22 Burst results for "Dan Heath"

"dan heath" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

The EntreLeadership Podcast

05:39 min | 5 months ago

"dan heath" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

"Have, you ever gotten those spots where you start treating your business, your leadership, your team, maybe even your family and quite frankly your entire life like a game of mole, like you hit this one thing and you think you're good, and then another thing pops up and then another thing boss up. Then you have to hit two things at once and then you need five hands because you have to five things at once they keep coming up and you're going frantic and you're going crazy and you just can't get to all of it. Have you ever been there? Whenever you engage in that version of life. That's a lot like whack a mole. You start to realize that you're focusing only on symptoms and you never actually get to the source from the Ramsey network. This is the entree leadership podcast where we business leaders grow themselves, their teams and their profits. I'm your host. Alex Jed. Today, we get to talk with Dan Heath WHO's an author and researcher who has spent over a decade working on this exact. Exact topic, not just how you as a leader solve problems, but how do you prevent them from ever occurring? How do you not just attack the symptom, but get down to the source to the root cause. Now, he calls this upstream thinking and it's the title of his new book upstream and this whole idea that can transform your priorities, your leadership, and your team would all originated with a parable about you having a picnic by the river? So you and a friend are having a picnic beside a river. You've laid out your picnic blanket. You're just preparing to sit down and eat when you hear a shout behind you from the direction of the river and you look back and there's a child and the river. Kinda thrashing around apparently drowning and. Instinctively jump in both of you and you fish the child out you bring them to shore and Just. When you're adrenaline starting to recede a little bit, you hear a second. Shout, you look back and it's another child also apparently drowning. So you go. You rescue them, bring them to shore, and no sooner. Have you done now that you hear to shouts now it's two kids in the river, and so you're in, you're out, you're rescuing kids and you're starting to get exhausted. And about that time your friend swims to shore and starts walking away as though to leave you alone and you say, Hey, where you going I can't do this by myself. All these kids they need rescuing, and your friend says I'm going upstream to tackle the guy who's thrown all these kids in the river, and that in a nutshell is what this book is about. It's about this phenomenon. What's so often life whether it's our personal life or a businesses we get trapped in the cycle of reaction, we're putting out fires responding to emergencies. We're always. Always downstream dealing with problems after they happen, but we rarely make the space. We rarely devote the time and attention that we would need to go upstream and forestalled head off these problems before they ever happen, and that's what I'm chasing with this. I'd love to know what was the genesis of this thought being a book for you. Where did that come from? As something that you said man I want to spend a ton of time studying researching and writing about that. The first time I started a file called upstream was in two thousand nine. And two things that happened was I heard that parable for the first time. Then it was the first time. This notion of upstream thinking was planted in my head, and the other is around the time. I heard that parable I had this conversation with the assistant deputy chief of police in Canadian city, and he told me this story of this thought experiment really stuck with me ever since and he said, imagine you've got to police officers and one of them goes down in the morning during the morning rush. And she positions herself in this intersection. That's kind of notorious. It's chaotic. Accidents there, and just by being a visible presence in that intersection, she calms people down. She gets them to be more cautious and she prevents accidents from happening. So that's officer one. and. Then officer to go to a different part of downtown where there is prohibited right turn signal, and she hides around the corner and when people cheat and and make that prohibited right turn. She jumps out and slaps them with the ticket. And this deputy chief said, which of these two officers do you think did more for the public good and for public safety and he said? Indisputably was the first right. She probably prevented some accidents maybe even prevented someone from being killed. But if you ask who is going to be praised who's going to be rewarded, who's going to be promoted, it's officer to because she comes back with a stack of tickets that show what she's accomplished, and meanwhile, if you think about officer one, how does she prove? She did anything. You know how do you prove that something did not happen. And we might say, well, you can look at data and that's certainly true I mean. We could keep a log of how many accidents happen at this intersection before and after the officer was stationed there, and if there's a downtick claimed credit for that. But notice even in that scenario where we have the data backing up our work, we still don't know. Know who exactly was helped? There was some guy headed downtown to go to his job that morning and he noticed the presence of the officer. He slowed down a little bit. He was fine in an alternate reality where she wasn't there. He would have been in a crash in died that morning. He'll never know that that's right. Officer will never know who? Who she helped. So there's this kind of maddening ambiguity about upstream work that even though it's essential, even though it can stop problems before they happen. It also brings a lot of ambiguity and complexity, and in that idea coupled with that parable Kinda. Got Me hooked and I've been fascinated by ever since

officer deputy chief Ramsey network Alex Jed Dan Heath researcher
The Importance of Looking Upstream with Dan Heath

The EntreLeadership Podcast

05:39 min | 5 months ago

The Importance of Looking Upstream with Dan Heath

"Have, you ever gotten those spots where you start treating your business, your leadership, your team, maybe even your family and quite frankly your entire life like a game of mole, like you hit this one thing and you think you're good, and then another thing pops up and then another thing boss up. Then you have to hit two things at once and then you need five hands because you have to five things at once they keep coming up and you're going frantic and you're going crazy and you just can't get to all of it. Have you ever been there? Whenever you engage in that version of life. That's a lot like whack a mole. You start to realize that you're focusing only on symptoms and you never actually get to the source from the Ramsey network. This is the entree leadership podcast where we business leaders grow themselves, their teams and their profits. I'm your host. Alex Jed. Today, we get to talk with Dan Heath WHO's an author and researcher who has spent over a decade working on this exact. Exact topic, not just how you as a leader solve problems, but how do you prevent them from ever occurring? How do you not just attack the symptom, but get down to the source to the root cause. Now, he calls this upstream thinking and it's the title of his new book upstream and this whole idea that can transform your priorities, your leadership, and your team would all originated with a parable about you having a picnic by the river? So you and a friend are having a picnic beside a river. You've laid out your picnic blanket. You're just preparing to sit down and eat when you hear a shout behind you from the direction of the river and you look back and there's a child and the river. Kinda thrashing around apparently drowning and. Instinctively jump in both of you and you fish the child out you bring them to shore and Just. When you're adrenaline starting to recede a little bit, you hear a second. Shout, you look back and it's another child also apparently drowning. So you go. You rescue them, bring them to shore, and no sooner. Have you done now that you hear to shouts now it's two kids in the river, and so you're in, you're out, you're rescuing kids and you're starting to get exhausted. And about that time your friend swims to shore and starts walking away as though to leave you alone and you say, Hey, where you going I can't do this by myself. All these kids they need rescuing, and your friend says I'm going upstream to tackle the guy who's thrown all these kids in the river, and that in a nutshell is what this book is about. It's about this phenomenon. What's so often life whether it's our personal life or a businesses we get trapped in the cycle of reaction, we're putting out fires responding to emergencies. We're always. Always downstream dealing with problems after they happen, but we rarely make the space. We rarely devote the time and attention that we would need to go upstream and forestalled head off these problems before they ever happen, and that's what I'm chasing with this. I'd love to know what was the genesis of this thought being a book for you. Where did that come from? As something that you said man I want to spend a ton of time studying researching and writing about that. The first time I started a file called upstream was in two thousand nine. And two things that happened was I heard that parable for the first time. Then it was the first time. This notion of upstream thinking was planted in my head, and the other is around the time. I heard that parable I had this conversation with the assistant deputy chief of police in Canadian city, and he told me this story of this thought experiment really stuck with me ever since and he said, imagine you've got to police officers and one of them goes down in the morning during the morning rush. And she positions herself in this intersection. That's kind of notorious. It's chaotic. Accidents there, and just by being a visible presence in that intersection, she calms people down. She gets them to be more cautious and she prevents accidents from happening. So that's officer one. and. Then officer to go to a different part of downtown where there is prohibited right turn signal, and she hides around the corner and when people cheat and and make that prohibited right turn. She jumps out and slaps them with the ticket. And this deputy chief said, which of these two officers do you think did more for the public good and for public safety and he said? Indisputably was the first right. She probably prevented some accidents maybe even prevented someone from being killed. But if you ask who is going to be praised who's going to be rewarded, who's going to be promoted, it's officer to because she comes back with a stack of tickets that show what she's accomplished, and meanwhile, if you think about officer one, how does she prove? She did anything. You know how do you prove that something did not happen. And we might say, well, you can look at data and that's certainly true I mean. We could keep a log of how many accidents happen at this intersection before and after the officer was stationed there, and if there's a downtick claimed credit for that. But notice even in that scenario where we have the data backing up our work, we still don't know. Know who exactly was helped? There was some guy headed downtown to go to his job that morning and he noticed the presence of the officer. He slowed down a little bit. He was fine in an alternate reality where she wasn't there. He would have been in a crash in died that morning. He'll never know that that's right. Officer will never know who? Who she helped. So there's this kind of maddening ambiguity about upstream work that even though it's essential, even though it can stop problems before they happen. It also brings a lot of ambiguity and complexity, and in that idea coupled with that parable Kinda. Got Me hooked and I've been fascinated by ever since

Officer Deputy Chief Ramsey Network Alex Jed Dan Heath Researcher
We're drawn to heroes.

Hacking Your Leadership

04:37 min | 6 months ago

We're drawn to heroes.

"For this week's episode, I WanNa talk about heroes. Here's a great. They saved the day. They get the cat out of the tree. They arrest the bad guy. They hit the Grand Slam in the bottom of the ninth inning to win the game. It's no wonder we love him. But what about all the people whose actions keep the day from ever needing to be saved? What about the responsible cat owner, who keeps the cat indoors and out of the tree? What about the passionate people who worked community safer and healthier, so there's less bad guys to begin with. What about the baseball players who had a singles and doubles throughout the game, so the team is already ahead in the bottom of the ninth. As human beings, we love seeing triumph over adversity, so because these people don't always produce the most exciting tales. They are often branded as heroes. I'm reading a book right now. Called upstream by Dan, Heath. It's about solving problems before they happen and said of her ROIC saving the day. Dan says many leaders tend to focus their efforts on symptoms instead of the actual sources of problems, the ten the fire hoses are in great shape. There's plenty of water available rather than on clearing all the dead brush away from the House. He tells the story of two friends sitting by a river, and is he a child drowning both friends immediately dive in and pull the child to safety, but as soon as they do this yet. Another struggling child, then another and another, and after about the fifth rescue, one of them climbs out of the water where you going other friend asks I'm going upstream to tackle the guy throwing all these kids in the river. It's an interesting parable, and it has far reaching implications for some very real issues. We face today. How many kids went potentially drown because there's now only one person saving them with the other tries to stop the flow, and is that worth it? How long can these two friends continue saving kids before they tire out? What the flow of drowning kids increases to beyond what they can handle. This question of available limited resources when that every leader must answer. When I was in college one of the jobs I applied for a customer satisfaction leader. I asked the per serving me what exactly this role did. It was explained to me that after a large transaction, many customers needed some extra hand holding and TLC order to avoid disappointment, and the company saw much higher levels of customer satisfaction since this role was created. I was young. I didn't think much of it the time, but in hindsight, the very existence of this position imply something it implies that wants a commission based sales. Person secured their commission. They were too busy moving onto the next sale to continue to care about their previous customers, and naturally this can lead the low customer satisfaction because customers don't want to feel like you only care about them until they paid you. So I started thinking about how position like this came to be in the first place. A very talented salesperson who generates a lot of revenue for an organization bites off more than you can chew his desire to make more commission leads into start multiple simultaneous deals, for whatever reason one of his recent customers is a little more high maintenance, and starting to become irritated that the salesperson isn't as reachable. None of the transaction has done. He demands to speak to a manager who rightfully takes time to solve the problem. Only the manager doesn't pull the salesperson in order to set the expectation that customers need follow up after the deal. Instead the manager sees the full plate of the salesperson and grabs. Someone else on the team to solve this problem. Problem, some the good interpersonal skills, but who has less plate, spinning at the moment, and it works the customers, happy and everyone moves on. This was the right decision, but this is also the important moment. This is the moment when the manager decides that he'd rather create an entirely new position from scratch called customer satisfaction leader, rather than set the expectation that going forward. The salespeople are expected to customer relationships, even after the sale completes now maybe the financial results of this process. It's the right thing to do. Maybe it's a waste of talent to have the best salespeople who hands with customers rather than generating more revenue. Every companies determine this for itself. But once the sales people realize they no longer have to spend time following up for transaction. Because the customer satisfaction, we'll protect the deal. They lose all incentive to stop the customer from going down that path to begin with. This means more customers will end up in the hands of the customer satisfaction leader, and the existence of this rule becomes valid. We see this happen everywhere from organizations like the one I just told you about all the way to the changing expectations of law, enforcement and our communities. How much of are available, limited resources should be put into solving problems, and how much would be put into preventing those problems from happening in the first place. Putting all your resources into stopping the kids from drowning ignores the very real issue of the guy upstream, and continues to throw into the river, and putting all your resources into stopping the guy from throwing kids into the river means kids might still end up in the river, due to other reasons and others to pull them out. If you're a leader of people and these are the decision to responsible for making I can tell you the answer is some combination of the two, and only you know what the combination is, but don't make the mistake of thinking that all rules are necessary, simply because a role seems to be validated. Constantly evaluate where you're putting your resources and make sure you're not being seduced by the lure of the hero.

DAN Baseball Heath
"dan heath" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

09:00 min | 9 months ago

"dan heath" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Come is like on. The roadside side. Heard that they're fun. Remember we looked up on the other day about a hamster. Somebody's ASS to and it. Was that a two lovers. One put a Gerbil or a mouse. It doesn't matter up his ass. It got caught. He had taken a paper towel to he had put that in in his partners but to get the vermin in there and then so he wanted to see. I watched by the way. Why do you need to see if some stuck and you needed to see in there to get it out? Oh no no. It was that he thought that the critter would be attracted to lights. That's what it was right. So we lit a match at the end of the tube thinking the critter would come towards the light and a big pocket of Methane. Gas exploded the man's ass and his love face that they went to the emergency room with a chart face and a blown out but that one spectacular. Yeah steeped in Homophobia which is if you let's just make it. Let's just make it? It's have man looking up a woman's air. Yeah how about that okay? So you said the most common way in all person would dis pneumonia. So the leading causes of death among adults over the age of sixty five are also among the most common cause of death among population as a whole so in order one heart disease to cancer three chronic obstructive pulmonary disease four-stroke by Alzheimer's six diabetes sad been pneumonia and flew eight accidents. Nine nephritis hold on those for the general population of people over sixty five. Okay okay wrong by a lot yet to the woman who died on February six dive caroni in California. Yes the New York limes. Okay Yeah you said. A New York percentage of people who've died is tenfold of California of Krona obviously In New York as of yesterday one hundred twenty six per one hundred thousand people in California's six per one hundred thousand people on E. Fold. Yeah Yeah Whoa WHOA. Whoa WHOA WHOA. Whoa also did you know the urban legend about like you know like the girl sleeping in her hands hanging down off the bed and her dog is licking her hand and then she looks and it's a person that's a killer years are the funniest know talk the licked hand real religion. Yes I'm not making. These real. Fake story describes a killer who secretly spends the night under a girl's bed licking her hands to win. Offered when she takes to be her dog up all my God. Everyone knows patient murderer. The best ones are. Can we talk about Alex Jones for one second because they keep showing the clip of him saying he's going to eat his neighbors? You know well eventually is I ask. Have you watched him say it? All now I'm not GonNa Watch that. He's in like a suit he's got a really like he's up the production value of his background. I'm not sure what it is. It kind of looks like a nuclear proliferation mountain but at any rate I'm watching him and he's screaming and he's talking about hanging his neighbor up and feel dressing them like deer and Gutting Nam and all this and I'm like okay. The guy's smart enough to have his own show on a following so he most certainly doesn't think this stuff. This is a totally disagree. I feel like he knows how to give his audience what they want. That doesn't mean he doesn't believe it though the guys who have that podcast. That's very popular. White Nationalist podcast. They believe it. They also are business savvy and know what to give their audience. But it's not like they're just doing that. I agree with you. I have a hunch Alex Jones is in on the joke on some level. I think he believes a ton of it but I also think he. Why would we at? Why why would we cut him slack like that like? There's no relief that makes us better. I think that makes them worse if he was genuine. I'd have a lot more sympathy for him. But the notion that he's just a performance and give a fuck what the collateral damages to me seems far more on ethical. The thing I wanted to get to you with you is more let. Let's just assume for a second that he's in on it and then he's smart and that he knows what he's saying sounds ridiculous. How does his ego except that others are? People are watching him going. What are your so fucking stupid. That's that's why. If that's the scenario than he has sold his ego. I guess for money which is Kinda fascinating you and I wouldn't sell our standing as smart for any amount of money. We wouldn't be willing to take on a persona that we were dumb asses for money. You and I just wouldn't do that now so when I think it might be possible. Someone has done that that that makes me deeply curious. That's so interesting so I can't relate at all I would be able to sell people's opinion of me of being a crazy dumb ass for an amount of money that's a fascinating mindset. Yeah I just. I personally don't know anyone who's doing that or believe anyone could truly do it. I also think is business savvy and the way that he knows how to push the boundaries and get headlines. Yeah I see nearly everything he does and I don't follow him but he he's still. I don't know that he believes I don't know if he thinks he would eat his neighbors but he believes the underlying concept behind it. Which is that. This is getting crazy. The government has forced him in a position to have to eat his neighbors right so so then he knows how to take to the extreme to get headlines to get attention but he believes in the thing. Fundamentally your that part yeah I I don't think you can put on a whole. I mean maybe you can. Maybe you can put on a whole act for the rest of Your Life. But then then what's the difference? Then you are that. If that's what you've decided to be than you are you have a person is measured by their actions and not their intentions. I totally agree with you. But if we were to watch a movie about somebody who had this persona. That really wasn't them. That would be a really fascinating personal journey to watch short. You know yeah and I just have a suspicion that Alex Jones has to be hamming it up. He is hand profound way that he doesn't really think I really think Sandy Hook was a hoax. I don't think he could possibly think that. I think he thinks there's a lot of things happening without our knowledge behind the scenes. These things don't just happen out of nowhere. I Yeah I think he believes that conspiracy happens all the time. No I don't know that he one hundred percent believes in his heart. That Sandy Hook was but he believes it's possible. Sure so once you believe it's possible then you double down and now it's your brand. You WanNa say one thing about conspiracy theories that if you've ever told a friend that you cheated on your girlfriend or if you've ever told a friend you cheated on your boyfriend you have learned. That secret does not stay there Almost eighty percent of the time. It's coming out. Yeah and the notion that there would be all these people involved in this conspiracy. Something that would take dozens of people To pull off and that the truth would not come out is insane. People don't keep secrets and specialty groups of ten twenty thirty forty fifth. That is a complete fantasy that humans can keep secrets. It doesn't exist around so perceived to be a a conspiracy. You're talking what the whole media house. So many members of the media got a nudge. We're GONNA say that this thing happened but it didn't happen and that person doesn't tell their wife and then their wipe doesn't other girlfriend and it doesn't get to somebody who wants attention so they call the newspaper. That's not how the world works. Tell Secrets Yeah. There's no great kept secret. Yeah okay thanks for energy. I agree definitely one hundred percent yet. The notion that like eighteen or twenty people plotted to kill JFK and none of them ever spoke is just to me. Seems implausible very farfetched? Yeah a great okay. I love you I love you. Happy Cinco de Mayo..

Alex Jones California Sandy Hook New York pneumonia nephritis government Alzheimer Gutting Nam Cinco de Mayo E. Fold
"dan heath" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

10:43 min | 9 months ago

"dan heath" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Right take care. Thanks and now. My favorite part of the show. The fact check with my soul mate. Monica pattern welcome. Welcome welcome to the fat check L. A. Double Welcome. We've just popped the air on in your apartment because it's GonNa be a sweltering eighty eight degrees in the ruck and Los Angeles area. Today scorcher a real barn burner sell. It's to stay Cinco Demayo but it's now when this airs. Well Yeah but that's okay you don't like to keep the illusion alive. They no you know right that we're not recording this day of. They're smarter than that. They might want not WanNa know recorded a week ago. Something happens with when things feel. It's now occurred we record two days ago. This is Thursday's episode okay. Okay you won. You won that one Barron Square clean a clean victory happy Cinco Demayo. Sorry Dax ruined Happy Birthday Gabby shepherd my niece. She's a single two mile baby. That's fine know. A lot of people feel like Cinco de Maya is tricky. Why cultural appropriation. We all celebrate. Say Day we're not Irish. We can all Party on Cinco de Mayo. No country is sitting there going. Wait another country celebrating this day. We celebrate they'd be so flattered. There's four kids in college saying it's cultural appropriation. Well it is not this. Yeah sure. It's so silly I do think it is different. A bunch of white people wearing sombreros and speaking in accents and stuff move. A bunch of Brown people are draping American flags over their shoulders on Fourth of July. In Lucknow fireworks in Guam fucking great. I'm flattered by that it's again you know. It's the the same reason it circles back. Always that Americans are in power and in charge. Yeah and other people are not well. You know we have different opinions on this. And that's I don't really lovely. I don't have that opinion if you put him Brown facing you know. That's an issue. That's now you're culturally appropriate. If you're celebrating this Mexican holiday your fucking nodding your head to something. That's positive but people try to make positive things negative because some people want to hate hate hate nice to look at all sides videos. I've looked at that side and I've concluded for me personally. I think it's silly doesn't seem like he looked at it. You don't have the full argument articles about it and that went my conclusion after reading the articles was this is preposterous. No one in Mexico's mad about this. I don't know what they think in Mexico. I assume they think is fine. I surveyed all them. Okay great great great. Can I just say? Let's get in a fight. This is the kind of Shit that makes people think liberals are insane fucking shit on our our brand so bad when we do shit like this so silly I disagree I disagree. Don't celebrate Cinco de Maya. That's another country's holiday in your white but we might sound you posture. No why does it have to be so defensive? I can't the people who are reacting like you just said Yeah. Take a second and think okay. That seems a bit crazy and extreme. Why could that be true? Still feels like saint. Paddy's Day to me. You really do a thousand percent. You think there's a difference between Saint Patrick's Day and Cinco de Maya think. Irish people are different for Mexican people who get shit on and is well known in every single while all my geography books it Mexicans do are the Irish people hated the Irish Erastus against the IRS. Now not during the famine yet. But celebrating Saint Patrick's Day was a movement and making them real people and not drags. That's how you come out of that. Well we all embracing and celebrating. I mean I think people who are pro building a wall no immigration they like eating tacos on Cinco Demayo. It's not like they're super empowered even in this country and we're celebrating. Butcha disconnect. Well everything can be racial so people in Ukraine. Have a standard of living. That's a tenth of what ours? They are almost equally disadvantaged under prioritized on the global scene but if they had some holiday that we celebrate it over here be literally the only difference at that point because the power dynamic would be the same structure and who has access. And who's the hegemonic that hasn't changed between the Ukraine and Mexico but because they're white that's cool because they're brown that's not cool that is silo. Ukrainians aren't oppressed here. Mexicans are there's a no Ukrainians are oppressed here. They come here and they have no means. They were doctors in their country. Now they're driving Uber's and they live in poverty and they're not empowered. I mean I think if we had a holiday where people running around wearing whatever and speaking in their accent. And I said if you're if you're imitating a generic Mexican accent that's an issue. I think it's fine. I think it's extreme to say it's cultural appropriation. But I I also get it and I think to immediately dismiss it as like. Oh liberals like it's just not paying attention to what's really going on but I disagree. So the native Americans have an issue with people white people wearing the Indian headdress. That makes sense. That was a religious ceremonial headwear. That people worn in not even all native Americans would dare put that on so that that makes sense to me some rare there's no religious aspect to it. There's no there's nothing important about it. It's a fucking hat. They invented like the cowboy hat so if they wear the cowboy hat. We're not like. Oh they're appropriating America. They're like Oh. We invented a hat that that works well to block the Sun. They're wearing it yet but they're not also saying and Americans. You can't come here it's different. We have a different relationship with Mexicans in this country where it's very political and divisive and a lot of people don't want them here and then they're gonNA wear their hat and eat their food and act like it's fine in those cases but it's not fine for them to be taking our jobs and we should build a wall. It's not the same but then I think that just then turned into yet a different debate. Which is is it hypocritical for people who are racist against Mexicans to be celebrating their holiday. Thousand Percent Yeah right there shifts. Yeah Yeah Yeah I guess that's what I mean and they're probably certainly are some people who hate Mexicans or xenophobic that are doing taco Tuesday. And that's one hundred percent. I people idiot. I also know like the Mexican restaurant down the street from my parents house. I know people who go there and eat there who are racist against Mexicans and can't put two and two together but do you think the road out. Xenophobia is have less interplay between the two cultures are more. It's not inner play. It's like white people are hanging out in a room with other white people eating tacos and wearing some barrows. That's what's happening. I'm again like now. I'm like I feel like I'm getting a little forced into a box that I'm like really pro. Yes and I don't but it requires some examination. I think everything requires some examination. And that is what's it's is clearly a step in the correct direction. Not Not in the wrong direction. But but what do you have to say about what I just said about? It's just white people hanging out with other white people. It's not like it's causing people hanging out with other white people so you're saying it's bringing people together food. They enjoy the food. Oh I like the food or I'd like to go there. Oh I heard it's really authentic there. Oh and then I go there and then I see all the people co Mingling as the solutions so Kazakhastan Kazakhstan aware. I don't know anything. I'm more Zena phobic about. I don't even know what the fuck happens in Kazakhstan so if Mike Culture started getting interwoven with Kazakhstan I started having. Oh my God I love their fucking sausage and I love this and I love that now. I have an interesting Kazakhstan. I might want to visit Kazakhstan. I it's in my mind. They're starting to become de other and more. Oh like you know I agree all right. So urban legends. At that part was very interesting. I thought in this episode sure I like urban legends. If you go Kapiti you can see a big old list. But what's your your favorite one. Is the coffin. One I mean. It's so preposterous. Yeah that's funny. The kidney wants the best thing has got to be the best a yeah. That's a really good one and one that everyone knows. I'm trying to think if there is any moment that I actually believed it did you. I'm sorry I did. I've had a few encounters that have had big impact one bloody Mary. That's probably the I think the most famous one or car where you know you go into a dark room and staring into the mirror and say bloody Mary three times. She appears youth. There was another really popular on when I was in high school that it was that gang initiation okay so gang members who are being initiated into a gang. They drive on the road with their. Yes I know you. High Beam them to let them know that their lights are off. They turn around and murder until they get into the real. No that's because if someone's going to risk committing murder which everyone acknowledged it's a risk. They're going to kill an enemy. Not a random person makes no sense to you. Never know an initiation would be like go. Kill this guy who we hate. Okay also the the one about this one. I still believe it so when I go into movie theater I always check the see. Because there's one about I think still gang members or just people put in the C with AIDS or sure. Yes you have to check the seat before you say. I always check the seat before I sit. It's a habit at this point but I also still believe in at ten percent. You know the Cactus Swan or someone brings a cactus home to their house and they think they hear it making noises but they're like of howling keep listening to it and I must be imaginable and in the middle of the night breaks open and like a thousand. Scorpions.

Cinco de Maya Kazakhstan Mexico Cinco Demayo Saint Patrick Ukraine Los Angeles murder Barron Square Kazakhastan Kazakhstan Lucknow Guam Dax Brown IRS Mayo Cactus Swan
"dan heath" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

10:43 min | 9 months ago

"dan heath" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Right take care. Thanks and now. My favorite part of the show. The fact check with my soul mate. Monica pattern welcome. Welcome welcome to the fat check L. A. Double Welcome. We've just popped the air on in your apartment because it's GonNa be a sweltering eighty eight degrees in the ruck and Los Angeles area. Today scorcher a real barn burner sell. It's to stay Cinco de Mayo. But it's now when this airs. Well Yeah but that's okay you don't like to keep the illusion alive. They no you know right that we're not recording this day of. They're smarter than that. They might want not WanNa know recorded a week ago. Something happens with when things feel well. It's now occurred we record two days ago. This is Thursday's episode right. Okay Okay you won. You won that one Barron Square clean a clean victory happy Cinco Demayo. Sorry Dax ruined Happy Birthday Gabby shepherd my niece. She's a single two mile baby. That's fine know. A lot of people feel like Cinco de Maya is tricky. Why cultural appropriation. We all celebrate Saint Saint Patrick's Day. We're not Irish. We can all Party on Cinco de Mayo. No country is sitting there going. Wait another country celebrating this day. We celebrate they'd be so flattered. There's four kids in college saying it's cultural appropriation. Well it is not this. Yeah sure. It's so silly I do think it is different. A bunch of white people wearing sombreros and speaking in accents and stuff move. A bunch of Brown people are draping American flags over their shoulders on Fourth of July. In Lucknow fireworks in Guam foggin great. I'm flattered by that it's again you know. It's the the same reason it circles back. Always that Americans are in power and in charge. Yeah and other people are not well. You know we have different opinions on this. And that's I don't holy lovely. I don't have that opinion if you put them. Brown facing you know. That's an issue. That's now you're culturally appropriate. If you're celebrating this Mexican holiday your fucking nodding your head to something. That's positive but people try to make positive things negative because some people want to hate hate hate nice to look at all sides videos. I've looked at that side and I've concluded for me personally. I think it's silly you looked at it you have. I've heard the full argument articles about it and went my conclusion after reading the articles was this is preposterous. No one in Mexico's mad about this. I don't know what they think in Mexico. I assume they think is fine. I surveyed all them. Okay great great great. Can I just say? Let's get in a fight. This is the kind of Shit that makes people think liberals are insane fucking shit on our our brand so bad when we do shit like this I so silly I disagree. I disagree. Don't celebrate. Cinco de Maya. That's another country's holiday in your white but we might sound you posture. No why does it have to be so defensive? I can't the people who are reacting like you just said Yeah. Take a second and think okay. That seems a bit crazy and extreme. Why could that be true? Still feels like saint. Paddy's Day to me. You really do a thousand percent. You think there's a difference between Saint Patrick's Day and Cinco de Maya think. Irish people are different for Mexican people who get shit on and is well known in every single while all my geography books it Mexicans do are the Irish people hated the Irish Erastus against the IRS. Now not during the famine yet. But celebrating Saint Patrick's Day was a movement and making them real people and not drags. That's how you come out of that. Well we all embracing and celebrating. I mean I think people who are pro building a wall no immigration they like eating tacos on Cinco Demayo. It's not like they're super empowered even in this country and we're celebrating. Butcha disconnect. Well listen everything can be racial so people in Ukraine. Have a standard of living. That's a tenth of what ours is. They are almost equally disadvantaged under prioritized on the global scene but if they had some holiday that we celebrate it over here be literally the only difference at that point because the power dynamic would be the same structure and who has access. And who's the hegemonic that hasn't changed between the Ukraine and Mexico but because they're white that's cool because they're brown that's not cool that is silo. Ukrainians aren't oppressed here. Mexicans are there's a whole no Ukrainians are oppressed here. They come here and they have no means. They were doctors in their country. Now they're driving Uber's and they live in poverty and they're not empowered. I mean I think if we had a holiday where people running around wearing whatever and speaking in their accent. And I said if you're if you're imitating a generic Mexican accent that's an issue. I think it's fine. I think it's extreme to say it's cultural appropriation. But I I also get it and I think to immediately dismiss it as like. Oh liberals like it's just not paying attention to what's really going on but I disagree. So the native Americans have an issue with people white people wearing the Indian headdress. That makes sense. That was a religious ceremonial headwear. That people worn in not even all native Americans would dare put that on so that that makes sense to me some rare there's no religious aspect to it. There's no there's nothing important about it. It's a fucking hat. They invented like the cowboy hat so if they wear the cowboy hat. We're not like. Oh they're appropriating America. They're like Oh. We invented a hat that that works well to block the Sun. They're wearing it yet but they're not also saying and Americans. You can't come here it's different. We have a different relationship with Mexicans in this country where it's very political and divisive and a lot of people don't want them here and then they're gonNA wear their hat and eat their food and act like it's fine in those cases but it's not fine for them to be taking our jobs and we should build a wall. It's not the same but then I think that just then turned into yet a different debate. Which is is it hypocritical for people who are racist against Mexicans to be celebrating their holiday. Thousand Percent Yeah right there shifts. Yeah Yeah Yeah I guess that's what I mean and then probably certainly are some people who hate Mexicans or xenophobic that are doing taco Tuesday. And that's one hundred percent. I people idiot. I also know like the Mexican restaurant down the street from my parents house. I know people who go there and eat there who are racist against Mexicans and can't put two and two together but do you think the road out. Xenophobia is have less interplay between the two cultures are more. It's not inner play. It's like white people are hanging out in a room with other white people eating tacos and wearing some barrows. That's what's happening. I'm again like now. I'm like I feel like I'm getting a little forced into a box that I'm like really pro. Yes and I don't but it requires some examination. I think everything requires some examination. And that is what's it's is clearly a step in the correct direction. Not Not in the wrong direction. But but what do you have to say about what I just said about? It's just white people hanging out with other white people. It's not like it's causing people hanging out with other white people so you're saying it's bringing people together food. They enjoy the food. Oh I like the food or I'd like to go there. Oh I heard it's really authentic there. Oh and then I go there and then I see all the people co mingling is the solutions so Kazakhastan Kazakstan wear. I don't know anything. I'm more Zena phobic about Kazakhstan. 'cause I don't even know what the fuck happens in Kazakhstan so if Mike Culture started getting interwoven with Kazakhstan I started having. Oh my God I love their fucking sausage and I love this and I love that now. I have an interesting Kazakhstan. I might want to visit Kazakhstan. I it's in my mind. They're starting to become de other and more. Oh like you know I agree all right. So urban legends. At that part was very interesting. I thought in this episode sure I like our urban legends. If you go Kapiti you can see a big old list. But what's your your favorite one. Is the coffin. One I mean. It's so preposterous. Yeah that's funny. The kidney wants the best thing has got to be the best a yeah. That's a really good one and one that everyone knows. I'm trying to think if there is any moment that I actually believed it did you. I'm sorry I did. I've had a few encounters that have had big impact one bloody mary. That's probably the I think the most famous one or car where you know you go into a dark room and staring into the mirror and say bloody Mary three times. She appears youth. There was another really popular on when I was in high school that it was that gang initiation okay so gang members who are being initiated into a gang. They drive on the road with their. Yes I know you. High Beam them to let them know that their lights are off. They turn around and murder until they get into the real. No that's because if someone's going to risk committing murder which everyone acknowledged it's a risk. They're going to kill an enemy. Not a random person makes no sense to you. Never know an initiation would be like go. Kill this guy who we hate. Okay also the the one about this one. I still believe it so when I go into movie theater I always check the see. Because there's one about I think still gang members or just people put in the C with AIDS or sure. Yes you have to check the seat before you say. I always check the seat before I sit. It's a habit at this point but I also still believe in at ten percent. You know the Cactus Swan or someone brings a cactus home to their house and they think they hear it making noises but they're like of hell keep listening to it and I must be imaginable and in the middle of the night breaks open and like a thousand. Scorpions.

Cinco de Maya Cinco de Mayo Kazakhstan Mexico Ukraine Saint Patrick Cinco Demayo Los Angeles murder Saint Saint Patrick Lucknow Guam Dax Barron Square Brown IRS Cactus Swan Paddy
"dan heath" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

15:55 min | 9 months ago

"dan heath" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Okay I want to ensnare you now with what we know about upstream thinking yes on a couple of different pet project thoughts of mine. Let the ensnaring begin. Let's do this. Yes so so obviously right now. Cova nineteen There's a lot to look at in terms of upstream here as you've seen this unfold because I have some provocative views as you've seen it. Unfold was your was your upstream alarm. Going off like mine was like wow. This is literally. This is where we're at. We don't even know how many people have it. 'cause we can't get these tests. It's such a glaring example of systemic issues right. It was just a complete failure of of management. And what's so depressing about this one to me? Is I think there are lot of truly unpredictable? Things that happened in the world the leaders have to deal with. I mean nine. Eleven is a classic example. Like it's hard to blame someone for not being ready for planes flying into skyscrapers. You know yes yeah. An asteroid hits Earth. Like we're GONNA give a lot of tolerance to our leaders for dealing with that but a pandemic and even corona virus pandemic something that people have been talking about for years and years and years. We knew exactly what needed to happen to be ready for this and yet the preparations were continually swept under the rug. Underfunded Public Health people who knew what the game plan was and did as much as they could to prepare. But -pecially de and underfunded. What are you GONNA do? I mean it's not on their shoulders and so I think it was. It was one of those situations where we we were able in fact did foresee a potentially huge problem. And we just didn't get our act together so my i let me let God do a disclaimer. You should social distance. You should wear a mask. You should wear gloves. You should do everything everyone's saying I am for all telling you. I am not a protester. With a rebel flag on my hammer with that said I was of the that many of us in California had already had it. That's certainly the verdicts out on that. But as Monica and I would argue about this and people would say well we would have seen a bunch of deaths like there would have been all these unaccounted for deaths throughout California and I and is a meeting where my brain goes. Do you think there's a czar somewhere overlooking all the deaths in California and communicating daily or weekly or monthly with the CDC that. There's some kind of coordination between states counties in the CDC. That's a pipedream that's not happening. I said you know. People are dying in nursing homes undoubtedly with symptoms. That look like pneumonia. That's the most common way in person would die so A. There's probably no reason even look into it to begin with and then the time that their samples were send out and they said they didn't have the flu. Okay well they're not going fund in launch an investigation and now this just came out so they've concluded that the woman in California that died on February six died of corona virus. We're just lucky that her tissues still exist in the morgue that they could discover that but that woman asks for tests from the CDC. And they're like I get real. Someone just died of some respiratory. You know what I'm saying. No conspiracy theory just an over generous view of that. There's someone watching over all this stuff. Is I mean you know? I think I think you're too cynical about. Oh okay good yeah please. I think that there are people who are paying attention to this and I think that there is. There is a a rhythm and pace at which people die that that is pretty well understood and win when deviation start to happen from that. I think public health people start getting curious. I mean this is one of the things that happens. Invisibly that that none of us are even aware of that. Actually helped this process from being even worse than it is public health people who built these amazing what they call surveillance systems around the world which is not like creepy orwell surveillance but just an awareness of you know kind of what ailments are popping up where and. I remember I talked to this woman named Julie Pavin who worked on infectious disease for the army and she told me this story that just kind of blew my mind and I don't. I don't remember the date of this but they had like six cases of the flu pop up in in one clinic and South Korea a few years ago. And somehow you know. This clinic was plugged into this international surveillance system and so somebody in the US paid attention to that was like. Hey this is weird. Is the women from zero to six in the same day. Could you fly some samples to to a lab in San Antonio? We WanNA check this out. See if it's all the same strain of flu and we want to see if this season's flu vaccine is good for this strain and and so it turned out that it was which was a great relief but even if it wasn't it still would have given them a lot of lead time maybe for the next season's flu vaccine as that new strain of flu spread around the world so there have been some incredible strides in figuring out. What's out there figuring out? What's going wrong tracking the incidents and getting early warning of these things before they happen. We have to bear in mind as a lot of aspects of this response. Seemed like a calamity could have been a lot worse in the absence of some of these systems that have been built over the years. I'm regularly blown away with how good a lot of the systems are. There's no question I guess my point it was more. You can't find something you don't know you're looking for if it's not what they're looking for. I don't know how they connect those dots and I think this this situation is unique in that it had the liability that it disproportionately killed old people and you ask questions when old people die. I think or there's less you know it's not like Oh a twenty four year old jogger. Who died in his kitchen is is at eighty two year old man who smoked for fifty five years case closed. I think if in February or fall or whenever if the California hospitals were running out of ventilators they would've been like wait. Something is happening here because we don't normally have this situation. I think a red flag would have been waived as like something is off is so many people are getting pneumonia. They wouldn't have known what to look for but they the signs would have appeared that like no. We don't have resources that's not normal. I totally agree with you in situations. Where the number so? You're looking at country to country now even state to state. The mortality rate is so drastically. Different wherever you're at wherever you get this disease right if you compare. New York's percentage of people who die of the known cases. It's just ten. It's ten fold. What Californians is so yes in in New York you would definitely notice it but there are areas that you might not notice it when we're seeing places like California. There's there's some some pockets where it's it's a really low number of fatalities versus cases in those situations. I think it would be easy to miss it. Yeah it's getting we're GONNA get into the weeds of our. We don't need to do. I have to say that California was in Los Angeles specifically in cal for new is one of the first states to really start implementing all these hard core changes so. I credit that for the difference in what we're seeing now with mortality rates than that may be that very well may be the case but if there were people with it in January. We now know that there was. We just weren't social this now not well and and this is a good example of one of the core ideas in the book which is just a different kind of layers of upstream. You know that that. What we're experiencing now social distancing and so forth is kind of the problem is already amongst us and how do we limit the damage? That's like a half step upstream and then a couple of steps before that is. How do we get early warning in this problem? So we can really prepare. I mean think about the the amazing fact that we had like six or eight weeks of early warning on this thing maybe more I mean. There's there's rumors now that they were discussing it last fall. I mean that's an incredible luxury to have even if it was wasted the mere fact that we could have done something is is phenomenal and then you can keep going upstream. We theoretically could have prevented this years in advance. You know there. I was reading I'm I'M GONNA forget the gentleman's name but a guy who is a a researcher of the origin of viruses and the transmission from animals to humans and many of these Flu Related Viruses. Come from bats you know and even bats in specific regions of China. You know what I mean. This is not a problem. That's too far to ever solve. It boils down to like. There's these caves of bats in China that we need to be monitoring on a regular basis but the issue. Is You know in in good times when nothing like this has happened and the guy who climbs around and bat caves in China like wants you to triple his budget your but we've got other things that are more urgent you know. We can't afford the really be investing in that right now and then five years later. The Corona virus hits. And you think we're crazy and that is where I'm incredibly sympathetic to the government and all these states which is next week it'll be a hurricane and then it'll be an earthquake and then we'll be some fires so yeah there's about nine trillion things. We should be working preventatively on and there's just limited resources time and all those things but you just kind of touched on the very last thing. I didn't really win any Supporters in that argument conceding. Defeat for now. But I'm going to now pivot the other issue is yes upstream as you start. Moving further and further back in time on how these problems are created. The logical conclusion has to be childhood. Talk about where to invest money right. It's so big but if you really are committed upstream thinking I feel like all roads just have to lead back to an investment in childhood will. This is one where I where I definitely agree with you. And in fact there's there's a ton of research that's come out in just the past few years to back that up didn't you have What's the name of the Surgeon General California's off Dean Burk? Paris aces to so good. Yeah so the the work on Ace's adverse childhood experiences shows that there's this lifelong impact from trauma happening in childhood trauma ranging from physical and sexual abuse to the parents getting a divorce. It's a spectrum of things and they're finding lifelong health consequences. I mean physical health as well as mental health again and again. We're finding that it's those first two or three years of life that are just absolutely foundational. And it's not like this is a problem that you couldn't ever solve. It is solvable. I mean it's GonNa take a lot of people in a lot of resources but We know the collaborators will be. It's it's the families first and foremost it's the schools. It's the politicians it's the social service agencies and and just as one example of a way we handle this in the US. There's a program called the nurse. Family partnership that is is very well known very research based where young women who are having their first kid. Often teenagers having babies out of wedlock often low income. A whole host of problems you know depression. And maybe they smoke and.

California flu CDC US pneumonia flu vaccine Cova China New York South Korea Dean Burk Surgeon General California Ace Julie Pavin Monica Paris San Antonio Los Angeles
"dan heath" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

15:55 min | 9 months ago

"dan heath" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Okay I want to ensnare you now with what we know about upstream thinking yes on a couple of different pet project thoughts of mine. Let the ensnaring begin. Let's do this. Yes so so obviously right now. Cova nineteen There's a lot to look at in terms of upstream here as you've seen this unfold because I have some provocative views as you've seen it. Unfold was your was your upstream alarm. Going off like mine was like wow. This is literally. This is where we're at. We don't even know how many people have it. 'cause we can't get these tests. It's such a glaring example of systemic issues right. It was just a complete failure of of management. And what's so depressing about this one to me? Is I think there are lot of truly unpredictable? Things that happened in the world the leaders have to deal with. I mean nine. Eleven is a classic example. Like it's hard to blame someone for not being ready for planes flying into skyscrapers. You know yes yeah. An asteroid hits Earth. Like we're GONNA give a lot of tolerance to our leaders for dealing with that but a pandemic and even corona virus pandemic is something that people have been talking about for years and years and years. We knew exactly what needed to happen to be ready for this and yet the preparations were continually swept under the rug. Underfunded credit the public health people who knew what the game plan was and did as much as they could to prepare. But -pecially de and underfunded. What are you GONNA do? I mean it's not on their shoulders and so I think it was. It was one of those situations where we we were able in fact did foresee a potentially huge problem. And we just didn't get our act together so my i let me let God do a disclaimer. You should social distance. You should wear a mask. You should wear gloves. You should do everything everyone's saying I am for all telling you. I am not a protester. With a rebel flag on my Hummer With that said I was of the that many of us in California had already had it. That's certainly the verdicts out on that. But as Monica and I would argue about this and people would say well we would have seen a bunch of deaths like there would have been all these unaccounted for deaths throughout California and I and is a meeting where my brain goes. Do you think there's a czar somewhere overlooking all the deaths in California and communicating daily or weekly or monthly with the CDC that. There's some kind of coordination between states counties in the CDC. That's a pipedream that's not happening. I said you know. People are dying in nursing homes undoubtedly with symptoms. That look like pneumonia. That's the most common way in person would die so A. There's probably no reason even look into it to begin with and then the time that their samples were send out and they said they didn't have the flu. Okay well they're not going fund in launch an investigation and now this just came out so they've concluded that the woman in California that died on February six died of corona virus. We're just lucky that her tissues still exist in the morgue that they could discover that but that woman asked for tests from the CDC. And they're like I get real. Someone just died of some respiratory. You know what I'm saying. No conspiracy theory just an over generous view of that. There's someone watching over all this stuff you know. I think I think you're too cynical about. Oh okay good yeah please. I think that there are people who are paying attention to this and I think that there is. There is a a rhythm and pace at which people die that that is pretty well understood and win when deviation start to happen from that. I think public health people start getting curious. I mean this is one of the things that happens. Invisibly that that none of us are even aware of that. Actually helped this process from being even worse than it. Is it public health. People who built these amazing what they call surveillance systems around the world which is not like creepy orwell surveillance but just an awareness of you know kind of what ailments are popping up where and. I remember I talked to this woman named Julie Pavin who worked on infectious disease for the army and she told me this story that just kind of blew my mind and I don't. I don't remember the date of this but they had like six cases of the flu pop up in in one clinic and South Korea of years ago. And somehow you know. This clinic was plugged into this international surveillance system and so somebody in the US paid attention to that was like. Hey this is weird. Is the women from zero to six in the same day. Could you fly some samples to to a lab in San Antonio? We WanNA check this out. See if it's all the same strain of flu and we want to see if this season's flu vaccine is good for this strain and and so it turned out that it was which was a great relief but even if it wasn't it still would have given them a lot of lead time maybe for the next season's flu vaccine as that new strain of flu spread around the world so there have been some incredible strides in figuring out. What's out there figuring out? What's going wrong tracking the incidents and getting early warning of these things before they happen. We have to bear in mind. Even as a lot of aspects of this response seemed like a a calamity could have been a lot worse in the absence of some of these systems that have been built over the years. I'm regularly blown away with how good a lot of the systems are. There's no question I guess my point it was more. You can't find something you don't know you're looking for if it's not what they're looking for. I don't know how they connect those dots and I think this this situation is unique in that it had the liability that it disproportionately killed old people and you ask questions when old people die. I think or there's less you know it's not like always a twenty four year old jogger. Who died in his kitchen is is at eighty two year old man who smoked for fifty five years case closed. I think if in February or fall or whenever if the California hospitals were running out of ventilators they would've been like wait. Something is happening here because we don't normally have this situation. I think a red flag would have been waived as like something is off is so many people are getting pneumonia. They wouldn't have known what to look for. The signs would have appeared that like no. We don't have resources that's not normal. I totally agree with you in situations. Where the number so? You're looking at country to country now even state to state. The mortality rate is so drastically. Different wherever you're at wherever you get this disease right if you compare. New York's percentage of people who die of the known cases. It's just ten. It's ten fold. What Californians is so yes in in New York you would definitely notice it but there are areas that you might not notice it when we're seeing places like California. There's there's some some pockets where it's it's a really low number of fatalities versus cases in those situations. I think it would be easy to miss it. Yeah it's me we're GONNA get into the weeds of our don't need to do. I have to say that California was in Los Angeles specifically in cal for new is one of the first states to really start implementing all these hard core changes so. I credit that for the difference in what we're seeing now with mortality rates than that may be that very well may be the case but if there were people with it in January. We now know that there was. We just weren't social this now. Lavar not well and and this is a good example of one of the core ideas in the book which is just a different kind of layers of upstream. You know that that. What we're experiencing now social distancing and so forth is kind of the problem is already amongst us and how do we limit the damage? That's like a half step upstream and then a couple of steps before that is. How do we get early warning in this problem? So we can really prepare. I mean think about the the amazing fact that we had like six or eight weeks of early warning on this thing maybe more I mean. There's there's rumors now that they were discussing it last fall. I mean that's an incredible luxury to have even if it was wasted the mere fact that we could have done something is is phenomenal. And then you can keep going upstream. I mean we theoretically could have prevented this years in advance. You know there. I was reading I'm I'M GONNA forget the gentleman's name but a guy who is a a researcher of the origin of viruses and the transmission from animals to humans and many of these Flu Related Viruses. Come from bats you know and even bats in specific regions of China. You know what I mean. This is not a problem. That's too far to ever solve. It boils down to like. There's these caves of bats in China that we need to be monitoring on a regular basis but the issue. Is You know in in good times when nothing like this has happened and the guy who climbs around and bat caves in China like wants you to triple his budget your but we've got other things that are more urgent you know. We can't afford the really be investing in that right now and then five years later. The Corona virus hits. And you think we're crazy and that is where I'm incredibly sympathetic to the government and all these states which is next week it'll be a hurricane and then it'll be an earthquake and then we'll be some fires so yeah there's about nine trillion things. We should be working preventatively on and there's just limited resources time and all those things but you just kind of touched on the very last thing. I didn't really win any Supporters in that argument conceding. Defeat for now. But I'm going to now pivot the other issue is yes upstream as you start. Moving further and further back in time on how these problems are created. The logical conclusion has to be childhood. WanNa talk about where to invest money? Right it's so big but if you really are committed upstream thinking I feel like all roads just have to lead back to an investment in childhood will. This is one where I where I definitely agree with you. And in fact there's there's a ton of research that's come out in just the past few years to back that up didn't you have What's the name of the Surgeon General California's off Dean Burk? Paris aces to so good. Yeah so the the work on ACE's Childhood experiences Shows that there's this lifelong impact from trauma happening in childhood trauma ranging from physical and sexual abuse to the parents getting a divorce. It's a spectrum of things and they're finding lifelong health consequences. I mean physical health as well as mental health again and again. We're finding that it's those first two or three years of life that are just absolutely foundational. And it's not like this is a problem that you couldn't ever solve. It is solvable. I mean it's GonNa take a lot of people in a lot of resources but We know the collaborators will be. It's it's the families first and foremost it's the schools. It's the politicians it's the social service agencies and and just as one example of a way we handle this in the US. There's a program called the nurse. Family partnership that is very well known very research based where young women who are having their first kid. Often teenagers having babies out of wedlock often low income. A whole host of problems. You know depression. And maybe they smoke and.

California flu CDC US pneumonia China flu vaccine Cova New York South Korea Julie Pavin Monica ACE Paris San Antonio Los Angeles Lavar Dean Burk
"dan heath" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

01:32 min | 9 months ago

"dan heath" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Yeast East infections. Uti's Itchy assholes skid marks and listen to this it's only seventy nine dollars you'd probably save that right off the bat if you're buying toilet paper on the black market so listen go to. Hello TUCCI DOT com slash armchair to get ten percents off your order. That's Hello T. U. S. H. Y. Dot Slash Armchair. We are supported by legalzoom. Health and safety is on the top of. Everyone's mind right now. No matter what happens you want to make sure your loved. Ones are protected. That's why legalzoom continues to provide a reliable way for everyone to set up the right estate plan without leaving your home. Now as I've told you Monica I actually made my estate plan on Legalzoom Abou- seven years ago and I was delighted with how darn easy was to new and it's bulletproof it's virtually Massey pre nup. Now it starts with finding the answers to your questions. Do you need a last will and testament or living trusts? What about an advance health directive? And what's a power of attorney you don't figure it all out on your own legalzoom's online resources make it easy to get started. And if you need to speak to an attorney. They're independent attorney network. Is there to guide and advise you? Legalzoom is off firm. So you won't have to worry about expensive billable hours adding up. Take an important step for your family. Today go to legalzoom dot com to get started on a last will living trust in more or find out how you can speak to an attorney for advice on the right of state plant legalzoom or a life meets legal..

"dan heath" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

14:49 min | 9 months ago

"dan heath" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Lack of ownership lack of ownership is is something curious about about upstream versus downstream works with downstream work. Usually it's pretty clear. Who's on the hook for something if your house is on? Fire the fire department's job to come and put out the fire. Right it's It's very easy but when you start thinking about upstream issues. It gets more complicated like if you were to ask. Whose job is it to keep your house from catching on fire. There's probably at least a half dozen different parties you could point to ranging from the homeowner themselves the course to the fire department to the people who write the building codes to the people who built your home and the materials they used and on and on and and when authority is kind of diffuse in that way a lot of times what happens is nobody takes it. Because it's nobody's job. Nothing gets done on the problem and so a lot of times. You know these. These problems emerge from the gaps between silos in authority. One of my favorite examples of this is related to the the website expedia so this is the travel site. You know where you can book. Flights and hotels and whatnot are back in two thousand twelve. This got him Ryan O'Neal. He started doing some research on their call center so they have a one eight hundred number where you can call. If there's a problem. He finds out that for every hundred people who booker reservation on expedia fifty eight of them in the calling the call center and it just blows his mind. This is an online travel site. This is supposed to be all about self service. What's going on here? And so he digs into. This turns out that the number one reason people are calling is to get a copy of their itinerary. That's it oh of their tenure. Twenty million calls were placed on two thousand twelve upper a copy of the itinerary and so they all just kind of collectively slap their foreheads at once and and when their attention is pointed at it becomes a very easy. Fix The issue was lot of these. Things were getting caught in spam. So you can change the way you send emails or people thought it was a solicitation and deleted it and you can add self service tools. So people can go back online and get their own itinerary. As as a technical problem. This was not a big deal sharp. But what's interesting about it to me is. I mean. This is a hundred million dollar problem. Like twenty million calls times five bucks a piece and nobody was aware of it. Basically Until Ryan. O'neal does this work is he as CEO or just snow. He was in the customer experience group. He was just you know a guy a couple levels below the CEO. And he's just doing this research and and it turns out that expedia like virtually every other company is divided into these silos. You've got marketing team. Whose job it is to to get customers to the site. And so they're measured on people. Can they attract? And then you've got a product team whose job it is to make a a great website that kind of funnels people toward a transaction and so one of the things they might be measured on his. What percentage of people who visit end up doing a transaction? Then you've got the tech team and they're measured on things like up time for the server and then you've got the call center and they're measured on. How quickly can I get somebody off the phone? And how happy are they when they hang up? And all that kind of makes sense on a micro level but then when you ask a simple question like whose job is it to keep customers from needing to call for help. The answer is nobody right right. Nobody in that whole system and in fact it's even worse than that because none of them even stood to gain if that happened like nobody would get a bonus no one get praised and this is what happens so often in organizations is is. We get so hung up on specializing in on efficiency. That we miss bigger problems. Like we're so focused on. How can we reduce the amount of time it takes to deal with an itinerary? Call the case. Can we get it for three minutes to two minutes and forty five seconds and you forget. There's a bigger issue here was. Why does anybody need to call for an idea? How do we stop calls right? In general right corporations. Don't have someone in charge of synthesis right like looking at all the different components of the system and then and then figuring out how they're interacting asking those big questions. That's not really a position that exists right and you can't really major in that Kenu. Well I mean sadly it does exist. But it's it's one person that's the CEO. This egos in really the only person who lives above the functions and silos. But it's just it's such a buzzkill that these things would have to escalate to that level to be dealt with and in fact that's what happened. Inexpedient it did have to escalate to the CEO the CEO took it on and said this is madness. We need to do something about this. And then the leaders of the of the silos came together to work on collaboratively. But you're right. You wish that there was some more organic solution to this. Where where people were more naturally crossing silos without having to come from on high. There's no pre-set space for workers to step out of their job. You read it like an essential that they talk about Bill Gates you know. He had a baked into his schedule. It was every couple of months and he took a week and he just he just thought he just thought about a bigger global issues at Microsoft and he left the trees to look at the foreperson it for him so crucial for all these other great. Ceo's and stuff. It's so important to leave your narrow point of view to try to gain some perspective and to start doing some of that synthesizing. Exactly what you're what you're focusing on here is something that call in the book tunneling which is a a term. I stole from another book. I'll scarcity a psychology book that's great here's the essence of tunneling. A woman needed Tucker For Her dissertation at Harvard followed around a bunch of nurses for hundreds of hours just shadow them to see what their days were like and she pretty quickly discovered. They're always solving these weird problems. Pop Up you know. Sometimes they're simple like their department runs out of towels and so they have to run down the hall and steal some towels for another group or you know. Sometimes it's medication. That's not available when they need it. Sometimes it's really weird things like Anita Tucker writes about this one day that the nurse was trying to check out a woman who just had a baby and part of the checkout processes to recover that security. Anklet they put around. You know The wrong baby home and in this case it was missing which is a big deal. Because now you've got to security threat. But they found the anklet in the baby's bassinet. So problem solved and then weirdly. The exact same thing happened a few hours later. A DIFFERENT MOTHER. Different baby missing anklet. This time they couldn't find it and so they have to go through another protocol to make sure the MOMS taking the right baby home and so Anita Tucker writes that these nurses they were resourceful and solving problems. They were spontaneous improvisational. They didn't need to run to the boss every time. Something bad happen and so it's like this this really inspiring portrait of nurses but if you flip it around and look at this different perspective you realize what I'm describing here is a system that never learns never improves because these nurses had gotten good at working around problems in fact what what surprised? Anita Tucker so much was. She didn't find a single instance of where nurses were doing. Root caused level analysis like. Hey why were these anklets? Do to make sure this problem doesn't happen next week and to be clear like this is not to poke it nurses or throw stones at them. Well especially now time the environment I mean. Let's wait till we're all healthy and then we'll start through then we'll throw stones versus so I mean. I think all of our sympathies are with the nurses right that that. What could they have done about this like? They've got twelve patients. Who Need Them Right now? I mean can they just pause everything to do like a formal root cause analysis and try to get the manufacturer on the phone? And I mean it's absurd. Yeah but when you think about it if we can't figure out a way around that trap it just dooms them to continuing to solve or work around the same problems every week every month forevermore and so back to your point about Bill Gates and others like we need a way to allow employees to step off of that hamster wheel and engage in systems analysis. To be clear. This is not like some some genius idea. I just thought up. People are actively working on this like in health systems. They have what they call a safety huddle in the morning where they'll get together a bunch of doctors nurses and they'll say okay looking back on yesterday. Were there any near misses where something went wrong? in what were the circumstances and today do we have any complicated patients that we need to talk through to make sure we have all of our ducks in a row so that would be the ideal forum for this nurse to said we had this weird thing happened yesterday where two babies both had their security anklets ball off like. We need to look into that so I think it doesn't take much. We don't have to revolutionize the way people work but we do need to build in these little escape valves where they can kinda step out as you suggest about of the trees for second to see the first and then and then get right back in and it feels like it has to be a cultural thing. Were businesses recognized. There's going to be two dead days a month or whatever it is and that's a cost of doing business and ultimately it's going to save a Lotta money but it I guess it takes courage right because a lot of these things are hard to measure their long term goals. They don't bear immediate fruit. So so it takes some willingness to spend the time in capital to see in the long term. How it works. Is that one of the big hurdles. I mean it. It's always hard in the moment because I mean even even as a Dad. This happens all the time. Where like you constantly in these situations like getting a kid's shoes on or you know getting them out the door. Whatever you face this fork in the road where you could do something the right way and it would take like ten x what it would take to just do it the quick way you know and so you always do it the quick way because it's faster but then you do it the the quick way a thousand times in a row and you would have been better at just you know deviating and fixing the problem once and for all one time for the sake of of not getting back in the river again and again and again. Yeah the ounce prevention I was just thinking scale in these circle I had a big issue with a big company earlier. This year was a catastrophe to say the least and it was exactly this. It was a breakdown of that companies. So huge the scale is so large that like you know. I couldn't talk to the same person more than once. Nothing was getting communicated but I can also recognize from their standpoint. Like how could they possibly fix it? They probably think Oh. This is just too big. This is impossible to do but let me just piggyback on that because I thought the same thing when you're talking about the Chicago School district although you get the economy of scale with great numbers do you also transversely get it. Just gets almost impossible to manage. There must be exponential issues as things grow now. Yeah I think it cuts both ways you know back to that quote about every system is perfectly designed to get. The results gets like if if you're getting good results than the inertia favor you know. The system is kind of baked properly. But but if you're not it can be a tall order and you know Chicago public schools. It took them a good fifteen years to turn it around. I mean this was. This was not a quick win situation and it took some fundamental ways of redesigning the way they serve students they had to make a mindset shift where before teachers think about their role as. It's my job to teach a good lesson. It's my job to test. Students have learned the things that I've shared but if they fail that's ultimately the kid's fault. That's that's a problem on their shoulders and and in the new model what they realized is. It's not just a kiss our problem and now if a kid fails it's a joint problem of the teacher and the student that part of their role is to support the student and they started doing this really innovative work. This is based partly on the work of a woman named Elaine Allen's worth and academic who studied the situation and found something fascinating that you could predict in the ninth grade who is.

CEO Anita Tucker Ryan O'Neal expedia Bill Gates fire department solicitation Chicago School district Chicago Microsoft booker Kenu Harvard Elaine Allen
"dan heath" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

14:48 min | 9 months ago

"dan heath" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Lack of ownership lack of ownership is is something curious about about upstream versus downstream works with downstream work. Usually it's pretty clear. Who's on the hook for something if your house is on? Fire the fire department's job to come put out the fire right it's it's very easy but when you start thinking about upstream issues it gets more complicated like if you were to ask. Whose job is it to keep your house from catching on fire. There's probably at least a half dozen different parties you could point to ranging from the homeowner themselves the course to the fire department to the people who write the building codes to the people who built your home and the materials they used and on and on and and when authority is kind of diffuse in that way a lot of times what happens is nobody takes it. Because it's nobody's job. Nothing gets done on the problem and so a lot of times. You know these. These problems emerge from the gaps between silos in authority. One of my favorite examples of this is related to the the website expedia so this is the travel site. You know where you can book. Flights and hotels and whatnot are back in two thousand twelve. This got him Ryan O'Neal. He started doing some research on their call centers so they have a one eight hundred number where you can call. If there's a problem. He finds out that for every hundred people who booker reservation on expedia fifty eight of them in the calling the call center and it just blows his mind. This is an online travel site. This is supposed to be all about self service. What's going on here? And so he digs into this turns out that the number one reason people are calling is to get a copy of their temporary. That's it out of their ten. Twenty million calls were placed on two thousand twelve upper a copy of the itinerary and so they all just kind of collectively slap their foreheads at once and and when their attention is pointed at it becomes a very easy. Fix The issue was lot of these. Things were getting caught in spam. So you can change the way you send emails or people thought it was a solicitation and deleted it and you can add self service tools. So people can go back online and get their own itinerary. You know as as a technical problem. This was not a big deal sharp. But what's interesting about it to me is. I mean. This is a hundred million dollar problem. Like twenty million calls times five bucks a piece and nobody was aware of it. Basically Until Ryan. O'neal does this work is he as CEO or just snow. He was in the customer experience group. He was just you know a guy a couple levels below the CEO. And he's just doing this research and and it turns out that that expedia like virtually every other company is divided into these silos. You've got marketing team whose job it is to to get customers to the site. And so they're measured on people. Can they attract? And then you've got a product team whose job it is to make a a great website that kind of funnels people toward a transaction and so one of the things they might be measured on his. What percentage of people who visit end up doing a transaction? Then you've got the tech team and they're measured on things like up time for the server and then you've got the call center and they're measured on. How quickly can I get somebody off the phone? And how happy are they when they hang up? And all that kind of makes sense on a micro level but then when you ask a simple question like whose job is it to keep customers from needing to call for help. The answer is nobody right right. Nobody in that whole system and in fact it's even worse than that because none of them even stood to gain if that happened like nobody would get a bonus. No one will get praised and this is what happens so often in organizations is is. We get so hung up on specializing in on efficiency. That we miss bigger problems. Like we're so focused on. How can we reduce the amount of time it takes to deal with an itinerary call? Which was the case. Can we get it for three minutes to two minutes and forty five seconds and you forget. There's a bigger issue here was. Why does anybody need to call for an idea? How do we stop calls right? In general right corporations. Don't have someone in charge of synthesis right like looking at all the different components of the system and then and then figuring out how they're interacting asking those big questions. That's not really a position that exists right and you can't really major in that Kenya. Well I mean sadly it does exist. But it's it's one person that's the CEO. This egos in really the only person who lives above the functions and silos. But it's just it's such a buzzkill that these things would have to escalate to that level to be dealt with and in fact that's what happened. Inexpedient it did have to escalate to the CEO the CEO took it on and said this is madness. We need to do something about this. And then the leaders of the of the silos came together to work on collaboratively. But you're right. You wish that there was some more organic solution to this. Where where people were more naturally crossing silos without having to come from on high. There's no pre-set space for workers to step out of their job. You read it like an essential that they talk about Bill Gates you know. He had a baked into his schedule. It was every couple of months and he took a week and he just he just thought he just thought about a bigger global issues at Microsoft and he left the trees to look at the foreperson it for him so crucial for all these other great. Ceo's and stuff. It's so important to leave your narrow point of view to try to gain some perspective and to start doing some of that synthesizing exactly right and what you're what you're focusing on. Here is something that call in the book tunneling which is a a term. I stole from another book. I'll scarcity a psychology book that's great here's the essence of tunneling. A woman needed Tucker For Her dissertation at Harvard followed around a bunch of nurses for hundreds of hours just shadow them to see what their days were like and she pretty quickly discovered. They're always solving these weird problems. Pop Up you know. Sometimes they're simple their department runs out of towels and so they have to run down the hall and steal some towels for another group or sometimes it's medication that's not available when they need it sometimes. It's really weird. Things like Anita Tucker writes about this one day that the nurse was trying to check out a woman who just had a baby and part of the checkout processes to recover that security. Anklet they put around. You know The wrong baby home and in this case it was missing which is a big deal. Because now you've got a security threat. But they found the anklet in the baby's bassinet. So problem solved and then weirdly. The exact same thing happened a few hours later. Different mother different baby missing anklet. This time they couldn't find it and so they have to go through another protocol to make sure the MOMS taking the right baby home and so Anita Tucker writes that these nurses they were resourceful and solving problems. They were spontaneous improvisational. They didn't need to run to the boss every time. Something bad happen and so it's like this this really inspiring portrait of nurses but if you flip it around and look at this different perspective you realize what I'm describing here is a system that never learns never improves because these nurses had gotten good at working around problems in fact what what surprised? Anita Tucker so much was. She didn't find a single instance of where nurses were doing. Root caused level analysis like. Hey why were these anklets falling off? What can we do to make sure this problem doesn't happen next week and to be clear like this is not to poke it. Nurses or throw stones at them. Well especially now time the environment I mean. Let's wait till we're all healthy and then we'll start through then we'll throw stones versus so I mean I think all of our sympathies are with the nurses right that that what could they have done about this like. They've got twelve patients. Who Need Them? Right now. I mean can they just pause everything to do like a formal root cause analysis and try to get the manufacturer on the phone? And I mean it's absurd. Yeah but when you think about it if we can't figure out a way around that trap it just dooms them to continuing to solve or work around the same problems every week every month forevermore and so back to your point about Bill Gates and others. It's like we need a way to allow employees to step off of that hamster wheel and engage in systems analysis. To be clear. This is not like some some genius idea. I just thought up. People are actively working on this like in health systems. They have what they call a safety huddle in the morning where they'll get together a bunch of doctors and nurses and they'll say okay looking back on yesterday. Were there any near misses where something almost went wrong In what were the circumstances and today do we have any complicated patients that we need to talk through to make sure we have all of our ducks in a row so that would be the ideal forum for this nurse to said we had this weird thing happened yesterday where two babies both had their security anklets ball off like. We need to look into that so I think it doesn't take much. We don't have to revolutionize the way people work but we do need to build in these little escape valves where they can kinda step out as you suggest about of the trees for second to see the first and then and then get right back in and it feels like it has to be a cultural thing. Were businesses recognized. There's going to be two dead days a month or whatever it is and that's a cost of doing business and ultimately it's going to save a Lotta money but I guess it takes courage right because a lot of these things are hard to measure their long term goals. They don't bear immediate fruit. So so it takes some willingness to spend the time in capital to see in the long term. How it works. Is that one of the big hurdles. I mean it. It's always hard in the moment because I mean even even as a Dad. This happens all the time. Where like you constantly in these situations like getting a kid's shoes on or you know getting them out the door. Whatever you face this fork in the road where you could do something the right way and it would take like ten x what it would take to just do it the quick way you know and so you always do it the quick way because it's faster but then you do it the the quick way a thousand times in a row and you would have been better at just you know deviating and fixing the problem once and for all one time for the sake of of not getting back in the river again and again and again. Yeah the ounce prevention I was just thinking scale in these circle I had a big issue with a big company earlier. This year was a catastrophe to say the least and it was exactly this. It was a breakdown of like that companies so huge the scale is so large that like you know. I couldn't talk to the same person. More than once nothing was getting communicated but I can also recognize from their standpoint. Like how could they possibly fix it? They probably think Oh. This is just too big. This is impossible to do but let me just piggyback on that because I thought the same thing when you're talking about the Chicago School district although you get the economy of scale with great numbers do you also transversely get it. Just gets almost impossible to manage. There must be exponential issues as things grow now. Yeah I think it cuts both ways you know back to that quote about every system is perfectly designed to get. The results gets like if if you're getting good results than the inertia favor you know. The system is kind of baked properly. But but if you're not it can be a tall order and you know Chicago public schools. It took them a good fifteen years to turn it around. I mean this was. This was not a quick win situation and it took some fundamental ways of redesigning the way they serve students one of the biggest ships they had to make a mindset shift where before teachers think about their role as. It's my job to teach a good lesson. It's my job to test. Students have learned the things that I've shared but if they fail that's ultimately the kid's fault. That's that's a problem on their shoulders and model. What they realized is. It's not just a kiss our problem and now if a kid fails it's a joint problem of the teacher and the student that part of their role is to support the student and they started doing this really innovative work..

CEO Anita Tucker Ryan O'Neal expedia Bill Gates fire department Kenya Chicago solicitation Chicago School district Microsoft booker Harvard
"dan heath" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

10:45 min | 9 months ago

"dan heath" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"You give a great example of problem blindness as it pertains to Homelessness and specifically looked at Homelessness on Illinois. What was the city Brock for? So now you say that you know. One of the problems with homelessness is that people generally have a very strong opinion about it. This could not be more appropriate for Los Angeles. You know the whole west coast is in crisis but Everyone has a strong opinion about it yet. No one has been homeless right so I don't have a huge opinion about Olympic diving. Because I know what the fuck goes into Olympics. I wouldn't presume to have a strong opinion about the diving. But I'll tell you got a lot of strong opinions about homelessness and then also you point out one's really even talked to a homeless person. Which weirdly enough just before covert. I told Monica. I'm going to interview ten homeless folks defined out. What is the experience wire you there? Do you WANNA leave. What do you think things were doing? What do you think of you know? And it just occurred to me. I don't think I've heard a homeless person interviewed. Sincerely you know a real interview not clip on the news. Too great idea. It's a little shelved at the moment but yeah walk us through what happened there. Rockford guy named Larry Morrissey was mayor. He was in his third term. He said when he had started he developed this. Ten Year Plan for ending homelessness in Rockford and in year nine at best. He said they just kind of treaded water in probably lost a little bit of ground and so of his colleagues comes to him in year. Nine with this idea to participate in this program called built for zero which was a brand new model of working on homelessness and he was pretty cynical about it. I mean the guy's been trying for nine years gotten nowhere like what's going to change. But he reluctantly agrees to be part of this and then ten months later. Rockford becomes the first city in the US to end the problem of veteran and chronic homelessness. Just a massive achievement. So the obvious question is what the hell happened. In those ten months and in several things the first of which was homelessness. A lot of complicated social issues has so many constituents if you think about all the people who have some part of the puzzle AP- homelessness well. It's it's the health system. It's homeless shelters. It's the VA social agencies. It's the police on and on and on but they all have their little piece that they administer but they they rarely are all collaborating together so they all were brought together into this kind of Task Force to work on homelessness and then the second thing was and this is what Larry Morrissey told me was critical as they had actually brought together those people in the past periodically but usually they would just talk about the issue of homelessness. They kind of pontificate about what should be done. And Larry Morrissey said a lot of times it would just devolve into Bitch Sessions Shar. And and what changed was they started taking a a real time census of the homeless population in Rockford. Meaning that at any given moment. They knew exactly how many people were on the street. What their names were case? Histories were. It's all in a Google Doc. I looked over their shoulders when I visited there. And that changed everything because now when they brought people together they could go name by name on this list and it wasn't about homeless policy anymore it was about. Hey who's seen Larry last week? Well right you know. He's still got his tenth under the bridge. And you know he's been coming into the shelter for lunch pretty regularly and then you know the social services people can say well we actually just had a housing unit open up. We're ready to to ask Larry to take it. Who's in the best position to do the outreach and it becomes this very tangible project you know with a human face in a way that defies a lot of work on on complicated issues like this and so person by person name by name. They just start winning. They start getting people off the streets and into their own housing and that's the strategy that has been rolled out nationally by this this group. I'm talking about built for zero. The kind of retrain cities how to think differently about homelessness. We interviewed them mayor. Garcetti and he had brought up the amount it would cost to supplement rent to prevent a vision versus the amount that you then spend to deal with anyone living on the street through medical costs and police and you know all the number of of expenses. That come that are unavoidable. It's pennies on the dollar exactly right. Isn't that always the biggest hurdle publicly? It's very hard to get people in this country to accept that there are cheaper ways to deal with problems but that they're gonNA have to violate maybe one of their simple concepts about liberty equality or one of these tenants right but so often. I try to say like even if you're a fiscal conservative. Forget about the social responsibility to help. Forget that's not even my argument. Argument is let's work backwards. You going to turn people away at Hospitals. Is that something you think we're going to do in the US and everyone agree now? We're never GONNA turn people away at hospitals right so we start with that fact and then you go okay. We'll who someone is. GonNa pay for all the people that don't get turned away and you recognize that's US right. That's the taxpayer. Yes okay recognize that okay. So you'RE GONNA pay for it whether you want to or not so is it cheaper. Is it a better use of money to prevent it? You know what? What is the total cost in? It just seems like a very hard thing to get Americans to buy into because it maybe they feel like they're violating the principle that there shouldn't be handouts and it's like okay. Well that's that's a fine position to have. I wouldn't argue whether you think there should be handouts or not but we all agree we're going to have to pay for the hospital admissions then. Let's just try to reduce that right completely agree and and I've talked to some of the leaders of this homelessness movement and they acknowledged your point. That part of their game plan is to do what they call housing. First which in the old model homeless people would have to kind of earn their way into housing. So they would they? Would I try to get him in substance abuse treatment and then they would try to give them some kind of job skills and then as the seventh hurdle they could finally get into housing once they had proven themselves worthy the new model called housing? I basically says homeless. People are first and foremost people without houses. That is the presenting. Problem is they are a person without a house. Why are we delaying the obvious? They don't have a house. Let's get them in a house you know and then we we can work on the other problems subsequent to that and and I think that makes a ton of sense from a public health perspective from just a moral perspective but but I think a lot of people here that and they're like well wait a second. You're just going to give free rent to this homeless person. That's on the street. And meanwhile there's people struggling to pay the bills and I mean there's there's some tension there in legitimately a lot of people are going. Why would I have to work? And no one says the word and then why would you take some of my money from the work? I'm doing and give it to someone who doesn't want to work. So that's a fine opinion to have but you're GONNA pay for it or you're going to say we're the country that turns people away at the hospital. Exactly right. Yeah I mean one way or the other. This is our problem as a community to deal with. And this is an area where I think the finances and the humanity are both aligned. Where there's pretty good evidence that if you just get people into housing you start saving money downstream on emergency room visits and and all the outreach that has to happen across agencies and and so you get are y but you also get you know the the humane benefit of helping someone without a house. Get a house to your point. You're so right. The group of people we were exploring was called the kidney less people. We wouldn't go like well. How do you make your kidneys bad in the forest? I change your beverage intake habits exam. We're GONNA make you prove that you won't destroy another kidney and it's like okay. Well we should probably do that but that's probably not step one it it. It's funny how blind we can be about these things where we're willing to pay a hundred x downstream rather than just take a few steps upstream and probably the best example of that is healthcare. You know we spent three point five trillion dollars a year in this country on healthcare and virtually every nickel of it is spent after. The problem has happened. You know. It's it's a fee for service system you know it's triggered by somebody shows up with an ailment and we try to undo whatever's wrong with you. You're so right. I mean the the expense of yearly physical versus dealing with somebody that's got full blown heart disease. There's no comparison in those numbers. None at all. And if I talked to this Guy Patrick Conway who used to work as the senior administrator Medicare Medicaid and he said. It's kind of outrageous that that we think nothing of paying forty thousand dollars a year for insulin. But we won't pay a thousand dollars for a program to keep people from getting diabetes young wise and pound foolish one less thing the homeless thing. I happen to be shooting something. We had hired police to shut down a road. Where in between shots and board. I start talking to the guy about if asked him if he's in a motorcycling and shit and then it came on to the topic of homelessness. So I said you know your point of view. What's the experience and he said? Well you know. Here's one of the crazier things we deal with is that people are living on the side of the highway. One Oh one in the five very dangerous scenario right. The police could remove someone from that that dangerous of a situation. The laws are such here in in Los Angeles that they have to victim right so they have to serve them in a fiction notice and then you have some period of time after being served that you convey kate right so I I wanna say he said it was seventy two hours so their job. Think about what a fucking insane proposition. Their job is driving around the highway going and getting an addiction. Notice then. Serving it to somebody then tracking. Where was this person? Oh they were. Mile Marker Thirty two point two so I can go in three days now and remove them from this very dangerous living situation. It's like I hadn't even heard that I hadn't heard that either I mean that's a great example of a system that is just baked wrong. You know and it's like we're we're spending all this energy. Just TREADING WATER. So the the homeless person moves what one mile marker down and the whole process starts again and meanwhile we could have found some more for them to live. Yes yes I yeah I. I can't imagine how a police officer doesn't just throw their hands in the air. Serve this guy and then serve on four days later for being a mile down the road right.

Larry Morrissey US Rockford Los Angeles Olympics Google Illinois Monica VA Garcetti Guy Patrick Conway officer kate senior administrator Medicare
"dan heath" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

02:02 min | 9 months ago

"dan heath" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Me on these is committed to the cause by keeping you in a constant stream of uninterrupted dream. Inducing unday comfort. How do you reach this uninterrupted state of Comfort? You ask with a membership from me unease and man. It is handy. Imagine this every month. The softest COSIES UNDIES magically appear at your door plus comes with a site wide savings early access and free shipping manny's has a great offer for Arm Cherries for any first time. Purchasers you get fifteen percent off and free shipping you gotta give this super softness try especially because they have one hundred percents satisfaction guaranteed to get your fifteen percent off your first order free shipping and one hundred percent satisfaction guarantee. Go TO ME UNDIES. Dot Com slash. Dax that's me UNDIES DOT com slash. Dax we are supported by legacy box now money. It is mother's Day be Mothers Day. Mothers Happy Mother's Day and I can't think of a better present to get mom than to digitize all of the Family Memories. Legacybox is a super symbol. Mail service to have all your home movies and pitchers digitally preserved on a thumb drive. Dvd or the clout. I did this and I got all these really cute pictures of my brother. I wasn't the key one but my brother was very cute. And then I digitized them and then I can just email them to the family members in. It's so sweet. Feels like he did a lot of work. But you didn't do any that's one of the great things about legacy boxes is very very easy all you do. Is You take all your old stuff right. You got your photographs your VHS tape you ship it to them they digitize it by hand and then you can get a copy on a thumb drive a DVD or the cloud ready to share and enjoy for a limited time and legacy box is running a fifty percent off mother's Day special or your legacy box today to take advantage of this incredible offer. This is one of the best discounts they've ever offered. Legacy box is perfect for you. Or someone you love go to legacybox dot com slash DAX in save fifty percent while supplies last..

"dan heath" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

15:53 min | 9 months ago

"dan heath" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"World of AIDS. You Know I. I have heard other versions of that one but years is way better. I love the miniature coughing in the box. That's amazing a woodworker. Or He's a miniature doll house woodworker. So there's like Dallas furniture being made for this. I feel like the through line between all of these. I was going to bring up the one that everyone thinks someone from their high school hog sucking their vagina. Yeah Yeah Yeah. And then the hotdog got shoved up there yet and everyone has that story but everyone has a story so it's not true but I feel like fear is the through line between of these legends. And the stickiness is this like visceral. Fear that you feel like you could get taken advantage of are susceptibility or something. You're onto something important here. Which is which is the the fuel for virtually all sticky ideas whether they're true or not or urban legends or not emotion and legends. You right tend to have a couple of different bases of emotion fears very common one as with the Kidney. Thieves as with the casket and the box But disgust is another all time classic. You know you've probably heard the stories of like the Kentucky Fried rat or you know you find an eyeball in your Coca Cola. You know there's some beautiful ones from that genre. And in fact hilariously chip at one point did some academic research where he varied the disgustingness of different versions of urban legends to see if it associated with memorabilia and of course it did the more disgusting basically. Yeah but you know it'd be fair that there's a side to all this and this is what got us so excited about. The book is was just kind of trashy sleazy terrifying ideas. That were sticky. This would be a pretty short conversation. Yeah but if you think about something like proverbs. Proverbs are another example of a class of ideas that stick naturally and yet they contain moral truths you know not not sleazy false ideas something like a bird in hand is worth two in the Bush and if you notice you know the similarities for instance. The The concreteness is one of the things we talk about in the book is a quality of a sticky idea and the bathtub. Full of ice is a very concrete sensory detail notice. The proverb is is talked about in this visual language. Word hand is worth two in the bush. Rhino it's it's not. It's not some abstract more lesson. It's it's something you can see back to that idea of a film strip that embeds itself in your head and so many proverbs have have that kind of quality and so in the book. What we're doing is kind of comparing all these ideas that stuck really well. Proverbs conspiracy theories urban legends great lessons in school marketing campaigns. And we're trying to figure out what all these things have in common like. What's What's the engine of their stickiness? And can we learn some of those principles to make our own ideas stickier? Okay now. We're going to talk about upstream. So you're just lab designed for me in my own pet peeves this this yes my number one most hated thing in the whole world more than getting my kidneys removed without my permission is being a part of a bad plan like when someone comes out and they they launched the plan and then. I have a role in this plan but I can see that. It's just a very flawed plan right or were we're addressing something so downstream that. I'm like we're going in circles. We need to back up so this is my number one thing that gets me. Irrationally angry at things so. I'm so delighted about upstream to concepts that we need right out of the gates. Right is just. What is this system? How how does this system differ from a person? I think those are. That'd be some relevant groundwork. Yeah and maybe even one step further as well just because I know the the language upstream may be familiar. Some people like I discovered this this term in this concept when I heard a parable awhile back. That's that's well known in public health but not so much outside there and it goes like this. You and a friend are having a picnic by the side of a river and just spread out your picnic blanket. You're getting ready to sit down and eat. And then you hear a shout from the direction of the riverine you look back. There's a child thrashing in the river. Apparently drowning you jump in you save the child you come back to shore and you're kind of just as your adrenaline starting to recede a bit. You hear a second show you look back. There's another child drowning. And so back in you go you. Fish them out. Then there's two more children and back and forth and back and forth you go and it's exhausting all this life saving work and then you see your friend swimming to shore steps out and starts walking away as though to leave you alone and you go. Hey where you going? I can't do this by myself. And your friend says I'm going upstream to tackle the guy who's thrown all these kids in the river right and that in a nutshell is what this book is about this. This kind of traps that we get into so often in life in our personal lives and work. We're we're we're always reacting things yelling out fires and we're dealing with the emergency of the day but we never make our way upstream to deal with things a systems level that that could have potentially prevented us from needing to be in the river. Fishing out drowning kids. Get to your point. The question you asked about systems probably my number one favorite quote that I learned in researching this book is. Is this one from Paul. Batali healthcare expert every system is perfectly designed to get the result it gets. I wrote that down. I bet is so fantastic. Every system is perfectly designed to get the results. It's getting kind of quote that just sticks in your mind and it changes the way you see the world. There's stories in the Book About Substance Abuse and homelessness and dropping on a high school and one of the stories is about Chicago Public School district at one point. Cps public schools. They were graduating. Only about fifty. Two percent of the students like people had a coin flips. Chance that number seemed impossible when I read that. So what year was this as one thousand nine hundred fifty two percent fifty two percent? And also you. It's a humongous public school system. Six billion dollar. Did I six billion dollar budget which is about the same as the city of Seattle is three hundred thousand students. I mean this is a massive massive system and the point of that quote in this context is if you think about it. You're not failing half your students because people aren't trying hard enough or because they're not showing enough enthusiasm you know you're not gonNA hire a motivational speaker to come in and get people jazzed up and then graduate eighty percent this in essence is a system that has been designed to fail half its students so if you want different results you have to figure out how to reconfigure and redesign that system. Yeah it again. Back to that quote you just said it is designed not intentionally but if the results are what they are fifty two percent then regardless of the intentions this is what the systems producing and will likely produce forever unless intervened. Yeah yeah that's a really big example of a system that's broken but but it also applies to smaller things like you know. I have two young girls I know you too. I see some artwork behind your screams. Young girl. Yes that's that's Mama as a giant if you find the same thing happening whatever. It is meltdowns at bedtime happening every night. I mean what you got to ask yourself is. This is a system perfectly designed to get the results gets in anytime you see consistently bad results. You gotTa be thinking. Something's wrong with the system. What do we change? The system is not a matter of like just rejigging our attitudes in the moment. It's something about this process that we have to tweak boy that is so true right in simple examples are like okay great so when we give them sugar at six. Pm or seven Pretty predictable outcome at seven thirty PM. Exactly right these things just become kind of self perpetuating and that was true at Chicago public schools by the way like one example of what they found when they started thinking about this. As a system was disciplined policies. This was the era one thousand nine hundred eight of being tough on discipline zero tolerance that kind of thing and and so. I talked of this one woman. Sarah Duncan who had a big role in the chain and she said during that era. Two weeks suspensions were doled out like candy like a couple of kids would shove each other in the hallway and they both be slapped two weeks suspension. But what we know now from the research is if you take a kid is kind of on the border you kick them out of school for two weeks. They come back their lost and they can't catch up. They end up. Failing classes failed. Classes are a heavy predictor of dropping out of school and so it's like these unexplored trails of causation where the assistant principal. Who slapped him with that suspension? Never in a million years. Would it have occurred that person? Hey this may be the reason. They don't graduate from high school. It's things become opaque and kind of Hard to trace inside systems but but once we flip around Linz and think how could we rewire this for for better outcomes often we can change them but really quick just so as we move forward. I want everyone to have a really good concept of system. Yeah yeah I I would just think of a system and this is a loose definition obviously but in terms of you know the the participants involved in so your family is are those of the collaborators involved in that system if you will and then your habits your routines so your your bedtime processes routine of some kind and the example you gave of well you know. We've just gotten in the habit of getting him. Chocolate milk. Fifteen minutes before bedtime. Ah-ha maybe that has something to do with these results. Were seeing you know. These things that that we often do. Unconsciously can lock in become part of the habitual recipe for the bad results that we don't like by the way one of the funniest things I've ever heard on your show is. I don't remember which episode this was a you were talking about. You know you're a little bit of an older father like I am. And and just how older fathers I think. There's a lot of advantages to that. But we're also a lot lazier and relieved to hear you relate. I laughed when I heard that because I find that I spend a lot of energy like coming up with low Energy Games. For my daughter's you know like one of one of my greatest triumphs is what. I Call Theater in the sky which involves my My four year old. Denial just lay down on the ground. That's the laziness part of it. Yeah we'll hold up like dolls or little figurines or whatever inevitably it's on an Elsa to be honest okay signing to be truthful it's also Jinyu. She's Elsa on Because she has the magic powers naturally and you know we'll just have like some kind of little story that happens and and the whole time just getting to lay down on the floor but she's loving it because it's a story it's on an Elsa said anyway maybe maybe I'll frame that as an upstream solution to a to a child rearing problem. Yeah okay so when wanting to look at systems and to go upstream to try to find the source of problems in into address those there are some initial barriers according to you. So let's start with the first one is problem blindness. Problem Line says we can't solve a problem when we don't see it so this this thing happens where when we've been living with the evidence of problems for a long time often we just kind of to now you know when it's so ubiquitous we just kinda lose sight of it and one of my favorite examples of this is. There's a guy named Marcus Elliott. Who was hired as a trainer for the Patriots and this was a time when the Patriots had been plagued by hamstring injuries. They had twenty two hamstring injuries. In one season and you know some of their best skill players were.

Elsa Bush Patriots Dallas Chicago Public School district Batali Seattle Chicago Marcus Elliott principal Paul Sarah Duncan Linz
"dan heath" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

15:53 min | 9 months ago

"dan heath" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"World of AIDS. You Know I. I have heard other versions of that one but years is way better. I love the miniature coughing in the box. That's amazing a woodworker. Or He's a miniature doll house woodworker so somewhere. There's like Dallas furniture being made for this. I feel like the through line between all of these. I was going to bring up the one that everyone thinks. Someone from their high school got hotdog stuck in their vagina. Yeah Yeah Yeah. And then the hotdog got shoved up there yet and everyone has that story but everyone has a story so it's not true but I feel like fear is the through line between all of these legends and the stickiness. Is this like fear that you feel like you could get taken advantage of are susceptibility or something? You're onto something important here. Which is which is the the fuel for virtually all sticky ideas whether they're true or not or urban legends or not is emotion and legends. You right tend to have a couple of different bases of emotion fears very common one as with the kidney. Thieves has with the casket and the box But disgust is another all time classic. You know you've probably heard the stories of like the Kentucky Fried rat or you know you find an eyeball in your Coca Cola. Some beautiful ones from that genre and in fact hilariously chip at one point did some academic research where he varied the disgustingness of different versions of urban legends to see if it associated with memory ability. And of course it did the more disgusting basically. Yeah but you know it'd be fair that there's a side to all this and this is what got us so excited about. The book is was just kind of trashy sleazy terrifying ideas. That were sticky. This would be a pretty short conversation. Yeah but if you think about something like proverbs. Proverbs are another example of a class of ideas that stick naturally and yet they contain moral truths you know not not sleazy false ideas something like a bird in hand is worth two in the Bush and if you notice you know the similarities for instance. The The concreteness is one of the things we talk about in the book is a quality of a sticky idea and the bathtub. Full of ice is a very concrete. Serie detail notice. The proverb is is talked about in this visual language. Word hand is worth two in the bush. Rhino it's it's not. It's not some abstract more lesson. It's it's something you can see back to that idea of a film strip that embeds itself in your head and so many proverbs have have that kind of quality and so in the book. What we're doing is kind of comparing all these ideas that stuck really well. Proverbs conspiracy theories urban legends great lessons in school marketing campaigns. And we're trying to figure out what all of these things have in common like what's What's the engine of their stickiness? And can we learn some of those principles to make our own ideas stickier? Okay now. We're going to talk about upstream. So you're just lab designed for me and my own pet peeves this this yes my number one most hated thing in the whole world more than getting my kidneys removed without my permission is being a part of a bad plan like when someone comes out and they they launched the plan and then. I have a role in this plan but I can see that. It's just a very flawed plan right or were we're addressing something so downstream. I'm like we're going in circles. We need to back up. So this is my number one thing that gets me. Irrationally angry at things. So I'm so delighted about upstream to concepts that we need right out of the gates. Right is just. What is this system. How how does this system differ from a person? I think those are. That'd be some relevant groundwork. Yeah and maybe even in one step further as well just because I know the the language upstream may be familiar. Some people like I discovered this this term in this concept when I heard a parable awhile back. That's that's well known in public health but not so much outside there and it goes like this. You and a friend are having a picnic by the side of a river and just spread out your picnic blanket. You're getting ready to sit down and eat. And then you hear a shout from the direction of the riverine you look back. There's a child thrashing in the river. Apparently drowning you jump in you save the child you come back to shore and you're kind of just as your adrenaline starting to recede a bit. You hear a second show you look back. There's an child drowning and so back in you go. You fish them out. Then there's two more children and back and forth and back and forth you go and it's exhausting all this life saving work and then you see your friend swimming to shore steps out and starts walking away as though to leave you alone and you go. Hey where you going? I can't do this by myself. And your friend says I'm going upstream to tackle the guy who's thrown all these kids in the river right and that in a nutshell is what this book is about this this kind of trap that we get into so often in life in our personal lives and work. We're we're we're always reacting things yelling out fires and we're dealing with the emergency of the day but we never make our way upstream to deal with things a systems level that that could have potentially prevented us from needing to be in the river. Fishing out drowning kids. Get to your point. The question you asked about systems probably my number one favorite quote that I learned in researching this book is. Is this one from Paul. Batali healthcare expert every system is perfectly designed to get the result it gets. I wrote that down. I bet is so fantastic. Every system is perfectly designed to get the results. It's getting kind of quote that just sticks in your mind and it changes the way you see the world. There's stories in the Book About Substance Abuse and homelessness and dropping on a high school and one of the stories is about Chicago Public School district at one point. Cps AKAKA public schools. They were graduating. Only about fifty. Two percent of the students like people had a coin flips. Chance that number seemed impossible when I read that. So what year was this as one thousand nine hundred fifty two percent fifty two percent? And also you. It's a humongous public school system. Six billion dollar. Did I six billion dollar budget which is about the same as the city of Seattle is three hundred thousand students. I mean this is a massive massive system and the point of that quote in this context is if you think about it. You're not failing half your students because people aren't trying hard enough or because they're not showing enough enthusiasm you know you're not gonNA hire a motivational speaker to come in and get people jazzed up and then graduate eighty percent. This is a system that has been designed to fail half its students so if you want different results you have to figure out how to reconfigure and redesign that system. Yeah it again. Back to that quote you just said it is designed not intentionally but if the results are what they are fifty two percent then regardless of the intentions this is what the systems producing and will likely produce forever unless intervened. Yeah yeah that's a really big example of a system that's broken but but it also applies to smaller things like you know. I have two young girls I know you too. I see some artwork behind your screams. Young girl. Yes that's that's Mama as a giant if you find the same thing happening whatever. It is meltdowns at bedtime happening every night. I mean what you got to ask yourself is. This is a system perfectly designed to get the results gets in anytime you see consistently bad results. You gotTa be thinking. Something's wrong with the system. What do we change? The system is not a matter of like just rejigging our attitudes in the moment. It's something about this process that we have to tweak boy that is so true right in simple examples are like okay great so when we give them sugar at six. Pm or seven Pretty predictable outcome at seven thirty PM. Exactly right these things just become kind of self perpetuating and that was true at Chicago public schools by the way like one example of what they found when they started thinking about this. As a system was disciplined policies. This was the era one thousand nine hundred eight of being tough on discipline zero tolerance that kind of thing and and so. I talked this one woman. Sarah Duncan who had a big role in the chain and she said during that era. Two weeks suspensions were doled out like candy. Like a couple of kids would shove each other in the hallway and they both be slapped two weeks suspension. But what we know now from the research is if you take a kid is kind of on the border you kick them out of school for two weeks. They come back their lost and they can't catch up. They end up. Failing classes failed. Classes are a heavy predictor of dropping out of school. And so it's like these unexplored trails of where the assistant principal who slapped him with that suspension. Never in a million years. Would it have occurred that person? Hey this may be the reason. They don't graduate from high school. It's things become opaque and kind of Hard to trace inside systems but but once we flip around Linz and think how could we rewire this for for better outcomes often we can change them but really quick just so as we move forward. I want everyone to have a really good concept of system. Yeah yeah I I would just think of a system and this is a loose definition obviously but in terms of you know the the participants involved in so your family is are those of the collaborators involved in that system if you will and then your habits your routines so your your bedtime processes routine of some kind and the example you gave of well you know. We've just gotten in the habit of getting him. Chocolate milk. Fifteen minutes before bedtime. Ah-ha maybe that has something to do with these results. Were seeing you know. These things that that we often do. Unconsciously can lock in become part of the habitual recipe for the bad results that we don't like by the way one of the funniest things I've ever heard on your show is. I don't remember which episode this was a you were talking about. You know you're a little bit of an older father like I am. And and just how older fathers I think. There's a lot of advantages to that. But we're also a lot lazier and relieved to hear you relate. I laughed when I heard that because I find that I spend a lot of energy like coming up with low Energy Games. For my daughter's you know like one of one of my greatest triumphs is what I call theater in the sky which involves the my my four year old. Denial just lay down on the ground. That's the laziness part of it. Yeah we'll hold up like dolls or little figurines or whatever inevitably it's on an Elsa to be honest okay signing to be truthful it's also Jinyu she's on Because she has the magic powers naturally and you know we'll just have like some kind of little story that happens and and the whole time just getting to lay down on the floor but she's loving it because it's a story it's on Elsa said anyway. Maybe maybe I'll frame that as an upstream solution to a to a child rearing problem. Yeah okay so when wanting to look at systems and to go upstream to try to find the source of problems in into address those there are some initial barriers according to you. So let's start with the first one is problem blindness problem. Linux says we can't solve a problem when we don't see it so this this thing happens where when we've been living with the evidence of problems for a long time often we just kind of to now you know when it's so ubiquitous we just kinda lose sight of it and one of my favorite examples of this is. There's a guy named Marcus Elliott. Who was hired as a trainer for the Patriots and this was a time when patients had been plagued by hamstring injuries. They had twenty two hamstring injuries. In one season and you know some of their best skill players were.

Bush Elsa Dallas Chicago Public School district Batali Seattle Chicago Cps AKAKA Marcus Elliott Patriots Paul principal Sarah Duncan Linz
"dan heath" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

14:20 min | 9 months ago

"dan heath" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"I am so excited to be talking to you. Guys I I feel like now I am like one degree of separation from idiosyncrasy personal connection when all that great comedies of all time I mean. Did you sort of know at the time that this was going to be a thing you know. Look this script was the funniest script I had ever read and I had turned down a really great movie to be in that movie. I wanted to work with Mike Judge and we got there and everything went seemingly well and then we wrapped and then months and months just kept going by and it was becoming apparent. Fox was not going to release it but they contractually had to put it on some amount of screens and all this adding up to us. Finally Finding out that the movie tested terribly right like yes really terribly. Oh Wow. This is a very on topic because obviously Fox is a system right. There's all these mechanisms and levers and one of them rightly globally. Speaking is that you don't throw thirty million dollars marketing a movie. That's testing at thirty. It's just GONNA a bad bet for you but I will say the one thing that a very smart person pointed out. Has it not occurred to the studio that the people that go see a free movie that they know nothing about are the people being made fun of by the movie so you should expect these very low scores so there was no slot in this system to kind of comprehend that that might be the issue that makes right? Yeah so no I thought. Oh No we did this movie. No one saw. It didn't even make a million dollars and I'm like Oh here's kidding me know why and I thought Oh this is just disappeared into the ether and I feel terrible for Mike because it was a great movie and then through the course of time it turns out I maybe more people have seen that movie than other movies. I've been in. That had done great initially so then a great for me. A great life lesson of like you don't know the outcome of really anything until the the time horizon is such that you can evaluate it. I use time right correctly probably not I'm in for it also tells you like I mean I think money correlates a little bit with quality but not very much. It's a good reminder yet I would love because you study all kinds of things and you study systems and you study data and we look for outcomes in Hollywood is one of the weirdest business models out there. Because you're weekly introducing a new concept or a new or new idea. Write your first book made to stick. Why some ideas die and other stick so you come across any kind of Hollywood stuff and then you're researching that book. The one thing we came across is is kind of a model of a sticky idea is the high concept pitch. And you'll have to tell me whether this is still a thing or if this is all You know thing of the past but the way movies would pitched as jaws on a spaceship was the alien high-concept pitch and die. Hard on a bus was speed. And there's just what's so beautiful about those from a communications perspective is. There's just so much meaning packed into the very short phrases. When you hear die hard on a bus it tells you a lot of the foundational elements of the whole thing. You know you already have an intuition about who the star is GonNa be in. You already have an intuition that this is probably a summer release not a winter release into the high concept pitch is kind of a model of how to communicate a lot with a little and the problem is your example is is a one in a million perfect execution of something so you're basically promising to things that are once. A decade collapsed. Together it does enact some some kind of emotion that makes people want to buy it. But I mean the odds of you executing jaws and star trek in one picture. You know what a high bar but it's aspirational. I mean. That's the point. Is You want to get people thinking about the best case scenario and I think what's even more powerful about it is just. How much exposition is packed into that? Like you can do the same thing with businesses like if you if you went back in time to win net flicks was first being pitched as a thing and remember the first iteration of Netflix was like DVD's being sent in the mail. It must've seemed like a very weird idea at the time. And so to think about having to explain this new model and the shipping and you could just condense that down and say well net flicks. It's our new idea. It's Kinda like blockbuster video with no late fees drive in fact something they came up with and it kind of gets you in the right mental space in two seconds or all of blockbuster in your mailbox exactly right. I just punched up their time. I think that would've really worked out that eighty year. So what is what is your history. I know that you throughout your career worked a lot with your brother and chip right and now your new book upstream is Solo Project. You've left the Beatles. I'm curious immediately before we talk about upstream. 'cause I have an older brother who's older and WHO's younger? He's older. He's ten years older so he's Fifty six I'm forty-six I mean. He was off to college. By the time. I was eight years old so we don't have a lot of memories together really growing up like we kind of developed our relationship as adults and it's kind of like a senior partner junior partner thing which is totally legitimate amies. He's a lot older. He has a lot more experience and he's he's sort of the. You know the wise elder in the family and he teaches at Stanford he does. He's in the business glee actually just retired from Stanford Business School. So he's doing other stuff now but he was there for many years. Yeah Yeah because I was I was thinking maybe the gap would be so big that he might have looked onto you lovingly at times and thought. I'm going to help him. I often hear from Bill. I can imagine working with my brother on a book and I think it's because most brotherly relationships you know there's that sense of competition and you're always trying to one up each other and it would have been pretty pointless for him to engage in any sort of competition with me with ten years age difference pretty much good at dunked on me at anything. Yeah and so. I think that takes a lot of the. The Ego out of our relationship is is. I don't think we've ever really felt competitive with each other. Like you know we have to compete for attention or or whatever. I think. It's just a really healthy healthy place to start but you certainly have had to share accolades. In praise in that yeah the meagre quantities. We've gotten yes. We see those UK when we first started working together on made to stick. I mean first of all it was no picnic at first because we're we're very different people in and we had never worked on something as as big as this and I. I'm sort of like the student who in college would have started a major paper at like three. Am in the morning like fueled by no does and then just blaze through it. And he's the student who would turned it in like a week early just to make sure it was done and kind of off of his desk and so you can imagine some of the tensions that we had during this verse process but he and and later my wife. I think over a period of about ten years have slowly almost beaten the procrastination out of me which I am eternally grateful for all my Gosh. Please share their their method. Their methodology is kind of slow attrition over a period of years relentless work. You can eventually be healed. So all you procrastinators. Oh you have to do is get a sibling and a spouse that will collaborate against you and at the ripe age of forty or forty seven. Forty six forty six. Yeah you'll you'll finally not procrastinate job during retirement that's right now made to stick is and I hope you take this as a comic. Because he's my all time favorite. It's glad well ask Ya. It's a little mouth thank you. I do take that as a compliment. He's one of my all time favorites and really kind of someone who blazed the trail for for all of these kinds of books that are now everywhere if I had to describe the cottage industry. It's like it starts with these kind of Social Science theories or social science data. And it's got some overarching kind of hypothesis. The genius of it is then. You just keep derailing into these personal stories or or stories so much storytelling in which ironically is part of made to stick one of the elements that you're looking to have is something that can be passed on orally what what we were chasing with made to stick was was just a very simple question. Why is it that some ideas that you hear stick with you change Your Life? Change your behavior and others just kind of pass in one ear and out the other and my brother had done a lot of research actually on urban legends. It's one of my most favorite topics urban legends so literally. The first story in the book made to stick is Classic Urban Legend. It starts with I shouldn't get. I just gave away the punch lines in urban legend. Forgive me for that. So a friend of a friend of mine is a big business traveler. He's always flying around for work and and he had some extra time in the airport on the way home from a trip. Recently any stopped in the airport bar before he could even order a drink. This attractive woman walks up to him and asks if she could buy him a drink. And this isn't something that happens to this guy very often. We will sure I'll have one. So she walks up to the bar. She orders to drinks for her for him. They have a cheers moment. And He's thinking this is the best day of my life takes a big chug and then blacks out and some unknown amount of time later. He wakes up in a strange hotel bathtub. Full of ICE. Sure and there's a there's a sign on the wall of the TUB says. Don't move call nine one one. And there's a phone right by the TUB and he called nine one one and he describes the situation. The operator says Sir. Can you reach behind you in the TUB and see if there's a tube sticking out of your back to the guy like a finger? Kind of Numb and clumsy from the icing reaches behind many feels a tube and now he's freaking out even more. What's happened to me? I don't understand.

Mike Judge TUB Hollywood Fox Netflix Stanford Business School UK senior partner partner
"dan heath" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

14:20 min | 9 months ago

"dan heath" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"I am so excited to be talking to you guys I I feel like now I am like one degree of separation from idiosyncrasy personal connection. When all that great comedies? Of all time I mean. Did you sort of know at the time that this was going to be a thing you know. Look this script was the funniest script I had ever read and I had turned down a really great movie to be in that movie. I wanted to work with Mike Judge and we got there and everything went seemingly well and then we wrapped and then months and months just kept going by and it was becoming apparent. Fox was not going to release it but they contractually had to put it on some amount of screens and all this adding up to us. Finally Finding out that the movie tested terribly right like yes really terribly. Oh Wow. This is a very on topic because obviously Fox is a system right. There's all these mechanisms and levers and one of them rightly globally. Speaking is that you don't throw thirty million dollars marketing a movie. That's testing at thirty. It's just GONNA bad bet for you but I will say the one thing that a very smart person pointed out. Has it not occurred to the studio that the people that go see a free movie that they know nothing about are the people being made fun of by the movie so you should expect these very low scores so there was no slot in this system to kind of comprehend that that might be the issue that makes right? Yeah so no I thought. Oh No we did this movie. No one saw. It didn't even make a million dollars and I'm like Oh here's kidding me know why and I thought Oh this is just disappeared into the ether and I feel terrible for Mike because it was a great movie and then through the course of time it turns out I maybe more people have seen that movie than other movies. I've been in. That had done great initially so then a great for me. A great life lesson of like you don't know the outcome of really anything until the the time horizon is such that you can evaluate it. I use time right correctly probably not I'm in for it also tells you like I mean I think money correlates a little bit with quality but not very much. It's a good reminder yet I would love because you study all kinds of things and you study systems and you study data and we look for outcomes in Hollywood is one of the weirdest business models out there. Because you're weekly introducing a new concept or a new or new idea. Write your first book made to stick. Why some ideas die and other stick so you come across any kind of Hollywood stuff and then you're researching that book. The one thing we came across is is kind of a model of a sticky idea. Is The high concept pitch in. You'll have to tell me whether this is still a thing or if this is all You know thing of the past but the way movies would pitched as jaws on a spaceship was the alien high-concept pitch and die. Hard on a bus was speed. And there's just what's so beautiful about those from a communications perspective is. There's just so much meaning packed into the very short phrases. When you hear die hard on a bus it tells you a lot of the foundational elements of the whole thing. You know you already have an intuition about who the star is GonNa be in. You already have an intuition that this is probably a summer release not a winter release into the high concept pitch is kind of a model of how to communicate a lot with a little and the problem is your example is is a one in a million perfect execution of something so you're basically promising to things that are once. A decade collapsed. Together it does enact some some kind of emotion that makes people want to buy it. But I mean the odds of you executing jaws and star trek in one picture. You know what a high bar but it's aspirational. I mean that's the point is is you want to get people thinking about the best case scenario and I think what's even more powerful about it is just. How much exposition is packed into that? Like you can do the same thing with businesses like if you if you went back in time to win net flicks was first being pitched as a thing and remember the first iteration of Netflix was like DVD's being sent in the mail. It must've seemed like a very weird idea at the time. And so to think about having to explain this new model and the shipping and you could just condense that down and say well net flicks. It's our new idea. It's Kinda like blockbuster video with no late fees drive in fact something they came up with and it kind of gets you in the right mental space in two seconds or all of blockbuster in your mailbox exactly right. I just punched up their time. I think that would've really worked out that eighty year. So Dan what is what is your history. I know that you throughout your career worked a lot with your brother and chip right and now your new book upstream is a Solo Project. You've left the Beatles. I'm curious immediately before we talk about upstream. 'cause I have an older brother who's older and WHO's younger? He's older. He's ten years older so he's Fifty six I'm forty-six I mean. He was off to college. By the time. I was eight years old so we don't have a lot of memories together really growing up like we kind of developed our relationship as adults and it's kind of like a senior partner junior partner thing which is totally legitimate amies. He's a lot older. He has a lot more experience and he's he's sort of the. You know the wise elder in the family and he teaches at Stanford he does. He's in the business glee actually just retired from Stanford business school. So he's doing other stuff now but he was there for many years. Yeah Yeah 'cause I was I was thinking maybe the gap would be so big that he might have looked onto you lovingly at times and thought. I'm going to help him. I often hear from Bill. I can imagine working with my brother on a book and I think it's because most brotherly relationships you know there's that sense of competition you're always trying to one up each other and it would have been pretty pointless for him to engage in any sort of competition with me with ten years age difference pretty much good at dunked on me at anything. Yeah and so. I think that takes a lot of the the ego out of our relationship is I. Don't think we've ever really felt competitive with each other like we have to compete for attention or or whatever. I think it's just a really healthy healthy place to start. But you certainly have had to share accolades in praise in that. Yeah the meagre quantities. We've gotten yes. We see those UK when we first started working together on made to stick. I mean first of all it was no picnic at first because we're we're very different people in and we had never worked on something as as big as this and I. I'm sort of like the student who in college would have started a major paper at like three. Am in the morning like fueled by no does and then just blaze through it. And he's the student who would turned it in like a week early just to make sure it was done and kind of off of his desk and so you can imagine some of the tensions that we had during this verse process but he and and later my wife. I think over a period of about ten years have slowly almost beaten the procrastination out of me which I am eternally grateful for all my gosh. Please share their their method. Their methodology is kind of slow attrition over a period of years relentless work. You can eventually be healed so all you procrastinators. All you have to do is get a sibling and a spouse that will collaborate against you and at the ripe age of forty are forty seven forty six forty six. You'll you'll finally not procrastinate job during retirement. That's right now made to stick is and I hope you take this as a comic. Because he's my all time favorite. It's glad well ask Ya. It's a little mouth thank you. I do take that as a compliment. He's one of my all time favorites and really kind of someone who blazed the trail for for all of these kinds of books that are now everywhere if I had to describe the cottage industry. It's like it starts with these kind of Social Science theories or social science data. And it's got some overarching kind of hypothesis. The genius of it is then. You just keep derailing into these personal stories or or companies stories so much storytelling in which ironically is part of made to stick one of the elements that you're looking to have is something that can be passed on orally what what we were chasing with made to stick was was just a very simple question. Why is it that some ideas that you hear stick with you change Your Life? Change your behavior and others just kind of pass in one ear and out the other and my brother had done a lot of research actually on urban legends. It's one of my most favorite topics urban legends so literally. The first story in the book made to stick is Classic Urban Legend. It starts with I shouldn't get. I just gave away the punch lines in urban legend. Forgive me for that. So a friend of a friend of mine is a big business traveler. He's always you know flying around for work and and he had some extra time in the airport on the way home from a trip. Recently any stopped in the airport bar before he could even order a drink. This attractive woman walks up to him and asks if she could buy him a drink. And this isn't something that happens to this guy very often. We will sure I'll have one. So she walks up to the bar. She orders to drinks for her for him. They have a cheers moment. And He's thinking this is the best day of my life takes a big chunk and then blacks out and some unknown amount of time later. He wakes up in a strange hotel bathtub. Full of ICE. Sure and there's a there's a sign on the wall of the TUB says. Don't move call nine one one. And there's a phone right by the TUB and he called nine one one and he describes the situation. The operator says Sir. Can you reach behind you in the TUB and see if there's a tube sticking out of your back to the guy like a finger? Kind of Numb and clumsy from the icing reaches behind many feels a tube and now he's freaking out even more. What's happened to me? I don't understand.

Mike Judge TUB Hollywood Fox Netflix Stanford business school Dan UK senior partner partner
Upstream w/ Dan Heath

Developer Tea

04:21 min | 9 months ago

Upstream w/ Dan Heath

"In the book you get into these details a little bit more mechanically Specifically talking about you know uniting people and What are the changes? Actually that you need make to assist them. How do you determine some of those things Finding Leverage One thing I'd like to talk about specifically is how do you know when this is succeeding in the point of no when we're talking about the The children that are that are drowning. It might make sense that if you had a rate of children drowning when every five minutes in that drops to one every twenty four hours then that might make a good measurement but it's not always that easy right. No it's not and I think the reality is. We live in a world where in the fictitious parable world. I mean my guess is that enormous corporate America. What people would be a measured on is? Is the speed of Rescue You know it and in fact. There's there's an example in the book. I think illustrates this. Well it's about expedia the online travel site and back in two thousand twelve. This guy named Ryan O'Neal is studying some data about the call center at Expedia. So if you book a flight or hotel or something in something goes wrong with your reservation you call one eight hundred number. What he found made his jaw drop. He found that for every hundred customers. Who booked a transaction? Fifty eight of them ended up calling the call center for help. Which which would pretty much seem to nullify the whole point of having an online self service travel site and so he starts digging into figure out why are so many people calling us in the number one reason people are calling. I mean to the tune of twenty million calls in two thousand twelve was to get a copy of their itinerary was twenty million calls. Can I get a copy of my tannery? And so he and his boss. Just they're like this is madness. We've got to do something about this. And they make the case to the CEO to create a special team to work on this and they do and The technical solutions as you might expect are pretty simple. They changed the way they send. It's not like they forgot to send the itineraries. They were always sending them. It's just they would end up in spam or customers would delete them thinking they were ads or the sort of thing so the change their strategy and emailing they added a self service tools on the VR and online and so forth and they basically took twenty million calls and whittled them down to zero so from from a technical perspective. This is a trivial problem. But I think what's interesting about? This story is is why this problem got to this level like you would think that there would be an alarm bell. That would go off somewhere. Once you reached like your your three million call for hi Tenora like people would start to take this seriously but but the deal is that expedia like like virtually every other company has to organize itself or chooses to organize itself in in silos. And so you got a marketing team whose job it is to to attract customers to expedia versus. Kayak or someone else. And then you've got a product team whose job it is to make the site so smooth and intuitive that the customers are funneled toward a transaction. Then then you've got the tech team that makes the plumbing run and keeps up time high. And you've got the call center that's trying to minimize you. Know the the response. Time to fueled a customer issue and to keep them happy via net promoter score or something like that and from a silo perspective like all of those goals make sense but but the problem is when you ask a very basic question. Like whose job is it to keep customers from needing to call us. The answer was nobody. Yeah Yeah and it was even worse than that like none of those silos even stood to benefit if the number of calls went down and so. That's something I think that that's really interesting. About upstream problems is that it's often very easy to find owners for downstream problems like your house catches on fire. It's the fire departments problem at that point. Like It may not be an easy problem. But it's an easy problem to define an owner for verses if you flip things around and you say whose job is to keep customers from calling or whose job is to keep your house from catching on fire will. That's a very different

Expedia Ryan O'neal America CEO
"dan heath" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

12:04 min | 9 months ago

"dan heath" Discussed on Developer Tea

"How does it feel to prevent the problem? Notice that we're not saying. How does it feel to fix a problem but instead to never know what the consequences would have been? That's what we're talking about with today's guest. Dan Heath Dan is the author of so many books that have been instrumental in my career in my thinking. A lot of the content on this show has been inspired by Dan's work in. I'm so grateful that Dan.

Dan Heath Dan
#41 - How To Make Learning More Effective

Leadership Biz Café

10:38 min | 1 year ago

#41 - How To Make Learning More Effective

"So Aaron shared with me how he took one hundred of their top. GM's for a two day Leadership Development Summit that address topics topics and issues that were of interest to his team. They also have several Ellen de portals where they offered articles videos podcasts which Aaron told me also includes this one to supplement the training session the challenges having now though is how to make sure these new insights are applied and not lost when in these leaders returned to the hectic pace of their everyday work and more importantly. How can you keep them engaged in wanting to learn even more when Aaron aren't asked me this question. I asked if I could share his story because it's a question I've been asked many times over the years when giving keynotes corporate trainings in fact it's one of the reasons one of my leadership keynotes deals with how leaders can shift from simply training employees to creating a continuous learning environment in their workplace so I know there's as many of you out there who are also dealing with this issue as well so what I'd like to do is share with you. Some simple steps that you can take right now that will help make the new the skills and insights. You learn stick to start off. Let me give you a little context to help frame these steps in their book made to stick chip and Dan Heath present. This idea that a sticky idea is something that's understood. It's remembered and it changes something now while their book was about how how to make what you communicate stick with your audience. I think we can all agree that when we learn new skills or insights we wanted to be something that's understood that that we remember it and that it ends up changing the way we work continuing with chip and Dan's book they describe how they are six principles behind what makes an idea sticky eighty and these six principles are simplicity unexpectedness concreteness credibility emotions and stories now while they say you don't necessarily need all six principals to make your message stick. I want to offer you three steps. You can take that will employ the six principles again if we go back to the problem. Erin shared one which other leaders have also asked me about the challenge we face when it comes comes to training or going to a conference to learn new insights to improve the way we lead is why were there we could see the value of these approaches but but soon after we returned to our workplaces these new insights often fade away as we return to the routines of our day to day work lies so the first step you need take is one that. I often get my audiences to do at the end of my talks and that is to identify one simple change. You'll make based on what what you've just learned now. This one thing you choose has to contain two characteristics. I it has to be something. You can start doing now. With these this and second it has to be something that's personally meaningful. The reason stems from the work of two different researchers Stafford behavioral scientists scientists. BJ Fog who found that the key to changing behavior is taking small steps and Harvard Professor Teresa Mobley who was the second guest to appear on on this podcast who found in her research that making progress on personally meaningful goals leads to enduring success and happiness on the job in other words. You want to focus on applying a new behavior or skill. You've learned on something that matters to you you so that this becomes something that you don't have to do but it's something you want to do and this that lines up with the sticky principle support of simplicity as we're focusing on one specific thing that we can do right now that will improve our work in personally meaningful fashion this also ties into the emotion principle because as chip and Dan right this sticky principle is driven by answering the question of what's in it for me me which you've already answered by this exercise of picking that one simple change you want to make thanks to what you've learned so now that you have this one simple behavior or skill in mine the obvious question becomes. How do you make sure you apply it every day. Well that's the next step and for for this. We're going to use the example of very successful person and one of my favorite comedians Jerry Seinfeld well. Let's start the insanity now. It doesn't matter whether you like it or not as this has nothing to do with his sense of humor but more to do with what he's identified as being the key to his success comedian Brad Isaac Isic once as Seinfeld for tips on what he could do to improve his success at comedy and Seinfeld told him that what he needed to do was to commit to writing every everyday because writing jokes every day would help him hone his craft. Now what's the Real Jim in the story is what Seinfeld told Isaac as being how he pushes himself to write every day especially when he doesn't want to basically what Seinfeld does is. He gets a wall calendar that shows every every day of the year and every day that he writes he puts a red X. in the box for that day once he's done that for a couple of days he's created a chain of XS on this calendar and as Seinfeld told Isaac you like seeing that chain especially when you get a few weeks under your belt. Your only job is to not break the chain now the reason why this is a great strategy for anyone to us is because it embraces braces something that I'm sure you've all heard and read about gamification as Seinfeld says himself he transformed the task of writing into would game where his only job is to not break the chain now. You don't need to get a three hundred sixty five day wall counter for your office us but what you need to do is get a notebook that you use a journal to just write a quick note of what you did to practice this new behavior or skill the reason why is because you need to be able to visually see this chain growing which is critical for this to work because this allows allows you to shift from focusing on how well you apply this new behavior or skill on a given day to the process of applying it regularly elite and consistently towards making it a habit going back to the principles of making things stick you can see that this step ties into the principle of of concrete nece as you can see visually for yourself how you've applied this new behavior or skill on a given day and also links to the principle of credibility because as you re back how you apply this new behavior or skill and not qualifying how good are bad you were at it you can. I can see how this new behavior or skill can be used successfully everyday and hopefully also noticing some positive benefits growing along on with and this leads to my last step that will help make those new behaviors and skills you've learned stick and this one revolves around one of the points. I share my keynote talk on how the shift from training people to continuously improving talent and that is you need to treat learning as shared experience now to help illustrate rate the value of this step. I WANNA share a story about one of the leaders. I wrote about in my book Leadership Vertigo. Billy Taylor was the plant manager for the Goodyear Vale Plant. When he joined the plant? It was one of the most poorly performing appliances goodyear and was at risk of being closed within two. Oh Years Taylor transformed it into one of the top performing manufacturing plants a good year and was promoted to an executive role at goodyear while there are many things Taylor did to achieve this outcome. There's one I wanNA share in the context of making our learning stick and that is how he put up information boards throughout the plant that identified which manufacturing team was working on a given product line and the level of output. They were creating now the reason he did this was was not simply to hold the different production teams accountable for their productivity but so that's different teams could learn from one another about what they were doing to improve their performance performance. In fact Taylor facilitated this cross learning between teams by putting up other boards throughout the plant that showcase projects is employs initiated improve the plants productivity and cost effectiveness as a result of the lessons. They learned from one another working on the plant floor. Now remember remember that the first step I told you about was to pick that one behavior or skill that you've learned that you WanNa make stick because you not only know no you can make this a part of your leadership tool kit but also because you know it's going to have a meaningful impact on how you perform your job well well. The wonderful thing of identifying this at the start of this process is that it allows you to not only attain some early wins but you also now have something something of value to share with other leaders in your organization in terms of how they can apply this behavior or skill to improve their leadership and conversely when when they share with you how they apply other behaviors and skills to the way they lead you gain better insights on how you yourself can apply these other behaviors and skills to continue learning and growing the key point. I want you to take note of is that learning can't exist in a vacuum or silo but as I pointed out in the first step it needs to be connected both to why you do what you do and how you go about getting things done in your everyday the day work and again going back to chip and Dan's principles of stickiness we can see how this step clearly ties into that principle of stories in how we're sharing sharing our stories our experiences with learning to improve ourselves but it also ties into the principle of unexpectedness because in en- sharing your lessons learned you stand to gain both new insights into how to build on what you're currently doing as well as where you can start next in that process of applying applying what you've learned

Jerry Seinfeld Dan Heath Aaron Billy Taylor Brad Isaac Isic Leadership Development Summit GM Ellen Goodyear Vale Plant Erin Professor Teresa Mobley Harvard Goodyear Plant Manager Executive Three Hundred Sixty Five Day Two Day
Understanding the Peak-End Rule

Crack the Customer Code

04:03 min | 2 years ago

Understanding the Peak-End Rule

"I've been thinking a little bit about what we should do for a topic. And I realized that genie, and I had mentioned the peak end rule in the number of episodes. But we really never got into what it is. Or why it's important. And this is something I actually cover in one of my keynotes, some of my trainings. My keynote on hassle from hassle to hero paving the way for positive emotions, and you're going to see how that ties in. So thought we do a quick little dive into the pecan rule. What it is why it's important and just you better context around it. So what does the pecan roll? The peak end rule is pretty much how we remember experiences. And the first principle is understanding that the experiencing self and the remembering self are not the same. And what matters for customers for us. As we go through experiences is truly what we remember about the experiences not necessarily how we felt. So the begin rule states that the things that tend to be remembered most strongly that tend to stand out or the peak that is the most intense emotion you fail so that can be positive or negative. I wish that it was another word besides Pete. Because we always think peak is high and positive, but it can be a negative emotion or it can be a positive emotion. The key is this. It is whatever is the most intense emotion, you feel and the final thing in a lot of you may be familiar with this as the end what happens at the end of the experience tends to have an outsized impact on our memory. Now. Why is that the authors chip and Dan heath, you may have heard of them made the study that we've got a lot of bestselling books. They came up. I've been teaching peak for years, and they came up with this great sort of metaphor for how it works. I don't think metaphor is the right word, but you get the point and it's called the Disney paradox. And basically what it says is if you polled an adult every minute while they're at a Disney World theme park. And this is nothing against isn't. He, but if you. Pulled an adult every minute of their experience at a Disney World theme park. They probably wouldn't be all that happy. Right. They'd be hot. They'd be tired. They'd be standing in line for three hours. He paying ninety four dollars for a coke. They wouldn't be that happy. If you pulled them every minute, but why even for adults is the Disney experience, so magical, and the reason is because. Ars appearances are memory. These princes is not the average of how we felt throughout the experience. It is defined mostly by that peak in that end and that is the Disney paradox. And that's why when we look at customer experience when we look at how one we can design proactive positive experiences, but how we can also work to prevent negative experiences. Keep the peak end rule in mind can be very useful in that in that quest because when we're looking at creating that peak emotion, can we design it in can we take charge of it? Obviously, we cannot control every part of the experience we can't control some things that go wrong that are out of our controllers. You know, things are just going to happen. And sometimes that peak emotion is gonna form on its own. But to what degree can we strategically control it to what degree can we want prevent the negative emotions by focusing on certain key attributes. That tend to cause them a disrespect things that come from our human teams from our human parts of the experienced right from our team members hassle. Which is why this relates to that speech. I told you about my hassle to hero speech if we look for certain areas of negative potential negative motion. If we look at that from the experience lens from the journey lens. We look at it through the lens of the peak end we can start to design around both creating positive moments and really focusing on preventing negative moments. So that was a brief look at the peak annual hope you enjoyed it. And I hope it clarifies some of the things we've been referring to earlier episodes for you long time

Disney Dan Heath Pete Ninety Four Dollars Three Hours
"dan heath" Discussed on Motley Fool Money

Motley Fool Money

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"dan heath" Discussed on Motley Fool Money

"Next bestselling author dan heath this is molly money welcome back the motley fool money i'm chris hill dan heath and his brother chip have written several bestsellers including switch and made to stick get the chance to interview dan in front of a live audience and talk about his latest book the power of moments why certain experiences have extrordinary impact one of the things early in the book is something your brother referred to as the disney paradox which is botha luminated and in some ways a little i don't wanna say disappointing but one of the things that you bring to light is that problem solving for businesses almost doesn't get the credit deserves that that peak moments are outweighed significant get an undue amount of credit for what a business does for any given individual yes let's let's start with the disney paradox which anybody's been to a theme park i think can relate to this and that is if we were to monitor your moment by moment happiness levels via some advanced technology i think it's pretty safe to say that for the majority of those moments during the day you would have been far happier sitting on your couch at home less humid there less crowded you can get lunch for less than eighteen bucks but looking back on that experience you might consider it one of the highlights of your year and so that's kind of paradox could something that wasn't that fun in the moment or at least in the aggregate of the moments be a highlight and the answer is something that psychology can explain in that is that that even though most of the moments may have been average or even on pleasant you know in ninety six degrees humid orlando temperatures there were moments that matter there were the adrenalin high of coming off of the space mountain roller coaster or that moment when mickey mouse comes up and delight your child and the moment when they pick out a souvenir and they're hugging this little plush stuffed animal pluto and those are the kind of moments that your couch never creates and what's interesting is psychologist noelle lot about how we remember experiences and they say that there's basically two principles here that say a lot about what experiences are made of what rate experiences are made of and the first thing is called duration neglect which says it when we remember our experiences the link of those experiences tends to fade out wash away and what we're left with our snippets or scenes or moments from those experiences it easy enough to see this for yourself just think about a family vacation from year to ago and you'll notice there's no sense in which you can kind of load up the whole film of your family vacation and watch it into in a lot of it's gone but what you remember the special moments the second point from psychology is when we talk about these moments that are left there is a logic to which moments we remember and their to particular kinds of moments that we disproportionately recall one of them's called the peak of the experience which in a positive experience is the most positive moment that's the space mountain moment that's the cute mickey mouse and counter and then there's the ending the peak and the ending and so this tells us a lot about being in the business of providing experiences to other people whether that's our customers the patients that we take care of the students we serve even our own kids and part of what it says is that we may have the wrong mental model about what a great experience is made of because in a lotta situations our instinct is to make an experience better you go and survey people about it you look at what they're complaining about and then you fix those problems aren't it makes sense that's how you make something better you fix the problems but fixing problems doesn't make people happy fixing problems wellm 's people not overwhelms not underwhelms just wellm 's so think about it if you're driving down the road you go three miles of highway without hitting a single pothole like you're not giddy about that you're wellnamed your cable tv functions exactly as opposed to for a full month you're not gonna look back install on that a year later remember that month you're just wound and wellness is pretty good i don't mean to to be little wellnamed weld means that people basically got what they expected you know the alternative to.

dan heath ninety six degrees