18 Burst results for "Dallas Taylor"

Do You Know Your Sonic Brands?

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

01:33 min | 4 months ago

Do You Know Your Sonic Brands?

"Gives us the first one donald donald donald all right was kind of the modern gold standard. I'm lebanon it for mcdonald's we're as i mentioned we're gonna be talking to dallas taylor from twenty thousand hertz. they didn't entire episode about strongly. Recommended is listening because that episode. We'll give you the deep dive into the bizarrely complicated. Backstory that jingle And just how huge stakes it was but it really did bring together the global marketing of mcdonald's which had always been scattershot and there really was nothing consistent except the golden arches All right so we're all primed warm. Nick gives an excellent flex net. Flex that flakes. Has anyone made it through the last year without hearing that seventeen times. So yes the netflix. But also has its own episode on twenty thousand hertz. Where i think they were the first to hear the back story of how that was made and how was originally or at one point was going to feature a goat get to the end and then like like that almost made the cut. But it didn't quite. I part of me misses the go that we never knew. And yes brianna mentioned in the in the chat here as we talk that It's also kind of law and order which boiler law and orders not here but like the two great bottoms and there's some weird stat right. That like the law and order is seventeen sounds mash together. It's like jail doors clanging it's a gavel. It's like all of a sudden. I that's that's another.

Donald Donald Donald Mcdonald Lebanon Seventeen Times Dallas Taylor Netflix Nick Brianna
"dallas taylor" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

The Podcast Engineering Show

02:46 min | 4 months ago

"dallas taylor" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

"Everything is either covered in foam or covered in absorptive material. Or you know pyramid foam or you know whatever. So that's just keeping the room contained every time someone into my studio. That's not like an audio the first thing they go. Oh this weird like to not here any reflections. So that's step number one but then there's my voice Which takes a long time to get decent at. And i'm talking into an sm seven. Be like many people do nowadays. And i personally love this microphone. Because i can be literally anywhere for the most part not literally but most places and you would never know the difference so like if i'm recording a whole show here in my studio but then i go travel and i'm in a hotel room i can pull this out of my bag. Plug it right up and it sounds almost identical any issues with that. I can record ads or whatnot. So i love it because it only records it only is like what's right in front of it so that is going into a yellow tech arm which then goes around my argosy console desk that then plugs into em- put one of my my sound devices. Mix priests six The reason that i use A sound devices mixed pary and not pro tools. Which i did for years is because that transition from being a sound designer sound engineer into hosting is two different parts of my brain and i cannot i cannot have pro tools up and my brain work in the proper storytelling world. I don't know what that clashes. But i needed something that was that never fails and is off to the side. And when i hit record. Forget about until i stopped and so the sound devices has never in five years ever dropped a recording. Ever had a problem. So that's why. I use that listening to you through that right now. Then once. that's solid my voice. Just get sent off to my team. So i own a sound design company Called defacto sound over. There are bread and butter is doing like trailers for things like hbo net flicks games. We do a lot of advertising. Cars commercials nike commercial stuff like that. So that's our bread and butter over there but we also have a team of great sound designers that we use to help craft this show and so as far as on that side kind of moving into we send the show through writers we send all of our things their transcripts. The red dot com. We use google docs to to write our show before we ever go into audio. We have long month. Plus phase of all we're doing is just scripting Once we do get past the scripting phase and then we're approved on the script. Then we go into sound design we usually will use our sound editor soren to do our first three preliminary passes and so sore and works in pro tools. And you know all the fancy.

nike five years first three step number one Called defacto sound first thing two different parts red dot com one six google years sm seven docs hbo tech
"dallas taylor" Discussed on The Futur

The Futur

07:34 min | 9 months ago

"dallas taylor" Discussed on The Futur

"We'll come back to our conversation with dallas taylor the question i really want to know from you. Is that with the bronco people Was it a single bid situation or were they talking a couple of people and wooded you do if it was a competitive situation to get them to feel like yup. I trust you. You're the right team you go do this. I think it was the director that brought us on somebody that we'd worked with before but that never means that you're gonna necessarily get the job as far as when you're actually negotiating with a client My tendency when i get an i broke this rule just the other day and i'm i'm still like kicking myself for it but when i do the first call with an agency or a creative As creative. luckily we're in. I'm in a situation. Where a have a producer who can really deal with the money and those type of things. And then i'm the creative director of the studio. The one thing that i learned is that i should never ever as the creative especially on the first call ever start getting money or talking about that sort of stuff my number one job and i put this on a whiteboard right in front of me off camera is to get them excited. My only job on that first call is to be fully creative like if they start diving into money or whatever i go you know what. That's not my thing sam. My producer Handles that but once we get off the call we'll talk in the know she'll she'll put together a bid and so there is a lot of like Theory in that In if i messed that up. And i'm forty five minutes into a call and then i start digging into money and stuff it just kind of sours the conversation so i always find the best thing to do I mean people were coming for an experienced. People want to know that they're in the best hands for that job possible. And so as the creative leader of the studio My job is just a spitball on the highest level and get everyone like jazzed about sound And so that's that's really. How like the biggest technique that i have is that like i do creative. Samantha does money and everything else and of course. We're talking behind the scenes. And i own the company but But yeah i think like that's that's hard and if you're a solo creative that's really hard to do But i would encourage people to kind of if you're having a conversation especially in real life on zoom or something like that number one thing. Get them excited. Push money to after like slow the process down when we're talking about you know tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars depending on what's happening like that process does not need to be a rushed process It needs to just be slow methodical and really well thought out and it starts with one call that is really just like if you want to call her performance Performance of just like every thing that you could possibly do creatively to to boost this spot. And so so that's really my theory With that we don't get every day because so many things are relationship based so someone might know some other sound designer or whatnot. That's okay there's plenty of work to go around okay. So i've i've been working in advertising for twenty some odd years and i'm always fascinated by how other people approach things especially because you're in a different part of the post production pipeline chain. So i'd i'd love to hear a little bit more about your process. pre that call in the mindset. 'cause you said about getting excited so let me just see the first part and then i'll follow up with the second question. Which is your worst process. Liked to prepare for this call. How important is this first. Call to build a genuine connection. Because it's like if you have it then you have a shot of doing this work. If you don't kind of ends the affair right. So what are you doing to prepare for these calls. The first thing is to actually evaluate it for the best for this job Most of the time. I think we are but if i recognize that we're not i don't want to waste anybody's time especially when we're talking about sound like heavy sound design and stuff. I feel really confident about our our our Process but not only. Is this the best job for us but is this project. Something that i don't know is at least good for the world or at least not not bad for the world and so generally at thankfully eleven years into the studio we do have the opportunity to say no and survive That took a long time to get to that point. But for us i found in the past that even bringing on certain projects or hearing or maybe i repeat client that we had a really bad experience with or something like the. The process is really like do. We want to take this job Because because if we don't or if we had negative process before or if it's something that's bad for the world or just negative and she's gonna make our gut churn That takes a lot even though we may get financially compensated for that it takes a lot of emotional toll out of our studio since we generally stay away from like hard line politics. We definitely do 'cause base stuff like hard line. Politics or like slimy stuff. I learned like over the years. I worked on so many different types of projects That i found that the content that comes through the screen is generally generally reflected in the process. And what. I mean by. That is if. I'm working on something like the real housewives of something something almost every time i've ever worked on kind of a reality show. That's like crazy and its way The whole process is like that like everyone kind of absorbs. We all absorb each other's energy and when all of those All this tape and it's just like drama and all this stuff. I found every time if something's dramatic onscreen or especially pointlessly dramatic. It comes through the the the the post production process to some kind of evaluating things. Like do i feel good about this Do i want to do this. Sort of thing like do i. Am i gonna wake me up in the morning. And i'm like i can't wait to work on this. So that's that's one thing and then What we crossed that bridge. I'm generally going to be excited about whatever it is and so then then. It's really like to prepare for that that call. It's knowing what the brief is not just skimming it really understanding like what they're trying to communicate. How sound can play into that. 'cause usually you know they're all gonna most of them are going to have music And really just trying to solve problems along the way. Like if i see something. That's super sound. Is i want to make sure that. I'm prepping tour when i come in i say. Hey let's let's get a sound as i'm pass for your editor like we're not gonna charge anymore but we're going to start doing getting sound design Give us some super rough cuts. We're gonna sound design more split everything out and give it to the editor where the editor can then influence how that used Because it's very hard to shoehorned that in when an editor hasn't already set those those beats it's very hard issue horn that in when it's when it's already semi approved up the food chain and so yeah i'm trying to see where the potential problems are how it can alleviate those fears and then just You know how can i i. I don't think this is really natural. Like if i'm excited about it i'm just gonna be like peppy and go through all start talking really fast and and and start saying oh we could try this or maybe we could try this or you know. Maybe we could try this totally unique thing in an wieden kennedy case. I was like why don't we. Why don't we just do it right now and send it over in two days and let us know what we think what you think so. Yeah just getting myself psyched up. But usually it's like if.

dallas taylor Samantha sam wieden kennedy
"dallas taylor" Discussed on The Futur

The Futur

02:21 min | 9 months ago

"dallas taylor" Discussed on The Futur

"Then i think you'll really like off plus also they've got great customer support whenever you need it and from real humans which is always nice right now. Evil octopus is offering future listeners. Fifty percent off of their first visit. Email octopus dot com slash future or quote code future dash fifty at sign up for fifty percents off of your first month of email marketing. Visit email octopus dot com slash f. T. you are quote code. Future.

"dallas taylor" Discussed on The Accidental Creative

The Accidental Creative

02:46 min | 11 months ago

"dallas taylor" Discussed on The Accidental Creative

"Love that so if people want to learn more about you learn more about the show Better understand this topic where you send them. I would say to the podcast especially because we're talking to you from podcast right now so wherever you are right now You can simply just type in twenty thousand hertz which is all spelled out with outnumber so not me etc and Go over there. Tap subscribe and the cool thing about our show is that it's completely evergreen so you can literally tap on anything. There is no through line. Sometimes we put a little easter eggs around. But there is no like you have to listen to this before the other thing So if something sticks out Almost recently we've done Just some really fun things on perfect pitch and melodies that you hear all the time but you never realize that they're all intentional or like the sound of taranath sorace wreck sound in jurassic. Park was made and not accurate at all too real life. You know the netflix will scream all kinds of stuff so all these like little sound things that most people have no idea what the story is behind it We do these very deep. Dives that take us over two hundred hours every single episode to craft together. And they're out there shore they're like twenty twenty five minutes but it's called twenty thousand hertz. Yeah i've been doing. What you described the auditing bins or the hopping in and hopping out of a certain topics. That are that catch my district. The will scream. It's funny because every time my kids are watching a star wars movie or a marvel movie. Every time that happens we turn to each other. And we're like there. It is every single this on our air yet. But i know that skywalker. Where wilhelm was developed and started i know they have discontinued it and i know that they have put they have now have a new sound that they're putting all of these films that no one has discovered yet. I need to put that call out on my own. That's awesome by the way if you're listening to you have no idea what we're talking about listened to that episode immediately you'll be like oh yeah that right. It's like everybody knows that. But they just don't know what it's called and i'd say like if someone the in your listening audience is like very much on the advertising stuff then i'd go checkout defacto to we do silly stuff on instagram and we do really silly stuff on youtube where we take like tiktok videos and like re sound design them But yeah on the defacto side. We're basically just doing like trailers and ads and all that stuff if somebody wants to check that out. That's cool but since we're here in podcast. Land highly recommend twenty thousand hertz. In tastic will dallas taylor. This has been a conversation. I'm i'm can't wait to continue to dive into the show. Twenty thousand hertz. Thanks so much for taking the time to be.

netflix youtube wilhelm
"dallas taylor" Discussed on The Accidental Creative

The Accidental Creative

04:45 min | 11 months ago

"dallas taylor" Discussed on The Accidental Creative

"Hover and now back to the interview with dallas taylor. Yeah okay so. I want to talk a little more about the show and specifically about some of the things you've discovered. Is there a story that you uncovered on the show. That especially surprised. You were delighted you in some way. So many there are so many. As far as like surprise and delight the one that jumps out right away is that the net flicks too dumb sound. You know the thing that episode by the way when you turn on netflix goes dune. Well that story had never been told of where that came from and so It took me a took a year to find who did it and kind of what. We're all the iterations to get to that point. They had all kinds of different versions of it. One that was like bubbles and Yeah there just like any sonic brand. They went through like It i it took us a year to find the people and it took them a year to make it Even though it's super short but they went through all kinds of focus groups and they had all kinds of different versions But the thing. That's the most surprising is that they almost put a goat. Bleat response at the end of that that sound so no joke and they they wouldn't let me play on the air as the direct source file. But they were like you are welcome to talk about it and you're welcome to recreate it but like they played it for me like no joke. This is exactly what it was. This is exactly what it sounded like a win win. So what was the rationale behind to go. The rationale is like it has something to do with the call and response. I can't remember the specifics. It's in the show. But i remember like The the person who was was leading that had something to do with the thought of like a goat response back and forth type of idea and sometimes like when..

dallas netflix
"dallas taylor" Discussed on The Accidental Creative

The Accidental Creative

03:39 min | 11 months ago

"dallas taylor" Discussed on The Accidental Creative

"It'd be like every image you ever saw was just brightened all the way to the max And kind of just in this very small bandwidth kind of what's happening with music and it's not like a you know i always try to go back to like what's natural for our ears and what's natural for our years is to have quiet in loud and to have you know whites and darks you know things like that Have dissonance and have harmony. That's another thing that that in our world when we think of dissonance and harmony I always find that like when we're doing like a scary trailer or something. It's kind of easy to make things dissonant because you can kind of throw anything at the at Sound design piece. And if you're not thinking about it it just kind of naturally comes out dissonant. So doesn't it's pretty easy harmony as hard and if we translate that to our normal world when when things are not designed or thought of our world just naturally ninety nine percent of the time is just very dissonant. And that's that's not something that we really like want whereas if you got a nature like generally it's very harmonic unless there's a predator that's about to eat you right. And and that's that's important point. I mean when you hear something that shocked q. in nature it's usually something that is like a warning sign to you ray. Dysentery sounds are warning signs like shrieks and things like that but we don't need like constant notifications and interruptions that is not good for our brain Be that's that's kind of putting yourself in a constant state of Oh there's a word for it. But i can't think of it. It's like a reaction alarm. Fatigue reaction fatigue when you can kind of be pained interrupted at any moment in your life like that is not healthy because you kind of get in a constant state of of anxiety that might happen might might be. They might be paying or something like that. so i always recommend like her off your notifications. Let your phones and devices work for you not the other way around. See what's interesting is. This is the way that our culture it's trending not just with sound. I mean sound is sort of like maybe the canary in the coal mine. Were moving moving and moving closer and closer to zero db. Everything is like peaked out. All the time ray but i think also just. We're doing that with our attention. Were maximizing our attentional You like you said we're being pained all the time. We're we're minimizing our attentional bandwidth instead. Were sort of squeezing as much as we cannot ever ramona where that's constantly refreshing twitter constantly refreshing instagram going checking the news and there are no peaks and trousers no ebb and flow this rhythm in our life anymore. Everything is maxed out all the time..

Sound design twitter instagram
"dallas taylor" Discussed on The Accidental Creative

The Accidental Creative

04:57 min | 11 months ago

"dallas taylor" Discussed on The Accidental Creative

"All i know is that Har- like harmful sounds can cause a lot of stress and stress. We have so much of it in our life and it would be great to find little ways to reduce that That that level of stress and so For me and this isn't like everyone in new york city. But like if you're in new york city i i have a really hard time sleeping when i'm there because i'm just not used to garbage trucks and the constant motion the constant movement of that city. For me i get very poor sleep because of that some people need the city sounds because they grew up in that But generally like we've made a situ we've kind of culturally decided that Loud sounds good. Sounds we have done that with restaurants and we've done that with concerts and The fact is our ears are not like made for that Are you know. We're in the first generation or the first couple generations in the entirety of human history. That's listening to sound on such a high threshold and In what our brains really crave is like the sound of nature. And that's you know how calming a hike can be Of course because of the wind and things like that but just the sound is something our brain really graves and the entirety of human history. It's it's really been absorbing natural. Sounds in the now In the last few generations we've replaced natural. Sounds with a lot of human made sounds and and what i would like Some humane sounds amazing. But i would like for people to do is is try to reduce some of these. Just like annoying sounds whether it be like a community effort or just somebody in their apartment putting. Wd forty on a squeaky door or something. Yeah you know it's interesting you mention that you of these man made sounds are maybe not harmful but certainly not Comforting way to us and one of the things that i often lament..

new york city
"dallas taylor" Discussed on The Accidental Creative

The Accidental Creative

05:02 min | 11 months ago

"dallas taylor" Discussed on The Accidental Creative

"So i've been listening to your show absolutely love it very excited to have you on the podcast today but the have to start with for those who may be aren't maybe sound professionals. What's with the name. Twenty thousand hertz. Twenty thousand hertz. So it's all spelled out there that's one thing But that is the threshold of our human hearing or at least it's the threshold of human hearing for babies and small children because as we get older it kind of we kind of lose that high end but essentially like what a hurts is is. It's like a cycle. Like sound is like a pressure wave and then like a vacuum. It's if you think of a speaker cone it pushes out and then it pulls in. That's how sound moves through the air and That's measured by hurts. So he had like twenty hurts. It's twenty cycles of that. That motion a really low sound. And then as you sweep up It becomes Ten thousand hertz herb thousand hertz and ten thousand and then all the way up to twenty thousand hertz but yeah there's a lot of tests online that the people can take in. Just be sad that they're hearing Doesn't go all the way up to that. But it's generally do and as as a an aging musician that i am i will admit that. Probably the high end boundary of my hearings probably much lower at this point than twenty thousand hertz. Imagine i think mine caps out even at sixteen. It's like sixteen thousand two hundred or somewhere around there but it's totally just age based so totally normal nothing to be ashamed of but yes i'm also an aging musician you need to do is just change. The name your show every year to be the top boundary of you're hearing rates next year it'll be like fifteen point nine hurts the of fifteen point nine of all right so You know we're we're talking about sound and the nature of your show is that you explore the origins of various kinds of sound and specifically me some of the shows..

"dallas taylor" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"dallas taylor" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> Four. Thirty <Speech_Male> three should be mindful <Speech_Male> experience <Speech_Male> that helps you focus <Speech_Male> on accepting things <Speech_Male> just the way <Speech_Male> they are. <Speech_Male> It's not something that <Speech_Male> anyone else can tell <Speech_Male> you how you're supposed <Speech_Male> to feel. <Speech_Male> It's deeply personal. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It also brings up some <Speech_Male> pretty big <Speech_Male> questions about our sonic <Speech_Male> world. <Speech_Male> Is Four thirty-three <Speech_Male> music <Speech_Male> is sound <Speech_Male> is sound music <Speech_Male> is there even <Silence> a difference? <Speech_Male> John Cage <Speech_Male> reminds us <Speech_Male> that music isn't <Speech_Male> the only kind <Speech_Male> of sound worth listening <Speech_Male> to. <Speech_Male> All sounds are <Silence> worth thinking about. <Speech_Male> We <Speech_Male> have a once in a <Speech_Male> lifetime opportunity <Speech_Male> to reset <Silence> our ears, <Speech_Male> and if we <Speech_Male> become more conscious <Speech_Male> of what we hear, <Speech_Male> we'll inherently <Speech_Male> make our world sound <Silence> better. <Speech_Male> Quietness <Speech_Male> is not <Speech_Male> when we turn off <Silence> our minds to sound. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> But when we can really <Speech_Male> start to listen <Speech_Male> and hear the <Speech_Male> world in all <Silence> of its sonic beauty. <Speech_Music_Male> So <Speech_Male> in the spirit, <Speech_Male> let's perform the first <Speech_Music_Male> movement of four thirty-three <Speech_Music_Male> together <Speech_Music_Male> wherever you are. <Speech_Music_Male> It's only thirty <Speech_Music_Male> seconds long. <Speech_Music_Male> Listen <Speech_Music_Male> to the texture rhythm <Speech_Music_Male> of the sounds around <Speech_Music_Male> you right <Speech_Music_Male> now. <Speech_Music_Male> Listen for the loud and <Speech_Music_Male> soft the harmonic, <Speech_Music_Male> the dissonant <Speech_Music_Male> and all <Speech_Music_Male> the small details that <Speech_Music_Male> make every sound <Speech_Music_Male> unique. <Speech_Music_Male> Spin <Speech_Music_Male> these thirty seconds <Speech_Music_Male> as present <Speech_Music_Male> mindful and <Speech_Music_Male> focused in this <Speech_Male> real life <Speech_Music_Male> sonic moment. <Speech_Music_Male> Enjoy <Speech_Music_Male> the magnificence <Speech_Music_Male> of hearing and <Speech_Music_Male> listening. <Speech_Music_Male> So, here comes the first <Speech_Music_Male> movement. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Starting. <Silence> <Advertisement> Now. <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> And that's it. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We did it. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> This <Speech_Male> ted talk was based <Speech_Male> off of an episode of <Speech_Male> twenty thousand. <Speech_Male> Hertz which is my <Speech_Male> podcast, and it's <Speech_Male> also the newest member <Speech_Music_Male> of the Ted Family <Speech_Male> of podcasts <Speech_Male> twenty thousand Hertz <Speech_Male> a lovingly crafted <Speech_Male> show that reveals the <Speech_Male> stories behind the world's <Speech_Male> most recognizable <Speech_Music_Male> and interesting sounds. <Speech_Music_Male> In <Speech_Male> addition to the four thirty-three <Speech_Male> episode this talk <Speech_Male> was based on. <Speech_Music_Male> You'll also find <Speech_Music_Male> tons of other fascinating <Speech_Music_Male> sound stories. <Speech_Male> We've unpack <Speech_Male> origin stories <Speech_Music_Male> behind the wilhelm <Speech_Music_Male> scream. thx <Speech_Music_Male> Deep Note, the <Speech_Male> NBC chimes <Speech_Male> the xbox startup <Speech_Male> sound the Netflix <Speech_Male> Sonic logo, the sound <Speech_Male> of Star Wars cartoons <Speech_Music_Male> and so. <Speech_Male> Many, more <Speech_Male> the stories <Speech_Male> behind these sounds <Speech_Male> are so fascinating, <Speech_Music_Male> some <Speech_Male> surprising and <Speech_Male> some surprisingly <Speech_Male> emotional. <Speech_Music_Male> We also dive into subjects <Speech_Music_Male> like brain science, <Speech_Music_Male> themed songs, <Speech_Music_Male> music copyrights, <Speech_Music_Male> the sound of Hamilton <Speech_Music_Male> Sonic allusions, <Speech_Music_Male> sound of the deep ocean, <Speech_Music_Male> and even the <Speech_Music_Male> sound of other planets. <Speech_Male> The podcast <Speech_Male> is also clean <Speech_Male> and appropriate for <Speech_Music_Male> all ages. <Speech_Male> So take a few moments <Speech_Male> right now to go subscribe <Speech_Male> to twenty <Speech_Music_Male> thousand Hertz, <Speech_Music_Male> which is all spelled out <Speech_Male> without any numbers <Speech_Male> T. w. <Speech_Music_Male> e. n. you <Speech_Male> get the idea <Speech_Male> once you find are purple <Speech_Male> logo tap <Speech_Music_Male> subscribe and enjoy <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'll meet <Music> you

"dallas taylor" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

07:12 min | 1 year ago

"dallas taylor" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"I'm Elise Hugh and you're listening to Ted talks daily. The, sound you're hearing from my voice what are you hearing? What is sound anyway and what is music? What does it mean to really listen? All these questions are considered in today's meditative top from Dallas Taylor, a sound engineer and the host of the twenty thousand Hertz podcast. He spoke at Ted Twenty twenty about the meaning of sound and the power of silence. Listen carefully and if you WANNA hear more check out twenty thousand Hertz wherever you get your podcasts. For many of us right now, our lives are quieter than normal. And quiet can be. Unnerving. It can make you feel lonely or just all too aware of the things you're missing out on. I think about sound all the time. A sound designer and I host the podcast twenty thousand Hertz. It's all about the world's most recognizable and interesting sounds. But I. Think. This is the perfect time to talk about silence. Because what I've come to understand is that there is no such thing as silence. In the person who opened my mind to this idea is one of the most influential composers in history. John Cage has made an impact on artists in many genres from avant garde musicians to modern dance to pop music. Right now, we're listening to his nineteen forty-eight piece called Anna Landscape. This version was recorded in nineteen ninety-four by Stephen Jewelry. This piece is actually not very typical of John Cage's writing. He's more known for his innovations and guard techniques. But despite his reputation no one was prepared for what he did in nineteen fifty two. When he created the most daring piece of his career. It was called four minutes and thirty three seconds, and it was a piece that some critics even refused to call music. Because for the entire duration of the piece, the performer plays. Nothing at all. Well to be technical the performance actually playing rest to the audience and looks like nothing's happening. GIANCANA's four thirty-three was performed for the first time in the summer of Nineteen fifty-two by renowned pianist David Tudor. It was at the Maverick Concert Hall in Woodstock New York. This is a beautiful wooden building with huge openings to the outdoors. So David Tudor walked out onstage sat down at piano then closed the piano lead. Even Sat in silence only moving to open and close the piano lid between each of the three movements. After the time was up, he got up. And walked off the stage. The audience had no idea what to think. It made people wonder if cages even taking his career seriously. A close friend even wrote to him begging that he not turn his career into a joke. John Cage had well well, if you could call it composed a piece of music that. Challenged some very established ideas about music composition. It's something that musicians still debate today. To understand just what John Cage was thinking what's back up to the nineteen forties back then John Cage was making a name for himself composing for prepared. To make music like this John Cage put objects inside the piano between the strings. Things, you just find lying around like screws tape and rubber erasers. So. Now, you've transformed the piano from a total instrument with high and low pitches into a collection of unique sounds. The music you're hearing is cages Sonata number five from Sonatas and interludes for prepared piano probably his most famous work outside of four thirty three. This version was performed by Boris Berman. John Cage wrote incredibly detailed instructions about where to place each object in the piano, but it's impossible for performer to get the exact same objects. So the sound you get is always different basically, it comes down to random chance. This was pretty bananas and pretty alien to the way most composers and musicians are taught to do things. John Cage was becoming increasingly interested in chance and randomness and letting the universe provide the answer to the question. What note should I play next? But to hear the answer to the question I you have to listen and in the nineteen forties listening to the universe was getting harder to do. The Music Company. Was Founded in the thirties it really took off and soon there was constant background music nearly everywhere. It was almost impossible to escape. John Cage realized that people were losing the option to shut out the background music of the world. He worried that muzak would prevent people from hearing silence altogether. In one, thousand, nine, forty, eight, four years before he wrote four thirty-three John Cage mentioned that he wanted to write a four and a half minute long piece of silence and sell it to the music company it started as something of a political statement or an offhand comment. But this idea struck a nerve and quickly evolved. John. Cage was starting to think deeply about silence. and. When he visited a truly quiet place. He, made a startling discovery. John Cage visited an Acoustic Chamber at Harvard University. Inequality Chambers or rooms that are acoustically treated to minimize sound to almost zero. There are no sounds in these rooms. So John Cage didn't expect to hear anything at all but he actually heard his own blood circulating. I've personally experienced an antibiotic and it's a really wild experience that can completely change your perceptions about sound and silence. It really felt like my brain just turning up an amplifier grasping for anything to hear just like John. Cage I it very clearly here my blood pushing through my body John Cage realized in that moment that no matter where we are even our bodies are making sound. There's basically no such thing as true silence. As. Long as you are in your body, you're always hearing something. This is where. Interest chance and randomness met his interest in silence. He realized that creating an environment with no distractions wasn't about creating silence. It wasn't even about controlling noise. It was about the sounds that were already there but you suddenly here for the first time when you're really ready to listen. That's what's so often misunderstood about four thirty, three people assume it's a joke but that couldn't be further from the truth. It sounds different. Everywhere you play it and that's the point. What John Cage really wanted us to? Is The beauty of the sonic world around us..

John Cage David Tudor Ted Twenty twenty Music Company Elise Hugh Dallas Taylor Ted engineer Maverick Concert Hall Boris Berman Anna Landscape Stephen Jewelry GIANCANA New York Harvard University Acoustic Chamber
"dallas taylor" Discussed on Switched On Pop

Switched On Pop

10:22 min | 2 years ago

"dallas taylor" Discussed on Switched On Pop

"Whoa hello that i mean it's too bad this is radio because my eyes are popping out of my head right that was such a different experience you're saying that's the exact same original recordings yes but remastered and it sounds like a different track yes so that was remixed and remastered because they had even more to go with in the two thousand eighteen version so the amazing thing is they've done this for a lot of the beatles albums now and it's and it's something i don't even have a lot of people know and just a namedrop a little bit because you know i work in a little bit of the music the sound stuff i actually wrote rick rubin because i email you know but i asked him like what's the best mastering thing that sticks out in your mind more than any other issues like the white album the latest version of the white album just his mind off and so there's this goldmine of new beatles stuff marketing told us you know here's a new remastered here's a new remastered master you buy this you buy this but now this is awesome these rate rena stores so that's one of a lot of examples of where remixing and remastering can make a huge difference with technology now the kind of recently this terrible thing happened where universal music is the biggest record label in the world and recently there was a fire on the universal studios lot that just happened to catch a warehouse on fire that just so happen to have hundreds of thousands of original masters masters in it and so these are i can't even begin to start this list but i'm gonna just start throwing stuff out okay old stuff like louis armstrong duke ellington bing crosby ella fitzgerald judy garland billie holiday on the second line of eight lines patsy kline chuck berry elton john leonard skinner eric clapton jimmy buffett eagles aerosmith oh smith iggy pop patti labelle tom petty and the heartbreakers please sting it i'm just going to skip around here REM janet jackson guns n. roses queen latifah sonic youth no doubt nine inch nails snoop dogg nirvana soundgarden hol beck sheryl crowe to pock eminem fifty cent the roots and it just keeps this is a scratching the surface of what original master tapes most likely burned in in this fire a universe that is that is heavy that's that's crazy yeah so it's one of those things that you don't you can't really understand stand what that what that losses for music without hearing the remastered that we just heard so what that means is that we can't do do that same experiment that we just heard with the with the beatles lucy in the sky with diamonds with so many of these artists you've just mentioned like unless they have already transferred the multi-track versions of these tapes to digital files now they've done that already for some of these but it's most certainly not been done done for all of these for all of them yeah because again it's a marketing thing like who who were going to revive you know so you just never know so that's all these re mastered tracks that could have been just gone up literally in flames yes yup and it's so a lot of people are calling it the biggest loss in music recording history but but again when we're talking about mastering and we're talking about remastering and all this stuff it's like why do we need these original tapes when we have what i have here on the cd will now we know without a shadow of a doubt that like sometimes the best sounding version of our favorite music is not what we have right now yes accessible and one day we could come back and make it better and more intentional from what the artist originally meant for it to sound like and i think that's such a great takeaway here because remastering is not just about how can we make this sound like something you know of of the present moment but rather you know in this in in a hypothetical world where lennon mccartney had access to modern mastering tools what might what might this music of sounded like like let's bring it it into technicolor well dallas that was a slight downer of a note to end this episode on can we bring this conversation nation about mastering to a more positive conclusion yes the great news is is that mastering and remastering is going through a bit of another revitalization if you will right now that a lot of people don't realize so you know on one sense the only physical medium that's growing in the music industry vinyl and i think anybody who actually plays things on a new vinyl especially there's a big misconception here about vinyl like sometimes you put on an old record onto a turntable it's all crackly you nasty and you're like this does not sound great it's been scratched in a case for fifty years yeah but like a new vinyl record on a great turntable is sounds incredible and so this this is coming back the physical medium of taking a an album pulling it out of a piece of artwork putting it on a turntable putting a needle on it and walking away and listening in this mastering engineers just can't take the i tunes version and then just press it to vinyl because of all these problems of the actual physical medium so that's kind of pulled old people back to go wait a second we can have a little bit more juice here and a little bit more punch on this in but because we have to for vinyl as a lot of people oh might think that the vinyl records sounds better at but they can't put their finger on it while it might be because of the vinyl record has these physical limitations that force it to have more dynamic grange and more positive thing words that people say when they listened to vinyl records right right right interesting so it's not anything inherent about the medium vinyl itself it's more of the limitations that make it sound so refreshing maybe from what we're used to hearing on spotify and i tunes cetera i do believe that there is something to be said for the analog thing and not having bits and bit rates and sample rates and all that stuff i think that there is a natural a more natural naturalistic sound not to say that anything and digital's bad because that's not true digital sounds amazing but there are vinyl aspects it's hard to know all this stuff is such a mystery because you might have a vinyl record that has been mastered completely differently so you can't really compare that but what i do know is that sometimes when you do hear it you're like wow that sounds incredible all these beatles albums i have the remastered on vinyl and and not only are they remixed remastered but they're also having to be forced onto vinyl which was the original intent to begin with so i kind of feel like it's like the best version of what was intended by the beatles to begin with sure the great news is that i think it's really easy at this point to say that like streaming services are the problem the great news here is that they're fixing this problem and so there's a couple of things i would say right off the bat while i have this airtime that i can do is up on your soapbox his first off you can go into apple music or spotify or wherever you listen to music streaming music and there's gonna be a section in there in the settings we can turn on high quality streaming yes that will be more for your data plans but yeah it'll sound better and it's marked difference in my opinion so if you have a higher data plan or whatever or if you're on wi fi i suggest go and switching over to high quality streaming that will immediately immediately kind of like push us out of that like really bad MP3 soon and then start to kind of get higher quality music and be a little bit more discerning because of that nice yeah but these streaming services also get complaints from listeners and the number one complaint is giant jumps in volume this has also happened in in with commercial television and and congress had to come in and regulate how loud commercials could be but with music and streaming services it's much more of like a self off policing thing but what they wanna do you know services like spotify or whatever like wants you to just enjoy your music without having to think about these giant changes in volume yeah and so they're starting to measure loudness in a completely different way they're they're they're measuring loudness from like an average level and then they're taking all of these average average levels and then putting all the songs back to back so what that means is that they're not measuring it from the max level like it touches here so we all everything super loud but then you still get these he's varying you know if you listen to again that that led zeppelin piece versus you know some new pop track you're not getting that spike in volume what they're doing is they're measuring these things as an average and now putting all all of those averages together so the great news here is that now we're in a we're in a world where like getting that dynamic range back to the the artists you know volume is a tool for so long that's been taken out of the toolbox right now due to the way that we listen we now have volume as a tool again and that's thanks to to the streaming services especially the ones that want things to just play coherently from from one to the next and it really if you're over compressing if you're going too far to try to compete with that the nineties and two thousands loudness war you're just gonna sound like kinda crunchy and kinda sad compared to sting giving more punch yeah so so whether intentionally or not the streaming services are now sort of playing the role of the UN in the in the loudness wars or something there absolutely the conflict in their own self interests yes i know that i tunes even has like a special like mastered for itunes badge where they're also trying to fight the problem as well so the amazing thing here is that artists do what they're doing mastering engineers they're doing mixing engineers know what they're doing the people who are who are serving you this music wanna make it better you're all all of these people and we are all music lovers and i don't think there's any kind of like bad person out there trying to like take your music can make it worse is that you can take comfort in knowing that like everyone in the chain understands it and everyone in the chain wants to serve you the best version of this this music and it's really exciting and it even has gone so far that like certain artists have been giving different masters for different platforms so as an example gino l. monet actually put out two different masters for one for i tunes and one for youtube now it's real slight but these are different but these are different aren't files which is fascinating that they're they're going this far to maximize audio fidelity so so one is slightly more compressed a little bit louder and that's the one that went on the CD eighty and on itunes and that's this one.

fifty years nine inch one day
"dallas taylor" Discussed on Switched On Pop

Switched On Pop

07:08 min | 2 years ago

"dallas taylor" Discussed on Switched On Pop

"So what happened here so you know the one thing that i found found in the research and stuff is like artist typically won't acknowledge it they'll just slowly kind of fix it over time so since then i believe the only replace you can hear this version of it is from the cd and let's give everyone you know credit here it may have just been a mistake that that would explain a lot but the actual actual mastering engineer has simai come on the record while through a private email to say that you know he's that it was kind of over driven are already before it got to him him in like he wasn't proud of this hopes that like this example here will bring some sort of good as far as backlash against these volume wars and so meeting yeah even the most like you know even like the most go to mastering engineer this engineer ted jensen out of nashville which is just an icon was like this was a problem now to be to be fair since then you know if you listen to youtube or the music video or itunes or any of that stuff this version has been inscribed but as far as i'm aware this was the very first cd version but that's not the only place where sometimes mastering gets a little wrong and i recently did a show about the eight eight kick drum and just you know just hanging out with DJ jazzy jeff as as podcast hosts do and and he dropped this nugget on me when we did teased a DJ i'm the rapper was the first record that i used eight eight eight eight samples on that i wanted to kick drum to really resonate and i remember fighting with the engineer because i wanted to push the envelope on how how loud and how deep i wanted to eight a week because i knew there was some hip hop records that you would get in a car and you would play and the entire car would vibrate and i was like i want that i had to fight with the engineers turn it up and he would turn it down and turn it up and i had to kind of explain to him like i understand that there is a technical way that you think you're supposed to do something i want to push the envelope i need this to be this loud allowed on these almost at the brink that is not distorting and it's not overpowering everything but i need this to be the focal point of the record hip hop is something at the drums have to drive the record and i got him to allow me to do it to the point that i loved it and what i never realized was i'm never told the mastering engineer that i wanted that and he thought it was a mistake and he took all of the eight out of the album and i don't think i've ever said this in public i can't listen to he's the DJ i'm the rapper now that is the biggest record we've ever done and i absolutely hate the way that it sounds sounds they sucked all of the bottom in from the eight out in mastering pretty heartbreaking wow this is such a different take on this phenomenal we've been talking about where DJ jazzy jeff actually wants to push the limits and get that speaker rattling rattling body shaking sound by like reaching the upper limits of what the the human ear and human speakers can tolerate well when this album came out it was kind of during this transition to so maybe this mastering engineer didn't come across that very much do that i mean he has already trying to fight with the engineer of what what he wanted because it's what he heard you know out on the street and with people but this was just slowly moving its way into the mainstream and so to support that you know you know it's heartbreaking that he says he can't even listen to this because it's the biggest thing that they've done but for sake of analysis here here's he's the DJ i'm the rapper straight from the cd being not to be banned but as it seems some suckers people getting the rules about put your mind back in that eight oh eight thing that does that ring any sound and if you're listening on ear buds right now you might not notice it but i promise almost you if you're in the car right now or if you're listening on a big stereo you're going to hear the difference here so this is maybe our interpretation of maybe what he meant for it to sound like talking yeah but as it seems some sokolski forgetting the rules about wrapping but that's a a huge difference yeah it really is and i love that because maybe now DJ jazzy jeff can listen to that you know this classic song by him and and the fresh prince and and not feel so crestfallen over what could have been an sadly that was put together by my team and i don't know if DJ jazzy jeff said we're gonna hear it but you know this is an amazing transition to what remastering is because this would be an awesome album to re master yeah i'm so glad you brought this up because it's something i see again and again you know classic albums remastered an honestly once again i don't really know what that means so so and i don't know the frankly if it's just kind of like a marketing ploy to get you to buy something that you might already have in your collection it's absolutely a marketing ploy but it actually is legitimate a two and so when remastering is where you take these original reel to reel tapes and with newer technology you know as we get a better and better digital it'll technology in newark tech these things can be transferred and higher quality ways and so all kinds of albums especially albums that people continuously by people like and led zeppelin the beatles the rolling stones like these things get released over and over again because people by them and when a new remastered comes out services like itunes a tune spotify usually remove the older versions from their library which is interesting because kind of the whole perception of what classic music sounds like is being reshaped shaped every time a new remastered comes out so like as we replace the old versions with newer ones kind of rewriting history at the same time but it's not all so bad because they sound amazing yeah and it shows that a classic record is is a living object and it will sound different in mean different to different people different times what may be an example that we could use to like here and original versa remastered version my favorite example is lucy in the sky from the beatles so listen to exactly what it is straight off the original master okay i've got that in my ears so years years years later they do a new version this is not the only remastered by the way so here's the two thousand nine version that was from the same source i believe it was a stereo mix so this is kind of remastered version two thousand nine.

"dallas taylor" Discussed on Switched On Pop

Switched On Pop

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"dallas taylor" Discussed on Switched On Pop

"Okay initial impression it rocks deeply okay but we're talking about mastering so i'm i've now now have a little more you know vocabulary to talk about this okay so i'm hearing like one thing is that the vocals are kinda hard to hear here they feel like they're buried amidst all the other instruments like it's hard to differentiate one from the other feels a little flat perhaps so a lot there are a lot of complaints from metallica fans that it sounded really really bad compared to what they've i've heard before and i will admit i am also metallica fan so hearing that yeah knowing what where i'm going with this kind of painful to hear that version of it but also a great example to play when you don't know where it's going because our brains except what we hear you remember it was just talking about MP threes and kind of downgraded quality and all that stuff while i think it's going to be real clear here soon so what happened was is this this CD came out around the same time this album came out there there was a new guitar hero where he can play this track in guitar hero but very quickly as the internet does started to put two and two together and realize what are you going to get something about the guitar hero version sounds different than the actual version that came out on the CD and so someone posted this to the internet so here's the guitar hero version of of that same track.

metallica
"dallas taylor" Discussed on Switched On Pop

Switched On Pop

05:50 min | 2 years ago

"dallas taylor" Discussed on Switched On Pop

"In these conscious decisions by someone to give themselves a little bit more even though they're song might sound a little bit quieter than somebody else's that's fascinating like a way to stand out today is actually to maybe decrease the volume of your track little and introduce a little more more dynamic range that yeah yeah that's jano retreat to move forward certa in a little sidebar here just to remember we haven't even talked about MP threes and so this was also happening about the time where MP three started to takeover for wave files so files are these pristine files it's it's full quality quality but you gotta get rid of something when you're gonna take this giant full quality song and make it one one hundredth the size so a lot of this started back back over the like in the napster days like imagine like you got your backstreet boy cd you pop it into your computer you have a dial up internet connection and want to get this shared to napster so what are you gonna do you're gonna do all the settings that like oh i like the file size of that and it's smaller and smaller and you listen to it and you go i that sounds fine to me because without context of what it could sound like it's kind of okay but that kind of led us into kind of where we're going because it's almost like watching these tiny MP3 files is kind of like watching youtube or net afflicts before it fully buffers you know it's kind of like fuzzy and then it clicks into HD or four k yeah that's kind of what the MP three was doing with music you know it's almost like back in the day when we had standard definition television sets we didn't really complain about it when we had DVD's we watched it and it's amazing compared to VHS but if you'll get a DVD now it looks awful and that's kind of what a lot of music has been for a really long time and so the good news is there is hope but there have been some really bad offenders along the way why don't we take a quick break and then maybe will return i sort of rogues gallery of some of the worst casualties of the MP three era and the loudness wars this episode is sponsored by dell they're totally remastered x. p. s. thirteen laptop takes binge-watching to the next level with vivid colors and super smooth streaming it's also got incredible built in speaker so you don't have to sacrifice on sound quality the next time you watch your favorite music movie or documentary next time you i say just one more episode make sure you're getting the del cinema experience ready to remastered your next binge session get the x. express thirteen laptop with the latest intel core processors call eight hundred buy dell that's eight hundred beat you y del this episode is sponsored by masterclass an immersive learning learning experience that's really unique they have classes taught by people who are absolute masters of their craft you can learn singing from christina aguilera producing and beat making from timbaland jazz from herbie hancock and they're all beautifully shot the level of production is incredible and it's not just i music i mean this master class roster is all over the map cross genre i'm i'm talking about for instance we checked out the masterclass hosted by i pen and tell her what does that have to do with music you might ask i'm not entirely sure but i will say it has a lot to do with how we talk about music how you present things things in a clever and interesting surprising way to this applies not only to magic which i do not and frankly never will do it applies to like how you communicate how you you how you teach how you podcast how you talk to people this was one of the most fascinating things i've ever seen i mean whether you're a fan of of penn and teller are not like this is truly something to behold this to absolute masters at the top of their game breaking down how they get into your head how they grab your attention how they riverview from the first word to the last and yes teller talks it's wild it's fast and they're over sixty classes masterclass and they're adding adding more all the time each class is broken out into individual lessons that are about ten or fifteen minutes long and you can watch them on any device it's really flexible so i highly recommend you check it out get unlimited access to every master class and as a switch john pop listener you get fifteen percent off your annual all the access pass just go to masterclass dot com slash pop for fifteen percent off that's masterclass dot com slash p. over for unlimited access to masterclass at fifteen percent off masterclass dot com slash pop okay we're back we are deep in the weeds of mastering and we're going to get to know ooh this dark art of music a little bit better by actually studying some of its casualties now yes so i would say that the first the thing that comes to mind when anyone talks about mastering gone wrong is the death magnetic story by metallica i'm gonna play you what came off of the cd okay and i just love for you to give me your reaction sounds good so here's the day that never comes off love the original cd.

fifteen percent fifteen minutes four k
"dallas taylor" Discussed on Switched On Pop

Switched On Pop

05:22 min | 2 years ago

"dallas taylor" Discussed on Switched On Pop

"Yeah that is erasing that is like the epitome of loud rock and roll yeah people always want things to be like how can you take it louder and louder but this is an example of good psychology what they do is they start at a volume that's quieter and you physically turn up your volume turned up your stereo at the beginning of the song so then you leave it alone you get into it whatever and then it forces it to be louder and you never you don't really notice it's just like the intensity is is something that doesn't happen nowadays i mean interestingly even the wave form of stairway to heaven is kind of like the stairway up an up and up even in volume interesting so today you wouldn't find into track with those extreme lows in those extreme highs volumes i imagine it would if we looked at the wave form of contemporary song would be like flatter flatter not a not a staircase but one of those moving walkways in the in the airport or something it also has to do with the way that we consume music if you think about back back you know maybe in the seventies you may have a stereo and you kind of just set the level and you kind of listen to full albums right start and you'd play the whole thing this is something that you know a little sidebar i really enjoy now very intentionally listening to fool albums from from top to bottom but it's it's something that we don't do a lot have now with playlists and all this stuff and kind of bounce all over the place with volume yeah totally so another thing to keep in mind that the format was in analog and so these are things he's like the the vinyl record cassette and for analog there was you had to really have this headroom you had to have this buffer for allowing these dynamics and music and so this this was kind of set at a lower volume than what it turned into later because if you think about it like you could you could literally bounce the record needle out of the groove with base at a certain time how yeah that's an amazing image i love it okay yeah so there's a lot of limitations to to the physical medium to so in addition to you know kind of listening to albums from top to bottom there was also these kind of physical limitations and that's just one of many in the eighties there was this in this giant seismic shift because of digital technology it kind of changed everything as we know so that that kind of initially that initially manifested itself as the CD right so now you no longer have to worry about out having so much base that the needle on your turntable jumps out of the groove of the record you're playing but i have to imagine there's still some pitfalls when it comes to music in the digital era yes so with every new technology and new advancement we soon find out that it can be abused and and so in this case what happened is now in the digital world we have a ceiling we have the the maximum level that you can make a digital file all the way up to here and that is not debatable is it is a hard fast line whereas in the analog world it was a little mushy and you had to be conservative with how you did that and how you approach that but now we know all the way within you know point zero zero zero zero zero one percent of max loudness where to go and so now songs could be louder louder than ever and so we've been living through something called the loudness war all the way back from when it started in the nineteen eighties so it's like too much of a a good thing you don't have the same limitations on loudness that you did in the analog era but that freedom has been abused possibly yeah possibly debatably okay debatably so i think if you think about that very first example i played for you where if we just ended up a little bit you get a perceived volume volume difference now assuming that if we just go louder and louder and louder louder than the other track that you're hearing the naturally the the the idea would be like well if this is louder it's going to be better but there's only so far you can go in digital stuff these wave forms are being squished squished and squished into the tiniest amount of dynamic range and is not even knew like this didn't just happen with digital technology the beatles actually got abbey road to buy this fancy compressor compressor just because they were trying to compete with the volume coming out of motel really so this was something leading into the digital world right and so essentially now we have this finite ceiling of loudness everyone can push all the way toward it we can make the volume of anything any track max out right before the absolute salute maximum possible level and again with this old analog tack it's like you had to be really conservative and since then like every single year the average autumn so the average between the quietest and the loudest part has gone up and up and up since every single year whoa wait that's kind of staggering like since the dawn of digital music has been getting like from an absolute perspective just louder and louder if you look across the board of all music it's been getting louder and louder i i wild okay yeah so rewind i'm gonna just acclimate you a little bit to the difference in volume that happened straight off the record here's here's a pink floyd money.

zero zero zero zero zero one p
"dallas taylor" Discussed on Switched On Pop

Switched On Pop

06:29 min | 2 years ago

"dallas taylor" Discussed on Switched On Pop

"And i'm musicologist nate sloan so i wanted to tell you about this cool thing that i have gotten into who are you and what have you done with with charlie harding i don't know what you're talking about who's who's this charlie harding person i seem to recall that i use i used to host the show with char char songwriter yes songwriter charlie harding wait a minute dallas taylor is coming back to me now we your dallas taylor host of the awesome podcast twenty thousand hertz and since you're here is there anything you want to talk about about well i guess i can always kind of working on something anyway so here's something that i've been thinking about a lot but i i want to start with an example so i want you to tell tell me which one of these two examples sound better to you so here's one so that's the first one so now take a listen to the second can't version of this let me know what you think okay do you have any overall thoughts you hear any differences between the two you know dallas my initial reaction is that and i'm i'm not going to necessarily have the vocabulary here but the second example you played sounds lake juicier it sounds thicker it sounds deeper it makes my head nod with that much more intensity what's going on here so nothing is different other than turn the second one up oh but all of what you said said is exactly the phenomenon that is totally appropriate or ears are weird and they react to things in different ways so everything that you you said is absolutely accurate red let's run that back one more time because that's blowing my mind okay 'cause we listen to the first example again let's do it and the second that's wild it kind of sounds like i'm listening to a different sign but you're telling me that all that's changes that you've upped the volume of the second example yeah the second example is two decibels louder so what musical phenomenon are we dealing dealing with right now that's a little example of how our ears hear the world slightly differently what it means that our ears don't necessarily hear everything exactly as the world presents them you know we kind of know that dogs can hear really high pitches that are are hearing kind of gets the top end of our hearing kind of goes away stay with age but we can't hear super low frequencies but there's slopes in there too and so by turning it up just a little bit you hear a little bit more base here a little bit more trouble it sounds a little little bit more full years a little bit that's not necessarily what i'm here for i'm here to demystify the art of mastering and that's been a lot of the motivation for for how mastering has been approached for a while and for for a lot of different reasons i am so glad that dallas my my longtime co host here is bringing this topic to the table because it's sort of a scarlet letter that i wear as musicologist i don't really know what mastering is i hear this term all the time i see it on you know liner notes for a record mastered by so and so but man man i would be lying if i said i really understood this dark art you're referring to so i'm excited to dig into this topic me too and i guess the first question that i always have have about this is what is the difference between mixing and mastering so there's a big difference the mix is you know after you compile all the recordings and you know all the takes from the drums vocals all these things you compile all together mixing is taking all of those elements yes you're mixing the individual instruments you're mixing in the voices you're kind of doing panning you're adding effects volume compression eq- auto tune all that stuff so there's a ton to it i mean the vast majority of the creative process that's all happening like in the mix a lot of times especially with really big artists rests they may be mixing and working with different engineers and different cities in different time periods and all this stuff and eventually all these things have to kind of be put together next next to each other and if you just hold them together as they are straight in the mix it can kinda sound wonky is it like carpentry you put your table together and all the different elements go into place in our joined properly with all the the right nails and fasteners listeners but then at the very end you need to like stain the thing you need to finish it you need to give it a glossy sheen or like furniture picking gang you see they all have to work together in the end it might be an awesome piece but this other a piece might be an awesome piece but they totally clash and so that sometimes happens even with great mixes to to begin with okay so you've just described mixing and honestly it kind of seems like that's everything it's like how loud instruments are relative to one another it's it's affects what is left what what is what is mastering add to that final mix will there's so many different places that that music is going to go it could go at least traditionally into a cassette or an eight track vinyl record nowadays streaming it's gonna be a youtube it's going to go to these different places so they all have slightly elite different constraints or benefits and so the mastering process is is a bit of like what is it going toward and and how can we maximize everything in the sonically to kind of get us there but the real trick here is that like it's extraordinarily hard to find any pre mastered tracks out there usually artist keep that super close to the vest and they just don't share the pre masters because it's pretty much like sharing unfinished work gotcha but but with a lot of google searching i did find one track that i thought was pretty cool that was unmastered this heartless by kanye west in the nine.

nate sloan charlie harding twenty thousand hertz two decibels
"dallas taylor" Discussed on Bad Science

Bad Science

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"dallas taylor" Discussed on Bad Science

"This might be actually pretty accurate because generally when you accumulate wealth and stuff of course you're going to be the top of the food chain so there's almost like a bit of like if if you're really big and chunky like he might do really well for yourself and <hes> you know i i could definitely use lose a few but i really enjoy eating so it's kind of like a backup bus with that but with this like all the leaders were the ones that like where the fattest which made the most sense that they kind of accumulated most of that stuff right while the soldiers and stuff were like fan like famine and barely eating anything thing yeah but they're also jacked up like the people that were waiting for the water down there like the population are they seem to be star so they have like a secret stash of protein protein bars somewhere. That's what i'm saying like yeah and like wait. Wait rooms and stuff somewhere. There's a giant jim in that mountain mountain somewhere and some sort of hunting range. I guess where there's like buffalo and deer and i would have appreciated seeing some sort of you know like a bunch of carcasses or something. Someone's the scene where they're just like getting jacked. Sit in the steam room like ready to go yeah. Why was their skin white was. That's paint on there. Okay i mean i guess it's paint because they also have that like chrome spray for when they're gonna kill themselves. Currently that's like a euphoria thing like it's a thing that apparently has like a euphoria drug in it so they like express their face right before they like martyr themselves and the alex spray their teeth and all this stuff and they have like a chrome god. I know they do worship like the eight. I know that's a big part of the movie movie but yeah they're kind of sacramento juice company or the company i mean who knows tomato juice and salt. I mean you gotta get as in these days of course yeah so yeah..

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