35 Burst results for "DSM"

Rudy Giuliani and Boris Epshteyn Discuss Joe Biden's Declining Mental State

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:42 min | 6 d ago

Rudy Giuliani and Boris Epshteyn Discuss Joe Biden's Declining Mental State

"The thirteen brave americans. The thirteen brave americans who were killed. Whose blood is on. The hands of joe biden. The app just came out and last few minutes right. Will you what we're talking about. In terms of the civilians killed and then the disrespect the disrespect shown to true american with that with the the looking at the and with the five is that disrespect or is that his mental breakdown. You know i'm going to tell you. One of the key symptoms of dementia. Alzheimer's is inappropriate behavior. I mean i remember it in the middle of the campaign last year. I put out a very very isolated very authoritative podcast with doctors who very painstakingly went through the symptoms of dementia and alzheimer's as laid out in the dsm five which is a book that they used and They didn't disagree. They had like they nailed about eight of the ten symptoms. They showed them on tape. And the only difference between the two of them what one daughter was moderate and the other one was headed for real real serious difficulties and they debated exactly why one of the things they kept pointing out is inappropriate behavior for example when he says i was instructed. Now actually inappropriate even if it's true all your faculties you wouldn't say right what president would walk out and say. I was instructed to not answer any questions.

Alzheimer's Dementia Joe Biden
ADHD with Dani Donovan

Mental Illness Happy Hour

02:23 min | 4 months ago

ADHD with Dani Donovan

"When did adhd. I come on your radar. And i love that. We're talking about. Adhd and not combining adhd with add. Because i think a lot of times they get lumped together. And i think it's important to to talk about the differences in fact maybe we could. We could start there with some of the differences between. Add adhd add is actually a term that is no longer being used In the dsm or anything it's adhd with hyperactivity or without arm so adhd or add was formerly known as is now called adhd without hyperactivity which is a mouthful. But i didn't. I didn't use to say no that either 'cause i definitely have people in my life. Who had been diagnosed with. Add and so. It's just one of the many. Jose tidbits that i have been learning because this is like a process for me to of self-discovery 'cause i don't have. I love psych in high school in college but My training is a visual communication design. So i do really get to learn so much myself. And about your. adhd general. But i can that was like a little side tangent. But like i can talk about the differences between the two kind of types if that might be useful so our and then combined type which is what i have and so adhd with hyperactivity not just has hyperactivity which can look different. Depending on the person for boys it might be a little mar- you know obvious which is why guys tend to get diagnosed younger because they might be the kid running over the place and climbing on stuff at the rest to climb on constantly fidgeting sort of thing and girls get missed a lot who might even have hyperactive type like because we tend to be much more. Chatty we're like very chatty distracting other people with like wanting to talk constantly fidgeting with our hair and it's it's a little more subtle ways that you wouldn't necessarily think of hyperactivity

Jose Adhd
AstraZeneca may have "included outdated information" in COVID-19 vaccine trial report

NPR News Now

00:50 sec | 6 months ago

AstraZeneca may have "included outdated information" in COVID-19 vaccine trial report

"There have been questions about data from astrazeneca's covid nineteen vaccine a federal group called the data safety monitoring board or dsm dmv is tracking the companies us. Covid vaccine study astrazeneca said. Yesterday its vaccine was seventy nine percent effective against cova disease. Npr's joe palca says that triggered fresh questions about the vaccines effectiveness. The trouble is that the dsa mvp said. Whoa hold on a second. That's not what we saw. And they put out a statement or at least the national institute of allergy and infectious disease. Put out a statement quoting the as saying we express concern that astrazeneca may have included outdated information from that trial which may have provided an incomplete view of the efficacy data. Astrazeneca says it will provide fresh data to the dsm. Be within forty eight

Astrazeneca Data Safety Monitoring Board Dsm Dmv Joe Palca National Institute Of Allergy NPR
NIH Statement Raises Questions About AstraZeneca's Vaccine Data

NPR's Business Story of the Day

01:36 min | 6 months ago

NIH Statement Raises Questions About AstraZeneca's Vaccine Data

"Company to work with the dsm be. That's us to review the efficacy data and ensure the most accurate up-to-date efficacy data can be made public as quickly as possible. Those are such long sentences that i feel. We need to translate a little bit here so we were told yesterday. Seventy nine percent efficacy which is pretty good for a vaccine so that sounds good but then there is this concern expressed suggesting that maybe if you look at the test results different way you don't see seventy nine percent astra zeneca saying in response to that. Well that's exactly right so there so the dnb is saying look at all the day to look at the newest data and the company. Just put out a release said the numbers published yesterday. Were based on. A pre specified interim alice's with a data cutoff of february seventeenth. So they're looking back at data that was collected as of february seventeenth and the dsm be seems to be saying that between then and now we have more data which makes your efficacy numbers. Not look as good. That seems to be what's happening here. I think we can interpret that as well. That would mean does it. Not that a few more people in this study got sick. Got covert and so the seventy nine percent rape didn't quite hold up right. They got sick and they got sick in the vaccine arm of the study. Not the placebo arm of the study. That's why the numbers don't look as good so we still think this is a pretty good vaccine but maybe not seventy nine percent. What are the locations for actually getting this approved in the united states. Exactly it's still a good vaccine. Not quite as good and this is just a strange turn. And it'll be up to the fda to analyze

Zeneca Astra Alice United States FDA
Hagop Akiskal And The Bipolar Spectrum

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

04:46 min | 6 months ago

Hagop Akiskal And The Bipolar Spectrum

"Rare for a scientific paper to fetch much on the black market. These days but i got the kisco was no ordinary psychiatrist. This is a book that has been made into many editions by cycads clinics. But if you go to latin america mimeograph versions are xerox versions on the market access for three hundred dollars like market for this book brazilians particularly loved so that in defiance of the even the the sim and that monograph he's talking about is currently selling for seven hundred to nine hundred dollars on amazon. It was an issue of the psychiatric clinics of north america. That gop guest edited in nineteen ninety nine and a paper that he wrote in that issue became one of his most influential and controversial in it he laid out a spectrum of bipolar disorders from the most manic psychotic extreme that schizo affective disorder two cases of bipolar that are only unleashed by substance abuse antidepressants or brain atrophy from dementia. Excuse me affective bipolar psychotic less than skis. Affective psychotic bipolar one bipolar to. There's something we call the half because there are psychosomatic less type. Which is medication associated Type for which is hyperthermic with depression. Because they people looking at the press is for the half which is substance used as five. Which is the knicks states. There's a pipe. Six which is in the context of dementia all but two of those categories have actually been absorbed into the dsm which now includes bipolar one disorder bipolar two disorder psychopathic disorder which views as the temperamental underpinning of borderline personality disorder and calls in his list bipolar two and a half when it occurs with the longer depressions of bipolar to then what about his bipolar three well antidepressant. Induced mania is now categorized as bipolar disorder in dsm five largely based on the research of gop and others who showed that over ninety percent of patients with antidepressant induce mania. Go on to develop full bipolar disorder with long term. Follow up a switching on the presence indicate by piloting. Now finally this and five is going to accept that then. He had bipolar four. That's hyperthermic the real charismatic. Hypo manic type temperament with depression. Okay this one didn't make it into the dsm actually and bipolar four and a half substance induced by polar disorder which is now categorized in the bipolar chapter india. Sem bipolar five depression with mixed features which was recognized for the first time in. Dsm five bipolar. Six mania in the context of dementia got believed that the brain atrophy of dementia could unleash a latent bipolar disorder in people with genetic or other risks for bipolar. But this category is not recognized in. Dsm unless you count as bipolar due to a general medical condition and yet you can hear in that court. That hookup is not satisfied. He's looking for a fight. He says his conceptualization was done in defiance of dsm that in defiance of the even the newly sm was a passionate man wore his heart on his sleeve. I am not very much of a political individual. Actually shy individual. Relatively speaking intellectuals tend to be. Yes oh you did do poetry and art. I saw on your cv you you. You were a poet and artist. Right of. I would say a young man. Everybody lies poetry. But some you fall in love with my wife. I always thought that way because When we were college students she said to me you one of those people who can bring science and art together and she said that's the ultimate aim of all our knowledge and i think that She she really saw something in me that time and predicted that my career would rise in methodic way bob Would only seventeen in college.

Bipolar Dementia Affective Psychotic Bipolar Disorder Bipolar Disorder Psychopathic Disorder GOP Depression Xerox Latin America North America Knicks Amazon Latent Bipolar Disorder Mania India Bob Would
Could This Simple Hack Reduce Anxiety and Panic Attacks? with Dr. Kristen Allott

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

06:16 min | 7 months ago

Could This Simple Hack Reduce Anxiety and Panic Attacks? with Dr. Kristen Allott

"Dr analogy welcome to the broken brain podcast. It's an honor and a privilege to have you here. Thank you so much drew. I am so excited for this conversation. I think it'll be just fine Back and forth to share information. Yeah i love what. You're bringing to the world in this topic of anxiety and i think that we zoom out in the context of the current world even prior to cove nineteen pandemic anxiety. You could see that. The instances and usage of the word in just general language newspaper social media is skyrocketing and you know languages so powerful and sometimes we really have to parse apart a word to really understand like what do we really mean when we're saying that because sometimes we say anxiety and we actually could be meaning something else when you talk about this world of anxiety and your new book which we're going to get into in a little bit. What do you really want people to help understand. What exactly is anxiety. Yeah so i think that's a great question. And i will just tell you how i approach that When i started in practice about fifteen years ago Because i'm a naturopathic physician acupuncturist decided to specialize in mental health. And people were coming in. And saying i'm anxious and and i just didn't think it was like so. How does that apply. Physiology was really the question that i was interested in and because some for some people it's stress for some people. It's i'm afraid to move forward and take a step forward for some people. It's a i'm overwhelmed like there's all sorts you know. It's a catch word as you say. And but there's also a curious about what the physiology of depression or anxiety or whatever these words were saying. And and so i. When i started in practice i literally in my on my living room floor. I had stock physiology textbooks a stack of neurology. Textbooks and the dsm and the dsm is the diagnostic statistical manual. It just describes. What the diagnosis categories for anxiety are and i was just like will. I think it's more than just an emotion like a candy but like the people were coming in with panic. Attacks like that is not an emotion that is a full embodied experience right. And and so i started just parsing out like what are the. What are the fizzy. What physiology causes these physical symptoms of shaky and racing thoughts and your heart racine. And maybe you're sweating and and all those symptoms that you know sometimes it starts small and Escalates to really big asu started to parse that out and then was like well. Once once i started to understand the physiology in the neuro physiology will. Where do we. Where can we intervene to help. People feel better and so answering your questions kind of copying out. But it's like. That's that's the approach that i took because so many people were using words and i was like i want a grounded in something concrete. Absolutely i mean if we look at the history and evolution of just anxiety and a lot of mental health. A lot of these things in early medicine were considered to be They're kind of in your head right like nothing else is going on right. We made a documentary a few years ago. Which then led to the name of this podcast. Broken brain my business partner. Dear friend dr mark hyman. We made a documentary called broken brain and the underlying premise. That documentary was what you do to your body you do to your brain. Your brain is not in. This isolated eight oregon that just as floating on top of your head. That's completely disconnected than the rest of everything. That's going on there actually an intertwined system and we have to understand that yes there can be. Let's call for lack of a better term emotional factors that are there right. Stressor is the complete driver of so many different things that we feel but let's also look at the physiology of what's happening underneath so when it comes to that topic of anxiety and the physiology gonna ask you a question which is a question that i came across a few years ago in a book by peter thiel little bit of a controversial character. But i really love this question that he had inside of this book. I think the book is called zero to one and he said what truth do you believe is true that other people disagree with in that category. So when you look at right what do you believe is true when you think about anxiety and physiology that people maybe traditional western medicine will say like. I don't know if that's true. Yeah so The one truth. That i see time and time again is it is really hard to have a panic attack. If you just ate. And i don't see panic. Attacks occur unless people are five hours from food or more at or they may have eaten some really sugary substance to at two hours ago. But if you had a real meal. It is really hard to have a panic attack. That's powerful right. There and people like that is not true and and the same applies to suicidal Which is know just part of the spectrum of people keep doing doing panic attacks they can get there and and and and the reason for that is that are i mean i can go into the physiology but but people don't believe that until they start looking mental health professionals or physicians and then when they want start looking at the pattern it holds true. Now there's always an exception to the rule ways but it holds like ninety five percent true

Pandemic Anxiety Dr Mark Hyman Drew ASU Anxiety Depression Peter Thiel Oregon
Stemina's CEO on diagnosing autism earlier using biological markers

TechNation Radio Podcast

05:24 min | 10 months ago

Stemina's CEO on diagnosing autism earlier using biological markers

"From the outside. We often know autism through observation of behavior. but are there biological markers for autism. Despite an average diagnosis at four years old stamina biomarker discovery has developed a blood test for autism spectrum disorder for as young as eighteen months. Beth tonle is its ceo. I want you to tell us if you could about autism so much has happened over the years. People have forgotten about what this means to be on the autism spectrum. What this exactly means today. Well i'll tell you the prevalence of autism is the first issue. We now have one in fifty eight kids in the united states that have autism and that's a new statistics from the cdc previously. It was one in sixty nine so almost everyone knows someone or has someone in their family. That has autism Obviously autism is a behavioral disorder. sometimes characterized by social shoes. Repetitive behavior cognitive issues. We're actually looking at it from a biological perspective and trying to sort of peel back the onion and understand What is the biology. That is autism and their multiple. Biology's that manifest then and the behaviors that we see. Well we should say right away. The your the mother of someone who is on the autism spectrum. And he's in college yes. He is so the idea that the these are not functional. People put them in some special class and not deal with them anymore. It's just not true. There's so much that can be done but you have to have knowledge. That's true and autism spectrum disorder. It's a spectrum disorder from cognitive behavioral and biological perspective. Jack is pretty high functioning. But he's had a lot of interruption over the years Lots of behavioral therapy ot pt speech. Language you know tutoring We've tried modified diets and dietary supplements and vitamins. Attention deficit medicine three kinds I think your study and your cell we are. We are like many parents. You go to the internet and you read about these things and There isn't any precision around how they're applied so parents. Try everything And that's what we're trying to bring at stamina. Neuro point is some precision about what's different about the biology of these kids. And how do we order our thinking around how to intervene. Obviously behavioral therapy. Every child should get. But how do we prioritize some of the other choices to address the biology. So there's a major study out there. Eleven hundred children. what have you studied. And what have you available still to continue to study So the children's autism metabolism Project or camp took place at eight sites across the country led by our head of our sab. Dr david amaral. Who's at the mind. Institute at uc davis. We recruited eleven hundred and two children to be specific Children with autism typically developing children and also children with developmental delay but not autism and we collected i of the morning plasma. It's important to have a fasted sample when studying metabolism as we do because just like you don't need a sweet roll before you go get your glucose or cholesterol tested. We can measure that to. This is an enormous resource. That's allowed us to identify the first set of biomarkers that Show a dysregulation in amino acid metabolism. That may be addressable through a supplement. it describes about seventeen percent of the kids and we publish that in biological psychiatry back in september of two thousand eighteen We have a second paper in progress which we hope will be submitted by the end of the month which looks at mitochondrial function and energy metabolism. And this is an area that's been known in the literature in smaller studies of thirty or forty or even a hundred children. This is an opportunity to look at an eleven hundred and two kids and so we really get a chance to kind of dissect some of these hypotheses and bring forward some additional biology. That could be addressable through specific treatments if we know this. Can this become a diagnostic. Do we know enough that it will be. Yeah so that's a great question. We are going to start offering this as a i would call it a prognostic so it will screen for whether or not the child has a metabolism subtype that we've seen has highly associated with autism. And then they would be referred to a developmental specialist to would screen them using traditional behavioral assessment that will be necessary for insurance coverage for. Iep's at school for behavioral therapy etc. But we hope it will do because our kids are eighteen months to forty eight months. Is that child. Re- referred sooner right now. The average age of diagnosis is over four years. My son was seven in fact when he was diagnosed with pervasive developmental delays not otherwise specified. Pdd s which used to be a form of autism. That's been rolled up into the regular autism diagnosis as part of the dsm. Five and we didn't. We were not told it was autism and we knew he had pervasive developmental delays. So a lot of time is lost. Where if we can diagnose as young as eighteen months with our test and get a child referred they can get into behavioral therapy and that can be critically important to the outcome In addition the insights into the metabolism that we can give as i mentioned. We'll give opportunities to sort of prioritize all those different different interventions that parents try and take the most innocuous one first and see if you can make a difference

Autism Autism Spectrum Disorder Beth Tonle Dr David Amaral CDC Uc Davis United States Jack
The Suffolk Strangler

Serial Killers

05:07 min | 11 months ago

The Suffolk Strangler

"His tone was descending into panic in the final weeks of two thousand six but forty eight year old steep right was on top of the world. He had gotten away with murder twice. On second passer-by found the body of gem adams the second woman he killed his first victim. Canyon nickel had still not been found. What's more his devoted girlfriend. Pamela suspected nothing. The steve she knew was a shy unremarkable. Man who loved golf soap operas and her homemade shepherd's pie but without even knowing it pamela was a part of his deadly nighttime routine. Pamela night shifts at a call center every evening right came home from his own shop as a forklift driver. Ate dinner then drove pamela to work after kissing her goodbye. He drove back into town where he picked up sex workers in the red light district but more recently rights appetites took a darker turn. Now he wasn't looking for women to sleep with. He was looking for his next. he was meticulous. He used gloves to handle. The bodies then carefully vacuumed his car and washed his clothes right. After by the time. Pamela arrived home at dawn. He was in bed. Sound asleep the day. The body was found right and pamela. Were watching the news on tv. Pamela pushed her plate away unable to eat another bite with horror. I'll bet the other one's dead to without missing a beat right kept eating and said yeah. I bet you're right. Most people wouldn't be this calm watching their murders become headline news but right wasn't like most people. Vanessa's going to take over on the psychology here and throughout the episode. please note. Vanessa is not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist. But she has done a lot of research for this show. Thanks greg rights. Calm behavior during this period and his uncanny ability to lie to his loved ones could indicate antisocial personality disorder. Although as far as we know he's never been diagnosed with this or any other personality disorder. Right fits many of the criteria for apd as outlined by the dsm five a pattern of deceitfulness of failure to follow through on personal or professional obligations hostility and a lack of remorse for hurting others. Key lied to his partners about using sex workers for years. Dating all the way back to his twenty. He had a long history of bad debts and short-lived jobs and seemed free from remorse for the violent abuse of his second wife. Diane though it's not clear what was going through rights head at the moment has murders came on the news. It seems that he wasn't afraid of getting caught. In fact it's possible. The discovery made him more anxious to kill again. The day after gemma's body was found. He was back on the hunt. On the evening of december third right picked up twenty four year old. Analii alderson of feisty. Mother of one analyst struggled with drug addiction in her teenage years and was never able to shake the habit in the last months of two thousand six. She turned to sex work in order to make ends meet. She was last seen alive that night boarding a train around six. Pm on underway. Way to ipswich where she was known to work the streets few hours after she arrived in ipswich she crossed paths with steve right. It's important to note that right has never offered full accounts of his murders. So we can only piece together a possible version of events based on forensic evidence and later testimony. What's uncontested is that right. Drove emily back to his flat on london road just a few minutes away from where he picked her up and they had after they finished analee. Try to leave but wouldn't let her. He made a habit of choosing women who were physically slight and stood no chance against him. It was only too easy for him to overpower her and strangled her to death shortly before two. Am a traffic camera captured. Right driving out of it switch. He drove several miles southeast with annelies body on the floor of his car stopping in a wooded area near the village of nakdimon there he prepared to dispose of her body just as he had ten years and gemma's but this time something was different right left his first two victims in water but this evening he chose dry land at instead of simply dumping attlee in the woods. He arranged her body in a cruiser form shape on her back arms outstretched side to side like across even with this extra attention to detail. Right was back home by three. A m as always. He washed and vacuumed his car. Put all of his clothing in the washing machine and went to bed.

Pamela Vanessa Steve Analii Alderson Ipswich Golf Gemma Greg Diane Annelies Nakdimon Emily London
The Vampire of Dsseldorf Peter Krten

Serial Killers

04:32 min | 11 months ago

The Vampire of Dsseldorf Peter Krten

"As Dusk, fell on February eighth, nineteen, twenty, nine, forty, six, year, old Peter Curtain prowled the bustling boulevards of Dusseldorf searching for his next victim. He stopped outside Saint Vincent's Church, and leaned against the stone wall he watched as Rosa. Olica a young girl of about eight years old sauntered towards him Peter Shot Rosa of friendly smile and asked where she was headed unfortunately. Roseau was unaware that it's often best to stay away from strangers and freely told him her address. Peter. Extended his hand and offered to take the eight year old home as soon as they were alone on a deserted street Peter Seized Rosa by the throat and strangled her aroused by. Her Death Peter Sexually. Assaulted her body however like so many times before sexual abuse was not enough to satisfy him for that. He needed see read Peter pulled his trustee pair of scissors from his coat pocket and repeatedly stabbed Rosa in the chest. He would later claim that only when he saw the gushing blood, did he finally reach sexual satisfaction Peter Stared down at Rosa's lifeless body and noticed that a small wound had formed on Rosa's temple where she hit the ground and it was starting to bleed at the site of the blood Peter was seized by a sinister craving. He pressed his lips around the wound and sucked the blood from Rosa's skull. Peter derived a pleasurable sensation from the act and like when he first killed a sheep as a teenager, it would change his life forever. Vanessa. Is going to take over unless psychology here and throughout the episode please note Vanessa is not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist, but she has done a lot of research for this show. Thanks Greg Peters Consistent Sexual Sadism can be considered a pair of Philip Disorder. This is an abnormal sexual desire that causes harm to others according to the DSM five. They're eight classifications of para phileas and parasitic disorders. Prior to drinking Rosa's blood Peter fell firmly into the category of someone suffering from a sexual sadism para. Philip Disorder. Meaning that he derived sexual pleasure from hurting others but now Peter Succumb to an uncategorized para phillix disorder known as he Motta Linea or the sexual stimulation from blood. This is sometimes referred to as clinical vampirism or R-enfield Syndrome after the character. From. The Novel Dracula. Of course, Peter would never know the name of his disorder. He only knew his taste for blood was more literal than ever before he also suspected that the graphic nature of his crimes would provoke a series police investigation so he needed to tread carefully. Peter decided the best course of action would be to establish an alibi. So while his wife Ow Gustav. Was Out of the House he returned home to inspect his clothes for bloodstains and clean his scissors. Once he was presentable and weapon free he took himself to the movies on his walk home from the Cinema Peter. Thought. It might be a good idea to burn Rosa's body. Not only would this destroy any lingering evidence it would also increase the grisly nature of the crime that night Peter filled an empty beer bottle with the petroleum from one of his lamps then headed back to where he left Rosa but as Peter ventured toward Rosas body, he realized there were too many witnesses to set a fire on detective he hit. The bottle behind a nearby sign and decided to come back later early, the next morning Peter told his wife he was headed to the bathroom, but instead a snuck out the front door of their building he sprinted to the hidden petroleum, grabbed the bottle and made his way over to the hedges where he'd left Rosa's body Peter Poured the petroleum all over. The girl then dropped a lit match onto the corpse as soon as the flames ignited Peter made himself scares within minutes. He was home and crawled back into bed with his wife who was none the wiser a few hours later, construction workers discovered Rosa's charred body but the fire hadn't and Gulf the girl as Peter had hoped only her clothing and. A little bit of her hair had been burned. So she was easily

Peter Seized Rosa Peter Peter Curtain Cinema Peter Philip Disorder Roseau Ow Gustav Dusseldorf Saint Vincent's Church DSM R-Enfield Syndrome Vanessa Greg Peters Trustee Motta Linea Rosas
Dealing with COVID Anxiety

The Psych Central Show

05:42 min | 1 year ago

Dealing with COVID Anxiety

"And welcome to this week's episode of Psych Central. PODCAST. I'm your host gave Howard and calling into the show today we have. Dr, just lean shot wall. She is the chief medical officer and Director of Mood Disorders Program at Sierra Tucson, a premier residential, behavioral, Health Treatment Centre Dr Chow while welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. I'm delighted to be here. We are super excited to have you here today because you're also an anxiety expert and many people who aren't used to feeling the effects of anxiety are because of covid. So I WANNA start with are you seeing people that never had anxiety? And stress issues before suddenly developing anxiety disorders because of the global pandemic. I am noticing that there are a lot of people who noticed anxiety type symptoms and since they've never really experienced them before they're really taken aback and they don't really know what's going on and so I feel like one of our big duties at this time is to help people become more aware because I think once you can name the beast benefits a lot easier to tame the beast and I think a lot of individuals will have a hard time if they don't know what to call it or what to do with it. The psych central podcast has been on the air for almost five years psych central dot Com has been around for twenty five years. So we are well versed in mental health advocacy. And for the most part, it's always sort of been in its own little corner. There's the people that have a mental health issue or a mental illness, and they understand it. There's people who developed one or have a loved one who develops a mental health issue or mental illness, and they're searching for information, but by and large the majority of the population. Was Not discussing this openly we've seen that changed dramatically in the last six months where suddenly it's sort of mainstream news about how adult that never had any mental health issues before are suddenly a suffering from the symptoms of depression anxiety stress and on and on and on. It's a lot of people talk about anxiety like it's a pathological thing. I really try to. Explain to people how anxiety is normal. You have to have the neurobiological fear response to see safe as a human being like you are going to the Grand Canyon and walking over the skywalk. The fact that we don't just climb over the rail and try to jump down is because we do have a biological response to anything that's not within the normal human experience or. Scope if you think about having a snake your chair, you want to have an anxiety response so that you can quickly panic and run and what will happen. If you don't have that fear responses, you will die because the snake will bite you or you'll have some pretty negative consequences of that. How can you not having society when you're being told all day on the? News that you need to take all these extra precautions to just be safe to not fall sake to make sure your loved ones don't die. That is something that just normally will cause some degree of anxiety the difference between that type of anxiety and what can be called a DSM anxiety disorder ends up being that it becomes overwhelming to the point that you can't function. And what we start to see people who may have had a higher level of anxiety before were being able to do things to help themselves like going to the gym to work out or going for a run outside or spending time with loved ones all people they're coping skills have been taken away, and that is where you start seeing that they now fall into more that clinical anxiety. Disorder category if you look at most mental health conditions, they are on a spectrum and it just really depends on how far along the spectrum you are. Today could be that today it's a disorder, but a week ago or two weeks ago wasn't quite meeting the criteria. One of the themes that runs through the sake central podcast we try to explain that mental health and physical health actually. Are. They have a lot in common meaning most people have good physical health. Most of the time you can still get a cold. You can still get injured and that's a very temporary problem but you can also have, for example, diabetes, which is severe and persistent and lifelong mental health is the same way I. Think a lot of people think that you either have good mental health or. You're mentally ill and that there's nothing in between do you believe that because of the pandemic people are starting to realize that everybody has mental health and that you can have the equivalent of of a cold which in in this case is stress and anxiety or panic do you think this is helping to educate people that we all have mental health and anything can trigger bad mental health. I think reading a lot more content about that in very popular channels, Navy your podcast, or me this our world. But other people for whom this is not their world. We are seeing them talk more about mental and in my own World I try not to talk about somebody having just mental illness I think about mental health on a continuum. You can do things every day to improve your mental health and you can do things every day that may not really be serving well, the kind of food you e the places that you go to the people you spend time with each of those things can help build up that mental hell.

Anxiety Howard Grand Canyon Sierra Tucson Dr Chow Medical Officer Director Of Mood Disorders
"dsm" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

The Dental Hacks Podcast

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"dsm" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

"For the gentle packs. Let's talk about sleep apnea because it's A. Sounds like you. You just took the test on and all that stuff. So so, how how long have you been doing sleep apnea treatment. Well I'd say. I started dabbling about eight years ago. Okay, you know. We started doing sedation dentistry about twelve years ago, and it's at that time. I started noticing when she put someone's sedated and they relax a lot. They looked like they were going to die chair and started freaking me out and so That's when I kind of. Learned what sleep apnea was right around that time. My father was no sleep apnea and started wearing a c. pap machine, and he was one of the people that that actually tolerates, and he loves it because he feels the benefits from it, and so started looking into it and went to one of the DSM meeting their convention. It's every end of May. Early June. Do they have? Their annual meeting went down to to see. See what it was all about so I started taking a couple of classes to kind of get certified, but really to be honest I was just dabbling every once in a while, we would make an appliance and admit it now. I was doing it wrong. Because I was really wasn't screen inappropriately and I wasn't doing a proper follow-up. It's pretty much just kind of like giving a breakfast guard here you go I. Hope it works. And so as I started. Sometimes is the less you know, the more success you have to work coming back planing they. Didn't have any problems until I finally did and and I needed to do a home sleep test at least find out how good I had done, and if I needed to make any adjustments, and so started taking even more courses to make sure I wasn't going to kill anybody, because it's just to be honest, this is one thing that we do that is life or death. If we don't treat them in their sleep, apnea date could die. Die, in their sleep. They're probably not GonNa die if I don't clean their teeth well and forgiven those veneers, but with sleep apnea it's is saving lives,.

apnea DSM
Fighting Loneliness? Try Friending Yourself.

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

06:56 min | 1 year ago

Fighting Loneliness? Try Friending Yourself.

"Hey all you sober people hand anyone else. Who is interested in listening to me talk about mental wellness? Some of you might remember that my word for the year is clarity and especially with. Cova did that word has not changed my journey. This year is very much about taking the noise out of my daily life and boy has that been difficult in this time of lockdown and isolation and loneliness which is why. I'm GonNa talk about loneliness today and what it means. Not only to me but to you all as well. The statistics are growing. Not only because of covet but prior to Cova. We are becoming more and more lonely. And why is that and more importantly what can we do about it? I live alone and if I am feeling the loneliness even though I have people built into my daily work. I can't imagine how other people are feeling who don't work any longer or don't necessarily engage with people daily in their line of work before Kovin. I liked living alone. I enjoy the peace and quiet and frankly I like my relationship with myself but now that I'm confined an had been confined by the way. I'm still very much. Laki myself down except for a walk that I take almost daily with some friends Monday through Friday but we social distance or physical distance during the walk. I carry a mask with me so although I'm getting Interaction I still spend most of my downtime. My non work time by myself and it's become more difficult. I only imagine how difficult it is for some of you who live in bigger cities and can't get out to walk every day on walking past like I do. It has to be really tough. Interestingly the rate in which we are living alone has been on the increase for the last fifty years Grand Julie Aching up to about twenty eight percent in two thousand nineteen of our total population here in the US which means at thirty five point seven million people here in the US live by themselves in a recent study by CIGNA which is a health insurance company here in the US of twenty thousand people. Us adults they found that half of Americans feel like they are alone. Only slightly more than fifty percent of the respondents said they had meaningful in person. Social interactions on a daily basis and fifty percent said that sometimes or always they feel that the relationships are not meaningful and that they're isolated from a smaller but still surprising number of people. Twenty percent of the twenty thousand said they never or rarely feel close to people and eighteen percent felt like they have no one to talk to and this same study by Cigna revealed that Young People Age Eighteen to twenty two are far more likely than senior citizens to report being lonely and Import Health. Making them the loneliest generation and well loneliness itself is not an diagnoses or a mental health disorder. It goes hand in hand with many of the diagnostic criteria in the DSM. Five diagnostic statistical manual. That most of us in the mental health professionals zone us. Furthermore there's no accepted definition of loneliness. Sometimes it gets jumbled together with social isolation but the two concepts are very different social isolationism indicator of how much contact. Somebody has with other people. Whereas loneliness is the subjective feelings of isolation and there is no agreed. Tipping Point at which acute loneliness transitions into a chronic problem with long term mental health and physical health ramifications. Alone doesn't necessarily mean that you're lonely nor does being around people mean that you're not loneliness is a very subjective. Feeling loneliness is a feeling that only you the person experiencing it can truly identify the fancy schmancy definition of loneliness is the distress that results from discrepancies between ideal and perceived social relationships. That's according to the Encyclopedia of human relationships. What that means is that loneliness is a feeling and a perception. It involves a wave seen ourselves and the world around us. We can feel lonely. In a wide variety of social settings and circumstances. It doesn't take being alone. Some studies have shown that people who struggle with loneliness may actually perceive the world differently. Does that sound familiar to some of us. I know it sounds very similar to the world that I grew up in the world that I created for myself through my perceptions and certainly when I was drinking boy did I create A world within a world one researcher even found structural and biochemical differences in what he labeled the lonely brain. Okay and I'm going to murder his name. I'm sure John Casio Gosh. His research revealed that a lonely person can experience more difficulty recognizing positive events and have more trouble picturing the thoughts of others known as mental ising.

Cova United States Social Isolation Cigna Kovin Encyclopedia Of Human Relation Import Health Researcher Murder DSM John Casio Grand Julie
What Cocaine Tells Us About Depression

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

01:35 min | 1 year ago

What Cocaine Tells Us About Depression

"Today on sixty seconds side. What cocaine tells us about? Depression come starts now in this study in Cardoso and colleagues followed five hundred eighty five patients who appeared to have Yuna polar depression on the mini structured interview when they followed them up later after an average of years twelve percent had converted to bipolar disorder. The risk of conversion bipolar was three and a half times higher in those with a lifetime. History of cocaine use although they were careful to ensure that these new bipolar patients had mainly as our hypo mania during times of sobriety they admit that cocaine can cause persistent changes in the brain. That may mimic mania even during abstinence. The results are in line with prior studies. Which have found that even after rigorous testing every year one in twenty five people with depression convert the bipolar. The same rate they came up with and that substance abuse increases the risk for example. There's a large epidemiologic study where Jules xts and his colleagues found that co Morbidity Between Depression and Substance Use disorders was entirely explained by mixed features whether those mixed features occurred as part of full bipolar or a bipolar spectrum disorder like the Dsm five depression with mixed features people with bipolar disorder and substance abuse. More likely to present in a mixed state and more likely to respond to anti convulsants or atypical. Antipsychotic Stendhal

Bipolar Disorder Depression Cocaine Jules Xts Stendhal Yuna Cardoso
How Does Agoraphobia Work?

BrainStuff

07:02 min | 1 year ago

How Does Agoraphobia Work?

"Doesn't it seem like some people aren't afraid of anything? But you know what those people? They're phonies because they're scared of chainsaw clowns just like everybody else. They're just better at hiding it. Everybody has fears. But not everybody has a phobia medically recognized. Phobias are different from normal fear in that they provoke a very intense reaction they're unreasonable or unwarranted for instance being intensely afraid of guy with a shotgun in a ski mass while that kind of makes sense but being intensely afraid of balloons doesn't so much and finally they can interfere with a person's ability to live their life but there are other anxiety disorders that while very real and potentially very disruptive of a person's life are far more insidiously. Vague and Agoraphobia is one of them according to the DSM. Five every year one point seven percent of adolescents and adults will be diagnosed with agoraphobia. So what is it well? A lot of people have heard the term and have a vague idea of what it means but a lot of these ideas are wrong or at least they don't tell the whole story so for instance some things that a Gora phobia are not are a fear of crowds a fear of wide open spaces or a fear of being outside though all of these may be a manifestation of actual agoraphobia. Agoraphobia is actually a broader complaint that will often include some or all of the fears previously listed so for some general layperson definitions to help. You get the gist of it here. We go agoraphobia. Is A type of anxiety disorder in which you fear and often avoid places or situations that might cause you to panic and make you feel trapped helpless or embarrassed. That's from the Mayo. Clinic OR AGORAPHOBIA. Is An intense fear and anxiety of being in places where it is hard to escape or where help might not be available. Agoraphobia usually involves fear of crowds bridges or of being outside alone. That's from the National Library of medicine at the National Institutes of health. One More AGORAPHOBIA is a fear of being in situations where scape might be difficult or help wouldn't be available if things go wrong. That's from the National Health Service in the UK so really agoraphobia is more broadly the fear of being trapped in a vulnerable situation especially when exacerbated by an existing predisposition to panic disorder. Very often the person with agoraphobia specifically dreads experiencing a panic attack or other panicked like symptoms in a situation where such inexperienced would be especially inopportune according to the DSM five and this is the latest edition of the professional diagnostic handbook for mental health professionals. According to that to meet the diagnostic criteria for a goer phobia. You must have quote market fear. Orange Zaidi about two or more of the following scenarios standing in line or being in a crowd being outside of the home alone using public transportation being an open spaces or being an enclosed spaces so the DSM five reports that the person with a Gore phobia fears or voids these situations because of thoughts that escape and might be difficult or might not be available in the event of developing panic like symptoms or other incapacitating or embarrassing symptoms. What physically happens is the following according to the US National Library of medicine these symptoms. Show up when you're experiencing agoraphobia chest. Pain or discomfort choking or shortness of breath dizziness or fainting nausea rapid heartbeat sweating and trembling also according to the DSM five. You can only meet the criteria for diagnosis. If you always are almost always have the fear response to these situations. You actively avoid these situations or require the help of a companion. The level of fear you feel is disproportionate to the threat represented. This condition lasts for six months or more the fear anxiety or avoidance causes coat clinically significant distress or prevents you from living a normally functional life and the suite of symptoms. You experience is not better grouped under another diagnosis for example if your fear only occurs because you fear people's reactions to perceived flaws in your physical appearance this might be a body dismore disorder instead of general agoraphobia. So if you have intense persistent debilitating fear. That you'll begin to have a panic attack or another embarrassing or incapacitating episode while you're stuck in a place or situation you can't get out of or where you can't find help. You might have a Gore phobia. We'll that's a long one and this can have some really serious consequences for example more than one in three people with Gora Phobia are completely homebound and unable to work and sometimes people inappropriately self medicate with the abuse of drugs and alcohol. Agoraphobia often develops out of an existing panic disorder for example if a person experiences a panic attack in particular type of place say for example like an airplane or an elevator. He or she might start to avoid ever being in that situation again over time. This can develop into full blown agoraphobia. Something like Agoraphobia can sometimes be difficult to accurately diagnose since it's associated with something like panic disorder and because the functional symptoms may resemble those of problems with different causes for example may dread and avoid flying an airplane because of a Gora Phobia or maybe simply because you feared death by plane crash. The situational phobia is outwardly similar. But it happens for very different. Reasons are all right. So maybe you're wondering if I've got a Gora Phobia. How do I treat it? Well the most common treatment responses are a combination of cognitive behavioral. Therapy an antidepressant medication. Cognitive behavioral therapy is basically a common form of psychotherapy where the therapist helps the patient talk through thought processes and common behaviors and then replaces those bad thoughts and behavior patterns with better ones antidepressant. Medication could also include drugs. Such as selective Serotonin reuptake inhibitors or s our eyes or Serotonin Neuro. Epinephrine reuptake inhibitors. So if you or someone you know are suffering from agoura phobia. There's help out there. All you have to do is seek it out.

Agoraphobia DSM Gore Us National Library Of Medicin National Institutes Of Health National Library Of Medicine Epinephrine UK National Health Service Orange Zaidi Mayo Nausea Agoura
Sober Sex & Recovery with Stacie Ysidro

The Addicted Mind Podcast

08:32 min | 1 year ago

Sober Sex & Recovery with Stacie Ysidro

"I'm Stacey CETRARO and I am a sober sex coach or sex and recovery coach for over ten years. I've accumulated over ten thousand hours of education and Experience. And all things sexual. I have studied a lot of contra sacred sexuality and sexology the DSM and also the erotic blueprints. I am acknowledged by the World Association of sex coaches and also by Jaya who is a world renowned sexologist. That is the founder of the erotic blueprints. And I've been working really closely with her the last couple of years. You may have seen her as a speaker on Tony Robbins or on Good Morning America. Or even the view or Oprah magazine and I've been working with her to expand my understanding and my application of the erotic blueprints to help my coaches and to help myself and my personal life and my clients awesome. I'm so glad that you decided to you. Know come onto the podcast. I think this is a topic that so many people need help with especially when they get into sobriety. So let's just jump in. Let's how how? How did you start this work so I had started sex coaching over ten years ago on I started out with just a business and life coaching certification that I was using and the salons. I was the salon professional working behind the chairs. The stylist and training stylist and working with our leadership team and being a partner in salons and as I was going through that process business and life. Coaching kind of vague. And they always want you to find your niche so I went through a few processes and all the common threads were around spirituality and sexuality. So that's when I started taking this deep dive into the world of Spirituality and Sexuality and sex coaching which led me to get a couple of different sex coaching certifications and studying sexology and I also have experience with addiction and recovery in my personal life so after about ten years of working with mostly couples and men around Sacred Sexuality Contra mostly helping men with premature ejaculation or rectal dysfunction energetic orgasm. I got to a point where I really wanted to move into something a little different and deeper and that's when I found the erotic blueprint certification and I did that and Since I started going on that journey with Jaya I have really come into this new space of seeing the need for people to get some coaching around sexuality and so Brian Easy or Saxon recovery. That's that's great You know I think our sexuality is so much. A part of our spirituality. Such a core part of who we are and so for a lot of people who struggle with addiction and maybe have a lot of that I guess I would call it. Wounding of the spirit their sexualities impacted by by that trauma absolutely Sexuality is such a huge part of being a human being for my perspective. I guess it's kind of Taoists but I believe that orgasmic energy as the life force energy in it flows through US and makes us alive and so we can experience that and a lot of different ways on a day to day basis in different levels of intensity but that sexual orgasmic energetic exchange that occurs is something that's so deeper so much deeper and brings us to something that's bigger than us and for me addiction has really been about isolation and being disconnected with spirit and so going into recovery and being able to reconnect with my higher power and with Spirit. It just was natural to recover my sex life in the process so I just really felt that it all kind of blended together right. Yeah definitely I think you're absolutely right. So tell me a little bit about when someone is in sobriety and they're starting to look at their sexuality. What are some of the issues that you see in that? Come up and then our common with the that process so for me. Sex was not always conscious and honoring. It was more about power and manipulation control. It was about feeling needed or seeking. Validation was about people pleasing others and it was through sex so I've seen people go through similar things also once getting sober like kind of feeling like you're a virgin all over again like everything is new right. And so you know there's a lot of challenges with defining what are my sexual values. And how do I get out of my head and into my body because now my mind is racing and I'm not using a substance to escape. Do you find a lot of people. When they're in their addiction that they have hidden their sexuality in it like their true sexual self is hidden by the addiction. Does that make sense? I think that addiction can definitely cloud who we really are inside To me it was definitely like a spiritual death and disconnection with who I really am so yes actuality as part of that and I think that a lot of times when people are using. They're doing things sexually that. Maybe they wouldn't do consciously sober or they're using sexuality and away that is not honoring and Present with themselves right or others will. There's a lot of that trauma that interpersonal trauma. And if you're if you're self is hidden from yourself. I guess if that makes sense by an addiction you can't really be yourself their present. You can't be whole. Yeah it's about being all of us and honoring and accepting all of our selves and allowing someone else to see all of us you know especially when people have had traumas. It's hard to even honor yourself to begin with and that's incredibly vulnerable to to be yourself to come with your full self with all of your sexual desire and fantasy and all of that. I mean it's to me who we are sexually as like a window into our our very deepest selves absolutely. I always tell people that sexuality is almost like the outer layer of why people start reaching out to me but what really happens as this deeper personal transformation that you never could have plans for or even asked for to begin with because it is so vulnerable and it gives you access to all parts of yourself your self worth unconditional love and acceptance. So it really. It really goes so much deeper than just. How do I have a better orgasm? Yeah yeah definitely I mean. That's that's part of it but that's not the whole part. That's not in some ways. That's a great part and in some ways that's not always the best part right and I found that. Yeah I can tell you some tips and techniques and tools to do all day long but if you don't really do the inner work you're never going to access that part of yourself that's going to bring you to experience that deep connection and intimacy with someone which really expands your orgasmic energy. So it's almost like you can't have one without the other. I definitely agree. I I work with a lot of people who struggle with compulsive sexual behavior. And what's really you know? We look at it as an intimacy issue. It's this fear to be vulnerable. It's a fear to bring their true self to the relationship and so their sexuality is in a in a in a way hidden Their true selves are hidden.

Spirituality And Sexuality Jaya World Association Of Sex Stacey Cetraro Tony Robbins DSM Founder United States Oprah Partner Brian Easy
"dsm" Discussed on The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"dsm" Discussed on The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

"To appear. Made is tested for compulsive shopping. But we're not buying it. To- pyramid is often used an impulsive and compulsive disorders like gambling. Binge eating believe MIA. Ocd Binge drinking cocaine and methamphetamine abuse and irritability indeed it has small controlled trials showing benefit in all of those conditions. This study tested it out in compulsive buying disorder a disorder. That's not in the DSM five but that she might see in practice because it said to affect to eight percent of the population but the results of this study. Tell us more about how to read a research trial then whether we should use to appear made in this population it was a twelve week. Randomized placebo controlled trial. Sounds good so far. Twelve weeks pretty long only fifty patients though which is a bit small. We'd like to see studies with one hundred or more subjects. The main problem though. Is that the medication. Only made a difference on secondary measures. At that means. The medication didn't really work. According to this study so why is that? Why can't we just count? On the secondary measures the tests we use in. These studies are only valid in a statistical sense which means that every time we use one. There's a chance that we might get a false positive. And the more times we run them. The more likely that chance is just like the more times you roll a dice. The more likely order role double sixes. That's why we want researchers to name what their primary outcome is so they don't keep rolling that dice so in the end when you see things like a trend towards statistical significance or positive and secondary measures but not primary measures. It means that the studies kind of a wash that if there is a benefit to this medication the benefit is probably so small. It's not able to show up in the design of the study. So should we try to appear? Mate in people with compulsive buying disorder. Well the first thing we should do is rule out. Hypo MANIA had those folks. But if left with nothing else to do and psychotherapy hasn't worked we could consider tope your meat which just need to go forward without honestly knowing that it's not been proven to work and stopping it. If it's not making any difference. Compulsive buying disorder is not in the DSM. But here's the purse criteria one. There is an over. Preoccupation with buying to the patient is constantly obsessed with buying and they are always dissatisfied. No matter what they purchase three compulsive buying is not limited to hyper manacle manic episodes and four. There is often distress or impairment as a result.

DSM Ocd cocaine methamphetamine
Unconscious Orbiting

Mission Daily

07:32 min | 1 year ago

Unconscious Orbiting

"Today. We're talking about unconscious. Orbiting Call Young says until you make the unconscious conscious. It will direct your life and you will call it fate so sometimes the subjects in our life come in for a reason. Sometimes they're just noise. Sometimes the stimulus that we see is random but sometimes it's not and sometimes we find ourselves circling orbiting the same topics people places terminology again and again and again sometimes we can be orbiting something that is so important to us yet remains so far away from our conscious understanding that it's hard for us to even see the good news today. Is that just by becoming aware of the fact that you've been unconsciously orbiting something you can investigate further you don't have to remain orbiting it forever. You can get closer to the planet that celestial body some crash into it as I did with. Ptsd this last year or sometimes you can look into it a little bit closer to the surface and realize now there's nothing there that's not about me that's just something in the unconscious and then you can get the escape velocity needed to make a break and get away from that celestial body or thing that you've been orbiting so in my case though this was ptsd. When I left the military years ago though on a date myself too much there. I'm still young still young though when I left the military. This was something I researched. I wrote a book. I did a lot to try to draw awareness to emerging resources for veterans for first responders anyone suffering from PTSD and generally just who wanted to see where the future was and what type of opportunities were available to veterans that were undervalued or recently coming on the scene. You know not. Many people knew about them so this leads to writing a book. I briefed a panel of generals in DC on topics relating to. Ptsd in the future of work as well as talking about culture the culture of the military. And how we could create a kind of a better reintegration program in the civilian world for veterans. This was a lot of fun however it's brought me very close to PTSD post traumatic stress disorder. And I was open to the idea that I had it however I also was open to the idea that people around me at it much much worse and we need to focus our efforts in our attentions on those that had it in the most severe forms so this led me to just orbit this topic and one of the pieces of good news that you can use. Is that when you're orbiting topic and you find yourself really passionately committed to it and you find yourself defensively triggered about the topic so in the case and PTSD. I just couldn't stand the fact that the of the acronym the disorder part was attached to it. Right this is a sign where you know the biological organism. That's having a natural stress reaction to a traumatic event doesn't need the D. added because this is a cultural stigma. Basically the idea that this is a disorder. I felt was just unnecessary cultural judgment and baggage and the reality is though. It doesn't really matter how I feel. It's what the term is labeled as it's what the medical community wants to call it. So that's what it's going to be called and a lot of psychological terms whether they're in the DSM five or anything like that they come with tons and tons of baggage and there's going to be cultural stigmas about this stuff any way you cut it right. Anything emerging from the unconscious is going to have cultural stigmas. They're going to be inevitable and it's very important that you notice. How defensive you get around certain topics. This is rife for clues. This is rife for going deeper. This is a big big opportunity to be brave enough to go into the unconscious. Gilo bit closer to the object and examined in detail so for years I just stayed orbiting this. This was something that was. In my periphery and it wasn't until I crash landed into this realization literally with near death experience last year that I was open to the idea that not only had. I been suffering from it but I'd been suffering quite severely. You know as far back as childhood so you might have to crash land into an object from your unconscious to make it conscious. This isn't a bad thing. Many people will deny ever crashing into objects from their unconscious. They will keep this bottled up. They will think that happens to other. People doesn't happen to me. This is the place you want to avoid because if you can make the unconscious conscious like young says you can free yourself from it. You can free yourself from fate. There's no fate but what we make and you have an opportunity to make new fate. And maybe even cast out that B. S. descriptors the most passive word in the world fate and adopt new words adopt new language for the future. I would say unwritten. I would say it's whatever you WanNa make I would say it's whatever you envision and believe and create. That's what's going to happen so this is a call to action to become more definitely optimistic about your words about your vision and about what you choose to research that is hovering in that realm up unconscious and consciousness when you're brave enough to admit to what you've been orbiting now. You have a chance to integrate it into your psychology so defensive about it noticed that. Don't judge it. Just look at that as a an early warning sign that dangerous close or an opportunity is close or it might just be a false alarm and you just pull off. And you had the escape velocity to get off the planet or get away from that gravity when you go out into the world today when your in quarantine when you're thinking if you're meditating on this the daily mission is to think about and write out whether it's in a journal or on your phone in the notes. App right out. What have you been orbiting that you need to examine more closely and get Intel on? You will not regret it. You will not regret taking a little bit of action today to examine that celestial body more closely and pull out that thing from the unconscious look at it. Make a conscious and either transmute it integrated into your psychology. Whatever you want to say this is a powerful idea an activity. I encourage everyone listening to think about it and maybe take some action on it today. Thanks for listening

Ptsd Intel DC
Rethinking Your Drinking/Drug Use During Times of Crisis

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

09:14 min | 1 year ago

Rethinking Your Drinking/Drug Use During Times of Crisis

"I don't know how you're feeling this week but I'm actually feeling a little bit better. Had A couple of tough days. I'm GonNa admit that because it's really important for everyone to know that we are all struggling right now with these big emotions and were isolated and trying to cope with them and handle them. This is why I want to talk about my subject for today and that is getting or stain sober really rethinking near drinking and drug use. During this time of crisis I am getting lots of inquiries and new clients because people who have been kind of going along with their drinking or their pot use for instance are now seen that use increase exponentially and it's scaring people rightfully so. I remember those times when my alcohol use was increasing when I was taking more benzodiazepines those anxiety drugs than I whisper -scribed and it wasn't during a time of crisis today. I want to ease into the idea for those of you. Who are listening to reducing your drinking especially at this time to really rethink how you're using substances in your lives. One of the reasons that the shift in my profession from diagnosis seen a chemical dependency or an abuse problem shifted in two thousand thirteen. And by the way people were trying to do this long before it was actually adopted to substance use disorders. That means we are now and probably all along could have and should have been looking at substance use honest spectrum. I wish that I didn't have to experience. A severe substance. Use TO SORT. Because for me that look like heavy duty long binges of using alcohol twenty four hours a day. Lean and bad my last big bend before I found the help that changed my thinking in my way of being in this world and for me that meant residential treatment for thirty days with that. Look like in my life was laying in bed and suffering and kind of getting up to maybe eat or I used to drink gatorade to try and get my body back to some kind of functionality and get out their power walk and after a period of time I just succumbed to the chemicals that were overwhelming my brain. The neuro toxins that had infiltrated my bean. My neurobiology and I had not a fighting chance so when I talk about the spectrum of substance use and the idea that we have a mild moderate and severe spectrum the mild part of the spectrum is where you can really turn things around pretty quickly so for those of you who are listening in. May Be aren't yet ready to stop because it's a little stressful right. Now I'm going to encourage you to look at it a little differently to rethink the idea of total abstinence and to look at moderation in a very clinical way. Because if you're working with me for moderation there is a way to do that to make the experience really successful for you you know. We grow so accustomed to these patterns that we develop in our lives and we don't think about them after we develop them. We just returned to the same kind of Groundhog Day and in the case of what we're dealing with right now where there's really good opportunities to look at this space and time that we are alone that we are able to really look at these patterns and not give way to them and not give into them. Can't tell you how many posts I have read on instagram and facebook where people are saying. It's a real struggle not to take that first drink earlier in the day and I've seen a lot of people saying I really want to start drinking at two. Pm or even noon and the good news is that where we were a month ago. People were really joking about that but I hear and read concern now. Like people don't really want to do this but they're bored. They're they're scared. And it is for many coping skill that they have turned to over the years. So I WANNA work on that with the all today to really dive deeper into the opportunity to reduce. Maybe quit altogether or to reinvest in your sobriety and recovery. I know I have covered how I go about diagnosing people. I'm air quoting diagnosing. Because for most of you have listened to me. I'm not really a big diagnosis or of disorders. I do like to use the criteria that's identified in the DSM the diagnostic statistical. Manual won't walk really big name for a diagnostic manual because the information we get from going through the criteria with our clients however for today. I want to give you three questions or topics or criteria for you to think about if you're struggling with your thoughts around drinking or drugging number one. Are you obsessively thinking about alcohol or drugs in a way? That's impacting your life. Is this kind of obsessive? Thought that you have regarding taking a drink or engaging in your drug of choice what I talked about earlier where people are saying. I'm I'm really wanting to drink earlier in earlier in the day. That's obsessive thinking you're not thinking well. I'll go take a walk earlier in the day. You thinking about your coping mechanism that you've turned to mostly probably in the evenings but not focused on any other healthier coping skills to relieve your tension so it makes sense that you're going to think about drinking or drugging earlier in the day unless we can get you to shift your paradigm shift. You're thinking a little bit toward a healthier coping skill so number one criteria. Are you thinking about alcohol or drugs more often during the day number two in the face of potential severe consequences? Do you still drink or use drugs now. I want to be really clear about the word severe in here because so many of us don't count our relationship. Problems has a severe issue and I don't mean that these problems with our relationships have to be big blow outs. It's that resentment that we feel toward our or our loved ones that were not sharing. Its festering inside of us. Also people feel compelled to take a little nip to take the edge off. So you might be using it before you have a tough conversation with the kids or your husband or your parents or the biggest one. The one that I fell prey to was easing to sleep. And we also underestimate the power of clean sleep if you will sleep without taking some kind of medication. Drug naturally induced self soothing. I will also say the really troubling consequence that most people belittle or minimize is getting behind the wheel. When you've had one or two drinks most of us who have had one or two drinks like over the happy hour were not really stained for four hours in which case if you are staying for four hours like I used to. You're really not good to get behind the wheel and of course right now. That's not a big deal but I will tell you in Georgia. It's still a big deal. People are actually kinda going to places And meeting with people keeping social distancing and still having cocktail parties. Yep even on. What's the date today? Wednesday April eight crazy.

Instagram DSM Georgia Facebook
"dsm" Discussed on Say Why To Drugs

Say Why To Drugs

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"dsm" Discussed on Say Why To Drugs

"A local treatment service <Speech_Female> there but <Speech_Female> getting support for yourself <Speech_Female> as well if you've got concerns <Speech_Female> but also <Speech_Female> accessing the information <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> it's also really important <Speech_Female> that you don't <Speech_Female> feel you've got to be an expert <Speech_Female> as a parent and <Speech_Female> it can be very easy to <Speech_Female> get befuddled by your <Speech_Female> teenagers. <Speech_Female> The fourteen <Speech_Female> gonNA thing <Speech_Female> in attitude <Speech_Female> even if not in words <Speech_Female> and you can feel that yourself <Speech_Female> because <Speech_Female> it is such a different thing. <Speech_Female> He knew that those <Speech_Female> little silver canisters <Speech_Female> got drunk soon. I <Speech_Female> mean <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> what they did <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> lots of things that you <Speech_Female> do and <Speech_Female> and all parents <Speech_Female> know enough to have <Speech_Female> those conversations and <Speech_Female> also told <Speech_Female> us <SpeakerChange> the <Speech_Female> about stuff without <Speech_Female> without <Speech_Female> asking <Speech_Female> an interrogation <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> but be curious <Speech_Female> with them and learn <Speech_Female> together and <Speech_Female> there <Speech_Female> are always opportunities. <Speech_Female> There are opportunities <Speech_Female> that come up. There are <Speech_Female> always things in the <Speech_Female> news. There's <Speech_Female> always a storyline on <Speech_Female> eastenders <Speech_Female> about something <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> make take <Speech_Female> opportunities as they <Speech_Female> come up but yeah <Speech_Female> lots of advice and <Speech_Female> we are just rebuilding <Speech_Female> website and there will <Speech_Female> be a good area on <Speech_Female> there for parents in <Speech_Female> terms of resources support <Speech_Female> places to <Speech_Female> potentially <Speech_Female> by the time this is out. <Speech_Female> That might <Speech_Female> be crazy. <SpeakerChange> I should <Speech_Female> be out see. <Speech_Female> Fernand Sarah <Speech_Female> Thank you so <Speech_Female> so much for taking <Speech_Female> time and coming speech <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> led so much. <Speech_Female> And it's just <Speech_Female> it's absolutely inspiring <Speech_Music_Female> genuine. <Speech_Female> Egli <Speech_Female> thank you. Thank <Speech_Female> you for the <SpeakerChange> opportunity <Speech_Female> to speak on a CD <Speech_Female> capable <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> much <Speech_Female> audio <SpeakerChange> bullish. <Speech_Music_Male> I'm doing <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> work. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Thanks against so much <Speech_Female> to fear newness. Araf <Speech_Female> taking the time <Speech_Female> to come speak to me <Speech_Female> check out all the <Speech_Female> links on Acosta <Speech_Female> in in the notes to find out <Speech_Female> more about the DSM <Speech_Female> foundation and the various <Speech_Female> things that we talked about. <Speech_Female> If you're <Speech_Female> around come along to one <Speech_Female> of the live say want <Speech_Female> to drugs events. I'm doing <Speech_Female> in Liverpool on the <Speech_Female> twenty seventh of Feb <Speech_Female> London on the seventeenth. <Speech_Female> Thirty First March <Speech_Female> Glasgow on the fourteenth <Speech_Female> of March Oxford on <Speech_Female> the first of July <Speech_Female> and of places <Speech_Female> to be announced checkout <Speech_Female> might website. Cc <Speech_Female> gauged could you care <Speech_Female> for more information <Speech_Female> by the book <Speech_Female> please <Speech_Female> Review It <Speech_Female> on Amazon really <Speech_Female> does help <Speech_Female> at sent me pictures <Speech_Female> if you sit in the <Speech_Female> world in bookshops and <Speech_Female> see you next time <Speech_Female> where we've got another interview <Speech_Female> this time <Speech_Female> with secrets <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> drug addict <SpeakerChange> from twitter. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement>

Fernand Sarah Glasgow twitter Acosta Amazon London Liverpool
"dsm" Discussed on Say Why To Drugs

Say Why To Drugs

15:07 min | 1 year ago

"dsm" Discussed on Say Why To Drugs

"Is becoming century so yeah no it has. I think it's always a revelation to parents that. It's not statutory their kids didn't have to get it so in terms of talks. Now call at the moment. The only time that students in school have to be taught about drugs is in. Dc science which isn't necessarily going to harm you well for making safe choices about stuff but that will change so in September Twenty Twenty. It will be statutory for all state funded schools to deliver relation insect for secondary we relationships and health education imprimis relationship and health education and drugs. Now Co come under that. So that is a massive massive achievement. However and I don't mean to because it's amazing you know we should. We need to celebrate the fact that it is going to be. It's going to be something that all schools have to do but the next challenge then is is making sure that that's done well and not done badly. It's not quite different. Yeah yeah in. Terms of the guidances statutory guidance. That was out for consultation. And it's been fine lies now and there are schools from this. September that are going to be trying it out and the deer fees put six million aside for training for and kind of looking it's feedback and valuation and things but the guidance intensive drugs and alcohol. I mean it's the way that it's been written really but it but it's all in terms of people's will know so people will know and then a whole list of things whereas I think and I think the evidence base would support it. It'd be much better if it said stints will be able to because then it's about it's because it can't just be about knowledge. I think that's how they frame the whole thing so it's all about people's will now serve at everything but but in terms of the stuff that that it tends of all of these things really the rule things today but there are things you need to be able to know what you do with that. So that's the next challenge really is to is to resource and support schools to know how to do that. Well because again. There's no reason why they should know that and I do want to keep emphasizing that. I have huge huge sympathy schools and no judgement. Oh Chris nuttal because they are under so much pressure. Savigny challenges and a school doesn't exist certainly not that we've come across although I suppose we wouldn't because they would be asking us to go in but that doesn't care about their people's welfare is just how they do that is what's different so let's move away from schools now and there's a couple of things that you that. I want go into in a bit more detail. So sever you mentioned you've found buses. Can you tell us a bit more about those? Yes we have a team of us on buster's Spanning London boroughs all the way up to actually to West Wickham now not west Hollywood and they are kind of representatives within the school or or community group of the foundation. And they're there to help provide support and inform that pairs in school about the risks of drugs to actual school. But people ask usually they get eleven twelve so we preferred competitive training to equip them to support uninformed. There is a brown drug and alcohol awareness within affects pay pressure Managing Peer Pressure. Good decision making and also safeguarding. And they're fantastic resource for us in terms of bridging the gap between sort of adult and younger students in school and they bring so much to the foundation and and also so much to their peers setting. So how do the young people slain up to become a youth Well they can contact me via the foundation with an electronic very quick very easy application And then they'll be an interview Discussion about What that entails. Expect them and then And then some trying and support ongoing throughout the imitate what they want to achieve. We want to tap into their skills and talents so that they can really enjoy their time with us and also make the most of their skills and talent. Two's in them in the right way to help with the other young people fantastic and now both of you have mentioned a play so I'd love to know a little bit more about that. How did that come about that? Look like say that when I look back we did all of these things just crazily early on when we were just in complete shock couldn't just needed a way to do not think about things too much but I think when when Dante we we just left with such a passionate commitment to make sure we were doing all we kid to stop it happening because it's so avoidable. There's so many things happen in this life. There's nothing whatsoever you can do about them but this is hard from jokes. He's voidable so we started the charity registered with Companies House. Eight days after just ridiculous longer together charity registration but the play came along within That was in the accident in January but Dan neff drama. He was really good Easter fifty sixty dollars and he was in the suctions and he used to hang around in the drama studio mucking about putting on the costume zone running around in school drastically aims and and he loved his teacher and his. You know sometimes you can have special relationships with Drama teachers or one of those sorts of teachers that can have special anyway. Historical teachers absolute became one of offers trustees but she said just a few months after danae she said you know you really ought to think about drama because it can be such a powerful way of communicating a message. And I'm ashamed to say as an English teacher. I hadn't credited quite how incredibly powerful it can be. But she said this is playwright cold Mark Wheeler who I cheat. She taught him for for years. You said he writes so path for young people and Dan studied one of his place at school actually and he writes most of his plays. They're the most tree stories. And they're mostly forbidden. Place all the words in play or the actual words of the people who are in the story and she said we would. We mind if she contacted him so he said that's fine and so she did an amazingly he jumped at the opportunity. Came Straight back. You've always wanted to write a trucks play. He's written is such a cheerful chat mark. He say lovely but he writes these terribly. Sad stories about portion. Come to terrible ends. But he he was until just a couple of years ago. He was a heap all his professional create drama teacher. So He'd worked with young people and he worked. He knows what works in terms of youth drama and he's always run a you fit companies while until just very recently and when we met him he was point five drama. Teach point five Playwright and as part of his dramatic really had you third company so he came up and he was literally. This was six months after Dan died and it was all around the time of the trial and the sentencing and stuff so it was really raw looking back now and there were things. We found out through that process as well so the script itself is really raw. It's the only word I can think. Oh to use it. But he can't based something came up to Croydon. Spent a couple of days with US doing not seven to Hughes with with with me with ten. My Husband's Dad with Jacob is big brother with Jacobs Gopher with dance go friend with And with a whole bunch of his friends and recorded that he transcribed he made that into a script and then he worked for back. It took about eighteen months working on that kind of rule. Script to with his third company in South Hampton which is very much a community together. Titian thanks so they were really and very similar would've ages and they will kind of just gave their whole hearts to it. They're amazing and ended up with a play that was published by Bloomsbury in two thousand seventeen on their matthew in place young people schools list which is amazing when when he took on the commission he said. I can't make any promises. This will obviously a but it's now that play is it ended up being a two act play because there was somebody untold say much but also at ended up. Anyway it's it's it is an incredibly powerful play and that most of where that is we don't know we only know about it if somebody contacts us but we know that sold lots of copies and every now and then when we do get vestige. It's very clear that it's a lot more places than we realized. And it's being used in drama lessons. It's being used in a Batak. Gnc drama performance exams. It's being used for school productions across the UK and also overseas so we know about a production that was one in Tasmania about a year ago. There was one in Australia at Easter. There was this one school in Vancouver that stroke production moment. I'm wherever that goes that we know about the the young people that are involved in it. Just give it just the drama. Just I didn't know it has this power and I think especially with with teenagers. Actually one of the things. I absolutely love about working with teenagers is that they feel things they. I deeply care about stuff and can be so passionate about things that matter tutor before cynicism of old age. Yes yeah I think the something about that? Combination of teenagers of a powerful piece of drama. The has accardo special magic or something but the kids that are involved in productions. Get they care so much about they care so much about Dan. They care so much about all say they feel often a sense of responsibility for this message and they really want to get this message out to other people and it's so important and and then young people performing to the young people has such power as well. Because they're the age part from Timmy. Who are anxious that the rest of the characters a their age. So the young people's voices and being spoke being performed by young people we also though adapted to tour so we wanted to be able to have that play as a kind of a conscious part of our offer to schools in terms of drug education So we too long. It's ended up being and it's so difficult to get time freed up in school timetable. Because pressure so we commissioned motto adapted to talk so he shortened it forty-five minutes he adapted it for towing company for actors. And we've then commissioned a theatre in education company to take that into schools in and around London for the last three spring terms and they'll be another tool starting in January twenty twenty and that again but so it's fishing education production so it's a performance and then there's a an attractive workshop afterwards as well so again. It's not you couldn't say had the plan your nine so we've done drug education and but it's really good engagement activity it and it just. There's something about Life Theater. Which and something about the corporate experience. I think of life there too which is not like anything else is not like even sitting in the cinema watching amazing film with cinema full of other piece of something about you sort of become part of it somehow and. I think he is the English teaching but I think it's a bit more like poetry than prose. So you have to engage your imagination. I think in a way that sometimes something. That's a bit more explicit like drama on on television or film can be it tells you a bit more drama you've got to kind of that's why they're lifting that keep that well. That's why it just you have to you. It makes you engage with that much more and identify real people and so many young people never get to see live drama now. Another thing that school cups have unfortunately may difficult we funded that really. We have lost. We started asking schools to make a contribution to cook because it's so expensive. It's the most expensive thing we do. But I didn't say but I work that we do. Our work is with every every SORTA school imaginable say from some of the very most select independent schools to really struggling schools in very deprived. Two States to alternative provision faith. Schools Krems schools. Everything in between Boyce go schools because it's drugs are are say democratic. I really don't care what family or from what community you from and and for young people and especially with the role that social media can play that kind of your part of you in Habita- a much bigger world than you you than than young people who've done even just a few years ago and so it's relevant to everybody but we're so conscious that state school budgets are so tight so we do everything we possibly can for nothing. At all. In state schools we deal with the independent schools to help us do the rest of what we do. Are they generally budgets? But if anybody said we can't afford it even in the independent school because we just don't ever want to say no to any really accurate and say we madly fundraising and apply for growth. We're probably approaching the time we need to think about wrapping up but just before we finish. I just want to ask you if their parents listening to this who are worried about Children or not sure how to have conversations with their children. Is there anything from all that you've read more experienced? Is there anything you particularly? Sort of words of advice that you could give in times of conversations. I guess? Shade of conversations are those kind of preventive. Hopefully get in early when their ten eleven may be too is a good time to start all up to the conversation. Actually you know that your child's involved in something and how you have those conversations is quite different but one of the things that's really important. Is that you. Listen as well as talk that you keep that conversation open however totally natural and understandably is especially if you've got concerns to jump in with the big panicky lecture because of course you're natural instinct his apparent the first thing you want to do overwhelmingly to protect your child and say you just don't but keeping that conversation somewhere that your child can come back to you and if you have concerns than getting professional help if you need it and someone like drug fan has a helpline that you can call. If you've got concerns some Sun. That'd be right here frank. You can find.

Dan neff London September Twenty Twenty Jacob Mark Wheeler Companies House Croydon Chris nuttal US UK Dante Life Theater Batak frank South Hampton Bloomsbury Timmy Vancouver Australia
"dsm" Discussed on Say Why To Drugs

Say Why To Drugs

13:39 min | 1 year ago

"dsm" Discussed on Say Why To Drugs

"The Daniel Spoken Foundation which is a drug and alcohol education charity. And I'm Sarah Beckett's trucks educator with the foundation also Utah stor Kabul Tonight. Tap fantastic and. I'm really excited to have you both on the podcast today because began to talk about something that I'm really interested in but I don't know that much about other than very historical knowledge. That's drugs education so guests. Can we start with the Fiona wise drugs education important? It's important to me and the reason we started the charity was because my youngest son. Dan died five and a half years ago when he was sixteen. Taking what turned out to be an incredibly strong back then. Dma He had obviously had no idea that it was quite so strong We had no idea. Quite how prevalent and unstick metabolized and available affordable. Accessible jokes are too young people and of course we knew things were out there not totally naive but just had no idea how close they were to our door and we all say didn't realize how much schools were struggle. Generally speaking most schools struggle to do good drug education for perfectly valid reasons is absolutely no reason why schools should know how to do. That is a specialist thing. They're really good at doing all the specialist subjects that they have to do already and they have to be very focused on targets and they have to be very focused on achievement and they're under huge pressure and huge budget pressure as well but if if kids aren't getting the education that they need and good truck education then they're facing decisions on an increasingly frequent basis as they get older without being well armed enough to know how to make those choices safely. So that's why. We started the charity to resource schools to resort young people. But as part of that we've developed a much broader pregnant because there's so many other people and elements to How you can influence young people in terms of their understanding and management of risk. So can you tell us a little bit about the foundation so the foundation We started out. I say we started actually so different ways. We started out thinking we've got to. We've got to equip young people to people because we recognized that young people. Listen to it appears very differently but we all say started out in King. We've really got to resource parents better as parents for humans that's gone horribly wrong but also my professional background. Is I at a teacher originally an English teacher? Now don't education. I'd working as a manager. Adult Education for electoral thirty million. But quite broadly across education and lead national role as well within my specialism which was family learning so it was working with parents in order to impact on their not only their own confidence achievement in skills and qualifications don't but but in terms of their children and their children's learning and achievement and breaking that cycle of underachievement so so had a kind of a professional understanding of how important is to involve parents in children's learning as well as a personal understanding that I needed to know more than I did and if I didn't know that chances are that other parents also hadn't maybe picked up quite how different the world is for their for their teenagers but we also started with thinking that we really need to resort schools better so that they can teach really good relevant effective drug education to their student so where we actually started really was putting together some lesson plans and resources for teachers to teach drug education. Ps Hei over a series of six weeks. If lessons we started with the nine ten eleven. We develop programmes envious of nate and year. Nine six home so that so that they can be that reinforcement that age appropriateness and making it building what they limit forces aspira curriculum but also really really important through all of that that it was evidence based and evaluated as well because one of the things I did so much. Research and talked had so many conversations. I was very fortunate very early on to be put in touch with pretty much. Everybody that was really useful to talk to the sector. Three one very very very useful. Contact wants eyebrows as he was. Then thank you very much of an which was so useful because it was I was learning. I didn't know I know how to teach education but I didn't know the drugs and I didn't know what was out that we needed to know what was out. There worked what didn't work. Where were the gaps? And what could we do so finding out about what the evidence was and there is good evidence base of what works? And doesn't this was going to be my next question of what? What kind of evidence is there? Because it probably isn't the case that just giving people the information will you need to do and certainly I- ABC's slightly out of date now. But when I was at school the thing I remember about learning about drugs. Policemen came into a school. Showed us a box with a glass fronted if it was some pills. And what have you behind it and that was basically it and I remember. Well I don't necessarily remember thinking at the time looking back on it. That's a very unusual way to present slicked message about drugs of making them look kind of contraband illicit but essentially a little bit exciting as well. I'm being presented as a criminal thing rather than a health thing so when you went to look the evidence. What did you find when you start looking at evidence? He gets incredibly interesting. And then what is? Evidence isn't a longer but it so interesting but there is the evidence base in fact the EMC D. Young just published a European yes European Monitoring Centre for Drugs prediction publisher prevention handbook. This week which which again pulled together. The international evidence base in DC as well of prevention standards. So they're pull together all the research that's available but the re something like there is a list of things that don't work in a list of things that work so on the things that don't work policemen do seem to come onto that. Oh there's some really good policeman doing really good things in schools so I think with all of these things have a bit sort of generalizations to an extent exotics going in which is another thing to school still do but that again is on some can be amazing but generally speaking. It's it's again. It's on the list in terms of evidence of what what doesn't necessarily not only doesn't work but could be counterproductive. I think that's one of the things that's important. Come back to the audience facing ruin it but one of the things that's really important in terms of drug education. You know as an English teacher I could teach them really badly and I could the worst I could do would be children of poetry for life which should be terrible same but we talk education. You can actually do harm by getting it wrong so you can make. It seem more exciting more intriguing. You can rouse curious you can make. It seem normal. Glamorous or lots of silly. Yeah so the the things that things that do work. I start with the positives as the things that do work. Interactive is really important relevant in age appropriate is really important. It's really important that it incorporates a life skills approach because being able to develop the skills to apply the information understanding you've got in a social context is what they need so understanding the dynamic of that payer relationship and understanding the teenage brain and understanding. What makes that decision making situation complicated? When you're an adolescent particularly what's important things going on in your head so converse to that is what you were talking about. Is the information only approach so the one that says we just need to give them lots of information about drugs or maybe show as well but you do need information but you need to know what to do with that information as well and you need to be able to develop the skills to put that information into practice it also needs not to be a one off so going in and just doing one session however amazing? That might be a anybody that has been listening to this. Who's being an amazing training session or an amazing workshop or something you can probably still even even a couple of weeks on your remember couple of things and actually when you're out in Friday night or something two years later plus if you had something that was amazing when you were fourteen when you're seventy that might not actually be what you need to know anyway. So it needs to be a sustained opportunity to learn as well so over a period of time and it needs to be repeated in reinforced and and then adapted for the for the appropriate ages while it needs to be delivered by trained facilitators as well one of the things that look at evaluation in our evaluation of our program. We'd be working with the University of Middlesex Canal. Research Center is there. One is the aspects of our. They've done a very initial assessment. And we're looking. We really really want to get some funding to do something regularly so that we can add to that evidence space but one of the aspects that they looked at the initial assessment was the teachers experience of delivering lessons to teach our hating somebody else's lessons. Because I really want to make it my own anyway. But and there is that difficult balance between providing really good resources as a as somebody that is coming to a specialist but there is then that really important balance between fidelity and flexibility. Because you can't create something that will work effectively with every for every individual anyway but for it for every group and for every classroom dynamic and so there's that issue when you're giving resources to schools but the other issue is however Gucci make them. They're only as good as the teacher. That's teaching them really. So which is really difficult. And that's where we come into some of the issues for schools. Which is the pressure. That's on schools. I think it's such a hard time for schools. I got huge huge sympathy trying so hard to do their best and keep having something else loaded onto them. They've got to stop kids gambling as well as everything else tapping sorts out but but one of the challenges that they have is making sure that staff are adequately trained and supported. And so see. Pd Time In. Schools is hugely pressured so having training to deliver. Psat's not part of teacher training qualification anyway. But oh not not a significant part But to have somebody that knows how to deliver that well is really important and unfortunately what a lot of schools to too. Many schools unfortunately have felt the pressure to squeeze. Psat out of the curriculum together. So it's not timetable. Into less than some of them will deliver it in form time pull chunks in the morning when they do register. Cram holy mother things in separate probably kids. Finishing their homework can teach finishing their marketing thing but nevertheless we've adapted our resources to be delivered then because something's better than nothing if that's all they've got let's try and do to swell as we can but where they do. Timetable lessons very often. Schools will not many schools have dedicate some too but but a lot of schools that do timetable. Lessons don't have indicated. Psat teachers who've been trained to deliver PSAT and it is a particular way of training because you are a bit more like a facilitator than a teacher. Your it's really important that it's interactive it's really important that their opportunities to reflect and to discuss and to be honest. It's really important. That's a safe space. Which is another of yours have to school? So it's really important to acknowledge have a safeguarding. Issue and young people disclosing illicit drug use. The school has a GT of cash. Not Absolutely in. How schools responded only yes yes in terms of the delivery of the lessons. What will often happen? Is that whoever that pierce? Ats will be taught by whoever got a free space in the timetable in that slot. For that year Greg so they could be a geography teacher and English teacher. They could be a physics teacher or a PE teacher and they'll bring different things to that but but only might not have the particular sorta skills just because if you if you teach your subject that doesn't rely on discussion and then if you're not used to facilitating discussion of what that looks like. Plus Oh some. Teachers have better relationships with the class than others and if they don't have that credibility with their students they're not going to listen to them. Why WOULD YOU LISTEN TO MR? Whoever misses what do they know about? And again you can make the resources kind of teach themselves as much as possible And we've done our very very best to make them something that a busy teacher who's annoy specialists can pick up and do well but nevertheless it's it's it's a challenge but it's a challenge. That's worth working on absolutely so Sarah. Do you want to tell us a little bit? About what? Do your resources that you or how do you work with schools? What does that entail? Well we deliver workshops to write from. Yes say all the way up to the team and so we tailor it to.

Sarah Beckett Daniel Spoken Foundation Dan King Utah Gucci Ats Kabul European Monitoring Centre for EMC D. Young nate University of Middlesex Canal Greg DC Research Center pierce publisher
Qualcomm is at the center of 5G. Were still, almost, there.

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

07:47 min | 1 year ago

Qualcomm is at the center of 5G. Were still, almost, there.

"When it comes to rolling out five G.. There are a lot of moving parts at the heart hearts of the stories. It's qualcomm the company makes wireless chips for your phone and develops and licenses other technology in the wireless industry and it's been pushing five Gerard like future of the business hard but there are aspects of the five G. Rollout qualcomm can't control like how long it takes infrastructure to make it into you every neighborhood in the country. The company is also the subject of an F. T. C. investigation over whether it abused its monopoly. Position in four G.. Technology to charge too much for licensing. It actually settled a long-running lawsuit with apple over the same thing. Last April Cristiano Amman is the president of QUALCOMM. And we spoke about all of this at in Las Vegas starting with the promise of five G.. Basically as you bring the computational power of the cloud cloud all of the data that exists in the cloud to any device and one of the things we said in the very beginning of this transition in the five era era will develop side by side with five G.. Just because you're connected to Clo- you have a lot of data you can apply machine learning tool the data five days also technology that I think we've I've been waiting for right. We've been talking about the promise for a long time consumers. Being consumers people are getting impatient. At what point do you think people are getting frustrated. Or they're gonNA. I say this is all hype and no reality. I agree those things. Take time for you to have all of those benefits technology you have to have coverage infrastructure instructor needs to be built. There is no free lunch unless you have covers. You Not GonNa get there. We have a couple of things that would dealing with as an industry. I I if you look at United States one of the number one obstacles when you talk to operators its ability to get new sites up and they are working working with municipalities one at a time China for example have identified one million sites for five G. until the end of two thousand twenty. It also sounds like five day deployment is really important to your long term business success. I mean is there any world I can just hear the open source community city saying like listen you could potentially make some of this available for everybody to build on to accelerate the ecosystem. Well that's what we do if you were an automaker or if you're an industrial company and let's say you're Bausch and you're making manufacturing robots and you want to add five g you have to build. Put An engineering capability of a Samsung or apple. To be able to deal with this and what qualcomm offers is will provide you a license. Essence would provide you a chipset would provide a reference design. We provide your software. You can easily add seller to your robots industrial machine to your car and if you we don't have a model that is horizontal in creates eco-system. You actually prevent all of those other industries to get access to sell it. They have to build a cellular or phone company to be able to do it. And that is why we think five G. we're going to see an expansion of the licensing model not the other the other direction. Yeah this is a little bit of a left turn but we've been doing a lot of coverage on climate and how technology in the tech industry can help us adapt be more. Resilient may maybe maintain emergency communications. How do you see welcomes role in sustainability and resilience and climate conversation overall? Look I I feel I feel. It's a IT'S A. It's an interesting I agree with you. It's I didn't expect that question but The way the way we think about is I at the very basic. We're a company that developed technology for a battery powered device like we don't have the luxury extre- in into technology that we do to assume that we're going to be plugged into wall so we're probably being br building a lot of efficiency. That's no no Secret why we've been so successful in automotive because as an industry like any all of the industry really try to address How they can be more efficient consume laugh? You will consume less electricity and I think as a general. I think that's one of the things that we contribute. The other thing is by making everything connected it. There is a significant increase in productivity. Even when you think I'm trying to provide more of a vision but we always said that that every year that goes by you do more of your work and your phone And I think that's going to change over time with everything connected enact productivity people will be able to Damore to work at home. They won't be able to connect with other people without having to be there and I think there's a lot of in direct benefits of basically providing technology that allow everything to be connected. I do as long as we're in our awkward questions phase WanNa talk about licensing Because parts of that business model of come under scrutiny qualcomm Ben in a long legal battle with the Federal Federal Trade Commission over whether some of those this licensing agreements have reached monopoly status. Do Plan to approach five licensing any differently in light of those disputes. Look there's so much I can tell you about. You know the dispute. I think other than the public statements were made. Were very pleased and was the right decision. You know for us to be granted at stay and I. I think we're waiting for the appeal. But we can tell you is we. We actually have a very vibrant Licensed business more though. That equi enables competition competition. We're very pleased that we have many companies that sign a five t license with qualcomm independent of the dispute in even post the ruling and That validation that you know we have a competitive business model and actually won the provides growth in competition industry. All right last question because you first joined qualcomm. Welcome in Nineteen Ninety five when the company was just ten years old. And you've left income back since then but I just. I wonder what that journey has been like in this entire ecosystem system. It's an. It's an incredible company. Actually I was fortunate enough to join before the first. CDMA network was able to see. Every single transition of wireless ARLEDGE LENDS EIGHTY FIVE THIRTY ONE G two G to three G. to four G. Five G. so I've been to all of those it's really fascinating to see how seller changed the society. It's one of those few opportunities dead and I think all of our employees feel that you can work on something that you actually no that changed the society and It's also interesting to see that we. We may bet that everybody. In each one of those bats knowing exception told us that's That's not gonNA work or there's no need for this and And we'll we'll be able to see as we state with their vision to transformation and I don't WanNa go back all the way to CMA. But I'll tell you an example when when when we first talk about four g you know it was fascinating to see. All of the analysts on their blackberrys sending emails to each other saying a WHO needs a hundred megabits per phone. Nobody needs it. I have living I need to have my email I have all of the. DSM is good enough for email and blackberrys now and Ns US and now we see people say hi. Paul needs to be connected with the cloud and you know multiple gigabits of Speed Woolsey. Cristiano Amman is the president of QUALCOMM. All Com we spoke at. CAS in Las

Qualcomm Cristiano Amman Apple President Trump Las Vegas F. T. C. LAS United States Samsung Gerard Bausch Instructor Federal Federal Trade Commissi Damore Paul China
"dsm" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"dsm" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"AM right here on news radio six ninety K. DSM comfort away by a sweater and send lifesaving ice to a polar bear cub for send up the space shuttle or as New Mexico and save the earth with the new ERA beat carbon credit card your shoulder just at another press conference basically repeating what he said that this morning's press conference citing some bogus Washington post poll it says seventy percent of Republicans want the witnesses sixty four percent of Republicans want the way this is why does the president want to clear his name why doesn't the president want to present evidence if you didn't do it Hey that's not how it works you guys have to present the evidence that he did a new habit you don't have any yes it takes me off and I hi I am but if you get a deal with the legitimate I just got a new look at best you can the thing I realized he doesn't just make me man I know all of you who see at the same reaction to what I do not watching this stuff in the back and these people are actually they're digging a grave there literally digging a grave for themselves and they are not stopping if they don't have the discipline Hey if you're traveling for the holidays you are a light glare relying on free wifi somewhere it's offered in airports hotels coffee shops a lot of places and it's a great convenience for people but you should know that if you're using that free wifi it it's probably very insecure why should take on secure and even if it's password protected it's a likely not locked down because they're not going to go to the expense are not charging you for it it's free so they're not going to go to a lot of expensive curing it they're gonna leave that up to you and you can do something about it you can make yourself invisible on any network Iran with a V. P. M. every wifi network that's free there's a hacker somewhere nearby playing around seeing if an act you can identify everybody on that network checking to see maybe if he can in fact every machine that's connected to that the port plant malware on it for the fun of it or for actual damage but I hacker can't plant something on your device if we can't see it you could be sitting right next to the hacker on your iPhone or your your android device whichever you can be sitting right next to it he can be on his computer looking at everybody on the network and trying to find out a way to get in he will not see you you're sitting right next to it he will not see your connection if you are on a VPN that is a lot of VPNs it's a burgeoning business whatever you do don't go for one that's free I guarantee you they're collecting data on you and selling it somebody the best VPN we found we look long and hard because when it's a burgeoning business Norton secure VPN is the best three dollars thirty three cents a month and five devices you can connect.

K. DSM
Best Nintendo Switch Games Of 2019

Nintendo Voice Chat

09:31 min | 1 year ago

Best Nintendo Switch Games Of 2019

"Let's start it off with game of the year. Okay just to get the big the big. I guess it's not really an elephant in the room. I mean we talked about running for But Tom what were the nominees for the Nintendo game of the year for Nintendo Channel Game of the year. The nominees were three houses. pokemon sorting shield Luigi mentioned three supermarine maker to and the legend of Zelda Link's awakening. What a that's that's a pretty good year I party lineup to went back and looked at our lists from last year from twenty eighteen and it was really really good year right but like the the first party titles for is basically just poke them on smash pretty much and comparatively to xbox playstation? There's really really strong showing from Nintendo killed it. The three three of those were in our overall game of the year nominees as well whereas there were no there. There were no Playstation four or xbox one exclusives in our nominees for your overall essentially the middle of the switches life cycle than. It's pretty much kicking. But that's a that's a nice center point. We're in year three if the life cycle of this machine is more like the handheld like Dsm Gameboy. It'll be way longer. Yes the mid point is like in ten years or something. Yeah towards the last seven to ten years. That's when they sent out the garbage. And the Mario and Luigi Abby abby inside bouncers or what. We're going to tell people what one we're gonNA tell. Everyone went wine so we discussed extensively on a previous show Brian. I don't think you're yeah because I think you might have had a different opinion. What but I think most of US settled on? Fire emblem three houses. Probably being pick injury tunnel and and that is the one that won so gene has crown three houses as Nintendo game of the year and also won in people's choice awards for Nintendo switch game as Adema Adamus four percent of the vote choosing fire him. Because that's totally in tune with our community. I I think I mean honestly. LOSERS MANSION LINK'S AWAKENING POK MON monuments. And they're all really good game like if I score them they for me. They're all eight point five to nine point five range game and and then we also you know a couple we saw when we put out our nominations we saw a couple of people being worse. astral chain we only do five nine knees and I think if you asked her on the office probably probably astral train would be number six in that stray right it was Nintendo. Just had a really really good exclusive year. Even you know I didn't give it had huge glowing explosive review but like even though she's crafted world was fun. Game was a game this year. I think there's something like fourteen. Switch exclusive assist man crazy. Yeah I just I just talked about it and what happens when you don't support to systems at the same time this put it that way. I think that if you you look at or listen to NBC episodes from a year ago there was probably in the same way. We're looking at twenty twenty right now. There was hopefulness but also like a little bit of maybe be paranoia or skepticism. About how the year would roll out a year without like a big flagship. Three D Zelda or Big Three D Mario Game ultimately ultimately gave a lot of room to move around in for some of the slightly smaller. Ip's in their stable. And I'm pretty happy about that Firearms like not really my thing. But I think it's absolutely deserving to win link's awakening obviously from you as my favorite Nintendo exclusive deal but that's it's impossible with a separate fee from nostalgia. I'm feeling I mean the thing for me that I love about firearm limits. That Zach was such a can of like nick. He said. I'll check it out but I'm not gonNA play it much. And then he ended up completely getting lost in that game loving it and that just shows that firearm limbs taken another a step from being what we're really used to be this niche turn based strategy game to be something much much bigger and I think we'll see at the end of the. I think the sales are going to be really really impressive for that title. And I'm hopeful that this franchise will continue and continue to kind of experiment like this was a step in the right direction. Splitting the game into multiple copies apiece. That you had to buy like Pokemon was not a step in the right direction. Arise as Nice as it was to get that many. There's just so much in in three houses so you can play it again and get a different story. Yes Yeah I think like Zach story with this game is sort of symbolic of the larger story that's happening with a lot of people would switch You have lapsed gamers whereas you have new gamers and yet people that may never would have bought one of these things before are going in and connecting with these franchises for the first time. And that's really awesome and I think that was the hope with a game like Mario in rabbits to right there. That's a turn based strategy game and I think he was hoping that more people would pick it up. With the Mario Franchise sadly you know it didn't get quite that huge mainstream success and it was a really good game to it did pretty well. Yeah that's all that's I think that's the least for a while. Was the best selling third party. Switch which game yeah. Maybe we'll get a second one next year but I still want more you. RPG in that engine also shout out to Our best platformer of two thousand nine hundred supermarine maker to go away. Yes or that also won another major league best platformer should just be sponsored by Nintendo at this point that category brought to you by Nintendo. Because they are they kind of impossible to unseat in that carry despite some really good indie games coming out now in the platform of category. Still kind of own it to Super Mario Mario Maker is just ridiculous. Yeah the amount of stuff you can do with this. It was also cool that like just as we're having these conversations that game of the year to have an excuse to revisit that game and get the Master Sword which I did over the weekend so we should mention. Though the overall winner the overall winner was control and some lake and and friends MHM remedy. And I know this is a game that Janet really like Joe Championed and but our people's Choice Award was too straining which was a very divisive title here in the Office It was one of those games that I actually haven't been able to put that much time into it. They play like three hours and I did not get into even the me of that. Game is like dig it. It's Sifi animal. We'll crossing the chores and carrying around packages. I I like it. It's it's kind of Kooky but I I will admit that I can see a lot of people being put off by the game and in how repetitive it becomes after a while but like. I think it's really cool I forgot what the final tally was. Way over fifty. Thousand people voted for their Game of the year in the in the reader's choice awards and You know like Some Years Nintendo game will win both readers choice and our editorial Toyota pick across my arms but this year. You know the While we had multiple nominees fire MLB didn't quite make it into the into the top spot. It was I mean I think we knew a few months ago at least even probably halfway through the year that this was going to be really interesting year especially for game of the year stuff because the way it Kinda shook out was that there was a couple the front runners but then a bunch of games are also immensely popular and tied with a sort of third place voting area. The resident evil remake was very very very close. Yeah Yeah it was very close runner up and on. I think it's just there weren't very many stand out what masterpiece games sear like the last year like God of war in red dead came out in saint like that liberal college like fallen order was really good but it's also rough around the edges. Yeah performance issues issues and bugs and same with things awakening. Here's a good example. And obviously reviews are an individual's opinion but last year in twenty eighteen. We gave three tens and in two thousand nineteen we we and the years not done but having any right so that's I think a really good example bat said we gave like at least half a dozen. I think more board games and nine five right like this. This was exactly what you said right. It was a really good year of just create games really good games across the board but nothing that really just blew the roof off and stood out to everyone right right. Yeah when I tweeted out my favorite games this year listen I was kind of sort of taken aback at the variety. not only in genre but Like some of these games were incredibly tiny. Little Indie Games and others were massive. Triple A.. Action platforming games and stuff like that and it's really cool to see that there and then some VR games in there too. It's really cool to see just a mix of all that stuff this year. It'll be interesting next year. You know like like the kind of game of the year award. Darlings like Nintendo's Mario Zelda team were absent as rockstar naughty dog and stuff so it's GonNa be interesting next year with the new consuls and new Halo Halo in last of us. And see what we get from Nintendo with new councils. You always see Teams are sort of like figuring stuff out and there's that sort of like those hiccups that happened around on launch but intended is going to be really in the thick of solidifying. The switch is one of the best new platforms ever made. But we're going to get like their flagship title next year for as we know right now is animal Oh crossing which has historically never really one game of the year sort of like death straining and then it's pretty divisive games a Strand Strand on it is it is the national strategy gale and I love it. Ah Love Animals crossings. All that hurt me. That hurt me to here. I do want to give one shot out to our best strategy of winter which is sleigh. The spire fire which I could tell something was up the spot and get to say one of my favorite games.

Nintendo Mario Mario Maker Luigi Abby Zach United States TOM MLB NBC Adema Adamus DSM Brian Twenty Twenty Toyota Nick Janet JOE
"dsm" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"dsm" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Is genetically over determined impulse in uncontrollable urge nestled in our DNA, then punishing pedophile must be morally wrong this with Alli Olympic rights, science culture. Increasingly medical is as bad behavior finding a neurological components to everything from alcoholism to youth violence. We run the parallel risks of either absolving everyone for everything or punishing criminals or no guiltier than cancer patients. What science has revealed says lift wick about the moral medical roots of pedophile? Of course. Ambiguous. What is clear is that the binary choice laid out above is an over-simplification the medical community, which started to view pedophilia as a disease rather than a crime in the nineteenth century has amassed evidence that at least some violent and antisocial behaviors have genetic links and signposts researchers have been unable to isolate a biological cause for pedophilia or even to agree on a personality. Profile not to mention the terrific confusion within the medical community and defining what this disease really involves until a few years ago. For example, the DSM for the psychiatric associations diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders defined pedophilia. As disease only if the sufferers fantasies sexual urges or behaviors cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social occupational or other important areas of functioning in other words, it non impaired remorseless pedophile was apparently perfectly healthy, by the way. It is worth noting. That is exactly the same language that the DSM five now us with regard to transgenderism they suggest that transgenderism is not in fact, mental disorder unless it causes clinically significant distress or impairment, so. We will. We have been doing is medicalising transgenderism is not since pedophilia. Transgenderism is an adult making a decision presumably to behave in a certain way that does not impact other people in violation of their consent. Pedophilia is of course, the exploitation of children. I keep repeating this. Because they're going to be people who don't understand the argument that I'm making and seek to conflicts all of these things they are not the same. But the point that I'm making is that when we medical is evil, then we also run into the danger of suggesting that human behavior is not controllable, and that we are not responsible for our actions. And that is the death of a civilization. We'll talk about that in just a second. But first, let's talk about going to the post office. Nobody really has time to go to the post office. You're busy.

Transgenderism DSM
"dsm" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

The Virtual Couch

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"dsm" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

"So I want to get to a really good article by a PHD in sociology. Your name's Kristen nil stead, and she does a lot of research or research backgrounds in gender, sexuality sexual assault. But I love how she says in her bio writing about the dynamics of psychologically emotionally abusive relationships and doing socio promote awareness and providing evidence based understanding of hidden abuse. Because I think that is in fact, what happens a lot when people are in relationships with people who struggle with in PD, narcissistic personality disorder is that they are they are going through this hidden abuse. And she wrote an article called types of narcissists, including one to stay away from it all costs, and and actually let's do this real quick. Let's take a step back before we get into this article. Let me discover the diagnostic institute. Manual for mental disorders DSM five. And that is what we professionals use for diagnosis. So let's talk about what what the DSM five guidelines are for narcissistic personality disorder and actually before that is kind of fun. Let's let's talk about personality disorders in general. So okay, I saw this last and before that, but before we even get to personality disorders and just got so many things down here in my notes, but before we get to personality disorders. It's kind of important to know again in psychoanalysis, we've got these two terms once called ego sin tonic and one is called ego tonic. So so just bear with me for a second egos. Send tonic refers to the behaviors values and feelings that are in harmony with or acceptable to the needs or goals of the ego. Or they're consistent with one's ideal self image. The reason why that's important is when someone has a personality disorder. It's important to note that that what they're going through there. Experiences in life are typically in harmony with or acceptable to the needs or goals of their ego or consistent with their self image. Meaning when something's egos and tonic it means that the person what they're what they're experiencing this personality disorder is core to their central being of who they are. They feel like this is acceptable. And it meets the needs of their ego or it's consistent with their own self image. So this is that part that so hard to repre heads around where someone struggling with the personality disorder is just doing them. They're just living their life. And so they don't understand why people just don't admit that they are amazing or just do the things that they want them to do in their view people. Just did this. Everyone would just be so much better off. So ego dishonest is the opposite. So it's referring to thoughts and behaviors or dreams or compulsions or desires that sort of thing that are in conflict or dissonant with the needs and goals of the ego or encompassed with their their ideal self image. So ego dishonest things are things like depression, anxiety OCD. So it's things that. Go against the person who we want to be. And so they're things that we don't want and things that we have awareness of and things that we are going to work on so take that now and go for with now, we're talking about personalities orders, so personality disorders are a class of mental disorders, characterized by enduring maladaptive patterns of.

DSM Kristen assault OCD
"dsm" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

The Virtual Couch

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"dsm" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

"And it's kind of interesting to see also thanks research from bidding clearly outside you of of what are some of the nation's as well, as it would it could be I, you know, as an educational psychologist. I wouldn't be able to try to any of those kinds of theories, that's all it is at this point. But you know, over the passage of time, I think that will be flushed out to figure out what what exactly is is going on. Is there arise in it? Because of inherent visibility is increase disability, increasing. Okay. And you think you said what what do you if a parent thinks their kid may be on the autism spectrum? And I also wanted to know in. I think it was the DSM five where we don't even say aspirin, right? Yeah. It's autism spectrum disorder. Yes. How does aspirin fit into that? Yeah. Is. So a lot of people that I like this into the really smart people yet, you know, from Caltech MIT and all these schools a lot of them at all. I mean, this not everybody who has the schools is autistic or aspirin or anything. But but a lot of really really really people are do have aspirations or ADHD. Earth, aspirin or autism. But you know, how how's it differentiated? So this point again like you said is it's no longer in the DSM of separate Ryan separate. It's all combined altogether in into one thing. So we just be looking at higher functioning autism or or lower funky. Okay. Though. That would ask for now are aspects of old is that now hype puncturing batch it. Okay. So our pygmy into the world of so apparent is. Wondering is my child on the autism spectrum looking for where they where they even saying I noticed this. So oftentimes, so I usually might the bulk of my experiences with with with children or else anywhere from like five years old and up from there. But I do know I've spoken with. Scott psychologist psychologists who work with little children as well. Lot of things that they share is it the child is having difficulty with tracking so beating or. For example, if a look into airplane and points up in direction, and the the child autism may not locate at airplane at joint attention, not the tracking the joint, attention difficulty. You know, there's there's things to this is not a dead giveaway of whether autism. But I can't CAC can be seven research says about seventy percent of people with autism have or contact. Okay. You know, there could be other reasons to gathering the thoughts to start kind of putting together the pitcher, right? So the y'all did here of the the Braise. What is it? The social skills. They not is that led you because that's what I was gonna go next came out because that's where it's really at two. So social skills. Social perceptions understanding of you know, we can walk into a room, and we can get a filter room. You know, if the room is healthy, and everybody's happy contents and treating each other respect, there's a certain feeling real most people can walk into like. Yeah. I could deal with the moon is in you want into another maybe walk into court session tents. Yeah. You could just just walk into the room get that vied right right away. People who struggle with autism struggle with any of that perceptions. They don't they don't read the room. Okay. Let me okay. And it wouldn't understand people's emotions and perceptions all you can work with it in and help them with with those things teach them, you know, teach them how to get in contact and teach them how to understand people's emotions and things, but it's more of a they call it like more explicit instruction like explaining step by step helping you develop those hard to do with young kids. Yeah. I think it is..

aspirin autism DSM Caltech MIT ADHD Ryan seventy percent five years
"dsm" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

04:32 min | 3 years ago

"dsm" Discussed on Untangle

"Then that's an imprint where carrying with us in our bodies as opposed to just staying with whatever's going on allowing stir ration- being generous impatient and hopefully compassionate towards ourselves. Appreciative of her own struggle, then we're actually moving through something much quick and much more satisfied way as well. And we don't have to repeat the same thing over and over again, and where actually undoing our inborn fear of emotions. I just said that our unborn fear of emotions. Yeah. Is that like one of the challenges each about the challenge of self love had a self love? Help us to be. With these difficult emotions that we are afraid of both of those concepts are bound up with self acceptance as well. Exactly that what I'm going through doesn't necessarily mean. I failed or that. I'm wrong with knock good enough for unlovable in some way. As so many of us are quick to go to those might sets. It's actually just when I'm going through, right? Okay. So this also ties with your idea of the stories we tell ourselves, right? So image just something we're going down at tach, the meaning of it being a good story or a bad story than it takes on a completely difference tone in your body. And in your mind, I like that. I mean, you had a lot of greats ways of looking at things in this book, which I think is really great. And I like also your section called broken heartedness becomes relevant heartedness. So is that sort of the summation of what we're talking about? Here. Would you say or another piece of the story with what's difficult in life in how it's actually not bad? It's not necessarily a. Problem so much as an opportunity is that my friend suits Hiber wrote a whole book about this called wisdom of a broken heart that when we engage stockily with the disasters with clarity's in our lives where we're taking every is to life-affirming choices of some sort that win our hearts breaks. We might go through a low for little while my act out for a little while that eventually we get sick of that close up by bootstraps. Go back therapy. We maybe take our friends more. Seriously, we go back to learning how to play the tar or maybe we take our meditation path more seriously, we always do something that's really causative and creative in nature to pull ourselves out of those loans and not just that with enough repeat experiences. I been down before. But then I got resourceful, and it took me to a different place than I would have gone to in my life. If I had not been knocked down you repeat that enough times. And what starts to arise for person is confidence confidence I can meet life as it is. I don't need to be afraid or power from vulnerable experiences. I can meet with difficulty, and I'll be fine. It might hurt for little while. But I'm gonna be okay. And I think that's the ultimate choice that we all have and doing these practices. Help us to get clear that we do actually have a choice. Are there any other like sort of baked concepts in the book that you wanna share with us the guiding principle of the book, which is radical non pathology as a mental health clinician that has lived in the world of the DSM and symptom based notions of treating what's going on with us. I've come to see things in totally different way that everything about us are. Brains are really governed by three central drives which are for safety gratification and belonging or love those three impulses. Literally govern everything we think saying to and are the Silter through which we receive stimuli from the world. And so from that vantage point, yes at the surface level, our need for safety gratification belonging in very much get turned around and started into all kinds of not so great expressions. But you can't say that there's anything wrong with our base motivations with who we are at our core from that point of view..

Hiber DSM
"dsm" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

03:07 min | 3 years ago

"dsm" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"Problem, right? You can find a surgeon is willing to do that for you. Go for, it's a free country, but let's not pretend that science is on the side of all of the claims that are being made. I love this. The buried down in this article. Say genetics does play a role though. Oh, you think, oh, you think so. It's it's by the way you know how you know that it's not just trying to tell you because they mail were to have his twig and berries physically removed in some sort of accident. He would still be a male yet if he intends to do so in a surgery, we are now supposed to consider him a female. Okay, that is that is not logical. I wanna talk for Justice. I can about the sort of propaganda that's been promoted on this issue and really is insane propaganda. So the the notion that is pushed by the left that transgenderism is not a mental disorder is completely a scientific. Hey. Now what the left does that they like to say, things like the diagnostic and statistical manual because the DSM five suggests that gender identity disorder is no longer a mental disorder. Instead, what the DSM five says is that a mental disorder is a quote syndrome characterized by clinically significant disturbance in an individual's cognition emotion, regulation or behavior that reflects a dysfunction in the psychological biological or developmental processes underlying mental functioning. Now, this is the this is the the funny part socially deviant behavior and conf in conflicts that are primarily between the individual and society are not mental disorders unless the deviance or conflict results from a dysfunction in the individuals described about. So in other words, if you have something that makes you think that a pink elephant. Is stalking. You almost this makes you feel bad. This is not actually a mental disorder according to the DSM. The definition makes room for it's making clear room for politically correct posturing, right? If I am having a significant problem in and of myself, all I have to do is blame it on society's intolerance and it is no longer considered a mental disorder. Hey, so if you're suicidal because you're a man who believes he's woman, the DSM can still find a way to blame that on society. All you have to say is the reason I'm suicidal is because people are mean to me in society, not because I have suffered with this terrible conflict inside my inside my brain for my entire life. They now society's fault this, how the DSM five avoids the obvious implication that if you're a man who believes your woman, you have a mental disorder. If you're by the way, if you're a fat person who believes you are skinny or skinny person believes are fat. We all knowledge of mental disorder. If you're a skinny person who believes fat, it's called anorexia, it's dangerous and it's mental disorder. If you're a person who believes that you do not need a left arm where there's something called body just morphine. This is a mental disorder. But if you're a man who believes your woman and you. Need your penis, then it's not a mental disorder. It's society's fault. You explain that one to me. He none of this has anything to do with science and all that is specifically designed to blame society for what is clearly an obviously a mental disorder. The reason that I'm serious about calling it a mental disorder. The reason I do so is because you can't actually treat a mental disorder by blaming it on society. If you want to come up with new treatments for mental disorder, the way to do that is not by saying that society at large is responsible for the discomfort of people suffering from the mental disorder. I'm somebody who takes mental illness extraordinarily seriously. My grandfather was either by polo or schizophrenic..

DSM stalking morphine anorexia
"dsm" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

04:42 min | 3 years ago

"dsm" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

"Dot com. And there's a really amazing flow chart. It's taken from the community, but I think it's completely applicable across the board to anybody from touch of flavor dot com. And we have the link on our website called how to evaluate a scene gone wrong. Oh boy, and we're not going to go through this step by step. He's a lot of stuff. It's a lot of steps, but it's a really good tool if there's been an accident or some discomfort or something just went wrong. So this is written for a scene gone wrong, and they're a scene could be at a dungeon or an agreed upon seen. I haven't really built into this very far could be in a moment or seeing that you're having privately to absolutely could even be in a cuddle party or you know any sort of. Interchange. I like to say that head of the valuate an interchange gone wrong because I think it really allows you to go through and it talks about it has some really difficult questions which might not be really easy to answer, but there's really basic steps involves. We're gonna go over this at a really high level. The person who acted in a way that resulted in the violation needs to be open to taking ownership for what they did. And honestly, thanking the other person for allowing them to understand the impact of their actions. You do something is like, oh, that's just not working for me instead of being upset that I'm saying it's not working this time. Hey, thank you so much for letting me know that there's a problem there. I really did not mean to cause you pain. Let's talk about it. What happened? What can I do wrong? What do you need for me? And it's kinda going back and forth. You can talk about things openly again. You might need to give it some space. If you're right in the moment, emotions might be too raw. Yeah, definitely. Somebody's feel like they've had their consent violated. They're going to feel really closed off and unless they're able to be more self aware, we've seen people do that. Absolutely. But it takes time to get yourself to a point that you're able to address it. And then when the conversation or the communication seems to be coming to a close, at least that moment, one of the things that's really good to do is say, hey, do you need anything else for me does give you from what you need and maybe an additional one of. Do you need me to follow up with you in a little bit of time to is or. If you ask that most people say no, but, hey, is it okay if I check back with you tomorrow? Just to see if you're still okay. I'm really wanna. Make sure that you're ok road shows. Empathy issues care shows that you didn't mean to hurt this individual. It shows that you're taking ownership and moving forward to help the person that may be feeling like they've been violated or pushed to maybe understand that it wasn't intentional and if they say no, please don't. That's okay. You can then follow of, you know, I'm here if there's anything further you need and it lets them have the power to take back their power. So how do you move forward after you've had a consent violation? And we're most focusing on accident move? So if the consent violation accident was between people who have long term friendships relationships or who are. Or who are looking at starting one. This can also be the starting point, although maybe not immediately giving a little space for healing for motions to calm down. You know a fairly good idea to negotiate preemptively around situations in the future and how accidents can be handled. Yeah. I mean, some really good examples of that, and you'll see a lot of conversations around consult consent and building consent and creating consent and safe environments borrow heavily from the DSM community because they have an entire community in culture foundation built around consent discussions. One of my favorite things to do at the start of a relationship or early on in a relationship and relationship for me does not necessarily mean a sexual one. It could be a good friendship. A deep foundation is understanding what happens or how you react in how Iraq. If I get angry, hurt, upset, stressed route. I personally need space to calm down. Think about things, and then I'm coming back..

DSM Iraq
"dsm" Discussed on Parenting Great Kids with Dr. Meg Meeker

Parenting Great Kids with Dr. Meg Meeker

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"dsm" Discussed on Parenting Great Kids with Dr. Meg Meeker

"Autism spectrum disorder. I want you now to listen in on a conversation I had with Tammy Morris, your going to love this episode whether or not you have a child who falls into the autism spectrum disorder. Well, Tammy Morris, thanks so much for joining me on my podcast. Thank you for having me Dr Meaker. Sure. Now, as an autism expert, can you explain to everyone listening the difference between autism autism spectrum disorder and aspects? Yeah, I can do my best. You know there have been some recent changes in the DSM criteria for diagnosing autism. So what that means is there are folks that prior to the new DSM which is the diagnostic statistical manual, where we classify diagnoses, there was a recent change, so there will be folks. Right who've carried and a diagnosis for perhaps their whole lifetime. They've been characterized has asked burgers and they will go through the rest of their lives. I'm assuming, right, right with that diagnosis. And so it will take many, many years for the actual community to change some of the terminology around that sort of Ashby Asperger's diagnosis. However, what the DSM five did was recategorized something. So previously there were separate categories for autism spectrum, aspirin or syndrome. And then PDD and OS, which was pervasive, developmental delay, not otherwise specified as well as some other child disintegrated disorder autistic disorder. So now relieve the DSM is given just one broad umbrella of autism spectrum disorder. So ASID includes all of that includes any element or any symptom or something of autism. It's all under the same umbrella, right? So by forming such a broad umbrella, now they also had to change the characteristics of autism right in order to be -clusive of everything under that umbrella. So previously and the DSM four, there were three domains of autism symptoms. Those were social impairment language or.

Tammy Morris DSM Ashby Asperger aspirin Dr Meaker
"dsm" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

The Michael Knowles Show

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"dsm" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

"Left embraces democratic socialism right now, the DSM membership has increased seven and a half times in just two years between twenty sixteen in two thousand eighteen. The membership is increased almost seven and a half times the dues paying membership, which is ironic because I didn't think socialists paid for anything, but they are paying their membership dues. Now to this, there were forty two candidates across the United States who are now endorsed officially endorsed by the Democrats. Socialists of America. There is obviously Alexandria Casio Cortez. There's another one though. This guy Zach Ringel Stein up in Maine, he he says, he stands with the democratic socialists. He wasn't comfortable calling him. One before, but now he is comfortable calling himself one. This is spreading you have the sort of cackling lefty hyenas on the view there, embracing socialism, they're saying, isn't it? Just a like liberalism isn't? No, it's not. It's not real socialism. It's democratic. Socialism ladies repeat after me. There is no such thing as democratic. Socialism repeat after me, there is no such thing as democratic socialism, amiss. Alexandria, ocasio Cortez. Is there any such thing as democratic socialism? I am not the expert geopolitics on this issue as good. Fair enough. You're right now. I bet the New York Times is going to yell at me for spreading fake news. He didn't really interview her. He didn't raise your right wasn't that was just a clip. It was just a clip New York Times. There is no such thing as democratic socialism, their contradictions in terms, you know, there's a really depressing number that's been coming out according to two separate studies millennials, the majority of millennials identify as socialist they they would. They call themselves. Lists. They rather live in a socialist government that that number has risen dramatically over the years, even Prager us will wit, who I think was constructed in a laboratory made by Snapchat, will wit went out there and talk to these millennials, look what they had to say sh- we have more socialism in America..

Zach Ringel Stein Alexandria Casio Cortez New York Times America Alexandria Democrats United States DSM Maine Prager Snapchat two years
"dsm" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

02:20 min | 4 years ago

"dsm" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

"We haven't really talked much about what the dsm is but the dsm is the diagnostic statistical manual it's a medical model for diagnose same mental health disorders that was a lot of words not is scary as it sounds i promise so you just put on your therapy pan that there are three different anxiety anxiety disorders pacific phobias panic disorder and generalised anxiety disorder and the generalised anxiety disorder is the one i kinda wanna explain a little day here because we all feelings i eddie on some kind of the spectrum and that doesn't necessarily mean that we have generalised anxiety disorder when it shifts from just feeling anxiety to actually be nee disorder it's something that persists at least six months more days than not it's extremely difficult to control you have this excessive anxiety and worry it may be that you're very restless mayfield easily fatigues you could have difficulty concentrating and all that was always like me in school like again i felt a lot difficulty concentrating by i wouldn't have diagnosed myself and i wasn't diagnosed by therapist with generalising zeid disorder so just having like one of these things does not mean that you have the disorder there's several different kind of symptoms and when you actually become diagnosed with something is when you have at least three of them persisting more days than not for at least six months so the restlessness the easily fatigue difficulty concentrating ask them irritability perhaps some muscle tension and also sleep disturbance to like you can kinda towel that it's it's a little bit more intense and at times our anxiety does feel so intense by it often fades and being diagnosed with generalised anxiety disorder is very treatable you know just how anxiety as a feeling itself passes and is something we can learn to cope with it is as well when you are diagnosed with it.

muscle tension anxiety six months
"dsm" Discussed on Death, Sex and Money

Death, Sex and Money

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"dsm" Discussed on Death, Sex and Money

"Death sex and money is supported by mlive fleur which provides luxury clothing and personal styling to the busy professional woman who has better things to do than shop or who wishes she could shop the can't fit it in the audit quick online survey and receive a bento box of wardrobe staples and accessories handpicked just for you buy your dedicated in 'em stylist keep what you like send back what you don't it's free to try and it's not a subscription service said there's no commitment if you're ready to take the work out of dressing for work tribe bento by visiting mm bento dot com that's mmd ent out dot com death sex and money is supported by rocket mortgage by quicken loans chances are you're confident when it comes to your work your hobbies in your life rocket mortgage gets you that same level of confidence when it comes to buying a home or refinancing your existing home loan rocket is simple allowing you to fully understand all the details and be confident you're getting the right mortgage for you to get started go to rocket mortgage dot com slash dsm equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states nmlsconsumeraccessorg number thirty thirty this is death saxon money from wnyc i man a sale charlie schramm was arrested by federal agents at jfk airport in january 2014 when he was flying home into new york he was charged with money laundering and operating an unlicensed money transmitting business before he was arrested charlie told me worries about legal trouble had already prompted him to shut down his company bed instant my lawyers basically said well like.

charlie schramm jfk airport new york money laundering shut down
"dsm" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"dsm" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"And then genuinely lacking remorse the these are classic traces psychopathy right yet but that's just one facet of it there's another facet factor to which is the easy behavioural aspect of psychopathy in factor two relates to things like impulsively uh sexual promiscuity uh parasitic lifestyle yeah and so if psychopathy is a spectrum that we all potentially could be on the psychopaths spectrum but we would most of us fall below that threshold than factor one factor to or like a spectrum within a spectrum via to wear on one side you have a high functioning psychopaths like ceos say than on the other side you have very low functioning factor to psychopaths like a truck stop serial killer right right who's getting sloppy um and then in between you would have you know a mixture but uh you can kind of lean more toward the factor 1 psychopathy could lean more toward the factor to psychopathy but the factor to psychopathy relates almost exclusively to the dsm's antisocial personality disorder criteria and so therefore the dsm is norring factor 1 psychopathy and so therefore really the only way you can be diagnosis a psychopath is through the hair psychopath checklist um so there is almost like this competing field that's going up against the dsm yeah as far as the study of psychopaths is concerned you you take the rest of the efsa fight well let's take a break so i can memorize all the stuff.

antisocial personality disorde efsa