6 Burst results for "Dalton Conley"

"dalton conley" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:54 min | 2 years ago

"dalton conley" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"There's still a long way to go in this fall semester. I'm Mitchell Hartmann for Marketplace. So Mitchell was talking mostly about undergraduates and how the pandemic is changing that experience. Postgraduate education in this Corona virus economy, though, is no picnic, either. Dozens of PhD programs across the country are saying they are not going to be admitting any new students for the next academic year. That is the one that starts in 2021. Marketplaces, Eric Embarrass reports. It is a temporary pause that could have some long term effects. Colleges and universities have a lot of additional cost these days. Personal protective equipment, remote learning Infrastructure Cove in 19 tests and with fewer students on campus. They have less money coming in. So, says Carla Hickman with a B, an education consulting company Schools are making for they can fill their commitment financially. Students who have already matriculated One way they could do that is by not admitting new students. Princeton sociologist Dalton Conley says that's the decision his department made in regards to PhD students. It made more sense to suspend admissions for one year and have those resource is and to be killed by 1000 little cut. But students from poor backgrounds may not be ableto wait for schools to restart admissions so they'll pursue other careers. Suzanne Ortega, with the Council of Graduate School, says that's bad for diversity. We're disrupting the flow from a more diverse undergraduate student pipeline. To a less diverse graduate student pipeline. Even undergraduates are likely to feel the effects, says Gwen Toner, with the National Association of Graduate Professional Students, especially at big State universities, where the graduate students do the majority of close to the majority of the instruction of the undergrads. This might make it very challenging to continue to provide this inequality of education. But this pause could also give graduate programs time to change, Princeton sociologist Dalton Conley says with field research suspended We have to rethink. We have to develop courses and a curriculum in, for example, virtual ethnography, And that, too, will take resource Is America Baris for Marketplace? So here's an interesting tidbit in the How you feeling about this economy category. Spoiler alert pretty good, it turns out. The conference board reported this morning consumer confidence in September as high as it's been since the pandemic started also the jump in confidence from August to September. Big shop in 17 years. Chalk it up to that slowly declining unemployment rate. We will get the September jobs report Friday morning, by the way. We, though, have been checking in with some consumers also regular listeners to this program about what they have been consuming lately, and it seems Sometimes spending a little money. Could bring a little bit of joy. This is Kelly Kolinsky in Columbus, Ohio. I wasn't quite ready to fly yet, but I felt like I really needed to fly home to check on my mom who's 89 years old. And when I'm home, I always try and get my mom to maybe spend a little money on some new things. But she was raised during the Depression, and she won't spend money on anything except for groceries, and she only buys those when she has a coupon. But this afternoon we were looking through on old dog eared cookbook and she said, You know, your father gave this to me about a month after we were married in 1954. So you know, I think she's motivated by not wanting to spend on what she feels isn't necessary. But there's also a lot of value in the memories associated with a lot of things that she has Hi. This is Ernesto from Chicago. Not a lot of new things, but what I did do recently was invest in some Hi and ah French cookware, the enamel type that I usually would not buy because for the most part, it's just way too expensive. Now, I don't know if it's on sale. At 50%, because Businesses want to get rid of it before a possible future bankruptcy. Or not, I mean, that's that's how I see it. Most have been buying some use camera gear. It never goes bad. Hi. This is Ellen Murphy from Mission Hills, Kansas and my current virus shopping. A stories have gone from Being mass step and gloved up, too. Just Eyes glazed over walking through the store, picking at like things off of a very strictly written list, So I was pleasantly surprised Last week when I found A stash of tree ripened peaches. And I can tell you that there is nothing like a fresh late. Late summer peach. When you slice into it in the morning and sit down to eat it, no matter what is coming across on the radio. It.

Dalton Conley Princeton Mitchell Hartmann National Association of Gradua graduate student Council of Graduate School Eric Embarrass Carla Hickman Suzanne Ortega Gwen Toner Ellen Murphy America Depression Kansas Kelly Kolinsky Columbus Ohio Ernesto Mission Hills
"dalton conley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"dalton conley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"There's still a long way to go in this fall semester. I'm Mitchell Hartmann for Marketplace. So Mitchell was talking mostly about undergraduates and how the pandemic is changing that experience. Postgraduate education in this Corona virus economy, though, is no picnic, either. Dozens of PhD programs across the country are saying they are not going to be admitting any new students for the next academic year. That is the one that starts in 2021. Marketplaces, Eric Embarrass reports. It is a temporary pause that could have some long term effects. Colleges and universities have a lot of additional cost these days. Personal protective equipment, remote learning infrastructure coded 19 tests and with fewer students on campus. They have less money coming in. So, says Carla Hickman with a B, an education consulting company. Schools are making sure they can fill their commitment financially to the students have already matriculated one way they could do that is by not admitting new students. Princeton sociologist Dalton Conley says that's the decision his department made in regards to PhD students. It made more sense to suspend admissions for one year and have those resource is than to be killed by 1000 little cuts. But students from poor backgrounds may not be ableto wait for schools to restart admissions so they'll pursue other careers. Suzanne Ortega, with the Council of Graduate School, says. That's bad for diversity. We're disrupting the flow. Summon more diverse undergraduate student pipeline to a less diverse graduate student pipeline. Even undergraduates are likely to feel the effects says Gwen told her with the National Association of Graduate Professional students, especially at big State universities, where the graduate students do the majority or close to the majority of the instruction of the undergrads. This might make it very challenging to continue to provide this inequality of education. But this pause could also give graduate programs time to change, Princeton sociologist Dalton Conley says with field research suspended We have to rethink. We have to develop courses and a curriculum in, for example, virtual tomography, And that, too,.

Dalton Conley Mitchell Hartmann Princeton graduate student Council of Graduate School Gwen Eric Embarrass Carla Hickman Suzanne Ortega National Association
"dalton conley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:51 min | 2 years ago

"dalton conley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Long way to go in this fall semester. I'm Mitchell Hartmann for marketplace. So Mitchell was talking mostly about undergraduates and how the pandemic is changing. That experienced postgraduate education in this Corona virus economy, though, is no picnic, either. Dozens of PhD programs across the country are saying they are not going to be admitting any new students for the next academic year. That is the one that starts in 2021. Marketplaces, Eric Embarrass reports. It is a temporary pause that could have some long term effects. Colleges and universities have a lot of additional cost these days. Personal protective equipment, remote learning infrastructure, Coben 19 tests and with fewer students on campus. They have less money coming in. So, says Carla Hickman with a B, an education consulting company. Schools are making sure they can fill their commitment financially to the students who have already matriculated. One way they could do that is by not admitting new students. Princeton sociologist Dalton Conley says that's the decision his department made in regards to PhD students. It made more sense to suspend admissions for one year and have those resource is than to be killed by 1000 Little cut. But students from poor backgrounds may not be ableto wait for schools to restart admissions so they'll pursue other careers. Suzanne Ortega, with the Council of Graduate School, says that's bad for diversity. We're disrupting the flow from a more diverse undergraduate student pipeline. To a less diverse graduate student pipeline. Even undergraduates are likely to feel the effects says Gwen told her with the National Association of Graduate Professional students, especially at big State universities, where the graduate students do the majority or close to the majority of the instruction of the undergrads. This might make it very challenging to continue to provide this inequality of education. But this pause could also give graduate programs time to change, Princeton sociologist Dalton Conley says with field research suspended We have to rethink. We have to develop courses and a curriculum in for example, virtual tomography, And that, too, will take resource Is America Baris for Marketplace? So here's an interesting tidbit in the How you feeling about this economy category. Spoiler alert Pretty good, it turns out. The conference board reported this morning consumer confidence in September as high as it's been since the pandemic started also the jump in confidence from August to September. The biggest jump in 17 years. Probably chalk it up to that slowly declining unemployment rate. We will get the September jobs report on Friday morning, by the way. We, though, have been checking in with some consumers were also regular listeners to this program about what they have been consuming lately, and it seems Sometimes spending a little money. Brings a little bit of joy. This is Kelly Kolinsky in Columbus, Ohio. I wasn't quite ready to fly yet, but I felt like I really needed to fly home to check on my mom who's 89 years old. And when I'm home, I always try and get my mom to maybe spend a little money on some new things. But she was raised during the Depression, and she won't spend money on anything except for groceries. And she only buys those when she has a coupon, But this afternoon, we were looking through on old dog eared cookbook and she said, You know, your father gave this to me about a month after we were married in 1954. So you know, I think she's motivated by not wanting to spend on what she feels isn't necessary. But there's also a lot of value in the memories associated with a lot of things that she has Hi. This is Ernesto from Chicago. Not a lot of new things, but what I did do recently was invest in some Hi and ah French cookware, the enamel type that I usually would not buy because for the most part, it's just way too expensive. Now, I don't know if it's on sale. At 50%, because Businesses want to get rid of it before a possible future bankruptcy or not, I mean, that's that's how I see it. Most have been buying some use camera gear. It never goes bad. Hi. This is Ellen Murphy from Mission. L's Kansas and my current virus shopping. A stories have gone from Being mass step and gloved up to just Eyes glazed over walking through the store, picking up like things off of a very strictly written list. So I was pleasantly surprised Last week when I found A stash of tree ripened peaches. And I can tell you that there is nothing like a fresh late. Late summer peach. When you slice into it in the morning and sit down to eat it, no matter what is coming across on the radio. It almost doesn't matter..

Dalton Conley Princeton Mitchell Hartmann graduate student Gwen Council of Graduate School Eric Embarrass Carla Hickman Suzanne Ortega America Depression Kansas Kelly Kolinsky National Association Columbus Ellen Murphy Ohio Ernesto
"dalton conley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:05 min | 2 years ago

"dalton conley" Discussed on KCRW

"Still a long way to go in this fall semester. Hi Mitchell Hartmann for marketplace. So Mitchell was talking mostly about undergraduates and how the pandemic is changing. That experienced postgraduate education in this Corona virus economy, though, is no picnic, either. Dozens of PhD programs across the country are saying they are not going to be admitting any new students for the next academic year. That is the one that starts in 2021. Marketplaces, Eric Embarrass reports. It is a temporary pause that could have some long term effects. Colleges and universities have a lot of additional cost these days. Personal protective equipment, remote learning infrastructure, Coben 19 tests and with fewer students on campus. They have less money coming in. So, says Carla Hickman with a B, an education consulting company. Schools are making sure they can fill their commitment financially to the students have already matriculated. One way they could do that is by not admitting new students. Princeton sociologist Dalton Conley says that's the decision his department made in regards to PhD students. It made more sense to suspend admissions for one year and have those resource is than to be killed by 1000 Little cut. But students from poor backgrounds may not be ableto wait for schools to restart admissions so they'll pursue other careers. Suzanne Ortega with the Council of Graduate School, says. That's bad for diversity. We're disrupting the flow. Summon more diverse undergraduate student pipeline to a less diverse graduate student pipeline. Even undergraduates are likely to feel the effects says Gwen told her with the National Association of Graduate Professional students, especially at big State universities, where the graduate students do the majority or close to the majority of the instruction of the undergrads. This might make it very challenging to continue to provide this inequality of education. But this pause could also give graduate programs time to change, Princeton sociologist Dalton Conley says with field research suspended We have to rethink. We have to develop courses and a curriculum in, for example, virtual tomography, And that, too, will take resource Is America Baris for Marketplace? So here's an interesting tidbit in the How you feeling about this economy category. Spoiler alert pretty good, it turns out. The conference board reported this morning consumer confidence in September as high as it's been since the pandemic started also the jump in confidence from August to September. The biggest jump in 17 years. Probably chalk it up to that slowly declining unemployment rate. We will get the September jobs report on Friday morning. By the way, we though, have been checking in with me in some consumers who are also regular listeners to this program about what they have been consuming lately, and it seems Sometimes spending a little money. Brings a little bit of joy. This is Kelly Kolinsky in Columbus, Ohio. I wasn't quite ready to fly yet, but I felt like I really needed to fly home to check on my mom who's 89 years old. And when I'm home, I always try and get my mom to maybe spend a little money on some new things. But she was raised during the Depression, and she won't spend money on anything except for groceries, and she only buys those when she has coupon. But this afternoon we were looking through on old dog eared cookbook and she said, You know, your father gave this to me about a month after we were married in 1954. So you know, I think she's motivated by not wanting to spend on what she feels isn't necessary. But there's also a lot of value in the memories associated with a lot of things that she has Hi. This is Ernesto from Chicago. Not a lot of new things, but what I did do recently was invest in some Hi and ah French cookware, the enamel type that I usually would not buy because for the most part, it's just way too expensive. Now, I don't know if it's on sale. At 50%, because Businesses want to get rid of it before a possible future bankruptcy. Or not, I mean, that's that's how I see it. Most have been buying some use camera gear. It never goes bad. Hi. This is Ellen Murphy from Mission. L's Kansas and my Corona virus shopping. A stories have gone from Being mass step and gloved up to just Eyes glazed over walking through the store, picking up like things off of a very strictly written list. So I was pleasantly surprised Last week when I found A stash of tree ripened peaches. And I can tell you that there is nothing like a fresh late. Late summer peach. When you slice into it in the morning and sit down to eat it, no matter what is coming across on the radio. It almost doesn't matter. Now We're sitting right here listening, Teo, And that was Ellen Murphy in Mission Hills, Kansas with those summer peaches Ernesto from Chicago, Kelly Colette's in Columbus, Ohio. His final note on the way out today, CNN did the number crunching on this one. A breakdown of exactly where the $750 in taxes income tax is That is that The New York Times reports president Trump Aid in each of the first two years of his presidency went The Congressional Budget Office actually tells you what the dollar percentage breakdown is so of the 750 bucks. President Trump contributed $181.87 for defense spending. Another $72 in 44 cents for veterans benefits and military pensions. Medicaid health care for the poor and disabled Got $115.60. I could go on the data does, but here's the last one will pick Mr Trump's annual contribution of paying interest on the national debt. Which now stands north of.

Dalton Conley peaches Ernesto Princeton Mitchell Hartmann President Trump Ellen Murphy Kansas Columbus Ohio Chicago graduate student Eric Embarrass Council of Graduate School CNN Carla Hickman Suzanne Ortega Congressional Budget Office Kelly Kolinsky
"dalton conley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"dalton conley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Even though we think of the endowment effect as economic language now just describe what you think is the sort of psychological you know formation that results in our wanting to keep what is ours. Yeah, That's something called Loss aversion loss aversion is this basic idea that once you have something, it feels more painful to give it up. Then, then it would have felt good Tio acquired in the first place. So quite robustly. Students act as if it hurts 2.5 times more to be asked to give up the mug. Then then it felt good to be given the mug in the first place. It's almost as if it, you know, just instantaneously. This sense of ownership makes it a painful loss to give up the mug as opposed to kind of a smaller game toe Tio acquired in the first place, and what that does is it basically suppresses trade. It means that we just don't seem nearly as much economic activities we see between humans. So Keith Chen found that capuchin monkeys once they were taught to use money behaved rationally like we do when it comes to price theory and irrationally like we do when it comes to the endowment effect. We were surprised every month. Like every month, we would just be flabbergasted again. And how sophisticated are monkeys looked specifically at economic activity, but also the subtle ways in which they looked irrational and they looked emotional in exactly the same ways that people dio. Maybe we shouldn't be too surprised that other primates behave like us in these ways we do. Share more genetic material with them than other animals. That is something pointed out by the renowned primatologist Frans de Waal. When we asked him what makes humans human I've been doing this for a long time, like 40 years. And the question when humans are different and how they're different. Is for me a sort of weird question because for me, humans are primates, so they're not fundamentally different. Darling, of course, said that we descend from the apes, but I think he didn't go far enough. We are basically apes. There's no good reason to distinguish us from apes and their taxonomists, who have argued that we should not even have a special genius. We are just part of chimpanzees and bonobos because in terms of DNA, br 98.5% identical in every respect, I consider human intelligence and cognition. Variation on animal intelligence and cognition. I don't see this fundamentally different Okay, I see the walls point. Maybe we shouldn't be surprised that other primates engage in what looks like the economic activity we engage in. But still let's remember Keith Chen's experiments happened in a lab after he and his colleagues had painstakingly taught the monkeys to use money. You don't see capuchins setting up banks and stock exchange in the wild. You certainly wouldn't expect to see economic activity in animals further down the chain like Fish, would you? I said, Whoa! If networks will eat my head. Over the past few decades, an idea has been percolating through the field of biology. That economic activity may be happening in the wild. Yeah. I guess it would be natural to think that animals can't engage in very rich economic activity because you just look out at the animal kingdom and you just typically don't see very rich economic activity. But I think when you start to actually test those assumptions by bringing animals into the laboratory and just try and create the conditions for them to learn economic, trade and subtle aspects of reputation, maintenance on dhere detection and cheating punishment. Is that it doesn't take very much that adding just very thin layers of institutions for trust, adding very thin layers, which allow the emergence of abstract money just immediately engender very, very rich economic activity, even among monkeys. We'll hear about that next week. But first, here's the Princeton sociologist Dalton Conley, when we asked him what makes humans different from all the rest? The answer is Absolutely nothing one by one. The supposed attributes that we had thought were unique to humans have been shown to be present in other species. Crows used tools..

Keith Chen Dalton Conley Frans de Waal Princeton
"dalton conley" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

15:08 min | 2 years ago

"dalton conley" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Life changing for this person and their family and for me both professionally and personally one of the things that I did notice and that I have the family also brought to my attention many times was although this is legal the infrastructure doesn't necessarily exist for someone to access the law and there were a couple of you know how happy coincidences that allow this person to access the law but there are a lot of things left up to chance and as a professional that makes me uncomfortable if someone comes to me in approaches me help me do this I can't be sure that we can be successful again it is the drug companies who have put a clinched fist around this medication and it has become very very difficult to get it as I said Sentinel went down to you know it used to be twenty five fifty dollars and then went up two to three thousand dollars and now it's no longer available at all so now all of these compounding pharmacies have gotten into it and it takes a lot of work to get that drug when you need it you gotta find a doctor who will fight for you and get that drug thank you we only have about five minutes left so I'm going to ask the remaining members of the audience to try to keep your questions or comments as brief as possible thank you so first off you have a much larger younger following that I think is represented in the crowd here may be the youngest one in the crowd not certain at thirty two so I've got a question from a religious standpoint and don't worry it's not weird and awkward and preachy but some of you may think it's a little weird it's not operative bricks yeah now I'm I'm a satanist I'm a member of the satanic temple and it may come as a bit of a surprise that I agree with absolutely everything that you're saying everything that stalking about as far as the right to die one of our tenants is the third tenant is one's body is inviolable subject to one's own will alone a lot of a lot of what we believe is basically if you should be a good person and you should have control over your own body to not get into that much greater details and tell question yes sorry now my question is what is your take on possibly leveraging religious liberty to emphasize the capability to have the right to die to say it is my religious belief that I have the right to die the way that I want to none of that has that kind of religious authority I'm not sure what you're asking me I'm telling you is that mine personal belief is one minute his companion I believe in god I was baptized I pray my religious beliefs is consistent with my beliefs that I have a right to say when my life should end Q. and a from the historic sixth and I synagogue Diane Greene when my time comes I agree with that completely thank I'm not you have to move on to the next person sorry we are running out of time very quickly hi my name is Barbara BA I am with you all of my personal belief based on the experience my parents as we should have the right to decide for ourselves however I'm wondering what you would say to somebody who's concerned about the fact that most people working age are covered by managed care insurance and a growing percentage of Medicare beneficiaries are covered by managed care it's a lot cheaper for people to die than to be turned to health palliative care and and to go on living so what what would you respond to somebody who would be concerned about financial incentives to encourage people to opt for a quick death versus living on in needing more care I think he is gonna to be up to each and every one of us to make that decision all of the hard decisions every day I make decisions based on what I can and cannot do what I can afford to do what I cannot afford to do I think that those same decisions that we make as we live with may be the same decisions we make as we reach the end of the month I'm not arguing that poor people should go more quickly I'm saying that I want each of us to decide for ourselves and that decision may include what do I want now what can I do now what's realistic for me now I hope that those decisions do not come out of monetary concerns I'm sure some do I think most come out and pain and suffering just two more please make a question or comment please hi Roseanne Weissmann I had gone to a program at Iona I highly recommend that to people who are looking for a place to discuss end of life great two things one of the interesting exercises they have boys riding around a **** right what did you want your children to say that was really great course everybody laughed at mine and they said would you be happy if this is what it said and I said I would be ecstatic so it was a funny one what I learned is there something that I didn't understand about the DC law I really felt it was a right to die it is not a right to die you have to have two doctors through it is really hard so let's say you're in a situation where you're ready to go I mean you're mine's not as good whatever you lost your vision and so on you have no right to die and you that you have to have two doctors certify in writing orally fifteen days apart that you are going to die within six months and there's only certain things you're going to die out within the S. not quite sure okay read you can't that's not quite true it depends on what the illness is and there are many that you could be suffering from the determination must be from two doctors that what ever the disease is the physical diseases that you are within six months of death and you must be able to say that without anyone else around no relative no daughter no son no uncle who's waiting for all your money you must be by yourself and that's a good car it makes so that no one can be taken advantage of it is medical aid in dying but you must meet certain criteria and I understand those criteria thank you finally I'm afraid we cannot indulge in an exchange that this might be because we're just about out of time and there's one person standing behind hi there Nicolas Batum my question was how would you go explaining this to a family member that might be visibly afraid of their own mortality well a number of people have asked me this and what I would say to you as a young person is the way to start the conversation and this may sound ridiculous when the urine odor person speaking to a younger one or younger ones speaking to an older one I would say you know what I've been thinking a lot about what hi everyone at the end of life and start talking about yourself and what it is you've been thinking and what it is you want and then perhaps they will little by little and I'm not saying it's going to happen in one conversation you may need to do it little by little by little to advance that conversation to really find out exactly what it is that person more I hope that helps thank you thank you thank you for former first book finding my voice this book when my time comes Diane lane has allowed us to enter into her life and to use that as a public service and for that land line we remain eternally grateful that's going to be upstaged onstage here for a while so those of you who have both have to sign this this event took place in early February hosted by politics and prose at the historic sixth and I synagogue here in DC Diane ream longtime host on W. A. M. U. radio discussing her book when my time comes joined by radio host culture what TV visited the American enterprise institute where social scientist Charles Murray shared his beliefs on the role of genetics in race gender and class here's a portion of the stock for almost a century now the social sciences have been in the grip of an orthodoxy that is scared stiff of biology at the moment it takes the form of three widely and loudly proclaims truths gender is a social construct race is a social construct class is a function of privilege I have stated those tenants very boldly if you go onto a university campus in chat privately with faculty members whose research touches on these issues you'll find that many of them have a much more nuanced view than that they acknowledge that biology plays a role but only a few of them Dalton Conley being one of them are willing to say so in their lectures articles or books what amounts to is that I have set out in this book with the aim of demolishing the academic orthodoxy and making it easier for the same members of academia to do their work to watch the rest of this program visit our website book TV dot org type in the title of the book human diversity using the search box at the top of the page Nextbook debate she's been radio WCS be from Washington well here colonial historian Mary Beth Norton talking about the years leading up to the start of the American revolution the event hosted by Smithsonian associates good evening hi Morton Rosenberg with Smithsonian associates and I'd like to welcome you to tonight's program to our members I'm so glad that you're here it's your ongoing support that make events like this possible and to the many of you joining us for the first time in equally warm welcome and an open invitation to explore the wide range of programs we offer at Smithsonian associates now is the perfect time to turn off your cell phones or anything else that might make noise during the program thank you for doing that we're thrilled tonight to welcome a clean historian Mary Beth Norton she is the author of five books and co editor of several others and her textbook of people and a nation a survey of U. S. history has been published in ten additions and has sold more than five hundred thousand copies Norton is a Pulitzer Prize finalist and with the twenty eighteen president of the American historical association she is the merry Domon Alger professor and professor emerita of American history at Cornell University her new book seventeen seventy four the young long year of revolution is available for purchase and signing following.