35 Burst results for "Dan Charles"

"dan charles" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 2 months ago

"dan charles" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"International team of scientists has taken a close look at satellite shots of deforestation in Brazil. And they say that just a small minority of farmers is responsible for most of the damage, the scientists are calling on international food companies to stop buying from those farmers. NPR's Dan Charles has more The whole world has a stake in Brazil's forests, their planetary treasure of wildlife and carbon and Brazil itself has a forest code that orders landowners like farmers to preserve at least some of those forests in the Amazon. It's 80% in some other parts of the country, about 30%. Roni Raja, who teaches at the Federal University of Miniaturize says Brazil also monitors what happens on that land Using satellites. Actually present has the most advanced Montri systems in the world that data's public people can see what land has been deforested. So bourgeois and a team of colleagues created a tool that looked at close to a 1,000,000 farms to see whether they'd cleared more land than is legal. And in a paper published this week in the journal Science. That revealed results that Rachel Fine's encouraging more than 80% or farms do not the forest they have not the forest that after 2008 In fact, most of the illegal deforestation, 61% occurred on just 2% of the farms 17,000 properties Original calls them the bad apples of Brazilian agriculture. And he says, this means it should be possible to enforce the law. Just go after those bad apples. You can concentrate your efforts in a relatively small number of farmers. But quite often, The problem is, you know, those are also farmers, which are very powerful. They have very strong connections in Congress, he says. Right now, Brazil's government does not seem interested in enforcing the law. That's where multinational food companies could stepped in, he says. Cos. Like Cargill and Bungee and J. B s, which by Brazil soybeans slaughter its beef and exported to places like Europe and China. Those companies have already promise to stop buying grain or cattle that were raised on deforested land. Raja says they should go further stop buying from farmers who've been burning the forest on any of their land. Dan Charles NPR news.

Brazil Roni Raja Dan Charles NPR Dan Charles NPR Rachel Fine Federal University of Miniatur Amazon Congress Europe Cargill China J. B
How Absentee Landowners Keep Farmers From Protecting Water And Soil

Environment: NPR

04:55 min | 2 months ago

How Absentee Landowners Keep Farmers From Protecting Water And Soil

"Some of our biggest environmental problems like water, pollution and endangered wildlife caused by large scale farming, which means farmers are in a position to reduce environmental damage or at least mitigate it. Why don't they one reason? They often don't own much of the lands that they farm here's. NPR's Dan Charles Lisa Solti more loves nature. I reached her while she was visiting. The forests of northern Minnesota I can only describe it as healing. All the stress of our world, and said she just forget about it when you're in one of these beautiful old growth, for as she teaches ecology at Iowa State University, but when she moved to Iowa seventeen years ago, she struggled a little. She didn't have that same feeling standing in vast fields of corn. She wasn't hearing any birds or seeing many bugs all I can here are the leaves of the rustling corn around me and not one other. Biological Noise at all right. It's you know they call it the Green Desert and there is a lot of land like this this year. Corn and soybeans covered land. That's equal in size to all the East Coast States from New York to Georgia. But solti more says it doesn't have to be a green desert. She's been studying what she calls. Prairie Strips stretches of land, running through fields of corner soybeans. We're farmers of set-aside may be percent of the land for tall, stemmed grasses and wildflowers. It's a different world there. She says birds singing their bees buzzing. They were crickets chirping. There was stuff hopping around. These bits of prairie also protect soil and water capture carbon dioxide from the air. For this to happen. Though farmers have to be willing to give this land back to nature and many experts on farmland say it can make economic sense. One of them is Steve Brewer President of People's company in Des Moines Iowa who buys sells and manages farmland across the country. One of the first things that we do and we do this on every farm that we managed as we run, these profitability maps. His company creates a detailed map of the. The farm what they spend and what they earn on every acre, and they're finding consistently that some of that land loses money. It's amazing about ten to fifteen percent of all the acres in Iowa. aren't profitable. They're those hillsides with eroded soil spots where water collects in a big puddle after every rain. That is where they advise farmers to cut their losses may be bring back the prairie. Some farmers are doing this kinda thing most are not. And one reason the farm experts say is an under appreciated fact about America's farmland farmers only owned about half their land the rest of it. They rent year-by-year from a collection of landlords. Linda pro copy from Purdue University has studied those landowners. There are very diverse group of people much more diverse than farmers. Many are elderly retired farmers now renting the land to the next generation, some inherited it from grandparents. You have younger urban people who co owned a piece of land with cousins. Don't know anything about farming so when it comes to managing that Land Steve Brewer from People's company says it often plays out like this. Let's say somebody owns one hundred sixty acres. Thirty of those acres are lousy for growing crops, but they'll rent out. The whole thing is a landowner you want. Those thirty acres farmed because you're trying to get rental revenue on every acre that you can get, and the farmer will go along because he or she really wants one hundred thirty good acres. Sarah? Carlson longtime environmental advocate with the group. Practical farmers of Iowa gets annoyed by landowners who just want their rent check? We need to start calling landlord, slum lords and a lot of cases. They're just as guilty she says consider something else. Cover crops vegetation that farmers can plant in the off season to protect and enrich the soil. It's great for the environment and for your crops in the long run, but it costs money upfront, so tenant farmers who may not be there in the long run are reluctant to spend that money. Carson says some landlords do care enough that they'll spend the money to protect the Environment Bill. Does prairie strips pay for cover crops? But they're the exceptions. I mean even my mom wasn't that kind of landlord and I'm her daughter like I'm like what do you mean we're not going to do? Cover crops was wrong with you Steve. Brewer land. Brooker says he does see. Signs of things are changing. There's a new kind of landowner showing up people who didn't inherit the farmland, but decided to buy it. Some of them because they care about how foods produced and the environment, others are purely investors for them. The land is a financial asset, but they understand that this asset can't increase in value if they protected Dan Charles NPR

Green Desert Steve Brewer Dan Charles Lisa Solti Iowa Iowa State University NPR Minnesota Des Moines Iowa Dan Charles Npr Purdue University America New York President Trump Brooker Iowa. Georgia Carlson Sarah
"dan charles" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:08 min | 2 months ago

"dan charles" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"So tenant farmers who may not be there in the long run, are reluctant to spend that money. Carlson says some landlords to care enough that they'll spend the money to protect the environment. Build those prairie strips pay for cover crops. They're the exceptions. I mean, even my mom wasn't that kind of landlord. And I'm her daughter like I'm like, What do you mean? They're not going to do cover crops? What is wrong with you? Steve Brewer, The land broker says he does see signs that things were changing. There's a new kind of landowner showing up. People didn't inherit the farmland, but decided to buy it. Some of them because they care about how foods produced and the environment. Others are purely investors. For them. The land is a financial asset. But they understand that this asset can't increase in value if they protected. Dan Charles NPR news Of the most famous actors in India has covert 19. Bigby, as he's called is Bollywood fan's air. Praying for recovery is NPR's Lauren Frayer reports. And a Hindu temple in Bhopal, India. The faithful chant prayers for Amita Bachan and his family. 77 year old Hollywood icon and his son were both hospitalized over the weekend with covert 19. His daughter in law and granddaughter also tested positive and are isolating at home. Bastions are bigger than royalty. There's another Hindu temple dedicated to Amita Bachan in Kolkata, complete with a life sized idol of the actor on the throne. The sanctuary walls are plastered with movie posters. I'm number one money. We're not fans were Devo tease. This man told local TV. He's like a god for us. People are tweeting video prayers from around the world, including brothers Caravan and Kabeer from Chicago, with their hands clasped in anonymous. Stay pose. They were fertile. Amita Bachan as Dadu. Grandfather. Get wass on me. We are sending prayers for you on the button managed to get a hospital bed, even though he had only mild symptoms. While regular folks in India have struggled to receive treatment, people have even died in hospital parking lots waiting to be admitted. Before he became ill. Bocian starred in public service announcements about the pandemic. In India. People with the virus have been evicted from apartment buildings and even attacked his own infection may now help fight that stigma. Say Islamic Don't be afraid of Corona virus patients, Fashion said in one ad, embraced them and bring them home safe. Lauren Frayer NPR news This is NPR news. It's morning Edition on W. When I see a hearing today may decide the fate of international students after it was announced that they would be prohibited from being in the US if their school's on Lee had online classes this fall..

Amita Bachan India Lauren Frayer NPR Dan Charles NPR Steve Brewer Carlson Bhopal US Bigby Kolkata Bocian Chicago Hollywood Fashion Lee
Absentee Landlords Interfere With Farmers Protecting Water, Soil

Environment: NPR

04:55 min | 2 months ago

Absentee Landlords Interfere With Farmers Protecting Water, Soil

"Some of our biggest environmental problems like water, pollution and endangered wildlife caused by large scale farming, which means farmers are in a position to reduce environmental damage or at least mitigate it. Why don't they one reason? They often don't own much of the lands that they farm. Here's NPR's Dan Charles. Lisa Solti more loves nature I. Reached Her while she was visiting the forests of northern Minnesota I can only describe it as healing. All the stress of our world, and said she just forget about it when you're in one of these beautiful old growth for as she teaches ecology. At University, but when she moved to Iowa seventeen years ago, she struggled a little. She didn't have that same feeling standing in vast fields of corn. She wasn't hearing any birds or seeing many bugs all. I can here are the leaves of the rustling corn around me and not one other. Biological Noise at all right? It's you know they call it the green. Desert and there is a lot of land like this this year. Corn and soybeans covered land. That's equal in size to all the East Coast States from New York to Georgia. But solti more says it doesn't have to be a green desert. She's been studying what she calls. Prairie Strips stretches of land, running through fields of corner soybeans. We're farmers of set-aside may be percent of the land for tall, stemmed grasses and wildflowers. It's a different world there. She says birds singing their bees buzzing. They were crickets chirping. There was stuff hopping around. These bits of prairie also protect soil and water capture carbon dioxide from the air. For this to happen, though farmers have to be willing to give this land back to nature and many experts on farmland say it can make economic sense. One of them is Steve. Brewer President of People's company in Des Moines Iowa who buys sells and manages farmland across the country. One of the first things that we do and we do this on every farm that we managed as we run, these profitability maps. His company creates a detailed map of the. The farm what they spend and what they earn on every acre, and they're finding consistently that some of that land loses money. It's amazing about ten to fifteen percent of all the acres in Iowa aren't profitable. They're those hillsides with eroded soil spots where water collects in a big puddle after every rain. That is where they advise farmers to cut their losses may be bring back the prairie. Some farmers are doing this Kinda. Thing most are not. And one reason the farm experts say is an under appreciated fact about America's farmland farmers only owned about half their land the rest of it. They rent year-by-year from a collection of landlords. Linda pro copy from Purdue University has studied those landowners. There are very diverse group of people much more diverse than farmers. Many are elderly retired farmers now renting the land to the next generation, some inherited it from grandparents. You have younger urban people who co owned a piece of land with. Don't know anything about farming so when it comes to managing that Land Steve. Brewer from People's company says it often plays out like this. Let's say somebody owns one hundred sixty acres. Thirty of those acres are lousy for growing crops, but they'll rent out. The whole thing is a landowner you want. Those thirty acres farmed because you're trying to get rental revenue on every acre that you can get, and the farmer will go along because he or she really wants one hundred thirty good acres. Sarah Carlson longtime environmental advocate with the group practical farmers of Iowa gets annoyed by landowners who just want their rent check? We need to start calling landlord, slum lords and a lot of cases. They're just as guilty she says consider something else. Cover crops vegetation that farmers can plant in the season to protect and enrich the soil. It's great for the environment and for your crops in the long run, but it costs money upfront, so tenant farmers who may not be there in the long run are reluctant to spend that money. Carson says some landlords do care enough that they'll spend the money to protect the Environment Bill. Does prairie strips pay for cover crops? But they're the exceptions I mean. Even my mom wasn't that kind of landlord and I'm her daughter like I'm like. What do you mean we're not going to do? Cover crops was wrong with you Steve, brewer? Land Brooker says he does see signs of things are changing. There's a new kind of landowner showing up people who didn't inherit the farmland, but decided to buy it. Some of them because they care about how foods produced and the environment, others are purely investors for them. The land is a financial asset, but they understand that this asset can't increase in value if they protected. Dan Charles NPR

Lisa Solti People Iowa Steve NPR Dan Charles Des Moines Iowa Minnesota Dan Charles Npr Purdue University President Trump America New York Brooker Sarah Carlson Georgia Brewer Carson
"dan charles" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:31 min | 3 months ago

"dan charles" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"At a Tyson plant in Logansport Indiana at the time I was not feeling sick not at the time of testing but a few days later while he was waiting those test results he lost his sense of smell developed constant headaches so it wasn't a surprise when he got his result positive along with about nine hundred other people at the plant fortunately his was a mild case and this has been the story at one plant after another most of the people who test positive seem healthy at the time no symptoms of covert nineteen one extreme example Tyson says that a hundred ninety nine workers at a poultry plant in Springdale Arkansas tested positive but only one of them had symptoms people who test positive have to isolate themselves if they still haven't developed symptoms after ten days they can go back to work scientists say by then they likely can't infect anybody and getting those infected workers to stay home has helped in Black Hawk county office of C. say bonuses new covert cases at the Tyson plant are way down actually today's our first day we've had a zero a zero increase in cases meat packing plants are at the leading edge of a debate about how many people to test and how often in businesses and schools a one time test is only good for the short term because workers can pick up the virus the very next day mark Lawrenson the top health and safety official for the United food and commercial workers is demanding a rapid coronavirus test for every worker every day we really do have to get to some sort of daily testing mechanism for all the essential workers in this country a lot of his union members are still afraid to go back to work he says testing would make it much less stressful they look around the plant and they look around the locker room for their break room they know that everybody else inside these walls is covered free the director of health for the city of Nashville Michael Caldwell dealt with a corona virus outbreak at a Tyson plant right outside his city in Goodlettsville Tennessee he says right now it's not feasible to test all the workers every day at a plant like that but he wants companies to do regular random testing to catch any new waves of infection yeah I've told this to hi Susan I've told it to construction sites I've told it to nursing homes and I've told it to restaurants Tyson foods says it is planning to test a random sample of employees in its meat processing plants it hasn't yet decided how many or how often Dan Charles NPR news.

Indiana Tyson Springdale Arkansas director Michael Caldwell Goodlettsville Tennessee Susan Tyson foods Logansport Black Hawk county mark Lawrenson official Nashville Dan Charles NPR
Court Ruling On Popular Weedkiller Dicamba Upends Midwestern Agriculture

Environment: NPR

02:13 min | 4 months ago

Court Ruling On Popular Weedkiller Dicamba Upends Midwestern Agriculture

"A federal court has rebuked the Environmental Protection Agency and declared that it is no longer legal to spray. One of the country's most widely used herbicides. It's causing turmoil in mid Western agriculture NPR's Dan Charles has the story. Four years ago, the gave farmers a green light to expand their use of a Weedkiller, cold dyke, Cambe they started spraying it on new varieties of soybeans that had been genetically modified to tolerate the chemical, and from the beginning. It's been hugely controversial. Steve Smith is chairman of the save our crops coalition, which was set up to fight die Cambe. Problem is the chemistry of this product. It doesn't stay where it's supposed to. It sometimes evaporates and drifts into neighboring fields, orchards damage has been reported on millions of acres of other crops mostly soybeans. It was predicted. Predictable what the outcome would be! Several environmental groups sued the EPA saying that the agency violated the law by re approving those uses of Dot Cambe two years ago. And last Wednesday a Federal Circuit Court agreed revoked the EPA's decision. It was early evening in Illinois and Jean Pain President of the Illinois Fertilizer and Chemical Association outside grilling dinner. She came inside discovered dozens of messages on her phone. Everybody had questions what it means. Can I still use Dyke Cambe what is going on? That decision has thrown pains world into chaos, because we are in the middle of soybean production season in largest soybean state in the united. States, most soybeans in the country are now die. Cambe tolerant farmers ready to spray it. But in Illinois Minnesota and South Dakota pains, says state officials have been clear. The court's decision is the law guys. You need to quit using this. Other states are like Iowa have told farmers. It's still okay to spray die camp. Tells them not to. The EPA took several days to respond to the court's decision. Late on, Monday, it issued an order that bans any further sale of these specific dot com products, but the agency also says if farmers in professional applicators have already bought die, Cambe, they don't have to return it. They can spray it instead. Dan Charles NPR news.

Dyke Cambe Environmental Protection Agenc Federal Circuit Court EPA Dan Charles Dan Charles Npr Dot Cambe Illinois Illinois Fertilizer And Chemic Steve Smith Jean Pain President Iowa Chairman South Dakota Minnesota
Contamination at CDC lab delayed rollout of coronavirus tests

On The Media

00:57 sec | 5 months ago

Contamination at CDC lab delayed rollout of coronavirus tests

"Officials at the food and drug administration say the government's first corona virus tests didn't work properly because the centers for disease control and prevention didn't follow its own manufacturing guidelines and here's Dan Charles reports the FDA says that has affected the U. S. outbreak when the new corona virus was first identified in China early this year scientists at the CDC set to work making a test to detect it but when the agency sent its first test to public health labs for them to use many of the labs reported problems the test to seem to be detecting coronavirus where there was none it took weeks to iron out the problem and the lack of reliable tests made it more difficult to contain the epidemic FDA officials now say the CDC did not follow all of its own rules when making those first tests this could have allowed traces of the virus to contaminate the test kits the government has not yet released the full conclusions of its

Dan Charles FDA China CDC
Data Privacy Concerns Are Raised After Startup Tries To Rent Farmland

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:28 min | 7 months ago

Data Privacy Concerns Are Raised After Startup Tries To Rent Farmland

"An Internet startup company is trying to kind of AIRBNB for farmland but the company hit a snag recently an uproar on social media outrage on farmer twitter. Npr's Dan Charles has the story. Parker Smith grows corn and soybeans on land near Champagne Illinois together with his father and uncle. But they don't own most of that land about seventy five percent of what we farmers rented ground across the Midwest half of all farmland is owned by landlords who live somewhere else and farmers compete to rent that land. There's only so much ground and most of the farmers out there want more so obviously it's it gets pretty competitive and stuff. These farmer landowner relationships can last for decades. They sometimes feel personal. So Smith was pretty upset when he heard this past winter about a company that was sending letters to is landlords offering cash. Upfront to rent that land. The letters came from a company called tillable based in Chicago backed by venture capital. I called them up. My name is Quebec Cool. Ceo of tillable. So how many offers like this? Did He make several thousand? How many people took you up on it a whole lot. Tillable will take that land and listed on its site as available to rent. It'll take bids from farmers and then sublet it. The rental market for farmland is huge. Thirty two dollars a year and co thanks tillable could be farmlands. Airbnb or Zillow. This is one of the beauties of digital marketplaces where you can bring to parties together. That might otherwise. Never meet those letters to landowners though got farmers very angry for several reasons. Here's Parker Smith the farmer in Illinois. They're reaching out to our landlords that we have relationships with to sort of go behind the farmers back and break up that relationship. Now this kind of thing does happen among farmers competing for land but there was a new factor. In this case an unproven. Very Internet era suspicion about data and privacy. You See Parker Smith. Like a lot of farmers uses equipment that automatically collects all kinds of data about his farm like how much grainy harvests from each small square each field he pays a company called the Climate Corporation to manage that data. Help him understand it. We'll asphalt tillable and the Climate Corporation announced a partnership which makes Smith wonder did tillable target his land because he got access to data about how productive and profitable it is. They would know yields. They'd be able to roughly figure how much money a guy is making just over a week ago. Tillable the company. That's trying to use the internet to disrupt farming was itself disrupted by farmers on the Internet. They started raising suspicions on twitter about the tillable climate corporation partnership the accused the two companies of trafficking in farmer data which Corbett coal denies. They were absolutely false. In this case we had never accessed the data from climate but the storm on social media forced the Climate Corporation until the ball to announce. They were canceling their partnership. Tillable says this is not a major blow to its business plans but the controversy could have one lasting effect. Parker Smith says he never worried about his farm data before who gets to see it now. He says he and a lot of other farmers probably will

Parker Smith Tillable Tillable Climate Corporation The Climate Corporation Twitter Airbnb Midwest NPR Champagne Illinois Dan Charles Chicago CEO Quebec Cool Zillow Illinois Corbett Coal
Pesticide Police, Overwhelmed by Dicamba Complaints, Ask EPA for Help

Environment: NPR

05:45 min | 8 months ago

Pesticide Police, Overwhelmed by Dicamba Complaints, Ask EPA for Help

"In some of the big farming states officials have become overwhelmed by complaints about a weed killer that farmers are using. The demand for enforcement is so high that these officials say they don't don't have time to think about anything else. Some of them argue the federal government should really just take this product off the market. Here's NPR's Dan Charles. For the past three summers the phones have been ringing like crazy. In the office of the Indiana state chemist farmers and homeowners were reporting a kind of chemical hit and run their soybean fields. Tomato plants looked sick with curled up leaves and they blamed pesticides from nearby farms. So Andy. Ross one of the field investigators had to jump in his car and head to the scene. It's sort of a mad rush at the beginning B.. Rush out you do the field work you take the pictures. You Take the samples. You get him back here back to the lab test S. those samples of leaves and Soil Pesticides Lab Supervisor Ping want says her people were overwhelmed to first issue. Was We quickly reach our maximum storage capacity. They had to buy more freezers store. The evidence there is not an inch of wall space left and their tests showed the same thing thing over and over Die Cam die campus herbicide for years ago the Federal Environmental Protection Agency approved a new use for it. Farmers now can spray special versions of camera right over some soybean varieties that are genetically engineered to tolerate it. The weeds die but these crops are fine. A lot of farmers love this technology and majority of also being planted in America. This past year. Were I can be tolerant others. Like Louis. Floor in Frankfort Indiana who's growing soybeans. That can't tolerate DOT Cambe. They think it's a plague. I had about an eighty acre field. That was whacked pretty hard with Cambe. He says it cut his harvest on those sakers by a third. That CAM has this problem. It does not always stay where it's sprayed on hot days. It can evaporate and drift across the landscape damaging other their plants and it's been happening on an enormous scale across the soybean farming belt from Minnesota in the north to Arkansas. In the south millions of acres of old old-style soybeans have been damaged also vineyards and orchards friendships of ended over this in one dispute between farmers in Arkansas one farmer shot and killed the other Louis Floor Nelson's neighboring farms as a potential threat and I just flat out tell people I've got a lawyer you know watching. What are your neighbors? Say to that they think it. It's up to state governments to investigate reports of pesticide drift. And figure out if anybody caused by breaking the rules but in Illinois the number number of complaints went from about one hundred twenty four years ago to over seven hundred in two thousand nineteen in Indiana went from about sixty two two hundred and Dave Scott. WHO's in charge of Indiana's pesticide inspections says everybody is overwhelmed? We're just running ourselves ragged. Just trying to get out there. Collect the evidence. It's also so frustrating. Field investigator Andy. Roth often sees dot can damage across entire fields. And he can't figure out where it came from WHO to hold accountable. Sundays you WPRO. Am I doing any good. Am I making an impact here or what might just spinning my wheels. Meanwhile because of Campbell the inspectors don't have time to do everything else else. They're supposed to do the check on. Pesticide uses at schools or golf courses or businesses. Leo read another. Indiana official is also president elect of the Association of American pesticide control officials. I think the most affected states would all agree that it's not acceptable to continue with this. The number of complaints. It's just not acceptable but the EPA reapproved Daikin but just a year ago before the two thousand nineteen growing season. It decided did the problem could be addressed with a few new restrictions on where that can be sprayed and more training for people who use it. I asked read about that. So what was the experience experienced in two thousand nineteen. Did it fix. The problem knows a matter of fact. A- The the complaint numbers went up in some states the numbers did go down but not necessarily because there was less damage. According to a survey of farmers in Missouri Eighty percent of them are not bothering to file formal complaints anymore. They I don't think does any good. Leo Read from the Office of the Indiana state chemist. Says he understands why you know. I've I've used the phrase die camper fatigue and it's very real thing another another possible sign of dicamba fatigue all but one of Missouri's eight pesticide inspectors left their job within the past year and a half Missouri officials said there was not any single reason for the rapid turnover but according to minutes of meetings between state pesticide enforcement agencies heavy workload and burn out was at least one reason last fall a group of state officials including Leo read had a conference call about Di Cambio with officials at the EPA. They had a question. The question is you are crinkled soybean leaves an unreasonable adverse effect. Because if if they are then. This product is federally miss branded if a product product is found to be miss branded than it can no longer be sold or used and EPA spokesperson said damage to plants can be an unreasonable adverse effect but it depends ends on the extent of the damage and on the benefits of spraying the pesticide. A lot of farmers don't want to give up those benefits nor does the company Bayer formerly Monsanto Santa which cells die camera herbicide and Campbell tolerant soybean and cotton seats. It's a billion dollar business at the end of two thousand twenty the EPA will have to decide ride once again whether to let farmers keep spraying. This Chemical Dan Charles N._p._R.

Indiana EPA Missouri LEO Dan Charles Louis Floor Nelson Andy Association Of American Pestic Cambe NPR Frankfort Arkansas Federal Environmental Protecti Supervisor America Ross Illinois Dave Scott Campbell Minnesota
Pesticide Police, Overwhelmed By Dicamba Complaints, Ask EPA For Help

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:45 min | 8 months ago

Pesticide Police, Overwhelmed By Dicamba Complaints, Ask EPA For Help

"In some of the big farming states officials have become overwhelmed by complaints about a weed killer that farmers are using. The demand for enforcement is so high that these officials say they don't don't have time to think about anything else. Some of them argue the federal government should really just take this product off the market. Here's NPR's Dan Charles. For the past three summers the phones have been ringing like crazy. In the office of the Indiana state chemist farmers and homeowners were reporting a kind of chemical hit and run their soybean fields. Tomato plants looked sick with curled up leaves and they blamed pesticides from nearby farms. So Andy. Ross one of the field investigators had to jump in his car and head to the scene. It's sort of a mad rush at the beginning B.. Rush out you do the field work you take the pictures. You Take the samples. You get him back here back to the lab test S. those samples of leaves and Soil Pesticides Lab Supervisor Ping want says her people were overwhelmed to first issue. Was We quickly reach our maximum storage capacity. They had to buy more freezers store. The evidence there is not an inch of wall space left and their tests showed the same thing thing over and over Die Cam die campus herbicide for years ago the Federal Environmental Protection Agency approved a new use for it. Farmers now can spray special versions of camera right over some soybean varieties that are genetically engineered to tolerate it. The weeds die but these crops are fine. A lot of farmers love this technology and majority of also being planted in America. This past year. Were I can be tolerant others. Like Louis. Floor in Frankfort Indiana who's growing soybeans. That can't tolerate DOT Cambe. They think it's a plague. I had about an eighty acre field. That was whacked pretty hard with Cambe. He says it cut his harvest on those acres by a third. That CAM has this problem. It does not always stay where it's sprayed on hot days. It can evaporate and drift across the landscape damaging other their plants and it's been happening on an enormous scale across the soybean farming belt from Minnesota in the north to Arkansas. In the south millions of acres of old old-style soybeans have been damaged also vineyards and orchards friendships of ended over this in one dispute between farmers in Arkansas one farmer shot and killed the other Louis Floor Nelson's neighboring farms as a potential threat and I just flat out tell people I've got a lawyer you know watching. What are your neighbors? Say to that they think it. It's up to state governments to investigate reports of pesticide drift. And figure out if anybody caused by breaking the rules but in Illinois the number number of complaints went from about one hundred twenty four years ago to over seven hundred in two thousand nineteen in Indiana went from about sixty two two hundred and Dave Scott. WHO's in charge of Indiana's pesticide inspections says everybody is overwhelmed? We're just running ourselves ragged. Just trying to get out there. Collect the evidence. It's also so frustrating. Field investigator Andy. Roth often sees dot cam damage across entire fields. And he can't figure out where it came from WHO to hold accountable. Sundays you WPRO. Am I doing any good. Am I making an impact here or what might just spinning my wheels. Meanwhile because of Campbell the inspectors don't have time to do everything else else. They're supposed to do the check on. Pesticide uses at schools or golf courses or businesses. Leo read another. Indiana official is also president elect of the Association of American pesticide control officials. I think the most affected states would all agree that it's not acceptable to continue with this. The number of complaints. It's just not acceptable but the EPA reapproved daikin but just a year ago before the two thousand nineteen growing season. It decided did the problem could be addressed with a few new restrictions on where that can be sprayed and more training for people who use it. I asked read about that. So what was the experience experienced in two thousand nineteen. Did it fix the problem. No as a matter of fact a- The the complaint numbers went up in some states. The numbers did go down down but not necessarily because there was less damage. According to a survey of farmers in Missouri Eighty percent of them are not bothering to file formal complaints anymore. They I don't think does any good. Leo Read from the Office of the Indiana state chemist. Says he understands why you know. I've I've used the phrase die camper fatigue and it's very real thing another another possible sign of dicamba fatigue all but one of Missouri's eight pesticide inspectors left their job within the past year and a half Missouri officials said there was not any single reason for the rapid turnover but according to minutes of meetings between state pesticide enforcement agencies heavy workload and burn out was at least one reason last fall a group of state officials including Leo read had a conference call about Di Cambio with officials at the EPA. They had a question. The question is you are crinkled soybean leaves an unreasonable adverse effect. Because if if they are then. This product is federally miss branded if a product product is found to be miss branded than it can no longer be sold or used and EPA spokesperson said damage to plants can be an unreasonable adverse effect but it depends ends on the extent of the damage and on the benefits of spraying the pesticide. A lot of farmers don't want to give up those benefits nor does the company Bayer formerly Monsanto Santa which cells die camera herbicide and Campbell tolerant soybean and cotton seats. It's a billion dollar business at the end of two thousand twenty the EPA will have to decide ride once again whether to let farmers keep spraying. This Chemical Dan Charles N._p._R. News.

Indiana EPA Missouri LEO Dan Charles Louis Floor Nelson Andy Association Of American Pestic Cambe NPR Frankfort Arkansas Federal Environmental Protecti Supervisor America Ross Illinois Dave Scott Campbell Roth
Food Waste + Poop = Electricity

Short Wave

09:16 min | 9 months ago

Food Waste + Poop = Electricity

"Everybody Emily Kwong here. Filling in for Mattie WHO's out training for thumb were competition today our story comes from NPR correspondent. Alison opry the. Hey there emily. Hey Alison so what you got for us. Well why don't we start with a pop quiz. What do you say? I thrive in. Quick pressure. Go on do you know how much of the food supply in the. US never makes it to our mouths. Ten percent thirty two Orley percents. Thirty to forty percents is the estimate in fact folks at the. USDA the US Department of Agriculture estimate that you could fill the Willis Tower in Chicago goes big skyscraper every year forty four times the amount of food that goes to waste that is staggering. Food waste is this huge problem and on top hopping being a massive waste when food ends up in a landfill. It rots and a lot of methane is released and methane is a greenhouse gas which is a huge contributor attributed. Climate jets right. It traps heat in the atmosphere and methane is over twenty times more potent than carbon dioxide in terms of its warming the impact in fact a recent report from the United Nations found that up to ten percent of all human made greenhouse gas emissions are actually linked to food waste. I humans we're just we're just the worst you know but we're also kind of good at coming up with solutions for Demar species. Okay sure well to solve this problem. Some farmers farmers and Massachusetts are taking all of that methane making food waste and turning it into energy actually making electricity to power nearly fifteen hundred here at homes. Wow that's pretty amazing. And to make that energy these farmers or combining that food waste with something else that can be a big source of methane especially on big big farms. I'll give you a hint. It stinks Oh cow poop. That's right and it's stored in these big pits and cow. POOP can release a a lot of methane as well. So you're saying that farmers have found a way to take to methane sources food waste and manure and turn it into energy. That's right to methane source is is one stone so today on the show we had to Massachusetts to get a closer look at how some dairy farmers are turning tons of cow. POOP and truckloads food waste into Green Energy Alison. I suspect this is going to get messy but I was thinking more like two parallel line from our colleague. Dan Charles. We're GONNA get a whiff of the future. Okay Allison before we get into how these farmers are doing this a host talk about. Why is it just about methane and the environment? Well I mean. I'm sure a lot of farmers do care about the environment but really times are tough for dairy farmers is out there. I mean many farmers are looking for ways to diversify their incomes. They've gotten very efficient at doing what they do. Producing milk perhaps to efficient. And that makes it tough have to be in business so my name is Peter Melnick and I'm a fourth generation dairy farmer in Deerfield Massachusetts. I visited Peter's farm late last year. He's one of a handful of farmers in Massachusetts converting wasted food and manure into electricity. He has essentially turned part of his family farm. Fire into this mini power plant. Well and he says they're saving about one hundred thousand dollars a year by producing energy a hundred thousand dollars a year. That's huge savings. Yeah Okay so how. How does this waste to energy process actually work so a key piece of equipment on the MELNYK farm? Is this ANAEROBIC digesters. adjuster fun name. What is an ANAEROBIC digesters? So it was basically a big sealed tank and when the food waste in the manure are put into the tank and heated. All all of this biomass is broken down. By the little organisms the bacteria and a methane bio gas is produced from this big mixture. That's right and and the digest that he has on his arm has a tank that can hold about a million gallon of what is basically a big organic waste Brownie. Yes and then as methane is released it rises to the top of a bubble shaped dome recapture the gas in that bubble and then we suck it into a generator. It's about the size of your car. And that engine run on methane instead of diesel or gasoline and that in turn is turning big generator which is then creating one megawatt. The water is one mega law a lot of electricity. Well to put this in context. This operation power is not only his farm in his home but a lot more. We only use about ten percent of what we make in the rescue. It's fed onto the grid and it's almost enough to do fifteen hundred homes. That is a huge output. Oh put energy fifteen hundred homes and you mentioned that Peter is mixing food waste in with the manure. Why is he adding food? Waste too well the more you add to the digested the more volume you have. The more electricity can make so that manure may not produce enough to make the economics of the digestive system work out you need scale right. So Peters not not only using this manure he's also processing millions of pounds of food waste from across the Boston area food that is spoiled or surplus also a lot of waste products from food production facilities around the state traditionally all this would end up in a landfill but instead it is to his farm we presently take in about a hundred hundred ton which is about three tractor trailer loads every day. WHOA that is a huge amount of food waste? I watched it. It's amazing I mean these trucks and and it's just piped in to this big hit where then ends up in the digest. Her gets waste from the local creamery. Waste from a local brewery rury local juice plant and then another big source for him is waste from whole foods. The grocery chain seventeen of their stores in Massachusetts participate dissipate There's a woman at whole foods Karen Franchet. She showed us how it all works. We do have items that we can't sal either because they're spoiled vitamins. That are bruised that we might not be able to sell so what she showed us when we visited. Is this big industrial Masher. This was at the whole foods roots in Shrewsbury Massachusetts. It basically gobbles up everything that would be wasted and you can imagine. There's everything from bones. We put fish in there. Um Vegetables You can have dry items like rice or grains so it really becomes kind of a liquefied food ways liquefied show. Yeah Okay and what happens next. Wow so the slurry is loaded into the tank of a truck. It heads to Peter's farm and then it goes right into the digest or anything anything that ends up going to landfill or incineration costs us more money. That is the most expensive way to get rid of waste on our source so this is cheaper for whole foods. That's right it is and also I should point out in Massachusetts. Grocery stores and food producers aren't allowed to send this organic waste to landfills anymore. The estate passed a law back in two thousand fourteen that restricts this it applies to all businesses the generate over a ton of organic. Waste a week. Wow so there's incentive for supermarkets like foods to participate in something like that exactly. Okay let's go back to our farm for a minute. Can any farmer get in on this. Like how did Peter get his digest her. Well here's how it works. The digesters are built and run by a company called Vanguard Renewables Vanguard pays farmers a fee for the use of their land and and also gives them free electricity to power their farms and houses. Right now there are five digesters spread out across the state the CEO. Oh of Vanguard Renewables Jon Hansen says he hopes that this whole operation expands. There's more than enough food waste in Massachusetts to feed all of our I five digesters plus many more allison. Do you get the sense that this is something that can be realistically expanded. You know I think it really depends on the right mix of policies as an incentives. That's what Massachusetts put in place. They passed the commercial food material disposal band. They had a series of grants. I mean this is a new approach so I think we'd have have to look to see. Would we have some kind of federal policy or other state policies to promote this handsome and told me he's really inspired by what's happened in Europe where he says there's more than seventeen eight thousand digesters so we saw what was happening in Europe where anaerobic digestion is extremely widespread across the United States. We don't have that incentive incentive program. We don't have the federal energy policy or any federal benefits. Fran rubel digestion. We are at the cusp. We're at the early days. We've finally got the economics onyx to work. And when I spoke to Peter Melnick about this the farmer he says he really agrees as the price of milk has really been flat. The digesters for is just been A home run for us in that sense. It's made us more sustainable environmentally but also economically as well Alison thank you so much for taking us to Massachusetts where this kind of amazing chain of suppliers and energy makers exists now. I know where to send all my extra cow manure and food waste. Oh my pleasure. It was really a great story to report.

Massachusetts Peter Melnick Alison Opry United States Emily Kwong NPR Mattie Who Europe Deerfield Massachusetts Vanguard Renewables Vanguard Melnyk Farm Usda Willis Tower Allison
Farmers received billions of dollars to compensate for tariffs

Morning Edition

00:50 sec | 9 months ago

Farmers received billions of dollars to compensate for tariffs

"Oregon farmers receive twenty two billion dollars in federal aid this year NPR's Dan Charles reports that's the highest level of farm subsidies in fourteen years government payments to farmers this year went up sixty four percent compared to two thousand eighteen more than half of the money fourteen billion dollars was supposed to compensate farmers for income they lost during trade disputes with China when the US impose tariffs on imports from China the Chinese cut imports of America's soybeans and farmers got less money for their crops the US department of agriculture calculated the payments based on a farmer's production so the bigger the farm the bigger the payout some Democrats in Congress are criticizing the USDA for restricting access to food stamps or snap cutting off benefits to the needy while delivering generous payments to

NPR Dan Charles China America Congress Usda Oregon
Invasive Species: We Asked, You Answered

Short Wave

01:19 min | 10 months ago

Invasive Species: We Asked, You Answered

"Mattis affair here with NPR. Science correspondent. Dan Charles. Hey Dan hi so Dan recently on the show you brought to us. A story of a bug called the spotted lantern lantern flights and insect and invasive. One that has it's been spreading across eastern Pennsylvania and into surrounding states They're pretty big. Little bit like cicadas. They jump more than they fly not dangerous to people but definitely dangerous to some things like vineyards trees so at the end of that episode. We said if anybody listening has an interesting invasive species this is where they live they should write us about it and A lot of people did indeed. We heard about cane toads and Australia do not eat not good Etxeberria muscles in Nevada Lake Mead. How in the world did they get their stowaway? bivalves native Russia we heard about Asian Carp Brazilian pepper. Trees Hemlock Lock woolley Adele Jade so many plants and critters in so many places. They should not be Dan so today. Straight from our INBOX. We're going to talk about three three of them. Three invasive species all which reveal how delicate and complicated ecosystems can be

Dan Charles Mattis NPR Adele Jade Nevada Lake Mead Pennsylvania Australia Russia
Europe Is Burning U.S. Wood As Climate-Friendly Fuel, But Green Groups Protest

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:34 min | 10 months ago

Europe Is Burning U.S. Wood As Climate-Friendly Fuel, But Green Groups Protest

"World leaders are gathering at a U. N. climate summit in Madrid this week to talk about how to reduce greenhouse emissions in the search for alternatives to fossil fuel. Some some countries have now turned to one of the oldest energy sources around would some are importing from the United States calling it clean and renewable but some environmentalists. Say this makes no oh sense. NPR's Dan Charles has the story on a soggy field in eastern North Carolina. Jason Too and his crew loggers cutting trees threes and sorting the logs into piles depending on their size. And what kind of would they are poplar. Sweet Gum Elm right there. Some piles will go into plywood. Some will become puffy absorbent fiber in baby diapers and then there's the least valuable pile the small limbs tops of hardwood trees. It's basically a trash. Should we would've normally hauled that back out in the woods and just left it. But now there's a new market for that Wood Pellet Mills they've expanded across the southeast over the past decade. They'll take this would crush it and pressed into little pellets. Ready for burning fuel the landowners. Getting some by we're getting some production is just an all around good deal do most of these pellets. Millions of tons each year. We'll get shipped to Europe where burned in power plants because some European governments are offering financial subsidies cities to burn these pellets. Instead of say coal it's supposed to help fight climate change. Here's Seth Ginther. Executive Director of the industry group that represents Wood Pellett companies. The carbon benefits are tremendous burning. Would also biomass does release lots of carbon dioxide the greenhouse gas. But the idea behind had the subsidies is you can let farce grow back. And as they do they'll recapture the carbon dioxide from the air and stored in their branches and roots again so it's considered renewable lable just like wind or solar the European Union literally just pass something known as the Renewable Energy Directive to and biomass sustainable biomass ass was unequivocally included as part of what can meet renewable energy goals but environmental groups are challenging that decision in court. They say the idea that large scale. wood-burning is carbon neutral is based on bad math and to explain exactly why Adam collect from the environmental group Dogwood Alliance takes me to another patch of land North Carolina near the town of Williamson. I know it doesn't look like much but we're gonNA take a walk. It's covered with bushes and little trees as maybe ten feet tall. In the south. We call it a briar patch but yet on paper this is a forest for years ago really was a forest with big trees rees then it was locked some of it went to make wood pellets. So let's count the carbon emissions accurately. Colette says when the big trees were cut they stopped opt capturing carbon dioxide from the air that benefit was lost at least temporarily and some of the carbon they'd previously stored was released into the air when the wood pellets were burned and as tree roots decomposed. But you won't see any of that in the official calculations of greenhouse emissions. He says none of it's ever been counted in any of our like emissions counting in the US or in Europe that's because the forest eventually will grow back and recapture that lost carbon but it could take a century for that to happen now. Seth Ginther from the US Industrial Pellet Association says his industry should not be blamed for those carbon emissions because wood pellets are not the reason forests wrists are cleared. These are lands that are being harvested for Sawed Timber for housing for paper and for other things what we're taking is is the the byproduct of that in facto independent forestry experts. Say That's not completely true. Their data shows that the wood pellet industry is competing for some of the same. Would that might go for making paper or diapers and it's pushing up prices for that. Would Adam Collette from Dogwood. Alliance thinks it's persuading some small landowners to harvest their trees. You have have more knocks on those doors. More telephone calls saying hey I'll give you X.. Number of dollars for your trees. What Colette wants is for officials to knock on those doors with a different different message encouraging landowners to maintain forests expand them? Our forests are young. They're degraded and what that means. Is that the potential Henschel to suck carbon out of the atmosphere of force in the U._S.. South is enormous. Those forests are some of the best climate solutions. We have he says if they keep growing Dan. Charles N._p._R.

Seth Ginther Colette North Carolina Adam Collette Europe Wood Pellet Mills United States NPR Dan Charles Wood Pellett Jason Madrid Us Industrial Pellet Associati Charles N._P._R
Lithium-Ion Batteries Help Power Civilizations, But How Can They Be Recycled?

All Things Considered

02:43 min | 11 months ago

Lithium-Ion Batteries Help Power Civilizations, But How Can They Be Recycled?

"More and more civilization runs on a lithium ion batteries tiny ones in our phones huge ones in our electric cars those batteries break or wear out they mostly get thrown away now scientists are trying to figure out how to recycle them NPR's Dan Charles has the story to understand why a lithium ion batteries are so hard to recycle let's take a look at how they're put together with Linda gains a scientist at Argonne national laboratory outside of Chicago each cell is a series of sandwiches the outer layers of the sandwich are metal foil inside them are thin layers of powder one of them is the really valuable one made of things like lithium and cobalt and nickel and these sandwiches are either rolled out for folded up into a tight package and then the electrolyte liquid is forced to end and the whole thing is put in a little can that's an individual cell dozens or even hundreds of cells get stacked together into modules and a bunch of modules go into the battery pack of a car this whole sealed assemblies almost impossible to take apart which would be risky anyway remember the stories of batteries catching fire it is a high voltage device and you would not want to be poking around in it with your screwdriver when they stop working though it's wasteful and dangerous to just throw them in the trash a few lithium ion batteries go into a crude kind of recycling they get chopped up and go into a furnace the nickel and cobalt survive but almost everything else gets burned away including the lithium and aluminum I kind of find that offensive you know you spend all that energy to make this really neat material on you just burning and as a fuel so all over the world teams of researchers are trying to invent something better to handle the big lithium ion batteries that may power hundreds of millions of climate saving electric cars down the road here's govern Harper from the university of Birmingham in England we need to really make sure that we don't crack a waste management problem with electric vehicles wed Manson's about trees accumulate and we don't know what to do with them Harper and his colleagues are building robots which they hope can take over the dangerous job of cutting batteries open and collecting what's inside in the U. S. a whole group of labs including Linda gains as group at argon is trying to figure out if you just chop up the batteries can you find a way to filter that mass and recover the valuable stuff the medals in the high priced powder at the heart of the battery gains admits it'll be difficult it was easy it wouldn't be interesting and you can kind of imagine it working yeah I can they have a goal within three years the one of a process in hand for recycling lithium ion batteries one the companies will use because it's profitable then Charles NPR news

Three Years
Most U.S. Dairy Cows Are Descended From Just 2 Bulls

All Things Considered

02:48 min | 1 year ago

Most U.S. Dairy Cows Are Descended From Just 2 Bulls

"Thanks there are millions of dairy cows in the U. S. producing an amazing amount of milk but the drive to maximize production has come with an undesirable side effect the cows have become more and more genetically similar in fact the vast majority of them are descended from just two bowls NPR's Dan Charles has the story Chad deck out is sitting in his office at Penn state university explaining help Jerry cal's ended up so much alike this is the company select sires we're looking at the website of a company that sells semen from bowls so if we just look at their whole scheme lineup Holstein cows in the black and white ones that make a lot of milk they dominate the dairy business says loading America's finest bowls there on the screen that's right there are just a few companies like this with hundreds of stud bowls thirty farmers go online pick a bowl and the company's ship doses of semen to impregnate their cal's factors one bowl who we figure he has well over a quarter million dollars the company's rank their bowls based on how their daughters perform how much milk they produce this is a bull named frazzled his daughters are predicted to produce two thousand one hundred and fifty eight pounds more milk than daughters of the average ball farmers pay extra for semen from top ranked bulls and the company's keep breeding even better what's meeting their top bowls with the most productive cal's they keep selecting the same families over and over again well a few years ago Chad deck ounce mother scientist at Penn state made the discovery that shocked a lot of people all the Holstein bulls that farmers are using can trace their lineage back to just one of two male ancestors everything goes back to two bowls born in the nineteen fifties and sixties and their names their names were around oak rag apple elevation in Pawnee farm are Linda chief now this doesn't mean that all the bulls in the catalog are genetically identical have lots of different mothers and grandmothers but judge Eckels says it does show the system of large scale artificial insemination farmers picking top ranked bowls has made cal's genetically less diverse trait that you have found in Holstein cows a generation ago have disappeared we've lost genetic variation some of that genetic variation was garbage that we didn't want to begin with some of it was valuable stuff that will be gone to see what might have been lost decal decided to do an X. he located some old seem from other bowls that were alive decades ago with names like university of Minnesota Cuthbert then Zimmerman all star pilot heirloom bulls the US department of agriculture keeps samples of the semen in deep freeze storage in fort Collins Colorado decal used it to impregnate some modern counts they gave birth and now you can see some lost pieces of the hosting family tree come to life in a barn at

Milk Fifty Eight Pounds Million Dollars
As The Climate Warms, Companies Are Scrambling To Calculate The Risk To Their Profits

Environment: NPR

03:55 min | 1 year ago

As The Climate Warms, Companies Are Scrambling To Calculate The Risk To Their Profits

"Those risks some of them are turning to high tech tools for answers here's NPR's Dan Charles the company ingredient makes as you might guess ingredients arches and sugars in all kinds of manufactured food from soft drinks two beers to frozen meals this is Brian Nash Ingredients Director of sustainability the company makes these products from special kinds of corn I mean we use millions and millions of metric tons of corn around the globe lots of things can go wrong in the supply I chain bad weather broken machinery but lately Brian nashes corporate bosses have been asking him to look at a new kind of risk what might go wrong in a warmer planet and that could be anything where climate change is impacting the crops that we purchase to water availability driven by climate change says lots of companies are doing the same thing because investors are worried any publicly traded company I think is under increasing pressure from the investment community too particularly what we see as upcoming climate risk companies are now looking for experts to help them figure it out and the Danish engineering firm ramble which built its reputation able to simulate something that's in the atmosphere and really seeing unfold in front of you was thrilling these simulations climate models really can give businesses information about future risks she says here's how they work so climate model in many ways is like a weather model a weather model is what generates those videos you see on TV weather forecasts storms moving across the map it's basically a computer program that takes current weather conditions and calculates forces like heat or air pressure will drive win and temperatures over the next few hours days climate models are just bigger they factor in forces like rising levels of greenhouse gases which trap more heat they're changing occurrence in the ocean but still you're starting with current conditions and just turning the model loose leading mathematical equations calculate weather decades into the richer you know you'll see storms form it see and then come ashore over California now every time you run one of these models from a slightly different starting point the weather plays out differently but if you run them over and over collecting all these possible versions of the future you do get a sense of what's the new normal normal highs and lows normal rainfall and how that's different from what we're used to now sue Campbell Cook and her colleagues at ramble are trying to boil that down into estimates of particular risks in in particular places like here you'll see more flooding here you'll have trouble growing corn Katie lush key consultant Ram blue helped create this tool called has atlas as the sales pitches pretty simple it's really easy to make the point that as climate changes we're getting increased damages from events like flat adding and wildfire this tool helps people prepare for that future but they still have to convince businesses that this tool can deliver information that speed civic and accurate enough to help them make decisions ingredient that company that makes food ingredients is not yet convinced the company worked with Ramble to see what the Ma say if these tools for predicting climate risk get better there will be a huge demand

How Penn State Is Cutting Greenhouse Emissions In Half — And Saving Money

Morning Edition

03:25 min | 1 year ago

How Penn State Is Cutting Greenhouse Emissions In Half — And Saving Money

"Welcome how can a community grow in population while cutting carbon emissions that is the challenge facing the whole planet in the fight against climate change NPR's Dan Charles reports on how Penn state university is doing that from the top of beaver stadium one of the very biggest stadiums in the entire world you can see just part of Penn state's vast and beautiful campus he picked a spectacular data come visit the new rob Cooper is the university's director of engineering and energy we've got six hundred major buildings here over twenty two million square feet parking lots with thousands of cars the couple of gas burning steam plants for heating we have our own water system wells we have our own waste water plant basically it's a city with sixty thousand people and students on campus a lot more when there's football. and like most American cities it runs largely on fossil fuels releasing hundreds of thousands of tons of greenhouse gases every year from those steam plants from power stations far away that supply electricity from the cars the people drive to campus from aircraft that faculty take to conferences. state has added up all those emissions over the past twenty years and it makes kind of an amazing graph twenty years ago the line was going up up up the university was growing more people more buildings burning more coal and gas just like the rest of America and then you get to two thousand four and the line suddenly changes direction it starts falling like it's rolling down a mountain and it's been falling ever since even though the university still growing yeah we've been pretty successful over the last fifteen years I wanted to know how it happened so I went to see professor Chris you'll in the department of biology and my I guess Passionist with ecology in the mid nineteen nineties you'll helped organize a small environmental movement on campus there were students calculating greenhouse emissions from specific buildings looking at technical alternatives when we unveil these different reports we would meet on the steps of old main which is you know and stuff like this big center the university and lots of people showed up you know the press was there they put the university under pressure and as it happened these activists had some allies deep inside the university administration building engineers maintenance guys led by a former navy officer named Ford striker who was in charge of buildings and construction we've seen a lot of evidence that global warming was a real thing and we you know we were concerned about it striker pulled off a classic bureaucratic move he convinced the university president to declare environmental stewardship an official priority the pressure from students probably helped this give them leverage inside the administration he got the university to set up a fund to pay for upgrades that cut greenhouse emissions it took awhile. to get the budget guys and you know in the finance guys to agree but you know we're like they they had to be convinced that it was money that could be paid back yeah heck yeah I mean we had to demonstrate to we're actually saving money and this is what turned around that graph of greenhouse emissions a whole bunch of projects that cut the university's demand for energy and they typically paid for themselves within ten years through lower energy bills rob Cooper who worked for strikers as some what they did was really basic like fine tuning heating and air conditioning systems and you'd be surprised what you find when you try

Twenty Years Fifteen Years Ten Years
How Penn State Is Cutting Greenhouse Emissions In Half  And Saving Money

Environment: NPR

05:12 min | 1 year ago

How Penn State Is Cutting Greenhouse Emissions In Half And Saving Money

"How can a community grow in population while cutting carbon emissions? That is the challenge facing the whole planet in the fight against climate change. NPR's NPR's Dan Charles reports on how Penn State University is doing that from the top of beaver Stadium One of the very biggest stadiums in the entire world. You can see just part of Penn State's vast and beautiful campus. You picked a spectacular day. Come visit. Didn't you rob. Cooper is the university's director of Engineering and energy. We've got six hundred major buildings here over twenty two million square feet parking lots with thousands of cars a couple of gas burning steam plants for for heating. We have our own water system wells. We have our own wastewater plant. Basically it's a city with sixty thousand people when students are on campus a lot more when there's walking and like most American cities it runs largely on fossil fuels releasing hundreds of thousands of tons of greenhouse gases every year from those steam plants from from power stations far away that supply electricity from the cars that people drive to campus from aircraft that faculty take to conferences. Penn state has added up all those emissions over the past twenty years and it makes kind of an amazing Graf twenty years ago the line was going up up up the university was growing more people more buildings burning more coal and gas just like the rest of America and then you get to two thousand four and the lines suddenly changes direction. It starts falling like it's rolling down a mountain and it's been falling ever since even though the university still growing yeah. We've been pretty successful over the last fifteen years. I wanted to know how it happened so I went to see Professor Chris. You'll I'm in the department of Biology and my guest passion is with ecology. In the mid nineteen ninety s you'll help organize a small mall environmental movement on campus. There were students calculating greenhouse emissions from specific buildings looking at technical alternatives. When we unveiled these different reports we would meet eat on the steps of old main. Which is you know? It's like this big center. The university and lots of people showed up you know the press was there. They put the university under pressure and as it happened these activists had some allies deep inside the university administration building engineers maintenance guys led by a former navy officer named Ford striker who was in charge of buildings and construction. We've seen a lot of evidence that global warming was a real thing and we you know we were concerned about it. Striker pulled off a classic bureaucratic move. He convinced the university president to declare environmental stewardship and official priority. The pressure from students probably helped this. This gave him leverage inside the administration. He got the university to set up a fund to pay for upgrades that cut greenhouse emissions. It took a while to get the budget guys in You know in a finance guys to agree but you know we're like they. They had to be convinced that it was money. That could be paid back. Oh Yeah Heck Yeah I mean we had to demonstrate mm straight to we're actually saving money and this is what turned around that graph of greenhouse emissions a whole bunch of projects that cut the university's demand for energy and they typically really paid for themselves within ten years through Lower Energy Bills Rob Cooper who worked for striker says some what they did was really basic like fine tuning heating and air conditioning questioning systems and you'd be surprised what you find when you try to tune up buildings. HVAC system. It's one of the shortest paybacks consistently three to five years on on every building that we go into in the central heating plant. They switched the fuel from coal to natural gas. They installed new energy saving motors and windows this here. The university signed a deal to buy electricity from a new five hundred acre solar farm. Here's Andrew Gut Berlet Penn State's manager of Engineering Services. Every time we looked at added before the economics weren't there we could not get solar power or any renewable energy for less than we were buying it off the grid until now now penn state's greenhouse emissions now are down by a third compared to the peak in two thousand four in a few years with solar power rolling in they should be down almost fifty percent which which seems really hopeful because in principle any city could do this. The country could in essence. We are demonstrating that this can be done to notes of caution though I I ben States not irregular city with thousands of homeowners making their own decisions it owns all the buildings and heating plans. It can make decisions that take ten years to pay off and the second caution is cutting emissions in half is good but it's not enough not if you're really trying to stop global warming so penn state has a much more ambitious. Just go an eighty percent reduction by twenty fifty. Some people on campus are pushing for one hundred percent so I ask shelley mccaig the person at Penn State. WHO's in charge of measuring those emissions. Are you going to make that goal. You're asking me we we need to. I mean do. We have a concrete plan to get there. We we do not and there is the country doesn't either but they are studying lots of possibilities figuring out how much each one would cost what it would accomplish so far. They are on track to reach their goal.

Penn State Penn State University Rob Cooper NPR Beaver Stadium Dan Charles Professor Chris Department Of Biology Director Of Engineering Graf America Andrew Gut
Irrigation For Farming Could Leave Many Of The World's Streams and Rivers Dry

Environment: NPR

02:27 min | 1 year ago

Irrigation For Farming Could Leave Many Of The World's Streams and Rivers Dry

"All right to a new scientific study that shows trouble ahead for the world's streams and rivers that is because people are draining underground aquifers that provide water to those streams. NPR's Dan Charles has more Joshua Perkin is a biologist at Texas A and M University studies fish and he spent a lot of time around water on the high plains in Kansas us in Colorado. He's noticed an odd thing there streams and rivers disappear we will go and visit these dreams and in many cases. It's like a dirt bike trail now. It's it's no longer functioning. As a stream channel. Those streams were partially fed by groundwater water moving underground through rock and sand draining into stream beds ed's or bubbling up in natural springs but people have been tapping those underground pools of water drilling deep wells mostly irrigate farmland. You know oh growing crops in a region that semi-arid becoming increasingly arid in the way that you continue to grow crops when there's no rain is to pull water from the ground and farmers have pumped so much water. The water table has fallen by more than one hundred feet in some places so it can't flow into streams and rivers anymore which means that fish fish and plants and birds streams also disappear. It's happened in other places to California northern India China hydrologist Inga the graph at the University of Freiburg. Germany wanted to see the whole global picture today and in the future I think that's one of the goals that we have with this study raising awareness to explain what what is happening in our feet showed shea she and her colleagues created a computer simulation of groundwater and rivers all around the world they threw in a heavy dose of climate change and extreme scenario lots of warming in this computer model the future there's less rainfall farmers pump even more more water to make up for that so in places where farmers rely on groundwater the water flow in streams and rivers in this model shrinks dramatically in half of them at falls below a kind of ecological limit healthy ecosystems can be sustained the plan and fish that live in the river or lakes they. Ehlo by her paper appears this week in the journal Nature. It's pretty alarming national things he can do about it devoted slowing global warming of course some places like California are starting to reduce the amount of groundwater that farmers are allowed to extract.

Joshua Perkin Ehlo NPR Texas California Germany Dan Charles M University Colorado Kansas University Of Freiburg India One Hundred Feet
Vineyards Facing An Insect Invasion May Turn To Aliens For Help

Environment: NPR

04:49 min | 1 year ago

Vineyards Facing An Insect Invasion May Turn To Aliens For Help

"Bug recently arrived from China is munching its way across eastern Pennsylvania from there. It's poised to spread across much of the country. Killing trees and grapevines finds so scientists are considering something drastic importing other insects the bugs natural enemies from the place it came from NPR's. Dan Charles has the story. I was walking around the park near Allentown Pennsylvania and I didn't even notice the bugs at first then heather leach arrived the insect expert Berg from Penn state but if you take under these leaves sure enough they're climbing up underneath the ivy and then I realized they're all over. This tree spotted lantern flies. A marching column of gray bugs each one about an inch long black spots on their wings sucking sap from the tree. They're kind of ugly especially. When there's thousands of them you'll start to poke at them and you'll see how strong hopper there you see that they've just take off could be entertaining. You see a lot of kids running around playing with them trying to stomp on them spotted lantern flies. I showed up in the United States five years ago right here in Berks County. Nobody knows exactly how some eggs probably hitched a ride on shipping containers across the specific. Now there are hordes of spreading across Pennsylvania and beyond chances are they'll eventually reach most of the country. It's an insect that lays its eggs on on anything including things that get transported hops onto vehicles and can hold on. They don't seem to have any natural enemies here but they found lots of trees with sapped that they like. They've got a buffet out here if they can eat all of these plants and they don't have anything that's down so they're having a good time. They're having a party right. Heather Leach gets panicked calls for people with swarms of lantern flies on their houses or their trees. She tells them don't freak out. These bugs won't bite or sting but but they're not a joke either they really can destroy fix and the people who are seeing this first our vineyard owners like John. Landis vine crest winery west of Allentown uh-huh going. Landis is pressing grapes smiling. Harvest is a good time. He says but then I asked him about the Lantern Flies Anthony Turns series. We've never had a situation like this and forty years. If you start to decimate your vineyard we can cause people to go out of the wiring business. It's actually actually killed funds. Oh yeah definitely kills wise. We walk out into the Vineyard and sure enough. The section next to the woods is infested with lantern flies a lot of vines. It's our dead already. From last year's attack we had lantern pipe just kind of pouring out of these trees last year invading this area here and then down on this hill vineyard owners can spray insecticides protect their crop but that's costly and it can kill helpful insects like bees and ladybugs also it doesn't help with the bigger problem. The damage lantern flies can cause to whole ecosystems leach scientists or worried. They might kill off some trees in forests were also starting to see early indications of displacement of other insects and as a result displacement of birds as well but maybe she says if the problem came from China the solution Russian could to you see back in China. The lantern fly has natural enemies that hold it in check tiny wasps so small you can barely see them scientists from the US this department of Agriculture have brought two kinds of these wasps to the United States. They're under quarantine and a couple of USDA labs like the beneficial insect introduction laugh in Newark Delaware to USDA scientists. Amanda Stout and Kim homer lead the way into the quarantine room. We're all suited up in white overalls head to toe now. Next door is high security this quarantine zone. It's filled with these environmental chambers. They look like big refrigerators. homer opens opens one up and points me towards something in sealed containers. There's a little white thing about a quarter of an inch long with a dark in there that just the cocoon. This is one stage in the life cycle of a lantern flight killing wasp. The wasp lays eggs inside baby spotted lantern flies called nymphs the eggs hatch into larvae that feet on the nips and kilter so maybe they could do this outside. The lab in Pennsylvania's forests sounds kind of crazy releasing an invader to fight another invader but homer says really it could work. There are many many examples of successful and safe introduction of natural enemies. He says it's best when the natural enemies a specialist when it only tax invasive species you're trying to control so now he's trying to figure out whether these wasps only lay their eggs in lantern flies or if they attack. North America's native insects to getting answers. We'll take years in the meantime. The lantern flies will keep on moving. Dan Charles N._p._R. News.

Kim Homer Heather Leach Pennsylvania Landis China United States NPR Dan Charles Usda Dan Charles N._P._R Allentown Berks County Berg Homer North America Delaware Amanda Stout Department Of Agriculture Newark
"dan charles" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"dan charles" Discussed on KCRW

"Is Dan Charles as some of those companies are watching with their suppliers are doing from space mom to lease international may not be a household name but its products are with a company that makes oreo cookies and treats kit and wheat thins for example this is Jonathan Horrell the company's director of global sustainability we make snacks to write nice things to eat all purpose a stocky made right he says they wanna make their snacks the right way to without heating up the planet so the company decided to measure its greenhouse gas emissions and I realize most of them were not coming from factories or trucks it's actually the carbon emissions that a link to the fire station or forests being cut down in order to produce raw materials that we use as ingredients in our products like palm oil from plantations in Indonesia a few years ago monthly's promised to stop its suppliers from cutting down trees dozens of food companies made the same promise here's Louis our morale from the world resources institute an environmental group Walmart and mac Donald's all the major brands have made those commitments they promise to get it done by twenty twenty but most of them are not going to make their deadline turns out it's hard to do so Louis summer out and his colleague stepped in and created a new online tool for companies to use including monthly's they call it global forest watch pro so the first thing you need to do it's actually to log into the system I'm arose in Brazil I'm in Washington DC but with the miracle of Skype in computer screen sharing you can show me exactly how it works I see an image of the glow it shows which areas are covered by trees which is kind of the Google maps of force a satellite scans the entire globe every weekend updates this map so you can tell of trees disappear from one week to the next another satellite monitors the globe for fires every day the key innovation here is that the computer is doing all that work for us constantly looking at those images as they're being taken to identify if something changed on the tree cover if there is a fire that is happening in that area and then the overall shows me how you can use this to monitor specific farms so in this case here just let me just give you an example so I uploaded twenty two cattle farms in Brazil I see a bunch of rectangles and other shapes on this one part of Brazil those are real farms he got this information from public database of land ownership Purcell with a few mouse clicks we see how much of each form is covered with trees and also how that's changed he points out one forty thousand acre farm half of it's covered in forests but fifteen years ago we see the whole thing was forest resuming closer we can see exactly where the trees disappeared so you can see here that almost all of the tree cover lost within his region actually happened within this specific farm here and specifically within the borders of that farm to that we had tension all that wasn't just a wildfire yeah that that would be a second my assumption if a company makes a list of its suppliers like this the tool will send an alert whenever it detects deforestation right there so that's the tool Jonathan Horrell from under these international says his companies already using I think it's actually extremely important because the tool enables you to on the around what's actually happening in real time but the really hard part is companies have to figure out exactly where their suppliers are Margulies is doing that with cocoa farms ourselves into twenty eighteen week mapped around ninety three size cocoa farms in Ghana and cote default which of the two most important sources of cocoa in our supply chain this is easier to do when companies buy food directly from local producers they often do with cocoa and palm oil but in other cases they don't farmers who raise cattle may sell them to a local slaughterhouse not McDonald's but I'm a real from the world resources institute says the beauty of this new online tool is it's so cheap and easy to use even local slaughter houses can use and they have convinced the slaughter house in Paraguay to sign up for an account I'm Charles NPR news the band mush relay lab has built up a huge following in the last decade especially in their home country Lebanon the front man and lead singer is gay and some of the songs are political in the past that has caused problems in Jordan and Egypt.

Dan Charles one forty thousand acre twenty eighteen week fifteen years one week
"dan charles" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"dan charles" Discussed on KCRW

"Saint Louis. Dan, Charles NPR news, this is morning edition on KCRW ahead on morning edition Toronto, Raptors superfan. Knob Battista a think emigrant will sit courtside for the teams. I ever NBA finals game on the top of the word. I was not believing it I put myself couple of times to see we are in the NBA finals has attended every raptors home game since the franchise began in one thousand nine hundred five that's coming up on morning edition. You're listening to KCRW parole. Next time on all things considered. President Trump has been ratcheting up the rhetoric on Iran now. The administration says it's ready to talk that lease through some back channels advocates for stricter tobacco laws found an unlikely ally. Senator Mitch McConnell, why they say they're not too happy about that, and a look at why tornadoes like the ones slamming the midwest. Right now are so hard to predict plus local news, weather, and traffic. It's all things considered from NPR and KCRW it starts at three. Now this from KCRW news. L officials have long acknowledged they're having trouble shutting down black market marijuana shops. But now we have a better idea of just how many more than two hundred illegal dispensaries have been able to. Keep selling according to a report out yesterday. Here's case you use of short sea. Police raids on unlicensed pot shops are becoming more common site in LA, but even after the city cuts off the water and power at these shops and threatens the owner with arrests or finds many stay open or reopen elsewhere, creating a whack a mole situation. There are more than two hundred and twenty legal dispensaries operating in the city with many of them in downtown in south LA. That's according to police estimates, and an LA times review of city records and listings on weed maps, which is like yelp for pot shops. Compare that to about one hundred eighty marijuana dispensaries that the city has licensed, these illegal dispensaries don't pay for permits or pass, along state, or local sales taxes and state officials warn they threatened to put legal shops out of business time is three twenty one..

KCRW NBA LA marijuana Dan LA times Senator Mitch McConnell Saint Louis raptors Charles NPR NPR President Trump Battista Toronto Iran
"dan charles" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"dan charles" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Changes to the country's constitution extending president of Delfa tall CC's rule while giving him unprecedented powers the change which will be subject to a national referendum would cement, his authoritarian. Hold on the country was expected Egypt's parliament is dominated by cici's loyalists. This is NPR. After years of patient reports of injuries and complications from type of mesh implants used to repair pelvic conditions and women the food and Drug administration today stopping sales of the product the FDA also told the two remaining makers to stop selling the mesh immediately saying they failed to show the implants are safe long-term. Several other manufacturers have already discontinued the product tens of thousands of lawsuits have been filed against the mesh implant makers by women reporting pain bleeding or infection possibly tied to the device. There's no evidence about how farming arrived in Britain thousands of years ago as NPR's Dan Charles reports, it's just that farmers arrived from continental Europe and took over farming settlements appeared rather suddenly in present day Britain about six thousand years ago. And there's been a lot of debate about how it happened. Whether it was a cultural shift or new people arriving scientists now say the DNA in ancient bones suggests that an entirely new group of people with route. It's near the Jian see between present day Turkey and Greece arrived in Britain at that time and brought farming with them unlike in continental Europe where these Jian farmers mixed with local hunter-gatherers in Britain. There was little interbreeding and the hunter gatherers simply disappeared. The findings appear in the journal nature ecology and evolution, Dan. Charles NPR news. Wall Street is trading higher at this hour. The Dow is up twenty four points at twenty six thousand four hundred nine the NASDAQ is up twenty seven points.

Britain NPR Dan Charles food and Drug administration Charles NPR Europe cici president Egypt Turkey Greece six thousand years
"dan charles" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:39 min | 1 year ago

"dan charles" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Scott Simon a chance week in Los Angeles as the teacher's union and the city school district try to make a deal to avoid a teacher strike the district up there offer on Friday. But the union said it wasn't enough. United teacher, Los Angeles. President Alex Caputo Pearl spoke at a press conference after the day of negotiations yet ready because on Monday, we will be on strike for our students. Spoils and for the future of public education in Los NPR's. You listen add warning has more from Los Angeles. While the union in the district rep negotiating table LA history. Teacher Rosa Jimenez was at the front of her class with a simple question. What is it labor union? High school junior named Ingrid answers Lee is an organization of workers that's foreign and the purpose for like benefiting late the workers. And what is one thing that they're able to do what was that other word that that we wrote a definition down? Right students may see their lesson come to life on Monday when their teachers plan to strike for more money for smaller classes for more, nurses, among other things. The district says it just doesn't have the money to meet those demands. And if there is a strike district says schools will be open stocked by administrators volunteers and newly hired substitutes L. Listen, NPR news, Los Angeles inspectors from the food and Drug administration or inspecting less food during this government shutdown leading to questions about whether our food is still safe. Appears Dan Charles is here to stay a worry when it comes to food safety, the shutdown hasn't changed things much. Let's start with the big picture. There are thousands of slaughterhouses and meat processors in the country and they cannot legally operate without a USDA inspector on site. Those inspectors are still working through the shutdown. And then there are tens of thousands of other food plants. They handle everything else from cauliflower to cookies the FDA. Overseas. Those plants and David Johnson, a former FDA official now private food safety consultant says there's a whole different philosophy for regulating them. The expectation is that the industry will produce say food period an FDA's job was to periodically check that was indeed happening periodically. Usually means only once every few years so ninety nine percent of these plants were not going to get inspected this month. Anyway, the shutdown did not change things much. Meanwhile, a lot of them still are being inspected as part of a whole parallel food safety system, a private one run by people like Craig Wilson, the head of food safety at Costco. We spend money with those suppliers. And if they can't meet our specifications from a food, safety or quality perspective. Guess what happens? What? Yeah. Exactly what we won't buy from them. And he says we actually demand some things the FDA doesn't like more testing for harmful bacteria. There are several these private food safety certifications food company. Need them to sell the big food retailers like WalMart or Kroger or Costco, and they have to get inspected and recertified every year this private system has failed to catch problems at some companies critics say since food companies pay for the certifications, the certifiers don't have much of an incentive to look too hard for problems. Also, there are plenty of food companies that the private inspectors never see. Here's David atchison, the food safety consultant, keep in mind that there's lots and lots and lots of relatively small plants that are making food that are not selling into the major pains. So no big food retailers telling them to spend the money to get a safety certification actress and says for those companies and also to keep the big food companies honest. It is important for the FDA to stop by every so often nobody in their right mind would be complacent about nasty inspection because they can be very tough, and they can have fairly significant negative consequences on your business. Every so often, those routine inspections do find things. Evidence of rats in warehouses bad temperature, gauges just knowing the FDA could show up unannounced as a good thing just says, even if the visits are rare. Dan, Charles NPR news people on land along President Trump's proposed border wall risk losing their land. Here's the is ever. Actually, built some residents have received letters from the federal government in the last couple of months advising them of that possibility. There is some history here t Christian Miller, a senior reporter for a publica dug into all of this in a series co published with the Texas Tribune called the taking Mr Miller. Thanks so much for being with us. Thanks for having me on and take us back to this time. I guess what was called the border fence under the the Bush administration of what was the plan at that point? So this is back in two thousand and six and it was called the secure fence act and both Republicans and Democrats joined together to vote for the construction of a border fence as it was called at the time. It was eighteen feet high. So it wasn't quite as large as what President Trump has discussed building down there. There was a major construction effort and it put up fence all along the Rio Grande and different parts in order to do that the federal government had to seize land from a bunch of private property owners. And that's what our story looked at how the government in our reporting showed had abused that process to take land and resulted in unfair payments to different people. Well, we certainly want to talk about that. But let's note, I am big name democrat signed under this plan too. Didn't they oh sure back then it was a bipartisan effort, so Senator Pete king from Republican from New York introduced the act it was approved by both then senators Hillary Clinton, and then Senator Barack Obama both. Voted to approve the construction of the secure fence. Well, what happened when they actually began? So the first step in Texas is kind of an unusual situation. Must much of the land along the US border is in public hands already owned by the federal government. But for a variety of reasons in Texas, most of the border is still owned by private property owners. And this includes very wealthy individuals who own big ranches and farms along river, and a lot of small most of the Tino owners who've had claimed the land in some cases, dating back to Spain owned that part of Texas. So it's an unusual situation, and it required the government to come in and exercise what's called, eminent domain. And you might have heard of that before it's when the government takes a land to build things, like national parks or military bases. The interesting thing about the federal government is it in the nineteen thirties. When the US was in the middle of the depression. There was a big movement to stimulate the. Economy with large public works projects. So because of that need congress passed a very special law called the declaration of taking act essentially did is it gave the government. Unlike any other government agency gave the federal government the power to quickly seize land. And I say quickly. I mean, the government sends you a letter and the next day they can take title to your land, and that's called a declaration of taking and that's what they used to the army corps of engineers and department of Justice used to take land along the Texas border to build the fence, and what they do is to compensate you actually a check. And they say here's a check we on the land. Now, let's argue about how much money this check is four. But there's really no argument you make about whether or not they get to take your land, the federal government almost uniquely has the power to take land first, and then pay you later. The land. We're talking about the action in two thousand six is there is there a beautiful wall? There today. I don't want to opine on whether or not. But yes, there is a wall that stretches along a fence. I guess we should say, right. Yes. It's a fence. It's a question of terminology. There are places where it's at big there's a concrete supporting barrier there. And there are places where there is a metal fence that looks to most people look like a giant rusted picket fence did everyone get paid reimbursed. No, even ten years later now there are still lawsuits open where people still haven't paid for land. In other words, there were still negotiating how much to except for land. And there's no reason to suspect own occur. If there's any new wall construction t Christian Miller Shane reporter for propublica. Thanks so much for being with us. Thanks, scott. I appreciate it. Actually, the NBA's putting on its big London game the New York Knicks take on the Washington Wizards. But in his canter, the Knicks won't be there Kanter is Turkish and I've spoken critic of Turkey's president air to one he was playing basketball for the Oklahoma City thunder in two thousand seventeen when he was detained at a Romanian airport. When Turkey revoked his passport and his canter. Join just now from New York, thanks so much for being with us. They reminded me. And why did you decide not to go to London I really didn't feel safe because the Turkish government is very famous for hunting down those who oppose are drawn. So I mean, I just didn't want to really respond left by going to Europe. But you know, I talked to my team I told them well like how many times I wanna come? Because I want to be with you guys. And I want to get a win which you guys and then later on they came back with the news and say, you know, what I think the best decision as if you don't come. That's just not. Risky for one game. You do you feel safe in New York and elsewhere in the US I had been getting for three days hunter's death threats. But I think I feel safe in America but anywhere else in the world. I wouldn't really feel feel safe. Did you say you've gotten hundreds of death threats? Yes. I haven't given him since two thousand sixteen but especially the last two or three days I haven't get into law. So lots of veterans. And we'll note that your father never met Kanter. Yes has been indicted in Turkey's accused of belonging to terrorist organization. He is a follower of cleric who is in the United States and accused of plotting a coup against the air to one government. Does your father's Asia innocent? Well, I'll tell you this. I have no contact with my family right now. And I just don't want him to get in trouble. And if they would have any little taxi. Hi, mom. Hi, guys. How you guys doing how high debt, and they will be all in jail. They actually took my dad in jail for seven days, and we put so much pressure from here in America to Turkey, and they had to let them go. I have to tell you a former NBA star. Also from Turkey Turku is now chief an advisor to president or at a one. And he's he's been critical of you. Yes. Have anything to say about that? I was a real good friends with him actually play insane team two thousand eleven we were teammates in the Tokes net national team. And then after that, I think till two thousand thirteen fourteen we played against each other because he was planning NBA. And then after that, he retired. And then he started working with the Turkish government, and it's just very sad because he's actually a very good guy. But he picked aside and he's. His tough situation. I have to ask Mr. Kanter have have you received any pressure or advice from someone? I don't know sports agent commercial agent. Who says do you don't talk about politics? You're not going to be able to to sell basketball shoes in Turkey. This makes you controversial. Just be quiet about what what your feelings. Are. I understand when you talk about this kind of issues, you are not going to get big contracts. But you know, what I look at it in the end is worth it because I'm an NBA player, and I have a big platform. So I'm trying to use this platform to be voice of all the innocent people who don't have a voice, and people know my story because I played an MBA. But there are thousands and thousands stories out there waiting to be heard way worse than Mark. So I was like, you know, what I understand, you know, it's tough Malcolm's back and they're getting lots of trust too. But I have to do this for all of us citizen people and as cantor of the New York Knicks. Thanks very much. Good luck. You both on the court and officer guys appreciate it..

food and Drug administration federal government President Turkey NBA Los Angeles United States Mr. Kanter Texas New York New York Knicks Turkish government Scott Simon Dan Charles Costco basketball NPR Los NPR
"dan charles" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:38 min | 1 year ago

"dan charles" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Scott Simon a chance week in Los Angeles as the teacher's union and the city school district try to make a deal to avoid a teacher strike the district up there offer on Friday. But the union said it wasn't enough. United teacher, Los Angeles. President Alex Caputo Pearl spoken a press conference after the day of negotiations yet ready because on Monday, we will be on strike our students. Spoils and for the future of public education in Los Angeles. NPR's? You listen add warning has more from Los Angeles while the union and the district revenue goes shooting table LA history. Teacher Rosa Jimenez was at the front of her class with a simple question. What is it labor union Duke high school junior named Ingrid answers leaving there's an organization of workers that's foreign and the purpose for like benefiting the workers. And what is one thing that they're able to do what was that other word that that we wrote the definition down? Students see their lesson come to life on Monday when their teachers plan to strike for more money for smaller classes for more, nurses, among other things. The district says it just doesn't have the money to meet those demands. And if there is a strike, the district says schools will be open stocked by administrators volunteers and newly hired substitutes L. Listen to NPR news, Los Angeles inspectors from the food and Drug administration or inspecting less food during this government shutdown leading to questions about whether our food is still safe NPR's. Dan, Charles is here to stay a worry when it comes to food safety, the shutdown hasn't changed things much. Let's start with the big picture. There are thousands of slaughterhouses and meat processors in the country and they cannot legally operate without a USDA inspector on site. Those inspectors are still working through the shutdown. And then there are tens of thousands of other food plants handle everything else from cauliflower cookies, the FDA. Overseas. Those plants and David Atkinson, a former FDA official now private food safety consultant says there's a whole different philosophy for regulating them. The expectation is that the industry will produce safe food period. An FDA job boys to periodically check that wasn't happening periodically. Usually means only once every few years so ninety nine percent of these plants were not going to get inspected this month. Anyway, the shutdown did not change things much. Meanwhile, a lot of them still are being inspected as part of a whole parallel food safety system, a private one run by people like Craig Wilson, the head of food safety at Costco. We spend money with those suppliers. And if they can't meet our specifications from a food, safety or quality perspective. Guess what happens? What? Yeah. Exactly what we won't buy from them. And he says we actually demand some things the FDA doesn't like more testing for harmful bacteria. There are several these private food safety certifications food companies need them to sell the big food retailers like WalMart or Kroger or Costco, and they have to get inspected and recertified every year this private system has failed to catch problems at some companies critics. Say since food companies pay for the certifications, the certifiers don't have much of an incentive to look too hard for problems. Also, there are plenty of food companies that the private inspectors never see. Here's David atchison, the food safety consultant, keep in mind that there's lots and lots and lots of relatively small plants that are making food that are not selling into the major pains. So no big food retailers telling them to spend the money to get a safety certification actress and says for those companies and also to keep the big food companies honest. It is important for the FDA to stop by every so often nobody in the right mind would be complacent about NAFTA inspection because they can be very tough, and they can have fairly significant negative consequences on your business. Every so often, those routine inspections do find things evidence of rats in warehouses bad temperature, gauges just knowing the FDA could show up unannounced is a good thing. I just and says, even if the visits are rare. Dan, Charles, NPR news people. Land along President Trump's proposed border wall risk losing their land. Here's the ballers ever. Actually, built some residents have received letters from the federal government in the last couple of months advising them of that possibility. There is some history here t Christian Miller, a senior reporter for publica dug into all of this in a series co published with the Texas Tribune called the taking Mr Miller. Thanks so much for being with us. Thanks for having me on and take us back to this time. I guess it was called the border fence under the the Bush administration of what was the plan at that point. So this is back in two thousand six and it was called the secure fence act and both Republicans and Democrats joined together to vote for the construction of a border fence as it was called at the time. It was eighteen feet high. So it wasn't quite as large as what President Trump has discussed building down there. There was a major construction effort and it put up fence all along the Rio Grande in different parts in order to do that the federal government had to seize land from a bunch of private property owners. And that's what our story looked at how the government in our reporting showed had abused that process to take land and result in unfair payments to different people. Well, we certainly want to talk about that. But let's note, I am big name democrat signed under this plan too. Didn't they oh sure back then it was a bipartisan effort, so Senator Pete king from a Republican from New York introduced the act was approved by both then senators Hillary Clinton, and then Senator Barack Obama both. Voted to approve the construction of the secure fence. Well, what happened when they actually began? So the first step in Texas is kind of an unusual situation. Must much of the land along the US border is in public hands already owned by the federal government. But for a variety of reasons in Texas, most of the border is still owned by private property owners. And this includes very wealthy individuals who own big ranches and farms along the river, and a lot of small most of the Tino owners who've had claimed the land in some cases, dating back to Spain own that part of Texas. So it's an unusual situation, and it required the government to come in and exercise what's called, eminent domain. And you might have heard of that before when the government takes a land to build things, like national parks or military bases. The interesting thing about the federal government is it in the nineteen thirties. When the US was in the middle of the depression. There was a big movement to stimulate the. Economy with large public works projects. So because of that need congress passed a very special law called the declaration of taking act. What essentially did is it gave the government? Unlike any other government agency, it gave the federal government the power to quickly seize land. And when I say quickly, I mean, the government sends you a letter and the next day they can take title to your land. And that's all the declaration of taking and that's what they used to the army corps of engineers and department of Justice used to take land along Texas border to build the fence. And what they do is to compensate you is they write you a check. And they say, here's the check we own the land. Now, let's argue about how much money this check is four. But there's really no argument you make about whether or not they get take your land, the federal government almost uniquely has the power to take land first, and then pay you later. The land. We're talking about the action in two thousand six is there is there a beautiful wall? There today. I don't want to apply on whether or not it's beautiful or not. But yes, there is a wall that stretches along a fence. I guess we should say, right. Yes. It's a fence. It's a question of terminology. There are places where it's big there's a concrete supporting barrier there. And there are places where there is a metal fence that looks to most people look like a giant rusted picket fence did everyone get paid reimbursed. No, even ten years later. Now, there are still lawsuits open where people still haven't paid for the land. In other words, there were still negotiating how much to accept land. And there's no reason to suspect that won't occur. If there's any new wall construction t Christian Miller Shane reporter for propublica. Thanks so much for being with us. Thanks, scott. I appreciate it. Actually, the NBA is putting on its big London game the New York Knicks take on the Washington Wizards. But in his canter, the Knicks won't be there. Mr. Kanter is Turkish and outspoken critic of Turkish president air to one he was playing basketball for the Oklahoma City thunder in two thousand seventeen when he was detained at a Romanian airport. When Turkey revoked his passport and his canter joins us now from New York. Thanks so much for being with us. They reminded me. And why did you decide not to go to London I really didn't feel safe because the Turkish government is very famous for hunting down those who oppose are drawn. So I mean, I just didn't want to really respond left by going to Europe. But you know, I talk to my team I told them well, like how many times I wanna come because I wanna be which you guys there. And I want to get a win which you guys and then later on they came back with the news and say, you know, what I think the best decision as if you don't come just. Not risky for one game. You do you feel safe in New York and elsewhere in the US I have been getting lost two or three days hunter's death threats. But I think I feel safe in America but anywhere else in the world. I wouldn't feel safe. He's you say you've gotten hundreds of death threats. Yes. I haven't given him since two thousand sixteen by the last two or three days. I haven't get into law. So lots of Beth RAs. And we'll note that your father never met Kanter. Yes has been indicted in Turkey's accused of belonging to a terrorist organization. He is a follower of a cleric who is in the United States and accused of plotting a coup against the air to one government. Does your father's Asia innocent? Well, I'll tell you this. I have no contact with my family right now. And I just don't want him to get in trouble. Any little taxi? Hi, mom. Hi, guys. How you guys doing high debt, and they will be all in jail. They actually took my dad in jail for seven days, and we put so much pressure from here in America to Turkey, and they had to let him go. I have to tell you a former NBA star also from Turkey Hido Turku is now chief an advisor to president or to one. And he's he's been critical of you. Yes. Say about that. I was a real good friends with him actually play sim same team two thousand eleven teammates in the Tokes net national team. And then after that, I think till two thousand thirteen fourteen we played against each other because he also played in NBA. And then after that, he retired. And then he started working with the Turkish government and just very sad because he's actually a very good guy. But he picked aside and he's. His tough situation. I have to ask Mr. Kanter have have you received any pressure or advice from someone? I dunno sports agent commercial agent. Who says do you don't talk about politics? You're not going to be able to to sell basketball shoes and Turkey. This makes you controversial. Just be quiet about what what your feelings. Are. I understand when you talk about this kind of issues, you are not going to get contracts. But you know, what I look at it in the end is worth it because I'm an NBA player, and I have a big platform. So I'm trying to use this platform to be voice of all the innocent people who don't have a voice, and people know my story because I played an MBA. But there are thousands and thousands stories are waiting to be heard way worse than mine. So I was like, you know, what I understand, you know, it's tough Malcolm back and they're getting a loss of trust to. But I have to do this for. Citizen people. And as cantor of the New York Knicks. Thanks very much. Good luck to you. Both on the court and officer. Thank.

food and Drug administration federal government President Turkey Los Angeles NBA United States Texas Mr. Kanter NPR New York New York Knicks Turkish government Scott Simon basketball Costco Dan
"dan charles" Discussed on Racing Post

Racing Post

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"dan charles" Discussed on Racing Post

"Play now at beat the drop dot Patty, power dot com. Welcome back to this week's race. In post football, postcards, pursue both three games to get stuck into and the boys best bets of this weekend to land and Dan Charles from. The rice in post and the mount I Evison at home to boomer on Sunday to fifteen kickoff. Eight hundred eleven Evison thirteen zero five draw and seventy-two Bouma overturned off goes for me in in this one. I mean, you wanna be against Balmer then down to twelve in the Premier League but playing worst, and I you know, lost I eleven in the pram conceded, fifteen goals in the last four matches in all competitions. So there's the obvious negatives for them just with Everton something. Something's put me off them. I think that Donald we defeats Liverpool. Just not the stuffing out of them. You know, they're they're on the eleventh in the table and food is a bit pressure building on Silva, just because he's owned reputations. For doing a good job whole and a good job walford. But ultimately, you know, he he didn't achieve what we wanted. I ever those two clubs and now it's happening than gain evid somewhere to play scenes in like him, the footballs looks okay at times, but you know, the results and not backing up. So saw nervous about backing Evanston. But bloom of just defensively all over the shop at the moment. So it's a sensitive vote for over two and a half. I just think that maybe Evison we've your what they've got in the final furred, I'm boomer Fung fifty column. Williamson been linked with a fifty million pound move to to Chelsea, which my my always or pulp to say. I'm not sure he's worth that. Bumping fan. He's in king and phrases. Go goes in them. So. Yeah. Over two and a half done. You not in the pressure. Bill was. Do you think they're gonna they're gonna bright the pressure and win the game as a big game for silver on if I lost the gain or show he'd be that far away from even looking at the sacking him because he look, you know, where expect to be? Money been spent probably seven for they're looking. So even lot start, you know, attacking the, you know, some of the big sixteen or the week who might be man, you know, we were talking about that months ago, they might finish above unites then. And now, you know, if they can't even finish seven for an stuck among the lots of, you know, brought in you know, Boma his well with. Yeah. He's you know, he's a big, you know, they're underperforming to quote degree. So obviously, it's a massive game for him. And I think I have got so much for boomer for -fensive leave now Charleston, see goods, and there's Calvet loons, Donald we'd better as well. When he's I have the questions period when he's had a few chances. So massive I'll just think he's an idea we're talking to play ball if as I mentioned before the amount of Galway concede in there about to go to worst defense among the top fifteen teams that their money schools. Conceded seven go listen Fulham, we've been bright in being offered Abaco season. So I just think he's perfect game for them to get back on track. Yeah. Yeah. We back in. All right. Good stuff. Right. Let's move onto the four thirty kickoff. Then probably the match the weekend in the Premier League. Mark taught them a home to Manchester United evens, you can have about Spurs forms to to the drawer twelve to five. That's it. Yeah. I mean, obviously, very interesting game purchasing being strongly links. We we've the old traffic Jobe. You do wonder if there's a little bit maybe Spurs fencing..

Donald Evison mount I Evison Balmer boomer Fung Dan Charles Williamson Bouma Spurs Everton Bill Evanston Charleston Silva Liverpool Mark Galway Chelsea fifty million pound
"dan charles" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"dan charles" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Alan Krueger is a Princeton economist. He worries the proliferation of non compete clauses could be limiting wage growth. One of the ways in which workers do obtain higher pays by searching for jobs that offer better pay better working conditions, and to the extent that this is restricting mobility. I think it is probably restraining wage growth. Kruger's research shows about one out of four US workers can't switch jobs freely because they're under non compete clauses. We were pioneered the office rental sub industry known as co working it rents and develops communal office spaces that individuals and companies can then lease on a monthly basis. Within a decade. We work has become the world's biggest player in that industry. We work is not alone. In attracting regulatory scrutiny in July. The attorney general of Washington state won concessions from seven fast food chains to drop language that prevented workers from getting jobs within their own franchise. Other states attorneys general, including New York have said they continue looking into similar cases in other industries as for we work. It's original non compete clause will now apply only to one hundred executives the duration of the non compete will be shorter for about half of US employees. In a statement. We work says it has been working with the state attorneys general for two years, and that the company was already in the process of revamping its policy, you can achieve NPR news Washington in North Carolina. Most of the rain has ended but flooding continues much of the area where Florence dumped the most rainfall is covered with farms. Chicken farms, sweet potato farms, hog farms and the damage to those farms is just starting to come into focus. Joining us to talk more is NPR's, Dan. Charles welcome to the studio. Good to be here. So before Florence hit you reported a lot about people who were worried about what would happen to the ponds that are on hog farms with their filled with manure what have you learned so far? Well, the numbers are just starting to come in reported from farmers and they're coming to the North Carolina department of environmental quality, the latest numbers today are that four of those lagoons the walls have failed the contents have escaped into nearby rivers nine more were just flooded inundated by rising floodwaters another dozen or so they just got so much rain that they overflowed now the North Carolina port council is it's an industry group. They say this is not a widespread problem. They say this is isolated numbers of lagoons in the majority are fine. But there's numbers are still going to go up there. Double what they were. A yesterday and a bunch of environmental groups have been flying overhead looking down, and they say from what they see that number certainly will grow. What about the animals and livestock? There was an effort at least with the hogs to get them out of any low-lying houses, we have not yet heard what has happened to the hogs years ago. Hurricane floyd. There were thousands of hogs that died in a flood like this. But on the other side, there's not just hog farms. There's chicken farms and a big poultry, producer, Sanderson farms. They reported last evening that sixty chicken houses were flooded. One point seven million birds were killed another whole bunch of farms has been cut off by floodwaters. And so they can't get feed trucks into those houses. So that story is not yet over either. In the meantime, what are people thinking that the the long term effects will be well, obviously for the farmers whose land was flooded and who's building. Were destroyed. This is a catastrophe for a company like Sanderson farms. It's going to be a hit, but they will survive. I don't think consumers will see that much of an impact because it's a small part of country the country's production. But think about sweet potatoes, North Carolina grows half of the country. Sweet potatoes harvest was just beginning. They can't get back into the fields, but they need to because if sweet potatoes stay in a waterlogged field for too long, they could rot, and that might have an impact on your thanksgiving dinner. That's NPR's. Dan, Charles, Dan. Thank you. Thank you WNYC is supported by mohawk mountain house. Located in the Hudson valley, offering carriage rides voting and eighty five miles of hiking trails with reds and yellows of fall foliage this October mo- honk dot com. The your school of management executive education presenting women on boards a program, which coaches.

Sanderson farms North Carolina US Alan Krueger Florence Dan Charles NPR Kruger Hurricane floyd Hudson valley Washington mohawk mountain house WNYC New York attorney executive
"dan charles" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"dan charles" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's all things considered from NPR news. News. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Ari Shapiro right in the path of hurricane Florence. There's an area where pigs far outnumber people. A big worry is the state of hundreds of open air, lagoons filled with manure torrential rain could cause them to overflow. Here's NPR's, Dan, Charles, Katie Langley, lives on the North Carolina coast downstream from a bunch of hog farms, and she thinks about them a lot when you fly over the area. I mean, you can't throw a rock without hitting one. She works for an environmentalist organisation sound rivers. You just see these long Barnes and these big square shapes that looks like PepsiCo dismal pink. Because swine waste is bright pink. Fun fact of the day actually as bacteria feeding on the waste the turn the ponds pink, those lagoons are a little bit like compost piles, it's a cheap way to handle manure. But they're just sitting there. Open to the weather thousands of with a category. Four hurricane coming. Langley is worried that a lot of manure is going to end up in the rivers. Farmers are worried too like Marlowe Vaughn in Goldsboro, North Carolina. We're going to probably get hit on the nose with us. Or not spotting is our biggest concern they spent part of the day on her farm pumping liquid waste out of their lagoons spraying it as fertiliser on nearby fields. So there's more room for rain from Florence. If farmers are doing this. The lagoon should be able to handle almost three feet of rain, but they've never actually had to deal with that much. I mean, if you got two or three feet of rain with that fled the lagoon, we don't really know. I mean, we try to Paul down as much as we can. But after that kinda in God's hands. And then we're kind of at the mercy of the storm. Here's the really bad scenario. Water starts overflowing erodes, the lagoon walls, and the walls collapsed spreading animal waste across the landscape and into rivers some lagoons and hog houses could also be inundated by rising rivers about sixty of them lie within what the state considers the hundred year, flood plain vaughn's seen other hurricanes the farms come through. Okay. But she says it's like Florence could be worse than we really. Just don't know. We have no idea. What's going to happen? The everybody's very very very worried and very concerned. Please pray for us. Dan, Charles, NPR news. Hundreds of thousands of Palestinians live in Jerusalem. But those outside the city can't get there without hard to get permits. Restrictions. Israel says are necessary for security one group found a way in for a unique purpose in orchestra that went to play one of the world's most famous symphonies sandy Tolan reports on the musicians journey. Bump pumping pin on the wooded grounds of an east Jerusalem guesthouse.

Katie Langley Florence Marlowe Vaughn NPR North Carolina hurricane Florence Audie Cornish Ari Shapiro Jerusalem Dan hurricane Charles PepsiCo Israel Goldsboro Barnes sandy Tolan Paul three feet
"dan charles" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:03 min | 2 years ago

"dan charles" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From NPR news I'm Lou Garcia Navarro a jury, in San Francisco ordered the biotech and chemical company Monsanto to pay two hundred and eighty nine million dollars in damages to a man. Suffering from cancer the jurors concluded that one of the company's, top selling products the weed killer widely known as roundup made. That man sick it's a stunning setback for Monsanto and perhaps the. Whole. Pesticide, industry NPR's Dan Charles has, covered the case and he's here in the studio to explain good morning All right lay out the facts of, the case so man named Dwayne Johnson worked as a groundskeeper. To school he used this week Hiller a lot roundup he got. The. Relief, and he got drenched in, it a couple of times he was worried about it And then he got cancer. And several groups that have been, longtime. Critics of Monsanto and, its products they came to his aid. And filed this lawsuit okay is it pretty clear science wise that the chemicals and roundup caused cancer because that's still widely available people use. It all the time now it's not, clear at all actually so three, years ago there was an international group of scientists part of the w. h. o.. The World Health Organization came to issued a report came to the conclusion that it probably does cause cancer this active ingredient in. Roundup called glyphosate but a bunch of other organizations including regulatory bodies that are. Actually supposed, to look at real world risks, from exposure they have. Looked at. The same studies mostly involving mice and. Rats and the effect of the chemical on cells in the. Laboratory and they've come to the opposite conclusion. That it probably does not cause cancer I mean there's. A big study of farmworkers fifty thousand farm workers Any in that study the, workers who were exposed to glyphosate or around up have not gotten cancer at any. Higher rates I mean the stakes seem really high for this right because it is so widely used but the jury in this. Case decided that they believe that it caused cancer right which sometimes happens in. These jury, trials when you're confronted with a real suffering human being But, there's another thing going on which is quite interesting it's basically the plaintiffs put Monsanto on trial and. They went, back through years of internal emails in, the company and they basically came up, with lots of, evidence that the, company was not interested in finding any risks, in? Its product and was interested in shutting outside shutting down scientific debate about it all right What's the takeaway here for you someone who's reported on this industry on these issues for. So long What I find most interesting is the fact that the jury did not believe or. Or give credibility to sort of, the official institutions that are responsible for evaluating safety of. A chemical it didn't matter what the says the. Environmental Protection Agency or the European Food Safety agency the plaintiffs basically said the government is too cozy, the, regulators. Are too cozy with. The companies and that was convincing to to the, jury NPR's Dan Charles Dan thank you so much nice to be here. And now onto election security which is a huge campaign. Issue ahead of this year's midterms in Georgia the Republican candidate for governor is also secretary of state the top election official Brian, Kemp insists Georges elections. Are secure that as Johnny Kauffman? Of member station w. a. b. e. reports Democrats want immediate changes Thank you and again, we're, here. At Manuel's tavern in. Atlanta and we do have people from all over, Georgia tuning in so welcome everyone Caroline Stover a democratic activist speaks to. About one hundred people in the back room of a. Wood panel bar as they sit beers and eat tater tots they came to learn about Georgia's election system and what they hear, from Stover and others Is that, the system is not secure your we are three months before an important election living with the reality that once, again Georgia voters might be going to the, polls and, not know if your vote actually counts one big topic at Manuel's tavern is paper ballots a handful of voters filed an, ongoing federal, lawsuit. Pushing the state to use. Them in the, midterms Democrats like Stover one Republican secretary of state and candidate for governor Brian Kemp to order. A switch. To paper, ballots himself enough is enough and we, simply can't wait any longer for for example our secretary of state Georgia is. One. Of, fourteen states that uses electronic voting machines without a paper trail or paper ballots cybersecurity experts agree this. Leaves elections more vulnerable worst case scenario hackers, manipulate Georgia's vote totals and there's no paper backup to do a manual recount that could Mean chaos can isn't opposed, to paper ballots. But, he says the switch to them shouldn't happen before the twenty eighteen. Election and now the an absolute disaster changing from the current system that we have, now the paper ballots campus faced questions about the security of Georgia's elections ahead of the. Twenty sixteen contest an outside researcher found voter information, and passwords unsecured on a state contractors website after, Russian hacking attempts were revealed Kemp turned down assistance. From the department, of homeland, security a few months later he accused d h s itself of hacking the state's network that proved to be, false camp insists Georgia's elections are secure I, think if, anything my record is a strength for me and I'm glad to talk about that record all day long camp notes added, firewalls and, regular. Work with cybersecurity vendors before. He won the, Republican nomination some in camps party question his record they're more quiet now Kemp's opponent democrat Stacy Abrahams hasn't criticized him much but other Democrats have I, think he's not only failing in his duty but he shouldn't have it you should not have the responsibility anymore back at the bar democrat Elizabeth Starling says..

cancer Georgia Brian Kemp Monsanto Caroline Stover glyphosate NPR Dwayne Johnson Hiller official Dan Charles Lou Garcia Navarro World Health Organization Dan Charles Dan San Francisco
"dan charles" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"dan charles" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"I just want to let you know that what's happening in albuquerque these liberal law firms are taking legal immigrants are taking his young daca kids and they're hiring him as legal assistance and his liberal law firms and their and dr hitting and their educating these kids to give them a legal vantage i applied at a job at one of these law firms couldn't get the job they said there's no skills whatsoever to get the job we do what we tell us blah blah blah blah blah your legal assistant and then they had like all kinds of gangsta rap blasting a law firm does a daca guy kids sitting over there looking at me those other waiting to get picked up i think it's completely completely unfair that means american citizen these are legal everything kids are getting a surgeon into legal field which i'm trying to get into and then i can't get the job was liberal office why would i wanna work there anyway but i think you're gonna find an advantage ninety percent of the offices in albuquerque are that way john then good luck with that one buddy i don't even know what to tell you on that one and now look they're doubling down on this immigration status thing can you believe this exactly i mean i don't know what to do it's impossible i've i've given up it's over there's nothing i don't know what you know there's there's no way we can recover from this week it's been taken over we've lost the city crowns out of control i don't know what to tell you my friend but stay safe and maybe we'll be fighting back to back somewhere let's hope it doesn't get it when we come back i'm gonna give you more whereas dan charles i'll take your call we got one line open two four three.

albuquerque john dan charles ninety percent
"dan charles" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"dan charles" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"And the more of course more aggressively you save the faster you'll be wealthy the more aggressively say for a down payment but the two primary pieces of millionaire status as we study millionaires is that they use their 401k's their retirement plans to build wealth with mutual funds and they get their house paid off those two things are the first two things that millionaires do that lead them to millionaire status and that's your first level of wealth is millionaire status moving beyond that there'll be some strategies system things that might change but you know to getting to that first level and you know i'll give you my prediction i think you'll be there in about a decade just listening to you you know depending on if you decide to marry someone who's going to spend all the money but you know if you don't do that if you get you know get somebody of like mind do you and you keep your eye on the ball you keep focused and you live a good life but a frugal life and you invest invest invest in pay off your house pay off your house pay off your house you're going to be wealthy and you're going to be wealthy relatively quickly so while dan charles well rob is in new york city hey good how are you so i have a career question for you are currently a teacher and i'm looking to get into the physical education which is really my passion was teaching job was meant to be a bridge to that i don't i read forty eight days to work i love of red star and they all lead to the same thing the other part of this though is like i'm also interested in educational leadership and eventually i could see myself doing that which would be you know increased by salaries.

dan charles new york forty eight days 401k
"dan charles" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"dan charles" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The plan board argued about it around that meeting table an anybody with an opinion could drive over to fuller seed and supply poplar grove we ed as many as 15 people at the office before seven o'clock in the morning all way mislead me all on one side of the issue or the other in the end the board decided that i canbe could not be controlled so spraying would not be allowed during the entire growing season from april fifteen through october these are the toughest restrictions in the whole country and the board is now under attack monsanto sued the board and each member individually calling the decision arbitrary capricious and unlawful hundreds of farmers signed a petition saying they need d'yquem michael mccarty was one of them we got angry we didn't feel like we were able to be heard they wanted the board to allow sprang at least during the first part of the growing season when the weather is not so hot and i canbe isn't so prone to drift mccarty and five other farmers also sued the board it gets very emotional were we like centerfield claim we we larkham to be we'd for there's a chance the plant board may not even survive in its current form there have been proposals in arkansas legislature to move the board inside the department of agriculture make it less independent terry follower says he doesn't think he's lost any friends over this controversy but there are some pretty angry people out there there's two loaded guns in mouth is he felt personally threatened zoom would he doesn't regret his vote to stopped i canvas spraying though he says he's just trying to protect the citizens of arkansas dan charles npr news this is npr news the the from npr news in washington i'm windsor johnston the government's monthly report on consumer prices is due out today npr's giles snyder says the labor department's report is being closely watched as investors worry about inflation inflation fears were sparked by january's jobs reported showed a jump in wages prompting concern that the federal reserve will give more aggressive about raising interest rates reports that off wide swings in the financial markets they remain off their record highs but they have rebounded closing up for.

monsanto arkansas terry follower washington npr giles snyder labor department michael mccarty department of agriculture windsor johnston
"dan charles" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"dan charles" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mother doesn't believe that it helps to publicly speculate who has hit thirty five year old son we are less interest chant in answering that question then we are in having ever is whole nothing him reach out to lasse engaged with us for that we can work toward resolving the fishing and bringing on safely on today the state department said his case has the attention of the highest levels of government tyson's parents a cooling for the american public to keep up the pressure and not forget that boy greece shattuck m p unease bay rate across the country tens of thousands of prisoners worked for less than a dollar an hour making everything from food to furniture this doesn't usually get much attention but a couple of years ago protesters showed up at some whole foods stores angry that the company was selling go cheese made from milk supplied by a goat farm inside of prison whole foods stopped selling that cheese npr's dan charles decided to look at what got that cheese company in trouble and at what's happened since when haystack mountain was just a tiny startup company in colorado before it had any connection to prisons the company's founder jim shot was trying to get gross sri stores to sell his goat cheese many wouldn't but whole foods did from the very beginning they wanted to taste the cheese and they wanted to know the story where the trees came from who was making a where was mad jim shot had a great story to tell how he gave up a university job in his fifties to ray as goats on five acres of land i wanted to life where the work i did the people i saw the family that i had that that was all of one piece.

tyson dan charles haystack mountain colorado jim shot lasse greece founder thirty five year five acres milk
"dan charles" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"dan charles" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That the harm bees in the real world on farms so richard pie wealth from the center for ecology and hydrology in the united kingdom organized a field study hit with across three european come true for that we hungary germany the united kingdom home thirty three commercial foam photos unprecedented in cairo it was also partially funded by companies that make nieto neck's this week the journal science published the results pie will and his colleagues found that honey bees and wild bees that were living near crops treated with nieto neck's generally did not do as well they had more trouble reproducing colonies were less likely to survive the winter pie will says it's cause for concern there wasn't big exception though in germany bs living near nieto nick treated crops digits fine we think the hugo really interesting finding pie will says the bees in germany were relatively free of parasites and disease also they were able to find a lot more wildflowers to feed on so there were healthier and the pesticide didn't bother them another nieto next study published alongside pie whilst this week shows that bees near cornfields in canada are getting potentially harmful doses of nieto knicks all summer long and pollen that they gather ambrose i had from your university in toronto says it wasn't pollen from the crops that had been treated with nieto neck's most of the paul at ninety nine percent of the pollen and was actually from wild plants apparently new nick residues in farm fields get dissolving water and then are taken up by the roots of wild plants europe apn regulators have imposed a partial moratorium on new nicotinoid use in the us the environmental protection agencies taking a closer look the pesticides but it hasn't propose any new restrictions on dan charles than pure news.

united kingdom cairo canada toronto dan charles hungary germany united kingdom nieto nieto nick ninety nine percent