35 Burst results for "Dali"

Retail therapy is great, but returns can take the fun out of it

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:05 min | 3 d ago

Retail therapy is great, but returns can take the fun out of it

"In this pandemic shopping online way way more than we ever have. And sometimes we want to return things. We by which can be a hassle with shipping and restocking fees and printing out. Return labels with the printers. Definitely all have at home. This holiday season some retailers are trying to make returns easier like employees at simon malls will process returns for brands like levi's gap. So all you have to do is go to a mall. Kiosk with your item and qr code but as annoying as online returns can be for us. They might be worse for the retailers. Cerita dali is a retail analyst at forrester. She says when you return something you bought online it usually goes back to a warehouse and then the retailer has to decide what to do with it and either it will go to potentially what we call jobbers who buy the merchandise for cents on the dollar or it could get destroyed. If it's not in re salable condition out the other scenario. Is that if it actually is in resale condition. They need to think about whether they're going to mark it down or whether they're going to sell it. Put it back on the shelf at full price. It sounds like a lot of decisions to make a lot of decisions and that's why over the years. There's been a lot of return software. That's been created to try to keep track of all this stuff and try to create some consistency around the process. And does that software work. It can software make these kinds of decisions about. Should we accept this sweater back and should we resell it or destroyed or whatever to some degree. I mean there's some information that software can provide. It can let you know how much of the inventory is actually still being sold. It can tell you. is it a really hot item. And it's highly likely that there's a good chance that it could sell again at full price if you were to put it on the shelf but there's still a level of human interaction that's necessary. I mean somebody has to inspect the merchandise and assess whether it's been warning or you know. Is there a stain on it. Or is the tag missing because all of that can impact things like the sale ability and the salvage ability of that merchandise so it sounds like getting online returns that are mailed back to you as a retailer. That sounds like a pretty expensive process. Oh yeah i mean it's expensive to ship and then it's kind of equally more expensive to return because you could not only do you have to pay for the shipping back which many retailers often do but then kind of you could be losing the salvage ability if it's not in resale lable condition. So that's why some of the i would say. The stingiest retailers often don't pay return shipping. Because they are trying to dissuade you from returning altogether and others may even charge a restocking fee in addition to you know kind of making you pay return shipping to really really discourage you from returning that merchandise. I mean it sounds like retailers are really been trying to figure this out to hack this process right and make returns easier for them and for us And also cheaper for them. Are there any other ways. They're doing that are weezer using technology to do it. Well i mean the the cheapest return is the return. That never happens right. So having more accurate sizing charts having more accurate photography. The closer that you can be to. The actual product is and simulate the lighting and the coloring so that it actually looks like what ship that's the ideal And that can reduce returns to one of the number one reasons that people return either clothing or homegoods anything kind of aesthetic is typically because the item was not pictured as what was ultimately sent. The things that you mentioned retailers are doing on their websites to try to give customers a better sense of a product before they buy. Do you think that that'll work this year that it'll at least help. Keep the number of returns down one. The type of merchandise has changed. It's too much more casual. Wear to start with so that kind of merchandise is kind of. It's easier to fit than you know kind of work. Wear or kind of dress shoes. So that's something that is in favor of apparel merchants in particular to start with and then on top of that if you do put in more photographs more accurate photography you focus on your sizing charts and the accuracy of your sizing charts. You're collecting ratings and reviews from customers that are giving their comments on the size and fit of of the merchandise. All of that is good and it doesn't hurt sales and it doesn't hurt the the accuracy of the information that you're you're providing so i do think that it should help managing returns even though e commerce is grown.

Cerita Dali Forrester Levi
Genetic Engineering in Animal Agriculture

Talking Biotech Podcast

06:08 min | Last week

Genetic Engineering in Animal Agriculture

"Welcome to the talking biotech. The weekly podcast but agriculture and medicine with an emphasis on biotechnology. And the good things we can do for people and the planet. My name's kevin polka. I'm your podcast host and western plant biology coming to you from archer florida on the exotic farm and we're going to talk about animal. Agriculture and how biotechnology has or maybe hasn't been able to improve animal agriculture. And we're speaking with dr mark west susan. He's a professor at texas a and m. veterinary medicine in the area. Physiology and pharmacology. So i've been trying to get him on the podcast for about five years and here he is finally so welcome to the podcast dr west. Houston thank you so much can. Yeah this is really cool. Because you're you've been Not just involved in your research work at in your research directly with animal genetic engineering and working with different projects but you also have a very good sense of what's happening. Globally in animal agriculture. So i really wanted to get an idea you know. What is the current state of genetic engineering across livestock and livestock pertaining to the four legged. Ones you know. Maybe not chickens. But we've covered a few on the podcast. But what are the current agricultural animals that are being improved with genetic engineering techniques. Kevin so i would say that almost every livestock species that you can imagine or think of including chickens as you mentioned but if you think about sheep goats cattle pigs and even to some extent horses Our genetic modifications that scientists are looking into to benefit either the animals themselves and or the products that they produce for us. So it's it's it certainly has a lot of potential and there's a lot of work going on in in with all all the different species. Will you named a few different species there. And as a general rule. How is transformation. Don is it the same from goats sheeps pigs horses or is there. Something unique about you know. Different wants the general methodology that she used for genetic modification animals or gene. Editing is essentially the same. And i would say that with the new technologies that we have involving crisper cast meghan. Nuclear aces It can be as simple as collecting an embryo at the one cell stage injecting it with the necessary molecular tools and then Transferring that embryo back into a recipient female to produce genetically modified animal. If the if the modification that you're looking for is more complicated or say you want a very specific promoter on it you want it. The gened only expressed or the the outcome of the of the modification to only show up in a particular tissue. Say milk or something like that then sometimes the modification. The complication of it would require that you would take a cell line Genetically modified the cell line and then do some screening and genetically modified again until you got the proper cell line then use that with nuclear transplantation cloning to produce the desired genotype that looking for but essentially it's the technologies are the same across species. The differences come up a really in controlling the reproductive cycle is the old the older technologies that have been around for a long time I think that that tend to sometimes throw a monkey wrench into the projects. In i worked for instance i work quite a bit on For years on dogs and if anyone wanted to Genetically modified dog is kind of. we're not talking livestock species but the reproductive tract is quite a bit are the reproductive cycle is a lot different and so they can become a lot more challenging. Where do you get the ovaries. Where do you get the embryos how synchronized different things like that. Okay so i. I see that. It's probably kind of the same across most of our barnyard animals. But so let's start with sheep. I really don't know much about sheep i haven't heard much about it. But what approaches are current. What is the problem in sheep first of all and what's being done to solve that problem. There's really no problem with sheep. I think there's a left. Oh i would call it a leftover kind of thought that she difficult to work with because dali was one of the You know first sheep that was cloned and if you look at sheep from a standpoint of clowning they are. They do seem to be very difficult. And i don't think anyone really knows why they seem to be a species. That for some reason The efficiency of cloning doesn't work it. It just doesn't work very well if you compare that. For instance the cattle. Are you compared it to go to some of the other species is just. It's hard to clownish eat. But if you if you get out of the cloning aspect and you say i'm just wanna do genetic editing. We've we've done a lot of genetic editing and cheapen. It works very well. We we use the process. As i said earlier where we just collect embryos at the one cell stage we take them into the laboratory inject our crisper cast to do the modification. We wanted walk back over to the unit. The surgery unit transform back into the cheapen and produced a large number of genetically edited a shape. Genetics are in my lab. The we were looking at was to create a bu- a model for bone disease. And i want to say we obtain like seventy five percent

Kevin Polka Dr Mark West Susan Archer Houston Meghan Florida Texas Kevin DON Dali Bone Disease
Dolly Parton partly funded Moderna Covid vaccine research

The Bobby Bones Show

00:44 sec | Last week

Dolly Parton partly funded Moderna Covid vaccine research

"Parton is being credited by the folks on twitter with helping find a vaccine for covid nineteen earlier this year dali announced she was donating one million dollars to nashville vanderbilt hospital to help advance the research. Being done for a vaccine it turns out. Vanderbilt was part of the madonna. Trials and madonna just announced their experimental vaccine had ninety five percent rate of positivity in human trials. They showed a graph of where the money came from. A huge chunk of it was dolly glow. I'm just happy that anything odd do can help somebody else. Donated the money to the covid fund. I just wanted it to do good and evidently a pure real. So

Nashville Vanderbilt Hospital Parton Madonna Dali Vanderbilt Twitter
What It Was Like to Interview Shima Oliaee

Inside Podcasting

05:57 min | 5 months ago

What It Was Like to Interview Shima Oliaee

"Hello and welcome to fight podcasting the show in which. Discuss their craft I'm your host Sky Pillsbury. This is a post show episode in which two very special guests will talk to me about last week's episode in which I interviewed Dolly Pardons America producer. Mo only if you haven't heard that episode, I recommend going back and listening to it before you listen to this one that way, our conversation may make a little bit more sense. Today on the show I have with me, the two people most likely to remember my obsession with Dolly Parton. My wonderful parents welcome to the show, mom and Dad Hey. Hi there. Thank you so much for saying yes. Welcome On this kind of show you guys get to ask me questions. I have the first question here ready to go all right dad. Right. Do you feel a part of dollars America? That is a really good question Yes, I think am I mean I must be one hundred percent because I'm a fan, so I think by default that makes me part of her America, because you know I know who she is. I adore her like so many others. Of course that begs the question like what is Dolly, Parton America, and I think one of the points that she made in last week's episode was that Dolly is sort of this prison for everyone else's story? And I'm not sure that I have a particular story to tell but I think that the aura surrounding Dolly is sort of like. Everyone can be part of it. No matter what walk of life you come from and so I guess in that regard. Be Part of Dolly Parton America. She talked about the feelings of otherness enduring during her show. Do you resonate with that at all? I probably don't if I'm being really honest and. That's because I am very privileged in my life, so you know I am female. I'm white. I've had opportunities that many many people don't get to have. I went to college. I got a good job after college. I sort of did the things that I expected I would do. Thus far in my life. But I think that the way that I can relate with that was what Shima said about how she and Chad are both first generation Americans and you are a first generation American, Dad. And so you know what it made me think, and even in the show, because during the show Jad talks about how her dollies Tennessee Mountain home, reminds his father of his home. Overseas, you know of course I couldn't help but think about our family home in northern Finland, so of course I thought about like the listener. Any listener to this doesn't know is that I grew up going to Finland with you every summer and you know spending many many many many days. Not Whole Lot to do kind of like the countryside of Finland in this tiny town with a population of eight hundred people, where almost no one spoke English, and then of course I would spend a lot of time in Helsinki as well where people did, but you know I remember the excitement that I had the day that you got your citizenship when we were living in Hawaii. I remember you wore a suit and that was a big deal because you were is most of the time. So. You know I remember that feeling, but I don't ever feel I can't say that I ever felt other, but I. Think I knew that you at times felt authored. What about you? Well I guess what I was wondering about is. Dolly is also a what I would call a country girl. you got to know people who were definitely from the country, not from the city. That's true. Maybe I speculate that that may have had something to do with your level of comfort with Dali. Oh. That's interesting. Also expressed some interest in Loretta Lynn during that time. I loved Laura Adeline and I think I I remember i. read the Book About Her. Was the book called? Coal, miner's daughter, I don't know. I did identify with those two, but I don't know I can't like point to a memory where I connected those two things myself. You Know My love for them like I. Really Loved Donna Summer at the same time. She's not from the country and I think honestly I think. They spoke to my infatuation with Glamour, and even though I knew that they were from the country. It's sort of like they were like these unimaginable. Creatures all three of those women. They were like such a shiny thing, and then I love the music and I love to dance, but I think that I always had an interest in people who are different than me, and that's why like when we were in the countryside in Finland like I could hang out with Vinnie me. Who is the violin player? You know for hours or make friends with the girl who lived across the street Rita, even though we. We didn't speak the same language, and like really enjoy those people because it was like exposing me to this completely different way of life. You know just a way of life that I wasn't familiar with and I think that in a way Dali Donna. It sort of showed me a completely different slice of

Dolly Dolly Parton Dolly Parton America Finland America Sky Pillsbury Donna Summer Parton America Dali Donna Rita Producer Loretta Lynn Helsinki Tennessee Mountain Laura Adeline Shima Vinnie Hawaii Chad
Michael Dippolito

Casefile True Crime

05:09 min | 6 months ago

Michael Dippolito

"Michael Dip Aleida was born in Philadelphia Pennsylvania on December eighteen, nineteen seventy. But the parents struggled with drug addiction, which led to mock obeying raised by his grandparents. MARKLE developed his own substance abuse problems during early adolescence, and at the age of fifteen, he was admitted to a Rehab facility. Following his release, he maintained sobriety for five and a half years, and worked as not cancel at the same treatment sent out where he drew saved hell. He relapsed in his early twenties and spent the next few years in and dad of Rahab and began dealing crack cocaine. Michael eventually relocated to Florida and began working as a telemarketer for several different companies. His job involved cold, calling potential investors to sell gold coins and foreign currency. And Natural Sows Ben Michael thrived in this line of work at one point earning around two hundred thousand dollars in an eighteen month period. However the siles worse game in which the telemarketing companies would keeping clients investment money. When this games inevitably fell apart, Michael set up a cold cooling scheme of his own. Into thousand two, he was arrested and delighted, convicted of unlicensed tele-marketing communications, fraud and grand theft, and was sentenced to two years prison. He was released in two thousand five with an extended probationary period of twenty years, and ordered to pay a total of two hundred and nineteen thousand dollars in restitution to his victims. A payment schedule was set up in which Michael would contribute monthly installments over the course of his twenty eight year probation. He was also required to report to his parole officer once a month to provide details regarding where he was living who he was living with what car he was driving and how much income he made. His home and vehicle could be searched without prior warning at any time, and he was forbidden from leaving. Palm Beach County in southeast, Florida with the AD obtaining prior approval from the parole office. Upon, his release from prison, markle moved in with these. Go Friend Maria. He immediately started using drugs again, which prompted Maria to end their relationship? Determined to get so about once, and for all markle stopped using and begin attending support meetings and canceling. He secured a job at an online marketing company and reconciled with Maria, and the two were married in July of two thousand seven. Afraid of ever returning to prison Michael cooperated with these parole conditions and maintained his sobriety. He developed a stable retain starting h morning with the Noli Session at the gym before heading off to work. In late, two, thousand seven, he started his own online marketing company. Mad Media, which solved I'd bananas and search engine optimization services to help clients direct more traffic to their websites. The company's initial success was hindered by the global financial crisis of Thursday night, not mad media to end a decent profit regardless and avoided markle comfortable lifestyle that catered to his expensive tastes. By October of two thousand eight, he's marriage had started crumbling. Maria was out of town when Kobe introduced him to Eros Dot Com a website that advertised sex work services. As detailed in the book poison candy by Elizabeth. Parker! Michael contact a sex work I need Dali, Muhammad and to the to organized to meet that evening. Markle was immediately attracted to up. Who was the daughter of Peruvian and digestion parents? She was born in New York, but raised in Boynton beach along with her younger brother and sister. The parents had divorced when she was seventeen. The which she lost contact with her father, but maintained a close relationship with her mother, two siblings and her mother's extended family. At the age of nineteen, Dali started sex work and spent several years running message policy in south Florida and California. She was also a law since Thrilla Stygian and worked part time as a real taw. Markle and Dahlia had a common and instantly hit it off.

Markle Ben Michael Maria Michael Dip Aleida Florida Philadelphia Pennsylvania Crack Cocaine Dali Palm Beach County Mad Media South Florida Boynton Beach New York Officer Parker Elizabeth Eros Dot Com
Bitcoin Is Struggling - I Am Steering Clear

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

05:01 min | 7 months ago

Bitcoin Is Struggling - I Am Steering Clear

"On and actually subscribe. That you'll get to go through the market live and Just show you what's going on so I really do encourage you to get across to try to cope. Youtube page. Followed all subscribe on site and Click on those notifications. So you know when it's coming three softening Australia nation standard time you be getting the low down as to what is going on. So what exactly is going on? Well O. J. Have you ever been on the water when you like if you've been for several And you've been you know there's a big Y you've been smashed and pushed down Dave and you don't know which way's up you completely disoriented And you just don't know what's going on that looks like a mock it right now with scrambling trying to get to the surface which is up. So that's the bulls right with with trying really hard but was stuck in this bloody Whitewater keeps on tumbling is intending as pomace. We haven't had the ball yet so you don't even know where the bottom is with. Y'All hang on a second I. I can't even push off the bottle which why am I going in other words? The market looks confused and vein. Speaking about how can fuse. It's looked for a little while last week. We certainly saw a confused market and look like you know we talk. Throw it out point. Two point four point Nanda Dali soul that while we've seen a little bit more quickly coming into a little more volatility but we certainly haven't seen more confirmed direction. I can tell you that much. Full freight bitcoin a closed the session yesterday. It closed down four point one five percent now. What does that mean well? Much mile as we currently sort of banging around Twain to couple of levels of pretty messy regions. Seventy four and sixty six hundred. That's the Soda. Rage is that we will looking to bash between the minute. So we've got a good one hundred dollars of Ryan that but it's an ugly range. All at the trend fully hypermobility series of strategies. That are the trend following and the probabilities increase the more time frames that you have an agreement so wrought now what's the daily trend doing Baga Role. What's the weekly Trend Doing? Well pulled back up into that cradles on thing that we need to get through their full from the. That's what's replying at. In the market at the moment as far as the way the markets and the low of the time will amid timeframes. It's very very uncertain bitcoin yesterday. Lock closed down. Full percent be closed at six thousand eight hundred thirty three. The theorem also down yesterday. Five point three nine percent wants a guy. There has been moving in big swings to bitcoin. So in its theorems going up. It's going up hard. I WANNA themes going down. It's going down a little bit harder a lot harder but it is definitely going out. Holla keep that in mind for those of you who are looking to try to your cats and he's sitting in bitcoin sitting in his theorem Take advantage over the last couple of weeks with those moves higher. I'd has definitely helped the belts I'm holding I was holding bitcoin now holding a theory of In that one particular county say and It's been it's been helping out quite nauseous. Keep that in mind. Yes downfall point three hundred percent. We closed at a low hundred and seventy tools and forty cents. Were already two hundred. Seventy three seventy one today. Half an hour into the training day appeals had Dan. I three point nine on fought percent closing. Eighteen point one cents lot resistance in nineteen point is still. There is still strong haning very tightly around at twenty seven o'clock now they might talk off right now. Bitcoin Cash Dan yesterday. Four point two percent closing at two hundred nineteen dollars and forty cents on the base. Another one that was down five point three percent quota decent pullback yesterday across the market it closed at one hundred eighty three eighty four. Santana's Nice to say that Mr Craig Rod has gone quiet and BS face Kana just gone So many wars about what's going on here. And Hey said she says Blah Blah Blah. I suppose probably because it's a little bit between one of these little cases it will sort legal cases of what matters. I don't even know if he's got any but I'm sure he does. He always does on the lot. Coin was sitting right now. Forty dollars and fifty cents though a clause yesterday. Thirty eight dollars and thirty five CENTS DOWN FOUR POINT. Seven percent ails was down three point. Three seven percent causing at two dollars and fifty one cents. A guy very very sought wise as we've seen across the hold bonnets the sort of market while the only but one of the few that they're still looking strong on the daily notice strong as some of these other trends we have Translated like to save it worked. We close yesterday. Down was look it was down six point nine nine percent we closet at fourteen dollars and ninety two cents but already today in half an hour with put on two point five percent with sitting at fifteen dollars and twenty nine cents Kaduna Messy sideways closing the day at yesterday. Four point four percent Dan. Closing three point three cents a theory of classic

DAN Youtube Nanda Dali O. J. Hypermobility Australia Bitcoin Dave Twain Ryan Coin Santana Mr Craig Rod Kana
About Antonio Vivaldi

Classics for Kids

05:18 min | 8 months ago

About Antonio Vivaldi

"Antonio that's Italian for Anthony. Vivaldi was born in Venice in sixteen. Seventy eight then as the city with all the canals wasn't a part of Italy then it was an independent republic. Some records say that nobody was the oldest of six children but some say his family had as many as nine kids. Vivaldi's father was a barber who also worked as a baker and as a violinist. Vivaldi learned to play the violin from his father. We've all got something else from his father. Flaming red hair back then when a family had a lot of kids and not much money at least one boy usually became a priest. So that's what Vivaldi did. And because of his hair they called him the red priests somewhere along the line. We've all probably studied with musicians. Who worked at Saint Mark's Cathedral in Venice after awhile possibly because he had asthma? Vivaldi gave up the priestly. Duty of saying mass. Since Vivaldi couldn't do what priests normally did he started teaching music at the UH spit. La Della Pieta from the US Ballet de la. Piazza was not a hospital. It was an orphanage that was originally connected with a hospital. So that's where the name Auspey Dali came from. All the residents of the orphanage were female so volley taught and led an all girl orchestra bar people all over Europe heard about what great musicians Valdis students were. No one visited Venice without going to hear them perform their concerts. Where a huge tourist attraction? One of the most intriguing things about those concerts was that you couldn't see the musicians. Because they were hidden when they performed the audience just heard heavenly music coming from behind a fancy metal screen. Make It only guess what the girls looked like? Yvonne de worked at the speedometer. Della Pieta off and on mostly on for almost forty years composing religious music for his students to sing and hundreds of concertos for them to play. He wrote concertos all kinds of instruments but soon trumpets even mandolins at the same time. The valley had another musical career going writing operas. The valley is even more famous now than he was in his lifetime but his music was only rediscovered in the last fifty years or so. Today it's hard to turn on the television without hearing Vivaldi's music in some commercial or other especially the concertos spring from a set of violin concertos called the four seasons

Vivaldi Venice La Della Pieta Antonio Italy Anthony Auspey Dali Europe Saint Mark's Cathedral United States Piazza Asthma Yvonne De
In His Own Home: The Ted Ammon Story

True Crime Brewery

11:12 min | 10 months ago

In His Own Home: The Ted Ammon Story

"Robert Theodore Ammon was born in Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania to Steal Executive Bob Ammon and his wife Betty Lee he news. The first son was born two years after his big sister Sandy. His parents called him teddy and in his got older Ted. The Ammon family had that collect nineteen fifties upper middle class lifestyle. Betty Lee stayed home with sandy and Teddy Betty Lee was an intelligent strong woman who encouraged the two children to be competitive and work hard in school. A school turned out to be pretty easy for Ted who is a pretty bright guy but he also had a photographic memory so so steadying was very easy for him when he was in the eighth grade. His father was transferred East Aurora New York to be in charge of a steel plant. Yes so this was the ideal family. This is how I picture your childhood. The almonds had their family dinner every night followed by homework and they'd go to their various sporting events. Let's Boban was Ted's Little League Baseball coach to Ted was also on the swimming team and he grew up to be very athletic reaching an adult height of six six foot. Four so very tall in high school. Of course Ted was on the football team but he was different than a lot of the jokes because he played the piano quite well and he got excellent grates. He did have several girlfriends throughout his teen years being both a jock in academic he was widely Popular Sandy. His sister would say that she and Ted had wonderful childhoods and as adults they did remain. Close here a bit. He did pretty well in high school. uh-huh here he is an athlete and a break. Y- Y yeah. He had a lot going for him but he heard let girlfriends well. I don't know about a Ladda. He he had several. Okay yeah her nose a lot more than several several more than a lot a lot more than several several psych a handful allot what is dozens. Okay that's the way it is in my brain her think you're embellishing a little bit. But that's okay. It's just how I see it. Subjective now now the other half of this equation that will be talking about his generous rand. Her upbringing was far more complicated than Ted's generous his mother. Marie was born to a California farmer and his wife. Maria is acute moody little girl. She did actually join a convent for a year and then decided it wasn't working for her to during World War. Two Marie was a pretty much a party girl. She went out dancing and drinking. Sometimes Nice flighty. Sometimes the slug some family members who were worried that she might be suffering from some mental illness like manic depression but Marie had no desire to seek mental until health. Help Murray's father died just a few years before her mother died of cancer and that left Marie dependent on her older brother. So Marie married a soldier. They had two children but she was negligent. Mother and her children were taken from her and she got divorced she then Mary Clearance Rand. Who is another soldier and this is a few years later? Right submarine clearance had a daughter named Dally but Marie went back to partying while Dolly was still a toddler so oh Dolly was left with family members while Marie would drink and dance and meet new men she met an Italian man named Generoso and had a short lived affair with him mm-hmm in her long beach apartment and after about a week of hooking up Generoso was out of marine life went back to Italy but then she found out that she was pregnant agnete and it wasn't by her husband so Marie wrote to general so and told him about her pregnancy but he never responded so her fourth child who she did give. Her husband's last name was named Jennifer Rosa after her father but Maria didn't take long to return to her partying ways family members didn't call generosity by her given name either because a lot of them knew that this child had been named after this Italian guy they called her gen or Joe she became very close with her older sister. Dolly after Marie began to leave the two home alone to go out and have fun again. So Generoso was four and Allie was seven when they moved to oceanside California with their mother. Their uncle Al was also divorced by then he lived in a ground floor apartment in a three family house that he had purchased. There were tenants on the third floor and Marie and her two daughters were allowed to live on the second floor without paying rent summary even hired in English housekeeper who acted as a baby sitter for her. Two girls in the housekeeper was kind signed to the girls as time went on they really began to prefer the housekeeper to their own mother. But things didn't go well. The childhood just continued to be problematic. Matic Little Generoso was sexually molested as a child by a man who were mother had trusted as a family friend and then the English housekeeper was fired by her. HYUNG-CHOL AL for having men to the House so quite a mess it sure is and it gets messier. Two years after all this Murray felt a lump in her breast within a couple of years she had metastatic breast cancer which had reached her name. Anne Marie died when Generoso is just ten years old so chandelier she and Dolly. Her older sister went to live with her uncle. Al In the meantime he had remarried he lived in an exclusive Laguna Beach neighborhood. Dolly show general. Sir Sir Photo for biologic father. WHO's a sailor named Generoso? Now this is the first time generosity knew that her mother had not been married to her father and she. She resented her mother for lying to her for failing to protect her while sure but they said that from that time forward generoso was a different girl she it was determined to be strong and to be rich. She didn't ever want to have children of her own either. She decided that her mother's death had been a good thing and now she it was free to live a better life. Uncle Al's new wife on March was a smart and financially well off woman generosity admired her her and ended up having kind of special friendship with her March said that she wanted generosity to live with them but the house was really full and there was a a lot of friction between Genera and her cousins Generoso was prone to temper tantrums and she could be very jealous devious and manipulative in her mind. It was her way or no way in Dolly had been a fairly troubled teen also maybe not to the extent that China Rosa's but eventually Dolly was sent to live with her older half sister. Terry Terry's husband and their two kids and Santa Clara California an aunt. Marge had a rich friend who lived in Laguna beach with her husband and their two children. These folks had an eight bedroom house on a horse ranch so jane the woman who was living in house offer to adopt generosity and generous moved in with Jane and the family. She became very good at horseriding more than good actually. She competed shows and she even one ribbons. She also began to do well in school so seems like she's coming out of her Funchal Obita. She seemed to really thrive there. She learned to play the piano. She got braces to fix her teeth and she seemed to have things going pretty well. She had money she. Her loving parents foster parents appearance. Whatever and in a state with their own horace right? So you'd think everything was great and she could be quite charming coming but she was continuing to have a frightening temper big tantrums to whenever anything wasn't going her way and as generous entered late adolescence she had really changed from the sweet girl to a really rebellious troublemaker. In nineteen sixty seven. Jane Call generalises half sister Terry and told her that Generoso was causing trouble with the other. Kids generous was demanding jealous and she just seemed like she could never have enough material possessions. Jane and her husband couldn't controller. They were really tired and kind of desperate to be relieved of her. Terry was well aware of how it felt to be abandoned. She'd had a similar childhood and she felt sympathy for her little sister so she agreed to take her in and and remember Terry was already parenting Dali. Her husband was a high school English teacher. who was very patient and good with the kids? Terry and her husband had two kids of their own two daughters Julian. Amy and their house was pretty comfortable. They had four bedrooms and two baths but it wasn't anything like the estate that generosity was coming from and it wasn't good enough for her. She was really unhappy about being there and became came angry and very resentful. She no longer lived on the estate and she had to leave her horse behind. That really pissed her off. Life wasn't fair to her. She she said and she was just kind of angry at the whole world. When Dolly was eighteen she got her own apartment in San Jose? She moved out of the House the Teri and her husband had Dolly soon became promiscuous and got herself into drugs. terrier also been sexually abused as a child and when Dolly moved out Terry became very depressed and as she sent deeper and deeper into depression. She generosity butted heads almost seemed like generous new. The Terry has some weaknesses and was using against her and then Terry's husband began Genaro says that influence on the younger daughters. They sire getting away with do things and they themselves got into trouble right so this is just difficult. And it ended up being really heartbreaking for Terry who had only wanted to help her sisters sisters but she and her husband finally had decide that they just couldn't handle generosity and terry wasn't feeling well. The house was just kind of getting out of control. They told generous that the situation wasn't working finally and she was given one month's notice to find a new place to live generosity. Orosa cried but Terry promise that they would continue to help her however they could and generosity finally said she understood but you know this was her fourth big rejection. She'd been abandoned by her mother. Her uncle Jane Reagan who owned The estate and now tearing her husband so she was sad but you know really building. This deep seated anger so generous ended up living with another family who were friends with her aunt and this family had two teenage daughters others of their own and they lived in Los Angeles so things are okay at this house for a while. The family found generous to be very creative and pretty talented anted artistically. But she was Moody's Hell.

Terry Terry Anne Marie Dolly Generoso TED Uncle Al Robert Theodore Ammon Laguna Beach Jane Maria Murray California Pennsylvania Betty Lee Sandy East Aurora New York Bob Ammon Teddy Betty Lee
"dali" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

09:30 min | 1 year ago

"dali" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"So like you said they basically cancelled the project. I've seen a referred to as an indefinite hiatus kiss. Essentially you know they still own the materials they paid for it But they're not gonNA make it anymore. So Dolly goes his own way but apparently walt and Salvador remained very good friends and this wasn't exactly them. You know butting heads in a friendship torpedoing kind of way I mean they definitely be empowering but thirty seven years after Disney Disney Walt Disney past and thirteen years after Salvador Dali's death there became kind of a renewed interest in some of those materials. tirias that were archived in the Disney by the Disney family trust. Yeah that's the thing. This is cool because it's I wouldn't say it's a cover up but it's a neat each story of discovery because nobody really knew about this project it was. It was a secret until you know as you said like at least fifty years later in nineteen ninety nine Roy e Disney. The nephew of Walt Disney is working on fantasia. Two thousand. Which I'm I'm sure we all remember and then he accidentally stumbles across it and the Atlantic has a pretty great article about this? But just imagine. And you're you know you're you're trying to figure out what we're going to do how we're going to revivify if I'm just making up words the fantasia experience for a new Millennium Millennium and then all of a sudden you run up against something that looks like nothing else in the shorts. It's photo realistic. It's it's hyper experimental. Oh and they decide that they are going to resume working on this collaboration nineteen ninety nine after Noel As you said almost forty years after Disney's death thirteen years after dollars and is so cool. You might remember. We dropped a name rather than passing guy by the name of John. Hinch who who is a legend in enough himself. Disney the Disney. Walt Disney Company is comprised of so many moving parts and incredible artists that go on to contribute to the vision in the Aesthetics of a lot of these films just for example. There's an artist by the name of Ivan Earl who Disney brought onto create the look of a sleeping beauty which is very much of a departure from the rest of the Disney Canon. Up to that point. This guy that we're talking about hinch was a little bit more of a utility player. But he was the best asked he was absolutely a trusted confidante of Walt Disney And he was an artist and art. Supervisor worked on Animation Effects Act's special effects are direction storyboarding From everything from fantasia Dumbo. Some of those package films like the three Caballeros Make Mine Music. Zik Fun and Fancy Free One of my favorites. The Adventures of echoed and Mister Toad Worked on Cinderella when they got out of those package films and got more back into the narrative. Alice in Wonderland Art Supervisor on that and Peter Pan and he was the one who was working hand in hand with Dolly while he was developing this thing and they brought I am back. Yeah he worked at Disney for nearly sixty five years only a portion that was working with. But when Roy finds this hidden gem jim he gets hinge back on the team. Hinch is ninety years old and you know what he says. Yeah I'll do it. In fact he ends up being credited as is the film's co-authors so did Roy Disney Disney. The nephew is is in love with this idea. He put together a secret crew of animators he gets. It's a director from France. Casey kit see it but I I don't know why just pointed like you're going to cosign that he says okay The budget alleged one point. Five million keep it a secret. Let's let's figure out how to how to make this happen. And so by God. They did they did do it. One point five million seems like a lot for short the it does but also s Disney Disney. Yeah not to mention they had to reconstruct this. Like like from the original you know like storyboards and source material. And if I'm not mistaken they had to actually use them a pretty interesting three D computer technology to keep as close to the original vision as humanly possible So fifty seven years after this Disney Dolly COLLAB- had been birth from from these Genius brains d- Estino saw the light of day. Yeah Yeah it was released on June second. Two thousand three at It was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Animated Short film got offered it in multiple exhibitions. Also there's some amusing math here so it's one point five million that's the budget to create this thing and It's probably really it's about six ish minutes long it's worth a watch It's beautiful if you do the math. That means that it cost two hundred sixty sixty six thousand six hundred sixty six dollars and sixty seven cents per minute as wild. Casey do you know much about automation. Budgets I do not although the hand-drawn stuff I know is super expand various various. This wouldn't have been hand-drawn though this is this. If you look at it it really does does have the vibe of sort of a CG kind of like Pixar kind of thing but not it's different. It's it's sort of looks like computer rendered Tutti animation. Yeah it's very smooth. It's really really smooth. It employs some really cool kind of shudder effects. Where there's like missing frames and they'll be kind of a blur sometimes but it really does look like Dali's body body of work come to life? It's really really cool and striking. I recommend everyone check it out You can actually get a glimpse of it on Youtube Just search for for Walt Disney's and Salvador Dali destiny. No there's actually a ten eighty P Version of it on their feud checkout. I can't believe the Walt Disney Company has not stricken that From the Internet Internet. I think maybe Roy just said it's a labor of love so without -Tuni- spoilers we can tell you what to Stevens about. Still Please folks so I urge you to check it out. It's more than worth six minutes. Might be the best six ish minutes of your day. You know depending on how your day's going so in the film it turns out that both both Disney and Dolly's descriptions are somewhat accurate. They were just coming at the story from different angles. It's the story of Cronos. It's the personification of time in the story. Cronos falls in love with immortal and they flew across landscapes Painted by Dolly the. This is a wordless animation. Right and It's it's following as you said no is following the beats of the song long as much as the visual story and I think dizzy was simplified. It a little when he said boy meets girl. It's a simple love story But but they're both right Dahlia is mortal woman and Cronos's Cronos is like a doctor Manhattan figure basically should also of note This may be familiar to fans of mythology. Yes There is Cronos K. R. O. N. O. S. who is the Titan who does swallow his offspring but this sticks to the love story between him and yes yeah. That's right so there's Krona's with a K.. You also see as Krona's Krona's with a US or Kronos with C.. So yeah interesting so this must be that I believe Saturn is the Roman equivalent is that is that the deal like there's there's usually a version in there. There's usually similarities Greeks game first. The Romans did gritty reboot. That's right they are. It's much more like the the Grimm fairy tale versions of the Disney movies Funny rivers of problems. It's human nature to hate problems. But why is that after Darrelle problems inspire us to mend things. Ben Things make things better. That's why so many people work with IBM on everything from city. Traffic perfect to ocean plastic new schools to new energy flight delays to food safety smart loves problems. Ibm Let's let's put smart to work visit. IBM DOT COM slash smart to learn more. This is just such an inspiring story gives me one of the three emotions. I experienced a year. So ben you've been experiencing a little more motion lately. I feel like you might be over your quota quota. Oh man it is the end of the year though like when you gotta use those flexible health spending account dollars before the end of the year. Yeah exactly so you can you. Can you can feel feel some feels Ben Thanks man so So it is true that Disney in Dali remained friends throughout their lives. Disney had Dali's these paintings all over his home in Palm Springs He had Dolly and his wife over during their vacation. Russian to California in Nineteen fifty one and then later Disney and his spouse went to Spain visit dully in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven like these guys has kicked.

Walt Disney Company Walt Disney Dolly Disney Roy e Disney Roy Disney Disney family trust Hinch IBM Salvador Dali Dali Roy Casey walt Cronos Academy Award Cronos K. R. O. N. O. Salvador Dali destiny
"dali" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"dali" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"Because because there's there's a commentary about process right and so many quote unquote avante garde artists have made their fortunes and their careers by essentially proclaiming. The emperor has no clothes the emperor in this case being the value assigned to art or the the illusion that there is a quantifiable static. Value and a Mimi itself while we're on this I mean technically just an element of a culture or system of behavior meam started as an idea you know and now we call what we call. MEMES are our kind of Genera of of the the larger concept of a mean and one thing that really stands out to me from what you're describing there. Is that Dalia would say had this mission not just to redefine what visual artists but to blur the lines between our forms that were usually considered sittard distinct and separate right so he he would say you know he would love Jazz. He loved improvisational jazz and to him. That was a kind of painting and I think that's it's a beautiful way to look at it. Yeah I agree and I don't want it to sound like I'm saying the Dolly was doing this. Overtly conceptual stuff because if you look dollars worth it is very pleasant and end intriguing to look at and gives you all kinds of ideas and it's not a banana taped to a wall. It is very masterfully imaginative landscapes. And like you're the melting clocks the world's that he created which is kind of what made him have a lot? In common aesthetically with Walt Disney Disney was all about creating that stuff too and you never really peg Disney necessarily as being someone who fan of surrealism but as his career progressed. I think he started getting a bad rap for pushing Commercial Work Work over artistry. I think he started to get a chip on his shoulder about that. And that is what led you know. We're skipping some stuff you'll know what happened with Walt. Disney became the the most influential important person probably the history of cinema. Honestly I mean it's arguable but at least in terms of like really pushing animation to this massive mainstream explosion explosion He had hits with things like you know. Snow White Adapting Fairy Tales into these blush beautiful animated films that made lots lots of money and got people just hooked on animation But it got to a point where he wanted to do something. A little more innovative and interesting and with fantasia where he started incorporating cooperating. Much more kind of surreal imagery without dialogue distinct up to music. That was when he really started to be like okay. I want to push the envelope up of creativity here and that Kinda coincides with around the time that he met Salvador Dali. Hey everybody everybody I wanNA talk to you about your website. That doesn't look good. And it's hard to program because squarespace does it better. Yeah they do squarespace space. Is this amazing magical tool that you can just basically go deep deep deep and all of a sudden you have a website to do whatever you want with you can use it to sell L. stuff you can use it to tell your world about all the great thoughts you have and now squarespace also offers e mail campaign so you can take your business. Embryo it up. Yeah we use squarespace. Ourself are very popular S. Y. S. K.. Live website keeps track of Oliver Comings and goings on Oliver. Live shows and it's always a joy to go in there an update the squarespace site because it's so easy and it always looks so great and it makes me feel smarter than I am. Yeah they offer customizable layouts powerful editing mobile editing not just for your website but also for email campaigns too so go check it out go to squarespace dot com slash stuff today so just go to squarespace dot COM com slash stuff today for a free trial. When you're ready to launch? Everyone use the offer code stuff to save ten percent on your first purchase of a website or domain squarespace gross base. Just go check it out. This episode of ridiculous history is brought to you by the Ford Explorer. Hey Man I I tell you like not related to the ad this a true story. I've been thinking about buying a new car. Finally wait a minute been. You're abandoning the old lamb boat. Well you know New Year me man. What can I say I've been I've been looking around and I gotTa tell you? I think I might have found the perfect car. Wait a minute Ben. Is that the new redesigned twenty twenty twenty four to explore the greatest exploration vehicle of time. Get Out of my head Yes yes it is yes indeed no you are right and that's not hyperbole here because the twenty twenty Ford explorer can take you anywhere you WanNa go right well within reason I mean once they get to the bottom of the sea but those places have already been explored right true. That's true but it helps you in a realistic human non astronaut way right you can navigate complicated interstates new towns. Sounds when you're on vacation you can go on. Successful grew trips the cargo space knoll the cargo space load. You can haul everything. It's unprecedented could bend. The Ford Explorer will take you on explorations that everyone can relate to but few have conquered just so because you and I and Casey and all of our listeners on this show explorers at heart. And that's why we're excited about the old new twenty twenty Ford Explorer. The all new twenty twenty four to explore the greatest exploration vehicle vehicle of all time. There's some backgrounds that I want to provide here before we get to their meeting so so we know that they add initial skepticism. Let's say that I'll be diplomatic and call it skepticism. But we know they also proved themselves elves and they started acquiring Mainstream notice and acclaim dollies early work was praised widely as was Disney's knees silly symphonies. These were the short form animations that function as experiments proofs of concept for some of those technical nickel Innovations they were making and as these guys continue their careers. They had a brief mention. Where the I they? I became aware of one another if not physically meeting and that was at the Museum of Modern Art in New York the Moma in nineteen thirty six Dali had a couple of different pieces on display in an exhibition called fantastic art Dada and surrealism and and in that same exhibition. There were two cells animation cells from a short film by Disney called Three Little Wolves fast forward next six year. 1937 Salvador Dali visits Hollywood for the first time and. He says you know what I want to. He's always trying to find new formats a new mediums. He says you know what I want to make an animated film. I think this can really bring the metaphysical to this concrete observable double experiential place and he writes to Andre Breath on Casey key check me on that. Yeah it's only Great surrealist list writer. Highly recommend his novel. Najah Bretagne Casey on the case. Thank you sir. Dolly is in his letter to breath hall says that surrealism's realism's influence has become so enormous that even creators of animated cartoons are proud to call themselves surrealists. And I have come to Hollywood Hollywood and I am in contact with what he called the three great American surrealist ready for this list might be surprising the Marx brothers seasonal..

squarespace Disney Salvador Dali Najah Bretagne Casey Walt Disney Disney Ford Explorer Dalia Mimi Oliver Comings Walt Hollywood Museum of Modern Art Dolly fantasia writer Andre Breath New York
"dali" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

09:12 min | 1 year ago

"dali" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"Welcome to the show ridiculous historians as always thank you so much for tuning in I for one am excited about this episode because it allows me to use upon that he wrote years ago never found a good use for that pine fine. I will reveal in the course of today's show but I I'm Ben Really in abeyance which is like that Ben that is hurtful no. It's foreshadowing switch if we don't get too that's true but you know. Sometimes we forget I'M GONNA I'm GonNa bug you about him like that Pun pun buddy system. Keep me accountable. Who are you know your buddy the buddy system of fools and they're of course As always is our super producer. Casey Pegam so today's episode touches on a lot of things that touches on art touches on surrealism. It touches on the mouse. Capital n knows it touches on. What's that Muhart? Aw that's sweet man and I think it's sincere to right. Yeah always I'm nothing if not perpetually sincere to a fault so Salvador Dali Ali It should be well known to anyone. Even people who don't despair themselves for some reason or another fans of Art Salvador Dali is perhaps the most famous surrealist list in modern history. I mean you should know him if not only just for his mustache. Yes yeah and while we're while we're on the subject of facial hair very quickly thanks to our good friends over on the ridiculous historians community page who specifically requested that we talk more often about our facial hair. I feel about that. I don't know either because you know I thought our French mustache. A ruse pretty good. You know what else is there to say. Hey about facial hair about our facial hair in particular. I guess we'd have to do some changes. Do some updates or something can happen. Well I I don't know man I. If we have to one of the interesting things was the idea of having to disappear like fad to disappear. We we probably ended up changing facial hair but you can only use that move once. Yeah then then you get into You know the thing is don't believe what you see in fiction. Fake facial hair never worked for a long-term disguise. Oh absolutely not always always looks Just that looks like fake facial hair. You mean the genuine article if you truly want to Stage some sort of grand escape but we're not talking about our facial today we're talking about somebody else's facial hair Barely impasse right right Salvador. Dali what are the most Famous artist most of his day and one of the most famous moustache rockers of all time was approached by another fan of the mustache Fellow fellow named Walt Disney in nineteen forty five and while Disney came to Dolly With a with a pitch right he pitched on something he did indeed but before we get into the specifics of that pitch we should talk a little bit about Disney and Dolly's respective respective childhoods and kind of what led them to become the geniuses that they ultimately did become. Yeah that a lot of that. A lot of parallels are actually born in a relatively similar time right. They were born three years almost three years apart so they were around the same same age range but they were born in different parts of the world. They both were coming up in this game called life in the nineteen hundreds and when you think of Salvador Dali and you think Walt Disney other than the fact that the fans mustaches They may not seem to have very much in common. And but as you said Dole if we look a little deeper into into their professional lives into their artistic inclinations we see not that they actually had a lot in common thematically they both grew up in very small towns There is sort of big fish little ponds. There wasn't a whole lot going on in terms of like the arts or any kind of culture in these towns Disney was born in Chicago which would have been great but he actually grew up in Marceline Missouri Sorry Marceline Missouri and Salvador Dali on the other hand spent his youth on a small rocky. Coastal town. Of Costa Brava in Spain. Rain which was near another place where he spent some of his youth which was a fishing village called Kada quiz yet? Yep And Walt Disney is the elder older though not by much she was born on December Fifth Nineteen ninety-one Dolly was born on May eleventh nineteen o four and as pointed out on Walt Disney dot. Org of all places. The two men had some common parenting themes when they were growing up their their fathers were described as domineering But their mothers were deeply affectionate and warm. This is sadly not an unfamiliar situation into a lot of people listening to the podcast. Today there was felt like dreamers. You know the House that old saying go in English walking around with your head in the clouds clouds they were they were those sorts of people prone flights of fancy but they were also very driven figures so without making the entire podcast about Walt Disney. It's important to know just how driven he was driven. Dolly was Disney was the cartoonist highschool newspaper which sounds like a cool job but while he was doing that he was also attending in addition to attending high school he was attending night classes at the Chicago. Academy of Fine Arts. Talk about an honor honor student. Yeah it's almost like. By the time he finished high school he was firmly Educated And ready to kind of jump right into a career as cartoonist or elevate that To what would be essentially a very new art form of the time which was animation Dali was also in a slouched when he was a youth he had his first public art. Show at the municipal theater in regret is And that was when he was fifteen and then he later a couple years later would in roll at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Madrid. And that's where he kind of started to develop his reputation reputation as not only an incredible artists and innovative thinker but but also a very eccentric personality which was a big part of his brand and because they were both unorthodox. Because they were pioneers. Doing we knew things. They faced a lot of initial Bumps in the road less speed bumps lot of obstacles you know Disney was a groundbreaking animator and Dolly was a genius fine artist. Who was notoriously weird? He was a weird dude. Disney any focused on stuff like developing new technologies for audio visual equipment. Him along with his Partner I works develop develop things like the optical printer which allowed you to insert you know animation like composite things together basically the earliest analogue version of after effects where he could take different elements and put them together. Whether it be you know things that were filmed in the real world and combined with animation like you would see in bed knobs and broomsticks for example. Well that was all the result of these crazy inventions that he an eye works. Came up with together. Dolly was more of a creative kind of innovator innovator and he was pushing form he was pushing kind of the idea of what art is and was part of the surrealist movement which was an offshoot of the dot ust movement which was like the idea of anti art you know art like like Marcel Duchamp in his Are Mutts toilet bowl. That was literally just the idea of art can be whatever ever I say. It is It makes me think of this big thing. That's making the rounds right now. The banana taped to the wall. which is this idea that this idea is worth hundreds of thousands thousands of dollars but the banana itself is ephemeral and replaceable? And it's really funny. It almost not to get off the subject but it makes me think of means because really the idea is what is proliferating and people are reposting it and turning it into different forms and you know there's like The Silver Konya like with like as as a piece of duct tape over the banana. It's just become this. Take on a life of its own so you could say initially That's the idea but then you start to see it really like infiltrate great the site Geiss and interesting way. What do you think about that case He? I think it's really interesting. I think it's part of Almost a sort of Meta art idea you could look at somebody like Damien Hirst I or maybe Jeff Koons who are sort of their pieces sell for millions of dollars but they're almost about a commentary on the art world and how it's all just money and it's all just kind of rich people sort of almost laundering their money or protecting their investments their assets by buying art but it sort of no longer about just that experience experience as a human being of seeing a piece of art like having an emotional response to it. One hundred percent agree with you there Casey..

facial hair Walt Disney Dolly Salvador Dali Disney Art Salvador Dali Casey Pegam Ben Really producer Chicago Salvador Academy of Fine Arts Silver Konya Damien Hirst Royal Academy of Fine Arts Spain Geiss Dole
Thief Steals $20K Dali­ Print in Under a Minute in Broad Daylight

News, Traffic and Weather

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Thief Steals $20K Dali­ Print in Under a Minute in Broad Daylight

"And just thirty two seconds a man walks into a San Francisco art gallery in broad daylight and steals a famous piece of artwork this is a twenty thousand dollar Salvador Dali etching called burning giraffe here's a surveillance video that shows the guy stealing you can see here the gallery director says he watches Sunday afternoon stole the painting from an easel at the front of the art gallery what are they going to do with it really I don't know I mean obviously would have to be underground you know everyone knows the edition number and it's a famous piece so you'd have to have some pretty I don't know sketchy people to sell it to the etching is usually secured to the easel but somehow the locking cable were missing it's not clear if the man went into the store earlier can cut that cable

Director San Francisco Twenty Thousand Dollar Thirty Two Seconds
"dali" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"dali" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Being said the Dali wall a ten year veteran was the hero of was a respected member member of the community Anne was a trailblazer county sheriff engines Alice's Sandeep to Wally wall was killed Friday afternoon when he was shot twice in the back during a traffic stop the lowly wall was called a great deputy who left a well paying job a decade ago to join the sheriff's office because he wanted to serve the community two people were arrested Illinois democratic senator Dick Durbin says president trump has taken billions of dollars for military construction projects he says president trump is using a national emergency declaration to take away money from the US military and their families the projects he rated ray. from schools and childcare facilities for military families the ammunition warehouses security upgrades in farm ranges around the world Durbin also says traffic Nord the growing epidemic of gun violence in America he says the president needs to tell Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to call a vote on a universal background checks bill already passed by the house New Jersey Attorney General Gharbi gray wall is blocking local law enforcement from carrying out federal immigration duties I understand how this issue stirrers strong emotions on all sides but as Attorney General it is my responsibility to do what is right not what is popular war easy and nice raid swept up fifty four people this week but they weren't detained long enough for federal authorities to collect them because gray wall says they'll instead be handling the prosecutions this is the result of a drawn out disagreement between some sheriffs and gray walls.

General Gharbi Attorney house New Jersey Senate US senator Illinois Anne Mitch McConnell president America trump Dick Durbin Wally wall Alice ten year
"dali" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"dali" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"Details deputy Dali wall was a trailblazer when the first deputies in taxes to wear the traditional Sikh turbans while on duty this was a person from the C. community literally who made history across the globe law enforcement officers were seen saluting in tribute after efforts to save the deputy fails at a Houston hospital you go fund me page has been set up to support his family the forty two year old was a father of three school age children Dali wall was shot in the back of the head as he walked back to his patrol car during a routine traffic stop Friday in a statement Hoboken mayor Ravi Bala the country's first sic mayor called the shooting tragic and can damn commended Dhaliwal for opening the door to six interested in law enforcement the Los Angeles Police Department is launched an investigation after a recruitment ad went up on Breitbart news a controversial right wing website the LAPD says the post conflicts with the department's core values in a tweet Saturday police chief for a Michael Moore said the department did not purchase ad space from bright. bart and is trying to determine whether the posting was meant to tarnish the LAPD's image stars of the new joker film walked the red carpet Saturday night in Hollywood for the movies pre beer but some are concerned that it could inspire violence more from reporter Laurie Parratt as unusual alert this week the F. B. I. encouraged audiences to ID to escape routes in theaters and to run hi fight in an active shooter situation LAPD confirmed it will heighten visibility around the theaters when the movie opens and the families of the victims of the Aurora Colorado movie theater shooting have raised painfully personal concerns the shooter there was reportedly inspired by the joker character. landmark theatres the country's largest independent theater chain has announced a costume band for old jokers screenings W. CBS news time five forty eight traffic and weather together on the aids here's Joe dealing. thank you Tonya okay on the B. Q. a north bound at the cons bridge we have an accent they're shutting down the left lane the left lane there's block them start the season jam up. the accident on ninety five south bound we went through way between exit seventeen and sixteen has been cleared away now just residual delays so we're not doing too badly clear an accident on the south bound Jersey Turnpike this is gonna be approaching exit seven the a and B. near Teaneck the right lane there was blocked it looks like it's open backed up again the overturned vehicle on the north bound garden state parkway near exit one thirty six has been cleared away that had some blockage to his shoulder in the right lane because the emergency vehicles were on the scene but it looks like it's moving well now Lower East River crossings are doing badly we're moving nicely in both directions right now at the Brooklyn Bridge even though we have a bit of construction the Manhattan bridge and the Williamsburg bridge all move well same thing at the queens midtown tunnel although the fifty ninth street bridge has some construction rolling inbound we're not doing too badly not a lot of volume on the roadway Triborough bridge clean the green at the moment looking pretty good going on the Grand Central heading by LaGuardia not see any delays there even through the construction zone movie now down to the van Wyck heading south bound from the Grand Central to JFK airport incidents and accidents free tomorrow we do not have to have alternate side rules in effect for religious observances will be back in less than ten minutes with another try to update right here on the B. C. B. S. our five day forecast meteorologist bill decker a cold front across the tristate overnight in its wake high pressure edging in from our north will bring us a couple.

forty two year ten minutes five day
"dali" Discussed on Talking Machines

Talking Machines

15:15 min | 1 year ago

"dali" Discussed on Talking Machines

"Talk doc machines is Benjamin Akira of Mockery University in Kampala and when Neil got a chance to sit down with him at data science Africa. He asked him the first question that we we ask all of our guests. How did you get where you are? I started at Macarena versity and during my time at my career I was privileged to meet Dr Honest. Just my budget agrees currently heading lab at Mercury through this I happen to join the lab as an intern those two thousand seventeen while well as Bella I find myself and I've discovered the large abundance of data that collecting and with this data we were doing some work in machine learning trying to do some predictive analytics are especially in cassava cassava is this grown crop in Uganda and stuff at lunch. wjr And many people consume cassava because it is a call the security for Growth and in times of drought or famine must've casella and because it is so dominant we wanted to be able to do some kind of ad hoc surveillance so people go out. We have this us us this farmers who are growing around the country and we had a grant that was helping us do surveillance of how people grow about about what kinds of diseases that facing through this data is collected using mobile funds were able to have this very good understanding of the real time surveillance of cassava diseases crop serving. How did you get from Kampala originally or an I am from the northern part of Uganda called Kingdom and I my family stays in your in compiler because I stay home villages in the no yes it is how far so it's about seven Alice seminars waikato bake so that's like what two eight hundred kilometers yet Toronto as is is on the mountain gorilla region to the West more the mountain gorilla region is in the southwest West southwest? This is at another inside a bit drier regions okay so did you do secondary school there or lower income Paula. I did my second disc compiler and the secondary school Macara is the leading university in Uganda. Has This history AH along with University of Nairobi all used to be colleges of the University of London Venice quite old. I think macari has a history Nairobi focused on engineering engineering in Kenya and focused on agriculture. If I know well yeah so it's the most prestigious university in Kampala in Uganda the computer science of open relatively recently is that right yes that is so what's did you to choose software engineering as your degree all right so growing up I had this. I was very fascinated by computers and so income in Uganda is these Internet cafes and everyone seven years ago to Internet cafes to the things before mobile mobile phones common mobile phones are common but not not not to the nominally again. This is more like it was very expensive to own a mobile phone by people a using computers to do things like printing manages to play games on these computers Buddha's and I was among those kids will range you using computers for gaming on all of that and through this entire good to love and appreciate how so computers walk in my secondary school I went into a stained choose Red Cross to do in university. chance was my juries and then submitted take a second chance because there's different courses at university and I did not get comparisons but I got software engineering which is actually the same curriculum so to what was the reason you didn't get redesigned is a different math requirement or what was the yes. Oh Communist sense required a you'll have done cited physics economics and mathematics. Kazan's required to have done chemistry. I think it's a very thin line because some people who have done economic still did CABELA's percents biles just kind of situation. The interesting thing about the department is relatively new so one thing with an established university is the you get quite entrenched. Behaviors is amongst the faculty because they've been there a long time so I think so amazing about the lab in the department that is it's this prestigious university but it's very inventive. You've four thinking is something you knew about before. You went there did you did you arrive and just find this ecosystem yeah so I didn't know about it. arrived on land and nearby it when our university so you just graduated recently. So what year did you start at McCurry Mercury in two thousand fourteen two thousand fourteen dollars my first year on the Fox terrier about discovering yourself trying to do multiple classes until you find something ending early interested in so many students McCurry go through unfortunately without really figuring out what they really want to do because there's overwhelming topics in Austin and the Al we do confidence do I knew township by insult engineering. It's India so in Mexican honest and Pete encourage me to to join his is loud in my during the internship period and so it may twenty sixteen I began the internship at Todd area which in turn was one of the organizers of the data center Africa Yup and his during this intense period that I I started attending the DS as honest who has been viewed on talking machines he did his PhD and Gruenigan in Netherlands and and focused on this Kosova Crop survey so he you ain't with that type of application for your intervention now. I think the first they signed Africa you came to was in a Russia. Yes now so festival is what was the Jenny liked from Kampala to Russia because thank you guys so that's interesting because Lang into Asia by plane was very expensive and I was a student and I really wanted to come to Africa so we had to take a bus and Arusha. Tanzania is a neighbor of Uganda to from the West and from the southern side of Uganda but then going through the south was a bit of a longer distance and had to go through Kenya and then from Kenya into Tanzania and the entire took about twelve hours yes so twelve hours a we we got to be held up at the border of Kenya Tanzania because our driver have our visa or something like that and so we stayed at the Buddha for about four allows waiting to coming to Russia but so that's what the story is it. The driver didn't have a visa or a possible you still matters to go there and just got delayed for yeah. So the thing is the good thing about Africa. I think it's it's easy to communicate between people so so the newest African visa because the east African communities is van each other so we got held up in a Manga which is the Kenya Tanzania blood but at the end of the daily had an understanding so because there's an east African Economic Community Kenya Tanzania and Uganda is not or is that yeah I think think the moving into trying to have lunde end right into it but I'm not really sure how far that went. I love that story that the whole team came down to the driving the pasta yeah out yet anyway and then but that was your first exposure to some of these techniques oppressive you had sort of an understanding of python and basically analytics quite well set up for that. What do these meetings do to change your perspective on the directions you were taking yes so as a student McCurry doing in maybe data sense and much learning? You'll have this independent no sense of community because the community is very small so moving into the data sense Africa community. You helped me know how other people are doing that ascends mush and it is only through this day began to appreciate the Paul Community. Having having collaborators from enemy is de Medina. Was that post a Africa I'm ever since then we have been collaborating on different presents as a experts I go to meet people who are walking in industry and while using mush nine on these techniques in the real wad and through this experience I got inspired and I say I have to be part of this and I decided to land a lot and then also also helped the community grow in Uganda and I begun a mentorship program where I teach them Undergrad students fellow people in and what interested in in landing Mandela's ends and I just began the FUSCO hood out with the Michalik Clear Jeremy it has it has taught me a little bit about teaching and sharing the knowledge you have land because I believe it is through sharing and teaching people that you actually learn a lot more for the second Edison's Africa that I attended was inury. I got the chance to present the walk had been working on at Macarena Varsity and I also got the chance to teach and become our you're a mentor to other people attending the conference at the workshop and also these denizens Africa is again at ut so yeah you were actually doing the training raining but then the other thing you become very involved. It's one of the great stories of Science Africa is the amount of commitment arm have shown with bringing Internet of things devices prices and bringing education how to deploy the senses but that commitment is great from people who are ninety nine percent of the not here but you've really taken taken up the banner on Madden learning how to deploy and use these senses in practice right yes if that is for the first data science Africa I attended I was naturally involved in the Iot device thing but when I went to Africa in Yeary with Shira we began building projects around that is not devices and we went to this conservatory at they didn't come at the university from how we began trucking the things like air pollution seeing how animals move around the pack at all of this and and I my colleague Jared who who is indicative continue with this project I think did this for his undergrad finance project and he's actually presenting his walk and also moved on with his kills onto them compiler while we're trying to use raspberry pies to do some kind of quality acronyms monitoring our big project now in Kampala's does the Sushila who is run vanity essay in the areas one of the founders has really driven for this shit with arm and they have senses the I always get the conservancy in Dacoit is a small area of land where they have Zebra and wildebeest and end even a leopard was and they have three Lama. They're one of the lamb was killed by a leopard Aloma aunt maters Kenya and they called the leopard they have many birds. Share is a number of projects around acoustic monitoring pollution monitoring and I think they building water level monitor's to sort of test these sensors and bill practice in the field where the field here is a bit of jungle. That's on the campus so that's really defined tastic because building that connection we allow the students at other institutes is building a sudden robust network and then you've been able to take that learning back to Kampala power. Yes yeah so what's projects you doing with the Iot in Kampala Income Bella. I am not really involved but this is a project. The intends ends at the lab are working on and they want to do some kind of radio money tearing to understand what farmers are calling into radio stations to maybe know what what are the issues because in Uganda just a bit of context I we have this talk shows on radio where people call in to talk about the issues facing Alpha casillas to understand what kind of problems to finance have in regards to farming in general agriculture. This is a collaboration with U. N. Global Pulses salsas yeah yeah so this collaboration very tight relationship between global pulse. My understanding is it was up the UN felt it was very responsive to WHO events that are happening and the idea of pulse is to sort of have a couple of fingers on the pulse trying on the sign what natural disasters win win the recurring as their emerging so this very interesting project is about placing a raspberry pies around the country listening to these local radio stations describe. Our twitter isn't that popular in Uganda but these small short talk shows locally a very popular and they use westward detection is that right go to try and detect whereas like Flood Aura Hospital S. was that might trigger a conversation about a local problem and then a they cut out a snippet of sound around that and yes that is right so the global lab have done this in for for a broader a problem which may be community problems like the road's flooded or Eduardo which means the hospitals are maybe full. I'm trying to get the hospital intended Internet but I'll focus just on agriculture right farmers and significantly right the Kosovo project is is an APP which farmers can take into the field. This is.

Uganda Kampala Africa Kenya Tanzania Russia McCurry University of Nairobi Macarena versity Kampala Income Bella African Economic Community Ken Dr Honest intern Nairobi Paula Mockery University CABELA Benjamin Akira UN
"dali" Discussed on Talking Machines

Talking Machines

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"dali" Discussed on Talking Machines

"That it's doing all this sort of testing and monitoring because it's been talked about Komo if you don't have all that you build up an enormous amount of technical debt and that system of deployment is just not there yet I mean it's being done in patches of good practice but it's not consistent and has to be consistent across different areas and I think the only way you can really address that is by bringing together computer scientists who have a deep understanding systems thinking and the Cambridge Department is like world-leading in that they invented many of the techniques virtualization that are being being used across the cloud compute today and inspiring them with these ideas and getting them focused on what I see as a fundamental paradigm shift in the way we doing doing computer science in the future all the old lessons science again be have to be there and use but I just think this use of data data as software software is really changing the way that we're going to have to think of software engineering. I see that as a massive agenda I you know I know other people have spoken about uh maybe parts of it or all of it but I'd like to use this position as a sort of rallying cry to bring people together around that and start driving towards solving those solutions is but critically it's it's not just academia. We need deployment areas. I'll be focusing on date science Africa but we need companies startups. you know sort to come together and determine what they say it goes through to using you know what the software ecosystem you're using things like streaming solutions like Apache Kafka and Apache flink which people are using for these things but are they doing in a way that is sensitive to the machine learning something. I'm fond of saying is the machine learning views. The world of systems engineering has has a perspective on it that is sort of twenty years out of date whereas systems engineering has has moved very much streaming systems was to adapt to the modern era of big data machine. Learning things have batch data sets and we need to close that gap. We need to close that got. We need to close it rapidly because without rapid closing that gap we're going to continue making the areas of deployment Askale that lead to societal problems of the type. We've seen seen over the last five years yeah. Absolutely I mean it sounds it sounds monumentous. You're talking about changing the world. Neil this odd sort of month where I finished in August late August the twenty sixth at Johnson and I've just been thinking about it and not being out. You've just heard massive outburst as I as I as it comes together in my head I have not been able to fully get excited about it because it's not been public. Can you know people have known I found it is interesting thinking about. I've found the weight of it intimidating. I see this is something that I'm so excited. I talked about this but so intimidated about the scale of one I'm talking about and by the way the reason I can sale this and have this ridiculously over ambitious. This vision is because I know that the community around me is there and ready to sort of get involved in these types of ideas and get enthused enthused by the is these ideas and back. I don't have to carry this on my own and I have seen the example of great inspiration so people like Dave MCI who you know way more capable than me and waymo capable of doing these things independently who just sort of drove forward on what they saw was right and said this is the direction I'm going to go in and they made a significant difference and you know this is way bigger than anything I could possibly manage on my own. I just feel extremely lucky arkie. The I've been put in this position where hopefully I can provide leadership and by leadership. I don't mean doing all myself or any thing of without form I just mean infusing people about these ideas and getting them engaged because certainly my thoughts on this are not the thoughts that are going to solve everything I have. I'm not an expert in systems engineering our thoughts about probably Muslim wrong but I just feel this is an urgent area. We need to address. It sounds amazing zing and it sounds like there's going to be some some really incredible stuff coming out of your efforts here. I mean congratulations. Neil good job well dino. I hope so I let me back say swanning around. You don't think the useful to go back. I just WANNA say swanning around fence game yeah no mainly. It's going to be about swimming around and telling well actually to be honest that is how I intend to carry this agenda route swanning around and telling people what tonight's nice excellent good that's how the world gets changed more swanning around Joe around soft power influence. I Dunno so it's it's tough but it's it's amazing. It's great when it works and I hope people see the same things I do. I'm sure they will and do you have any other appointments. Are you doing any like collaborations or or or other stuff. That's going on with this move or is it just so. There's a bit of watch this space. I'm definitely retaining my visiting appointment. The University of Sheffield Sheffield is it's my spiritual home. I mean I'm now in Cambridge a bit. I you know I was there last week. During the guy was in process some school and the there was so much support for what I was doing there and and it really is moulded a lot of the approach I take the spirit of the group route we could create their. I'm so desperate to make sure that as we build the group in Cambridge we carry that spirit across so does that side to it this. There's a little bit more to come on how we're going to bring this about but maybe we'll save that for another episode. That sounds great. That sounds great well. We'll we'll have links to all of the materials that have been put together about the way that Neil is changing.

Neil Cambridge Komo Cambridge Department Africa University of Sheffield Sheffi Dave MCI Johnson Joe twenty years five years
"dali" Discussed on Talking Machines

Talking Machines

12:57 min | 1 year ago

"dali" Discussed on Talking Machines

"You are listening to talking machines. I'm Katherine Born and an and I'm Neil Lawrence and Neil. You have some big news. What is happening what is going on? I have big news because I have taken a new position at the University of Cambridge where I will be the inaugural deep mind professor of machine Russian learning and so I'm starting on first of October which I'm extremely excited about congratulations neil that is super exciting so that's like amazing and this this professorship. This chair has not existed before you will be the first one ever in the history of this fancy old university three. That's right so I'm seeing it up there. With the location professor of mathematics which of course Isaac Newton was the inaugural holder off all the Bertrand Russell Professorship philosophy. I think Hugh Prices The obviously it's entirely the same as all of those it is. It's the best one last one and it's the best one so this case deep mind have very kindly they funded a chair at the University of Cambridge and and they've also I think being adverts out for chat at University College London which are the places where did his undergraduate graduates and his. Phd Work Will Post Work Postal workers. They've been very kind in giving the money so these are what's called Benefactor victorio gifts they endow Chaz so it's called an endowed chair which is that they giving a certain amount of money the interest from which sufficient to support the professorship and POPs a little bit of money on top AD infinitum in theory so that that's that's the nature of the chess. It's a great privilege to receive Landau Chat and it re was was one of those opportunities. It's a dream go. I think for me this thing you just content out that's awesome well. I couldn't an offer you can't refuse so. Are you starting a lab. Are you just going to Lake Swan around and tell people they're doing things wrong. What's going to happen? What did you do well? I'm really good at the swanning around bit. It's in some sense. The more announcements is to come. I think in early October which will clarify a little bit about what I'm going to do because this. I've been very lucky that few different different does does this announcement now but there is there is sort of watch. This space is a little bit of it but I can give the broad thrust of what I'm very interested in. I feel an and maybe people may be regular. Listeners to the PODCAST. have got a sense of where that interest for me has been going so I sort of feel for the I I. I don't know fifteen years of my career. I was running around wondering why people apple one using machine learning enough these techniques seen really cool and useful and trying to fix the lack of use teaching the open date science initiative. We did gassing process summer school just trying to make people understand how where these techniques could be useful across a number of areas is. I don't really need to be doing anymore. It's it's swung the other way and the decision to go to Amazon which I think is an amazing place to I've learnt so much that that company is so focused on you know they have this. I sort of now say this without sounding like you know I've drunk. The KOOL aid on Omeday. I drink the cool eight when I was there and still lingering off to taste but I was absolutely convinced there anymore. So I can say you know I wasn't willing to say these sort of things on talking machines when it's like well nils is paid by them division of Customer Obsession of delivering innovation nation on behalf of customers so the thing about Amazon is they they liked portray themselves as a tech company because it brings people in and it makes it of engineers engineers want to what the and they do have some amazing technology and this is certainly not an Amazon line you would hear but in my head they know that company their customer company. They don't care what the innovation is long as it's helping customers they are entirely focused on customers and in that sense almost like the purest version of like what what the corporate system says you should have is something delivering customers and in that respect machine learning and fishing intern is super important their agenda because it's important for their customers. It's not machine learning for the sake of machine learning a and of of course a part of me that believes in machine learning for the sake of it. That's more like the academic sites in my mind but being invalid te in that world of breath. How is this going to drive things forward for people and you know we use the what customers but fundamentally it's about people and you can translate the same aim idea to whether working in health government wherever we do have this obsession with technology and we get carried away with the Technology Eulogy we're building and don't talk about the end effect and whether it's always being done in that way Amazon that is the idea that you're constantly doing that and I learned so much from that I it just an extraordinary experience and it was I was very purposeful about choosing to go there to learn that stuff because once once you are deploying that you have to see what are the effects of that being deployed in the real world but by the same token I think businesses unnecessarily early and rightly much more short term focused than you can be in academia because the sort of financial life cycle of a company is driven by quarters and years and if you're not not delivering results on timescale I know there's lots of wonderful research indeed mind being an example of it that it should have not held by these earthly bonds of quarterly reports but that was that is not the world of most people in business and you know I think that you have to understand and that worlds to understand how machine learning is going to be deployed and that experience of threes of doing that at Amazon across things like primer Lima directly or indirectly with Alexa and then finally sort of going all in with the supply chain team which is just the most extraordinary I would say it's the world's largest largest? Ai and this is the most extraordinary automated decision making system the volume of predictions and automated purchasing going to systems just amazing but brought by the same token. I've always wanted to bring back those ideas and sort of stare where we go academically in order to address that need because because things have flipped the challenges is not no longer sort of explain to people why they need these techniques did challenges. They know they need these techniques. They they are deploying those techniques and deploying those techniques at scale across the world did he kind of unimaginable to his academics and the raw downstream effects I'm from doing that and those downstream effects best addressed by think partnerships between academia and industry and that's very I want to lead on I want to lead on on looking at that and and dealing with those implications with a good understanding the technical side with a good understanding of the deployment side and bringing in some of the welcome that I've been doing on the ethical side data trusts and using example applications uh-huh from date science Africa which has always been my biggest motivator of ideas in my head about what needs because when you have to end to end where you I have to go I mean and it's not always not always doing this but I'm talking to people who have been in the field with the Pharma grow in the cassava crops and designing being the mobile phone application and then go into the Ministry of Agriculture and say this is the distribution of cassava crop disease and we need to take action and by distributing these breeds in these districts which are resistant to this disease otherwise this reserve crop that is their witness drought will not be there when there's an extra out that is the full end to end pipeline of what we're trying to do and data science Africa is just most amazing way of seeing that pipeline so my aim is to ice. What do I see this? As in general I see this is a paradigm shift for computer science and I feel a little bit. You know. I'm very enthused about this. I hope it doesn't sound arrogant probably does if I said in a very British accent it was signed even more organ- but I genuinely think that if machining is to be successful if the promise of Ai is to be fulfilled. It needs to be pervasive and that pervasiveness fitness should be achieved through revolution in the way that traditional computer sciences perceive and in particular you can see this from the fracturing of what are sort of canonical standard laws of computer science in what we're doing. I mean just the core principle of a computer system posted of cheering thing and Norman von Neumann architectures which integrated data and code within the sort of turing machine is like I can read and write from tape and I can write instructions that I'm going to read at a later time right that that's the cheering machine idea but in all modern computer architectures we deploy floyd we separate code and data and we do that for security reasons all the sort of the viruses and everything that we have subjected to coming around by sort of variants maybe not all but a large number of them are injecting code in through things that should be data so sql overruns are saying they're managing to write data Tara's which should be code and the computer reads them as code and carries out the instructions of the virus so that separation all data and code is it a fundamental security security of the system but what we're doing at the top level. There's many layers on top of that many layers where that's being implemented and now coming along and machine learning algorithms and miss saying okay now the data is going to write the code or at least even if we're not learning online we're going to have an evolving ecosystem around the code and we've only tested this empirically in the lab and we don't know necessarily those conditions particularly deploying its scale scale. We may even be changing the system around us so those those challenges a very real like if you think about the challenges we just having with security what you staying on top of this separate data and code when you're deploying in the real world and there's a potentially malicious environment imagine those challenges when in your deploy machine learning systems that are attempting to either learn from their environment or they're using subsystems are more difficult to verify or more difficult to comprehend but I I wanNA take systems point of view on it. I just don't believe you know having seen this inaction that you're gonNA be able to go into every single group and say to every single software engineer. You must now take all of this into account every time you write a line of code. It's impossible for them. I mean I it seems impossible for me. This agenda is way bigger than anything I can imagine doing myself so my agenda is to rally computer science around this and build architectures could Texas such that when people are deploying that deploying in such a way that is safe and reliable so they can ship machine learning model in the full knowledge that this is being worried about on their behalf by the system into which they're shipping and that vision for that really comes out of being data science Africa and just seeing those folks bright. They have no problem with the creation of machine learning model they have a better understanding of the application itself they have no problem with doing an analysis. After a little bit of teaching they have no problem with writing APPs or deploying sort of Internet. Things devices is in fields. This is all stuff you can learn and do on your own what they don't have access to is an ecosystem within which to deploy the models which they understand is handling the movement of the data and ensuring.

Amazon University of Cambridge Africa Ai Neil Lawrence Katherine Born Bertrand Russell Professorship Lake Swan professor Isaac Newton Landau Chat Chaz professor of mathematics Texas University College London Omeday apple intern
Woman gives birth at Pink concert to youngest Pink fan ever

Lori and Julia

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Woman gives birth at Pink concert to youngest Pink fan ever

"A pink fan had a lively event happened during pink's liverpool england concert last night she went into labor then she gave birth to child and she named her little baby after pink dolly pink dali peso kills the name of the baby they didn't have time to get to the hospital this woman she gave birth denise jones in the first aid room of the stadium he did it naturally no time for pain relief says the doctor and she was going to name the baby dolly louise but then she decided to name the baby doll pink so congratulations

Liverpool England Denise Jones Pink
China's two CRISPR babies might have shorter life expectancies

Dr. Daliah

09:56 min | 1 year ago

China's two CRISPR babies might have shorter life expectancies

"Is i'm looking at this christopher baby story so crisper would you look at d._n._a. they're able to splice d._n._a. and take out genes that may not be beneficial for the baby And researchers in the US are warning. What will whoa. These gene edited babies. May die young. now six months the world's first edited babies reported china and researchers are saying that the twin girls yeah they may be more resistant to h._i._v. they have significantly increased tally geneticist was he's young clean dubbed the chinese frankenstein they said and in november two thousand eighteen announced he was create that he had created the first gene editing babies team editor jean are five from two twin babies a third gene editing is supposed to be born this summer Now going back to the twins. He wanted to make them immune from. HIV. but we're being told that people with the various of genome that he and his team gave the children are now twenty one percent are younger according to researchers from u._s. berkeley u._c. berkeley heavy search you a vast repository of human subject d._n._a. from two thousand people the berkeley scientists found that cece are five somewhat of a double edged sword while it might grant the children heightened immunity today chevy virus leaves a more susceptible to dangerous strings of flu and west nile virus so what we found is that -nificant increased mortality lead researcher restless until then p._r. breaking the unfortunate news at the twin girls are now twenty one percent less likely to live the seventy six as a result of the crisper editing they were subjected to so of course the scientific community has been ticked ever since dr he que- Broke the news. in addition this of course the data heat dodger he himself present last year they said he didn't manage the editor specific gene as intended further emphasizing the risk inherent of plane god what their own d._n._a. and they say the changes could last for generations highlighting dramatic consequences of failure and the extremely tight margin for error so we've been talking about crisper technology and had to take out a gene i kind of like a typewriter in a way guess displace it out we've talked about that for years now not years for months and how on one end if you have child that is going to have a deadly gene atas because his parents made that jane have that gene was able to get pregnant had offspring live long we all want our babies to live long and so we'll do anything possible to help them live long if it's something as simple as removing a gene lot of people are for it some people aren't they said no no no you're messing with nature darwinian survival of the fittest if parents gave birth to a child that's not supposed to live long that child if they reproduce will then have children that won't live long that's not ever lotion airily advantageous let nature tickets course some people will say And then an argument. Other researchers say as well. God or nature gave us the ability to do this technology. So we aren't vested with. Because God inspired us or nature inspired us to be able to do this. So there's gonna be a back and forth on the ethics of this and. theory if you have a child that would be destined to live that long you fix the gene that child would then hopefully not transmit that gene to their progeny then we have the ethical question is of our we've manipulating and making a new generation an area generation right are we going to be trying to make populations of people that are perfect are we going to try to make them blonde are we going to try to make all skinny or all tall and just because we have the knowledge to do it do we i've told you guys mandates book god lakes man works god laughs i've been god's in charge i think we're going to punish them out i think something's going to bite us in the butt but i'm a scientist also went to medical school i did research scientist when you're a scientist you don't wanna stop progress i'm so grateful we have antibodies and that by the nineteen forties we could fight so many infections our soldiers faced but we must now we have superbugs now we have side effects antibiotics now we have other issues i'd rather take those other issues i would never go back and uninventive antibody but we did mess with nature in that process birth control we came up with a way to not get pregnant we have sex What a breakthrough. Populations loved it. They're like this fantastic. We will we can stop getting pregnant. well we're just hurting ourselves because we're not having a lot of babies So. you know how much do we do a lot of us were thinking of you know what we're living for the day you don't know how much longer you're going to live you know if you only want to babies and you wanna give those two babies college education you know give them all the resources you can without having a family of eight mom wants to work and have a radio career and also be adopter doctor and journalism and do marketing do all the things that i like to do what are we stop at two kids that was my thing have i ever regretted have i ever thought that i might not be doing right oh yeah i struggled that all the time i stopped at two babies and i didn't start having kids till i was twenty eight i have been having babies ever since i was sixteen maybe even younger god gave me a reproductive system that work thank god give me a gift i didn't use it till i was twenty eight got married at twenty six does i i baby twenty eight I'm glad I'm not I don't have any regrets because of my career but in terms of nature. m. i. populating the world with a whole bunch of new dali's in coreys no only two and i have that stone approx spread my jeans and what am i telling my kids am i telling my kids to go out there so the roads and it's no no no no i'm no sex no sex sex nobody have sex married get your career done go to college don't make any babies yet So. How is that? Now. You all we really don't need any more dollars. Yeah. So maybe that's my contribution to y'all. Not a lot of two. But if you notice a lot of things we do isn't really helping our long-term growth, we cut down trees to build our house. Well, those trees provided shelter. Those trees provided oxygen. Those trees provided an ecosystem for other animals. we're okay with them because we're fine i go to the grocery store food i don't need to eat what's in my tree i could buy sunscreen i can have a cover on my house and awning to protect from the sun But we do these things a little by little, and I'm not trying to make as for you know, I don't green movement. but we need to realize that a lot of the things we do all ready are probably endangering us i just think i think article just popped up on humans are dangerous in their lives of course we are we are data in our existence and we probably aren't going to live much longer in terms of thousands of years we're going to make robots robots are gonna kill us i'm being serious We are trying so hard to make artificial intelligence. That Terminator two movie is not that off base. I'm sorry. Guys. We're making robots. That have artificial intelligence people will never happen. If a robot thinks there's a threat later, what would you to protect yourself? we're already pushing ourselves out of a job market how are we doing darwinian survival of the fittest of the job market we're making robots to replace each other So we're going to keep going because here's a lifetime is going to be fun, all these robots and stuff. Overdoing for future

Scientist Editor United States U._S. Berkeley U._C. Berkeley Dr He Que China Hiv. Berkeley Coreys Research Scientist Jean Cece Researcher Jane Twenty One Percent Six Months
Benjamin Netanyahu set for record 5th term in Israel

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

10:34 min | 1 year ago

Benjamin Netanyahu set for record 5th term in Israel

"Are few countries whose elections command widespread international attention and very few such countries as small as Israel approximately the size of El Salvador with a population roughly comparable to that of Papua New Guinea, but Israel since its foundation in nineteen forty eight has become accustomed to being a story in which the whole world is invested. Israeli elections are never straightforward not once has any party won a majority on its own and government is always by coalition. And the this week's election was close. It allowed a narrow path to continuing power for Benjamin Netanyahu who now prepares to serve a fifth term as Israel's prime minister Netanyahu is by now for better and for worse. A very well known quantity. Many have interpreted his reelection as an indicator of a gathering right would drift by an increasingly uncompromising country. But and this would be a first where is. Rayle is concerned. Is it really that simple? This is the foreign desk. That he does not in buddy. Now represents all Rayleigh. He is elected prime minister. He knob in related for fister, certainly means a lot. But if you get this is what he's trying to do when we we accept that. Whether we're falling observers always Riley with thing along with him. Would completely expected. But what was not really expected, and what's is a little bit. Weary and problematic with Russ tinian. It was the right wing victory to that percentage. Israel has always been self conscious of its image around the world, and Israel has always known that it has one huge friend, which is America and San Yahoo. Who was not in great terms with the previous American president. And all of a sudden now, you have Trump is president and is released like Israel has been Netanyahu's position has been vindicated. You're listening to the foreign desk with me Andrew Miller on today's show on joined by Dr Dali Shenlin and show Feffer dully Shenton is a public opinion expert and strategic consultant who joins us from Tel Aviv and show Feffer is a journalist and author of BB the turbulent life and times of Benjamin Netanyahu and chill joins us from Jerusalem. Dalia? Is there a consistent reason? Do you think why the people who have voted for Netanyahu vote for him? If you were to ask his most loyal voters. What is it that appeals to about Netanyahu? What would be their response people who are stable supporters among them. Some of them are longtime traditional Likud voters Likud is one of a few parties left in Israel that has a traditional vote going back generations, certainly back to nineteen seventy seven and some of the people who vote for Likud just continue because it's part of their identity to vote Likud. But in addition to that, of course, they support Netanyahu. And I think it's a little bit of a miscarriage. Irritation. You hear frequently in this election that it's all about Netanyahu's personality people really support his policy those who have voted for him. They support the fact that he has not moved ahead on his Palestinian negotiations in a way that would lead to a Palestinian state. They believed that he is restrained when it comes to wars and escalations and doesn't always jump into wars and most of all the love his foreign policy. And the reason why new people voted for him is very similar to the reason why some of the supporters vote for him, maybe without the kind of long-term identity based reason for supporting we could before we look at Walt Benjamin Netanyahu's fifth term might entail, Israel, we should examine the likelihood of him actually getting to serve all how big a threat to his immediate political future of these corruption charges still looming against him there, quite a major threat. There was through cozy three investigations which have been. Wrapped up by the police with recommendations to indict him for bribery. The attorney general has accepted most of those recommendations and ready issued his official warning that he intends to for bribery and one case in for fraud and breach attrition to others. It's still has the right to a pre trial hearing, which will take some time Pepsi few months, but one that is over and assuming his lowest fail to convince the attorney general's every case, and we all the care has been taken into sending these I find it hard. I think it's not happening this we'll be we'll be facing charges in cold within some six twelve months. So if he's threatening the jeopardy of his victim just to fuller that up and Joel has there been any discussion at all of how he can hope to govern in any meaningful sense while actually appearing in court defending himself against what are quite serious charges. Well, there's been a great deal of discussion about that foot for quite a while. Now, that's now saying in the open that I don't believe that charges will be we'll be pressed because I will prove in the hearings that has nothing in these charges. They hasn't privately that if the charges are brought in. He intends to to stay with this kind of being prime minister despite having to pairing now, another people in Israel, including some of coalition members believe at that point. I it would it would be ridiculous permitted to remain. There's no precedent for Israeli law is does not stipulate that he has to resign. But there's there's widespread disbelief that he could hold on after that, then he'll try and who knows he's he's defiant. We had a team in other cases. Maybe it's maybe it will succeed as well. But it is really the main obstacle facing. And the biggest question Mark moving moving over his future. Dolly one difference in this election. Obviously was the emergence of a new position alliance, or at least a new opposition figurehead, which is the the the former idea chief general bennigan's, do we get a sense yet of whether Gaunt's intends to stick around as an opposition figure. And if he did whether he would be regarded. As a credible implausible one by Israeli voters. Oh, divi- divide generally tend to take the view that you had your shot and you failed and you are therefore done our bike to enter that. But I I do want to augment by. I response about why people support on Yahoo to follow up on the issue of the indictments just briefly, we should point out that I think I've heard a lot of people who were not planning on voting the cooed before. But said they changed their minds to vote Likud because they felt the indictments are either overblown exaggerated or agree with Netanyahu's own a narrative that there is some sort of a collusion or conspiracy. If you will between the forces of the left, the media, and they are pressuring the the judicial law enforcement system, and I think we need to take that into account. In addition to the issues of people who were simply supportive Netanyahu everybody who thinks that he is guilty. And then he does represent a certain form of corrupt governance and has been self serving. And we'll do anything to stay in power and represents the corruption of our institutions. Those are the people who supported Ganz and other members of the opposition. But I think that Ganz his party in relation to your second question really got the votes of a wide swath of people from the Israeli center. Many of them from the Israeli left and probably some from the Israeli right which seems to have lost three seats as a block many of them coming from other parties, but some of them clearly wanting to replaces on Yahoo by supporting Ganz now will he stay around. There's no way to know Israel. We have to remember that he is positioned himself as a centrist party and Israel. Does not have historically a great history with centrist parties, they tend to stick around for one or two cycles before kind of diminishing and then sometimes even collapsing. So I think it's not only about Gant's, but about the role for these kinds of parties that try to avoid taking a strong position on some of the most divisive issues in Israel, particularly, of course, the Israeli Palestinian conflict. And then we'll see if either he continues as a politician or whether his centrist party, which is. Strange coalition of three other party, three parties altogether. Whether they can see eye to eye on policies enough to keep them together. As a party until Bergamo McNeil who has worked I think coin to seed you asleep both in Israel and over seas to portray himself as the embodiment of the Israeli nation. And for that reason, certainly when I think is very looked at from overseas. People tend to regard Israel through the prism of Benyamin Netanyahu. We're going to talk in the second part of the show about how Netanyahu operates in the world and about how he plans to operate in the world. But when that view goes back the other way when people look at Israel and think of Benjamin Netanyahu. What are they not seeing what part of Israel that is still alive and vigorous now, he's not being represented in the government or the character of its prime minister. Well, yeah. I mean. Agrees with with this. But I think ace Pat to characterize the election as having been a referendum on the suit the busy for offense. And if you look at the numbers, this was a you're you're quoting from London where the issue of a referendum is still very much alive. Two and a half year after Brexit. This was a fifty three forty seven results. So forty seven percents of his railings, despite that's overpowering charisma, very successful campaign, and you just make ten years of successful governments in in terms of economy and relatives communist real and improving foreign relations despite everything that people thinking that's forty seven percent voted against him. Which is I think quite an impressive numbers almost half of the country. So is not represent Israel. If you look at their own party votes than he does certainly and did they could property which they needed for so long, but the view that he and buddy. This is what he's trying to do. And when we we accept that. Whether we're falling observers always Riley's where basically playing along with him

Israel Walt Benjamin Netanyahu Prime Minister Likud Riley Yahoo Rayle Rayleigh Papua New Guinea Russ Tinian El Salvador Fister Andrew Miller Bribery Dalia President Trump Tel Aviv Ganz Jerusalem
"dali" Discussed on Sex With Emily

Sex With Emily

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"dali" Discussed on Sex With Emily

"Which is just so amazing. Because this is what I what I tell you that what you guys know about sex. Now is so limited like we scratched the surface of our potential our potential for pleasure are potential for connection like all the places on our body. And that's why love this Dali's doing the sexological body work until Matic all of it. It's a journey because I was thinking about it. I was thinking about if I like talking about disconnected sacks and all this instant gratification. Like back in the day. Right. Okay. I'm aging myself. Now, you know, they're handwritten letter emails and all of that kind of stuff where it takes a little longer, and I always had out of state boyfriends. So I really let me tell you this is so fucking good about buildup inches the patient because I always put a long distance relationship. Maybe. And I think also that contributed to why really amazing. With masturbation because you have to use your fantasy. Exactly, I have a great fantasy jelly, Dolly, dallies sexy. Little mink is is. I just loved it. I mean, really, but the quick and fast sex. You know, there's a time in a place for it. I don't wanna bring shame to people because there is a time where you want you have curiosity, right? You want to understand? But sometimes you just have to look at why are you doing this? Or are you looking for it for validation? Are you looking at it? Just to learn to try something new these are, all okay reasons. But at some point you're gonna say I want something else. And that's when you pick up some great books. I'm sure you've recommended. That's when you listen, Emily. That's when you come to see somebody like me, and there's I'm not the only one there's amazing sex educators out there, still go, see sex educators. I was just recently seen my sex logical body worker. I also just went to do the sub Dom. Class of its right with. God, dammit. I don't I'm physical always things. We are never done. We are never I met Dolly. Because I was doing us to Matica somatic therapy training in San Francisco three years ago. It was intense. It was like every other month for five six days. It wasn't done. We, but I mean, I'm never I'm doing. Yeah. You're never done learning. I'm still in therapy, again, different kind. But we're never done even as practitioners because we want to burn Dolly's been going and doing it for a long time. I mean since you've been in this because let's just say the last five years you were doing this or for this kind of works. Yeah. But before that like, you were not having you didn't know your frigging Dennen now breath. She wasn't born knowing that someone talks into her. You're no you had to discover eight slight taking a time out and just having this lab with yourself. You know, when I did my sex logical bodywork training like truly we had a marathon of what they call orgasmic yoga practice. Another easier way to say, it is just mindful masturbation. Are embodied masturbation, and we had to do this every day, and the things you have to bump up against if you really take on the homework. It's just starts to unfold. And you start noticing things. Listen, I had a client the other day, we were working on giving and and giving touch and receiving touch, and there's a touch call taking when you're just like taking for your pleasure. And I was about we were saying, okay. What kind of touched you want? I want you to touch me. Okay. Great. And this over close, and we were teaching him how to express things to his girlfriend because he was feeling a lot of shame asking for things. So we want to break down that shame and say, it's okay to ask for something. But it was interesting because I was going to do a taking touch which the touch was for me. I do whatever I want, and I just started to warm up my hands, and I stopped like, oh my God. I just need to take a minute. He said why I said. I'm Mormon at my hands because I live in the giving quadrant. I'm like the ultimate giver. Right. But I was doing it for your comfort. So you didn't have to fill the cold. Oh, so it was like this lightbulb where it's really actually very hard for me to be a take..

Dolly Matic Dali San Francisco Emily five six days three years five years
"dali" Discussed on Jay and Miles X-Plain the X-Men

Jay and Miles X-Plain the X-Men

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"dali" Discussed on Jay and Miles X-Plain the X-Men

"And I always love when we get to see the inside of Logan's mind because it's very often depicted as super surreal, but also like appropriately representational, and what we see here is the surreal landscape in the center of which Logan is tied to a tree wearing his weapon x gear and having sabertooth and lady death's righteous slash him into pieces. Just slashing enormous chunks out of him. But in the background there like Salvador Dali style melting clocks draped over things and delirium from Sandman style schools of neon fish swimming through the air like it manages to be dream sequence. Like clearly an imagined scenario, but one that's just so visceral and uncomfortable. I really don't like it when Logan's mind has derivative psychedelia like I actually found the melting clocks kind of annoying. Okay. That is perhaps a valid point. My theory is that you know, how sabertooth beats Logan up on his birthday every year and almost kills him. Yeah. We'll maybe Logan took a trip to like a a modern art museum on one of his birthdays. To celebrate it and sabertooth slashed him into little tiny pieces while he was looking at a piece maybe specifically he went to the Dali museum in Saint Petersburg. Yes. That one oh is that the one that has a solid or Dolly created holographic image of Alice Cooper with his skull open in his brain visible. It is well Salvador Dali was a horrible human being. But he sure did it makes him cool stuff. Yes. Back in. Well, I would say meet space, but everything is sort of meat space in this issue back into non Sakic world, Bishop and quicksilver one member of the strikeforce and the person who came to rescue them irrespectively are trying. To pilot the Blackbird, and they're having hell of a time with re entering the earth's atmosphere. The Blackbird is capable of going into an out of space, but it's not really designed for it. And with all the electromagnetic stuff going on. It's a bad scene and. One of the things that really really affectively ramps up the sense of urgency here really makes it feel high stakes is how deftly Larry Hama story wise, a Vokes the Phoenix saga because it's for it to survive. Reentry genus having to tell the Pathak we hold the Blackbird together. Yeah. Totally. But also just a pacing in general and credit to Mr. Hubert for this one as well. Like as we go back and forth from Jean-Ann executor going into an out of Logan's mind based on where they're needed most and Logan just suffering and maybe being pulled away from the mortal coil and everything going wrong. One thing after another and Bishop quicksilver trying to hold the Blackbird together and Rogan Gamba trying to help like it just it just escalates attention with every little transition. A lot of the time the transitions can be distracting, but with this as you have two parallel scenarios each. Getting more and more fucked. Like, I've heard this issue. Don't even know how many times I loved fatal attractions when I was a kid so probably dozens and still reading it again and the reading it a second time as it prepared for this episode, which usually try to do with comics like I was on the edge of my seat the whole goddamn time..

Logan Salvador Dali Dali museum Bishop quicksilver Alice Cooper Larry Hama Rogan Gamba Sakic Phoenix Mr. Hubert Saint Petersburg
Katy Perry, Miley Cyrus, Garth Brooks, Willie Nelson and more pay tribute to Dolly Parton at MusiCares 2019 Person of the Year

Charlie Parker

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Katy Perry, Miley Cyrus, Garth Brooks, Willie Nelson and more pay tribute to Dolly Parton at MusiCares 2019 Person of the Year

"Big night for Dolly. Tonight. Sent to be honored by the Recording Academy as the two thousand nineteen music cares person of the year bell take place in Los Angeles. Little big town is set to host the event, and it will feature performers like Garth Brooks. Chris Stapleton, Vince, Gill Willie Katy Perry pink, Don Henley, Leon bridges, and more. And if that's not enough Dali set to take the stage as well. And we'll close tonight's show. This is separate obviously from the Grammys the sixty first Grammys which are on Sunday. But tonight's festivities will be recorded and shown at a later

Gill Willie Katy Perry Garth Brooks Chris Stapleton Recording Academy Don Henley Los Angeles Leon Bridges Dali Vince
Why the app economy wont touch your Christmas tree

San Francisco Chronicle Business & Technology News - Spoken Edition

03:37 min | 2 years ago

Why the app economy wont touch your Christmas tree

"You're listening to the spoken edition of the San Francisco Chronicle. Why the app economy won't touch your Christmas tree by Owen Thomas from business? Welcome back to tech chronicle if you choose to deck your in box with gave verbiage make it this newsletter used Christmas tree there's not an app for that in a non demand world can't just push button and get a Christmas tree my fellow journalists. Kara Swisher joke is that San Francisco is assisted living for millennials though. This particular query came from a boomer colleague, it seems like some combination of just in time logistics gig workers and magical ELS ought to be able to just put a Christmas tree in your living room. And this is the crucial invasion here. Folks, take it away when you're done. It turns out there are plenty of services that will get you a Christmas tree Dali and on-demand moving service which operates in the bay area has a seventy five dollar tree special. Delivery included, though, a tree stand his extra lights and decorations though for that you're on your own. Or maybe task rabbit, which offers a variety of holiday services, including event, decorating and lighting installation. Balsam hill sells pre lit plug and play Christmas trees, but does not accept returns after December twenty fifth. So forget about sending it back. If you're feeling ecological friends of the urban forest will rent you a tree for ninety five dollars. But pick up and delivery our on you. Hello task grab it again plant, man dot com. Interior scape will deliver and pick up a live Christmas tree for two hundred dollars up. But it's strictly a phone or Email joint. So no online ordering. It's twenty eighteen somehow all of our instant gratification takes too long. Consumer needs have not been met by the internet. If that's not an argument for a long, boom. I don't know. What is what I suspect is keeping people away from this market is the burden of what's called, reverse, logistics. That is getting rid of stuff consumers no longer want returns and exchanges, but devil online retailers for simple items, like apparel electronic. Can you imagine the costs for a business of decking, your warehouse halls with artificial Christmas trees that are only used once a year? It's far easier to put the burden of storage or recycling on the customer wasteful, though. That may seem when I get a pitch for a Christmas, tree pickup and delivery service all top to this bubble until then enjoy the old fashioned burden of going out hauling home etry and lighting it up the old fashioned way. That's how Ramona lump terrier will be getting her tree at any rate. Please don't put an internet connected light. Switch on the thing. Owen? Thomas quote of the week. The best thing about participating about the future is no one ever checks. If you were right. New media veteran Elizabeth Oester on the internet history podcast coming up markets are closed Wednesday for the state funeral president George H W Bush what I'm reading Rebecca Shuman tries to figure out when the nineties actually ended long reads a ban on gas cars JD. Morris looks at one California legislator who's trying to win us off internal combustion San Francisco Chronicle without the work partnership of Jeff dean and Sanjay gigawatt. Google might never have become Google James summers. Writes, a New Yorker speaking of which San Jose approved Google's one hundred ten million dollar land deal for a huge downtown development in the early hours of Wednesday. Rowland Lee reports San Francisco Chronicle.

San Francisco Chronicle Owen Thomas San Francisco Kara Swisher Google Balsam Hill Rowland Lee James Summers San Jose George H W Bush Elizabeth Oester Rebecca Shuman Jeff Dean President Trump Morris California
"dali" Discussed on Lore

Lore

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"dali" Discussed on Lore

"So in January of nineteen Twenty-three sheep sold the big mansion and bought a new home in another part of Los Angeles Herman Shapiro, moved in with her, and he continued his legal work while she took on the massive job of getting all her things moved into the new house all those closets and attic spaces wouldn't fill themselves after all and then in July of nineteen Twenty-three Dali was arrested and the trial began the case was made against her and Shapiro built his own defense. But in the middle of all of that Dali pulled Shapiro aside. And whispered cryptic message to him. He's there. She told him with a noticeable amount of panic in her voice. He's there. Two zero was utterly confused. But before he could ask her to be more specific Dali went on my vagabond half-brother, she explained you need to go. Make sure he has something to eat. And then she gave Herman instructions very specific instructions. Bewildered? But intrigued Herman went home that day and did everything Dolly had asked him to do. He prepared a meal probably placing all of the items on a serving tray and took it all upstairs not to a guestroom though. But the Dali's room once there he stepped inside the closet and doing exactly what Dolly had instructed him to. Do. He whistled. A moment later a panel in the wall at the end of the closet slid open. It was like a dark hole in his reality. A hidden space inside the home. He thought he knew inside and out here. It was a secret room that only Dali had known about well Dali and one other person. Hello Herman came the voice from inside the opening and then a face appeared. Over the course of the afternoon. The man in the wall told Herman everything he explained that. Dolly had always maintained a long string of lovers even when Fred was alive beginning with her affair ten years prior with auto, San Huber in Milwaukee and eventually leading up to men like ROY Klum and Herman himself Dali had never stopped cheating. Herman was suspicious, though, why are you living in the walls of this house? He must've asked him, and how do you know about all these other men the stranger in the hole in the wall, probably smile because he replied, I m auto San Huber. It was a stunning revelation auto San Huber, the sewing machine repairman that Dolly had broken up with a decade before was right there living in their home naturally Herman wanted to know more. He was an attorney after all, and he was very good at asking questions. So he managed to tease a bit more information out of the young men. It turns out that Idaho, never left win Dali pretended to break off their affair. He simply moved in and stayed all those times when Fred felt as if he wasn't alone as if someone were watching him and sometimes moving items he left around the house all those times. It was. Really just auto and he'd been there ever since moving from house to house as Dolly went through life for an entire decade auto was her secret lover hiding in the walls when he needed to and roaming the house when he was alone. No one had ever seen him in all those years. Besides Dali except for that one chance encounter with Marjorie tax who mistook him for a ghost. But oh had one more story for Herman. He knew what happened the night. Fred was killed, and it would change the way people viewed the tragedy forever. According to him the night, Fred and Dahlie returned home from their party. Fred was very drunk almost from the moment they walked into their home. The couple began one of their typical arguments. The neighbors had heard screaming after all and it wasn't from the attack. And that argument I'd acclaimed began to get violence. Fearing for Dali's safety auto told Herman that he climbed out of his hiding place in the attic and grabbed one of Fred's revolvers then as quietly as he could he rushed downstairs to stop the fight. Fred saw him recognized him and in his drunken rage began to attack the younger, man. It was during the struggle. The gun went off twice into Fred's chest, and after the older man fell to the ground auto shot him one last time in the side of the head. After that. It was a simple matter of hiding some valuables making a mess of the room..

Dali Herman Shapiro attorney Fred Dolly San Huber Los Angeles Idaho Marjorie Milwaukee ROY Klum Dahlie ten years
Pittsburgh synagogue-shooting suspect wheeled into courtroom

All Things Considered

01:45 min | 2 years ago

Pittsburgh synagogue-shooting suspect wheeled into courtroom

"Summer says he was helping his ninety year old mother fill out her absentee ballot. When he went to stuff it into the envelope. And he noticed he had a problem. It didn't fit to white. They took it out to see. Maybe I folded it wrong. But there's only one way to fold it. Michael Ryan, the head of New York City's board of elections says yes, some of the ballots didn't quite fit their envelopes. We got them back from the vendor folded in three sections. They probably should have been folded in four sections is city is reminding people there are two pages in two sides to the ballot. The candidates are on one side and ballot proposals are on the other for the rest of tonight here no area, no precipitation. It'll just be mostly cloudy overnight tonight. We'll see low of about forty three degrees. Tomorrow, Tuesday, mostly sunny through the day with a high near fifty seven it'll remain clear tomorrow night, low about forty. Eight and then on Wednesday, very nice day. It'll be mostly sunny through the day on Wednesday. The high reaching about sixty five degrees right now, though here in New York City, fifty six degrees under cloudy skies. You're listening to WNYC at four zero six. Support for NPR comes from visit Saint Petersburg Clearwater, along Florida's Gulf Coast offering artistic draws including St. Pete's Dali museum the to Hooghly collection and the museum of fine arts more at visit Saint Pete Clearwater dot com. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Mary Louise Kelley, and I'm Ari Shapiro. The man accused of killing eleven worshippers and wounding six others in synagogue, Saturday appeared in federal court today Robert Bowers has been charged with twenty nine federal crimes and could face the death penalty NPR's Brian man was in the courtroom in Pittsburgh and joins us now. Brian IRA at describe what the scene was like in there today. Incredibly

New York City NPR Brian Man Ari Shapiro Brian Ira Mary Louise Kelley Saint Petersburg Clearwater Saint Pete Clearwater Wnyc Summer Michael Ryan Robert Bowers Museum Of Fine Arts Dali Museum Pittsburgh Hooghly Gulf Coast Florida Forty Three Degrees
"dali" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

09:11 min | 2 years ago

"dali" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Dr Dali on Facebook deducted Ali show. So there's all this talk about blue waves and red waves and the Republicans are going to get a red wave and Democrats are going to get a Blue Wave and the Republicans get red wave. Obamacare will be repealed, if the Democrats get a Blue Wave then Odom, ObamaCare is going to be here to stay Donald Trump is going to be impeached, and I don't I don't know if we're going to have any wave. We may have a shift in the house and the Senate, but axios dot com. Says Republicans would need to lose forty eight US house seats and seven US Senate seats to technically qualify as a quote, unquote. Wait, that's according to a new report by Valla pedia-. I guess a wave as they defied. It is one in which the net seat King Jr. By the president's party falls into the top quintile of historical changes and compile data from nineteen eighteen to two thousand sixteen. So in the US house, they say in eleven of the fifty elections since nineteen eighteen the president's party lost forty eight or more seats in the house six of those eleven wave elections occurred during the president's first midterm election. That's why you keep hurry hearing. If a president comes in, and he has controlled the house. There's a good chance. He lose it in his first Mitchell as opposed to his second midterm election. But the US Senate they say ten of the forty eight Senate election says nine thousand eighteen the president's party lost seven more seats in ten of the forty eight. Three of these quote, ten wave elections again when the president's first midterm. Now. You could look at that going. Well, wait a sec if the minorities in the midterm, the first midterm this could happen. The second bitter. And ten of the forty eight Senate elections. That's not a lot. So they say Republicans would have to lose seven gubernatorial seats in Nevada a seats up for grabs. Between Adam black salt and Steve says, lack and four hundred ninety four state legislative seats for those to be considered wave elections. What a Democrats don't really need. They need to dozen seats in the house. So they got to pick up twenty four seats in the house. And they have to get a net gain of two seats in the Senate. Maybe it's not considered a wave. The people care if there's a waiver not adds a term that people are using and everybody's excited about, but would you guys want to know is what will happen if the Democrats do win twenty four seats? And if they do win two Senate seats, what does that mean for healthcare? What does it mean for immigration? What does it mean for? You know, how politics are going to look. Well, according to one reporter. The Democrats are going to gain seats. They're close, but they may not have enough. They may not make it by four seats. I don't really think the house is really in in in peril. In terms of that. However in terms of the Senate having a gridlock for the next two years, if the Democrats gain control of the Senate could be very very rough. And we kind of have a lot to do from a political standpoint Trump still has lots of proof. If the economy is improving and he wants to forward and push more common be saving measures. He's gonna need the house and the Senate. He can't have the house pass of the just for the Senate to say, Nope. Republicans barely got control of the Senate and still stuff isn't getting done. Now, they do with ObamaCare. Let's say the Republicans are lucky and they get to save. They get so save all their seats. They haven't done anything with ObamaCare. Now. Maybe maybe that's the plan. Maybe that's the smartest thing to do. Maybe the Republicans need to let ObamaCare just weaken and die and then start something new. Problem is they're not really going to appeal to either base that way. The base wants lower healthcare costs. It was so nice that we aren't penalizing employers anymore. I believe the employer penalty in the individual mandate are gone Hallelujah praise. The lord. But we still have high prices 'cause we still don't have really transparency of what's something's gonna cost. If I need to get a hysterectomy. I have no idea. I can't save for it. I can't put money aside. Because I have no idea what my hysterectomy is gonna cost. Now. An insurance company will say don't worry you only have to be five hundred out of pocket. We got the rest. Well, that's five hundred out of pocket for maybe the hospital. What about the surgery? What about the anesthesiologist? What about the medications? What about the follow up care? But Americans don't want packages either. They don't want to be told something to package, and then they don't get to have follow up care. You know, one thing Medicare a lot of insurance companies did is if you have a procedure. Then the doctor will get paid for that procedure. But if you need the stitches out or follow up or somebody looking over the wound doesn't get covered. Many insurance companies had this two week window where for two weeks or what have you covered? Now, they picked that. Because a doctor could really be in trouble from our practice. If you wouldn't see you for two weeks after surgery. The problem is is if nothing gets covered. Then. How often is the doctor going to be able to see you. Now for me, we every time I did procedures. I was always fascinated at how it would look like if I removed your toenail I'm like coming for free. Let me take a peek at it. You know, you don't even have to you know, we don't even have to go to room and do the whole setup we'll make it a nurse. Visit. But also come because I dying to look at it. I like seeing that kind of stuff. Let me see I couldn't wait two weeks. But the problem is is when they bundled like they were talking about bundling pneumonia. Bundling surgery if somebody had a Monja and needs a follow up x Ray. But the X Ray is not paid for. How often do you think they're going to get that x Ray? So bundling isn't the best way to do things either. Because people are always going to cut corners. See nobody wants to do anything for free. I went to school knowing I'm going to have to do things for free. That's the whole. That's the whole premise of going into medicine. You're going to be putting an hours you're going to be you know, putting in your dues. You're gonna knock it paid by insurance companies you do things for free. But it's the only industry that does that. Get groceries. Even nonprofits have to still have employees. They still have to bring money in. They still have to pay for power bills and mail and things like that. I mean, you know, we we still have medicine is the only only. Industry. Where it is assumed that free stuff for free time is going to happen. And to me that's an issue because there's only so much time. You have this is why there's such burnout. And then eventually, you could always tell when the doctor starts getting burned out because he's like I'm done doing stuff for free. Now, we still do stuff for free. But once they start to feel that way. Yeah. Once we feel taken advantage of it's hard to get that back. So what does next election? I don't know if the Democrats do win, and they got they want to spend the whole time trying to impeach Donald Trump and trying to. Investigate them and have one hearing after the other it is going to be exhausting even here. He Democrats go. I'm not gonna want to see that people have fatigue. Whether it's Trump fatigue or Hillary fatigue. People want.

US Senate Donald Trump president Senate US Valla pedia Facebook Ray Nevada Odom King Jr Dr Dali Ali Mitchell reporter Hillary
60 Minutes executive producer warned CBS News reporter: "There are people who've lost their jobs trying to harm me"

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

01:03 min | 2 years ago

60 Minutes executive producer warned CBS News reporter: "There are people who've lost their jobs trying to harm me"

"Sixty minutes, executive producer. Jeff Fager has been fired for violating company policy is departure comes amid reports of sexual misconduct. In a statement. Fager said his dismissal was not related to the false allegations printed in the New Yorker and point to a text message. He sent to CBS Girija Duncan who's covering the story. Sunday evening. I reached out for comment on the articles alleging he groped or touch CBS employees at company parties in addition to denying these charges Fager and a text said to me, quote, if you repeat these false accusations without any of your own reporting to back them up you will be held responsible for harming he went on to say, be careful. There are people who. Who lost their jobs trying to harm me? And if you pass on these damaging claims without your own reporting to back them up that will become a serious problem. Quinnipiac university has resend it rescinded the Fred friendly first amendment award that was given to fake her in

CBS Jeff Fager Florence Carolina Girija Duncan South Carolina Carolina Beach Amtrak Dali Whittington House Mary Joyce Carlson David Begnaud Pam Coulter LA Eeoc Dallas David Parkinson Heroin Quinnipiac University Executive Producer
First Look: DJI Mavic 2 Zoom and Mavic 2 Pro

Digital Production Buzz

01:14 min | 2 years ago

First Look: DJI Mavic 2 Zoom and Mavic 2 Pro

"I had their live announcement to announce two new maverick to drones. And again, the rumor mill on this one was pretty spa. Hot on the first one is the magic to pro with a one inch image sensor hassle color science, and then there's the DJ I medic to'soon with a zoom -able twenty four to seventy optical zoom lens. The first of its kind in drone new features include professional grade, hyper lapsing and Dali's zoom. You know that old offered Hitchcock Steven Spielberg move where you zoom in with the lands that your Dali ING out. You can actually do that on a drone now, which is really cool. There's incredibly improved obstacle avoidance features. It will automatically recalculate your route. You can lock in your course route. So you can actually do several passes at the camera shot using the course lock feature and a thirty one minute flight time with Oltra quiet rotors the word that came to my mind when I was watching the announcement was culmination. This is like the culmination of five years of steady drone development. Into what I now see as almost the perfect aerial cinematic platform.

Nikon Nikam Steven Spielberg Google Larry Gunners Dali Murless Kenan Ceefax Meats Los Angeles New York Partner Cameron
Tropical Storm Chris to become hurricane on Tuesday

24 Hour News

02:57 min | 2 years ago

Tropical Storm Chris to become hurricane on Tuesday

"On new york one our goal now is to do a very intensive inspection using the latest technologies x ray technology which gives them very intensive look at what's happening through the different layers of paint and one thing we're going to then be able to say which apartments still have led and which no longer have any lead and then those taken off the list and we focus our attention on the ones where there's a challenge last month it was revealed that more than eight hundred children in nitra housing have levels of lead in their blood that is concerning the blasio says the city will be contacting these families to make sure they know how to receive care for these kids lead paint was banned in the city in one thousand nine hundred sixty winds from tropical storm chris are expected to intensify soon accuweather meteorologist brian thompson tells us more about the storm and what it may mean for our area we'll tropical storm chris is sitting off the north carolina coast is expected to become a hurricane later today as a definetely starts to move it really is not move much in the last several days but as it races off to the north and east is going to stay well offshore but it will be close enough to bring a rip currents to some of the long island and jersey shore beaches as good throughout the next few days the storm is expected to track to the north and east late tonight into tomorrow keeping it well offshore wins news time ten seven today is the deadline for the youngest immigrant children removed from their families to now be reunited with them and correspondent jim ryan says the trump administration will not be able to get them all back together images of children taken from their parents to international outrage had a policy modification from president trump we are keeping families together but matching the youngest children with their parents has proven more difficult than expected only about half of the one hundred two kids under five who were taken from their families at the border will be returned before a court imposed deadline today and late yesterday a federal judge rejected an administration attempt to rewrite detention rules in order to hold immigrant children indefinitely us district judge judge dali g called the request wholly without merit speaking out on the internet has gotten another person in trouble a top prosecutor in san bernardino county california deputy district attorney michael seldom has been placed on administrative leave while disparaging and racially charged social media posts are examined a san bernardino son says he's accused of making offensive posts on facebook instagram and twitter referencing michelle obama congresswoman maxine waters and mexican immigrants the da's office says its investigation could result in disciplinary action and possible termination saudi m has been unavailable for comment wins news time ten zero eight the smartphone.

North Carolina Michelle Obama Twitter Facebook San Bernardino Deputy District Attorney San Bernardino County Dali G President Trump New York Accuweather Nitra Maxine Waters Instagram Michael California Prosecutor Jim Ryan
"dali" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"dali" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"For the private detective the book was inspired by the fact that there's so much written about noir and los angeles and they're so little about private detectives in los angeles i was putting together a course about private detectives and i was like oh yeah there must be a book and then i was looking looking looking and i was like wait a second there isn't a book and so it was sort of like by default i was like okay just fill this void right this book but it basically talks about the significance of los angeles as place and then it talks about the belushi of the private detective story and then it talks about the private detective as you know the kind of sturge a white man and then what happens when the private detective african american what happens in project is a woman and what happens when the private detective i'm not sort of how the book is organized circuit place for people to keep up with you and your project absolutely this is the day of the internet right so this is dali dot com his my website they can find me on facebook facebook dot com slash who is dalia and then they can also find me on twitter instagram and blah blah blah everything everything that's like ephemeral and social i tried to represent that they can't do snatch out no does not try to just it's one bridge too far i had it on my phone for like half an hour and then i was like i just can't can't do this this has to go so i maxed out.

los angeles dalia facebook twitter
"dali" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"dali" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Back in the in the nineties you recall dali was cloned right farmanimal and i received a call a few years earlier from the people who grading dali and they asked me what they needed to worry about from a ethics an animal welfare point of view and i said well the there are some obvious considerations does it hurt the animal okay they said we can respond to that i said does it harm the environment or cause other kinds of harms which and respond to that so what do we really need to worry about i said would you need to worry about is a vacuum that's created by new technology and are ethical thinking and if scientists like yourself don't lead the public in understanding that you will find that that vacuum that luke kuhn is filled by bad ethics they said give us an example i said for example there are people out even then there were people in the eighties there were people saying that this biotechnology violates god's will well they were worried about proprietary control over cloning so they didn't educate the public and then dolly was announced and time warner did a survey of the american public of fairly large survey within a week as i predicted three out of four people said it violated god's will and that's a tough one to answer because you can't email god so is the science there though to clone humans yet and we're just delaying that because of the religious skepticism about it generally the the yes to put it simply i mean if you can clone an animal you can clone a human i was gonna say something you shared with me yesterday is what does the saying that that bad ethics are they will replace good ethics free experiencing what was that phrase that you had that that you say.

dali luke kuhn warner dolly
"dali" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"dali" Discussed on KELO

"To witness the end and they're the ones to testify about began in how it was awful and how it happened jimmy california on ground zero go ahead collide the world of your metaphor this evening and i would say is very pointed and now this thing around thirty at night on it's not even funny and what's really interesting to me all says that las vegas thing happened on and it happened to sort of a more conservatives crowd and then right away to sing alcan with wind skiing and dali's dan a supporter of the dnc um and i think what you would bring about the dollar's in science ugly industry as far as people not participating uh people aren't going the live fish come common and like you know and maybe the donation day and you know they're not go north history through i never thought of the donations you're going through things that we don't know about they don't really do any real investigating and of course the media is hoping that these stories go away but we're looking once again added intelligence failure and and where the intelligence failures begin here's where the conspiracy theorists spin their conspiracies and her conspiracy theories and so if they don't want conspiracy theory any more all they have to do is avoid intelligence failures but they won't because intelligent intelligence failures breed coverup it breeds corruption it breeds impunity and we're getting used to this and we shouldn't be used to it we should demand accountability and transparency it's like everything's one hundred eighty degrees out of sank you know it's like would like you're saying when you grew up you weren't afraid of clouds and when i grew up i was an freight a politician he now and now it seems like everybody's just runamuck and out of control listen i wanted to bring one more female jimmy before you bring up that remember what you said about when you were a kid you weren't afraid of clowns you weren't afraid of politicians now you're old you afraid of both can i weird yeah and and so so they superimpose a new definition over a picture and then get you.

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"dali" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"dali" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"Salvador dali who died in 1989 was exumed for a paternity testing and guess what he still has that trademark mustache after all these years good go in salvador dali what is that not surprised me you know the greatest surrealist of all times still has that that mustache the jets about three or four inches from each side of his face yes bravo senor volvo but temperance flat project this is important slugging a lot of press doggone at this is so important so important it has less than thirty days less than thirty days to submit everything it needs for funding to the state of california the bill that damn now there is still a great need for letters of support the hear me these letters can be from you these letters can be from the aggravated organization you belong to the water twins mario and manual that's all i have to say you know who they are they're going to be one o'clock for a quick update on that temperance flat project and how you can help and when i say it's now or never it's now or never de understand whether you think this thing has a chance of happening or not what have you got the lose writing a letter of support what are you gonna lose what are you going to lose and very quickly i wanna dump on you lose a survey sangabodi by state university here in california about the great i talked about it yesterday the great exit is from the state but it's a different survey it's not the old where you going where would you wanna go if you could each year at a cold based upon the size of your wallet and if your wallet got a lot fatter overnight and the results of this survey surprising it's kind of a.

Salvador dali jets california thirty days four inches
"dali" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"dali" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"And eighty's well not necessarily he's saying that never happened right and his wife standing by his side and his daughters very outspoken about the fact that this is not her father and this is not something her dad would do they had a close relationship he doesn't treat women like this but hopefully maybe this will inspire more town halls across the country me me heard about things that have gone on it university universities where they try to speak to man about the correct way to treat women and when you're in a drinking situation and to be careful because you don't want to get too drunk and sexually assault the woman like that is the town hall that needs to happen in that wasn't the message exactly that cosby wanted to do what else has gone well this is odd the artist salvador dali who died in 1980 nine is possibly about to having maury povich moment are not there is a spanish woman named maria pilar able martinez she was born in nineteen fifty six and she claims that her mother who has made had an affair with salvador dali and she's been trying to prove that he is her father for some time somehow she has pushed this case to the point that a judge in madrid is actually ordered that the body of salvador dali be exhumed he's been there for a long time as me to have a paternity test done on his dead body and he hit where he is buried i think it's pro possibly where he used to live it's a big tourist place where taurus goes apparently there's a lot to see their but i'm surprised that this woman why why are they doing this for him guarany well no i know why she wants said bertel why would this judd's say okay let's just digging up because a quote tarotcard reader thinks that she is his daughter she says that the the only thing she's missing is a mustache that they look exactly like each other and obviously ba salvador dali estate is going to push back against they don't want this to happen.

salvador dali martinez bertel judd ba salvador dali estate assault cosby maury povich maria pilar madrid