3 Episode results for "Damian Tonio Gonzales"

07-19-21 - Creative water solutions

Native America Calling

56:31 min | 2 months ago

07-19-21 - Creative water solutions

"Welcome to native america calling from studio eight six nine in a slow pueblo. I'm taraji would expensive multimillion dollar water infrastructure projects. It's all many of the drinking water xs problems for you to nations but those are out of reach for many tribes that's why nonprofits universities and other groups are coming up with innovative and sometimes experimental water projects to provide native communities and individuals with safe drinking. Water join us as we talked about some of these water projects right after national native news. This is national native news. I'm antonio gonzales. The rosebud sioux tribe in south dakota welcomed home the remains of children who died more than one hundred years ago at the carlisle indian school in pennsylvania native youth and their mentors repatriated the remains from carlisle last week and escorted them home. A four hour. Service was streamed online saturday where people gathered at the tribes college quilts photographs and other items line. The front of the gym for each of the nine children brought home. The service included speakers songs an honoring before the remains were escorted out to the burial site by native youth veterans and the community. They were placed in graves in buffalo robes and buried on the rosebud reservation. The california assembly approved a resolution last week supporting us interior secretary. Dept holland's indian boarding school investigation which will identify boarding school sites and locate burial grounds. Hr sixty was introduced by native american assembly member. James romo's the. Us initiative follows. The discovery of remains in canada at sites of former residential schools. Romo says holland's investigation will help and the generations long guessing game about what happened to those who did not return from boarding school. His measure was approved on a bipartisan. Voice vote tribes that run child support agencies may soon get help collecting past due. Child support. Kale c. c.'s. Brian buhl reports on the bill sponsored by us senators. Ron wyden and john thune the. Us senate has just passed the bill which lets the sixty native american tribes of child support agencies access. The federal tax refund offset programme to collect past due money. Senator wyden says this is what state agencies already do. Legislation empowers tribal agencies with the same tools as have to ensure non-custodial. Parents are meeting their child support. Obligations this is about fairness for our tribes through the program. The treasury department can withhold a tax refund of a non custodial parent if they oh past due child support and senate to the child support agency to disperse to the family. I'm brian bowl. They canadian government recently announced an action plan on the recommendations of the national investigation into missing and murdered indigenous women and girls down carpet. Chuck has more. The long awaited plan offers a framework developed by a large group of partners that include the families of victims and survivors each of the country's distinct indigenous groups and the federal provincial and territorial governments. There are several steps that all partners have agreed to make priorities as the foundation for a more comprehensive plan. They include funding for survivors and family. An oversight body with investigative powers to represent the interests of families survivors and indigenous communities a public education campaign. That also includes trauma informed training for those who work with indigenous people. The action plan is getting a mainly positive response. Michelle debt is a former commissioner of the missing and murdered inquiry. And when i saw a few of the suggested are goals that they're proposing for me transparency ability and making sure that we have several or different bodies where i can put my complain. Or i can go to a tribunal or there's an indigenous ombudsperson i was like finally we have something there that the indigenous organization or leadership will have to work with all levels of government. A more in depth strategy will be developed in the future with more specific priorities. Also there is no dollar amount or funding commitment but that is expected to be included in next steps. The native women's association of canada walked away from the action plan saying it was fundamentally flawed and the process to get done was politically motivated for national native news. I'm dan carpenter and damian tonio gonzales. National native news is produced by broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting support by the nsf railway proudly supporting the nation's economy by moving the goods that feed supply and power communities across the country more at d. n. s. dot com slash tribal relations support by the sonata chambers law firm championing tribal sovereignty and defending native american rights since nineteen seventy six with offices in washington. Dc new mexico. California and alaska native voice one the native american radio network. This is native america. calling. I'm tara gatewood coming to you. Live from my homeland. Russia would do navajo citizens. Who live on the reservation or nineteen times more likely to live without indoor plumbing compared to their white counterparts. That's according to a recent report by dig deep and the us water alliance large multi-million dollar water infrastructure projects are not as feasible in rural areas. An individual wells are too expensive for some households so grassroots groups nonprofits in universities are among those stepping in to improve access to drinking water with innovative water systems for individual homes or small communities. We'll talk about some of the water projects and khalid a machine that pulls gallons of water from the air in. You're welcome to join the discussion today to. Are there any small water projects that are bringing water to your home or people in your community. Give us a ring. tell us about it. We're at one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. That's also one hundred nine nine native and today we're gonna start off in hard rock arizona with us on the line is germane simonson and she is the owner of rocky ridge guests in market and she is donate. Thank you for joining us for another native america. Calling germain welcome. Oh yeah they got a Jermaine simonsen shift out chips in ensler thoughts as the sun and buster's team ted. This gives another though. Key on the duchy auto. Thank you good afternoon. My name is jermaine science then I am the owner of rocky ridge. Gas marquette and i reside in hardrock arizona and hardrock chapter is one of the hundred and ten chapters located on the navajo nation. Thank you thank you and of course. Welcome and so. Tell me a little bit about an innovative way. Wonder is coming to people who are frequenting your business as well as the area. Tell me a little bit about something. Special yes so We Within the past year Somewhere in the midst of the pandemic We were coached by then Arizona state representative orlando teller Wanting to know if we could partner with Another the creator. The makers of water gen To install a water. Jen machine and of course we have no idea what this is or even what it does Except that it. You know produces water. It makes water out of the air And so after a long year of going back and forth and you know it you know. It wasn't always easy because we're dealing with international company as well And defend them and not being able to see each other. So just you know through phone and you know what however ways zoom We were able to finally install the very indiv- june and turned onto machine beginning of july and Since then we've produced probably a couple of hundreds of Gallons of water from the machine and We've had a variety of curious. People come by To taste the water and take water and it's been real interesting in so definitely. It sounds like an innovative way to address Water shortage and jemaine. Can you tell us a little bit of of how it works. You don't need to go deep into the science but generally your understanding and in what they've told you of what is going on with this machine go ahead So what is going on with. The machine is is. It's taking Water from the air. And so i'm i'm still trying to understand all of this So there's you know folks who say well you need you know good humidity and then there's You know the creators of water jen and worked in places. Where and they you know. We're pretty certain work here because they have located in other places where we have about the same amount of humidity And so you know we so. We were skeptical going into it whether it would work because we felt like we had no humidity And so we You know went. We installed it You know so basically. The water is cold from the air And and The way understand it. The the more humid the better But you know we've we set up at a time when there was no you know no clouds no humidity and it did produce water which was really amazing. And so the golden question. What does it taste like if he uses very good it. We it's a has a little sweet taste I you know. I think the first couple of people i sent over where my mom and my aunt and my my dad And coal them. I heard the water. Jen has we my husband. And i were traveling at the time And we called home and you know. He put the final Electric power up. Whatever you know. I i don't know the language to this what he did but He finally plugged it in. And then right after we left for a week. Long trip So while we were gone you know one day we call back then my son to check the machine And he said yeah it's got water produce letter and so right away so my mom my aunt and my my son over to go check it out take some water Taste it and so from what. I understand though the gen m machine which is what we have It it it feels and mineralized as the water So it is it is delicious. it's very good And you know. I kept drinking when i went finally went When we return from our trip. I went and drink them and it was. It was really good. The water comes out clear. It is very good at the time That i went out there. Mr donovan cantero. From that time. And and i think he ran an article this past week But he showed up and he wanted to also see for himself because we had a lot of people who were skeptical and I even saw one comment. I see green water. Hose behind your machine but anyway So that was funny but he came out and he you know. Check the machine for awhile and pasted the water and he kept refilling his water bottle and he said this is so good. This is really good. And and so i think Any case that will tell you it is very good and so where is it located inside the store or or describe that for me in in about how big is it and people want access it. How do they go about pat. And don't say any prices but tell the how So the machine is sitting In within the store Property except outside So they don't want it covered In any way so have to sit out there out. India open If a pretty it's a good site machine if i don't know what compared to maybe If you have a big lump cooler you know the ones that sit on top of the house I would say about that big. I you know. I'm sure there's specs somewhere But it's it's about in in hike. Maybe it's about as follows me. Which is i'm like five four maybe And so it's a nice size machine And one we have there at the store whole Two hundred and eleven gallon. A there's a holding a container and there and so we haven't sitting on the outside We have yet to establish and that was. I think that was one of the first questions that came out is how much water does it produce an. Is it a solution for a whole community and and the answer is no. It's not a solution for a whole community is a solution. I believe for a household of you know three to five people depending on their water usage and of course we should be all in the in the phase of conservation And live like you're camping as they say so. It's the machine that is not going to produce enough water to you know for so you can take showers for thirty minutes or you're gonna holiday for your life stock a whole bunch of them. It just isn't going to produce that amount of water and multiple house bills If it'll probably comfortably take care of one household This machine and so we have yet to establish you know what we're going to do with the slaughterhouse right now open to the public There are a few curious people that have come by already And we just show them whereas machine is and then you know they wanna take some water they take it and so those are still discussions. We we need to have within. You know the are group To see you know how we would you know distribute it and you know How it besides people coming in selling up their water bottle. You know And so that you know that's something we still have to talk about. In hausa powered. It is power electric power. So i you know one of the reasons that it was set up at rocky ridge market is because This side there. There isn't a lot of infrastructure in terms of buildings out here or even you know electricity. Besides you know electric running to homes which is typically a one phase electric power The only other buildings probably with s three phase power which is what this machine needs as probably the chapter facility. I don't even know if they have three phase Possibly the school. We have a local boarding school nearby. I don't i'm not certain. They have three days either. But this store has three phase power and three phase. Power is but typically They run commercial. industrial facility. needs a little bit of Power to keep it going and it's interesting germain and just hearing from her and this water solution. What are your thoughts. We sure hope you'll dial in one eight hundred nine nine six. Two four eight is a number. We look forward to adding you to the conversation today. So dial in drives are among those dealing with the double threat of forest fires in extreme heat this summer experts warn that persistent hot dry conditions set the stage for a difficult wildfire season in soaring temperatures affect native farmers and others won't talk about fires heat and climate on the next native america calling if you're hurting in your relationship or have been affected by sexual violence. Strong hearts native. Helpline is a no charge. Twenty four seven confidential and anonymous domestic dating and sexual violence helpline for native americans. Help is available by calling one eight. Four four seven six to eighty four eighty three or by clicking on the chat now icon on strong hearts helpline dot org. This program is supported by the national indigenous women's resource center. You're listening to native. America calling interrogate would from little pueblo and we are talking about innovative water projects in native communities today. And do you get your drinking water from a smaller water system. And how long have you been waiting for queen drinking water in your own home. Join our conversation by calling one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native in with us today on the line at a hard rock arizona is germane simonson and she's the owner of rocky ridge guests in market. Our pleasure to heather here also joining us today at flagstaff arizona. Is anne marie just chilly. And she is a northern arizona. University interim vice president for office of native american initiatives in the director for the institute for tribal environmental professionals and she is dna our pleasure to have her here with welcome to native america calling in marie then morning everybody yet been and thank you for the invitation to speak to you all today. I marie chili. And i anthony in all the nation. I am Not what the nazi ancient order jamie west chain on my excuse me agents another and they go to him before i use in the show. Also thank you for I'm also coming from flagstaff. I'd like to acknowledge that thirteen tribes in this region. Consider this land. They could see them. So i'm very proud to be here. And i'm honored to be a guest speaking on water issues. Well thank you for that. And marie and we just heard one solution. That is happening At the rocky ridge guests and market using a water jen machine which is pretty innovative and interesting and marie just knowing that people are reaching for other sources or open to try now new ways of getting water. Clean drinking water to their household or to their community Tell me a little bit about what you understand about the need for drinking water especially there in the navajo nation in why some people are open to innovative ways to meet the needs. Anything you want to share. Thank you yes I would love to talk about an organization. I sit on the board fourth. Call dig and you can go to dig the organization and this The work that i've been doing probably for the last two or three years With them has been extraordinary. They have a navajo. Water project headed up by emma. Roberts the ceo is storage And so and and so. It's been a really great program just to be involved with. They started twenty in twenty thirteen They were looking across the season. Seen that other african countries where Feeling with water issues but one of their donors and we have quite a few we have over. Forty thousand donors for the For the project and and we're very thankful for them but they they alerted george mcgraw. Who's the ceo to the issues on the navajo nation and so When the navajo nation. When we they began looking at the nomination They saw that the issues where the same lack of water access to water and so as we all know. These numbers are. I always heard them. Throughout my life to eighteen thousand homes on the navajo. nation without water was always Wayne on me. I'm a former water rights attorney and so that was always an issue for me. 'cause i thought you know the rest of the world are rest united states i should say has access and and so and we all know and i was raised on my grandmother's property Homestead and she didn't have water so it was hauling water siphoning water being very very critical with how use the waterside was raised that way and so When i started my work with them i was really interested. In just the technology they were using and This year will they raise their money. They go into communities and work with chapters they form alliances. Not only what the chapters but also with now who nation government to then go in and start building these Really great systems Where there's a water tank and then there's new pump it into the house and may have hot and cold water and then they have water delivery system where they bring the water to them so these have all been incredible new development. And when i saw that on my i raised my hand and volunteered. I said whatever i need to do. I love to help you all and so we started working. I started on their board about a year ago. Just depend on the kit and You know depend mic was Incredibly harsh to family and and try not to but we lost so many people in my life and and we dig the was able to continue deliver water. They delivered over just looking at numbers before the pandemic they had three hundred homes that were set up with these incredible systems where they paint and outside big tanks and then when the pandemic hit they brought in you know over two hundred and fifty thousand gallons of bottled water and then they and then they built these suitcases and keep everything outside and the water the twelve hundred and seventy five gallon storage tank. They would keep it outside so everything was outside and they modified and really Stepped up to the issue of lack of water and and they were able to Deliver those types of systems to a thousand four hundred fifty people families. So you know. I think the has continued no matter what has happened. Continue to work and serve the native american community but they also work with other communities outside they work with the appalachian communities they work with the communities in the colonia texas and down in the south. You know people primarily people color who are disadvantaged. Don't have access to water. There's a great report that we put out. I wish we were on like put it in chat but if you look at the deep access to water report you'll find that report. I mean that report you will see that. Nineteen percent native americans are nineteen percent more likely to lack indoor plumbing than any other race. So it's really. It's an eye opening report that we put forward to really get that conversation going and get the advocacy moving forward about why People of color people disadvantaged communities lack access in a first world nation. So you know. I've talked a lot of that. was the opening just. I just wanted to put that out there. That disorganization like many organizations are doing incredible work to help Tribal communities and when that work is received what changes and murray so what changes for each individual. If you can. I was march right before it depends on my i was out in the row Cindy and all the stuff that At incredible team they were out there building the system and it was an older our elderly woman. And you know just it changed your life and one thing. I really really appreciate that no matter the condition of the house. 'cause i've worked at other Nonprofits that houses too old or the houses to in disrepair. We can't do whatever we're going to dig deep this as we're gonna we're gonna serve whatever we reach and so in that community and that one person's like she was an elderly woman who lives alone pretty far off you know i'd probably i dunno say five miles off and no water and she would never get what that's the key she would now. You're forget waterpipe probably because it's too vast and the infrastructure is to is too expensive so you know i was able to watch her that day. Turn on her water There were solar filler. Well and it was just like this to see her and she was like our elders to blushing she was just like he shoot either. How others act very about things but they were incomplete to you know. It was just like so heart warming to know that and then water would be delivered to our house every month and so i was just thinking. Thank god we got to her before the pandemic or you know we. They can't shelter in place. If you're having to go to the store you having to go to all these places just to get water so for me. That was just like okay. I'm on the right path in my life in anne-marie just knowing that you know the importance of these kinds of projects are really showing you know the value especially given what we've endured with pandemic and Definitely people understood what it meant to be able to have this in your home or what it meant to have to still travel a distance to get water and so and marie thinking about everything that i guess is pandemic has covered with the need of the access to clean drinking water. Water that you can use in your home. What do you hope changes so that you know more projects like this can continue or even leading to even bigger projects where huge infrastructure revamps are happening. Any thoughts on on what. Your hopes are for still making change. Thank you for that question. I was just like literally five minutes ago. Speaking to the epa. This around cable. And what i one of my other jobs is. I always advocating to the federal government about Tribal trust responsibilities. You know this is an inherent right that tribes have because of the exchanges that we made many years ago many under duress probably all under duress but these treaty obligations are the foundation To what needs to be brought forward. And i think under this administration. They're hearing that their heating that But we need to be able to show them okay. This is where we need them. And we've done that with the water access report. We've also tried to really getting a lot more vocal about issues in their own communities. And so for me there's over an advocacy part of it I can't go through forever. But i always like i don't wanna step on toes. I think tribes are being very vocal and so in my role. I sit on several advisory committees. I'm always advising them hussein. You need to one. So you're out. What the tribes want. Listen to them and then build programs. That are sustainable. Much longer than just when administration you need to build system because this is a treaty obligations and these are treaty rights that tribe or allow. But they're they have rights too and so wants to try you know get into those conversations and start building those alliances. That's my hope is that they get to see these water programs or whatever programs. They're looking at natural resource programs or home programs really start flourishing because and i hope this administration takes into consideration that it should last more than their administrations. There should be safe guards to protect these prevents because we are we do. How tribal Treaty rights which are much different than state or or any other mini penalty. So that's my hope. Is that during this time. That we have done as ministrations those types of protocols and regulations if you will are put into place indeed and maybe you have some thoughts on that tribal leaders of your out there. We want to hear from you to your thoughts on any of this one. Eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is the number and of course anybody is welcome to call in and join their conversation and just your reaction to what you're hearing today. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is the number also here is germane simonson and germaine definitely wanted to give you a moment to just thinking about what water gent. Your water jen. Machine is doing and the possibility of bringing water to people who were having trouble accessing it especially during a pandemic and thoughts about moving forward. I think i'm gonna share jimmy. Yes certainly so water. Jenner is you know. I i think just one of One of several solutions out there. Of course The machine is making a head ways. i think in other parts of the world So i believe this is the first that up here on the navajo nation. And i think it'll provide within the you know a few more months to come. It'll provide you know some really good data some really good information and of course communities can then proceed And decide what they wanna do. And then i think you know just right now thinking about it. It is costly machine It does require a three phase electric power and we have yet to see are. Wealthy are monthly bill. Probably here the next weeks. We'll see how much it's costing to run the machine but we're also exploring other options like possibly putting it on And so you know as years go technology improves. And sometimes they get a little less costly. So i i think what i i see is You know maybe muller homes or smaller villages. Might you know wanna invest in the water gen And so that's what i were sea In the future. And do you know of any other places. They're on the nomination that are proposing putting one of these machines up no. I don't know of any other place. We had a few people who commented on our facebook story That there are some chapters who wanna look into it but you know they ultimately shy away from the cost Because we had to do some electrical work as well To make this all come together and you've seen how many partners have to come together for this to happen there are at least four to five partners. That came together for this to happen so I think the cost of it might be deterring deterrence for other communities and also just not knowing you know what it's capable of and what electric bill they'll be for seeing and i think we'll be able to provide some of those answers within the next few months very interesting. Thank you for that germain and annmarie any thoughts on other innovative ways that people are bringing clean drinking water to their home to their own water bottle. Any thoughts you know. There's lots of different organizations. That are really because cova A lot of different organizations really stepped into gear you know and Ones out of flagstaff headed the navajo. Hopi one there's also Several if you look online you just and look if you want to support a particular one. Maybe there's one that goes to your community or one that goes specifically to your Goes to your needs. Whatever you wanna do Th those are different things i know. Dig deep has worked with the navajo community for many years. Now and so. The program is tailored to them and see their needs We i think one of the issues that were constantly looking at our Just how do we make it sustainable. I think that's key when you're working at these types of water project. It's great to bring water in for one day or one week or would month but how do you sustain that for that family. Because they're going to need them every single day every every for all of us who don't live on the nomination who have water that's taken for granted we turn on our faucet and there and so really looking at programs that are sustainable looking ten years into the future for me. That's important when i. When i put money forward are put my time for it. I really look at staying ability aspect you for that in a lot to jump off of today as you hear this discussion and thinking about access to clean drinking water. That's a huge issue. We know for many people in many different places. And we'd like you to weigh in. What is the situation in your area in your own household. And are there initiatives that are being That have launched to try and help bring water to your home or just giving you access to clean drinking water. And what are the reasons why you don't have access. You can share some thoughts on that to. It's a water check in today. We've acquired to anything you have to share with us. You can give us a ring. We're ready for your calls. One eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is a number. We're gonna pause here for a moment but again we will keep these phone lines open ensure hope you'll dial in access to water in your tribal nation. One eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is a number dial in smoking. Gave me copd. Which makes it harder for me to breathe. I have a tip for you. If your doctor gives you five years to live spend it talking with your grandchildren. Explained to him that your ground personnel can be around anymore to share his wisdom and his love. I haven't figured out how to do that yet. I'm running out of time. Copd makes it harder and harder to breathe and can cause death. You can quit for free. Help call one eight hundred quit now. A message from the centers for disease control and prevention. Thank you for tuning in to native america calling. I'm tara gatewood and we are focusing on small innovative water projects that filter water bring water to individual homes in small communities. Call in join our conversation. Tell us about it. There is still time to join our conversation. And also it's a conversation about how people access water in their community. How big issue is it to bring clean drinking water to your own home. Give us a ring. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is a number. We look forward to your calls with us on the line today. Out of flagstaff. Arizona is anne. Marie is chili Who is The northern arizona diversity interim vice president for the office of native american initiatives and the director for the institute for tribal environmental professionals. Also here to from hard rock. Arizona is germane simonson and she's the owner rocky ridge guests in market think Thank you to both of them for being here and you know we got a call. I wanna go ahead and take a call. We have zone on the line in tuba. City arizona tuned in on kgb are thinks they're giving us a ring zoll year on air all right. Let's see can get them back Well we do that. We are going to go to one location on the navajo nation near The reservation border near flagstaff arizona. We have mark sorenson. And he's a ceo the star school and the painted desert demonstration projects. And it's a pleasure to have him here mark. Thank you for joining us welcome. Thank you tara yacht. Everyone i'm I'm glad you gave us a chance to talk about this Small solutions that can help. Our communities are schoo- star. School is An off grid solar powered school on the southwest edge of the navajo nation and we became interested in the water issues because our our name star is an acronym stands for service to all relations and we were noticing some years ago. That most of our elders were not drinking water from the local community wells and when we Ask them what the reason for that was. They said it was discolored and didn't taste good and also we as we looked into a deeper. We found out that there was our snake in the water and so we began working with some hydrologist from tucson to Develop a water filtration system and I hope to be able to tell you about that. System and how we've implemented in communities please expand tell us more well we We're just a small school We had a a school bus that We decommissioned So the water filtration system that we developed with the engineers actually is able to filter out from the water and filter out heavy salts. Those are two of the main problems in our wells Around this area and we were able to take out the seats of the bus and put the water filtration in the back of the bus so the students could actually get involved in the process of being water wires so we were able to drive this bus out to these remote locations. The bus Had solar panels on top so filtration system could run remotely and And we had a great degree of success. We were actually invited to the hopi village of Where they had a severe arsenic problem for drinking water. We took our bus out there and left it there for several months to see if people would really Preferred to have that water filter and right there and they did the elders. The mothers the grandmother grandmothers came around. And and we're very grateful. The water tastes that good. It was clear and of course. We removed the arsenic from from the water. So so it what we've been learning is it's important not only to remove the dangerous chemicals from water but to actually Make sure that water tastes good. Smells good looks good. Because otherwise people won't talk won't wanna drink it so we've been able to do that and We followed up after The village indicated that they really liked. What what it was producing we Through a grant from usda we were able to get A more permanent water filtration system in a shipping container and get it out to the village. And it's there now so we We have realized that even though we're a small school and a nonprofit If we focus in and engage with professionals some university and and from the water The knowledgeable people about water we can and actually help provide a solution to a serious problem. Existing says one thing i wanna point out is across the nation there over five hundred wells And it it's our approach to offer communities away to use the wells that that are now existing and make that water drinkable again in so mark involving the students to especially youth in our future leaders. What was some of very action knowing that they're really helping communities out in a big way with this project with this bus they were really excited about it My question to them was how many of you want to become water lawyers and every single one of them raise their hand. They they want to help You know sometimes. I think students get the from the community that there's nothing they can do. That really will matter. And it's great to see students actually getting gauged and know that what they're doing does matter and matters to their own families to their to their parents to their grandparents and Even though we haven't had children With us in in person since the pandemic began We're we're gearing up now to get another one of these units out into the community and and And we're hopeful that the students will be engaged with again with testing water and providing drinking water. That tastes good to the people that is great and maybe you have been a recipient of some of the benefits of this project if you want to share some thoughts. We sure hope you'll dial in one eight hundred nine six to eight. Four eight is number and let's try our caller again. We have zone in tuba city. Arizona tuned in on cagey biard zoll. Thanks for giving us a ring. Go ahead you're on air. Oh can you hear me now. Yes here you will welcome. Hi thank you yeah. I don't know what happened. I'm kind of in a spotty area. I'm actually hauling water right now In the services a little touchy out. Here i understand and tell me a little bit about what it is. You're working on so. I caught the programming. The lady from the board member from the organizational speaking and we pretty much do what they are doing what they kind of evolved into during the pandemic not knowing that they were doing that or what. Their plans were. System was I started. I live in new mexico. But i'm from tuba city arizona. The two hundred seventy five gallon water tank in the back of my truck hauling water to elders In ship out new mexico area and it just kind of grew from there Noticed a lot of elders out. There didn't have any containers. Large containers were several people living and and trying to get by with five gallon buckets. Old man had about fifteen of 'em so like kind went off and there was donations coming and ended up buying water barrels. So devolved into delivering water barrels remotely For drinking water up the empty barrels filling them up on site and it grew We now it grew into a program that we call water warriors united and we actually get water from the stars. Goes nice to hear I think it was from the doctor. I don't. I'm not sure exactly. It was bad we got markup. Yeah we get our water from the star school. And they're they've been so amazing for us. We been there several times They've just opened the doors for us. And we hall to the loop and killarney lake areas out kind of that way near flagstaff. Zona show basically it turned into Delivery water tanks as well filling up underground sister and tanks Under new mexico side of the navajo nation There are some other contractors that started putting in underground cistern tanks with the cares that money. They built restroom additions. Full bathroom additions and water pumps and all these complete systems My show and actually helped build them for a while and we service them. at times. We also service parts of arizona We have a small fleet as giant dig deep but we are Hundred percent homegrown organization. We started out with the water truck with my truck and water tank. So basically we kind of evolved into this nonprofit. We're called collective medicine. Our website is collective medicine dot net for those who want more information but basically we're not first year we're trying to evolve accordingly Trying to fit in get in where we fit in and we haul water year round haul firewood for elders We all help other organizations with food boxes deliveries donations campaigns. Whatever they might do And i myself. I'm a twenty year journeyman boilermaker. So i went from type. Bullying and power plant maintenance into kind of nonprofit were so it's been a transition but i think our group has done a very good job of kind of adding to help people through the pandemic and getting water where it's needed and we see everything that miss chile. I believe it was spoke about as far as issue. She she's pretty much everything right on the head. So i mean we're all kind of out there trying to do our part as groups as mutually groups and people who are community servants relapse. Well thank you for calling in so kudos to the work you're doing and see that's what a mean when we think about all of this water people doing in the community. That's you want to hear about it. You can share some thoughts with us. One eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is a number you can also email us comments at native america. Calling dot com. Maybe there's an organization a nonprofit are maybe a university that is helping get small water systems in your community or just straight up bringing the water to you Anything to share one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is the number and mark turn to you. Any thoughts are callers. Ol- was that mark any thoughts just after hearing zoll and shout out on your program to Yes i want to say. you know. People like zola amazing and this pandemic is brought out in addition to all the tragedy that these it's brought out the best of some really amazing people like him. You know there. There are so many people who are out there working to help help. The elders in particular and Particularly i think all of us have seen how important this issue of water is especially in the pandemic when As has been said before you know. People can't protect themselves if they have to continually go out and get water and other places so the the amazing volunteer spirit that's happened on the nation Has been really inspiring and we do need to all work together so i i think that We it's what i've seen out of this situation with our nonprofit. We can't just sit back and rely on the government to do everything. Nonprofits have a real role in in Having an immediate impact in community. And i believe we've seen them through the chew the pandemic. Yes time and time again and if anybody does want to get in contact with what's going on there and the star school to help meet the needs of water needs. Is there any context. You like to share mark. Yeah our our our phone number at the schools nine two eight four one. Five four one five seven and We also have a website that indicates what we're doing w w debts are schools out of work But i i also want to say that well Where zoll was talking about that. They come and get water man by group of volunteers from the community and we couldn't do it without the volunteers so you know it. It requires the spirit of of being willing to volunteer so we are looking for volunteers to who are willing to come and help man the well stations so we can actually expand our hours and deliver more water. Well that's great hands up to your volunteers as well. Thanks that mark sorenson of the star school. The painted desert demonstration projects Germain simonsen any final comments with the rocky ridge guests in market. We asked the. We're excited to have this machine at rocky ridge gas market We're We will be learning more about it in the months to come And that And we can be You can either Message us or I believe oh i have. Www dot rocky ridge market dopp rocky ridge market dot com. Where you can send messages to if you have any questions regarding the machines And i am really We'll eat to You know how works other communities and as they're interested so thank you for having me on the show. I appreciate it things. So much and meritas chilly. We've got to wrap things up but of course Contacts and of course again where people can find that report real quick great. Thank you for the opportunity to come on today. You can find the report if you go to dot org or you can also just google water access. Well dig deep water access report. You know in you'll find it and Again it nali highlight the nomination but like many other communities in the united states are dealing with access to water and for me. A water rights attorney. I'm always advocating for the fact that tribes have a right to are we have. We signed treaties many years ago. And we need to fight for those water right and we have to also fight for Are seven generations to come. you know. there's no. There's no reason why are trying to be in this situation so really highlighting those issues for the not only the federal government trouble government but also to work. You have time you can volunteer on any of these nonprofits including we'd be willing to take sure. I know that door is wide open. Well thank you for that. We've got to wrap up. emory chilly. Germain simonsen mark sorenson. Thank you all for being here. I'm tara gatewood. join us tomorrow. As we take a look at the heat and wildfires lee association of american indian physicians and the centers for disease control and prevention remind you receiving the in nineteen vaccination protect you your family and your community and urge you to please contact your tribal or urban clinic to get your cova. Nineteen vaccination if you haven't already more information at a p dot org or cdc dot gov slash corona virus who support this show skilled fash new could go with florida educated papua who took him off. One i've talked up with that for mike. I'm on you insure kids now. Dogs of whom o'clock kiki. We'll we'll geek. Why will want to few feet of him. Centers for medicare medicate. I ship native. America calling is produced in the annenberg national native boy studios in albuquerque new mexico by quantity broadcast corporation and native profit media organization. Funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting with support from the public radio. satellite surf. Music is by brent. Michael davids native voice. One to native american radio network.

rocky ridge germane simonson America arizona tara gatewood flagstaff marie hardrock germain taraji antonio gonzales carlisle indian school office of native american init institute for tribal environme california assembly american assembly James romo Brian buhl Senator wyden brian bowl
12-27-19 December in the News

Native America Calling

59:00 min | 1 year ago

12-27-19 December in the News

"Welcome up to native America calling from Studio forty-nine in Albuquerque. I'm Monica Brain. The number of federally recognized tribes rose to five hundred seventy four in the past few days. He's after decades of work. Congressional action formerly recognized the little show tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana. We'll talk with the tribes chairman. It also young climate activists in Alaska are pushing a climate emergency agenda we'll hear from the reporter who profiled them for high country news and we'll talk with Indian country today editor Martry hint about the year's biggest native news stories. It's our last news. Roundup of the year will be right back This is National Native News Antonio Gonzalez a federal judge has refused to dismiss a lawsuit brought by two tribes against President trump over his permitting of the keystone xl pipeline claiming it violates treaties and the US Constitution the Rosebud Sioux tribe and Fort Belknap Indian community. Unity say federal agencies. Have a duty to consult with tribes in South Dakota during water-management hearings Rosebud official outlined. The lack of tribal consultation Victoria wicks reports. Ben Rod is the Rosebud tribes historic preservation officer during water hearings earlier this month. Rod testified the not energy has not given the tribes adequate opportunity to survey the pipeline route. Here rod is questioned by energy attorney. James Moore was the Rose Foot Sutra. I offered a chance to participate in the development of a programmatic agreement for the Keystone Excel pipeline and the Rosebud. Sioux tribe chose not to participate is at Corona chose not to participate simply because the process had not been satisfied. Get up to that. Point right tells more that the tribe had repeatedly asked for topographical for graphical. GPS MAPS and did not receive them and so the tribe at rods recommendation did not participate. We do not know where this is going. We do not know where it is on the landscape wouldn't what proximity what sites that we hold significant on the day. Rod Testified in South Dakota Federal. Judge Brian Morris Released Easter decision. That Rosebud and Fort Belknap lawsuit could go forward in Montana. Judge Morris denied requests by TC energy and the trump administration to dismiss the tribes arrives claims Morris held tribes own inherent sovereign powers that include the authority to exercise some level of civil jurisdiction over non-indians on their reservations nations fee lands and surface and mineral rights. Morris wrote that Rosebud has sufficiently made its case that TC energy is required to comply with tribal laws for National Native News. I'm Victoria wicks in rapid city. South Dakota thirty three Bison were transferred this week from Yellowstone National Park to the four-pack reservation in Montana and marked the first transfer of female bison to the tribe through current quarantine program to make sure the animals are disease. Free Rachel Kramer with yellowstone public radio reports wildlife managers early Monday morning loaded up fourteen females and their calves along with five balls into a trailer at the Stevens Creek Capture Facility in Yellowstone Rabbi Magnin the fishing game manager for the cinnabon ensue tribes followed the semi truck as it hauled the vice nearly five hundred miles to the Fort Peck. Indian reservation aren't really really great. It's we've always wanted to get female. He called it an exceptional bonus because some of the females are pregnant at the tribes. Get more cavs in the spring Magnan. Inside the new arrivals will spend the next year in the tribes half a million dollar quarantine facility and be tested. Regularly for Bruce Willis a bacterial disease that can cause pregnant bison in cattle and October their fetuses he said the bison will then be sent to a tribe or federal agency trying to boost its conservation. Heard this summer the Fort Peck tribes sent its first graduates. It's of the quarantine program. Five Bison to the eastern Shoshoni of the Wind River reservation in Wyoming nearly five thousand Bison live in Yellowstone National Park and and over half of them test positive for Russillo. Sus there hasn't been a confirmed case of Bison spreading the disease to cattle but wildlife officials. Say this is in large part due to keeping the population -ation from getting too large. The agency Buys Management Team earlier. This month set goals of hunting two hundred to three hundred Bison that migrate out of the park this winter and capturing during another four hundred to six hundred ship to slaughter a park biologist at the quarantine program has space for one hundred ten Bison for National Native News. I'm Rachel creamer in Bozeman Montana and Damian Tonio Gonzales. The national native news is produced by Colonic Broadcast Corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting support by prairie edge DOT COM. Where you can find a full selection of Pendleton Products Traditional Ledger? Art beadwork and quirk as well as a complete line of native books music and movies in rapid city or online at prairie edge dot com. WON'T BE LA FOR NATIVE Americans affected by domestic violence. The strong hearts native helpline offers peer to peer support and resources. It's safe confidential and toll. Free at eight four four seven native program support by the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center native voice one the native American radio network. This is native America Calling Monica Brain to Alaska the native youth activists help push through a resolution at this year's Alaska Federation of Natives Conference declaring a state of climate emergency. We'll we'll check in with a reporter who profiled them for high country news also Indian country. Today's editor Mark Trae Hint will join us for a look back at some of the big native issues news in two thousand nineteen. We'll talk about major supreme court cases. A major land trust issue for an Eastern tribe and the upcoming twenty twenty election can and will catch up with artist Jeffrey Gibson who has Mississippi Band of Choctaw and Cherokee and the winner of a Macarthur Fellowship Genius Award and we're working on getting The chairman of the little shell tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana on with us today they just got federal recognition. So we're hoping to talk with them about that but first let's head to Alaska and talk with trip. Krause trip is the news and public affairs affairs producer for K.. NBA and trip is welcome back to native America Cali trip yeah. It's great to have you okay. So tell us about this. High Country News apiece so It really started back in October with Alaska Federation of Natives Holding Their Annual Convention And basically what happened is Victor Joseph from Internet Chiefs Conference Spoke up in support of a resolution solution to pass these revolutions written at elders and youth which is a conference that precedes Af en but at this conference the elders and youth then then take turns and write their own resolutions and then they get passed on But Victor had basically asked to pass them and gave the floor to the Nash. Peter who's a fifteen year old question and a woman from fairbanks leave now who who read the resolution and it basically asked the the F. N. delegation to pass it to declare climate of urgency and for FM performance. Own Climate Action Taskforce On paper that doesn't sound like a lot But for state who is you know we have about about two hundred and twenty nine federally recognized tribes. Six thousand plus miles of coastline A lot of interior land with animals. Yes oil development so Alaska's really this place where you see Oil Developed Oil gas development And Land Resources and land rights and this was kind of a big deal I don't think a lot of people Picked up on it. You know if you a few people did thankfully high country news dead But it was really spectacular thing to watch this young woman and later her friend Quanta chasing horse who USA seventeen and Lakota and which in who sort of spoke up and gave us really emotional plea About the way climate change has affected their daily lives. Yeah definitely There are some powerful audio from that that We were able able to play on a past show Have you heard from other folks okay. So there was some pushback though to To through this resolution what what kind of pushback was it. Well when you say push-back that kind of has a negative connotation So gentlemen from the Arctic Leixlip Bridge Corporation asked to amend the resolution to incorporate basically development and well oil and writes his concern. was that the resolution would sort of ask and I think he used to work. Handcuff their ability to develop resources. And so when you're looking at the Arctic slope you see community. I mean. That's a huge community credibly large. You're talking north. Slope of Alaska and oil development and and natural resources are a huge part of what drives the Alaska's because the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation to one of the twelve regional corporations and Alaska And so they're sort of guided by creating developing spend revenue for their shareholders And for them they seed. Natural Resources is a beneficial way for them to benefit their luther. People increased revenue. It's a little different in other parts of the state because other corporations have a different economies and they're able to generate revenue that way but Arctic slip really all this this resolution as a way to one handcuffed them but also so Sort of prevent them from developing those resources and they were worried about outside interests coming into the state and telling them how to Basically run their subsistence and Obviously the the north slope is will hunting is a very big being so they were worried about outside interests coming in preventing. I'm from being so Arctic Slope Regional Corporation was really looking for An amendment to that resolution I think there's been some miscommunication on whether or not that is quote unquote opposing that resolution But it did lead to some debate on the floor which is was was pretty powerful In the end Kamanda was turns down. it was voted down and the original resolution was passed Well I mean the thing. News is that Aren't those sort of competing ideas Declaring a climate emergency but then also supporting Oil and gas development. It is but really gets to the crux That's kind of divisive and we could. We could go into you know the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act can nineteen seventy-one And how the sort of credit these these different regions you really have Within the toll regions you have remarkably different rent ideas on how to generate the income and what it means for them to be able to progress as a region and like a lot of federally recognized tribes The native corporations are driven by self determination as well so yeah they get to make that decision It it depends on which side of the fence. You're on if you're you know you WANNA see these original corporation succeed Arctic slope is. Obviously they have an idea of what their their goals are other regional corporations and and tribes might have a different Yeah they may be diametrically weekly on the opposite sides of the fence But in Alaska that that kind of dialogue happens all the time And it really goes to the heart of Alaska Federation original data says about whether the statewide organization that's supposed to represent and advocate for tribal native regional corporations and tribes and villages alleges And so they represent about one hundred and seventy five of the two hundred Twenty Nine federally recognized tribes in Alaska. They don't represent all of them But they're trying to create a policy in which it incorporates as many perspectives as they can and that's part of the convention is everyone it comes together and tries to vote on these things Income to mutual agreement. But there's always there's always the Bay there's always discussion And and not everybody agrees because the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation just recently announced that they're withdrawing from AF en and They said in an editorial to the Alaska Journal of Commerce that endless non-productive divisiveness such as our witnessed at afn convention or not only outside the original intent of AFL offense but they are also distracting from the mission of Arctic Slope. Regional Corporation It some people have been drawing the you you know like that. This debate over the climate crisis was something that led to Arctic slope. Pulling out I mean in editor Oreal they said you know this conflict with. FM has been simmering for a wild well before the less conference. What is your impression of this? Yeah I mean I feel like the Arctic's loopers corporation pulling out is You know a lot of people looked at. FM is sort of aim. Hey Matt defining moment and it was a really powerful moment And it was a really good discussion to have in Alaska But I don't think you know I don't necessarily think that was. It's the final Straw. I think it's RC. was is was planning on pulling out at some point It just happened to be. They through membership goes through two thousand nineteen eighteen And they wanted to pull out at the beginning of the year And that this FM thing it was sort of like you know one more Straw. I guess so to speak but the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation. They really have their own ideas on on how they're going to provide for their people And they just see that as being SAF N not necessarily looking at representing them like they want and It was just an easy decision for them to to to leave. Yeah absolutely well trip were were just about to go to to Break I'm wondering if you might share a little bit about another article you work done They had to do with baby yoga. Yeah so you know like anybody like most news organizations. We wanted to capitalize on The rally maybe iota and so we talked to a few different Alaska native artists who I've been incorporating him into artwork that they've been making to give the gifts Most of everyone I talked to. You is busy and baking Christmas gifts. This was about a week before The holiday and so they were there they were busily making it But it was just really interesting to see how Within Alaska as sort of a a mirror to the lower forty-eight that you know a lot of indigenous people here sort of look at baby otas being they say he's indigenous Eamonn on whether or not you know he might be new PEAC or which but So it was just a really great Conversation with people It was this real Greece into the euro on. Really I love wrapping up on things like that. They just this makes my heart sing and we definitely talked about it on pop culture. Show This this week talking about The many pop culture things in Indian country this year Well if you're just joining us. It's our monthly news. Roundup if you want to join join our conversation give us a call. The number is one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. That's eight hundred nine nine native trip. We've got to break make and we got the chairman on the line. Can you hang out for a few more minutes. I wanted to ask you a few more things. You're working on absolutely all right. Well we've been talking uh-huh Krause trip is the news and public affairs producer for K.. NBA We're gonNA break will be right back. The end of the year is often a time to reflect on people who have come and gone from our lives on the next native America calling. We'll take a moment to celebrate the lives of some notable native people who walked on in two thousand nineteen. Who are you reading this year tune in for the next? We need of America Cali support by MATHEMATICA currently hiring classroom observers to work on the American Indian Alaskan Native headstart family and child experiences survey which gathers information about about the characteristics and experiences of children and families served by head start programs in tribal communities. They're limited positions available. Application deadline. Deadline is January tenth. Twenty twenty information about benefits and application available at careers dot Mathematica Dot Org Aw you're tuned into native America Calling Monica Brain and it's our monthly news. Roundup show if you WANNA get in on. The conversation gives call one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. Let's head to my home. State Montana to talk with Chairman Gerald Grey. He's the head of the little shell tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana. President trump just signed the bill formally recognizing the tribe. Welcome back to native America calling German Gray. Thanks for having me. Ah It's great to hear your voice again. How does it feel to finally be recognized? Oh man it's a great feeling of it was a long long time coming for the little shell people and we're just ecstatic about it. Yeah I can imagine. How long did it take well for us? I mean it really back to the mid eighteen hundreds but it's about one hundred thirty years that we've been trying to get this thing across the finish line. Are you gonNa take a break now. Relax take a nap. No you know what the members are already calling and and we've got a lot of work ahead of us to to do and you know we gotta sensors This doesn't happen that often but in especially for any country And there's no blueprint interest you kind of have to Learn our way through it so to speak week and We're GONNA take our time and and get it right so well for our listeners. Who might not know? Tell us a little bit about your tribe. Yeah so we're the the little shell tribe Where have about fifty two to fifty three hundred members The majority of us are in Montana. We're kind of scattered throughout Montana right now because we don't have a reservation were Montana's only state recognized tribe so there's Eight tribes in Montana now All of us are federally recognized. Yeah it's nice and I mean how did it does chip wise end up in Montana You know so if you look back in the day Chief little shell eighteen eighteen fifty to around that time period so there are no borders And when they had the what was called the ten cent treaty which became mccumber agreement where the federal government wanted to buy Chippewa land mostly was in North Dakota For Ten cents. It's an Acre and chief little shell said no it's worth at least a dollar and he walked out of the the negotiations well. The federal government Had add another person sign. It wasn't Was it shouldn't have signed it. And then they kind of Have held US penalized US ever since the little Shell So at that time after he walked out and walked out negotiations He was with a pick group in Montana. I'm hunting Buffalo. So that's how we ended up here so you know you mentioned that the you what you're GonNa take your time and and things like that and one of the things that we're GonNa talk about later in the show today is Supreme Court decision precision that determines when tribes can put land into trust. Is it is there a possibility for for the tribe to be able to land into trust. Trust now or Will you will you just have to sort of buy up land No Way Uh We'll be able to do that. You know definitely in our bill. It was You know at least two hundred acres for to Start a reservation but it was also where we could put that into trust but you know the little shell. Tribe has been very self sufficient for the last hundred and thirty years. We've had to you know do our thing and get by. We're one of those economically if there's land available uh-huh purchasing it and they're Atlanta. We'll always be tech fans so of course. Is there a possibility for getting into gaming aiming you know that's Was We never had said no to that. which is a good thing? There could be but Montana. There's so many smaller casinos You know right now that For us it's not something would look got maybe down the road ten years from now or so we've got some other economic benchers were looking into that better more promising than casino. Air Montana Yeah no I understand. There's a different class of gaming Available in Montana and there's some sort of predictions about whether or not that's profitable Just with the type of gaming that's available Ah What will you be able to accomplish now with Federal Recognition Chairman Gray. So I think the first thing I mean the biggest thing for us this was you know it was writing wrong. It's about for the little. Shell people that was huge You know now what will it opens the door for more grant opportunities that we have access to as federally recognized tribe in not just a state recognized tribe and then I think the first and foremost thing thing is they will provide some healthcare For a members because here Montana native Americans We were dying nineteen years earlier than are non native counterparts. So I think we I think we can do better than that and offer some more preventive initiative healthcare so we can Reverse those numbers for us to start its own clinic or Now now your members will be able to to go to another types clinic. You know. That's one thing where we'll be meeting with IHS right away after the first year to determine that and also the way to Try to map this thing out but you know my hope is is that two hundred acres that will get will probably be around the great falls area. 'cause that's where the majority of membership live but we're not all going to pull up our homes homes and move them onto two hundred acres so for my vision is to have that as Travel Office Complex The clinic or hospital spital and I'd really like to Start a trade school here Montana for for Indian people because we have a lot of two year four year colleges already well. We don't have very many trade schools and I think that'd be a better opportunity to fit a need that You know a lot of Indian. People are good with their hands in terms of carpentry urban tree of plumbing trillions mechanics. That that sort of thing. Yeah I vote that you also get a radio station and maybe start start training folks on radio a I think that would be a good idea. It's wide okay. Now you know so many possibilities with your federal recognition. It's pretty great Who supported your efforts along the way so so you know we've had a everybody has to be honest with you except for one person and Congress? Mike Lee didn't and that was the infant. Miss One vote talk show by last year that he didn't he voted. No but Here in Montana Senator testers Senator Dame's Congressman GM Forte Governor Bullock. Tim Fox All of the Montana tribes of supported us. So we've we've had I mean I can honestly it's hard even named one person that hadn't supported us or or anything like that. It's been just a tremendous amount of support for process and you had pursued both avenues through the interior as well as the Congressional Avenue. Is there anything that you would change about this process. Oh yes yeah definitely I mean honest with you. I mean it's ridiculous you said it it takes so long and it's so cumbersome What's office federal acknowledgment? It's still a broken process Kevin Washburn when his assistant secretary he did try to change the rules to make it a little bit easier because there are so antiquated and and then they did change it. But I think there needs to be So some kind of better standards in terms of The timeline would be nice because you could Partition and you could remain in that process for decades which is wrong and sometimes of have petitioned and become tied led to recognize what you know five hundred two thousand documents ours is over Last I heard over one hundred thousand pieces the paper that we submitted For proof and we're still nuts still sitting in that you know if if this route through the congressional Gresh away well well Chairman Gray. Congratulations thanks so much for taking the time to talk with us today. We really appreciate it. Of course I thank you for having me on. Yeah absolutely and if you're just joining us it's our money news roundup if you want to get in on our conversation gives call one eight hundred nine nine six two who eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native. Hey let's go. Let's take a call. Melvin Zinn santee Nebraska tuned in on K. Z. Y. K.. He didn't like to say congratulations little. Shell people there long effort to get federal recognition condition I see episode. Glad to hear good things day. I do a lot of work I used to and Long Island state recognized tribes and Shit they got recognize. Tuck are there yet but for the longest time they didn't want federal recognition. They were just doing fine as a state. Thank record hikes. Try and now. They're looking at looking at that role. But congratulations to show people. This is news day. You know the elections are coming up. It's very important that native people turn Out but you know eastern Missouri River Majority of eighty people that live out there and have casinos. The workers are not native. We need to get those guys to get are casino. Workers time off so they can go wherever they want. But we need to get out and we got a large voting bloc with our workers we just state it up through to to vote Pie. That's a good idea and Melvin. I hadn't heard that I hadn't heard that efforts of in terms of getting out the vote so that's great. Thanks thanks so much for giving us a call and always tuning in Melvin. It's always great to hear from you and I want to go back to trip. Krause US just for a few more questions Trip voting in an Alaska. That's a big topic hot topic. Yeah absolutely absolutely And Alaska's actually really interesting so because of the PSC which is the the the money that you you quote unquote get for living here when you apply for the you actually apply to register to vote as well So I'd be interested in looking at the numbers on how Alaska ranks with voter registration But with the PF D. I would imagine it's it's pretty high up there but yeah you know voting every year You know election cycles is as well as a really interesting time to be in Alaska. Yeah Definitely I. Also I know there's definitely efforts is to Legal efforts to make sure that the ballots are in you pick. I think it is and possibly another Alaskan native language which which is so important for for some villages to be able to read in their in their first language also trip. You're working on a piece about food. Sovereignty tell us about it. Yeah so Here in Alaska it. It's you know I live in Anchorage. which is a You know pretty decent sized population really big urban centers. I can go to the grocery store and get milk or bread Riva fresh produce and sometimes I take for granted but when you live in a village Some of these places will pay you know seven twelve thirteen dollars for a gallon of milk And that's just the reality of shipping costs And how you know. I hate to use the word remote. Because I don't think the remote they're just really separated from A lot of the shipping hubs that they in turn end up taking on that cost in Perthshire stores I if they even have like decent grocery stores a lot of them have You know package things or can things. Things filled preservatives. Sugar's a really big issue And a lot of areas but there are some interesting villages and tribal organizations. Who are working together to work toward Better Food Security In climate change is affecting that. Because it's changing population migration of animals. I'm all that's changing Subsistence calendars so like blackberries might be In season earlier which is problematic. Because if the Berry Jason Intercedes with like fishing season and you know families have to make a choice. Do they do want to do the other. Do they split up And so so those two issues that cost of of groceries and Sort of climate impacting food is creating security issues But there are really great initiatives that are going on You know we were in September. And they've got this great community garden then That's going on there able to grow their own tomatoes and Pumpkins and are able to sort of use that in conjunction with Getting their food and it's really creating this Really Amazing Culture in which they're they're creating their own food sovereignty and so there are are basically the ones that are in charge of you know what foods that they're getting and it's really empowering the community there are several other communities throughout On the State of Alaska that are doing similar projects There are some larger community organizations. That are are helping people Put them in touch with the right people to create these programs. So it's it's it's really interesting story. Yeah I love food sovereignty and particularly in Alaska anything anything to do with like subsistence hunting and fishing and learning more about How folks feed themselves in Alaska? It's just I don't think we have nearly nearly enough of that on this show and I guess my my resolution for twenty twenty is to do more food sovereignty shows and talk about this issue a lot more trip trip anything else. You're hoping to work on in two thousand twenty not really. Yeah I mean well there is. There's a there's a lot I mean the census is going to be a big story There are going to be a number of stories that come out of the census And that's for Alaska because the enumeration begins January and Tix Bay So there's GonNa be a lot of different things going on But most importantly understood really interested in. You know making sure that you know in we. We have more native people who go into journalism whether that's Radio Prints TV Web And I'd like to see more native journalists and I'd like to you know see more or Alaska native journalists and more more native journalists in Alaska because there are there are a lot of stories here And in my opinion they don't get told the right way unless we call them so here here. Our next guest mark trae hand has a few words to say about that as as well well. It's our news roundup today and if you WANNA get in on the conversation give us a call. The number is one eight hundred nine nine six two two eight four eight. That's eight hundred nine nine native and If there's a new story that you would like us to cover on this show send us an email to comments. It's at native America Calling Dot Com. Thanks so much to trip for joining us today and we go to a short break. Native Americans affected by domestic. Violence can call the strong hearts native helpline offering free confidential support and resources. Strong hearts takes calls else from anyone hurting in their relationship or who may be concerned for someone else available seven. AM TO TEN PM central time seven days a week at eight four four seven seven native. That's eight four. Four seven native more at strong hearts helpline dot. Org Program support by the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center. uh-huh uh-huh Sir Ah Ooh you never junior uh-huh you're tuned into native America calling I Monica Brain And I just want to say thank you so much for listening to our show today today. We really appreciate it. it's so great to be able to Have our listeners Tune in every day and listen to our show. We really appreciate that Joining us now is mark trae hand. He's the editor of Indian country today and he is Shoshoni schone bannock welcome back to native America calling mark. Thanks Monica Happy New Year Happy New Year. We haven't talked to you in like six months. What have you been busy with? Oh I We're growing so fast that we're just trying to keep up with everything We moved to Phoenix during the slashed year. we're about up to almost double the size of our staff. Are Anchorage Bureau. V fully operational in two weeks It's just a really exciting time for us. Yeah I I wanted to talk to you about that. Because trip was mentioning wanting to have more Alaskan native journalists same Alaska. And you know that's something that's near and dear thirty your heart absolutely and I probably shouldn't announced this on the show because It should come in in India country today but Jacqueline estes. It'll be our national correspondent anchorage. Oh that's fantastic. That's great to hear. Well you heard it first here on native American colleague. Oh we are not in competition with Indian country today. Marc all right big news year. Lots lots of things happening. Let's talk about the Murphy case I it's it's I think it's called Murphy versus sharp now but it was originally Murphy versus carpenter. Tell us a little bit about it right. It involves jurisdictions and whether or not the boundaries of Muskogee Creek nation apply within Oklahoma Hulme and It's interesting because in one sense. It's a very big case in another sense. It's not Jonah Dev the title. Right but ambassador to the nation said that because of the way that the tribe and the stay works on multi level agreements that. It's going to be fine no matter what happens win or lose and In a way some of the hype hype about it. overplays what is happening on the ground. The way tribes are now working with states in a much more collaborative way particularly when it comes to law enforcement forcement. That's what I heard you the feedback that when we were working on a show about it was that you know like there was a New York Times headline that said something like I. Half of Oklahoma could be returned to native Americans or something like that and there was some pushback on on headlines. Lines like that because it was misinterpreting. What would actually happen in kind of hyping up people's fears about it and wasn't return of land at all? Anyway it was about your sticks and who prosecuted which crimes and again. That's something that's worked out on that level On by people on the ground in most cases right we did a show on this June twenty fifth. We were hoping that the Supreme Court would have a ruling on it and That did not happen because the Supreme Court decided to hear the case again is is. It's my understanding that's pretty rare. But they're gonNA listen to it again and Come up with arguments one Well we'll see. I mean they have scheduled the argument. So it'll be interesting to see where they go from there. I read something that that it sounded like. The court was split evenly for four because one One judge had to recuse himself from from the case. So that's way they didn't want to have like a split ruling on it right and that certainly is an option because court the court does come up with split rulings all the time. I four two four one. One judge is absent Having gorsuch weigh in on the case probably is a good thing for Indian country though because of all the members of the court he has more more significant experience and engine law than just about any other justice. Yeah Yeah let's talk about the Mashpee and end their situation with trying to get land into trust right well as you were mentioning earlier in the show. There's a real contradiction where the interior arment has has taken a pretty firm view that Based on Supreme Court decisions that tribes that were in existence with a recognized government before nineteen thirty four within reorganization act was passed. They can't take land into trust for them and It's really created a huge dude hole. In terms of how CIA tribes are able to do economic development particularly those ones that are moving into different areas. The the irony of course in all of this is that we're not talking about land that wasn't in the country before it's just this narrow window it wasn't engine country from whatever date to nineteen thirty four asserts. A pretty narrow great time and it was the Supreme Court case that determined that that is guiding the That the cartridge criteria case is that right trick and but even then interior took a much more literal view of the case than most of them in a aw community. That's we had a show about that on the nineteenth and on June twelfth. If you WANNA learn more about that situation do you. Are you at all optimistic. That mashpee will be able to You know that something will change or that. Maybe the Congress will pass something to do a cartoon fix. I think Congress would be the most likely place for that to happen and I don't think the votes are there yet for it and it plays into a lot of Indian provision. But there's this new element in Congress that is let's just say anti-tribal and they are reluctant to move on things whether it be the violence against Women Act or this where the perception is that it's giving tribes jurisdiction over non Indians. Yeah but I mean we just had little shell got recognition in the president signed it into into law and I think he was saying that there was only one person who voted against it. You'd get getting their recognition right. That's a really great I guess the craziness of Congress were that it can happen yet if it involves non-indians that's where you get the pushback right like it's okay for little shell to sort of have their own jurisdiction juristiction but the as soon as they start building their own courts or Prosecuting people who aren't native in their own courts than than we have the problem exactly and I think where you really see this right now again. Is Oklahoma and this idea that the current governor of Oklahoma. So let's pretend this is not involving native Americans right now and if a major industry say Microsoft or Amazon wanted to come to Oklahoma the state would doing everything possible to get them there to keep them there whereas you now have. This industry tribal gaming that has created thousands of jobs pays the state Tens of millions of dollars a year and more than one hundred billion dollars and yet the governor is trying to eliminate it or get more money out of it and shut it down. It's really amazing and it. But it gets to this strain of this real anti-tribal attitude dude popped up in the body politic. The last couple of years you know. I don't know if the governor is trying to eliminate it my impression reading the situation is that The governor is trying to get more funds for from the tribes from the Revenue Sharing Agreement Agreement for the state and he's presenting it as this is what's good for Oklahoma not necessarily like I'm going to shut this down because I don't agree with this but he's willing to shut it down and cut off the economic assets or at least you threatening to which is what's extraordinary. Yeah again again. You wouldn't see this in any other area. I mean if Microsoft they would be saying you're GonNa do this else or leave the state but yet this it's really pervasive Do it our way or else. We had some legal experts on December nineteenth show about that and they were saying that it doesn't it doesn't even make sense because or not that it doesn't make sense but that's not what's actually going to happen because the it's up to the federal government to shut down the casinos and and the principal cheat the principal. Chief of the Cherokee nation also came on and said the same thing like back. It seems like the governor. It was like an exercise in futility. Or because they're not shutting down on on January first. No No. We'll see that next week. They're definitely not going to shut down. And and what is a stake in the do rent a blockade. They can't it's not it's not their jurisdiction to do anything. Well Yeah I remember if they tried to do a blockade. That's what they're trying to Arizona What twenty five years ago and and there was that day where they tried to come in and get slot machines and pick up for blocking the driveway for to make sure that no trucks could get through to pick ups lawsuits so these are disputes? That happen I mean over time but the rest of the country has figured this out and it's like the Oklahoma governor's in this time warp of trying to put back state paramount in an era. That no longer has that instead of working on collaboration. Yeah Yeah it's interesting and the the governor is in fact a citizen of the Cherokee Nation As well it's definitely an issue. We are going to keep a close eye on here at native America calling. Okay mark we gotta talk about. Oh there's so many other things big big news you know that happened this year So what else do you think we should focus on. Well it's funny because we can. Wow we're GONNA at least have a week where things slow down. This last week was crazy and then the next next week is just as good can. We don't get everything so it seems like that for the year ahead is going to be I. I think the election is going to be huge. We already are seeing. We're GONNA popish our list shortly more congressional candidates than we've had before you have a race in New Mexico Where you're going to have multiple Native candidates both in the House seat in the Senate seat in the two primaries More Republicans running across the country. which is going to be the interesting to see the messages they carry Climate Change continues to be one you mentioned earlier in the show I'm working on a major piece. It's GONNA run right after the first of the year Twins transportation is twenty nine percent of us emissions and yet it doesn't get the same Attention than other areas would see talk about a factory or Particularly coal mines but the ordinary stuff we do. Every every day is what really contributes to the climate and yet having those individual actions changed in a way that produces results. It's very difficult for governments Tribes are actually starting to get in this with more and more applications or transportation programs where Tribal Communities Minis are looking at whether it'd be buses or other. Alternative means micro. Transit is the big one where people can get rides to places so they don't have to take a car everywhere work. Yeah that's something. I'm definitely really interested in following. Also you know one big thing we're going to be looking at this. Year is Igwe and From what some are saying is the slow erosion of tribal sovereignty with these case after case after case challenging the constitutionality of the Indian Child Welfare Act. What are you watching for mark? Well definitely In Child Welfare actors a huge huge issue. That's going to continue tinge play out and to me. One of the great ironies in that is that Barry Goldwater was a champion of tribal rights and was someone somewhat in fact when There was he gave about a two hour test. On the importance of tribal religion without notes notes on the return of Blue Lake and just talk from his heart in the Senate floor for two hours and yet the Goldwater Institute that carries cherishes name is out trying to undermine probably what's the most fundamental aspect of tribal futures and that's our young people and making making sure that they have tribal communities and cultures part of our upbringing. I it's just it's something you have to watch closely closely because it just seems to me that They they the case after case has been really kind of looking around for a judge their degrees with them. And they'll find a judge who doesn't and then there'll be another case and another jurisdiction We'll see because it was ruled unconstitutional in Texas And then it was overturned. And then it's going to be Heard again and so we'll be following that carefully mark So one of the things that was a big at the beginning of the year was This incident with Nathan Phillips and the students from Covington Catholic The thing that I noticed is that there was a libel suit that was against the Washington Post that was dismissed and just recently reinstated and The libel suit against CNN NBC. I have you been watching that closely right and again. This is the case of judge shopping where they were looking for the right court to bring it back We were I mean it was one of those situations that it really blew up And there are so many stories over the air that we think. We're really significant that we did that. We worked really hard on yet of all the stories from this last year that particular one had more readership than any story. We've touched differently so I've had the first round of stories had one point seven million hits. Wow what a way to start the year did you end up did and The did you have a libel suit against you. Further for your coverage of it. We did not knock on wood We're fortunate in that respect. Well I we're just right at the end of the Hour I noticed an announcement You have a new president of Indian ending country. Today we do more and more. We're shifting to be our own independent nonprofit and Because it's a phone company. We appointed Karen. Lincoln can Michelle to be the company's first president and she will be running the entire business operations We now have bureaus in the anchorage in Washington. DC and Phoenix is our headquarters. But we're going to be continuing to build our capacity in the country Indian country today doing big things thanks to mark trae hint. Thanks so much for joining us. Let's have you back again next month. We'll we'll check in and check on on that election looking forward to seeing your reporting on this election year. Thank you so much to everybody else. Who joined our show today in particular killer? Thanks to chairman Gerald Grey and trip krause. We're back on Monday with the show remembering those who have walked on in two thousand nineteen are executive producers reducers Art Hughes or Hostess Tear Gatewood Are Associated Producers. Andy Murphy Reno. Spencer is our engineer. Nola Dave's Moses is the distribution director and Bob. Peterson is the network manager for native voice. One Clifton Chadwick resource development specialist into the anchor and producer for national native news. Charles say there is our our chief of operations. I'm senior producer Monica Brain. We'll see you soon support by dream. Spring bring a nonprofit community lender for over twenty five years dream. Spring has been increasing access to business credit for entrepreneurs across New Mexico Arizona and beyond dream spring offers loans for self employed entrepreneurs startups and large established enterprises information about flexible credit requirements affordable rates and and customized lending available by calling eight hundred five zero. Eight seventy six twenty four or online at dream. Spring Dot com down contained Costa Christie Society could do say if he deigned she's tenure in dot the Clinton Healthcare Kor Need Kadarshian East Talk. He saw you okay. Attiyah Healthcare Dot Gov Katiba Span Ca. Two two one eight hundred three one eight two five nine six cookie Medicare and Medicaid services. GW Houghton breath. 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06-08-20 Coronavirus concerns disrupt Native meat suppliers

Native America Calling

56:30 min | 1 year ago

06-08-20 Coronavirus concerns disrupt Native meat suppliers

"Welcome to native America calling from Studio Forty nine. In Albuquerque. I'm Tara Gatewood. Outbreaks of Covid, nineteen among people working in large processing plant are a health risk and reports aides slowing down production. This situation is also causing problems for some native producers cattle ranchers. And it's having an effect on what consumers have available at certain stories coming up, we're going to hear about the challenges in the food supply chain as more people navigate the endemic. We live right after national lead of news. This is National Native News Antonio. Gonzales the Mashpee womp og tribe, the National Congress of American Indians and the United South and eastern tribes are urging the Department of the Interior to reaffirm the status of the Massachusetts tribes reservation after a federal court, Friday ruled in favor of the tribe. The Interior Department had intended to disestablish the tribes reservation. The US District, court for. For the District of Columbia found the Interior Department's two thousand eighteen decision. The tribe did not qualify under federal jurisdiction was arbitrary, capricious and contrary to law in a statement Chairman Cedric Cromwell said the court righted. What would have been a terrible injustice and committed to fight if necessary to ensure their land remains entrust as the interior department is ordered to reevaluate its decision. Minnesota Department of Health. Officials say they're increasing the amount of COVID, nineteen testing among people who have attended protests over the death of George Floyd Melissa Townsend reports. Thousands of people have been gathering together across Minnesota for nearly two weeks. Floyd was an African American man who died after a white police officer knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes. Health, officials say these gatherings put many at risk for contracting covid nineteen. Mario and is a at physician and head of the center of American Indian and minority health at the University of Minnesota Medical School in Duluth while I'm really fearful of impact. The protests are going to have on rising rates of Cova and I have to admit. I went down to one of them myself because they just felt like they needed to be there. And also just let African American people in particular. Know about the solitaire. But I do worry Minnesota's Commissioner of Health Jan. Malcolm says her department will step up testing. The coronavirus takes about a week to incubate so Malcolm is encouraging people to get tested about a week after they'd been at large gathering for national. Native News. I'm Melissa Townsend. The Canadian government has delayed its promised National Action Plan to tackle systemic racism, facing the country's indigenous people down carpet has more recently announced the delay in implementing the plan because of the covid nineteen pandemic, the plan followed last year's inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women and girls. That inquiry presented its final report in June, and it concluded that decades of systemic racism and human rights violations had contributed to hundreds of missing. Missing in murdered indigenous women and girls over the years, Sheila North is a former grand chief of northern Manitoba. She says she's disheartened. By the delay in the action plan against systemic racism, north also takes exception to comments made by at least one Canadian political leader that systemic racism does not exist in Canada as it does in the US I go meet that the mothers and the sisters and family members of the ones. Ones that have been taken a very very sensitive and touchy subject, and for people to be blatant, and to be so dismissive like that is just reminiscent of what they've been dealing with for many generations and very hurtful to here, and it's very concerning to know that this this kind of thinking still persistent Canada North says indigenous people make up just over four percent of the Canadian population, but more than twenty four percent. percent of the country's prison population. She says there are parallels in what's happening to black Americans and indigenous Canadians. Especially in their interactions with police, she says the biggest difference between the two countries is that the death of George? Floyd was caught on camera. She adds racially motivated. Incidents take place daily to Canada's indigenous people, but out of the public's eye for national native news. I'm Dan Kerpen. Chuck and Damian Tonio Gonzales. National Native News is produced by Broadcast Corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting. It's the circle of life that teaches us to take care of each other to use our voice when we are in need like the circle of life, there is an opportunity that comes around every ten years a chance to participate and let others know who we are, and where we are the twenty twenty cents, this will be our opportunity to shape our future for generations to come shape our future start here learn more at twenty twenty cents a stock G. O. V. paid for by US Census Bureau. Native won the native American Radio Network. This, is native America calling I'm Tara Gate. Would have you heard about me? Processors having a hard time getting back to pre Karuna virus production levels because of the potential for infection outbreaks among their employees. In May the Centers for disease, control and Prevention reported nearly five thousand covid nineteen cases in more than one hundred meat processing plants across the country. That put a pause and some meat production, and the effects of that are affecting cattle, ranchers, and the availability of meat in certain stores distance despite President Donald Trump's executive order requiring meat processing plants to remain open. Many plants have limited operations because of the outbreaks. In this hour we'll talk about current food supply chains, and how some tribes are working to adjust, you can join us to. Are you concerned about your food supply chain Are you a farmer rancher? Who is feeling the effects of covid nineteen? Give us a call at one eight hundred. Hundred nine, six, two, eight, four eight, and does your tribe operate at culture businesses? Are you creating your own food sovereignty by growing a garden or keeping chickens for the first time because of covid nineteen? If you want to join us, our phone lines are open. The numbers, also one, eight, hundred, nine, nine, native and today. We're GONNA. Start off in Eagle Butte South Dakota. We Have Zach do show. He is the executive director for the Intertribal Agricultural Council, and he is Cheyenne River Sioux our pleasure to have him here with us. Today Zach Welcome. Thank you good to beer. Insect tells a little bit about how covid nineteen has affected your operations. From the organizational standpoint, our operations, most of our work happens at the producers. or at conferences, so we've had to really real back in our our conference attendance and our workshops that we hold. So. That's been challenging to to make those connections where we're out there. Providing the curriculum that we've spent the last three decades building help improve food systems. From the perspective of AG producers all across the country. The the effects of coded and pandemic. Really, are just laying bare the underlying problems that we've existed. With, since the since four beginning in fourteen, ninety one we, we have an inherently fragile and unsustainable food system. And are are Indian country it food economies are. Microcosm of that. My reservation here, the Cheyenne River Sioux we grew forty to fifty thousand head of the best beef cattle in the country every year. Are Tribal. Grocery store was rationing hamburger. because. We couldn't get enough from our suppliers. So we're. We're existing within this. Brittle fragile foods system structure. Where all of our natural resources in the form of commodities are exported. And then we import food into our into our grocery stores and retailers so that that's been really challenging and. The way that's affected the producers. Is. It's put a lot more weight on the industrial corporate agriculture. Influence in the system. They're limiting the supply. That's coming out of those factories even before they had any outbreaks. So that they can say. There's a backlog so that they can say that they can pay less for the products coming in. While, they're just piling up. Product that they're going to sell at an increased rate because they're saying there's not enough to go along, so it's. It's been real challenging Few months for our producers, the lack of Tangible efforts on behalf of the USDA have continued to to prove frustrating, but we're starting to see some movement there. and. Very early on in this, we decided that we were gonNA take a survey of our tribal tribal businesses or tribal lack producers, and and we got some really interesting results. Eighty three percent of our producers have already been adversely affected by by ten thousand dollars or more. In in their egg production this early into this crisis. And that's what the understanding that most of our producers are going to be marketing their product. From. August through December as the production cycle comes to a close for this year. So it's the we're already seeing tangible effects that are that are really going to resonate throughout our tribal governments because a number `nother. Component of this food system is that many of our tribal nations that are that have a large land base bigger than their tribal farm could actually operate on their own. Or permit that land out to their tribal members or others. And that income goes to support basic government functions, so there's GonNa. Be a double whammy coming this fall when producers. Existing in this world of uncertainty may realize. Lower sales income. And may not be able to pay those rental or lease payments. Well in you know just thinking of everything that is connected to this in how the system works it. Sometimes people don't understand this, but there's a lot that's coming to light, and we're learning things that maybe we didn't consider before because of the pandemic in what it showing when there is a glitch. Glitch in the system where the system or the link is broken and so for us, AC? understanding the importance of safety in all this. Has Anything else changed in in the way? production is going specially in cattle. we see many news stories of infections at different meat processing plant anything you want to share about connection to that or even keeping safe. What? We've really emphasized to our our tribal constituency icees membership is all federally recognized tribes and Alaska. Native villages and we've really stressed the importance even more so in light of this. Of developing local food systems and part of that. In. The central part of that is four tribes. To stand up and exercise their sovereign right to have their own food safety standards approved. Which would then create the pathway for local and regional processing facilities, whether it's meat, processing, or grain, handling or vegetable or or farmers markets? We have to have our producers producing to the tribal standard, not trying to conform to some state standard. or or a federal standard that has. Created without the understanding of our of our remote locations and our economic situation. Can you describe what it is you're you're. You're talking about of those standards that would be there for tribes, and that would work with the system as opposed to trying to fit in to state or federal describe what you mean. Absolutely, so in order to sell will just US beef, since we've talked a little bit about cows in order to sell meat to an individual. We would have to take that. Meet and have it processed that either state inspected facility or a federally inspected facility. And, only then could we sell the product? When? You know a significant number of our population have the capacity to be butchering their own livestock, they they hunt and fish for subsistence on a pretty regular basis, so they know their way around the processing of an animal. Our tribes have yet to take that step into cementing and tribal policy from the position of tribal sovereignty. Guidelines for the food safety and the regulation of the processing facilities that May. Exist within their jurisdiction, so has as a result. We've got our friends at the CO-OP. Tribe in Oklahoma have a state of the art processing facility, but they have to have federal inspection on it. In order to market their product. Even across the state line there into Arkansas. If they tribe does a thoughtful job of standing up its food safety regulations. Those can then be vetted by other jurisdictions, and they could say hey, you know that works as long as it's got. The Cheyenne River Sioux tribe stamp of approval. We know that the safety of the food product is there, and we will comfortably allow that to come into our jurisdiction. The challenge that we face right now is. We have the federal inspection that requires that. From say South Dakota to Auckland Homework and vice versa, but we've got the big four meatpackers who all have overseas processing facilities that don't have that same regulation on him, so we're. We're competing against overseas slaughter facilities that have an easy pathway into our stores when our local producers don't. Interesting and Zach in terms of where people stand now. Is there anybody or any tribes that? You've heard about who are saying. You know what we do need to get on board. Let's start. This is lessons learned from the pandemic. Any that you know Zach. There are a lot of tribes that are really taking a closer look at the. China Russia try. Princeton has a couple of producer groups that are trying trying to stand up a producer cooperative I know the tribes. Starting to take a look at maybe some processing capacity the co-op PA. Tribe was kind of already prepared for this because they had the facility built. And the federal inspection. As a result of their preparedness. Able to facilitate. The delivery of several loads of hawks that were to be euthanized down there to qua- so they were able to distribute them in their community and it just because they had the infrastructure in place already other tribes that are working towards this Black Sea. Nation in Montana is working on a multi-species. processing facility. These ability plan there's there's a a a probably more tribes than we could. Go into and just an hour's time. Moving towards this I know Navajo Nation always had a lot of. Activity over at the NOVELA AG products, industry and The some of the Pueblos or coming online with some. Local farm to market type of stuff, our brothers and sisters over here in the Great Lakes region have a very active food sovereignty movement. Where they're starting to do some trade in in in between tribal nations to try to try to provide food that they couldn't grow in their own territory, so we're seeing this list grow in. Maybe you know about your trip jumping this or their lessons that have been learned a because of the shortage of supply when it comes to what we need in our communities, or maybe even servicing a whole state, any thoughts join us right now. One, eight, hundred, nine, nine, six, two, eight, four eight. Doctors nurses and emergency medical technicians remain on the front lines of fighting corona virus. They're having to adjust to long hours and shifting information about best practices. We'll hear from some of those working to test and treat people during the pandemic. That's on the next native America calling. A. We. A. Was Be. Sir. Twenty shape our future start here learn more at twenty twenty cents DOT G-O-V A. Paid for by US Census Bureau. You're listening to native America, calling interrogate would and today we are talking about food supply chains. Hell fast does it take? To get some of the items. You need a especially coming from your local grocery store. has cova nineteen cause some hiccups. Go ahead and join us. One, eight, hundred, nine, nine, six, two, eight, four. Eight is a number to tell us what you've experienced. Are you having a harder time accessing food in these times? Do you know why one eight hundred, nine, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight is number also one eight, hundred, nine, nine native with us. Today is Act Douche. No, he's executive director for the Intertribal Agricultural Council also here to out of the Quad PA nation from a CO-OP PA? Today. We have Chris Roper. He is the director of Agriculture for the COPA. Nation Chris, my pleasure, a heavy here and Zach told us a little bit about some of the things that are going on there in your nation with the production to Go ahead and share a little bit more of what you've learned through this pandemic, and how important what you're doing is to make sure that food is getting out there. Welcome Chris go ahead. Thank you. Thanks, thanks for having me you mentioned that there's been a movement across the nation for many ears to for for all of our communities to get back to more basics into be more food secure, and and have taken back the food sovereignty responsibility in our communities inside the tribes. You know not only through you know growing vegetables and you know producing animals and and processing meat it's it's just really vital for us to. Take control of that food supply, and it's just became more parent all the things that we've been fighting for for the last several years that this pandemic has made them. Stand out further as people go to the grocery stores and find empty shelves. They're realizing that they need to take more control of their own food systems, and we've started this several years back. And even you know as we mentioned meat processing plant, but we open that back in two thousand seventeen. A lot of challenges along the way, but you know during this pandemic, we've been able to control or proteins in our community for tribe members. even though the grocery store shelves are empty. We were able to control or meat processing, and to keep our stores stocked full of beef and Bison products, so that our community members had access to good solid proteins There were a few times that we had to ration the quantities as people were trying to You know by more than what they actually needed at one time, so we were trying to control that, but we never had to limit it to the point where. You know people could never have anything, so we were always able to process and. To keep our community supplied meat. We're very proud to say that. At this point as well and that mentioned, there are a lot of tribes across the nation that are looking it standing up meat, processing plants, and there's been an obvious shortage of meat processing plants for many years. It's a very hard business. It's very intensive, but tribes have been hunters and gatherers, and have had cut me and hunted for years, so it's really getting back to basics. similar to the gardening aspects of growing your own vegetables and are, and you know what we've been starting some initiatives for several years here on greenhouses community. Gardens we started farmers market two years ago and this year through some of the some grant assistance to a couple of organising, we were able to even start some training operations on canning and drying foods, so in that really all hit about the time. This pandemic was hitting as well so. Getting people back to basics and and taking control. Their food sources has been an initiative of the Inter Tribal Council indigenous, Food and Agriculture Group in the Native Act Fund. For some time now and it's really become. frontline effort since it's pandemic it. In so Chris I'm wondering as we talk about where supplies come from. Do you know? Where does the majority of the meat that we're seeing in our local grocery stores? Where's it coming from? I, heard Zach mentioned early You Know International. Where's the meat come in from? You Know I. Don't track You know the amount of imports, but you know you have to look at the US win. When the beef plants were closed, the export numbers were still coming in from other countries and I don't WanNa, try to project. You know how much he came from other countries during this pandemic, but it's the numbers too high and we have as I mentioned. There are hundreds of thousands of cattle and you know in inside the United States that need processed and that market we need to be keeping our beef here and processing convenient to our people There's a lot of resources available here that need to be utilized. In Chris Precautions again in the headlines we see outbreaks at meat processing facilities anything you can share on insights into this either prevention, or if it's happened how things got under control? Yeah Prevention is key. We've been very fortunate We have not had any cases insider plan Where also small plants, so smaller numbers make it easier I I believe, and some of these larger plants that have six hundred thousand employees and I'm it's. It's extremely hard once you have a case, get in a community. It starts to spread like wildfire our, so we are fortunately in a rural area that our. Our community did not get hit as hard as some of the others did so. We're very fortunate in that aspect, but we also try. We definitely control who is in around our plant limit access to our plant. We take numerous safety precautions as as recommended by the CDC. and we're really just restricting in the the kind of people on the type of folks that are coming in. We don't allow customers in the building even. Though is strictly employees. Only the Lizard Irs. In so you know, there's talking mention of the second wave, and if indeed the number start kicking back up. What are the lessons learned the first round with this pandemic that you think should be implemented immediately or or anything like that. started off Chris. You know we we. We've seen this throughout various cities across the nation and unfortunately. I think there are some communities that are seeing spikes in the Cova. Cases as we speak as people go back to work, and and are getting back around other folks. It's it's it's a silent issue. People aren't seeing it. It's a lot of cases that we hear about and see. There are no symptoms so it's it's extremely scary to under. To. Think about people walking around the facility that might have this virus in and You'd have be cautious about that. In for you. Zach any thoughts or precautions, or you know things that we learn first round that are going to play and keep things safe. You Bet I. I would just offer it. Anybody listening that health just isn't about disease. Health is about nutrition. And Immunity, and the myriad of factors that go into this, so if we start to take a more thoughtful approach about what we're putting into our bodies and why? We're building a lot more. capacity for robust. Response to. These pandemics in that type of stuff that was of the strength of our indigenous. Diets as we. We were attuned to that. We knew what the plants out in the pasture did for us. And we didn't just go by whatever it was boxed and convenient than the store we. We knew that there was some effort. That went into gathering that up. But we knew the value of its to start thinking about health and a more holistic frame of mind, instead of just as a response to disease. And people were active, too I think you know when we think of the entire system that was going on and how it all fit into it, you know if you're out there in the garden, you know how many calories you're burning and just the care for the food to a lot there anything you want to add go ahead and dial in one, eight, hundred, nine, nine, six, two, eight, four. Eight is a number, maybe your producer. Maybe you're a grower in your own needed community how? How do you feel this is helping and when we say food supply food shortage. Did you experience any of that? In These times thoughts, one, eight, hundred, nine, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight is a number what about tribes, even individuals stepping up and making sure the food supply is coming straight local so that you're not caught without Fuji need any thoughts on any of this one, eight, hundred, nine, nine, nine, six, two, eight, four. Eight is a number also here with us today. Tulsa Oklahoma is carly hot vet. She is the director of tribal enterprise for the Indigenous Food and agriculture, initiative at the University of our concern, she's a Cherokee citizen and it's our pleasure to have her here with us, welcome carly. Kaoh show, thank you for having me. In curly anything you want to start off with just hearing a little bit of of how things are going for both Zach Chris and the communities are connected to. Sure I think I'd like to echo what Chris said you know this covid. Nineteen pandemic hasn't broken any of the systems. It has just revealed what has already been. A challenge in is really kind of. showing a spotlight on some of the issues that we're seeing in ending country when it comes to food supply and the suit, supply chains and with my work that we do the The Indigenous Food and AG initiative at the University of Arkansas. We're really focused on creating some solutions for some of these problems. We're seeing Indian country, not just short term, but also long term solutions and helping tribes really take hold of their food sovereignty as a part of the tribal sovereignty, and we say that we can't truly be sovereign until we can feed our people. and I know Zach this you know has much. supported that statement frequently, and we the work that we do is intended to provide resources to tribes and tribal organizations to help stand up their local and regional food, economies and systems, so we can have those resilient. Opportunities in place to avoid some the fallout that we see when our national food system is so disrupted, I mean you heard that talk about a lot of the food that's produced on reservations or an Indian countries exported, and then food that is consumed at that location. is imported and purchased from external sites, instead of having a more local closed loop system or more regional close loop system because of the challenges of infrastructure and food supply chain that we see tribal communities, so the work that we do would I is intended to. To provide support to really a resilient food sovereignty system in Indian country, and there's a multitude of ways that we do that whether it's you know encouraging trips to develop their own department of Agriculture whether it is supporting them as they worked towards implementing Food and agriculture code specific to their tribal community whether it is creating and developing that pipeline of tribal agricultural experts or professionals that can then return after their education and gaining some experience to their tribes or other tribal communities and help really Put those systems up to where they need to be but we were very excited. This is an exciting time to be involved in tribal agricultural, even before the covid nineteen pandemic, but after the pandemic it it became very explicit about how necessary this work was. We're very excited to be able to provide these resources and extend opportunities to any tribe that seeking assistance. Inc Really. How did if you know If you know, how do we get to the point where you know some of our products especially meat is coming. From another country, and then coming back to us, or you know going out and then coming back. How do we get to this point? Sure so I was actually on a call with nonprofit earlier this week, and the discussion was people were talking about how our food system has failed, and I think that failure really only exists at the beginning and the end of that system from what from your perspective and what kind of dollars they're bringing in and then the supply. That's available for your induce consumer. The people in between as you heard kind of talk about your processors, your packagers warehouses your distributors. Those corporate entities are very much concerned with that bottom line, profit margin and the negotiation and trade that occurs within those larger conglomerates really focuses on how to maximize profit, and if it means you know sacrificing some resiliency in the process in order to get that additional cent per dollar brought in by outsourcing or by You know seeking imported labour opportunities or looking for other ways to really maximize that it pushes that risk out to the ends of that food supply system to the producers into your in users, so we don't see that lack of success being born by your the people in the middle of the chain versus the people who are at the ends of the chain, so I think that's really contributed to that Outsourcing and offshoring, some of these activities in addition to that that bottom line, profit margin component. That is so important. In Sioux Carly when we think about you know. Being a part of the solution is opposed to. Exacerbating the problem. What can tribes do now? Even if it wasn't on their radar now we've learned a lesson. What are the next steps for tribes to make sure that you know that that food supply chain is shorter in that you know. We are not in situations that we have been because of the pandemic. Sure, and that's a great question asking I would really encourage you. To take a look and say you know, what can we do kind of avoid these challenges in the future, and I think probably the biggest thing from thirty thousand foot perspective is encouraging the development of local and regional food systems so that we have those redundancies in place when that quote unquote just in time, national food system becomes disrupted so bottleneck at certain points along the chain and those local and regional food economies can be propped up or supported and a variety of different ways. Ways depending upon what the goals of each individual tribe is in what their particular needs are. We know that one solution is not going to be applicable for every tribe in Indian country, and with over five hundred, seventy, three federally recognized tribes. They're all unique when it comes to their land base when it considered governance structures when it comes to the needs of their citizens, and when it comes to the relationships that they have in areas where they're at an all those are impactful for determining path for about. About what's going to be the best way to address that some tribes may have existing agribusiness enterprises that we'll be seeking to scale up and also bring an additional value. Add component in that so if they're doing production. Maybe they added an additional further step down that supply chain into processing, so they're able to bring additional dollars of that products sale in value back to their operation, and may look like developing a department of tribal agriculture so that they can start working on outreach and. And you know land-management development to maximize production or conservation activities that bring value back to the tribe and I value that doesn't necessarily mean you know dollars or revenue value can mean preservation of natural resources for downstream usage, or for tourism, or for I'm conservation and preservation to have for future iterations it could also mean the adoption of the tribal Food and agriculture. Code to occupy that regulatory space and prevent encroachment from external jurisdictions like Zach was talking about and also give. Credence to tribal oversight and so when products are developed under those tribal codes, they're able to enter markets more easily with branding or a labelling, indicating that it is a product of that tribe or tribal organization. There is just something different about being able to see those tribal names on some of these products in where they're coming from knowing that. You are helping a community when you're buying certain products, it's interesting. Hang tight. There's morehead. If. You're hurting in your relationship and want to talk strong hearts, native helpline, confidential and anonymous domestic violence helpline for native Americans available at one, eight, four, four, seven, six to eighty, four, eighty, three, or connect with alive advocate by using the chat now button at strong hearts helpline dot org advocates offer support and referrals for resources daily seven am to ten PM Central Time this program supported by the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center. We appreciate you tuning into native. America calling today I'm Tara, Gatewood and we are ready to hear from you. You're invited into this conversation. One, eight, hundred, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight is our number. Are you concerned about how food gets to your table? Happy been even more concerned because of the pandemic. Have you run into glitches? Tell us about it now that you're hearing from folks who are supplying different products What do you think about the whole process? Does it need to be redesigned in when you hear tribes jumping into the line of this and saying we're going to be there? We're GONNA. Make sure that there is. Enough produce in and also production of meet. What do you think one, eight, hundred, nine, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight, is number, one, eight, hundred, nine nine natives and other. We can get us, and we look forward to hearing from you going down right now. A thank you to everybody joining us. We have carly hot fit with us with the Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative also here to is Chris, Roper. Director of Agriculture for the qual- nation, and also Zach Dushi know who is the executive director for the Intertribal? Agriculture Council our pleasure to have all of them here and Zach not too long ago on this program in time goes fast might be longer than I'm thinking, but we did a program on trying to get more people. Especially, our youth interested in ranching and farming, and there was a big need in. Plead to try and get. Get more young people into this especially with competition of other options for our young people Do you think this is also a time to maybe reopen that discussion? And you know talk about a little bit why we really do need to get more young people into this that next generation stepping up to beatty's producers because we can say, we WANNA do this, but if our people are lining up, what do we do, go ahead Zach? All right, maybe Chris can answer that we get Chris. Go here. Yeah, no problem. Yeah, it's very important to keep the youth involved and to expose all of the issues that are out there and actually take their young minds and build to take the ideas they have and implement the different things that they come up with. We have been very fortunate to be able to work with universities across the nation. we've been able to work with Grad students on various projects in our area is. On different issues from gardening to canning, too of food waste composting lots of initiatives that are out there, and then keeping the young folks involved. We try to implement as many of those ideas as possible. Each year we try to increase our intern. Shit numbers We've been able to obtain some funding from some outside of outside groups to help us fund the internships that we do. we started out with just a couple of year. And now we're, we're. We'll should have around eight. Different interns this year not just to own tribal us, but when you open it up to native youth across the country. We also participate in different Use groups and learning sessions across the nation, trying to provide technical assistance outreach We try to do all we can to share and to bring young people back into agriculture, and we try to help them understand that agriculture is not only planning and harvesting crops out in the field, but you know agriculture businesses you need the you need the lawyers that specialize in agriculture. You need the accountants that specialize in agriculture You know every possible. Trade you can think of can tie back to agriculture, and that's been a misconception that some of these us have had to overcome. And once we show them that they can tie their specific interests back to agriculture and food, sovereignty and food security. Policy all these different things that really really see her eyes light up and and. See, the, passion come out so it's extremely important to. Keep the US involved in. Bring them in, and we need their energy. So that's a that's very important. Indeed in Zach, I think we've got you back anything you want to add. The you know the time is perfect for for the youth to really step up and take the lead and we've been working for the last. Ten years at least with Indigenous Food Nag Initiative on on bringing that next generation of. Young leaders in the food neck system space forward. And armed our assertion is that. If we had the solutions, we wouldn't be trying to the problem, so maybe that solution is in that next generation of thinkers, so we do everything we can to empower them. Give them voice. We have created a position on our board of directors. Voting position on our board of directors for the youth. To select their leader and put them at the table with leaders from all across Indian country to bring these solutions forward. And it's it's. Really GonNa be the the. The changes that were needing in the industry. Think about the fact that. It's a three point five billion dollar a year industry, and that's just the raw commodity production. If you think about the entire food system. Lied, we could be a twenty five billion dollar a year industry, and just a few years which really moves us towards? Sovereignty and being able to take care of our own instead of depending on. Food programs and government contracts, and that type of stuff, so we really see it as a solution for sovereignty nationwide. Maybe you have some comments on that daily now. One, eight, hundred, nine, nine, native, and so I understand that there is an intertribal food summit going on this month, Zach any details you can share with us. About it when it is what it's about. Yes, so that'll happen on Saturday. June twentieth registration is open now, and it is free to virtually attend. We normally have these inter inter tribal food summit's in person, a big conference where local regional nationally renowned indigenous chefs will walk through the preparation as other professionals will walk you through how to harvest touted roll how to cultivate. The indigenous products. This year we're doing virtually we figure there's a there's some opportunity and. Every circumstance you stumble into, so we're looking at re crafting. Our. Curriculum delivery in a way that it's always there for folks. If you have a broadband connection, are access to one at your local library, you can come in and take this indigenous food preparation, lesson or you can. You can engage in this made of Native health through nutrition movement and we're. We're co hosting this with the native American. Food Sovereignty Alliance, and the Indigenous Food Nag initiative and some other partners. And we really hope that we can make this the first of many of these virtual. Summits that were able to host until we can get back to get them together in person, and in bringing people together to really share their stories and share their knowledge. And where do people sign up or or connect? INTERTRIBAL FOOD SUMMIT DOT COM. Okay I'm straightforward. It is so fun when information is easy to find like that entirely alternative, you know. We spent a lot of time at the top of the hour talking about processing meat but we are also talking about agriculture. What what needs to be shared lessons learned things that we need to step up on more even hurdles that we. We need to jump over. Go hit anything new an update us. Carly sure yes, so when we look at tribal agriculture, and especially from a historical context, the overlay of federal Indian policy dating back. You know more than two hundred years has been very impactful, even today for what the status of our current food sovereignty systems look like and I I call it an underdevelopment because there are a ton of great resources available in Indian country, but being able to leverage those and maximize the benefit for tribal populations has been a challenge based on some of the constraints that we've seen so Indian country Kinda has a a much steeper uphill battle when it comes to really working through some. Some of those issues and a lot of that has to do with what Zach was discussing as far as having professionals and knowledgeable people who have the background and understanding of not just how to operate and as a producer with an accident system, but how to do it in Indian country because there are specific nuances that really make. Make a big difference for how we work especially when it comes Charlie management, and how our lands are held and transferred in the ability to access credit for investment in those types of systems, in addition to that there's also different funding operation or funding components that are available whether it's federal sources whether it's administration dollar whether it's tribally. Tribally generated revenues, possibly some gaming operations or other types of funding areas that are set up. That are different from what mainstream agriculture may access so There's a lot of nuance components that are very important to understand in order to kind of level that playing field. That's necessary, and that's what a lot of the work that we do I say. Say I as we actually are hosting Discussion Forum via facebook live on Thursday at one o'clock to talk about how to develop a department of Agriculture and have a conversation about what some of the issues that people are seeing in their local tribal communities, and what we can do, and advice and resources that we can provide help get over. Over the Hump so there are a lot of concerns when it comes to that, but Christmas absolutely right agriculture is not just you know cows and plows anymore. There's a lot more to it and there's a lot of different ways to shore up that food sovereignty through production, and it's not limited to commodity crops. There's a lot of opportunities available. In alternate back to you Chris Anymore that you wanNA share again. wanting to hear more about the egg site go ahead. Well. It's extremely important. I think you know not only ending country, but across the across the nation. You know we all have to get back to our roots. We have to take control of our food supplies. We have to be aware of where food comes from and we. Need to step out and grow something. Ultimately you know we need to. We need to grow some gardens and grow are plants and learn to preserve them again. A lot of our grandparents did that years back, and they initially told us when we were young and growing up. That's how a lot of us were raised. So you know we've gotten away. We've gotten away from that in in our fast paced environment, but we need to get back to our roots. That's one the biggest things that I tell everyone is. We've got to get back to our roots and take control of our systems. In Zach anything to add. I think that it's that. At this time, it's really important that we focus on. How do we get in touch with those local producers? The ones that do have food that they could sell. In our American Indian foods program. We've got a list of. Scores of producers that have participated in the actual overseas export market on the order of fifteen to twenty million dollars per year in exports from Indian country overseas and. Eighty seven percent of those producers are looking for ways to get into the local market. And they're looking for ways to get into ECOMMERCE. So what are what are tribal membership? That's listening can do is. Go to your local grocery store and ask them what you're doing about. Sourcing local tribally grown food. Because, the consumer is ultimately GonNa vote with their pocketbook, and if they ask for it through their grocery store, the grocery store is going to start looking around the community despite things that they could put in there, and that'll help spur demand that will. Lead, a producer say you know. I'M GONNA I'M GONNA. Take my vegetables to the grocery store and sell them here in town. And and maybe add acre. And then really start to do something about. The economic disparities that exist between our Indian country, food and credit desserts and our. Friends and relatives that are just right across that in imaginary lying on the ground. People realize that they have that much pool. Do you really think they do Zach? I I don't think they do and that's why. I'm reminding them to exercise that. If if three hundred the next three hundred people that go to the LAKOTA thrifty Martin South Dakota ask the manager. What are you doing about sourcing local beef? That's going to resonate with the Cheyenne. River, Economic Development Corporation and they're going to say hey, what can we do about this? We didn't realize there was this kind of demand. And then there would be the opportunity for tribal leadership to invest in the infrastructure needed to get it there. It's the same in the in the northwest with the with the fruit and vegetable produce. It's the same and I to where their own potatoes on tribal land, but it's non-indian corporations doing it I I think the consumer really. Ultimately controls what happens in those stores, and if we're looking for their crunchy salty poison, the comes in that cardboard box. And that's what we're willing to spend our money on. That's what they're going to stock the shelves with, but if we you know, we need some healthy vegetables, we need some healthy locally grown protein some meat. That's what's GONNA show up in those stores. Friends at the Rosebud Sioux tribe in their tribal grocery store have set up their store. So that's the first thing you see when you walk in. While, that's taken it to to a whole other level to. Maybe your tribe is doing some of that. Maybe you are the person who got some of that in the places where you shop, you WANNA. Tell us about that. Journey can always reach out to us. Come into need of America calling dot com. Let's take a call. We've got latisha in fallbrook. California on the Pala reservation or listening on. Paula Radio! Thanks Latisha for calling. Go ahead, you're on your. Thank you. Thank you for having me the comment that I want to make is of course as Citizens citizen so I haven't been shopping a lot. Other people have been shopping for me and I've been out for the first time last week and the flower shelves were practically empty, but there was and I was looking for unbleached. And there was little bags of. unbleached flour that came from the Navajo nation. And I just thought that was so interesting. that. We've never seen these before and here now in the time of crises where they can't get gold medal. I guess, or whatever the if is that and this is a major market was Albertson's that that they were reaching out and looking for the product that the consumers are going to need? And in this case it was flour. And I. I know that over the years I've heard that there. Companies that I don't know if they'd give a discount to the store if they will put their product more in a more visible place so that the consumer will buy it. You have to first thing they see so. That's that they pick up. But I think it's I. Think it kind of goes hand in hand with what we're talking about here is that if the consumer knows it's they're. They're they're going to be more apt to at least look at that product. Sure and you know. All of this has definitely opened the doors to new ways of thinking in this example that you are talking about. It'll be interesting. They continue to carry it and then Latisha wondering what will happen if they don't. Keep carrying it again. We get back to that point that's just made about the power of what our consumers are saying in buying very interesting. Thank you to everybody today including collar, and also carly hot vet that. And Chris Roper anything you miss. Find It on our website. 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Zach producer Zach Chris America United States Chris Roper executive director director Albuquerque Census Bureau Cova Prevention director of Agriculture Canada National Native News George Floyd Melissa Townsend Indigenous Food and Agricultur