8 Burst results for "Dalton Walker"

"dalton walker" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

02:52 min | Last month

"dalton walker" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

"Home arrive on Mars and begin colonization process there and just very very interesting because you know, we're we screwed up this planet to the point that You know the that now we're having to look at the colonization of another planet and you have to ask yourself. You know, why would we repeat the same mistakes? Right? Correct what you're already screwed off and work from there. Yeah. Yeah, you know but there any aliens in this stock, you know know although you know know they take a very realistic approach based on you know available information. Like is there water on Mars, right, you know and and stuff like that. So and they have these cutaways to you know, actual scientists, you know, like they've got Neil deGrasse Tyson, you know, they they are ways to journalists environmentalists, you know scientists and and you know a few others and politicians that was important in she was very interesting and I recommend checking it out. It was not what I initially thought. I thought it was gonna be another one like a look like a science fiction movie and no it's not and it really caught my attention so I may have to try to look for that. Yeah, that's So he also make an analogy. Although they never mentioned covid-19. I think when they started shooting this covid-19 happened yet, but what they elevate and they talk about is like the SARS outbreak. And the leopard the SARS outbreak? Yeah, and so when you when you watch the way they present, you know, what already happened being that of SARS. You cannot help but wonder and think about you know, what's going on with covideo now, right? So yeah. Yeah, it's definitely worth trying to definitely worth checking out. So, it's too long to find that. Yep. Okay. All right in other news other news. All right, you are up this this article. I have a lot of emotions surrounding this article and it's it's a it's a failure to those that need the services not not from those but it's a failure to provide the services to those jobs. They needed on the title of this article as a birthing center closure, my baby and I felt abandoned and this was written by choice. Okay, and it's an article from Indian country today to see the guy's face, but I don't know what happened to us named. Oh Dalton walk. That's the guys tonight Dalton Walker wrote this story.

Neil deGrasse Tyson Dalton Walker
"dalton walker" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:44 min | Last month

"dalton walker" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is native America Calling Monica Brain. The Texas observer is into several pieces of ledger art on display in a museum in Wyoming. That might be fakes. Some of the art looks like replicas of real artists work and others are signed by artists that may not even exist reporter Savannah Mar looked into the allegations and had. Examined the art. Also haskell Indian nations. University is receiving criticism from journalism organizations like the native. American. Journalists Association for attempting to limit the schools papers reporting. We'll talk with the editor of the Indian leader about what's going on and Dalton. Walker from Indian country. Today investigated the Phoenix Indian hospitals abrupt closure of their birthing center. If you want to get in on any of these topics today, give us a call. The number is one, eight, hundred, nine, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight. Let's check in with Mark trae yet he's editor of Indian country today and he's a Shoshoni bannock. Welcome back mark. Monica glad to. Be here. Mark I can't believe it. There's eighteen native candidates running for Congress and Senate. Tell us about this. Sure. It's when you think about it as well as folks did last time doubling the number from two to four. Point six, six percent. So, we're so far underrepresentation in Congress and if you could get half of the fourteenth elected, you would be actually pretty close to parody and their folks running in all kinds of places that normally don't have congressional candidates Boise Idaho. Northern Utah Wyoming it really makes it an interesting look at Candidates the other thing about candidates running in these rural places I. Think it's so important. Is that forever it changes people's perception instead of just seeing on American Indian dealing with the tribe maybe conflict maybe in gaming maybe another some other Story that often hits the news. Suddenly they're in the context of a professional running for office to represent everybody and I think that's a really powerful message. Yeah. Absolutely I know I remember talking to Susan Harjo years ago about About mascots and you know she was saying that as long as we're sort of viewed as caricatures, it's it's so much harder to. Go to Congress, and to have people you know be represented than the way that you're just talking about and you with the fall of the Washington DC football team mascot. I'm really you know I feel like we're entering a new era when you think. Absolutely, in fact, this election cycle is a new era, another way and that's money Some of the candidates running have had access to capital that they've never had before. pollock Jordan who's running for the Senate and I who raised a.

Mark trae Congress Monica Brain Wyoming Senate Savannah Mar America Susan Harjo reporter Texas Journalists Association Washington DC Walker Dalton Idaho Jordan Utah
"dalton walker" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

08:07 min | 2 months ago

"dalton walker" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

"Vaccines study. Y. After all the crap. That Europeans have done to native peoples why? and. This was brought to us by way of Dolphin Walker for Indian country today. Dot Com. Dalton. Quote. Excuse me. If this study finds the backed vaccine is. Effective. against. Kobe. Listen to the first word of that that sentence again if. Excuse me. If this study finds the bacteria vaccine is effective against Covid nineteen than American national on Alaska native individuals and indigenous people around the world would benefit. If. That's a big word. Well. Not only that. If, I could just step in on this because this is the other part that I'm very, very concerned about. That's if you can get access to get it. Now, they're gonNA. Get it. When I'm talking they're saying if Okay I. See what you're saying if this study finds I'm talking about after the fact. I'm talking I'm talking about discrimination in in. An injection. I understand that but okay. All right I'll shut up. What bothers me so much about this article is they want to use. As Guinea pig, I understand. The. Scotty thought on it though I have two schools of thought. But anyway, go ahead I want our audience to understand that that's what this is all about. It's not that there's a a viable usable vaccine, a proven vaccine. That's working. There is no such animal. This virus seven months old. Seven months old. We don't have a cure for the common cold. We don't have the cure which is another another. Another form of Corona. It's a science virus. Absolutely. A cure for the flu. We don't have a cure for pneumonia. Way Don't have a cure for any of the many SARS related viruses that are out there. So. They're going to tout that there's a vaccine available for covid nineteen. They're using. People of. Color as guinea pigs. That's what they're doing. The making it available. To People's of colors to be used as frickin guinea pigs. Going on. With dolphins article, the Navajo nation which is more has has lost more than five hundred citizens to the Kobe nineteen pandemic. It's on the front. Lines Volunteer Vaccine Study. This. This makes my stomach turn. To read that. Only a few days after reporting. Now, new daily cases for the first time in months, the tribe announced Friday that it is participating in a Pfizer Bio INTECH Kobe, nineteen vaccine trial. A patient volunteer basis. Navajo Nation President Jonathan Ness regularly, updates cases each day the social media. He reported no new cases on Tuesday, which is Great. The next day. He reported twelve new cases still a dramatic drop from past weeks. Several potential vaccines are in development and summer in clinical trials trials on humans. But there is currently no licensed vaccine that prevents Kobe nineteen I'll read that again, there is currently no licensed vaccine that prevents Kobe nineteen. And a statement necessarily that it's important that the Navajo people have an opportunity to participate in a phase three trial quoting. At this study if this study finds that the vaccine effective against Covid nineteen then American Indian and Alaska native individuals, indigenous people around the world would benefit. Okay don't blanket us all onto one one heading please sir. Quoting again, we want to do everything. We can to keep our elders and people healthy and to prevent another spike in Kobe nineteen cases and I, understand the need for that. Without a safe vaccine, which it's not I'm members of cases will continue to fluctuate and we will continue to face substantial risk of infection. Stop right there for a moment. If people really understood what clinical trials do. and. Why they're done. Nobody would participate in them. I understand some people participate in in these various trials because they feel they have no choice. Because it is literally life and death. I I understand that. I'm not knocking anybody for doing that. You Know God bless you that's what you feel you need to do. But to expose an entire group or groups of people to trials. volunteer basis. To something that they have no idea about. Is is beyond me it's it's insane if you ask me. Yes. To be done to prove medications, vaccines, Etcetera Etcetera Etcetera I understand that. But I can't. I can't wrap my head around this. After all the things Europeans have done to native peoples. Why? Why do this? I can't even finish the rest of the couple of paragraphs it to be on the show notes, right? Well. Okay. I'm going to break this apart. first of all none none of this in my opinion is directed at Dalton Walker author all simply reporting the news. I didn't get the indication that it was I didn't I was just for the audience in case somebody. Thinks Dalton had something to do. With this They didn't. Also before I, give any additional commentary I have no idea what's involved in a clinical. Trial. I'm just be up front with that right. So I'm going off merely an assumption in Dave. You can correct me if any of what I'm about to say is just blatantly incorrect. All of this voluntary. I Don I e regardless of if you're indigenous or not. All of this is voluntary. Would I do not hear anything.

Kobe cure Dalton Walker Covid Alaska Guinea Navajo Nation Corona Scotty pneumonia President Jonathan Ness
"dalton walker" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

07:50 min | 2 months ago

"dalton walker" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

"Say something about the firefighters I think each and every one of them that are out there. Doing. All they can do to help mitigate this fire or these fires. But I'm going to point a finger at the states that are using inmates. As firefighters. Okay. Yeah. I've read these stories. Yeah. Yeah I I have mixed feelings about that. If you're going to ask these these people to put their lives on the line to that degree. At least pay them a fair wage to do so. If you want to resume back to your normal. Dollar an hour wage rate after the fact, and that's fine. But in the meantime, pay them a decent wage. For putting their lives on the line. There I you know The fact that I think to some degree want one of the arguments to is the. the state. Some states are viewing them as their lives are valueless. Oh why not put them out there right? And that's You know. It does a difference in my opinion between. The crime they committed against manmade laws in human law. So. That's That's a discernment that needs to take place. I think so Ali but I agree. And like I said they you know. In, my opinion these people are putting their lives. They're not willingly putting their lives on the line they're being thrust into a situation where. If, they get trapped behind the fire line they they could buy. So. I think there's some consideration. Then you've made their first responders job that much harder. Correct. And I think there's some consideration that should be granted and given to these individuals for for doing this. It's only human to be. Compassion compassion runs in deep-vein. If allowed to. And Showing a little compassion towards someone that violated the laws against the community. Goes a long way. You know grant these people some sort of reprieve. Somehow do something. You know show some appreciation for what they're doing instead of treating them like a commodity which they're considered as prisoners are considered commodities. Because you can buy stock. In. The prison system. Drew. So anytime you can buy stock against something it becomes a commodity. Stop treating them like commodities they're still human beings. They may have committed crimes, but they're still human beings. Agreed no matter how heinous the person may be or hey, how heinous the crime they're still human beings So. A little bit consideration. Well said. One more time. Thank you. Again to Paul for. What we appreciate that. Are. Going to move in here and Get into native news and you're, up on here we go You know it really saddens me when we see more consideration for natives in this country coming from other countries. It saddens me. Not to the point of that gratitude or compassion or consideration coming from another country, it sends me because it doesn't exist in our country. Where we live? And That kind of gives us a black eye. We've had so many black is you would think that we were flies or something with millions of is. But it gives us another black tie in the in the. View of the world. Let's let some. Let's add some context to what you're saying which I completely agree with. So when we're when we're talking about respect. We're not talking about throwing a bunch of money. Exactly. We're talking about how `bout you create laws that do things like take down all of Columbus statues. That's an example and explain from our perspective or allow us to speak from our own perspective, which is even better. Why That is being done. That would be far better than. Tokens of gesture which is all this country's ever done. against. They know they've committed in the past and is wrong. Our. Current generation of of and I'm not really speaking so much for the younger folks. Okay. So let me let me quantified us but but you know we're going to say the people that know better the adults. In the rooms. No better and still did nothing. Still did nothing absolutely so Thank you thank you for that. So. What I'm speaking of. Is. Article are one of the things I'm speaking of this article in relation to consideration. Friendship between Ireland tribes. Lives on. The friendship friendship between Ireland and tribes lives on and this comes to us by Indian country today and the author is Dalton Walker. Some people are going to be surprised by this story but. Some won't. More than one hundred, seventy years ago a US tribe did Ireland of solid was more than one tribe actually. The European country has not forgotten it this week. The Ireland. Lacrosse team bowed out of an international tournament to open up a spot for the Iroquois. Nationals. Now a little context about that sentence right there. The. Iroquois nationals were not being allowed to participate in this international tournament because of a little thing called passport. Correct That's why they weren't being allowed to travel to Europe to participate in this tournament. Now they do have passport but their passports for the Air Corps Confederacy. That's a valid legal document and is correct. But this country is not honoring that document..

Ireland Europe Air Corps Confederacy deep-vein Ali Columbus US Dalton Walker Paul
"dalton walker" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

16:06 min | 7 months ago

"dalton walker" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

"Me when we tell you it does truly help us grow and we thank you from the depths of a heart for listening and sharing our show and many thanks to everyone who wrote in and have and who let us know about the audio quality improvements. That was an a very important information so far. We haven't heard any bat audio as of yet. So hopefully the problem has been solved and we will continue to tweak stuff absolutely. Yeah we do appreciate that. A lot of people have written in. We definitely appreciate that you guys annoying. You know continue to do so if you want You know as we've said what really helps us and helps. Our provider is You know the type device that you're listening on if you happen to hear bad audio and the The version the operating system. And I know I know it's a lot you know not. Everybody wants to act like an engineer but It does help it really. Does the more information the better how to track down what what had been causing that problem. So you know. Try to make some changes on our end here as well So hopefully the combination of the two We'll make things better for you guys because Good audio is better than bad audio absolutely hands down better than that audio there you go about a very anyway never mind. I'm only on one and a half coffee today. So all right quick Gulp Gulp. Yes I know right here all right. We have a little bit of listener feedback and this first bit comes to us by way of listened to Joseph and says reconnection. Hi Guys let me start by saying I love your podcast. Well thank you. Joseph leading next to here we love having you as a listener absolutely thinking. I actually have a question that I've been thinking about for some time now to make a short story my father's native and grew up with the culture but was not around for a lot of my life. I look a lot like my father and I've been trying to be more involved within native culture. Unfortunately he says I feel that it is wrong in quotes for to try to be a part of a culture that I never grew up in. I appreciate my mother's culture because it is part of me as well but I feel like I am missing my other half's culture. I have found her the people in this position and noticed that they like myself have felt people. Look down on us because we did not grow up within this culture meaning the native culture. Sorry for the long story but I was wondering what you thought about people trying to reconnect with the culture that they were technically never connected to Joseph. We get this question a lot and I'm glad you wrote to US and ask the questions with your concerns. They're important. Those concerns are valid important. I will start by saying you have every right to learn about a culture. You're part of now how you go about. That is not so much the tricky part. But it's important that you go about it the right way and and that's my opinion. But what do I mean by the right way? The best way I can describe or suggest that someone learn about native cultures that they belong to or have ancestry. Ancestry too I should say is to listen look and learn and doing so respectfully listening looking and learning people will see that you are honestly wanting to learn about that culture instead of being invasive and so. And pushy that's where a lot of people make their mistakes I believe is because they don't approach the learning aspect with an air of respect and there's not enough listening and there's not enough looking to see how customs and cultures behave our own are conducted. So that's my suggestion approached the culture with a sincere respectful interest Look and listen and if you have questions ask ask someone. Ask elders if you can without any claims until you know more about the culture and get to know those that you are. You have related ancestry with you'll be more welcomed bat way over a period of time. I believe then you would be by being pushy in an so. And the everything you want to add to that brother not too much really Think I think you hit all the all the main points but Yeah I think you know having having family that That may be or have never left the community of which you're you're trying to connect with Also helps having having family members that are right within the community. Also those family members that are within the community if they have patients with you see. Sometimes I I've come across that in my own life where they're like. Well if you grow up here you know a you know. Tough luck right and You know I've come across that but it's a matter of persistency both on your own your own part but also Patients from community members as well You know it's it's a. It's a long slow process Believe me But but definitely go after you know in in in and try to learn And then I would say when a as you know more. Share that with other family members who also might be Struggling right Because that's part of the responsibility I feel is passing that on something that my own brother here taught me because I had some challenges in that area. I remember some of those conversations brother all right because I got frustrated with other relatives. Shall we say so? So Yeah Yeah. It's a combination of Of a few things and Like I said. Just take it. Slow and Patient with yourself as well as You know the best you can seek out good guidance from other people so yeah thanks. Thank you all right. Let's see Amanda wrote in and With the subject of Land Lakes Native woman removal and she writes what do you think of Landau lakes butter removing the native American woman? Off THEIR LOGO. I saw a mean that said quote. Let me get this straight. They removed the native American woman but they kept the land close quote. Do you think that should have been removed? I'm a bit behind in the podcast. I just started listening a from the beginning so I don't know if you have covered it yet or not but I was interested on what you guys thought about that. And thank you Amanda. Cruciate that Actually yeah we covered this last our last episode episode to Seventeen. It's entitled of course It was always. It has always been our way. It's the title of that episode. And if you fast forward in there about an hour and twenty two minutes in we brought it up. During our racism in America segment and the the tagline for Orlando legs is changed as part of that They now say they are proud to be farmer owned. Remember this brother and I think that That could tie very cleanly to Continuous land occupation. That is the United States of America. Okay so as a part of new colonization. Shall we say People had to eat and the rub in all of this and you can ask to people. This specifically is that We taught colonialists how to survive here in the early days. How to grow things the proper way so that they could literally survive and and and the The lovely thank you that we got was. We're GONNA take your land and continue to do what you taught us and that gets brought up you know on this show. We do tend to remind people The only time Americans really start to think about US. I think is around the time of Thanksgiving which is a joke in and of itself. Pretty much so you know. There's a lot to all of this but it also took land lakes ninety years to change that image. But there's more detail if you go back to that particular episode and take a listen But we sort of Pitched that as even though it appears in racism in America segment It's somewhat positive in the sense that they did make that change right But they refuse to acknowledge any type of aspect as to why they used that image to begin with which I think is is a very much lacking and should have taken place. I have an article. That's titled There's another story behind that land of lakes butter box and we can talk about that now. If you'd like where we can talk about it later talking about now or Yeah uh-huh already on that subject doing it. This article comes to us by way of Dalton Walker stated twenty two April this year. So it's a recent article and the legacy of Patrick. The this Jarl it in his body at work some three hundred pieces of art across the US in museums and private collections. So this story seems to be about the artist who created that that image. Okay and it goes on to say. There's more to the story box. Butter one burgess assert that just landed the bugs of butter one version starts win land. The legs quietly removed mea. The face obits butter since one thousand nine twenty eight from its box. She actually had a name. Yeah she had a name. Company President Beth for it said in February six and a February six news. Release that the new marketing campaign needed packaging. That reflects the foundation here. We go the foundation and heart by a company culture and nothing does that better than our farmer own who's milk is used to produce lion produce land of lakes dairy products. Okay so that was a faux pas on her part but going on this was all done with out fanfare where me and Neil for nearly a century there is now an empty space. What remains is a logo and a with trees in the background. People picked up new butter packages without much notice. Then the Minnesota Reformer digital nonprofit new source reported the change on April fifteen. The story went viral and was posted by national media ranging from the New York Times to NBC's Today Show and the chain was applauded by many in and out of Indian country including Minnesota. Ten Governor. Petty Peggy Excuse Me Flanagan of the white earth nation. I know the attended. Govan was a native woman she is that is that. That's recent that was like the last election okay. I was GONNA say h e two cycles ago. She wasn't there quoting. Thank you to land a Blake's for making this important and needed change in quote. Flanagan tweeted quoting again. Native people do not. Our native people are not mascots or logos. We are very much still here in court so it goes on to say a week later representative. Buffalo added on Facebook. And IT'S UNFORTUNATE. The issue of land legs cooperatives recent decision to phase out the MIA butter main logo on its packaging has been used in a divisive way and it goes on to tell how people are still saying we're are not you know mascots and logos or visible and then the article goes on to say. This is where the twist the stories twist because the legacy of the Jib way artist Patrick Desk Charlotte goes well beyond me and land of lakes discharge. It was employed by the advertising agency. Campbell myth them or excuse me in Minneapolis. When he was given the assignment to market they farmer owned cooperative. The original brand of MEA had been refurbished twice since its launch in twenty eight deaths. Charlotte was tapped to create a third version. He reimagined more human character adding detail to me as face and floral motifs on her dress. Subtle changes that mattered. That wasn't the brand that stuck seven decades but the real legacy of Charlotte in his work. Some three hundred pieces of art across the US in museums private collections for many especially for the Red Lake A JIB. Wayne Minnesota this jar. Let's artistry impact remains nearly fifty years after his death the award winning artists and US Navy veteran died at age. Fifty one in seventy two from cancer complications. So this is the twist behind that that box of buddy with the native ladies image on it there was a native man that actually. I say improved that image..

US Patrick Desk Charlotte Joseph America Amanda engineer Land Lakes Landau lakes Me Flanagan New York Times cancer Charlotte Wayne Minnesota Campbell Red Lake A JIB Dalton Walker Minnesota Reformer
"dalton walker" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

02:07 min | 7 months ago

"dalton walker" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Imagine that at the very moment right it was all about assimilation native languages. Were being suppressed spiritual traditions even dancing. Which today we think how could why would someone want to suppress that tradition? But all these things were threatening in some way in the United States at the time that jingle dress tradition was born and so at the very moment that these traditions are still being suppressed women in the Great Lakes create this whole new healing tradition And and practice it and it has stayed with us a century later. We know that in the nineteen eighties. Something very big happened. It moved out of the Great Lakes into the other Native communities of the United States and Canada. So it's exciting to think about that. Revolutionary beginning to the jingle dress dance that still with us a century later. I love it. I absolutely love it. You know. We had to be quiet and not do our ceremonial dances and practices. And these women said Nope. You're gonNA hear my dress. I'm going to put jingles on it. Unfortunately we've reached the end of our hour. I WANNA say. Thank you so much to all our guests. Nick Martin Dalton Walker Melvin Monet. Barabbas DOCTOR BRENDA. Child and leave Francis the fourth. We're back on Monday. We're going to talk with folks who've recovered from Cova. Nineteen our executive producer is our Hughes. Our host is Tara Gatewood. Our associate producer is Andy. Murphy Marina Spencer is our engineer. Nola Dave's Moses is the distribution director and Bob. Peterson is the network manager for native voice. One Clifton Chadwick resource development specialist Antonio Gonzalez is the anchor and producer for national native news. Charles say there is our chief of operations and president and CEO of Quantum Broadcast Corporation. Is Jacqueline SALITA ANTENA PRODUCER? Monica brain have a good weekend?.

Great Lakes producer United States Nick Martin Dalton Walker Melv Tara Gatewood Antonio Gonzalez executive producer president and CEO Peterson Jacqueline SALITA Cova Clifton Chadwick Quantum Broadcast Corporation Marina Spencer Monica Nola Dave Francis Charles Bob Hughes
"dalton walker" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

11:48 min | 7 months ago

"dalton walker" Discussed on Native America Calling

"You'RE TUNED IN NATIVE AMERICA. Calling senior producer. Monica brain. And it's a regular news roundup. Show if you've got something you'd like to share gives call number one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight eight so I promise you good news. Well some might think this is good news. Others might not The land lakes butter quietly removed. The Indian lady that was on the package. It actually happened About a month ago possibly two months ago but it's Recently got into the media into the press and so i WanNa Bring Dalton Walker in. He's the national correspondent for Indian country. Today and he's a Red Lake Ojibway Dalton walk back to native America Calling Monica megrets for having me in New Orleans for all you do inform native people. Thank you I appreciate it. You too man. This is a big time for journalists. A lot a lot of work going on for sure so okay. So what was your initial thought when you heard that the some are calling it. The Indian maiden was taken off the land lakes butter well. It was a nice to take a break from all this covert nineteen coverage which is very important. Yeah but it was nice to that little break and being able to write this story unto legacy of Patch. Bizarrely wasn't honor This is the type of story is is what I got into journalism in when I heard about this butter. The butter story this via social media. I was curious to know what happened. So basically I look I look into it and I saw a digital nonprofit Minnesota Lord about that approach that the change happened and when there's change involves native people specifically controversial change my first Goto. The journalist is made of twitter. A lot of people have a voice and they said Okay Perspective on to change and that was it caught fire and some some media outlets was able to catch it a little bit of that capture a little bit of the change as well but the bigger picture. I know there was another story. There did you. Did you know that the like third version of this? This woman on the butter Was painted by a native artist. I remember growing up. I grew up in Minnesota I remember that that specific packaging and that type of butter when I would see it and I and I recall. I'm not sure if it was my mom. Are someone else but some invention to meet growing up as a kid that there was a native artists behind that specific specific piece of art. So I I guess I did but being a kid going up you really this kind of move onto the next thing. I just everywhere so not one of them right so tell us about. Tell us about him about the artist. When I was Kinda looking on social media to see what people were saying one specific person caught my attention. His name is Robert Zarley in yours talking about his dad. Patrick and going up Minnesota on the Red Lake reservation dessert dessert leave last name. I'm familiar with so I. I knew that there was some connection there. I'd probably knew of someone that was related are something that extent so I was Kinda following. What Robert The sunless thing about his dad and he was kind of making some great points about the coverage that was happening so reached the chat a little bit knee shirts. Great stuff and I reached out to his sister. Sure I mean. And she shared a lot of stuff and it wasn't necessarily the same stuff. Was this more perspective. Which is Great? Which is what I was hoping to get because I wanted to learn as much as I could about their dad and when I learned firsthand this man about his artwork. I thought it was beautiful. Art The begin with. Yeah sure when he knew he passed on. But I wasn't sure win in learning that he passed away way before his time. Actually he was barely in his fifties and a nineteen seventy in for what he did. As it was a job he was part of this AD agency. How how much shock waves that sent over the years later? It was this amazing. Yes so he he Somebody else originally did the Indian maiden and then they decided to do like a new version of it and that's where he came in and and the version that we have been seeing recent until recently that was his version. Is that right? Yeah so I attempted to a couple of times to reach out to Landau late for clarification couple questions because they published a news release in early February announcing that they were going in this specific direction to celebrate one hundred years and they didn't really mention the native character or any other native artists. They basically kind of moved on when you read between the lines where you're like what what's going to happen with the with the maiden so. I was trying to get some clarity. They respond but they just for reference back to that Specific News. Release but yeah. I had a lot of questions regarding holidays. Form though that the idea behind it but around in nineteen fifties. I didn't see Patrick worked. Worked FOR Workless land-o-lakes and he basically had a chance to I guess upgrade the image to what he thought would work work better in he did and you can kind see little things that are kind of separate the one before. If you didn't know much about even native culture or Jewish culture you probably really notice much of a difference but talking to a Senator Robert Robert explained the key differences in when you learn about the key differences like the water or trees. The designed floral patterns like it. It's a lot different. Was the family sad to see her. Go from the butter Robert initially he was. He was glad he said it was about time. They had to move on but then he started to get more feedback from his acquaintances friends people. He mentally met along the way and they talked about how much that specific packaging meant to them. Going up native so that was part was interesting and then his sister. She wasn't she didn't sound like she was upset. She was more interested in having her father's story be shared beyond the butter part that it was a part of it and going up. She didn't really Like that image was always there for her as she knew her. Dad Did. I think she's eighteen when you passed away so once she should go grocery store she would notice it but it wasn't really a huge deal and then anything was that once you learn to change. She actually went to the grocery store recently to see she could find anything I did too. I went and I could see. It was about half in half there was you could tell they were still like cycling out the old stock and And then the new ones and I picked up the one without her on it And finally I guess able to buy some land lakes butter. A lot of folks have released. Broken out about it because it's They say that it's sort of over. Sexualize is native women presents native women in a way that you know and and of course the whole conversation about mascots and having natives as token images to sell things as well. Did you think much about that as you were working on this piece? Oh yeah that was kind of Perspective that I've seen a lot with From a lot of native people especially a lot like you've been elected officials. I saw that they were happy. And how much impact? This design like this can do in harm native people so I knew that was a part of the story in when I was looking into it. I I wanted to make sure I could include it the best I could while how how important that perspective is but the same time trying to wrap around the story of the artist so I Had a chance to talk to the North Dakota State Rep Ruth Buffalo briefly she. She was one of the first to comment about the change and she received some feedback. Mostly not really great feedback about her comment so she kind of press release more detailed at really explained her thoughts and I thought that was a good perspective and I made sure I included it in the article. Yeah well we'll put a link to the article on our website native America calling but if you WANNA follow Dalton Walker. You can find all of his stuff at Indian Country Today. Dot Com Dalton. Thanks so much for joining us today. We really appreciate IT IN Q. How can we can you to right? Now let's go on to some more native artists joining us. Right now is Dr Lee Francis the fourth he's the CEO and founder of native realities and director of indigenous pop ex and he's from the Laguna Haley. Welcome back. Hey thanks for having me you can hear me. I'm good. Yep Sound pretty good pretty good so so you had almost pretty quickly after. Things popped off with corona virus. These posters showed up online Tell us about them. Yeah so I just I was gonna say it seems like a million million years ago that I was talking about US having to cancel the digital pop right and and now we're kind of back Yeah it was You know it was one of the responses that I had because I started to see a bunch of stuff floating around online and I try to look at ways that I could support made a creative especially since with a digital backs going down with a bunch of the other vending opportunities going down. I was trying to figure out a way that I could. You know Showcased the talent of the artist as well as get some money into their pockets You know and I always been fascinated with you. Know the You know the the propaganda posters one of our books that we have at the shop. That tells us code talkers. We made these old style propaganda posters around burning language. That went with that so I thought this is a time that we really need that sort of old style right. Deterrent like awareness. Posters aren't like you know like You know just like a You know like here's what you need to do these. I was like no. We need to go with the straight old style. Which is like telling you what to do like treat your brain right so so I started coming up. I started like sitting there. I was with my notebook and I just started writing.

Minnesota AMERICA Dalton Walker America Patrick Senator Robert Robert Red Lake Ojibway Dalton twitter producer Robert Zarley Monica megrets New Orleans North Dakota State Workless land-o-lakes Landau Robert The Dr Lee Francis
"dalton walker" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

13:13 min | 9 months ago

"dalton walker" Discussed on Native America Calling

"We were talking with a Tamara's Saint John. She is a historian for the sit in Washington. Oh Yeah Tae and District One House Representative for South Dakota and representative. Saint John So tell us about this. This proposed law to use tribal ADI's for voter registration. And why you voted against it The there wasn't necessarily a proposed law to use voter. Id's for registration. What happened was there was a cleanup bill. Going forward on voter registration. The Secretary of state intended to add on non driver's license. Id's and that's really all it was There were other amendments related to residency and verification and The there was Some rush attempt Right before the vote in an amendment that I wasn't able to access online and and to this point haven't seen to add try Belie D. onto that. They'll and so as that. Debate happened to add that amendment. There was discussion about whether or not that would work and questions arose by the legislative body the house and They were. We found that nobody was really able to answer those things number one all. Try The light. These are very different. There is and my personal opinion that as sovereign nations the state can't dictate what we have on our ideas that is completely up to us the fact that they are all different though and do not necessarily assist in the verification of residency They are not able to be verified by the Secretary of State. And that's really what it huge around I have to also say that. A lot of tribal. Id's and the State of South Dakota more than likely we're able to be used for registration because they had the social security numbers and A lot of tribes have taken their social security numbers off their ID's for privacy purposes. So basically what that did was Adding trying to add that on as an amendment was going to create confusion and possible unintended consequences. It was either going to require a tribe to allow access to verify that tribal ID number and most tribes sovereign nations would not want to open up their database for that purpose or else it would require it the other direction and more than likely just create a situation where people would be turned away eventually at the voting book so in in order to it certainly wasn't something that was workable in any way so yes. I did vote against it but to be clear. The House didn't vote to ban. Id's at all. They voted not to accept that amendment With those things there has to be. I think they have to be only processed. There should be consultation with sovereign nations. The nine tribes in South Dakota and there should be a an ability to see how it's going to work and those things were not supplied with that so it wasn't again a ban on tribal. Id's as some of the headlines took it Some of the headlines sort of do it out there like I band. Id's what I what I attempted to do afterwards was because I saw the bill without the amendment continue on it moved over to the Senate side so it was my effort to catch over there and see if we could Do what was intended. I understand why those that brought it forward wanted to do it. I think we all have the same goal to make. Every vote count in a very critical election year anytime and So what I came to put together with stance and you're going to the secretary of State's office talking to different tribal leaders. I'd have many brands like Like OJ and others that work with the native American vote on nationally and then there are those that are the boots on the ground within your tribal communities talking to all of those people. I believe that I came up with something that could work. And what that was was to add language onto that bill that would allow for a conversation possible agreement with each tried and the secretary of state to acknowledge as a sovereign nation their right to consent to or determine how dare tribal. Id's are verified. That way at tribe doesn't have to they choose not to engage in that matter to verify tribal. Id's and For those that do they can it protects them they are able to through an MOU which is a common practice for smaller things we actually do have MOU's with the Secretary of State for Uniform Commercial Code a lot of tribes or some tribes do use them in economic development so it's not unheard of. I took it up to the Senate and again You know the Republican majority there. I expressed the need for it. Why and and in in all reality I'm not able to predict how many of these would come forward with just a tribal ide- and again the whole thing about it's about the inability for the secretary of state to verify that tribal ID number. It goes nowhere that they can access when they enter it into a database unlike driver's license and unlike a social security number so with I explained There was some opposition with the secretary of State. I truly think that they didn't quite understand or hadn't had time. This all went very fast to Really look into the process. And what it hinged around was whether or not under the native American under the Bony Neck Federal Voting Act whether this would be allowable and the Senate State Affairs Committee Listen to my testimony. The opposition We looked at all the parameters of it. But don't wind up to abby amendment and it passed so I was super excited but then there was an effort of by. Oh a lobbyist representing I believe one maybe two tribes that came forward and stop the vote so that was really unfortunate because I felt like it was foot in the door to ensure and find a way for those types that wished to put in the extra effort to ensure that every vote counts It has not been determined yet. I have been watching this closely. in it has not come up for four boat it as it sits right now today the amendment to do so is all the bill but the the bill itself has not Past vote in Senate eight affairs all right. Thank YOU REPRESENTATIVE. Saint John for sharing that with us and Oj. We gotta move onto another topic. But I do want to give you a moment if there's something that you know considering you know your dealing with things after the fact sometimes When they've already created these laws um anything you wanted to comment about what representative Saint. John was sharing. No I think Represented Saint John is is doing a real good job of being thorough and looking into things and not signing off on a bill. That's just put our even in the minimum that's just pushed in front of you and say we need this done right away. So I appreciate all the efforts that she's doing for her district and really for any country and it's always really good when you have individuals in a house in the Senate that Are Willing to listen to what problems may occur If the certain legislation is passed so I do appreciate that all right well Tamara's Saint John. Is The district one House Representative for South Dakota Orgy Siemens? He's the CO founder of four directions. Thank you both for joining us today. We really appreciate it And if you've got something you'd like to share give us a call one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native as I mentioned earlier. President trump granted. Clemency to Crystal Munoz who was sentenced to eighteen years for conspiracy to commit drug trafficking on the line. We Have Dalton Walker. He's national correspondent for Indian country. Today and he is Red Lake. Initially obey. Welcome to native America Native America Calling Dalton Booze you Monica Week. Which for having me on. Yeah Yeah this. Is it just a fascinating thing that showed up in my feed and Tell us a little bit more about this case. And and her clemency. It's it's pretty interesting. Overall the White House and would make Some announcements periodically on who they pardon there any clemency. And they'll list some names just a little bit of information on each and this happened on February eighteenth. I believe in crystal is listed in in a word that didn't mention that she was native or Navajo so as a native journalists. You always try to look and see. There's a native angle to pretty much any story that you can kind of find out there. But I needed twitter. I found that she had connection and that she was nabbed host. I thought hey this is pretty interesting. But they're looking to see where I get it from basically yes. She was kind of a tough story. She has been in prison she. She's out now but she was in prison for a long time on charges that the White House said we're a small role in that in that specific crime. Yeah from what I was reading. That she Some drug traffickers asked her. If she had been somewhere I think it was an a national park and she drew them a map on where they were planning to go or something like that and that was considered Aiding a drug traffickers is. Is that what you got from the from her case? Yeah basically. That's kind of the gist of it. In the court hearings and all other stuff it Kinda piled up on her and unfortunately you kind of went that direction. Not In her favor in when I was talking to her she was pregnant at the time basically she said she was speaking with law enforcement and she didn't think she did anything wrong wasn't trouble and it sounded like they told her that she wasn't and not long after they came over and basically took her in took her in and held her instruments basically held even during the whole trial period. Yeah and then she. She ended up being convicted and gave gave birth in prison Do you know what I mean. Do you have any idea why she got such a long sentence for that? From my understanding it had to do early on with the whole legal process in the way her attorney decided to go through with it and crystal told me that she wasn't even sure even that gets her at now. We're fighting to get her released clemency. They're saying that that whole initial part didn't go in her favor at all and the a t in her attorney basically.

Id Representative Senate South Dakota Saint John Washington Senate State Affairs Committee representative attorney twitter MOU White House Crystal Munoz