fifty percent by twenty thirty or one hundred percent by twenty fifty or even earlier carbon pricing is expanding to more states and more sectors and states cooperating more intensively through the US climate alliance which has grown to over twenty three governors who are committed to the goals of the Paris agreement. They now represent about fifty percent of the US population. And more than sixty percent of our GDP. At the federal level climate change has reemerged as a top priority on Capitol Hill, and the conversation has matured from whether to take action to how the emergence of the green new deal has inspired unprecedented activism. And sparked a lively debate about the future of climate action in congress in the context of economic and social equity. In addition to the broad goals and principles enunciated in a green new deal resolution. We're also seeing more and more concrete legislative proposals. Including two carbon pricing bills. Sponsored by Representative Cabello and. We'll hear from shortly as well as his fellow Florida Republican Francis. Rooney Representative caster has as the primary sponsor of HR nine which focuses on keeping the United States in the Paris agreement and meeting our commitments and holding other countries accountable on the Senate side Lamar Alexander has proposed a new Manhattan project. Focus on energy are in D And Senator Smith plans to introduce an ambitious clean energy standard Bill shortly. We've also seen Kevin dividend proposal and discussion of a trillion dollar climate smart infrastructure plan for fighting on all this activity. Representative Paul Tonko recently said let thousands climate proposals bloom and that really captures where we are. Right now. There is a hunger for solutions to the climate crisis and how to realize them, and that's why we're here to talk about today. So again, thanks for coming. There are few more seats here in the middle of people want to slide in now, we do want to keep today's conversation interactive. So while we don't want you to check Email on your phones, we do want you to take them out now and take part in a quick poll on his platform, slide out or slide. Doe. We're also be using this this platform for asking questions to the panelists. So if you go to slide Donau or slide, oh dot com and type in Ben code three fifty. We're going to have this poll. And so here's the question by wind should the United States aim to achieve a zero carbon electronics sector. You'll see options for your answers there. And the results are coming in. I don't know if I can see how many people have replied give people a minute to get there. Dan Lashof with the world Resources Institute this program took place, Monday, April ninth. Scratch that it's Monday, April eighth..

United States world Resources Institute Kathy castor Paris Dan Lashof congresswoman caster Carlos Cabello CRA Bello Representative Cabello Rooney Representative caster director aspirin congressman congress federal government Carlos Quebec