19 Burst results for "Dan Fogelman"

"dan fogelman" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"dan fogelman" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"So I think the world's are kind of shifting in that way. But, but honestly, like sometimes for me, like I don't see that much of a difference in in terms of tone. Any like, because ultimately you're telling a story and the kind of stuff I like doing a lot of the stuff. Obviously you've done so successfully, it mixes comedy with drama, and that's all about tone and intimacy of the moments. And it doesn't matter if you're watching it on a giant screen or on a little screen at home. Sometimes the capture that EM. Do you? I mean, you're so you're so busy with your your careers. As you know, it was a TV producer writer d- are you already looking forward to your next film as director, or do you have other other other things to do now for a while? Waiting for an idea? Yeah, maybe I'm tired. I need. My wife wants me to take a break. We had this really strange between us directors. We had a strange experience this week. We took the film to the Toronto film fest when we opened it there. I've been. I've now been screening this movie for a year screened it for everyone from Warren Beatty and Barbara Streisand who you know to audiences to critics early. And we kind of had a sense of how it's playing and how fancy people responding. We went to Toronto in the film opened, and it got like a five minutes standing ovation. It was very exciting and then the critics just came out with their teeth Barrett, and it's been. It's been so surprised. It's been a little confounding to us. We expected there would be. A portion of cynical critics that wouldn't be able to tolerate this film and we were prepared for that. The viciousness and the bring my TV show into it was it was very strange experience. So when you ask like, am I excited to direct my next movie? Like my legs have been taken out for me a little bit because it was just such a bizarre experience so far. But I'm excited because audiences have been continuing to respond to it that I think it'll balance out. But you really put your, especially with a film like this, you really it is a strange exposing feeling when you put something out in this day and age as dark and cynical as the world is and something that kind of it's it's been a bizarre week. Yeah. Well, I mean, just to. A little bit of the DJ cone of silence. The reality is that when they when there's something to write about as as sort of significant as, oh, here's this show, here's a movie. Here's the individual involved. There's sort of related in some ways, not related in other ways and it and yet, and it's so distinctively different..

director Toronto Barrett Warren Beatty Barbara Streisand writer five minutes
"dan fogelman" Discussed on About to Review

About to Review

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"dan fogelman" Discussed on About to Review

"The three choices and only three choices are good, bad or ugly. A good film is something that you came into the theater. You liked it, you enjoyed it. You want to tell your friends about it. It was good time, a bad film, walked into the theater and we're like, okay, I don't feel like I wasted, you know that two hours, but it also didn't really do anything for me. Ugly avoid at all costs pretty civil rating system and expanded on every episode. And I have explained every episode for the past one hundred twenty six episodes. So why stop now my fill rating for the house. The clock in its walls. This is tough because I wanna give it a bad because it was just kind of off and they're, they're missing holes kind of all over, but the performances and just the gen genuine fun that I could tell the actors were having and interactions that they had with each other. Pushes it up to good, but not by much. So my Fisher rating is good for the house, the clock in its walls, but it, yeah, it easily could have slipped into bad, had the performances not been there. So yeah, there we go. Next movie is a life itself. Now, this is a movie INA, genre that I usually avoid, which is kind of the romance, drama stuff. It is Britain and directed by Dan Fogelman who is kind of has become the king of the schmaltz because he did it. She's a little show, does a little show called this is us which keeps winning awards at every ward show. Everybody cries at every episode. My timeline is chock full whether to Facebook or Twitter, not too much Instagram, but Facebook and Twitter when people are watching, they're like, I cried six times in this episode episode or sixty minutes, like what is happening on the show. Apparently it is really, really well written. I have not watched not only been a single episode. I have not watched a single minute of this. Uh, so I cannot speak to that..

Facebook Twitter Dan Fogelman Britain Instagram sixty minutes two hours
"dan fogelman" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"dan fogelman" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"And then I would follow up. How hard was it to explain that to same Jackson and get him on board to do it? He's the coolest the it was that was the basically the process. I think I was getting married at the time. I've been with my wife ten years. We got married like four years ago when I was writing this and I thought I'll do something about a guy. Like I think if I wasn't thinking this consciously, oh, I'm I'm getting married and I don't know what I would do if anything happened to her, what if she literally, I think the thought went through my like, what? If she got hit by a bus one day, it was literally like that. And and then I started writing. I was like, what? If that's what happens in the movie? And it's a screenwriter writing and he's writing it as a fake shitty movie and then you'll learn that that's what really did happen. And I think that's where it started. And so I just started writing. I wrote it for Sam Jackson, I wrote it with his voice. I think if you like went into my final draft, I probably the first time I saved the document was the opening five pages would Sam Jackson, and then that became the screenplay. And then once again, like Bob Dylan, it was just there. And then I was like, oh crap. I gotta get Sam Jackson, and so after the screenplay was done. We sent it to him, and I think I got on the phone with him and I was like, do you want to do this? And he literally, I mean, it was like a Sam, Jackson person nation. I mean, he's the best, but he was like, mother, fuck you wrote my name in it. Of course, I'm going to do it. And. We, he came to New York where he came for like three hours. We banged it out on the street. I mean, I had a net bending lying on the ground in New York City with blood coming out of her head. It was crazy I, it was an Samuel Jackson screaming. I mean, you can't imagine how weird the whole scene was. You have you have poed Dame Rune and fury meeting, you know, and that's all. That's all the Oscar Isaac had texted me that he's like. He was like, bro. You got a net bending to lie down in the middle of Fifth Avenue today with blood pouring out. He's like, that was a crazy day, but Sam Sam just was so game. And then we went that night to a studio and he recorded the voice over that became the voice over and he was in and out and he was such a pro and he's he's a really cool guy. He watches everything. He knows every movie every TV show. He does that rant at the beginning what you can barely hear his nets walking out into the street where he's like, she smells that shit on you like nicotine detective. He smells that shit on you like moose kahad. Tan mourner and he's going and he's naming every female detective on network television that was not in the script, Sam, all that. All that was there was Murska heart attack, and he came into the voice where he was. He was like, hey, I hope you don't mind. I wrote some other ones down and he had a long list that's now framed in my office of every female detective ever on television. What's next? What are you working on next? Are there any other scripts that have kind of been bumbling around that you've been taken off the shelf? Taking a second look at? No, I'm gonna finish out the. I mean, we're halfway through the third season of the show. It starts in a couple of weeks and then I'm gonna get through the third season and I think we're gonna take a little break. It's been a lot off once. Well, you've been very generous with your time. I can't wait to see we do next and give it up again. Dan. Thank you. And that's how the QNA would down special. Thanks again to writer director, Dan Fogelman for coming down and chatting about his latest film life itself and folks. I hope you'll also check out issue thirty three of backstory magazine at backstory dot net. It's our mission, impossible fallout issue. And we have added a Tom Cruise interview because that's the beauty of digital publishing..

Sam Sam Sam Jackson Bob Dylan New York City Samuel Jackson Dan Fogelman Dame Rune Oscar Isaac Jackson nicotine writer director three hours four years ten years one day
"dan fogelman" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"dan fogelman" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Like if I start seeing Mandy patinkin crime, like lose my fucking mind. And so, and so that's a place where you pull back a little bit with lie at the end. For me, this is a mother. This is me and my mom. This is good. Goodbye. Never got with my mom. And so, I mean, I think our performance is so unbelievable at the end of the film, and I was like, we're going to hold in one that was the performance that I cast her for and she's crying, but I find it restrained and all the ways that you wanted to be. But still, I mean, it won't probably be for the cynic, but I think it's an undeniable. Performance. And so I probably had ones where she was more hysterical. I probably had one where she was more contained, but to me, that feels right. So that's all you can do to the circumstances you basically picked the middle ground? No. Sometimes you pick the bigger ground. I mean, you try not to go over the top. You try to get. I really. I've been. I'm certainly been accused of it before. I mean, we've had a point on my television show. I've said before, we're like the little kids who cast just because they were cute and looked like the actors are now going like, hey, Dan, you need me to cry on this one. Like it's that it's so like you've got him on. You've got to monitor at all. And so, yeah, there's a modular, loving, there's a modular level to the storytelling in which you're doing a non linear story. It has a linear project projection. Yeah. Is there a way that in editing you could have slid things around to help you out in a way that they weren't scripted, and if so, what? We're some of those things. They're usually are, especially on this at this were going backwards and forwards all the time. Yeah, this one really a, we had no money for excess and be it was so carefully scripted that like if you start moving things around, it's going to break. So it was kind of like we have the road map in the script, and now we're going to follow that. And if we go down, we're going down with the scrip. There was one bit we couldn't because of Donald Trump. We couldn't cast a little. I wanted the kid in the bus to be slightly younger than the kid who you've seen in the movie. I wanted to have two different kids who looked like, and I want you needed kids from Spain, and we couldn't get visas over in time because of all the homeland security rules. And so dangerous kids from Spain is actually, and so I had to, I had to keep the same kid throughout the movie. The reality is. That would that it makes the kid a little bit older than cook. 'cause she's them. So it's a little needle baby. It's a prenatal baby. So we're plant pretending he's five there. Okay. It's a, it's a, it's a little problem. Like there was nothing I could do. I guess that makes sense though, because he's waiting to go to colleagues. He's laying for one because of his. I took out because she's a little if you want inside baseball. 'cause she's a little younger. I didn't sit in right in on the page, which was in the script that he waited around for years while her cancer progress, right?.

Mandy patinkin Dan Spain Donald Trump baseball one bit
"dan fogelman" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"dan fogelman" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"But that ended tragically that led to a daughter who was unhappy and just tragic after. Tragedy, but also find a movie that makes you feel something positive despite that, that all maybe that could be like the magic that was medically what I was trying. I was chasing. I, I really loved you. I act in which you think that this is going to be, you know, and that Oscar for a lot of the movie and you're, you're getting very creative, of course with how you're handling your recalls your flashbacks. I mean, you were going like, obviously you're, you're paying tribute to Tarantino in here with Pulp Fiction, but you're almost doing part of the the marijuana speech by Mr. orange Reservoir Dogs when they're in the room as their current selves, looking back right past selves, we're some of the logistical challenges, directing those scenes. And did you find yourself doing rewrites to incorporate that information later as to where the characters were when you were telling it, or was it something that once you sat down during pre production that kind of dawned on you that style now? Honestly, almost. The, I mean, what you're seeing outside of like there's chemistry moments between Oscar Isaac and live your wild or between Lyon. Sergio, the Spanish couple. But for the most part, you're, you're watching the script. And so there wasn't a lot of revision and I was just trying to be mindful of tone and like and making everything makes sense. I mean, if you look at them film close enough, it should all make sense. This guy who this guy who was like he loved to intensely loved this woman to intensely everything from him, putting a water gun in his mouth in the beginning, you know, beginning and and it should all kind of track. But yeah, there wasn't a lot of revision going on. We just kind of like I worked with the actors to make them feel comfortable with the characters. But yeah, you talk a lot about unreliable narrators, and of course it's literary device, but it's also brought to the forefront here is the fourth wall is broken maniac. Who, in your opinion is the most unreliable narrator out of this out of the of the story. Well, I think the movie is the unreliable narrator. I mean, I think that's kind of the point. I, I think that there's. When you tell a story of your childhood, this is a movie about memory in like the first half of it specifically is about nostalgia and looking back and your. I've always, you know, your perspective is shaded by your existed. So if you're telling your own story, you're automatically just kind of influencing too subjective. Yeah, and my mom had a book. She loved that. She made me read when I was a young guy and Tyler, you know, the author and Tyler called dinner at homesick restaurant, and it's a very Rosh, Amman kind of concept of a family, looking back on their live and trying to gather for one last thanksgiving. And it's told like Faulkner like each chapter goes back and forth from a different character. And we all like can go back into our childhoods and four of us who grew up in the same house up four completely different memories of the exact same moment and the exact same. And so I've always been fascinated by that, especially as anyone's telling a story, and it's not just Oscar telling his story. It's me telling a story of these other characters. And so I, I've always found that interest on top of that level Oscar. Is diluting it by mixing Xanax and alcohol. Well, so seems like his narrative is probably a little off the rails to what I try and do the show. And what I've tried to do this is you know, there's a way I think there's a way to make take like the human drama or drama d for lack of a better term because that's kind of at the end of the day. That's what the stuff is right zone and give it a little bit of urgency and plot that makes you snap your fingers and pay attention, and whether that's like how Jack died in this is us or that it's we're still making entertainment here too. And so I think that can be important like saying like, I don't think movies that just have keep you guessing always have to be just usual suspects is I love right, but they don't all have to be crime Capers or mysteries like it can also be a bunch of people lying in bed, loving each other..

Oscar Oscar Isaac Tyler Mr. orange Reservoir Sergio Tarantino marijuana Jack Faulkner Amman
"dan fogelman" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"dan fogelman" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"They're all part of a family or if people that were touched by game show. And so the I've always, I've always been drawn to that kind of storytelling. But I felt I felt a little more literary to me the the influences some. On this one. Tell me how about your habit for a second. When you sit down, how important is outlining to your habit? I don't outline, but I don't recommend that. I don't. I inner connected is everything is there's no outline. Interesting, hot. I mean, I, you get a sense of beginning middle and end, you know, you're ending. No, I kind of red stream of consciousness, and I and. But I don't write often. I have all the worst habits that I know. I just I don't write off in writing like a kind of explosive process for me. Like, I'll I will. I learned that I'm constantly disappointing myself and if I try and write a little bit every damn constantly not getting enough done, and then I just kind of have angst and it makes me feel what I try to do. As I say, I have an episode, do I want to write a screenplay? And I go away with a set period of time and a set deadline and a set amount of work want to accomplish. And I do. I don't do that often. So like so that's what is it for an episode? How how long do you give yourself when you go away? I write very quickly like I, I've ridden film. I wrote crazy, stupid love and a couple of days, but, but this is draft but this, yes, but this film I wrote over the course of a year year and a half just slowly in sequentially and figuring out where it went as a one. I've talked to a lot of writers who have gone away and done stuff like that. Even the actor writer rub cordray gets on trains and goes up cross country. Do you do you go away to a hotel and just kind of turn off the phone? I used to have a cat used to rent a not my cabinet. I would rent a little one bedroom cabin in Joshua tree, and I'd go up and I had a process. I would get bags of groceries and a little booze, and I would just go, you know, eight AM til midnight and I'd sleep like four hours, five hours wake up start again, and I would do that for six days and then come home with a screenplay. And that was not an episode in episode? Yeah, or an episode. Now I'm getting older and I I'm slowing down. So you could do a screenplay in six days? Yes. Wow. Yeah, but but I've made some shitty movies. But of course, if you're not going in shooting the screenplay that you come back from Joshua tree with that, you're going to go through a revision process and rewrite. I would think, right. Yeah, I've been lucky. I mean, I, I don't know that I'm a, I have a skill of migrate. I write very readable scripts. It's not a pro. You know how we all read scripts and write scripts probably over here. It's a process like where you like, what characters that whose name is that it's it's hard to read a script and stay focused like mine are very easy to read. It doesn't make me a great writer. I think I've, that's my one skill. So I've been lucky in that I get everything. I've been able because of that skill to get a lot of things made the revision scum when the movie stars want to delve into their characters, the directors of notes, and then that can be a really good process like it was on like a crazy stupid love or it can be detrimental process where everything that was actually good about it falls apart. What do you do about writer's block? If you get it, I'm not sure you do based on what you said. But like, well, I'm normally going away from my my writing period when I've kind of I know I'm going to go do something and so I don't get it to what I do for writer's block when I hit a place, I'm on page forty on a screenplay, and I have no outlined and I don't know what I'm doing. I sometimes we'll open up a Microsoft Word document and just kind of right out like some beats to kind of unblocked my brain..

writer Joshua tree cordray six days five hours four hours
"dan fogelman" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"dan fogelman" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"We knew there were no batteries in the smoke detector what was going to happen? What could you tell us about that episode? And then I swear to God. We're moving on to life itself. I was just, I mean, we didn't. I mean, we didn't think it was going to be lost like anybody would care about secrets of this is us. So we had to go and shoot it an hour and a half away. Really, we had fake scripts fake names on scripts. We, I had think my poor assistant has things in lock boxes in our office. It was crazy, but a, yeah, it was. It was quite a process. And then we were at the Super Bowl at all was just crazy. It was well. So this is almost a throwback in a way or not throwback continuation of your writing directing feature debut Danny Collins, which which had a lot of John Lennon kind of through it here is Bob Dylan? Yeah. Talk talk about how for life itself. You again turned back to music and the influence that could have on people in how life itself sprang into a reality. Yeah, I, I was I had sat down to write this film. I had no idea what I wanted to write about. I originally thought the film was going to be about Oscar. Is it gonna live your wads characters? And the end of the film would be revealed that she hadn't left him. She had passed away and him reuniting with his child. And and then I kinda shifted. I just put on my I tunes Bob time, out of mind, came on on shuffle, and I kept going back to it as I wrote. And then by the time I had finished, I had twelve Bob Dylan songs and so I had to go and everybody like. It and I was like, oh shit. And so we went and we approached Dylan's camp and he, they gave us the whole album like to you with the script or without a script, we approach them with the SCR. Okay. Okay. And then I think I actually believe we, we close the deal after we showed them the final film I wanna say. So you still didn't have the rights come now? I don't believe so. What would you have done? I don't know. I don't know, but seriously had no backup while there's not a lot of dialogue, we must have had it. Her name is Dylan. We must have had it. It's all a blur. I think I think we must have had in some shape or form. I think we had gone back for anything. We, I think we got the stuff that was basically in the script like the demolition to music in the bed. One reference to make you feel my love earth to her singing to make you feel my love, and but then I think we went back and got more after the fact if I remember and we'll get into spoilers later. So we'll have our spoiler section, but you know, I would be remiss if I didn't mention this and you could tell me maybe I'm out on a limb, but it would seem that you were kind of very influenced by our yoga, an inner into with twenty one grams and with battle. Yeah. And and even even film like Margaret, to an extent, just kinda curious what some of your influences were for this and especially with Arriaga and in a re too because they love non linear storytelling or connective. Well, I've always loved it as well. I mean, you can see it in. This is us in crazy, stupid love. And now this, but I. Actually, like I was big reader, like I never, I was never a film student. I've kind of fallen into this as a profession. And so for me, it was like Marquez, one hundred years of solitude, and these big sprawling like and Tyler novels, or when you read like thousand sponged sons or like these kind of generational novels letter on. That's always been a thing that turned me on of like watching the the, something that you can see a life and snapshots and then tell a big wide story. And so as much as those films were and and you can even look at it like I've always touchstone film for me as been, you know, magnolia in the way that it's, it's all these different characters, but they are tied together because they're actually not disconnected..

Bob Dylan Oscar Bob time Danny Collins John Lennon Marquez Tyler Arriaga Margaret one hundred years twenty one grams
"dan fogelman" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"dan fogelman" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"And and so I got Michael bay and I said, I wanted to wreck a twenty five million dollars action movie starring Emmanuel Lewis and Gary Coleman, and I got it green lit. And so it was a paramount. The green, I forget what studio was going to do it. It was basically, they said, we'll make it. We'll. Give you this budget and Emmanuel Lewis would not work with Gary Coleman. And I couldn't get it and it was. It was a har- an r. rated comedy action movie. I was gonna do like stunts like Michael bay movie and it was. It was absolutely insane. And I begged them, I begged him and he wouldn't do it. And then Gary Coleman passed away. It was really sad. I was having meetings across town with both of them trying to bring them together and I just couldn't get it done. Just the great disappointment of my life. It really. Did you ever get to find out what the rift was exactly about between it wasn't a riff? I, it seemed like a one sided riff. I mean, the it was and they both like they had deep monologues about because they had very different attitudes about their star and their what their experience had been. I try. I talked to them a lot and built it off of that. I, I don't know what it was. I remember very vividly sitting in kinky and studio city. The place love that place with Emmanuel Lewis. And I said, man, yeah, I said a begging you to change your mind. And he said, Dan, I change one thing and I change it every day, and that's my underwear. And I remember I was like the whole movie. I'm not going to be able to get this movie made, and it was killing me in. Yeah, so that was the great frustration. Sheer curiosity, devil's advocate. Is there any way that you could do a rewrite since Gary Coleman has passed now, I was asked that like could you do it with the girls from what's fact know stamos she's up full helpful. The twins, the Olsen twins, or like I do it with somebody. You'll lose an elf. It wasn't the same. It was there. It was pure. And I didn't want to read it. I did love it, but yeah, that never got made. All right. We'll so people also came to know you recently through, I guess there's a TV show called this is Russ or something. No, this is us. I'm joking. Any fans of this is us. I would hope. Okay. Good. There's there's so much to talk about there, but I do wanna get to life itself in a minute or two, but just what do you remember driving down the street and coming up with the idea for what? What gave you the idea for what became this is I don't. I don't remember having the idea. I started writing it is a film and I had like eight siblings and like eight different characters. We're all the same age. There was an Englishwoman like everything you could do to bury the fact that they were related. And then the reveal at the end of the film was going to be that, oh, no. One of the stories was the story of their parents. I was like, that's not a movie like it's a cool twist, but I don't know what makes that film, and I put it away for a while. And then I was like, what am I going to do for a TV show? And I thought I keep going back to these characters all the time. Maybe a TV show. It would hold better because then it would be you don't need a beginning, a middle and an end. It's it's the reveal is literally the start of the entire series as opposed to the end of a movie. And so that clicked infamy I eliminated a bunch of the characters and finished it, and then it just exploded. I mean, speaking of reveals like Jack's death, everybody was trying to figure out how that was going to happen..

Gary Coleman Emmanuel Lewis Michael bay Olsen stamos Dan Russ Jack twenty five million dollars
"dan fogelman" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"dan fogelman" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"So Tiber, owl was free for motto. And Leslie, Nielsen was the kindest man. And I remember I told him about the movie Fred clause which is coming out and he lived in Florida with his wife, and he called me from Florida. I was like, you should go see it. And I, I found the theater from him in Florida that was playing it and gave him the information. And he called me and he goes, he left a message on machine that I kept for like four years. And he was like, Dan, I must tell you no one has ever done anything for so generous for you to have rented out that theater for me because he hates. He thought I had sent them to a matinee. A that I had rented out the theater from, but nobody was going to the movie. That'll keep you up in that. And so I'd I'd sold so that one didn't. That one didn't go like, you'd want it to go. And I had a couple of others that had just kinda missed. And I finally said, I'm just going to write something that I want to write without a concept. I'm not going to take a job from a network or from a studio to write a movie. And I had had this idea for I rid in the first ten pages of crazy stupid love, but I didn't know what it was yet, and my wife kept saying, you should go. I was like, I don't know what to do. Next. I'm sick of making all these shitty movies that aren't working. And she said, you should go finish that one that you showed me the ten pages of. So I went and I finished it, and I wrote it for Steve Carell and I sent it to Steve Carell and then he wanted to do it and it and it make got me exactly the way I wanted to get mid. And so that changed everything for me like it was the first time I, you know, I had this weird ride where it was not the way it normally happens where I just like things had happened for me very quickly and. When I was taking jobs and taking notes, and that was the first time I said, I'm stopping. I'm going to write something for myself, and then it changed everything. I would be remiss because you were talking about projects that didn't go a favorite of mine that I still hope still hope one day to publish in backstory with an interview with you about it in my magazine. Backstory is your your your script, the Gary Coleman, Emmanuel Lewis project, which I've always been in love with and it made the blacklist? Yeah, in two thousand eight. Just give give the kids, the pitch the pitch was it was it's my all time. It's the only thing I've, except for that initial bar mitzvah scrip, good or bad. It's the only one I've never been able to get made and I'll tell you why. But it was the guy Coleman. Emmanuel Lewis project, it was Gary Coleman and Emmanuel is as themselves. They're these stars of these bizarre eighty sitcoms and they go to a country in Scandinavia where their shows have I blown up two thousand seventeen different different strokes and Webster, and so they're the biggest celebrities there. And while they're there because of their celebrity access, they get inside of a nuclear plot to destroy America and they become it's an action movie and it's brilliant and they hate each other and they hated each other in real life..

Nielsen Gary Coleman Emmanuel Lewis Florida Steve Carell Leslie Dan Scandinavia America Webster four years one day
"dan fogelman" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"dan fogelman" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"I mean, when we I was up there for a year, I subsequently would write three more movies for them for picks. Disney, right? Bolton, tangled. But you do like you do like thing, but do you do like, I mean, it's it's a million versions of it, and I always say, imagine because everyone's like their movies are so good. I'm like, imagine you could shoot a movie a million times and say, I like that character. I like that scene. I like that moment nominee to change everything else and keep redoing and redoing. And that's kind of what you do in an animated film. I don't know if the process makes a lot of sense financially, but it does make for good movies eventually and the what? What was something that like we wouldn't know unless you tell us about a character, a scene moment that you had hung onto forever for cars, tangled. But that was eventually scuttled and there was a good lesson. I can almost barely remember because there was so much. I mean, tangled was in existence for seven years before I got hired to write it and they'd and then we turned it over really quickly and like a year cars, I remember the animator of the drawer guys would have. They had like a cars, graveyard of all the characters and ideas. Is that had gone to waste in the course of making the movie. And so they would draw graveyard where they would bury the cars. And because I mean, it's just so turned over so frequently, but that was a real learning experience for me. I'd written up to that point. I'd written one screenplay about my life, a bar mitzvah, screenplay. I know idea what I was doing and what major agent decide to send it to Pixar. Because at that time, Pixar wasn't quite Pixar yet they while I was up there, they made finding nemo and the incredible they had made Toy Story in a bug's life and they were amazing, but they hadn't had this massive one after another success that happened while I was there the incredible finding nemo gratitude cars, all those moves you coming in around the same time that Michael arm was I came in before him. Okay. I believe and then, but yeah, they at that time they would hire young writers. It was non guild, and I think I got paid like a thousand dollars like a maybe like a great living, but like a thousand dollars a week to write cars and you are on a two week con. Contract that was extendable for like fifty more weeks because but but I was twenty five years old and I was a great. I moved to San Francisco and and then that's how it worked. And so I interviewed, they flip like ten young writers to interview. I think I interviewed with a in a room full of people and they don't tell you what the movie's about other than it's called cars, and so you don't know what to talk about. I'm like, I have a car. I mean, you don't know what to say. I know how to I've driven before, but I think Steve Jobs, John Lasseter who wanted to hire me. And so I had a good interview, but I had no idea about anything. And then they called said, we want to give them a two week shot and that turned into almost two years. That's awesome. Yeah, a lot of people came to know you for your adults entertainment, a crazy stupid love. So. Ed. So you know that you're getting into a different dynamic, what? What was your biggest lesson on that? I mean, it had a great cast and it became a movie that a lot of people are fans of. But again, you're still coming up through the ranks. You're now going technically animation back to live. Well, that movie changed the trajectory my career because I had made some live action movies that hadn't gone. Well, I, my first live action film was a film called Fred Claus with Vince Vaughn. Right. I wasn't going to bring it up. You did the record when whenever trying to traumatize it wasn't. It was it. It had been a beloved beloved script, and I I was doing at the time television pilot my first TV pilot with Leslie Nielsen. And what was it called? It was called Lipchitz saves the world. It was. Nobody ever saw. It was the best thing I ever did. Oh, my God, I, it was Leslie, Nielsen. It was Tiber owl right before he got modern family. It got it didn't get picked up..

Pixar Leslie Nielsen Disney John Lasseter Bolton Michael arm Nielsen Lipchitz Leslie San Francisco Steve Jobs Vince Vaughn Fred Claus thousand dollars two week twenty five years seven years two years
"dan fogelman" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"dan fogelman" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Guys. Everyone. Okay. You know, we always like to start with breaking in stories. Tell tell us when you started going down the path towards becoming a screenwriter, what what kind of made that happen for you? I had no real plan. I had. I had a bad breakup with a girlfriend, the twenty years old, and I got in my car and drove out to Los Angeles. I became aware from New Jersey and thank you and I had, I'd always been a writer like writing stories. I, I've been an English major. I'd studied the Victorian novel, which had no use in the real world. And and then I drove out here. I got my first job six months after living here is how he meant those assistant on his daytime, talk show. I and then got to see the germaphobe firsthand firsthand. We at NBC where they filmed the tonight show with Jay Leno, and it was a really exciting. I was twenty years old and it was really exciting. And then I got a job with Jimmy Kimmel as his PA on a show called the man show, which was the strange showing comedy central. And and then eventually just I kind of jihad I was writing like, you know, remember the TV guide channel where it was all the scroll of what was. On cable and then the top half had the programming I was writing top and that's writing for TV on TV. Yeah, and it paid me enough money to like start working out of home a little on twenty five. I wrote a screenplay about my bar mitzvah and it was a called becoming a man, and it was like a wonder year style bar mitzvah one of your style script as a kid, looking back at his bar mitzvah and it got me agents a Jewish identified with it, and it's still my agent of his dad. I would hope so. And and then whatever happened to it was never any. Nobody ever wanted to make it. I beg borrow and steal from it over the years. Hans Zimmer once asked for meeting with me over at I twenty five years old. I took an elevator up to his apartment. I remember so vividly, and he was like a telling me while you think that user. So funny. That was my first official Hollywood meeting. That's amazing. And then, yeah, and then that script got sent to Pixar and it was a random freak thing, and I'd never written a screenplay before except that one and I got hired to write cars and that became the start of my career. And that that started you on the Pixar experience, which is just a place that takes story really seriously. Yeah. And I'm just curious if you could remember for a minute, we'll of course get to life itself, but I just wanna talk through some of those years a little, you know, Pixar take story. So seriously. I'm curious, what are some of the things that you picked up about storytelling? The Pixar way, because they're in a unique situation where they get to since Santa mation make their movie through animated through Anna Matic's six times over the course of like three years, you see your movie evolve again and again, and again much more than six times. Actually..

Pixar Hans Zimmer Jimmy Kimmel Jay Leno Los Angeles NBC New Jersey Santa mation Anna Matic germaphobe writer Hollywood official twenty years twenty five years three years six months
"dan fogelman" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"dan fogelman" Discussed on /Film Daily

"Come back into try to criticize those who are criticizing your work of art, itchy. Tell us about what's going on with Dan Fogelman. Yeah. So after this film was almost universally lambasted by critics now has a fourteen percent on rotten tomatoes, dental is fighting back and he is essentially pointing the blame at the film critics themselves and more specifically the quote, unquote white male critics who don't like anything that has any emotion. So in an interview, he basically says, quote, a couple of earlier views that have come out about this movie feel so out of left fields. Everybody who's a part of this movie. There's a disconnect between something that is happening between are primarily white male critics who don't like anything that has any emotion, and he goes on to talk about health criticism is broken and how everyone is cynical, but that's I Rana considering that not only does this are most of the critical reviews of this film of both from male. Critics white male critics, but also from people of color and women. A large majority of them are from win and most and some of the positive views majority from white milk critics to ENZA also like he didn't even look at the rotten tomatoes in like Mika assessment like he dislike had already made up his mind that like it must be white male, and there is an important point to be made that, yes, the film criticism community is overwhelmingly dominated by white male critics. But in this case, that's not the issue here. I think that he just made a bad film. Yeah, I, I don't think it's a bad thing to have a filmmaker engage with his critics in heaven discussion, reasonable discussion. Like I feel like Ryan Johnson has done a good his walked that line pretty well. Even though you know, there's a lot of toxicity around Star Wars that have been attacking him, Chris, do you? What do you think? Do you think. Ever a good idea to have the filmmaker kind of like respond to critics. I, I don't think it is. I think it's a a line. You shouldn't really cross because it never comes off. Well, really. Like even, you know, I, I don't think I've ever seen a critic a filmmaker call out a critic and been like, yes, he was right to do that. Never works. I think it's just better to. I get it. I get, you know, I know if I made a film and everyone hated it. I'd be like, oh shit, but it's best to just let it go. It didn't Fogelman said so much success with this us. I feel like he just, you know, this is the first thing that he's been badly in a while. He's, you know, you do spend so much time you spend like years of your life, investing yourself in writing, directing ITO, casting, all that stuff. Editing you do have personal. Action, itchy. What do you think? Do you think. Ever good time for if he'll make her to engage with the critics. I think that there could be a place for it. But in this case, it's very reactive. He just like he just has sort of a knee jerk reaction to these critics who didn't like it and who kind of thought of it as being overly sentimental and mawkish. And he just kind of responded react into instinct of and essentially attack them instead of looking at their actual points were. So there probably is a place for it. I don't think this was the place and I don't think he had the proper, you know, response to everything. I agree. This reads more like, you know, when Dwayne, the rock Johnson responded to critics of Baywatch saying he made the film for the fans, not the critics and like that always bothers me. It just seems like you know, lumping whole group of people together is wrong, and that's what he's doing. He's making assessment of a whole category, them criticism. Another hand. I have seen film critics, you know, address issues that people have had with the movie, their movies, new people don't like the dimension. This guy by calling tra- Varo I feel like has tackled sometimes like, you know, when people didn't like his films ju- drastic world more so than. Like he, he actually came out and would like be like, oh, what this intention with this? And you know, whatever, like not like an angry defensive tackle attacking way, but like tr- trying to explain yourself as an artist, which I think in artist doesn't necessarily have to do..

Dan Fogelman Ryan Johnson ITO Mika Rana Dwayne Chris fourteen percent milk
'This Is Us' Season 3: What We Know So Far

Elvis Duran

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

'This Is Us' Season 3: What We Know So Far

"So Dan Fogelman the creator of of this is us sat down with deadline and he told the audiences I'll get. Ready season three, comes back September the, twenty fifth but he gave us a little insight on what they're going to be. Discussing three they're going to be, tackling, Vietnam Jack and Rebecca's, first date Randall. And Beth I ate during a dive into Toby suffering, from depression and they're also gonna talk about, Jack's, brother NICKY and what his role was with the at Phnom and his role to Jack. As. Well okay so there's some of the cool story lines we getting on the third season

Dan Fogelman Gilligan Garett Danielle Monaro Elvis Duran Felicity Dawson Garrick Vietnam Jack Shelly Jim Parsons Garrett Showtime Yankees Demi Tammy Sofia Vergara Mets Netflix
Oprah Brings Audience to Tears in Golden Globes Speech

Morning Edition

02:13 min | 2 years ago

Oprah Brings Audience to Tears in Golden Globes Speech

"Streisand presented three billboards with the best picture drama award and in doing so she slammed the hollywood foreign press association for not honoring more women filmmakers she noted that she's the only woman to have won a golden globe award for best director in 1984 that was thirty four years ago folks times up there was one man who did make history last night sterling k brown from the nbc series this is us he became the first african american actor to win in the best actor category in a tv drama he thanked his family and the show's creator dan fogelman therefore men who wrote a row four a black man but could only be played by black man and so what are pressured so much about this thing is that are being seen for who i am and bring appreciate it for who i am and it makes it that much more difficult to dismiss me or dismiss anybody who looks like him thank you again and it was a black woman who made history for her lifetime achievement award oprah winfrey brought the audience to tears and to its feet in standing ovations last night she began by talking about what it was like as a little girl to watch actor sidney poitier win an oscar and 19 64 i remember his tie was white and of course his skin was black and i'd never seen a black man being celebrated like fact and i've tried many many many times to explain what a moment like that means to a little girl a kid watching from the cheap seats as my mom came through the door bone tired from cleaning other people's houses winfrey noted that portia also wanna cecil b demille of gordon 1982 and it is not lost on me that at this moment there are some little girls watching as i become the first black woman to be given the same award winfrey said she was proud of an inspired by women who have shared their stories in hollywood and beyond speaking your truth is the most powerful tool we all have so i want to night to express gratitude to all the women who have endured years of abuse and assault because they like my mother had children to feed and bills to pay and dreams to pursue winfrey cited not just hollywood women but domestic workers farmworkers women and academia and politics and business she had a message for them and for all the little girls watching her that a new day is on even before she finished her speeds twitter erupted with calls for oprah winfrey to run for president in 2020 muenden than buckle npr

Oprah Winfrey Sidney Poitier Oscar Gordon Hollywood President Trump Massachusetts Lifetime Achievement Award Cecil B Demille Assault NPR
"dan fogelman" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"dan fogelman" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Do work into she know if you're acting at home yeah yeah i'm not a good actor i'm not no i can't and that's that's my whole thing i realised later early on in my career i was like i need to be a good actor like that's what i want to do i wanna be an actor i need to be a really good actor and then i realized as i got older i was like so the keita that having an acting career is not cannot act really you know what i mean and so when i'm acting you you'll be able to tell ya okay look at my earlier work it's and it's it's how okay but how did you get these job on this as us i mean this has been one of the biggest surprises the network tv in recent history thank you yeah no i am it was actually one of the most painless sort of processes i've i've been through uh i went in i i got this scripts um and i read it my friend said you know dan fogelman i said i know i know dan fogelman he was how long have you known as well and i don't know him i know of it and i know i know who dan fogelman is and he's i got i just read the script i think he just wrote you i got what are you talking about never met not the guy really and i read the script and i i got to the end of and i was like this is the greatest thing i've ever read um i gotta figure out a way to get into this room so i called my agent he got me into the room it was a standard audition and um they call me back i had one more on tape and then they i guess they watched it at the network and that was it it was really painless but what your strategy when you go in there because everybody wants to be an actor but the out in the room when you know that your future aurea i mean the.

keita dan fogelman
"dan fogelman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"dan fogelman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"No we can always come back to this sort of a sect styles sold valid from the show this is us written in part by my guests said arthur cuss was data i watched that episode i assumed that was an old song but through i assume that was for good first recorded a 1971 is on the way you're un my brotherinlaw what are hear the when it when he wiped the episode he call me i said make sure you watch this episode yet to hear the song the road the episode and the called me afterwards he like i didn't hear the saw with hamas it and i said it was when they were in a band together you know in the '70s and he he goes all that was you you and as they gear hess he goes i just thought that was from 19th 75 wherever we were so so yeah i've i've i've i've take that as the biggest it was it was meant to feel like it was coming from the 70s in memphis it was supposed to have this stacks records vibe and and hopefully we succeeded in in in in achieving that so how did you do it i mean i i want to get some context again if you're just tuning in the vets on plays in an episode where a dime a father of one of the characters randall goes to memphis to show his son where he came from to make his peace so tell me but how that track came together anything stick out yeah dan fogelman sent me the script for that episode and i get the scripts ahead of time for the shows and this one particularly he he he he said that there'd we need to have an original song for this episode.

arthur cuss hamas hess memphis dan fogelman randall
"dan fogelman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"dan fogelman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Before there was net flakes or hbo are really cable television of any kind there were networks and seasons of tv and shows that became for one of a better word water kulary which is how i found myself on the paramount studios lot here in la the other day talk going to a guy who created and now runs when the most popular network television shows gone this is uh through fifteen million people a week last year on average season to start september the 27th and dan fogelman is deep in production where shooting tonight we're actually shooting in the desert tonight with us of uster stallone is coming on enduring a whole war seem with us her movie within the show today so where i'm heading out there today to to work with sly physical calls here i guess i'm john tried it out are you the decider yuga yes apparent i'm told ya it's a weird position where you have to make these big decisions for this very popular show and suddenly you feel you still feel like a kid who starting out during a tv show in euros a crap at on the one is going to make the call that is the fagan so you wrote a thing in and and somebody's going to yell at me about this is a variety of the house ali would reporter i can remember which and it was an old really to network rash yeah what is it about network tv for you as opposed to cable and who giveth rose scenario why love cable i mean i i mean i just was i was literally like a 10yearold boy on the phone driving here taught in my best friend who stuck in traffic and we were analyzing the last episode of game of thrones like like nerds so i love it all from me i grew up on network tv i was born in nineteen seventy six and so the 80s were like that was where i watched my tell jokes kind of raised by television to a certain degree so there was i mean there was hbo little if you like you're lucky enough to get it and you.

stallone fagan the house dan fogelman ali reporter
"dan fogelman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"dan fogelman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Before there was net flakes or hbo all really cable television of any kind there were networks and seasons of tv and shows that became for one of a better word water kulary which is how i found myself on the paramount studios lot here in la the other day talking to will guy who created and now runs when the most popular network television shows gone this is uh through fifteen million people a week last year on average season to start september the 27th dan fogelman is deep in production where shooting tonight we're actually shooting in the desert tonight with us muster stallone is coming on enduring a whole warsaw gene with us her movie within the show today so where i'm heading out there today to to work with sly calls lada i guess i'm john tried it out are you the decider yuga yes apparent i'm told ya it's a weird position where you have to make these big decisions for this very popular show and suddenly you feel you still feel like a kid who starting out during a tv show in euros a crap that i'm i'm one is going to make the call that is the thing and so you wrote a thing in and and somebody's going to yell at me about this is a variety of the the hollywood reporter i can remember which and it was an old really to network yeah what is it about network tv for you as opposed to cable and who giveth rose jerry yo why love cable i mean i i mean i just was i was literally like a 10yearold boy on the phone driving here taught in my best friend who stuck in traffic and we were analyzing the last episode of game of thrones as like a like nerds so i love it all for me i grew up on that were tv i was born in nineteen seventy six and so the 80s were like that was where i watched my televised kind of raised by television to a certain degree so there way i mean there was hbo little if you like you're lucky enough to get it and you could see boobs but but for for the most part it was.

dan fogelman stallone reporter warsaw hollywood
"dan fogelman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"dan fogelman" Discussed on KCRW

"Before there was net flakes or hbo or really cable television of any kind there were networks and seasons of tv and shows that became for want of a better word water kulary which is how i found myself on the paramount studios lot here in la the other day talking to a guy who created and now runs when the most popular network television shows gone this is uh through fifteen million people a week last year on average season to start september the 27th and dan fogelman is deep in production where shooting tonight we're actually shooting in the desert tonight with us of uster stallone is coming on and doing a whole worsley with us her movie within the show today so we're i'm heading out there today to to work with sly yugolslavia hey i guess i'm john tried it out are you the decider regard yes a pera untold yeah yeah it's a weird position where you have to make these big decisions for this very popular show and suddenly you feel you still feel like a a kid who starting out to hit tv show and euros a crap that on what is going to make the call that is the thing and so you wrote a thing in and and somebody's going to yell at me about this in a variety of the hollywood reporter i can remember which and it was an old really to network yeah um what is it about network tv for you was opposed to cable and who giveth rozier yo why love cable i mean i i mean i just was i was literally like a ten year old boy on the phone driving here taught in my best friend who was stuck in traffic and we were analyzing the last episode of game of thrones like a quick nerds so i love it all from me i grew up on that were tv i was born in nineteen seventy six and so the 80s were like that was where i watched my tell jokes kind of raised by television to a certain degree so there was i mean there was hbo little if you like you are lucky enough to get it and you.

stallone reporter dan fogelman hollywood ten year