9 Burst results for "Dale Rogers"

"dale rogers" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:20 min | 3 months ago

"dale rogers" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Sticking with the trend, Johnson & Johnson said today it too may cut some jobs as it contends with inflationary pressures and the strong dollar. But the maker of Tylenol and band aids said lingering supply chain problems were starting to get better. The New York fed's global supply chain pressure index reports 5 straight months of easing supply chain pressures. Marketplaces Matt Levin explains why that is. Let's start with the good news. It is way cheaper now to ship a container full of engine parts or plush dolls or whatever from China to LA. Dale Rogers is a Professor of logistics at Arizona state. In 2021, a typical price was $20,000 to ship a container. Now we're at about 5000 that container. Those epic port backlogs are pretty much gone too. The ports of LA and Long Beach don't look like the container ship DMV anymore. And many manufacturing companies have tried to reassure supply chains away from congested ports anyway, says consultant Paul Weiner at Deloitte. So we are seeing companies trying to bring product in their supply chain closer to its point of view. Well in her says the pandemic has also forced U.S. companies to invest more heavily in supply chain management, which is also bringing down costs. But maybe the biggest reason supply chains are getting un snarled. That's the less good news. Frankly, I think it's more a symptom of falling demand. David corral teaches logistics at MIT, that's partly consumer spending more on services, but also inflationary pressure is taking a bigger chunk out of people's wallet. We've seen lesser demand strain put on supply chains. That

New York fed Matt Levin Dale Rogers Johnson & Johnson Paul Weiner LA aids Long Beach Arizona China Deloitte David corral U.S. un MIT
"dale rogers" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"dale rogers" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"It's Monday the 13th of December. Good as always to have you with us. The federal open market committee meets this week, starting tomorrow, which means in a few days, we should learn more about how quickly the Central Bank plans to end the bond buying that's been fueling economic growth. And when we might see interest rates rise. In deciding when and how much to tap on the brakes, members will be weighing last month's weaker than expected jobs report against continuing inflation. As we saw last Friday, consumer prices were up nearly 7% last month from a year earlier, busting records set decades ago. And yeah, supply chain disruptions are a big part of that. But so is a surge in demand from the American consumer. Marketplaces Mitchell Hartman reports. In just the last year, furniture sales are up 12%, electronics and appliances up 18%, clothing, and accessories, up 25%, according to the commerce department. Mark zandy is chief economist at moody's analytics. So the demand for those goods has been very high and that would put stress on supply chains regardless. And lead to some shortages and higher prices, even if nothing else was going on in the economy and of course, a lot of other things are going on. Like successive waves of COVID shutting and slowing down factories and ports, especially in Asia. Small businesses operate on tight margins, and they've been hit particularly hard by products being backed up or unavailable. But Simon worst fold at business software provider QuickBooks says the firm's latest quarterly survey indicates there's light at the end of the tunnel. Roughly two thirds say that those problems have either been resolved now or they expect them to be resolved soon. Once the Christmas retail rushes past, will likely stop hearing so much about shortages and delivery delays, says global supply chain strategist Britain lad, but the supply chains are going to be under a continuous transformation. Really throughout much of the rest of the 2020s, because he says, consumers are increasingly coming to expect that the wide range of goods they order online will be delivered not in days, but in hours. I'm Mitch Hartman for marketplace. Speaking of deliveries, I say this with no judgment, believe me. But if you still have holiday gifts to ship, you're almost out of time. The U.S. Postal Service says first class packages need to be in the mail by the end of this week if they're going to arrive by Christmas. Private shipping companies too urged consumers to send gifts early this year to avoid a repeat of last year's delays and disappointments. And those warnings, along with some other adaptations, seem to have made a difference. Marketplaces Savannah marr has that story. Toward the end of 2020, Katie stacks leather goods company called stitch and rivet saw a lot more online orders than usual. When you compounded that with the pretty serious delays that we were seeing, it was really stressful. To avoid shipping delays this year, stack encouraged her customers to do their holiday shopping early, but she says, even people who didn't listen to her and placed their orders in December, or seeing them arrive on time. So far this year and I'm going to knock on wood when we're done with this interview. Things seem to be arriving in a reasonable time frame. Last year's delays were caused by COVID outbreaks at shipping facilities, a delivery worker shortage and a massive spike in online shopping during the pandemic. It really changed consumer behavior. Matt bond with the consulting firm ship wearer says the shipping industry has been adapting to that. It's mostly investments in improving their network efficiencies to adapt to the new consumer sentiment. In things like new distribution centers and improved tracking technology, Dale Rogers, a Professor of supply chain management at Arizona state university, says when logistical issues do arise, the postal service and private shipping companies are better equipped to work around them. We're still in the pandemic and of course there's disruptions. But the last mile part of ecommerce has been much smoother than expected. If your orders are delayed, roger says the problem is probably further up the supply chain. I'm Savannah marr for marketplace. Wall Street was in more.

Mitchell Hartman Mark zandy federal open market committee Mitch Hartman commerce department Central Bank Savannah marr moody QuickBooks U.S. Postal Service Simon Asia COVID Britain Matt bond Katie
"dale rogers" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

06:16 min | 1 year ago

"dale rogers" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"There comes a point in life sure, of course, but also in business, when you just gotta ask, is it worth it? And right now with the supply chain mass and consumer demand and the resulting price dynamics by which I mean higher prices, a lot of businesses are asking that question about imports. Shipping costs are up, which means retailers have to pass on those cost to consumers if they want to keep their margins, but consumers have we as mentioned a time or two on this program, I'm sure we don't care how much for price increases. So their question becomes are imports even worth it right now. Marketplace is Justin Ho has more. Porcelain tile from Spain and Italy are the core products for palmetto tile distributors in South Carolina. And unfortunately, all of it has got to pass through the global supply chain. It's been a little bit of a stressful year. That's Catherine Reynolds. She's in charge of imports at palmetto tile. She says manufacturing is taking longer. Then it can take weeks to find a shipping container, let alone a ship with enough space on it. And once the tile actually makes it to the port of Charleston could be four weeks just to get the vessel into the port to be unloaded. And then once we get into the port to be unloaded, they're completely overwhelmed. That's when the cost of shipping starts really ramping up. Reynolds is paying port congestion fees, peak season fees. She's paying the store goods and warehouses while she waits for trucks to become available. Reynolds says door to door shipping costs for imported dial used to be around 5 to $6000 per container. Now I'm looking at around 12 to $13,000 for everything. So it's kind of quite a bit. So much, Reynolds says that she's cutting back on imports. In particular, a couple of tiles that I want to bring in because I know they'll be phenomenal sellers for our market. I know we'll do well. But I've hesitated. I'm not bringing them in right now because the cost of the particular product is fantastic to import, but the cost of importing I just can't justify it. There is some theory behind when businesses can justify importing goods. Typically you don't want the cost of shipping really total logistics costs to be above 10% of the value of the product. Dale Rogers is a Professor of supply chain management at Arizona state university. He says keeping logistics cost 10% is difficult now. Rogers says bigger importers like big box stores have the scale to do it. Some have even chartered their own ships to bring costs down. But a small suppliers, small importer, can't afford to do that. And they don't have a lot of choices. The choices that importers do have depend on the kind of products. Crystal wall is general manager of Hawaii supermarket, an Asian grocery store near Los Angeles. I mean, rice is one of those things where you have to have regardless of the price. Duang says he's had to raise prices on Staples, like bags of Thai Jasmine rice. So like the 2020 crop, I think the prices were maybe in the high 20s to mid 30s range. That's for a 50 pound bag. And now they're in, you know, the $50 range. Dong also sells a lot of imported alcohol, like French wine and cognac. He says people who want that kind of thing can probably afford to pay the higher prices. They're used to spending the 40 $50 on a bottle of alcohol, a $10 increase might not be such a big deal to them. But there are some products he can't raise prices on, enough to cover the increased cost of shipping. Products like cream crackers, bags of coffee candy, cheap items that probably won't sell if prices rise. People aren't going to have money in their budget too. Buy that extra bag of chips or chocolate or candy that they might have the cost of rice wasn't $10 more about. And so he simply isn't stocking those items anymore. And throughout the store, he's spreading out items he does have in stock to fill the gaps. We can make do with what we have and make lemonade out of lemon, so that's our job to kind of make the store look good and look stocked. Duang says Hawaii supermarket prides itself on the variety of goods it sells. But he considers himself pretty lucky that he has any products.

Justin Ho Reynolds Catherine Reynolds palmetto tile Dale Rogers Crystal wall Duang Hawaii supermarket South Carolina Charleston Spain Italy Arizona state university
"dale rogers" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"dale rogers" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"In los angeles. I'm kai rozelle fourteen september. It is day to day as always to have you along everybody so look. Don't take my word for it about nobody. Knowing what's going on with inflation. Jay powell who you'd think would be in a position to know was asked about this just a couple of months ago what the heck is going on forecasters have a lot to be humble about it. Say it's highly uncertain business so it is with all humility though a forecast i am not that i report to you today. Inflation is still kind of doing its thing with this economy. The consumer price index is the indicator in question at the consumer level. We're learned this morning. The cpi rose three tenths percent july to august five point three percent from august a year ago. Now those are big numbers yes as inflation numbers have been for a good solid couple of months now but the rate of increase. How much inflation is going. Up is slowing just a tad. I was happy that it seems that overall inflation was coming down. But i don't know that one month's data's going to help us really resolve these transitory factors economist. Julia smith is at lafayette. And she is all about that magic. T-word this debate on whether these factors that we're seeing inflation are transitory or not. A thing comes down to the difficulty. We have right now in interpreting the inflation data. Or if i might quote one jerome powell again. It's highly uncertain business. I think as long as the virus is a large part of driving the economy. It's going to be difficult to parse out where inflation's going and here is why that not knowing matters. If families are spending more on food and energy which both had fairly substantial increases in this report. I am concerned that that means those households have less income than to spend on discretionary purchases. And you know who's thinking about those discretionary purchases small business owners in this economy according to report out today from the national federation of independent business. Nearly half of those owners raise their average prices last month and forty four percent of planning to raise prices in the future so marketplace's caroline chaplain. Did some calling around for the rest of september katie. O'connell will be cautious. She's the co owner of an eyeglass shop called society of the spectacle in los angeles. I've been telling my vendors island like. I'm not going to buy anything as far as eyeglasses until we see how september goes in the last year. O'connell says she's actually surpassed pre pandemic sales but some glasses. Now take twice. As long to finish there have been shortages. Local lens manufacturing is behind and frame imports delayed. Our frame prices are definitely yep Nothing's severe nothing to outside of normal but it's there it's definitely there. She's had to increase her prices too. But in short supply she says is customers patients. People just getting really really mad about things not being on time and we just kind of look at each other like wow. I mean do not realize what we're all dealing with arizona. State supply chain management professor. Dale rogers does know what they're dealing with. He recently bought a pair of black glasses. They were out of the clear frames he likes. I think they're the most popular ones because the coolest funds they're not option right now they're just gone and the ones he did by were more expensive. Not a surprise to him. Inflation is related to supply shortages. They can't get components or finished goods that they need so they're increasing the price of the stuff they have. He says with the summer shipping season so disrupted. He can't imagine. The holidays will be any better. I'm carolyn champion for marketplace on wall street today equities have seen better tb age bonds though or where. The story is as is often the case. Actually we'll.

kai rozelle Jay powell Julia smith jerome powell los angeles caroline chaplain connell lafayette national federation of indepen Dale rogers katie arizona carolyn tb
"dale rogers" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"dale rogers" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Microwaves refrigerators. Plus all kinds of home gym stuff. That now you can just use at the real jim also close back to work dressy work from home casual grief seen surges of both dale. Rogers is a business professor. At arizona state university he says with pandemic restriction flip flops and lucrative surges in demand..

jim dale Rogers arizona state university
"dale rogers" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:23 min | 1 year ago

"dale rogers" Discussed on KCRW

"In Los Angeles. I'm kind of result is Wednesday. Today the 31st of March. Good is always to have you along everybody. And look, I know that was a big set up the idea that the era of big government being over might be over the original quote, of course, coming from Bill Clinton's 1996 state of the Union. Given the news of the day. It is not outlandish to imagine that maybe it is over. President Biden rolled out his second multi trillion dollar economic plan today, the American jobs plan infrastructure As you've seen already is the headline about $2 Trillion worth of investment into Yes, sure roads and bridges in the power grid and building out green energy infrastructure. But here's the turn into the hole over thing. The White House is taking an expansive view. Shall we say of just what's included? When we say infrastructure marketplaces? Kimberly Adams gets us going. One of the things under Biden's broader umbrella of infrastructure, more funding and resource is for home health care workers. Bill Dombey is president of the National Association for Home Care in Hospice. As a matter of policy coming out of the White House, this is not a surprise, just simply the vehicle in which it's contained at the moment. Putting health care into an infrastructure package is unusual, he says, but he hopes it works to address the very low level of compensation that many home care aides receive. Although I love my work and what I do, and Home care. It really doesn't Hey, enough. Terrell Cannon has worked for decades in home health care where the median salary is just above the poverty line. Now she's director of training at Home Care Associates of Philadelphia. She says she totally understands why home healthcare shows up in the Biden plan, just like the rules in the streets and the energy and things of that nature. That's there. We should have been because we are the essential workers to keep the quality of life going. But having such a broad concept of infrastructure could make it harder to actually pass a bill, says Diana Furchtgott Roth, who teaches at George Washington University and worked at the Department of Transportation during the Trump administration. There are going to be people who are gonna want to break it up into different kinds of bills because it's hard to be against an infrastructure bill, she says. But it could be easier for some lawmakers to oppose same a climate change bill or one to pay home health care workers Higher salaries in Washington I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. So that's the setup, right? The broad conceptual piece of the story, But you spend $2 trillion There is a certain amount of show me the money that is expected. And this bill remember is about improving infrastructure, broadly defined to improve the economy. Part of the American jobs plan is $17 billion for inland waterways and fairies and coastal ports. And we have been telling you About how those ports been struggling to handle the imported stuff we have been buying for the past year. But as marketplaces Justin whole reports American ports have been in need of upgrades since well before this virus hit American parts could really use the help, says Dale Rogers, professor of supply chain management at Arizona State University. He says. When you look at the design of some foreign ports like Shanghai or Rotterdam, it's really brilliantly designed and engineered. And what we mostly have in the U. S. Is infrastructure left over from an earlier time U. S ports have been improving some the handle more imports and bigger ships. Mario Cordero is the executive director of the port of Long Beach, which is part of the country's busiest port complex. He says the port is now prioritizing rail construction, which will help move cargo without burning as many fossil fuels but also in a more experienced manner to get the containers from the terminal and out of the harbor district, Cordero says Maurin vestment in port infrastructure won't just let the port handle more capacity. It'll also help create jobs at the port itself and throughout the supply chain, what jobs and a truck in community jobs and warehousing and of course jobs Even when we talk about rail That could help pull in manufacturing and construction workers who have been out of work. But Dartmouth economics professor Emily Blanchard says there aren't as many unemployed workers in manufacturing or construction as in the service sector, which was disproportionately hit by Cove in 19. It's probably not the case that if you're waiting tables a year and a half ago, you're gonna be jumping right in line to get involved in the reconstruction of the Baltimore port. Four supply chain jobs to boost the overall economy. Blanchard says the U. S will have to invest in skills training that she says will help unemployed people get better jobs and move up the income ladder. I'm Justin. How for marketplace? Let's do a little context here, Shall we Before we go any farther on the premise of the top half of the program today that what we're seeing with Biden and the spending and the government getting Maurin to this economy? Is maybe actually the end of Reaganomics. The idea that smaller government is better the tax cuts of the way to go trickle down and supply side all of that, Molly wouldn't I put basically that question Mark Life yesterday on our podcast Make me smart. Mark is a professor of political economy at Brown. I really think a lot of this comes down to this. Like Let's run this giant $2 Trillion experiment on if we can generate inflation or no on if we get real wage growth without any significant inflation. And I think that Baida nomics will actually become a thing just is Reaganomics that I mean We'll see. Right? You could hear that whole conversation. It was a good one. I am H o wherever you get your podcasts on Wall Street Today, Tech was up. Most of the rest was mixed. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. There.

Bill Dombey Terrell Cannon Bill Clinton Emily Blanchard Mario Cordero Dale Rogers Washington $17 billion Mark Kimberly Adams Los Angeles Wednesday Cordero $2 trillion Shanghai Today $2 Trillion Rotterdam Biden Blanchard
"dale rogers" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"dale rogers" Discussed on KCRW

"Trading in silver that way, the way you wouldn't stock without having to actually buy. Physical silver bars so that can move up prices in the short term. But in the long term, analysts are still skeptical because there was just a lot of silver out there, David it's a huge market and plenty of sellers and buyers. Silver's up nearly 11%, a 29 80 announced Now one trading platform used by the Reddit Blogged brigade is Robin Hood. It's been having trouble handing handling the volatility this morning. It has trading restrictions on eight companies down from 50 yesterday. Stock index futures are up down future up 208 point 7/10 percent NASDAQ futures up 1.1%. With all those boxes on doorsteps. These days, we'll find out tomorrow. How ups did in its most recent quarter. Marketplaces. Justin Ho has that shipping companies have expanded capacity to handle the surgeon deliveries during the pandemic supply. Chain management professor Dale Rogers at Arizona State University says shippers have also had the upgrade safety. All of those costs are hitting the bottom line of a lot of these carriers. Roger says. Shippers are also servicing sectors of the economy that aren't doing so well. For instance, Roger says, there's a shortage of semiconductor chips right now, which means that there are less of them to ship the computer and auto manufacturers. All that kind of stuff. Directly effects logistics companies like UPS. Last week, the company announced it'll sell off its freight business, which focuses on trucking cargo around the country. Detail mayor at the Brookings Institution says that's a bet on the profitability of home deliveries. First and last mile deliveries or pickups is absolutely the high growth area here. UPS says the sale will help the company be better, not bigger. I'm Justin. How for marketplace.

Silver Roger Justin Ho Robin Hood Brookings Institution Reddit Dale Rogers Arizona State University professor David
"dale rogers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"dale rogers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The precious metal rose to an eight year high in overseas markets overnight. That rise, apparently fueled by individual investors of the sword who've embraced Gamestop of late. Among their goals to make money by wrong footing. The investment pros marketplaces Nova Saw foe is here with more why silver? David. The talk online in online forums is that a lot of big banks hold short positions on silver. That means they're betting the price will go down so retail investors appeared to be trying to do what they did with Gamestop Drive up Silver's price toe hurt big banks, this time with Gamestop they were targeting hedge funds. We're seeing as they say, The price of silver go up overseas. Could this strategy work? So analysts are skeptical because big banks have far greater assets than hedge funds. So we're comparing apples to oranges here. Also, banks might own silver, too. Not just short positions, so If the price of silver goes up that could actually benefit banks. You know, Silver's a commodity, not a stuff. When you buy silver. They're ultimately has to be a physical bar of silver held somewhere that's got to make a difference, right? It doesn't make a difference. Retail investors are targeting exchange traded funds ET efs, So they're trading in silver that way, the way you wouldn't stock without having to actually buy. Physical silver bars so that can move up prices in the short term. But in the long term, analysts are still skeptical because there was just a lot of silver out there, David it's a huge market and plenty of sellers and buyers. All right now, but thank you. The trading platform used for a lot of this is Robin Hood this morning. It has trading restrictions on eight companies down from 50 Yesterday. Stock index futures are up the Dow future up 244 points 8/10 percent. The NASDAQ future is up 1.2%. With all those boxes on doorsteps to these days, we'll find out tomorrow how ups did in its most recent quarter marketplaces. Justin Ho has that Shipping companies have expanded capacity to handle the surgeon deliveries during the pandemic supply. Chain management professor Dale Rogers at Arizona State University says shippers have also had the upgrade safety. All of those costs are hitting the bottom line of a lot of these carriers. Roger says. Shippers air also servicing sectors of the economy that aren't doing so well. For instance, Roger says, there's a shortage of semiconductor chips right now, which means that there are less of them to ship the computer and auto manufacturers. It's all that kind of stuff. Directly effects logistics companies like UPS. Last week, the company announced it'll sell off its freight business, which focuses on trucking cargo around the country. Detail mayor at the Brookings Institution says that's a bet on the profitability of home deliveries. First and last mile deliveries or pickups is absolutely the high growth area here. UPS says the sale will help the company be better, not bigger. Justin. How.

Silver Gamestop Justin Ho David Brookings Institution Robin Hood Roger Arizona State University professor Dale Rogers
FedEx stock price tumbles after profit miss on "trade tensions"

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:51 min | 3 years ago

FedEx stock price tumbles after profit miss on "trade tensions"

"Which are now from the Fed to fed ex corporate Bert Story of the day the global shipping giant from Memphis is singing the blues in the form of a Glum quarterly report it missed earnings targets for the quarter and lowered its outlook for this year as marketplace's. Andy Euler explains Fedex is facing a double whammy whammy number one a trade war full of tariffs trees afford teaches business at Dartmouth. It's depressing demand for Fedex's services to ship that product in an earnings call on Tuesday Fedex. CEO Fred Smith said trade disputes beauts began to impact manufacturers in Europe and Asia in two thousand eighteen and he said that lowered demand for international shipping Dale Rogers teaches supply chain management at Arizona State University. He says Fedex is also feeling some pain due to an anti globalization movement around the world. It's problematic for companies like like Fedex who have really been in neighb- ler of global supply chains those global supply chains are also affected by economic slowdowns. Helene Lean Becker covers transportation for Cowan Company. Fedex again talked about the fact that they were seeing weakness in Italy Germany and France not to mention the UK where we're all wondering what's going to happen with Brexit okay so you got whammy one global slowdown slash trade war and then you've got number two bags divorce with Amazon. The company decided earlier this year not to renew its ground shipping and express contracts with Amazon. That's a one billion dollar revenue hit alone but Becker says Fedex's XS margins weren't great with Amazon so they're looking elsewhere to fill that gap. They're going after higher. Margin business like healthcare pharmaceuticals technology technology. Fedex Smith acknowledged that Amazon is increasingly a major competitor as it continues to develop its own delivery

Fedex Amazon Helene Lean Becker Ceo Fred Smith FED Dale Rogers Cowan Company Andy Euler Bert Story Memphis Dartmouth Arizona State University Neighb- Ler Europe Brexit Italy Germany France Asia UK