35 Burst results for "Dan Harris"

Uprooting Your Delusions With Andrea Fella

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:45 min | 3 d ago

Uprooting Your Delusions With Andrea Fella

"Andrea fell. Thanks for coming on really appreciate it pleasure to be with you. Nice to meet you. Likewise so i know from reading the notes of your discussion with my esteemed colleague samuel that you're interested in talking about the subject of views and delusion why that subject why is that interesting to you and what do you mean by views and delusion it feels to me like views in our country right now are creating a lot of stress and suffering and looking to me. I like to kind of look at what the interface is between what's happening in the world and what the buddha had to say. The buddha talked a lot about how suffering works how stress how people get into stress and difficulty and the tools and the the analysis he made of our minds. It really speaks to us with all of the changes that have been in the last twenty six hundred years. There's been a lot of change in our minds work. And so what he has to say about. How our minds work and the kinds of problems and stresses in suffering that we're in now as a world i'm interested in that kind of overlap. And how what. The buddha in terms of how the mind works can speak to us now can help us to maybe find some ways to navigate the difficulties that we're in in terms of delusion delusion operates in a lot of different ways in our minds. There's kind of a basic way that delusion operates which is that we're not aware of what's happening. That's the kind of most obvious way the delusion works you know when we're kind of checked out or spaced out or not really connecting with what's going on that's a form of delusion but it's that's not even the most Kind of insidious form of delusion the more dangerous we could say or the more kind of hidden even hidden forms of delusion because we all know when we come out of being spaced out. It's like oh. Yeah i didn't. I don't even know what was happening. Like we wake up after. We were driving on the freeway. It's like wow. How did i get here. We know that we've been lost but the kind of delusion we're not aware of is when we are kind of aware of what's going on but not aware that how we're taking in information how we're interpreting. The world is based on a perspective based on a view or a belief in the buddhist teachings. He talks a lot about the delusion based on taking what is impermanent to be permanent. What is unreliable to be reliable. What is not self to be self. We could also throw in there. What is uncontrollable to be controllable. And those are deep forms of human belief for view that we tend to believe that. What's impermanent is permanent. We tend to believe what is unreliable is reliable but there's a kind of a middle ground place where views beliefs ideas that come just from living and by view i really do mean what we normally mean in in our language about a view or a perspective or a belief is what i would call synonyms. We all have used beliefs perspectives. That are shaped by how we have lived in our lives shaped by our personal conditioning shaped by our families by our culture and this is the terrain. I'm kind of interested in exploring today. The terrain of what we might call the views and beliefs that are shaped by our personal and cultural conditioning. Because this is where i think. A lot of our suffering is happening right now in our world in our country in particular in the united states. So the the shaping of those views is natural. I mean the whole way that our minds work. Our human minds are always encountering the world and learning from it and shaped based on how we have been trained. How we what we've experienced. This is just the conditioning of our lives. Because i grew up in a particular family. I learned certain things about how families operate because i grew up in a particular culture. I learned certain things about how people who are strangers. Interact

Andrea Samuel United States
Your Craving Mind With Kevin Griffin

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:35 min | Last week

Your Craving Mind With Kevin Griffin

"Okay. Kevin griffin great to meet you. Thanks for doing this. Nice to meet you dan. So i'd love to hear your overall thoughts on the addictive nature of mind. I know the big big opening question but If i could just get you to hold forth on any little piece of that big topic. I let's start there. Yeah well when we sit down to meditate this is what we encounter. And i think that what's so hard for people when they start to meditate and we hear this all the time and i know you hear this all the time that people say i can't meditate. 'cause i think too much which i always sort of take as an insult like i can. Meditate. 'cause i don't think that much are you implying not thoughtful. But we encountered that just stream daleus of thoughts and we. We immediately try to work with that. Just keep coming back to the breath and if we watch that process and kind of put it in the framework of the buddhist teaching on suffering. Which is you know. The suffering is caused by clinging. Always start to realize. Oh what's happening here. Isn't just that i'm thinking it's that i'm clinging to something and so then comes this question. What is it that i'm clinging to. Am i really clinging to what i'm going to have for lunch or whatever it is that i'm thinking about is the content of the thought really the thing that's holding me that i'm trapped in and then as we go deeper into this we start to see that it's not that that there's broader deeper implications of what's going on in that process the end point being if i can cut to the end of the story that were clinging to self because it's the thought it turns out as we get deep into this that the thoughts are what define us what create this idea of self and letting go thoughts is a threat to that existence of ego so that's the ultimate addiction is the addiction to self. So i think. I got in deeper than i was expecting to. Your first question now is perfect. There's no such thing as too deep. I struggle a little bit with understanding the notion of addiction to self. Can you say more about it. Because i it feels right directionally for me but i am not quite sure i've crystallized it in my own. Mind what you mean by it well. I'm not sure this is an answer but you know i don't know if you know him. Great english mark in the thai forest tradition loves to quote a study that showed that people were more afraid of public speaking than they were of physical death and his conclusion. Being that people are more afraid of ego death of making a fool of yourself in public then they are of of actually dying and you know from your studies as well that this becomes a kind of mushy territory somewhat. Because their the buddhist says that there's nothing we can point to that is self after very careful how we talk about this because people say the buddhist says. There's no self well. The scholars say that's not accurate. And it's important distinction right but there's nothing we can point to that self however the way we relate to i is through thought i think about myself. All my thoughts are about me. One of the reasons. It's hard for people to stop thinking is that there's a fear and can feel it when you get to that edge. You only get to that deepa place on a retreat but you kind of get to this edge and spike. You're looking into a chasm like what is myself who am i

Kevin Griffin DAN Deepa
Making It RAIN With Tara Brach

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:52 min | 2 weeks ago

Making It RAIN With Tara Brach

"Nice to see you and you. I think this is the second time we've met. The first time we met in my memory was backstage at some meditation event. And i remember being a little hesitant because i saw you there and i thought i fun of her a little bit in my book and i didn't know how is going to go but then you gave me a big hug. So a where are we with that. Are you mad at me for who is actually a really great experience for me. Because you know everyb- it's famed disrepute and you know and you made fun of me. Some and you also appreciated the thing that most matter to me which is the practice of rain and figured you know. I can survive this. Well i've talked about this a lot on the show of my apologies to folks who've had to hear me hold forth on this too much but i got three. Do you know what a three sixty review is. If you've ever heard yeah. I got one and basically all the people in or many of the people in my life anonymously commented on my strengths and weaknesses. In one of the weaknesses was being judgmental. You i think were really an early victim of mine on the scored in the meditation world and there was a message for me too. Because i'm basically out to wake up and be able to present things in a way that are gonna reach people and i suspected for you. My way was had too much of a A kind of ui to sweet flavor. And i realize oh. There's going to be a message. People like dan that that's the way they receive it. And i think as we keep growing we just get more flexible ways. We present things so there was room for that. Yes i agree. I think yeah you have a way of talking about this that works for hundreds of thousands of people my way of talking about it or thinking about it or acting it out in the world is very different and that's the importance of having many folks out there talking about the dharma on this me too me too. It's really exciting to me actually. And it's exciting when the dialogues happened because basically we're free when we all stretch say more about the. Yeah the more first of all a teacher. The more flexibility. I have in how i present things. In the more sensitive. I am to the different ways. People receive things the more effective i can be and as a practitioner for instance this morning. I was talking to my husband about a book that right now reading for the twentieth time in. It's i am that by screener sergey data and it's a book about nonfuel reality about seeing how really constantly looking at. How am i getting identified right in this moment. Like really seeing past the coagulation of self recognizing okay. I'm not this particular personality. I'm not this body and recognizing a larger sense of being us and so we were talking about that. And i then i just said you know that is fantastic when my mind is quiet enough but if i'm caught in some anxiety for me to say oh i'm not this. Anxiety actually is a subtle way of pushing it away and what's more important as for me to feel the wave of anxiety and in some way. Okay this belongs. This is part of this is a wave in the ocean you know and to actually feel it and in opening to it and not resisting the identification actually dissolves so the pathway taught in the book that i'm riveted by right. This moment isn't the pathway. At any given moment our will at work for many people when they're stuck in a certain way so it just having that keeping the whole domain of practice fresh so in any given moment. There's a an intuitive way to respond to what arising now that actually deepens freedom and not going by road really is is actually what works in the most deep ways. So you talk about implicitly. A change that. I've seen you make in my observation of you as a teacher. Since the first time. I saw you speak until reading your most recent book so in the teaching of rain are a i n which we're going to walk through in detail. The first time. I heard you speak the n stood for non identification. Now you teach it as nurture which in your last answer. I think. I heard you say that nurturing leads to the non identification if you can be cool with whatever's coming up and you mentioned anxiety and you've talked about personally the things i'd in your own life if you're gonna be cool with anxiety if you can you know. Be warm in the face of this unwelcomed visitor in your own mind. That can ultimately i if i hearing you correctly. Correct me if i'm wrong. Lead you to seeing. Oh yeah this is just a visitor. It isn't me that's exactly right and if we bypass the nurturing and it's not like every time something comes up we have to put our hand on our hard and offer all sorts of phrases of self compassion but there are times that bringing a kindness and a warmth to watch their offense the resistance in a way that were embodied and yet more spacious and if we skip over it if we go to quickly to sing oh this isn't me. I'm not identified. It's actually a subtle kind of dissociation. We're not really embodied so the more full freedom is to be with the wave and realize your oceanus through the process of being with the wave which for most of us take some quality of kindness. Our compassion

DAN
A Deeply Healthy Kind Of Perfectionism With Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:10 min | 3 weeks ago

A Deeply Healthy Kind Of Perfectionism With Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo

"Jetson migrate to meet you. Thanks for staying up late in india to do this interview appreciate it. Thank you so really excited to talk to you. I think maybe a great place to start would be just a little background on your personal story. How did you get interested in buddhism in the first place. Well since. I was a child i had been. What shall i say asking questions i mean. I believed that we were inherently perfect. But that we had lost contact with our innate nature which was perfect so the question was what is perfection. And how do we attain it. So i asked many people i asked the priest sayas teachers. I asked my mother. I asked everybody. I could think of and they said you have to be rude. You have to be kind and even those a child. I recognize that merely being good and kind yes. Of course we have to be good. We have to be kind. But that's just the basis this perfection was something beyond all that but what was it. And how did we attain it. So i read the bible and we were supposedly high anglican. That's like a piscopo. And i also had many jewish friends and i ask them a net rabbis and i even tried reading khurram then i took yoga but none of them onset my question because all of them would dealing with the soul and its relationship to the creator and that just did not speak to me at all so i assumed i had to find my own puff them when i was eighteen. I read a very simple book on buddhism. The fall noble truths and the three signs of being and so forth and as i read it. I just knew. This is what i had always known. I just haven't known that there was actually a religion with said that. I read health book than i said to my mother. I'm a buddhist and she said. Oh that's nice dear. Then finished reading the book. Can you can tell me all about it. As i read it just was unfolding layers and layers of things which i already had known but the buddha gave a path and i was just so grateful he not only explained essentially what perfection was. You're gonna ask me. What is perfection but also. He should pass woods that. So you know i even as i read it. I recognize that. This is what i always known without knowing that i knew it. Let me pick up on. You're keen ability to read my mind. I was going to ask amd ask you. What do you mean by perfection. Because this is. I've spent a reasonable amount of time marinating in buddhism and would describe myself as buddhist for sure. Perfection is something. I haven't fully wrapped my head around and certainly in the west and you'll know this it's easy to get it. Tangled up with perfectionism strikes me as a problematic forced to say the least well essentially. I think all genuine spiritual paul's recognize that our true nature is something beyond our conceptual sort. It cannot be thought about it cannot be spoken about but it can be realized

Jetson Khurram India AMD Paul
The Joy Of Being Wrong With Adam Grant

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:58 min | Last month

The Joy Of Being Wrong With Adam Grant

"Adam. Hello thanks for coming on. Hey dan it's such a treat to be back although i have to tell you. I have not started meditating. That's fine. I have no plans to berate year for that fact what i plan to say off the top of this adam grant has done it again. You've written many books but the book for me. That's been most impactful as give and take and as i dive into this new book. I realized that this is landing in a lot of ways for me so just as an audience of one atom grande has done again. So congratulations well thank you. I hope i don't make you rethink that conversation. That would be poetic. But i doubt it's going to happen. So speaking of rethinking. Can i just get you to state the basic thesis of this book. This book for me is about rethinking. What intelligence means in a rapidly changing world. I think in a stable worlds which most of us for a long time thought we lived in intelligence was basically the ability to think and learn but now we live in a crazily turbulent world and i think increasingly being smart having good judgement even writing it wisdom requires us to be equally good at rethinking and learning and a lot of people assume that those things are the same that if i'm good at thinking and learning i'm also going to be good at rethinking and learning but as you know sometimes the better you are thinking the worse you become at rethinking because you can find so many compelling reasons to support your beliefs and essentially outsmart your own ability to question yourself and i think that's a very dangerous skill set and so for me this. This book is about saying look in many ways. Twenty twenty was a year where we were all forced to rethink so many things. We took for granted whether it's where we work or her whether we can get access to food and toilet paper or what are stances on racism and my hope is that in twenty twenty one and beyond we all get to be a little more proactive about rethinking before were forced to and saying you know what there might be some assumptions or opinions that i've held for a long time that no longer fit in the world that i live in. I said this to you before we started rolling. I think this is of evergreen importance this argument and it's particularly important right now. This is the word you use in the book. It's about mental flexibility and i struggle with it And yet i've just found it to be incredibly important because there is like now i'm going to get a little meditative with you but we'll see if you agree with me on this. I feel the more self aware. I become an. I'm not super self-aware but i'm somewhat software. The more that grows the more. I can see a sort of subtle pain. That's associated with dogmatism. Does that land for you. Yeah that's such an interesting way to frame it. Because i think for most people. What sailing is the pain of changing your mind right and just how much it hurts to admit that you were wrong to recognize that some of the major choices that you made in life maybe even some of the most important decisions you've made poorly thought out and if you could go back and do it over again you might actually have different views or make different choices and that discomfort for so many people it creates a ton of cognitive dissonance right and it's just easier to be consistent than it is to be flexible but i think you're you're exactly right that in the long run it hurts a lot more to stick to convictions that turn out to be false or at least ineffective for us. There was a great psychologist. George kelly who had what i think is an endlessly interesting definition of hostility. He said that hostility is the emotional reaction. You have when you find out that one of your beliefs is wrong and you always suspected it was wrong. But you don't want to admit it.

Adam Grant Adam DAN George Kelly
How To Do Nothing With Jenny Odell

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:51 min | Last month

How To Do Nothing With Jenny Odell

"Jenny. Thanks so much for doing this. Nice to meet you nice to meet you and thanks for having me so you have great line. I think you may be the opening line or one of the opening lines of your book. Nothing is harder to do the nothing. Can you unpack that. I totally agree. I just want to hear your point of view on that. yeah. I think that doing nothing. Or maybe more appropriately. Feeling like you're doing. Nothing is hard for several reasons. One is just habit. I think there's a habitual way of thinking in which you always need to be working towards something or having something to show for your time otherwise it was somehow worthless. I've been thinking about this a lot lately. Because ratings new book about time there's kind of like orientation toward time in general. I think that's almost a leaning forward. There's some desired outcome. that's different from the president. And you're sort of leaning forward in the space between those sue and to do nothing in relationship to that would be to simply just sit back and just in that moment as it is which is very difficult to do because of that. I think you get into that posture. It's something you get used to. The posture leaning forward the great writer and former buddhist monks. Stephen batchelor i believe. Hopefully i'm steven. If you're listening. We're friends so he might be listening. I apologize if we're gonna mangle this line. But i believe in his book buddhism without beliefs. He says something about how our default state is wanting to be elsewhere or otherwise. Yeah that's exactly. That's such a good way of putting it. It's this kind of underlying dissatisfaction or feeling that something where you are inadequate therefore you need to be sort of working working against that. I think that actually that line makes me. Think of pauline oliveros who i talk about in the book who is a sound artist and composer and she's similarly says the reason for needing to cultivate deep listening which is her name for sitting in an environment and listening actively is that our culture privileges snap judgment basically needing to grasp and react to things and that the opposite of that which would just be kind of empty. Listening is something that i think you already need to train yourself to do but especially have to train yourself to do now because everything's kind of a raid against that. How have we gotten ourselves into this situation. Because i fully agree. I feel haunted by what We're both quoting a lot of other people. Hear about quote again is a great podcast or jocelyn k. glide as a podcast called hurry slowly. She's been on the show and she talks about something called productivity shame which really describes my mindset. Maybe twenty two and a half hours per day of just feeling haunted always behind every moment needs to be maximized optimize utilized. Where does this mindset. come from. Well i mean. I have been on her podcast. And she's great. I love that podcasts. But in terms of where this mindset comes from just a mere speaking from my own experience. I think that it probably starts pretty early on. I mean i have. I have journals going back to when i was just old enough to right and have you know really detailed journals through high school in college and i went back through them about a year and a half ago and i was kind of horrified. Find myself saying the same exact thing today. Say now like. I never have any time. You can just see this kind of always running after something like always trying to catch up and there's like some passengers where like staring towards the santa cruz mountains and sort of wishing i can just go over there and draw of this and it's the kind of very familiar refrain and so i was reflecting when i was reading those about how even and that was pre social media kind of over scheduled. I was and i think that's kind of a combination of you know school could be your parents. It could just be kind of like the ether of expectation. Like that something. That i think about a lot with my students who are at stanford be that. No one in particular is telling them that they need to do that many things. It's just an expectation that exists around them so it's really like a culture a business or culture productivity where yes technically you are. Free did not participate in that but you will feel the pressure of not falling in line with that culture.

Stephen Batchelor Jocelyn K Jenny Pauline Oliveros Steven Santa Cruz Mountains Stanford
interview With Tara Brach

Good Life Project

04:39 min | Last month

interview With Tara Brach

"So i heard la monroe in conversation with dan harris and he mentioned this interesting question to lead with and that was. How's your heart and not long ago. I heard you in conversation with your friend. Dan gottlieb which was beautiful conversation. And we'll touch on that a bit and you led into that conversation with that very same question so i thought maybe it would be an interesting way for us to lead into our conversation by simply inviting you to share. Your heart is right now jonathan. I'm glad you're opening that way. I i heard it when you heard it. That opening with murad and i started with him that way. And there's nothing better than a check into the heart so right now. I'm just feeling kind of gladness in just gratitude. I often think of rumi sang. Do you make regular visits to yoursel and it just always feels like such a gift when you know. There's that invitation to say okay. What's right here in this heart right now. So in this moment a gladness to talking to you Feeling a lot of have a lot of blessings in my life and the contrast of that and the degree of suffering pandemonium in our world is just so big that that's the ever present backdrop so there's kind of the mix of sorrow and worry and concern and Also feeling of gratitude both from for what from my personal blessings but also sense of hopefulness. Actually right now dan. It's interesting to that balance of Acknowledging the fairly call it may that's tends to be swirling around so many of us right now at the same time touching down into this place of gratitude. Gratitude interesting where you know if we actually circle back to that conversation where i i heard. You share that question with dan gottlieb. I mean his story alone blew my mind as she wasn't familiar with him Until you introduce me to him and would you share a little bit about about him. Because i think his story and the way that he sort of found his way back to this sense of present gratitude is is is really beautiful compelling yeah so dan gottlieb Probably early thirties. He was a psychologist. Clinical psychologist married children and he got into an accident that he he ended up paraplegic and he talks about his first converted the beginning and intensive care and how everything just felt like. Life's not going to be worth living. I don't think i can do this. And he shared with me. how one night and intensive care nurse was with them and she was really down she had a relationship falling apart and so on and she talked him for hours about it and the next morning she came by and said you know it just made a world of difference to talk to you and when she left he said you know i can live if if i can be engaged in feel a sense of that giving and receiving life's worth it and he's he's talked about how he's had dinner just countless ups and downs but there's something in him that is so cherishing life that he's probably the most grateful person i know and the something about that jonathan. This person who's been confined to a wheelchair for decades and soon after his accident. Actually his wife died. And you know he's gone through every so many losses and for him to have the basic lead into live. Being one of cherishing and savoring is just such a model at such a model so yeah. Dan got leave. He was a radio host in philly for years for anyone. That's interested in following a story and he has grandson on the spectrum and he's written some beautiful books including something to do a sam in the title so yes he's a he's a notable.

Dan Gottlieb La Monroe Rumi Sang Dan Harris Murad Jonathan DAN Philly
Everything You Wanted to Know About Self-Love But Were Afraid to Ask

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:12 min | Last month

Everything You Wanted to Know About Self-Love But Were Afraid to Ask

"Says in jeff. Thanks for doing this. Glad to be here happy to be here. Let's dive in with voice voicemails go. We're going to be playing voicemails listeners. Left us with questions about self love and self compassion and meditation. Before i play that though. I wanna play you a clip of you guys talking. Because after we recorded an episode a few weeks ago we caught you guys talking in ways that revealed your own inner critic. Let me just play that to you. I'll just say quickly feel free to trim whenever you want. I vowed take a little bit too not to be self critical but it took a little while to of me to warm up so i think i kind of rambled a bit off the top so i will not be offended if you decide to take big chunks of that out okay. I know that this is none of my business. I did not hear rambling. And i felt the same as you. So jeff let me start with you clearly. Even after having spent the whole episode which we posted a few weeks ago in which we talked about managing the inner critic yours is not vanquished. Yeah thanks for busting me outing me as a human true. Yeah no i mean it's an ongoing feature of my life actually even during recording something like that you know. There's a part of me that wants to do the best job i can. So i'm thinking about that. And i did a good job and i can recognize when i'm more on point when i'm not now if i were moore economist with that i would know that it would serve all wash out in the end and it would be fine but because i'm not totally because part of me locates except for myself in others in some way i still get hooked so for sure know. That's why do this frigging practice. That's why i could so relate to the whole self compassionate thing. 'cause i need it. Yeah i have no idea what you're talking about. Sorry her no. I realized this is early when we were recording the other day you played a clip of me talking inside. I noticed i was just cringing. I was like oh god. I don't want to listen to my own voice and at the end i said something like well. That's sounds like a know it. All and the second i said it i was like oh crap i just did it. I just dissed myself. And i did feel uncomfortable hearing my voice and all i heard in it was well. She sounds quite holier than thou. And i don't know how it sounded to anyone else and i don't know if i'd heard it on a different day i would have heard something else but yeah that's not gone. That's not gone but what does seem more present. In addition to the just like self owning constantly is seeing that himself owning say where are these elision fields of perfect mental health. Who has the exactly here. You look around. I mean actually when you spend time with people who've been meditating for a longtime senior teachers. They're human foibles. Or right there. And i think that maybe there are some people who really have zero suffering in their life. I how would you know. I am skeptical super skeptical. Yeah dan at one point in a past conversation. You and i talked about this. I went through a period in my life. Where a lot of panic attacks. And if i would tell someone about it they would say well. You're a meditation teacher. Shouldn't you just be able to meditate. And i'll be like no. It doesn't change the truth of being a beautiful messy crazy awesome human and what meditation does enable you to do what appears to experience it more fully with a more open heart. This is such an employer in conversation. The conversation of sort of like what can you change in your life. And what can't you change. You know for me personally. It's either diagnosed with. Add have diagnosis in bipolar. I have this kind of tortured. Inner situation for many years of my life and i thought meditation was going to cure me of that tortured. Inner situation that it was going to bring my attention in so less shooting off in all directions that it would bring my emotional life in which has a natural up and down. That can be quite wild and it's been a very very very very long process of realizing that it's not gonna do that. It rather it does sort of but not in the ways you think that incoming into accepting the weird way your configured so my case this particular sensitively that's going to create a volatility in my attention and my mood incoming to do that then. It shaves off all the suffering in the system. that's amplifying those signals. That's making you more volt. How the mood is making your attention. More strung out and desperate to find some place to land so in other words i had to learn to accept this complicated messy person in order to really receive the gifts of that configuration. And i think that's what every one of us is facing in our life in a way

Jeff Moore DAN Bipolar
How to Call People In (Instead of Calling Them Out)

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:05 min | Last month

How to Call People In (Instead of Calling Them Out)

"Loretta great to meet you. Thanks for coming on. Thanks for having me on your show. Fortunately or unfortunately this is the perfect moment to have you on I wish it was a calmer moment in history but given that it's not i'm glad that Have the chance to talk to you. When i woke up on wednesday morning after the election. I was you for 'cause. I knew that we had turned georgia blue. And in five hours later i was Because we have so much further to go to bring our country back from the brink of self destruction and so royal emotions right now because i fear for our democracy even though i call myself the queen of the call in culture. There's some people. I don't want to call it at all. I'm gonna call him out because they enabled this insurrection. Seems to be that. If they can't control it they don't wanna share a democracy. You said before that you have the the the moniker of the queen of the call in culture. Do you have any hope that there are some constructive calling in that can be done at this time in a country where we are really at each other's throats all at each other's throat if you don't mind out indulging me tell you how i see the world i think that first of all i live in ninety percent bubble of people who are progressive sometimes even call us radical which i don't mind i consider that a compliment but the people that i most in conversation with. We understand that. There's things like racism. Sexism homophobia transphobia immigration violence. At all of that stuff going in the world we even have our own little lexicon of all the 'isms that we talk about and part of my problem is that we in the ninety percent bubble. Spend too much time trying to turn ourselves into one hundred percent. i like. we're supposed to perfectly align with every thought as if i work on women's rights that means i'm doing something wrong because i'm not working on trance. Right if are working on trance rights. Doing something wrong. If i'm not working on racial justice on and on and on that's why i call us a circular firing squad because we're all on the same team but we spend our best anger on each other for not being cult members. We're all supposed to be. Apparently one hundred percent aligned. Outside of us are what. I call the seventy five percenters. These are people. Who don't use our insider jargon of homophobia all of these other words but they're lined with us in a world view. So since i'm a women's rights activists a seventy five percent for me would be somebody like the girl scouts where they may not be organizing the girl scouts to market a protests. Like i would. But at the same time they worked for women's and girls empowerment so they will be my ally even if they are repelled by jargon. So i'm gonna to find a way to talk to them in a register the fake it here versus the register that i used for the ninety percenters. Outside of the seventy five percenters are the middle of the roaders. Did a fifty percent of those people like my parents. My father was a lifer in the military in the army very conservative retired. After twenty six years my mother was a southern evangelical christian woman and there probably wasn't a whole lot of common language evacuate us from ninety percent bubble on my parents but at the same time. They taught me their values. And i'll tell you a conversation that my mom had. I had one day back in the fifties. My mother has started a black girl. Scout troops in san antonio was because black girls want allow to join the white girl scouts troops and every weekend we had to cook food and feed it to the homeless people in san antonio and so mom could never figure out hat what is social justice. Human rights activists did and finally. I put it to us and mom deliver when we had to feed the homeless people when i was a girl scout and she of course she she said yes. I said well as human rights activists. I asked why they're hungry in the first place and she got it because she said oh okay i feed them and you wanna know why they're hungry and so you can use that kind of values driven language to talk to fifty percents if you stay away from your jargon and your assumptions that they don't have values that you can agree with

Loretta Georgia San Antonio Army
A Big Dose Of Perspective With Jack Kornfield

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:43 min | Last month

A Big Dose Of Perspective With Jack Kornfield

"Jack. Great to see you and thank you for coming Great pleasure thank you. Dan also for having me. It's time when we. I think we need to all come together and use our best wisdom and understanding of how to navigate. I completely agree and so let me. Just start with your mind. What are you doing to stay even in your own mind. Of course i meditate some but more importantly arrested in place that has a lot of spaciousness in it and a kind of trust. I'm old enough at age. Seventy five to have seen revolutions. Common go and difficulties arise in pass. Have and i also see that. There's i guess it was martin. Luther king talked about the moral arc of the universe being long but advance toward justice. I see that there's ways that systems also regulate themselves so whether it's the pandemic that we are in the throes of that is really causing enormous amount of suffering and loss whether it's the political disruptions in the capital and otherwise were just the calls for racial and economic justice that we needed for so long. I feel we're in a evolutionary process with its fits and starts. And i think about people like one gary mata who won the nobel prize for the greenbelt in east africa. She started by planning one to ten. Twenty fifty trees got other people to do. It eventually was thrown in prison on. I think that's a requirement for nobel peace laureates mostly And ended up planning fifty one million trees in changing a lot of the face to be africa or or or ellen sirleaf in manga bowie also nobel prize winners who said their country. Liberia used to be known for its child. Soldiers in had these terrible civil wars and now it's known for its women leaders and so there is some way in which just as the green sprouts come up through the cement in the sidewalk. There's something about life in. it's also the human heart that wants to renew itself. And so i rest back in kind and loving awareness to say yes. Let me turn my gaze away from the from the needs suffering the things to respond but also to hold it in a much bigger context justice. I agree that universe in the world is breathing. And that's how i keep my mind on a good day not the mean. There are bad days a bad moments but mostly my heart is pretty peaceful but you know there are things. I get a call from my daughter. Dad you know. This terrible thing is happening. At the nonprofit she runs for getting asylum for all people whose lives are endangered. What do i do our calls from dear friends. Oh my family has covid. So i'm deeply touched by these things and responding. Sometimes they really affect me. And i can feel the pain of it. You know or give worried but with all of that. There's a rounded a field of loving awareness of spaciousness entrust. That gives a much bigger picture and there. I'm just going on back away trying to answer your question and also spread out a little bit. When i was a monk training in the forest monasteries in southeast asia as a buddhist monk the main forest temple i lived was in a province adjoining. Both laos in cambodia was during the war in vietnam and laos cambodia. So we would see fighter jets going overhead and bombers and you know in some of the branch monasteries you could even see flashes from the from the bombs and people would come visit us. I had friends who were working in. Vietnam laos people that i knew as i had been working on medical teams in that ray calm river valley saying what are you doing sitting on your you know. There's a war to stop. There's things we need to do and my teacher would say. This is the place where we stop the war.

Gary Mata Ellen Sirleaf Luther King Greenbelt DAN East Africa Jack Martin Liberia Bowie Africa Laos Cambodia Vietnam Laos Cambodia Asia River Valley
The Anti-Diet With Evelyn Tribole

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:06 min | 2 months ago

The Anti-Diet With Evelyn Tribole

"Thanks for making time for this. Yeah absolutely how did you get into. Meditation is so bizarre. I have was a securities route The long short story is when my mom was dying of cancer. I had to keep missing sessions with patients and i would tell them. Why didn't they flaky. And so patient might give me a book called mindful grieving and i remember looking at it. They can wine the hell. Do i wanna feel migrelief. I am a ten of sadness and it broke me open. Because i noticed during those times i practice some mindfulness as i knew it back then i was just a little baby meditators off but i noticed there was times is neutral that time to actually was happy even though my mom was dying and so with open something up and then taking this is this is really funny. I took a professional retreat with someone. Who's a zen zen master and a pediatrician as for health professionals. And i'll never forget the second time they made us meditate. I thought i was going to die a call my best friend. They made us meditate two times. And now we're going to go into silence and long story short here i am. I fell in love with meditation. I now trained with dan brown. Who's just an amazing teacher for me. I've never met dan brown. He's at harvard at harvard and the thing that appeals to me. Personally i'm a skeptic. That's what i loved about your story. I'm a skeptic. I'm always the one asking the questions. And because he's also an academic practitioner. He is a very satisfying relationship with my mind. And he's he's just really really gifted and And one of the most homeless persons. I've ever met especially being at harvard. You know so. How did you find him. Oh i got. His book is really really big. Book about the state of meditation. Mahamoud mudra pointing out the way. And i bought it. Put it down five years later. I picked it up and it blew me away. And i had the i realized i had the illusion of his meditating but it was not meditating properly and i thought i've got to go meet this guy. I've got to go train with him and i did. And that's what Just knocked me over. So would you say you weren't meditating properly. But he pointed out the way to do it properly. What with what would the difference. What was the difference there in the technique between with meditation. Your mongols all over the place and one of the techniques he has. I'm gonna decent detail since. I'm not a teacher but he really. Has you practice the awareness of your breath the entire way and really noticing when you leave noticing when you have partial iced concentration in these types of things and so the other thing. I like about him as a teacher when you go into retreat with him. He's there the whole time usually other retreats. I've been a teacher for me about an hour and then there's constant interaction i connected with it very deeply so you when you say you went and met him did you. Just say hey. Can i get a little bit of your time or do you show up and no no no. I showed up to retreats. I signed up and it was so funny was held a monastery so it was like. Oh my god. I'm going in deep here and it was great. It was really really great and i have become. You talked about being ten percent happier. I think i'm a. I'm ten percent better person which makes people around me happy. We're you complex. Before i didn't think i was i didn't think i was reactive and i realize holy moly was so reactive but this thing that has changed with is telling this with dan we just met a couple of months ago is that i have changed. I actually this is gonna sound terrible before. I would do the right thing because you're supposed to but now i actually genuinely care it. It's hard to put into words what this is but this connection and this compassion and talk a lot about the wu stuff the most you stuff and i'm like that and now here i am talking about stuff and it's like oh we have to end all suffering and so this is done in my career you get it. Yeah i'm not. I'm not a person but it has lit my passion for what i do to a level i didn't expect would happen to put an end to unnecessary suffering as it relates to mind and body. Because there's so much unnecessary suffering around eating and body and judgment and shame and you talk about conceptual mind. Oh my gosh. The rules and the concepts and the judgements. That are out there. It's neat to watch people's lives change. You know it's a technique that we created through intuitive eating over twenty five years ago we've updated it all along and the cool thing is there's now research on our method and it just it just warms my heart and ways. I just can't begin to describe. We're going to go deep on diet culture at

Harvard Dan Brown Mahamoud Mudra Cancer DAN
A Counterintuitive Remedy for Stress with Sebene Selassie

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:26 min | 2 months ago

A Counterintuitive Remedy for Stress with Sebene Selassie

"Hey there this is. Seven a welcome to this meditation on developing friendliness and compassion towards ourselves. Research shows that when we have self compassion. We exhibit more resilience ruminate less and are able to learn from setbacks easier. A friendly and compassionate attitude is imbued with ease. When i'm kind to myself it's like my whole system starts to relax. We're going to practice bringing a friendly and kind attitude to ourselves by extending compassion for stress. Let's start find a comfortable posture. Take a few moments to settle into your body. Perhaps connecting with the breath to gather your attention. This feel that air coming in and out the breathing in breathing out. Can you rest awareness on the body feeling sensations going inwards. Just notice how you feel in this moment you can ask yourself what's happening right now. How does the body feel. What do you notice in the mind with your emotions. Not changing or trying to fix anything just notice without judgment in a moment. I'm going to invite you to say some phrases to yourself. Just remember for the next few minutes. We'll be training your capacity for self compassion. And let's begin that training by considering a major stress in your life right now. Allow yourself to feel it by connecting to it in the body notice where it is and how it feels. Now offer yourself these three simple phrases. This is stress. Stress is a part of life. May i find ease stay connected to the sensation in the body continuing to bring awareness repeating these phrases silently to yourself. This is stress. Stress is a part of life. May i find ease. You want to feel better. We all do even in the midst of your stress. You've chosen to engage with this meditation.

Kryptonite for the Inner Critic With Kristin Neff

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:30 min | 2 months ago

Kryptonite for the Inner Critic With Kristin Neff

"Nice to sue they you for doing this. I've been wanting to talk to you for a while. Actually because i've actually writing a book about kindness right now and i wanna do a chapter about self compassion. So you are the you are the leading experts so before we get to sell compassion. Though i wanna. I wanna hear how you got interested in meditation in the first place right so It was my last year graduate school. I was finishing up my phd at berkeley and basically my life was a mess. I'd gotten out of a divorce. It was a very messy divorce. I was feeling a lot of shame. I'm and i was also feeling a lot of stress not so much about what i finish my phd. But more after seven years of my life. When i get a job the job market was really tight. And so i thought you know. Well i've heard that meditation is is good for stress in berkeley. So right down. The street from me was a meditation group. I was lucky every right down every street. Yeah in berkeley so that you know on every corner but luckily the one. I chose to go to The woman leaving the group it was actually a tick not han sanga reason. It's important is because some meditation teachers. Mindfulness bennett teachers wouldn't necessarily talk about self compassion tic time one thing that's unique about him. He's really emphasizes heart qualities of practice. Vietnamese zen master doesn't talk a lot about compassion. Full stop is but he does in particular right and so i started in his tradition And the very the very first night. I went the woman talked about having compassion for yourself the needed to actively cultivate compassion for yourself as well as others and so i was also learning mindfulness but because my life was such a mess because i was such a mess you know almost immediately i saw the difference it made when i turn myself with this kind of kind. Warm supportive attitude. I just saw my own experience really made a difference. So and then i started practicing more in the insight meditation tradition. I think because. I am a scientists it. It was a little more compatible with my Way of approaching things. But with people like jack cornfield the path with heart. Sharon salzberg loving kindness. So i was always i was always really drawn to the integration of you might say the spaciousness of mindfulness with the heart opening qualities of compassion and i was fortunate because it was their practice from the very beginning and that was about twenty years ago. Let me just jump in and define terms for people. Yes i i just never know. We have a lot of experienced meditators who listen for new folks who are coming every week in once you start to meditate. There are lots of ways to lots away within buddhism. There are. I would say at least two big skills. We're trying to teach. One is mindfulness which is put simply the ability not to be around by your emotions. The other is compassion. Or if you're if you're afraid as. I am of gooey words. You can just re translate that into friendliness. Just exactly cooler. Calmer nicer attitude toward external and internal phenomena can replace would cooler with warmer sure. I mean i know jimmy but fair enough so it sounds like you pivoted from the initial zen tradition into what's known as the insight tradition which is just another form of buddhist meditation. It's actually the school. I've trained in and right stumbled upon teachers like jack cornfield. Sharon salzberg both of whom have written a lot about yes. Mindfulness again just being able to be non-judgmental aware of stuff compassion which is adding in the notch just non-judgmental aware but having a certain element of warmth in the awareness and so so the mindfulness is aimed holding experience in a non judgmental manner so the compassion is aimed holding the experience in a friendly manner and so they have slightly different targets and so both need to be practiced that can actually almost appear to conflict. Sometimes because you accept your experience as it is including the fact that it's painful at the same time that you wishing yourself well and you want to help. And so it almost forms a bit of a paradox. Actually one of the scenes we like to say is we give ourselves compassion not to feel better but because we feel bad so you have to allow the experience to be as it is at the same time as toward the experience. Because you're friendly because you care you do what you can to help. So one paradox is since sara restate that and i'm also thinking that there may be yet. Another paradox probably won paradox. Is you in mindfulness meditation. We are not trying to control anything. We're just trying to see things as they are right. See clearly insight. The clear seeing of whatever's happening so that it doesn't own us right but in this case All when you add in the compassion layer you're trying to Notice that they're suffering there and you're not trying to alleviate it per se you're just sending warmth toward the suffering as it is trying to manipulate your experience because if you use compassion to try to make the pain go away. It's actually just another form of resistance so you have to fully accept the fact that this was painful this hurt. You know mess the mindfulness validating accepting the fact that this is really painful right now

Berkeley Jack Cornfield Sharon Salzberg Han Sanga Mindfulness Bennett Jimmy Sara
Manure for Enlightenment

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:40 min | 2 months ago

Manure for Enlightenment

"Mall. Thanks for coming on my pleasure. Dan great v. here. So let's start. I'm sure you're not surprised that i'm going to start here with your personal story as i understand it. A big landmark in your personal and contemporary of development was going to prison. Can you tell that story. Yeah absolutely. I'll try to relatively briefly so yes that was A really important time for me. I spent fourteen years in federal prison. How did i get there. I was one of those baby boomers that came of age in the sixties kind of classic angry young man graduate from high school in nineteen sixty eight completely. Disillusion daily naked justifiably or not. That's what was going on with me. Both families up but a lot to do with the cultural stuff. All the assassinations and so forth and i grew up in the midwest roman catholic up being basically good family but we out her issues. Alcoholism and things like that. There was quite painful. Sixty eight was one of the multiple two issues culturally in this country. I just went headlong into the counterculture went off to a big state university but really majored and drugs and rock and roll and antiwar politics and any other crazy again bombed in. But i'd always been a spiritual seeker. In fact my family always thought i was going to go into the priesthood early on or something like that so i'd always been as brutal secret. I continued that all along. And so i ended up eventually leaving the country. I just became so alienated. I in part to get away from the drug culture house and baldin and partic- nixon was reelected. I i just wanted to get out and also was on this search for something authentic. I remember at a time in my childhood when i felt really plugged into reality things. We're very ribbon. Really been magical and that kind of just gone away at some point and that's probably a normal developmental process. But i never made peace with it so i was always hungry for that looking for that and you know the drugs were some mirage of that but obviously with a lot of baggage and if you got a hole in your gut indicative propensities that can take you down a lot of twisted roads. So i did leave the country star traveling as an ex pat throughout latin america. And and that was very transformative time. I've spent a year living on a sailboat to another guy night a small native both that we learned how to sail and kind of an incredible life for a while and just living off the ocean literally and and then sold. The boat continued to south. American and i had some notion about getting to prue and finding something magical there and had nothing to do with drugs. I don't know where. I got the idea but i did get there and did. Discover something quite magical. They're just environmentally. There was some kind of real magic in the environment. And unfortunately the first time i came back to the states. When i ran out of money. I had to come back and work for a while. I couldn't bring them with me. So i realized you know it was still environmental and anyway this went on and eventually at near the second time i fell into or may choices rather engaging kind of small time cocaine smuggling originally just i was i had a connection and i would purchase something for people who are coming down and smugglers and i can make like a thousand dollars and live off that for six months down there so i continued like that for a while eventually got involved smuggling myself to come back to the us. And you know that kind of path remained intertwined. While before i could pull it apart. But when i came back for the us for was to go to nairobi university. I'd been trying to practice on my own for a couple years. High mountains impro- in a little place that bay remote valley up above the sacred valley. The incas and i zeroed in on the tibetan buddhist tradition reading the few books that were available at that time. And and then when i someone actually showed up at my house there with a copy of rolling stone magazine in nineteen seventy four with an article about that first summer session. It was kind of legendary in boulder at neuropathy vendor open institute and when i saw trump firm shades name i just knew i had to go there and so i did and went. Got my master's degree there. It was very intense. Contempt would've or clinical contemporary psychology program. And that was very transformative in the process. I became a student but i kept his other shadow. Part of my life a secret for quite a while from teacher from everyone i would disappear once or twice a year. I was able to live outside. The system continued to pursue my interest and so forth and my marriage was falling apart. I kept those problems at bay with money. And so i had all this cognitive dissonance and when i was traveling with my teacher which i was very fortunate to some develop that relationship and travel with him a lot as one of his primary attendance and when i was on retreats and i spent about half the year and retreats programs are traveling with him and then i was leading a very sane life and now go to this completely crazy life back and forth and before i could tease that apart i ended up earning my way into what originally looked like a thirty year. No parole prison sentence

Dan Great Baldin Partic Midwest Nixon Nairobi University Bay Remote Valley Latin America Neuropathy Vendor Open Institu Rolling Stone Magazine United States Boulder
A Great Way to Get Out of Your Head

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:16 min | 3 months ago

A Great Way to Get Out of Your Head

"Hello. This is joseph nice to be with you. Compassion arises from a willingness to come close to suffering and in response to the suffering we encounter. The compassionate heart asks the question. How can i help this meditation. We will use compassionate phrases to cultivate the feeling of compassion toward another. Let's explore the some together. Take a comfortable sitting posture. Settle into the awareness of the body. I know you're sitting. You can begin to feel sensations of the body breathing centering. The attention the awareness at the heart center that area in the center of the chest as if you're breathing in and out from this heart center breathing. No you're breathing in breathing out. No your breathing out. Let the hard in mind. Relax into this awareness of the breath at the heart center and then call to mind someone you know either personally or perhaps someone from the news. Somebody who's experiencing some kind of suffering in their lives maybe that they're experiencing some physical distress mental suffering. Bring an image of this person to mind in some way open to connecting with the suffering that they're experiencing and simply repeat the basic phrase of compassionate. Wish may be free of suffering may be free of suffering as best you can hold the image for the sense of that person in mind aware of the suffering that they're experiencing and connecting with your own inner motivation to help in whatever way you can slowly repeating. The phrase of compassionate response may be free of suffering may be free of suffering. It may be that as you're expressing. This wish may be free of suffering holding the person who's experiencing difficulties in their lives in your mind and your heart. It may be that your own mind will begin to wander get lost in thoughts past future the soon as you become aware that the mind is lost in thought simply come back to feeling the body

Joseph
The Science of Emotional Intelligence With Daniel Goleman

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:44 min | 3 months ago

The Science of Emotional Intelligence With Daniel Goleman

"My friend danny goldman wonderful. Dan you wrote. This obscure book called emotional intelligence. Twenty five years ago. I acted because it became a massive bestseller and let me ask a really basic question. What is emotional intelligence. Well you know when. I wrote emotional intelligence. Iq was like the big thing and it was really speaking to people's overemphasis on purely cognitive ability so much intelligence means being intelligent about your emotions and you know the way i look at it. There's four parts to that. There's being aware self-awareness. Very big part of it knowing what you're feeling y you're feeling it how it impacts you then managing your emotions using that self awareness to get over your upsets and you know encourage positive emotions motivations and so on and then empathy tuning into other people and what. They're feeling and to do that if to pick up. A lot of nonverbal cues people. Don't tell you in words they tell you. In other ways facial expression so and then putting that all together to manage relationships will to be effective with other people that might be the most visible part of emotional intelligence but interestingly so f- awareness the least visible part turns out to be foundational when you talk about self awareness within the e. q. Context is it the same thing as mindfulness. Why would say. Mindfulness is an application of self awareness. Mindfulness in mindfulness practice. You watch your mind very carefully. You don't let yourself get sucked in to this thought of that. Thought you don't judge it. You see it your knowledge it you let it go. That's definitely self awareness. But you don't have to be a mindfulness practitioner to be self aware. Anybody can do it anytime. What are you experiencing right now. What are you thinking about what you feeling. The answers to that are all so foreignness. It seems like it might be much easier to do. If you've got a mindfulness practice i would say that. A mindfulness practice is the equivalent of getting cardiovascular fit. You know the more you work out the more you ride your bike the more you do the treadmill the more you do whatever it is the easier it gets you you become more able to exercise for a long time and the same thing with exercising your mind. Which is what mindfulness is. It's a metal workout and the workout. Is you make a deal with yourself. That you're gonna watch thoughts and your feelings and not judge them and let them come and go and when you get distracted and you get caught up in a thought and you notice you're caught up you bring it back to that mindful stance that bring it back. I think is the equivalent of the you know lifting await in gym every time you lift weight. That muscle gets a little stronger. And i think every time you bring your mind back the brain circuits for being able to observe what's going on. Get a little stronger. It says your concentration and you know. I just finished book with my friend. And i think you know to richard davidson the neuroscientist at wisconsin where we looked at all the most recent best studies of meditation and we found that beginners become more calm and they're more able to focus and interestingly from a brain point of view. Both of those things use the same circuitry

Danny Goldman DAN Richard Davidson Wisconsin
What is Happiness

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:49 min | 3 months ago

What is Happiness

"Hi this is j. When we're feeling happiness or joy it needs definition. it's just the feeling of happiness but we don't really want to be happy all the time. That would be weird. Human life has its ups and downs. It would be really odd to just to feel happy. All the time at cemeteries or reading news of injustice or war so what is happiness than. Let's do a little guided meditation together to take a look begin by settling the mind resting in the body coming to rest in the present moment. Go ahead and close your eyes or leave them open if you prefer and find stillness in your posture a comfortable position where you won't have to move around much for the next little while maybe take a nice deep breath just to start all right. Let's bring to mind something. You really want something that you're pretty sure will really bring you happiness. Choose something that's real for you. Whatever it is for you bring it to mind. Kept in touch with the yearning. That's a big part of what it is to be human to yearn for something or someone getting in touch with what you really want and what it feels like in your mind and your body to want it now next. Shift your imagination to what it would be like to have that thing. What would it feel like to have that. Be real in life. Now take just a moment to feel that and then see if you can put some words to this feeling maybe contentment love acceptance. Let's take some time now. Explore that for a bit. You might also notice that any feeling can coexist with this kind of happiness. This natural ease the mind arresting you can feel profound sadness for the suffering in the world or among people you love and yet it's still now still this moment still here. This kind of happiness isn't a feeling that comes and goes. It's the ease of the mind at home with itself. See if you can explore this a little bit thought comes up rest in the mind and see how it feels in the body. Go ahead and open. Your eyes. Affair been closed and do a quick check. Is it now. Is it here

Secrets from the Happiness Lab With Laurie Santos

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:40 min | 3 months ago

Secrets from the Happiness Lab With Laurie Santos

"All right. Let's get to today's episode. Twenty twenty as we all know sucked extremely hard already but we may now be entering into even more difficult months ahead as winter sets in and the case loads appear to be rising so we asked professor. Laurie santos to come on the show. She is overflowing with science based strategies for navigating this difficult time this is the second episode and our two part series that we are semi facetiously calling. Winter is coming. If you missed last week's episode zindel segal a pioneer in mindful treatment for depression and anxiety. Go back and check that. One out laurie. Meanwhile as a tenured professor at yale where she teaches a blockbuster course unhappiness. she's also now. The host of a really popular podcast. A really great podcast called the happiness lab and in this conversation we talk about how to handle the holidays in a pandemic how to have hard conversations with your family combating pandemic fatigue in your own mind. The need to double down on self care these days. Why the things we think will make us happy. Probably won't and the cultivation of jomo the opposite of fomo and time effluence. Here we go. Laurie santos laurie santos. Thanks for coming on. thanks for having me. It's a pleasure. So let me just start with your course which there been a bunch of articles about your course in the new york times in new york magazine and so i've been following your work for a long time. But can you just describe how you became interested in teaching this students. And why you think it took off in such an incredible way. Yeah so it. All started when i took on a new role so i've been teaching for over a decade. Now which makes me feel very old but in just the last couple of years. I took on this new position. I became a head of college on campus. And so y'all's one of these weird places like hogwarts where they're like colleges within a college like connect griffin doris leather in sort of thing And so i'm head of silliman college no relation to slither and even though people get that confused but what that means that. I live with students on campus. Like my house is literally in the middle of their quad. I e with them in the dining hall. I kind of hang out with them in the courtyard as i was seeing student. Life up. Close and personal and honestly. I didn't like what i was seeing. I was kinda shocked at the level of mental health. Dysfunction that my students were dealing with it was something. I was kind of blind to while i was like up at the front of the classroom. Which sort of embarrassing. Now in retrospect. But i kind of just didn't see it but you know so many students reporting. They're depressed and anxious and this caused me to like look. Is there something weird about yale or something. We're doing wrong but conceptually to something. We're seeing nationally like right now. The national statistics are really scary over forty percent of college students today. Report being too depressed to function. I shouldn't say today. this is more two thousand. Nineteen sorta of pre kovic time right so in two thousand nineteen over forty percent of college. Students were too depressed to function over sixty percent report. They felt overwhelmingly anxious most days and more than one in ten said. They'd seriously considered suicide in the last year. And so these are national statistics but this bore out what. I was seeing on campus. It just felt like you know honestly. We weren't meeting our educational mission at yale right. We're bringing these students here but you know for students in my lecture and forty percent of the kids out there. Too depressed function most days like they're not learning computer science or chaucer trying to teach them at yale right there just kinda missing it and so i thought it was sort of part of my educational mission to sort of fix this and as a psychologist i thought you know. There's lots of work on the kinds of practices. You can engage with to improve your mental health. It doesn't have to be this way. And so i thought i know i'll develop this whole new class about living a good life and all these evidence based practices students could use. I no idea. I thought it was going to be thirty or so students. Because that's what's typical for a new class. And i remember yale. Students don't register ahead of time so it's like once the classes offered you kind of watch. This little graph of how many students are interested in your course and the i noticed something weird was happening. Was that the graph in most classes went from zero to one hundred students but mine had an order of magnitude difference. It went from zero to one thousand students and then it went over. That and i was like this is strange and that was because over. A quarter of the students at yale wanted to take the class the first time it was offered over a thousand students and so that created lots of logistical hurdles. Like finding a concert hall. That was big enough to fit everyone. You know joked about putting it in the football stadium but that would be a little cold. And yeah i mean when it showed me. Was that students you know. They don't like this culture of feeling stressed anxious. They're really like searching for solutions. And i was sort of proud of them because they were really looking for evidence based solutions. Like they didn't want platitudes or just kind of self help but they wanted to know what did the science say about how you could live healthier.

Laurie Santos Yale Zindel Segal Griffin Doris Silliman College Laurie Anxiety Depression New York Times New York Football
"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:46 min | 6 months ago

"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Is ten percent happier podcast. I'm Dan Harris. Hey guys. We're doing something a little different for the Friday bonus meditation this week. This one's from seven Selassie author of the forthcoming. Book you belong. And instead of just doing. The traditional mindfulness move of. Tuning into the breath and the body, and there's a little bit of that in here. She's also encouraging us to to work on some other trainable skills such as perspective and gratitude. With that said over seventy. Hi. This is Ebony. As it three time cancer survivor I've come to appreciate both the blessings and challenges of my life. How it's all contributed to the happiness and well-being I have in this moment. And this meditation you'll be reflecting on your life as a way to cultivate appreciation for the particular roads you've traveled to get here. Let's begin. Find a comfortable seated posture. Your is can be open or closed. said. But make sure your back is not tight or rigid. Take a few moments to settle into your body. Connecting to the breath as a way to anchor and gather your attention. Let's spend some time reviewing your life starting with childhood. Bring to mind a happy memory from when you were a kid. We all have them even if for some of us, they're harder to remember. Try and connect to where when and how it occurred. See, if you can elicit all the sensory recollections of this happy memory. That's just one moment in entire childhood of sensory memories. All the childhood experiences that got you here. Now, let's move onto adolescence. Can you remember the energy of that time? Perhaps. They were insecurities or maybe hope about the future. Neither or both. Bring to mind a memory of a challenge from adolescence. Nothing. Traumatic that something you now see with some more perspective. Can you remember how this challenge made you feel? All these moments from adolescence have gotten you to where you are today. Perhaps, you can even appreciate them. Now, let's move onto current adult life. Everyone has a mixture of happiness and unhappiness in daily life. Is there a particular challenge that you're having a hard time accepting right now? Keep. This particular challenge in mind and take a few moments to settle into an awareness of the body. Just notice what's going on for you internally. Breathing in. Breathing out. You don't need to choose or reject any particular experience. Just know that it's all part of the flow of life you've been witnessing since childhood. As we end this meditation, try extending gratitude for this pretty miraculous life you've led. Each moment has gotten you to where you are today. See if you can bring some appreciation to at all. Great job you can open your eyes now and began to move your hands and feet. Let yourself reconnect to your surroundings as we end this meditation? Thanks for your practice. See you next time. I really hope you enjoyed that meditation if you're thinking you know, I, really could've kept that going for another five or.

Dan Harris Ebony Selassie
"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:49 min | 6 months ago

"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Hi. . This is Ebony. . As it three time cancer survivor I've come to appreciate both the blessings and challenges of my life. . How it's all contributed to the happiness and well-being I have in this moment. . And this meditation you'll be reflecting on your life as a way to cultivate appreciation for the particular roads you've traveled to get here. . Let's begin. . Find a comfortable seated posture. . Your is can be open or closed. . said. . But make sure your back is not tight or rigid. . Take a few moments to settle into your body. . Connecting to the breath as a way to anchor and gather your attention. . Let's spend some time reviewing your life starting with childhood. . Bring to mind a happy memory from when you were a kid. . We all have them even if for some of us, they're , harder to remember. . Try and connect to where when and how it occurred. . See, , if you can elicit all the sensory recollections of this happy memory. . That's just one moment in entire childhood of sensory memories. . All the childhood experiences that got you here. . Now, , let's move onto adolescence. . Can you remember the energy of that time? ? Perhaps. . They were insecurities or maybe hope about the future. . Neither or both. . Bring to mind a memory of a challenge from adolescence. . Nothing. . Traumatic that something you now see with some more perspective. . Can you remember how this challenge made you feel? ? All these moments from adolescence have gotten you to where you are today. . Perhaps, , you can even appreciate them. . Now, , let's move onto current adult life. . Everyone has a mixture of happiness and unhappiness in daily life. . Is there a particular challenge that you're having a hard time accepting right now? ? Keep. . This particular challenge in mind and take a few moments to settle into an awareness of the body. . Just notice what's going on for you internally. . Breathing in. . Breathing out. .

Dan Harris Ebony Selassie
"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Just just give me those leftover drugs. Exactly. I, you know, they're they're really interesting. Studies going on right now at Johns Hopkins of using Silla silent on long term meditators. And and I have friends who are experienced meditation. Teachers who lead retreats that mix Iowa ska with meditation. And so I'm quite convinced that there's a lot of their there. But I'm not as a public figure going to strongly recommend it nor have I done it personally because it might entail. Either more panic attacks or divorce or both. Briefly. I have not done I go, but I know many people who have it's very in vogue now and people are claiming to get a lot of benefit from it. And I certainly don't doubt that I think that the most significant benefit I got from doing psychedelics back in the day. It's been it's been many years since I've done any anything like that more than a decade since I've done any psychedelic. But what what I got from them, which I couldn't have gotten. I don't think I could have gotten otherwise, I I was certainly not tempting to get it. Otherwise is the conviction that it was possible to have a radically different experience than I was tending to have. And it sounds like you already have that conviction because you're already going to sit ten day retreats. That's not to say psychedelics couldn't be useful for you. And there are certainly people who would argue that they're they're further benefits than just being convincingly advertised to that there are other states of consciousness that you'd rather inhabit than the one. You're into. But the reality is that whatever psychedelic you take no matter how good the trip it will wear off. Right is impermanent by its very nature doesn't give you. It's not quite the same thing. As building a skill that, you always have recourse to and there's the other part, which is that it is the experience you have on any of these drugs is somewhat haphazard, no matter how assiduously you control your your sentence. At in me, you can you can have the exact same set and the exact same set in and have two very different experiences. One being absolutely sublime in one being heroin -ly awful. And it's in the end. I mean, the reason why I stopped taking psychedelics more or less totally is for me. There was it's felt like a kind of psychological Russian roulette. I mean, it was just like I had. No, I had no way of expect. Eating what I was going to get. Because again, I I couldn't control. The variables that seem to matter. Dan earlier you'd mentioned like the bad marketing or the flowery message that meditation had in the past and like in my perspective, though, there seems to be something more peer in honest about the peace. Love the hippie approach to it the wearing the world's long hair like Sam did not to be cynical. But it just seems to be somewhat dishonest or like when you hear these CEOs make these ridiculous salaries Milton about like, oh, yes they met at team. They have guided meditations and stuff like that. So I mean is there sort of like a legitimate practitioner versus an illegitimate practitioner, and like, how can we nudge, you know, the people in power towards more, you know, giving up their possessions type direction, meditation, so. Look, you know, it's been a big challenge for the traditional Buddhist community. I. I consider myself a Buddhist. So it's a big challenge for the traditional Buddhist community to have. Their beloved practice spread out to the masses. I always joke that. We would suspend so many years assiduously sending you know, good wishes out to the world. May you be happy may be safe? But turns out there was an asterisk all along. Which is if you do it like me, and look we could take issue with the way some high profile meditators choosing to leave their lead their lives. But I'm still of the view that the end of the day more mindfulness is better than less mindfulness. So I'm not gonna trash talk in less Uday who say take up the practice of not gonna get into the business of trash talking her nitpicking every public meditated unless I I think. think they're doing demonstrable harm in the world..

Johns Hopkins Iowa heroin Uday Milton Sam Dan ten day
"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:36 min | 2 years ago

"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"It seems like a lot of the ailments that plagued humanity are this same types of ailments that arrest loose mind experiences. We fluctuate from war to peace to polluting the environment to trying to clean up the environment than polluting it again to. It's just chaos, and we don't quite know where we're going as species, I'm just wondering if you guys think that's a helpful metaphor to to you where we're at. And do you think there's some kind of collective meditative state that we could we could reach some kind of way that we could structure society or some of our institutions that take some. That take mindfulness and meditation and those and what that can bring you the level of awareness that can bring you into account if that makes any sense, it doesn't take long spending time in the meditation world before you hear claims about how meditation we'll fix everything. It will surprise you to hear that. I don't believe that. I think however that if we see a broad societal embrace of the practice. There will be salutory changes. If we had the same. Proportion of the population practicing, mindfulness that currently engages in physical exercise. I think we've probably see real impact on things like. Road rage. Bullying type of comments you see and social media. The quality of our politics. I don't think it would make everything barking unicorns. But I do think you would start to change things. Maybe ten percent at a time. There harris. So so I I do actually think I'm not a utopian by nature. But I do think that broad embrace of mindfulness could make a difference. How much I don't. It's interesting to realize that we have virtually no norm around mental training like mental training is still a totally esoteric concern. And yet physical training is is just an absolute norm where it's impossible to doubt, the utility of whether you exercise a lot or not there's nobody who's living in doubt as to whether or not there's something to be done to be physically better off most of the time. And it seems should it seems obvious even just thinking of it in physical terms, the brain as an organ, which changes depending on how you use it. And we're training ourselves all day long based on how we use our attention to fixate on various things, whether it's social media or so much of it now is is driven by the phone. We got in our pockets and. You can get better at doing anything you care about you can get better at having conversations with people you can get better at in your relationships, you've your marriage can get better. The thing you're doing by default is rarely the best possible version of that thing. And when you this becomes so obvious in athletics because you're learning to play a new sport that you don't know how to play and you're not in that in shape for that sports say, and so everything you do is wrong. Right. But most of what we are doing with our live go through school, and you get to a point where they say, okay. There's no more school for you in this on this topic. So you're done now get a job. And there's no notion of mental training the on that you're just basically who you are trying to figure out how to live a meaningful life after that and the traditions out of which practices like meditation. Come a very different picture of what? Life. What's possible in terms of the comfortable here in your own skin as a as a human being navigating social space with other human beings. I think if if we just acknowledged that emotional and moral development continues throughout life, and even in predictable ways, if you if you apply attention in certain ways, or you think or you just forget about meditation. Just reframing situations conceptually can do enormous work in terms of how you feel. It's like road rage. Is the perfect example. That's a it's a it's a cliche that we've all become right with we've all experienced the saying, we're just magically you're in a car and somebody does something in front of you or just driving too slow and a part of your personality, emerges that simply does not emerge in other circumstances when you're not surrounded by glass and metal you never never comes out of you. In an elevator with other people right unless you're total sociopath. But you're seeing the safety and relative privacy of your car all of a sudden your day Hussein and mindfulness is useful there, but it just reframing the person who just cut you off maybe on on on route to some medical emergency..

physical exercise Hussein harris ten percent
"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Experience of now you're in the presence of some kind of emergency. But how long do you want to suffer the results of that hormonal hijacking of your awareness, and what we tend to do is we keep these these emotions alive in our thoughts for much. Much longer than their useful. And it's just one of these truths. You can notice about the nature of of the mind, and you really can only notice it by learning to meditate if you don't get lost in thought about the reason you have to be angry or fearful or anxious or whatever it is. You actually can't maintain that emotion for more than a few seconds at a time. It's impossible to stay angry. No matter what it is. I mean, no matter how grave the injustice that merits anger. It's simply impossible to stay angry for an hour much less day, so becoming aware of the mechanics gives you a choice in the end, you can just you you can decide. Well, how long do I wanna be energized in this way? But this stream of thought, and I think most of us given that ability will want to get off the Ribe far earlier than we do. But I'm not I wouldn't say that negative emotion is is never. Appropriate or never useful. I think it's been classically negative emotions like anger or fear. I think occasionally that we need we need that energy is just it's just you know, what you do with. It is is something you you want to be able to wisely. Choose. Yeah. I the more I practice in my for myself. I the more increase the the more convinced I become of the disability of things like anger. I agree with Sam that there is a galvanizing quality to it in the face of pretty much everything we talk about on the news. But. I don't find that. That is the most constructive emotion out of which to act. Sam talks about this. I don't you probably don't even remember saying this. But I quote you on this all the time that that. We we experienced anger, and then we re up at through compulsive neurotic thinking, but if you can cut down on that on what samples the half life of anger, the amount of damage you can do in an hour of anger versus two minutes when that reduction is just incalculable, and I've just found that for me cutting down that has been a huge game changer. It's not to say that I never experienced anger. I spent I spent time in anger today. But and so, and I don't think it's the type of thing we should engage in much of self-laceration over because we're experiencing it. But I do think it in my own experience. Having now investigated at length. I don't see much use for it beyond what Sam described the in terms of like taking action in extreme situation. Thank you. Ignace thanks for being here. Big fan of both the questions taking things on a little bit of a different direction. But it's not a perfect analogy. But if you were to look at the human race is somewhat of a hive mind, so we're collective consciousness..

Sam Ignace two minutes
"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Hey, guys. I I wanna thank you for getting me to meditate Sammy sparked my interest many years ago, and then you're up finally got me to establish a practice and eventually go on retreat. I know you guys are big fans of I m s and spirit rock as recommendations. But for someone like myself, I found those prohibitively expensive. So I turned to the going Cova pasta those ten day retreats, and because they're free, and you can donate a which I do to your podcast. It's just like that in that regard. So I was wondering if you had any opinions on the going courage Frey as it contracts to the other retreats, I know there's walking meditation and you only do forty five minutes. Max, I looked at the schedules a little bit wondering just if you had any opinions on their methodology, and perhaps any alternative recommendations that something might be more affordable. Well, what I would say, but I m s spirit rock to retreat centers that you read. Referenced one is called the insight meditation society based in central Massachusetts Joseph Goldstein lives. Spear rock is. North of Marin, I think they're they're kinda sister organizations that I believe they have scholarships. So we do so that I think is worth investigating because I need to keenly aware of the expense. And so they'll actually charge people with means more and as a way to subsidize others to go. I think it's really kind of beautiful. So I would look into that. But every you know, everything I've heard about going retreats is that they're great. So I think you're in good hands. Good luck. Hello. Thank you for being here. I have a question for both of you given that you're both seasons. Meditators curious. If your thoughts have shifted regarding the value of emotions, specifically negative ones. Well, they might have shifted. But I think shifting back. Briefly imagined that expressing anger may actually be a good thing in certain contexts. What do you think of reciprocally? But no, I think there is I think negative emotion is certainly appropriate and useful in certain contexts. I think it's also useful to get over very very quickly. I think so I think it meant anger can be energizing outrage. Moral outrage can be energizing fear can be energized. Invent fear is totally appropriate. You know, if you're in a situation of potential physical violence say or a lion gets out of the cage at the zoo is totally appropriate to have the full adrenaline is d-.

Sammy Joseph Goldstein Frey Massachusetts Marin Max forty five minutes ten day
"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Did you get your own? I can drag back. That's so the question is what is the aspect that you thing you emphasize different aspect here? Which is the thing that you were saying before could can be seen on the on the subway, which I agree with, but it's a different thing. Or no thing at all. So this is really the truth door versus the useful door utility door. There was no guarantee that scene the character of your mind more clearly, which is the same more accurately more. Truthfully would be useful. We could live in a universe where it would destabilize you somewhere. Right. It could be an may. In fact, be bad for some people. And I think they're probably people who certainly people who shouldn't do intensive retreats. I think that's can exacerbate certain psychological conditions. I think there's trauma. Yeah. There's a enemy. Demean that is that it is something you should talk to a professional before. So then there is a very small literature on people who feel like they have been harmed by doing intensive practice because they just thrown in the deep end of the pool and didn't swim. Well, but that those are certainly minority cases. But if you get a group of two hundred people together, there's very likely going to be one person for whom it was a bad idea to do an intensive retreat. I guess is conceivable that's true of daily practice. But I think it's very unlikely that sitting in the middle of your life for twenty minutes and paying attention as we just did would be bad for anyone. But if I guess the disclaimer is valid if you find that it seems like it's not doing anything. Good for you. Then or doing something bad for you. Then you should consult a psychotherapist who knows about these things and many now do mindfulness is has invaded the psychotherapy. Puta community, and it's understood by many many of them, but they're just is a fact that scene. Certain features of consciousness more clearly seems to be very helpful psychologically, in many ways doesn't help everything. I mean, you can still at whatever level of stability. You are in the practice use. You're still going to spend most of your time lost in thought. And then you are hostage to whatever. The character of your thoughts are so if you if you're on your thinking, well, then you're probably still in most of the time. But it's PA is possible to punctuate that with a very clear scene of some surprising facts about consciousness and one is that consciousness it self just the sheer fact of knowing anything whether it's visual perception or an internal appearance like a thought that condition of knowing in and of itself doesn't feel like a self. It doesn't feel like I doesn't feel like the subject that most people think is riding around in their heads. Having the thoughts and the experiences and appropriating everything from this position of being a a subject inside the head and is possible to recognize that and that is freeing in a fairly radical way all of the high falutin language, you get from the contemporary traditions. For the most part is anchored to that kind of insight that the ego is an illusion or the self is an illusion or the duality subject object perception is an illusion and it can be a very ordinary realization. It doesn't have to come with all the pyrotechnics of kind of psychedelic experience. If you don't have to feel like you're on acid in order to have that that insight, but what that does is. It does does radically interrupt this identification with thought and with and with all of the the things that follow from being identified with which all the mediocre emotions that play us so much of the time one way to to get this is with Sam was sang before when he was guiding us in meditation. I had us just listened to the sounds in the room..

Sam twenty minutes
"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Where you're just if it's if it's depressing thought, you're depressed, if it's a happy thought, you're happy. If it's a fearful thought, you're afraid, and you're just being played and just subsumed in each moment by these images and these sentences that. In many cases, are totally superfluous. And this this is an experience that I often have I walk out on stage like this. And I notice a tend to drink a lot of water at events like this. I notice there's water, and they'll be a voice in my head as I'm not schizophrenic. So it's actually my voice, it's not somebody else's voice. But I'll think oh there's water there. But who am I telling right? I I can see the water. There's there's there's no one else. These to be informed about. So most of our is not to say that we don't need thoughts for anything. But so much of our conversation with ourselves is deeply superfluous. I agree and from personal experience. You know, there's a there's a great writer. I don't know if you think he's right. But I think great Stephen bachelor who writes books about food ISM from the perspective of an atheist, although it's a little bit redundant because there's no God and Buddhism anyway. But. He has said, and I'm probably not going to quote, this exactly. But that if you look long enough into your own mind, you'll see a murderer and a rapist, you will see the capacity we all have for all sorts of things beautiful things ugly things. And that's okay. Actually that is part of the process. The scene of the craziness. How serious it is how shameful. It is. How scary it is. This is what we're doing. This is the business. This is at least part of this is the aspect that. I at first at least emphasize because I think it is so useful to see this stuff. So that it doesn't own you. It's good to to break the habit, which you emphasize in probably both books, but having just read your your current one. You do it a lot there, which is this judgement that comes naturally someone who's trying to learn to meditate, which is the moment you notice your lost. And thought you've been distracted for five minutes or whatever. While you're thought you were meditated you've been thinking about lunch, or or replaying some conversation your head and the moment, you notice that it's very common to have an additional moment of judgment about that leg. I was supposed to be meditating. Why am I going to do this? And yet you skillfully reframe that as that's a moment of. I mean, that's that's one. It's actually working hashtag winning Charlie. Sheen says. And I really do. I mean, an incredibly important thing to know. And I think it is what allows people to many people to do this. Because so many of us believe the story. We're telling ourselves about how we could never meditate because you don't understand my mind here, this whole time my mind is so busy that I could never do this. I call it the fallacy of uniqueness because we think that we have this kind of sewage pronounce so we generous. Know lunacy that only we have at that is that this is the human condition we evolved on the savannahs for threat detection and for finding sources of buzzer. And for a racing mind. And this is this is the if we weren't all like this wouldn't need meditation. Now, currently this is like ten years ago when when did we I made I believe? I believe the Jesus t-shirt thing was like two thousand six and I think the when did you set your first retreat? I didn't two thousand ten I think. Yeah. So I think that you to nine so you so now this is a it's actually part of your job now. Now, you have designed your life. So that you are you have to meditate. I mean, this is this is this is a great family business. Great gig yet. Yeah. Yeah. Just want to put a pin in the fact that you have aided my question..

Stephen bachelor writer Sheen Charlie five minutes ten years
"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:51 min | 2 years ago

"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Also, the place you see with your open is is the same place. Where you're thinking too as you can. You can broadcast thought into this field of color and light. So just to test. This. I want you all to picture the Eiffel tower in front of you as a statue. Make about two feet high. Now, depending on how good you are visualizing things may be very evanescent image may be barely image. But it is something it's not the same. As picturing a bicycle. So this is the place you see with your open is is also your mind. It's also conscious. So meditation and now now I'm officially talking not just guide in a meditation. It meditation is just the art of pain, more careful attention to everything that's already happening sights and sounds and sensations and changes in mood, and ultimately even thoughts can arise as objects of meditation and not distracted with for the longest time. When you're training in this. You're either lost and thought or you're aware of your senses, essentially thought thought is at least presents itself as kind of tickets to meditation because we are so distracted by. But ultimately, it's not about getting rid of thought or thinking less is actually just noticing everything arising as it arises, including thought what has your experience? Now, Dan's done, many retreats where you you just go into you. Go into silence for a week or ten days at a time and spent twelve to eighteen hours a day, depending on how much sleeping doing just what we were doing the last few minutes. You can do it. While walking you can do it while sitting alternate hour by hour. So what was that was that first retreat like that on I go to into doing? Suck. It was the first four days were some of the hardest days of my whole life where you're just rounded by all these weirdoes, and you're welcome. Yeah. Oh, I had things. I wanted to say to you. And the hardest part is not off people often latch onto the silence part of it. And there was nobody there. I wanted to chat with and. I actually despite the fact, I'm professional talker. Actually, not a huge problem for me to be quiet. So that wasn't the issue nor was it really the other people there who actually weren't that weird. I'm just joking. I all the my my mind was judging them all all the time. It was sitting meditating or walking meditation. Meditating all day long was incredibly hard just really thrown up against your own insanity. And. I was ready to quit and went sat with this teacher actually the teacher. I hated them. Most was the only one available and you're allowed to talk to the teacher. So I was telling her about how horrible it was. And she just said you're trying too hard. And so I kind of the next meditation session instead of sitting in the hall the meditation hall with everybody else, I I went and sat on the balcony outside of my on the hallway where I was staying. There was a balcony at the end of the hallway in one building those staying and had this kind of experience of effortless awareness of whatever was happening. So I was noticing the Russell of the leaves the wind the pain in my knee. The fact that I was distracted. And then starting again, and it was all just coming really fast and easy, and I wasn't trying hard. And I have described it as it was like those first four days retreat where I was like I was being dragged by motor boat by my head underwater, and it was horrible as that would probably be. And then on that in that sit outside. Side. It was like I got up on water skis. And I could see what the point of this whole thing was which is when the thinking the volume of your inner conversation goes down significantly. There's an enormous amount of serotonin that accompanies that and. Life is much more vivid. And you understand how these unseen conversations. You're having with yourself drive. You nuts. Judging you're wanting your and that then leads you to when you're not hungry, or as I sometimes do six say the thing that ruins the next forty eight hours if your marriage. And. And this is a very powerful insight and really is actually billable to anybody sits and meditates for two minutes that that that you're crazy. And when you don't see the craziness when you're unaware of of the aforementioned nonstop conversation..

Eiffel tower Dan four days forty eight hours eighteen hours two minutes ten days two feet
"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"There are many levels to the bed marketing, but in just to dress the level in which you're speaking is that just comes with all this cultural baggage that for people like me is deeply off pudding. And as I have written about the fact that my parents were hippies and maybe go to a yoga class when I was little and the teacher didn't like my tough skin pants, and maybe do sunset, you -tations in my tidy whitey's and created a life long to anything like that. And so I really hated that stuff and meditation just never even came on my radar screen till I started seeing science and that there is. And we have to be careful we talk about this because it's still in its early stages and some of the scientists, frankly, just not of a high quality. But I think I think we can safely say is that it strongly suggests that meditation can confer a long list of tantalizing health benefits. And that to me was really what started to change my mind and meeting people like you plus interesting because it seems to me that there two doorways into this at least two and they're not they're not the same. And so the first that you've just described is the the usefulness of the practice, and so then that extends now, as we know at least some medical claims that seem fairly well-founded, but there's another door, which is the door. I took which is really the still what I emphasize in my thinking about this, which is just the door of what is true about the mind from the first person side. So what is it actually like to be you? If you. Pay attention and win. What you find? If you're if you're new to this practice, and even for the longest time is that it's very hard to pay attention just get into the place where you can notice anything is quite a feat and takes takes training, but you can spend you can you can go through that door and not necessarily care that much about the benefits. And I often think that I would still be interested in meditation. Even if it were not good for you. You know, even if it were a little battery their people who get into sports, which are clearly not all that healthy. But they still love the sport. And this is a kind of intellectual sport in a way, which I think you you can become fascinated by even if you're not sold that it's that it reliably reduces stress or anything else that seems to do. I agree. My intuition as a storyteller also Rak Titian, and now as what sort of semi physicians used the word evangelist for the practices that it's I think more widely attractive to talk about the benefits the bigger door. But you many people quickly get to what you're talking about. Which is getting inexperience of what our minds, and therefore our lives are actually about and that comes of. For many of us practitioners becomes extremely interesting. I also think as it pertains to the science that look I think as an endeavor it's very good field of interest. But for me as a as an evangelist, the scientists useful as a way to get people interested in might not otherwise be interested. But it's doesn't have much of a bearing on your actual practice like as I like to say that you might start meditating because you see the brain scans. But you don't keep meditating as you think your prefrontal cortex would look different different in it. And then FM right now, you can't meditating because you're to yourself and others. And that is the metric that matters. It occurs to me. Now actually do lead you to that being? Yeah. They can still being fined. Rather regular not you. Our wives are both. Here's if we want to flesh out this part discussion. Get a Mike to them curse me. We might want to just sit for two or three minutes. Just so that everyone knows what we're talking about. So many people in this room have at least had some experience with meditation. But if not let's just do it for two minutes. So we are on the same page. So you might close your eyes. You don't have to close your eyes, but many people like to do it that way and sit a little more erect just comfortably. And.

whitey Rak Titian Mike three minutes two minutes
"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"A story our guest is. It's an incredible life story. Lots of useful takeaways for the rest of us as well. We'll get the Frank us assess key coming up, I a few pieces of housekeeping three actually the verse is just point out that the meditation challenge that we've been running at ten percent happier is really well subscribed. Thank you guys for signing up thirty thousand people participating in the New Year's meditation challenge. Second is that there are some new meditations up on the ten percent happier app. If you wanna go check them out one of them is about gratitude from seventy Selassie former guest on this show. The other is called is worrying useful by a guy named Dan Harris, and the third item of business is that we're making a little bit of a structural change to this show as close listeners will recall, we did a big survey listener survey a few months ago, hundreds and hundreds of you took time to fill this survey out, and I think it took. A not insignificant amount of time of which I am profoundly genuinely grateful and one of the one of the changes were making we're gonna make several as a consequence of all of this feedback is that we're gonna move the voicemails to the end of the show. So we get right to our guest every week. And that at the end of the show will be taking questions from anybody who wants to call and leave us leave as a question on the voicemail number that we've set up which is available in the show notes. And actually another thing we're gonna do not starting this week. But starting reasonably soon is is I won't be the only person answering the questions we're actually going to bring in meditation. Teachers to answer some of the questions and scientists at actual experts coming up, so we're improving based on your feedback. And I really appreciate it. So guess this week the aforementioned Frank us discuss key this guy, as I said has had a really interesting life characterized by some real pain when he was younger some you'll. Hear them discuss them of what it was like in his home when he was younger went on to lead a life of as he describes it drugs, sex and rock and roll. And then discovered Buddhism ended up over in Asia and came home and started to. Unlike many of us, we we meditate or we do a little bit of them or whatever. And it's for us. It's a private thing. This guy lived it out in a big way. He was involved in caring for the homeless serving on the front lines at the aids epidemic lobbying congress, and I think where he's made his most notable Mark is that in one thousand nine hundred seven he co founded the Zen Hospice project, which was the first Buddhist hospice in America of as as listeners, some listeners may remember. I'm also volunteer hospice, I'll be going later today. As a matter of fact, visit my friend Ronnie, and I think it's incredibly meaningful work. I suspect I get a lot more out of it than as a volunteer than than the residents do, but it's it is incredibly important work. Now, a lot of people not enough people are doing it. And there's certainly no shortage of people who need it. So Frank is pine. Ear in this space. And he's written a book just out in paperback called the five invitations the five invitations and he takes whittled down decades of experience sitting at the bedside with people on the cusp, and what he's learned about what he's learned in those moments that can be used for the rest of us to live happier healthier lives right now. Hopefully, well, before we die, and he's got these five really excellent lessons that he's learned as a consequence of all of this time sent spent at the bedside. So that hence the title the five invitations all right time for me to stop hammering. And let's bring in Frank. Here we go right to meet you nice to be with you. So how did you get into meditation in the first place? Oh, you know. I think I could give you all kinds of elevator speeches for that. But the truth is I was trying to avoid my own pain, and I tried everything sex drugs and rock and roll. And none of it worked. And I think it's some. You turn toward your suffering, and that becomes the ground compassionate meditation..

Frank Selassie Dan Harris Zen Hospice Asia America Ronnie Mark ten percent
"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"This is the ten percent happier podcast. Dan harris. Other great guests this week folks. Cal Rabinowitz. How does somebody how and why does somebody go from the upper echelons of network television to running a meditation studio towel runs den meditation in LA, and in the LA area. Part of this explosion in these secular meditation kind of drop in centres all over the country and many of the big cities around the country. Scott, really interesting story and a interesting view of the role of meditation and busy life. So we'll get to that in a second. I, oh, a few items of business, then your voicemails. And then we'll get to the interview a little business items. A couple couple of notes from ten percent world. We are hiring. We're looking for meditation producer and also a senior producers, meditation producer produces meditations as one might imagine. Both are video courses in our audio. Meditation. Also senior producer is much more sort of a TV role, video production role really. Working on on the video for the various courses we do and also for some stuff we're going to be doing outside of the courses. You can go to jobs that ten percent happier dot com to check that out. Speaking of checking out things related to the app. We've got a new teacher up there. Her name is Jess. Maury. She's been on this podcast. They should go back and listen to her story. She works with teenagers and has a long, personal practice herself. Very interesting story. I recommend going back to that podcast. I just saw just today actually at event and she's got some parenting meditations that are going up on the apps on the app. One's called parenting and hard moments in another is meditation fourteens. So check Jess out on the app. She's a star. All right, your voicemails. Number one..

Jess producer Maury Cal Rabinowitz LA Dan harris Scott ten percent
"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"If you are do if you're willing to do easy favors for people, it doesn't derail your productivity, but it does create a lot of good vibes in your network and and and that can have reputation. Benefits that really last and reverberate. As I mentioned, Adam has also created a little controversy in the meditation world because he's a pretty open meditation skeptic. So this makes him a bit of a different guest for our show. Although I would argue that his that, I think of meditation as a practice as something you do an order to improve your life, and he talks a lot about compassion, generosity and gratitude in the workplace context as a practice that you do to to improve your life. So I think it's right in the center of the bullseye for this podcast. Nonetheless, I, I've, I was lightly taken aback by some of the things he said publicly about meditation didn't in any way, reduce the the impact that his work has had on me, but I did want to to Provo them on it a little bit. So toward the end of the interview, we we get into that. So a lot here and like I said, has had a big impact on me and I hope it doesn't you here we go Adam grant. All right. Well, thank you for doing this. Thanks for having. As I said, I'm a huge fan. I've read this book. I probably read it three or four times. Why? Because Well, I I read it because I was really interested in it. But then I started working on a book about kindness, and this is one of the most important books in the John Wren my view, there are no books about kindness that are any good. I if you told me five years ago that Dan Harris would read my book, I would have fallen out of my chair. That's a huge honor. And I, it's funny. I voided the term kindness in the book because it sounds really weak, and I thought, oh, that's a great way to undermine the strength of a giver. What's what is kind of have such a bad rap? I think that it's a societas with do-gooders and bleeding hearts. There was this all the time actually that you know people say, oh yeah, but you know, if you're kind you people walk all over you, they can take advantage of you. It's it's almost like a, it's like a neon sign saying. Takers. Yeah, screw me over. And so as a result, I think people stereotype in is as dangerous. How did you get interested in the subject? Because I think your interest from what I understand goes way back. Yeah, it goes pretty far back. I'm sure you've had this experience too. I so many different moments that now in hindsight, I think, oh, that must have shaped it. I don't know which ones really mattered, but I grew up in a family where I was stunned by AXA generosity that were small but meaningful. So my mom was kind of an exercise fanatic and one day she wanted to go work out and there was a snowstorm and my grandmother, it's a fifteen minute drive from where she lived. My grandmother drove to watch me and my sister so that my mom can go work out, took her two and a half hours to make fifteen minute drive in the snow storm. But she said, you know what? My daughter wants to work out..

Adam grant John Wren AXA Adam Dan Harris fifteen minute five years one day
"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Happier podcast. Dan harris. Generally speaking, lawyers in the public imagination do not generate a surplus of sympathy, but I'm not sure. That's fair. And even if you think it's fair bear with me because our guest this week who has been teaching mindfulness to aspiring lawyers at the university of Miami law school is really interesting both in terms of his personal story and also in in terms of his approach to meditation. So Scott Rogers is coming up first, let's do your calls. Here's number one. My name is John. I'm calling from Abu Dhabi in the UAE up. I I want to say thank you for the podcast and the and the work that you're doing. It's proven to be very helpful and lightning. So my question is this I've been meditating in an established practice for the past seven years, and I went home for the holidays and started teaching some family and some friends, and. Realized that I have kind of pension for this and maybe even an ability. So in a roundabout way, my question would be, what advice would you give to current practitioners that are possibly prospective teachers and want to move into instruction and teach this stuff? Thank you. First of all, as awesome. I think it's great. And one of my biggest fears about the state of the meditation industrial complex right now is that there aren't enough highly trained teachers. And I've said this before in the podcast I am of the view is just my opinion that the great teachers have a lot of experience on retreat ran really, you know, eat takes. You're going to get under the hood of somebody's mind. You need to have a lot of time on the cushion yourself. It's a position of extrordinary responsibility and power. We don't have enough of them in in my opinion. And so I, I'm psyched that you're into it. So I would recommend embarrassment. I come out of a specific. I've, I've practiced in a specific tradition, so I'm I'm biased in that direction. I just want to be open about my biases. So their to places I would recommend you go the insight meditation society, which is in Barre, Massachusetts, b. a. r. e. they have a teacher training program, and I believe and I don't know too much about this in may be affiliated with or separate from spirit rock, which is on the west coast in Marin county believe it's Marin county north of San Francisco, which is a related meditation center, and they either both have teacher training programs or have a joint one. But in any event, I would recommend talking to them because they produce an extraordinary number of amazing teachers, many of whom I know quite well because they teach on the ten percent happier app. So I think it's awesome what you're up to, and that's. I would recommend you go to check it out and anybody else's listening wants to get into this. All right. Let's do call number two. Hey, Dan can really calling. I found meditation to have an incredible impact on my life, and I want desperately to pass the practice to my children, and I would love to have your best tips on how to do this without freaking out. My children that has been raised in more of a faith-based lifestyle that I am actually starting to question and make a turnabout. I've already tried to approach it with the one child I have that, I think could use it the most. And I have gotten a typical mean girl, what is this all the Pandy peace love not war kind of response, and she thinks I've lost my mind and she also genuinely believes that she's the one living in reality and I'm not, but that's a whole other conversation. Have a great day, and thank you to all you oughta Angelo boy. Have a great day. Thank you very sweet. I appreciate it. And I've had a minute of thinking, oh, no. Is this the same question? I get all the time. I wanna teach meditation kids. How do I do it? But actually, this is yours is a really interesting twist because it sounds like your kids are in a faith tradition, and therefore there's some sort of baked in hostility to meditation. So you really just trying to figure out how to position it so that given their conditioning, they might be open to it. And so I would say this, just my opinion, I would say that you should really depicted in secular terms that this is not about attacking their belief system..

Dan harris Marin county Abu Dhabi university of Miami law school Scott Rogers UAE Barre Pandy San Francisco Massachusetts Angelo seven years ten percent
"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Is there something that I should've asked you but didn't any areas that you would have liked to have touch on that I failed to bring us to. Appreciate the question. You ask the little while ago about, so how is this working and Mormonism something that excites me. Something that I think is allowed us to exist and persist and flourish to some extent is that there's a really strong value in Mormon culture to look for truth far and wide and bring it back, and you know, corral into back into the tradition, you know if there's anything good if there's anything that can elevate us as human beings, we're interested in it. So that's the that's the enterprise. We're engaged, lower lights. And I think you'll see more of if people wanna learn more about you can do that. Thus places our website, it's lower lights, SLC dot org. So the phrase that talked about earlier, lower lights, SLC dot org, have you on social media. I'm pretty lame social media. I don't do a lot of it, but you could Google me and I, you know, we have articles and not attain resources. We have a podcast mindfulness boss. Yeah, absolutely. So the podcast is mindfulness plus that's with a plus sign, and you know a lot of our teachings and things like that we do as a community. I try to put into the content of that show. Awesome. Yeah. And one is the become I'm getting through the manuscript. So it could be probably a year before we're actually, unless I, you know, pull a move like you. Brother, Jeff, Warren did, and. Thank you very much. Great, great job. Really appreciate that. Thank you for sure. It. Okay, that does it for another addition of ten percent, happier podcast. If you liked it, please take a minute to subscribe rate us. Also, if you want to suggest topics we should cover or guests that we should bring in hit me up on Twitter at Dan Harris. Importantly, I wanna thank the people who produce this podcast, Lauren, Ephron, Josh Cohen, and the rest of the folks here at ABC who helped make this thing possible. We have tons of other podcasts. You can check them out at ABC news, podcasts, dot com. I'll talk to you next Wednesday..

ABC Twitter Google Dan Harris Josh Cohen Lauren Jeff Ephron Warren ten percent
"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"dan harris" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"From ABC. This is the ten percent happier podcast. Dan harris. This is an interesting one folks. I stumbled upon our guest when I read an article, I have a Google. I've mentioned this before, but I have a Google alert on the words, meditation and mindfulness. So I get all sorts of interesting articles about the meditation and mindfulness space in my inbox every day. And I saw an article in the desert news which is the big newspaper in Salt Lake City, Utah. And the headline was what a Mormon doing Buddhist meditation has to do with the future of faith. And it was about this guy. Thomas mcconnachie who had spent many who grew up in the Mormon community, and then went off and spent many many years, doing Buddhist meditation seriously engaged with the practice, and then came back to Salt Lake City to this very Mormon community and has started a quite successful, a little Buddhist meditation group called lower lights. And so I can only imagine I could only. Agean as I read this article, what an interesting Madam, Asian of cultures and beliefs and practices this would be 'cause I've spent some time as a reporter at ABC news covering the Mormon community. And so I was really surprised that this was happening and intrigued, and I finally got Thomas into the studio and you're gonna hear a really interesting conversation coming up. I though one item business and then your calls the item of business. I mentioned this. On a previous podcast, but I wanna mention it again, just a case. You weren't listening. If you weren't listening shame on you, we're doing a survey where we want to take the podcast.

Mormon community Salt Lake City Thomas mcconnachie Google ABC Dan harris Utah Agean reporter ten percent
"dan harris" Discussed on RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"dan harris" Discussed on RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

"You know does not say wives all we're going to take a quick break we got dan harris he's got a ten minute meditation some meditation made easy for 10 minute uranium novel meditate in a manama in munich yeah but go all you have to know is dan harris because you go to amazon they're only two books yet go to amazon yes you say dan harris and fifty shades of meditation pop very go home and you got an you picked up look up you get it on your ipad you can get it do you do the redo read the book you selja you do the electronic version of it yes white you get like someone like you know freddie muna's or what was that guy's name on malcolm in the middle was his name nunez you know would have been really un is if i had you read wouldn't that be for you be in there conducting to orchestra couldn't reading it slow fast i do certain chapters in vocal fry and i do certain chapters in question mark up up speak what's it wasn't the same framing frankie muniz yet safe for me frankie fredericks frankie muna's should have read your book is who should i'm sticking with you know or or or he had you'd gotten all the queen's from dragrace uh to read a chatter absolute from your book that would be five as an adult and let them free associate on and just taking heart they want so good i so does something here okay we're gonna take a break and we're gonna come back with more dan harris in know michelle i'm back to eating healthy again i'll yet on i'm just so excited you know once you eat healthy of fruit becomes sweet and odds candy jazz and vegetables become so flavor volk i'll i am so excited about blue apron gas while here's the thing with blue apron it's funny that you said eating healthy again because there there are options on blue apron that don't have to be healthy right and there's not a lot but there's the pizzas and the things like that.

dan harris manama malcolm nunez frankie muniz the queen michelle munich amazon freddie muna frankie muna ten minute 10 minute