30 Burst results for "DSM"

"dsm" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

The Dental Hacks Podcast

04:24 min | 2 months ago

"dsm" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

"For the gentle packs. Let's talk about sleep apnea because it's A. Sounds like you. You just took the test on and all that stuff. So so, how how long have you been doing sleep apnea treatment. Well I'd say. I started dabbling about eight years ago. Okay, you know. We started doing sedation dentistry about twelve years ago, and it's at that time. I started noticing when she put someone's sedated and they relax a lot. They looked like they were going to die chair and started freaking me out and so That's when I kind of. Learned what sleep apnea was right around that time. My father was no sleep apnea and started wearing a c. pap machine, and he was one of the people that that actually tolerates, and he loves it because he feels the benefits from it, and so started looking into it and went to one of the DSM meeting their convention. It's every end of May. Early June. Do they have? Their annual meeting went down to to see. See what it was all about so I started taking a couple of classes to kind of get certified, but really to be honest I was just dabbling every once in a while, we would make an appliance and admit it now. I was doing it wrong. Because I was really wasn't screen inappropriately and I wasn't doing a proper follow-up. It's pretty much just kind of like giving a breakfast guard here you go I. Hope it works. And so as I started. Sometimes is the less you know, the more success you have to work coming back planing they. Didn't have any problems until I finally did and and I needed to do a home sleep test at least find out how good I had done, and if I needed to make any adjustments, and so started taking even more courses to make sure I wasn't going to kill anybody, because it's just to be honest, this is one thing that we do that is life or death. If we don't treat them in their sleep, apnea date could die. Die, in their sleep. They're probably not GonNa die if I don't clean their teeth well and forgiven those veneers, but with sleep apnea it's is saving lives,.

apnea DSM
Fighting Loneliness? Try Friending Yourself.

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

06:56 min | 4 months ago

Fighting Loneliness? Try Friending Yourself.

"Hey all you sober people hand anyone else. Who is interested in listening to me talk about mental wellness? Some of you might remember that my word for the year is clarity and especially with. Cova did that word has not changed my journey. This year is very much about taking the noise out of my daily life and boy has that been difficult in this time of lockdown and isolation and loneliness which is why. I'm GonNa talk about loneliness today and what it means. Not only to me but to you all as well. The statistics are growing. Not only because of covet but prior to Cova. We are becoming more and more lonely. And why is that and more importantly what can we do about it? I live alone and if I am feeling the loneliness even though I have people built into my daily work. I can't imagine how other people are feeling who don't work any longer or don't necessarily engage with people daily in their line of work before Kovin. I liked living alone. I enjoy the peace and quiet and frankly I like my relationship with myself but now that I'm confined an had been confined by the way. I'm still very much. Laki myself down except for a walk that I take almost daily with some friends Monday through Friday but we social distance or physical distance during the walk. I carry a mask with me so although I'm getting Interaction I still spend most of my downtime. My non work time by myself and it's become more difficult. I only imagine how difficult it is for some of you who live in bigger cities and can't get out to walk every day on walking past like I do. It has to be really tough. Interestingly the rate in which we are living alone has been on the increase for the last fifty years Grand Julie Aching up to about twenty eight percent in two thousand nineteen of our total population here in the US which means at thirty five point seven million people here in the US live by themselves in a recent study by CIGNA which is a health insurance company here in the US of twenty thousand people. Us adults they found that half of Americans feel like they are alone. Only slightly more than fifty percent of the respondents said they had meaningful in person. Social interactions on a daily basis and fifty percent said that sometimes or always they feel that the relationships are not meaningful and that they're isolated from a smaller but still surprising number of people. Twenty percent of the twenty thousand said they never or rarely feel close to people and eighteen percent felt like they have no one to talk to and this same study by Cigna revealed that Young People Age Eighteen to twenty two are far more likely than senior citizens to report being lonely and Import Health. Making them the loneliest generation and well loneliness itself is not an diagnoses or a mental health disorder. It goes hand in hand with many of the diagnostic criteria in the DSM. Five diagnostic statistical manual. That most of us in the mental health professionals zone us. Furthermore there's no accepted definition of loneliness. Sometimes it gets jumbled together with social isolation but the two concepts are very different social isolationism indicator of how much contact. Somebody has with other people. Whereas loneliness is the subjective feelings of isolation and there is no agreed. Tipping Point at which acute loneliness transitions into a chronic problem with long term mental health and physical health ramifications. Alone doesn't necessarily mean that you're lonely nor does being around people mean that you're not loneliness is a very subjective. Feeling loneliness is a feeling that only you the person experiencing it can truly identify the fancy schmancy definition of loneliness is the distress that results from discrepancies between ideal and perceived social relationships. That's according to the Encyclopedia of human relationships. What that means is that loneliness is a feeling and a perception. It involves a wave seen ourselves and the world around us. We can feel lonely. In a wide variety of social settings and circumstances. It doesn't take being alone. Some studies have shown that people who struggle with loneliness may actually perceive the world differently. Does that sound familiar to some of us. I know it sounds very similar to the world that I grew up in the world that I created for myself through my perceptions and certainly when I was drinking boy did I create A world within a world one researcher even found structural and biochemical differences in what he labeled the lonely brain. Okay and I'm going to murder his name. I'm sure John Casio Gosh. His research revealed that a lonely person can experience more difficulty recognizing positive events and have more trouble picturing the thoughts of others known as mental ising.

Cova United States Social Isolation Cigna Kovin Encyclopedia Of Human Relation Import Health Researcher Murder DSM John Casio Grand Julie
What Cocaine Tells Us About Depression

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

01:35 min | 4 months ago

What Cocaine Tells Us About Depression

"Today on sixty seconds side. What cocaine tells us about? Depression come starts now in this study in Cardoso and colleagues followed five hundred eighty five patients who appeared to have Yuna polar depression on the mini structured interview when they followed them up later after an average of years twelve percent had converted to bipolar disorder. The risk of conversion bipolar was three and a half times higher in those with a lifetime. History of cocaine use although they were careful to ensure that these new bipolar patients had mainly as our hypo mania during times of sobriety they admit that cocaine can cause persistent changes in the brain. That may mimic mania even during abstinence. The results are in line with prior studies. Which have found that even after rigorous testing every year one in twenty five people with depression convert the bipolar. The same rate they came up with and that substance abuse increases the risk for example. There's a large epidemiologic study where Jules xts and his colleagues found that co Morbidity Between Depression and Substance Use disorders was entirely explained by mixed features whether those mixed features occurred as part of full bipolar or a bipolar spectrum disorder like the Dsm five depression with mixed features people with bipolar disorder and substance abuse. More likely to present in a mixed state and more likely to respond to anti convulsants or atypical. Antipsychotic Stendhal

Bipolar Disorder Depression Cocaine Jules Xts Stendhal Yuna Cardoso
How Does Agoraphobia Work?

BrainStuff

07:02 min | 5 months ago

How Does Agoraphobia Work?

"Doesn't it seem like some people aren't afraid of anything? But you know what those people? They're phonies because they're scared of chainsaw clowns just like everybody else. They're just better at hiding it. Everybody has fears. But not everybody has a phobia medically recognized. Phobias are different from normal fear in that they provoke a very intense reaction they're unreasonable or unwarranted for instance being intensely afraid of guy with a shotgun in a ski mass while that kind of makes sense but being intensely afraid of balloons doesn't so much and finally they can interfere with a person's ability to live their life but there are other anxiety disorders that while very real and potentially very disruptive of a person's life are far more insidiously. Vague and Agoraphobia is one of them according to the DSM. Five every year one point seven percent of adolescents and adults will be diagnosed with agoraphobia. So what is it well? A lot of people have heard the term and have a vague idea of what it means but a lot of these ideas are wrong or at least they don't tell the whole story so for instance some things that a Gora phobia are not are a fear of crowds a fear of wide open spaces or a fear of being outside though all of these may be a manifestation of actual agoraphobia. Agoraphobia is actually a broader complaint that will often include some or all of the fears previously listed so for some general layperson definitions to help. You get the gist of it here. We go agoraphobia. Is A type of anxiety disorder in which you fear and often avoid places or situations that might cause you to panic and make you feel trapped helpless or embarrassed. That's from the Mayo. Clinic OR AGORAPHOBIA. Is An intense fear and anxiety of being in places where it is hard to escape or where help might not be available. Agoraphobia usually involves fear of crowds bridges or of being outside alone. That's from the National Library of medicine at the National Institutes of health. One More AGORAPHOBIA is a fear of being in situations where scape might be difficult or help wouldn't be available if things go wrong. That's from the National Health Service in the UK so really agoraphobia is more broadly the fear of being trapped in a vulnerable situation especially when exacerbated by an existing predisposition to panic disorder. Very often the person with agoraphobia specifically dreads experiencing a panic attack or other panicked like symptoms in a situation where such inexperienced would be especially inopportune according to the DSM five and this is the latest edition of the professional diagnostic handbook for mental health professionals. According to that to meet the diagnostic criteria for a goer phobia. You must have quote market fear. Orange Zaidi about two or more of the following scenarios standing in line or being in a crowd being outside of the home alone using public transportation being an open spaces or being an enclosed spaces so the DSM five reports that the person with a Gore phobia fears or voids these situations because of thoughts that escape and might be difficult or might not be available in the event of developing panic like symptoms or other incapacitating or embarrassing symptoms. What physically happens is the following according to the US National Library of medicine these symptoms. Show up when you're experiencing agoraphobia chest. Pain or discomfort choking or shortness of breath dizziness or fainting nausea rapid heartbeat sweating and trembling also according to the DSM five. You can only meet the criteria for diagnosis. If you always are almost always have the fear response to these situations. You actively avoid these situations or require the help of a companion. The level of fear you feel is disproportionate to the threat represented. This condition lasts for six months or more the fear anxiety or avoidance causes coat clinically significant distress or prevents you from living a normally functional life and the suite of symptoms. You experience is not better grouped under another diagnosis for example if your fear only occurs because you fear people's reactions to perceived flaws in your physical appearance this might be a body dismore disorder instead of general agoraphobia. So if you have intense persistent debilitating fear. That you'll begin to have a panic attack or another embarrassing or incapacitating episode while you're stuck in a place or situation you can't get out of or where you can't find help. You might have a Gore phobia. We'll that's a long one and this can have some really serious consequences for example more than one in three people with Gora Phobia are completely homebound and unable to work and sometimes people inappropriately self medicate with the abuse of drugs and alcohol. Agoraphobia often develops out of an existing panic disorder for example if a person experiences a panic attack in particular type of place say for example like an airplane or an elevator. He or she might start to avoid ever being in that situation again over time. This can develop into full blown agoraphobia. Something like Agoraphobia can sometimes be difficult to accurately diagnose since it's associated with something like panic disorder and because the functional symptoms may resemble those of problems with different causes for example may dread and avoid flying an airplane because of a Gora Phobia or maybe simply because you feared death by plane crash. The situational phobia is outwardly similar. But it happens for very different. Reasons are all right. So maybe you're wondering if I've got a Gora Phobia. How do I treat it? Well the most common treatment responses are a combination of cognitive behavioral. Therapy an antidepressant medication. Cognitive behavioral therapy is basically a common form of psychotherapy where the therapist helps the patient talk through thought processes and common behaviors and then replaces those bad thoughts and behavior patterns with better ones antidepressant. Medication could also include drugs. Such as selective Serotonin reuptake inhibitors or s our eyes or Serotonin Neuro. Epinephrine reuptake inhibitors. So if you or someone you know are suffering from agoura phobia. There's help out there. All you have to do is seek it out.

Agoraphobia DSM Gore Us National Library Of Medicin National Institutes Of Health National Library Of Medicine Epinephrine UK National Health Service Orange Zaidi Mayo Nausea Agoura
Sober Sex & Recovery with Stacie Ysidro

The Addicted Mind Podcast

08:32 min | 5 months ago

Sober Sex & Recovery with Stacie Ysidro

"I'm Stacey CETRARO and I am a sober sex coach or sex and recovery coach for over ten years. I've accumulated over ten thousand hours of education and Experience. And all things sexual. I have studied a lot of contra sacred sexuality and sexology the DSM and also the erotic blueprints. I am acknowledged by the World Association of sex coaches and also by Jaya who is a world renowned sexologist. That is the founder of the erotic blueprints. And I've been working really closely with her the last couple of years. You may have seen her as a speaker on Tony Robbins or on Good Morning America. Or even the view or Oprah magazine and I've been working with her to expand my understanding and my application of the erotic blueprints to help my coaches and to help myself and my personal life and my clients awesome. I'm so glad that you decided to you. Know come onto the podcast. I think this is a topic that so many people need help with especially when they get into sobriety. So let's just jump in. Let's how how? How did you start this work so I had started sex coaching over ten years ago on I started out with just a business and life coaching certification that I was using and the salons. I was the salon professional working behind the chairs. The stylist and training stylist and working with our leadership team and being a partner in salons and as I was going through that process business and life. Coaching kind of vague. And they always want you to find your niche so I went through a few processes and all the common threads were around spirituality and sexuality. So that's when I started taking this deep dive into the world of Spirituality and Sexuality and sex coaching which led me to get a couple of different sex coaching certifications and studying sexology and I also have experience with addiction and recovery in my personal life so after about ten years of working with mostly couples and men around Sacred Sexuality Contra mostly helping men with premature ejaculation or rectal dysfunction energetic orgasm. I got to a point where I really wanted to move into something a little different and deeper and that's when I found the erotic blueprint certification and I did that and Since I started going on that journey with Jaya I have really come into this new space of seeing the need for people to get some coaching around sexuality and so Brian Easy or Saxon recovery. That's that's great You know I think our sexuality is so much. A part of our spirituality. Such a core part of who we are and so for a lot of people who struggle with addiction and maybe have a lot of that I guess I would call it. Wounding of the spirit their sexualities impacted by by that trauma absolutely Sexuality is such a huge part of being a human being for my perspective. I guess it's kind of Taoists but I believe that orgasmic energy as the life force energy in it flows through US and makes us alive and so we can experience that and a lot of different ways on a day to day basis in different levels of intensity but that sexual orgasmic energetic exchange that occurs is something that's so deeper so much deeper and brings us to something that's bigger than us and for me addiction has really been about isolation and being disconnected with spirit and so going into recovery and being able to reconnect with my higher power and with Spirit. It just was natural to recover my sex life in the process so I just really felt that it all kind of blended together right. Yeah definitely I think you're absolutely right. So tell me a little bit about when someone is in sobriety and they're starting to look at their sexuality. What are some of the issues that you see in that? Come up and then our common with the that process so for me. Sex was not always conscious and honoring. It was more about power and manipulation control. It was about feeling needed or seeking. Validation was about people pleasing others and it was through sex so I've seen people go through similar things also once getting sober like kind of feeling like you're a virgin all over again like everything is new right. And so you know there's a lot of challenges with defining what are my sexual values. And how do I get out of my head and into my body because now my mind is racing and I'm not using a substance to escape. Do you find a lot of people. When they're in their addiction that they have hidden their sexuality in it like their true sexual self is hidden by the addiction. Does that make sense? I think that addiction can definitely cloud who we really are inside To me it was definitely like a spiritual death and disconnection with who I really am so yes actuality as part of that and I think that a lot of times when people are using. They're doing things sexually that. Maybe they wouldn't do consciously sober or they're using sexuality and away that is not honoring and Present with themselves right or others will. There's a lot of that trauma that interpersonal trauma. And if you're if you're self is hidden from yourself. I guess if that makes sense by an addiction you can't really be yourself their present. You can't be whole. Yeah it's about being all of us and honoring and accepting all of our selves and allowing someone else to see all of us you know especially when people have had traumas. It's hard to even honor yourself to begin with and that's incredibly vulnerable to to be yourself to come with your full self with all of your sexual desire and fantasy and all of that. I mean it's to me who we are sexually as like a window into our our very deepest selves absolutely. I always tell people that sexuality is almost like the outer layer of why people start reaching out to me but what really happens as this deeper personal transformation that you never could have plans for or even asked for to begin with because it is so vulnerable and it gives you access to all parts of yourself your self worth unconditional love and acceptance. So it really. It really goes so much deeper than just. How do I have a better orgasm? Yeah yeah definitely I mean. That's that's part of it but that's not the whole part. That's not in some ways. That's a great part and in some ways that's not always the best part right and I found that. Yeah I can tell you some tips and techniques and tools to do all day long but if you don't really do the inner work you're never going to access that part of yourself that's going to bring you to experience that deep connection and intimacy with someone which really expands your orgasmic energy. So it's almost like you can't have one without the other. I definitely agree. I I work with a lot of people who struggle with compulsive sexual behavior. And what's really you know? We look at it as an intimacy issue. It's this fear to be vulnerable. It's a fear to bring their true self to the relationship and so their sexuality is in a in a in a way hidden Their true selves are hidden.

Spirituality And Sexuality Jaya World Association Of Sex Stacey Cetraro Tony Robbins DSM Founder United States Oprah Partner Brian Easy
"dsm" Discussed on The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

02:54 min | 5 months ago

"dsm" Discussed on The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

"To appear. Made is tested for compulsive shopping. But we're not buying it. To- pyramid is often used an impulsive and compulsive disorders like gambling. Binge eating believe MIA. Ocd Binge drinking cocaine and methamphetamine abuse and irritability indeed it has small controlled trials showing benefit in all of those conditions. This study tested it out in compulsive buying disorder a disorder. That's not in the DSM five but that she might see in practice because it said to affect to eight percent of the population but the results of this study. Tell us more about how to read a research trial then whether we should use to appear made in this population it was a twelve week. Randomized placebo controlled trial. Sounds good so far. Twelve weeks pretty long only fifty patients though which is a bit small. We'd like to see studies with one hundred or more subjects. The main problem though. Is that the medication. Only made a difference on secondary measures. At that means. The medication didn't really work. According to this study so why is that? Why can't we just count? On the secondary measures the tests we use in. These studies are only valid in a statistical sense which means that every time we use one. There's a chance that we might get a false positive. And the more times we run them. The more likely that chance is just like the more times you roll a dice. The more likely order role double sixes. That's why we want researchers to name what their primary outcome is so they don't keep rolling that dice so in the end when you see things like a trend towards statistical significance or positive and secondary measures but not primary measures. It means that the studies kind of a wash that if there is a benefit to this medication the benefit is probably so small. It's not able to show up in the design of the study. So should we try to appear? Mate in people with compulsive buying disorder. Well the first thing we should do is rule out. Hypo MANIA had those folks. But if left with nothing else to do and psychotherapy hasn't worked we could consider tope your meat which just need to go forward without honestly knowing that it's not been proven to work and stopping it. If it's not making any difference. Compulsive buying disorder is not in the DSM. But here's the purse criteria one. There is an over. Preoccupation with buying to the patient is constantly obsessed with buying and they are always dissatisfied. No matter what they purchase three compulsive buying is not limited to hyper manacle manic episodes and four. There is often distress or impairment as a result.

DSM Ocd cocaine methamphetamine
Unconscious Orbiting

Mission Daily

07:32 min | 5 months ago

Unconscious Orbiting

"Today. We're talking about unconscious. Orbiting Call Young says until you make the unconscious conscious. It will direct your life and you will call it fate so sometimes the subjects in our life come in for a reason. Sometimes they're just noise. Sometimes the stimulus that we see is random but sometimes it's not and sometimes we find ourselves circling orbiting the same topics people places terminology again and again and again sometimes we can be orbiting something that is so important to us yet remains so far away from our conscious understanding that it's hard for us to even see the good news today. Is that just by becoming aware of the fact that you've been unconsciously orbiting something you can investigate further you don't have to remain orbiting it forever. You can get closer to the planet that celestial body some crash into it as I did with. Ptsd this last year or sometimes you can look into it a little bit closer to the surface and realize now there's nothing there that's not about me that's just something in the unconscious and then you can get the escape velocity needed to make a break and get away from that celestial body or thing that you've been orbiting so in my case though this was ptsd. When I left the military years ago though on a date myself too much there. I'm still young still young though when I left the military. This was something I researched. I wrote a book. I did a lot to try to draw awareness to emerging resources for veterans for first responders anyone suffering from PTSD and generally just who wanted to see where the future was and what type of opportunities were available to veterans that were undervalued or recently coming on the scene. You know not. Many people knew about them so this leads to writing a book. I briefed a panel of generals in DC on topics relating to. Ptsd in the future of work as well as talking about culture the culture of the military. And how we could create a kind of a better reintegration program in the civilian world for veterans. This was a lot of fun however it's brought me very close to PTSD post traumatic stress disorder. And I was open to the idea that I had it however I also was open to the idea that people around me at it much much worse and we need to focus our efforts in our attentions on those that had it in the most severe forms so this led me to just orbit this topic and one of the pieces of good news that you can use. Is that when you're orbiting topic and you find yourself really passionately committed to it and you find yourself defensively triggered about the topic so in the case and PTSD. I just couldn't stand the fact that the of the acronym the disorder part was attached to it. Right this is a sign where you know the biological organism. That's having a natural stress reaction to a traumatic event doesn't need the D. added because this is a cultural stigma. Basically the idea that this is a disorder. I felt was just unnecessary cultural judgment and baggage and the reality is though. It doesn't really matter how I feel. It's what the term is labeled as it's what the medical community wants to call it. So that's what it's going to be called and a lot of psychological terms whether they're in the DSM five or anything like that they come with tons and tons of baggage and there's going to be cultural stigmas about this stuff any way you cut it right. Anything emerging from the unconscious is going to have cultural stigmas. They're going to be inevitable and it's very important that you notice. How defensive you get around certain topics. This is rife for clues. This is rife for going deeper. This is a big big opportunity to be brave enough to go into the unconscious. Gilo bit closer to the object and examined in detail so for years I just stayed orbiting this. This was something that was. In my periphery and it wasn't until I crash landed into this realization literally with near death experience last year that I was open to the idea that not only had. I been suffering from it but I'd been suffering quite severely. You know as far back as childhood so you might have to crash land into an object from your unconscious to make it conscious. This isn't a bad thing. Many people will deny ever crashing into objects from their unconscious. They will keep this bottled up. They will think that happens to other. People doesn't happen to me. This is the place you want to avoid because if you can make the unconscious conscious like young says you can free yourself from it. You can free yourself from fate. There's no fate but what we make and you have an opportunity to make new fate. And maybe even cast out that B. S. descriptors the most passive word in the world fate and adopt new words adopt new language for the future. I would say unwritten. I would say it's whatever you WanNa make I would say it's whatever you envision and believe and create. That's what's going to happen so this is a call to action to become more definitely optimistic about your words about your vision and about what you choose to research that is hovering in that realm up unconscious and consciousness when you're brave enough to admit to what you've been orbiting now. You have a chance to integrate it into your psychology so defensive about it noticed that. Don't judge it. Just look at that as a an early warning sign that dangerous close or an opportunity is close or it might just be a false alarm and you just pull off. And you had the escape velocity to get off the planet or get away from that gravity when you go out into the world today when your in quarantine when you're thinking if you're meditating on this the daily mission is to think about and write out whether it's in a journal or on your phone in the notes. App right out. What have you been orbiting that you need to examine more closely and get Intel on? You will not regret it. You will not regret taking a little bit of action today to examine that celestial body more closely and pull out that thing from the unconscious look at it. Make a conscious and either transmute it integrated into your psychology. Whatever you want to say this is a powerful idea an activity. I encourage everyone listening to think about it and maybe take some action on it today. Thanks for listening

Ptsd Intel DC
Rethinking Your Drinking/Drug Use During Times of Crisis

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

09:14 min | 5 months ago

Rethinking Your Drinking/Drug Use During Times of Crisis

"I don't know how you're feeling this week but I'm actually feeling a little bit better. Had A couple of tough days. I'm GonNa admit that because it's really important for everyone to know that we are all struggling right now with these big emotions and were isolated and trying to cope with them and handle them. This is why I want to talk about my subject for today and that is getting or stain sober really rethinking near drinking and drug use. During this time of crisis I am getting lots of inquiries and new clients because people who have been kind of going along with their drinking or their pot use for instance are now seen that use increase exponentially and it's scaring people rightfully so. I remember those times when my alcohol use was increasing when I was taking more benzodiazepines those anxiety drugs than I whisper -scribed and it wasn't during a time of crisis today. I want to ease into the idea for those of you. Who are listening to reducing your drinking especially at this time to really rethink how you're using substances in your lives. One of the reasons that the shift in my profession from diagnosis seen a chemical dependency or an abuse problem shifted in two thousand thirteen. And by the way people were trying to do this long before it was actually adopted to substance use disorders. That means we are now and probably all along could have and should have been looking at substance use honest spectrum. I wish that I didn't have to experience. A severe substance. Use TO SORT. Because for me that look like heavy duty long binges of using alcohol twenty four hours a day. Lean and bad my last big bend before I found the help that changed my thinking in my way of being in this world and for me that meant residential treatment for thirty days with that. Look like in my life was laying in bed and suffering and kind of getting up to maybe eat or I used to drink gatorade to try and get my body back to some kind of functionality and get out their power walk and after a period of time I just succumbed to the chemicals that were overwhelming my brain. The neuro toxins that had infiltrated my bean. My neurobiology and I had not a fighting chance so when I talk about the spectrum of substance use and the idea that we have a mild moderate and severe spectrum the mild part of the spectrum is where you can really turn things around pretty quickly so for those of you who are listening in. May Be aren't yet ready to stop because it's a little stressful right. Now I'm going to encourage you to look at it a little differently to rethink the idea of total abstinence and to look at moderation in a very clinical way. Because if you're working with me for moderation there is a way to do that to make the experience really successful for you you know. We grow so accustomed to these patterns that we develop in our lives and we don't think about them after we develop them. We just returned to the same kind of Groundhog Day and in the case of what we're dealing with right now where there's really good opportunities to look at this space and time that we are alone that we are able to really look at these patterns and not give way to them and not give into them. Can't tell you how many posts I have read on instagram and facebook where people are saying. It's a real struggle not to take that first drink earlier in the day and I've seen a lot of people saying I really want to start drinking at two. Pm or even noon and the good news is that where we were a month ago. People were really joking about that but I hear and read concern now. Like people don't really want to do this but they're bored. They're they're scared. And it is for many coping skill that they have turned to over the years. So I WANNA work on that with the all today to really dive deeper into the opportunity to reduce. Maybe quit altogether or to reinvest in your sobriety and recovery. I know I have covered how I go about diagnosing people. I'm air quoting diagnosing. Because for most of you have listened to me. I'm not really a big diagnosis or of disorders. I do like to use the criteria that's identified in the DSM the diagnostic statistical. Manual won't walk really big name for a diagnostic manual because the information we get from going through the criteria with our clients however for today. I want to give you three questions or topics or criteria for you to think about if you're struggling with your thoughts around drinking or drugging number one. Are you obsessively thinking about alcohol or drugs in a way? That's impacting your life. Is this kind of obsessive? Thought that you have regarding taking a drink or engaging in your drug of choice what I talked about earlier where people are saying. I'm I'm really wanting to drink earlier in earlier in the day. That's obsessive thinking you're not thinking well. I'll go take a walk earlier in the day. You thinking about your coping mechanism that you've turned to mostly probably in the evenings but not focused on any other healthier coping skills to relieve your tension so it makes sense that you're going to think about drinking or drugging earlier in the day unless we can get you to shift your paradigm shift. You're thinking a little bit toward a healthier coping skill so number one criteria. Are you thinking about alcohol or drugs more often during the day number two in the face of potential severe consequences? Do you still drink or use drugs now. I want to be really clear about the word severe in here because so many of us don't count our relationship. Problems has a severe issue and I don't mean that these problems with our relationships have to be big blow outs. It's that resentment that we feel toward our or our loved ones that were not sharing. Its festering inside of us. Also people feel compelled to take a little nip to take the edge off. So you might be using it before you have a tough conversation with the kids or your husband or your parents or the biggest one. The one that I fell prey to was easing to sleep. And we also underestimate the power of clean sleep if you will sleep without taking some kind of medication. Drug naturally induced self soothing. I will also say the really troubling consequence that most people belittle or minimize is getting behind the wheel. When you've had one or two drinks most of us who have had one or two drinks like over the happy hour were not really stained for four hours in which case if you are staying for four hours like I used to. You're really not good to get behind the wheel and of course right now. That's not a big deal but I will tell you in Georgia. It's still a big deal. People are actually kinda going to places And meeting with people keeping social distancing and still having cocktail parties. Yep even on. What's the date today? Wednesday April eight crazy.

Instagram DSM Georgia Facebook
"dsm" Discussed on Say Why To Drugs

Say Why To Drugs

02:13 min | 7 months ago

"dsm" Discussed on Say Why To Drugs

"A local treatment service <Speech_Female> there but <Speech_Female> getting support for yourself <Speech_Female> as well if you've got concerns <Speech_Female> but also <Speech_Female> accessing the information <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> it's also really important <Speech_Female> that you don't <Speech_Female> feel you've got to be an expert <Speech_Female> as a parent and <Speech_Female> it can be very easy to <Speech_Female> get befuddled by your <Speech_Female> teenagers. <Speech_Female> The fourteen <Speech_Female> gonNA thing <Speech_Female> in attitude <Speech_Female> even if not in words <Speech_Female> and you can feel that yourself <Speech_Female> because <Speech_Female> it is such a different thing. <Speech_Female> He knew that those <Speech_Female> little silver canisters <Speech_Female> got drunk soon. I <Speech_Female> mean <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> what they did <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> lots of things that you <Speech_Female> do and <Speech_Female> and all parents <Speech_Female> know enough to have <Speech_Female> those conversations and <Speech_Female> also told <Speech_Female> us <SpeakerChange> the <Speech_Female> about stuff without <Speech_Female> without <Speech_Female> asking <Speech_Female> an interrogation <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> but be curious <Speech_Female> with them and learn <Speech_Female> together and <Speech_Female> there <Speech_Female> are always opportunities. <Speech_Female> There are opportunities <Speech_Female> that come up. There are <Speech_Female> always things in the <Speech_Female> news. There's <Speech_Female> always a storyline on <Speech_Female> eastenders <Speech_Female> about something <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> make take <Speech_Female> opportunities as they <Speech_Female> come up but yeah <Speech_Female> lots of advice and <Speech_Female> we are just rebuilding <Speech_Female> website and there will <Speech_Female> be a good area on <Speech_Female> there for parents in <Speech_Female> terms of resources support <Speech_Female> places to <Speech_Female> potentially <Speech_Female> by the time this is out. <Speech_Female> That might <Speech_Female> be crazy. <SpeakerChange> I should <Speech_Female> be out see. <Speech_Female> Fernand Sarah <Speech_Female> Thank you so <Speech_Female> so much for taking <Speech_Female> time and coming speech <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> led so much. <Speech_Female> And it's just <Speech_Female> it's absolutely inspiring <Speech_Music_Female> genuine. <Speech_Female> Egli <Speech_Female> thank you. Thank <Speech_Female> you for the <SpeakerChange> opportunity <Speech_Female> to speak on a CD <Speech_Female> capable <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> much <Speech_Female> audio <SpeakerChange> bullish. <Speech_Music_Male> I'm doing <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> work. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Thanks against so much <Speech_Female> to fear newness. Araf <Speech_Female> taking the time <Speech_Female> to come speak to me <Speech_Female> check out all the <Speech_Female> links on Acosta <Speech_Female> in in the notes to find out <Speech_Female> more about the DSM <Speech_Female> foundation and the various <Speech_Female> things that we talked about. <Speech_Female> If you're <Speech_Female> around come along to one <Speech_Female> of the live say want <Speech_Female> to drugs events. I'm doing <Speech_Female> in Liverpool on the <Speech_Female> twenty seventh of Feb <Speech_Female> London on the seventeenth. <Speech_Female> Thirty First March <Speech_Female> Glasgow on the fourteenth <Speech_Female> of March Oxford on <Speech_Female> the first of July <Speech_Female> and of places <Speech_Female> to be announced checkout <Speech_Female> might website. Cc <Speech_Female> gauged could you care <Speech_Female> for more information <Speech_Female> by the book <Speech_Female> please <Speech_Female> Review It <Speech_Female> on Amazon really <Speech_Female> does help <Speech_Female> at sent me pictures <Speech_Female> if you sit in the <Speech_Female> world in bookshops and <Speech_Female> see you next time <Speech_Female> where we've got another interview <Speech_Female> this time <Speech_Female> with secrets <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> drug addict <SpeakerChange> from twitter. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement>

Fernand Sarah Glasgow twitter Acosta Amazon London Liverpool
"dsm" Discussed on Say Why To Drugs

Say Why To Drugs

15:07 min | 7 months ago

"dsm" Discussed on Say Why To Drugs

"Is becoming century so yeah no it has. I think it's always a revelation to parents that. It's not statutory their kids didn't have to get it so in terms of talks. Now call at the moment. The only time that students in school have to be taught about drugs is in. Dc science which isn't necessarily going to harm you well for making safe choices about stuff but that will change so in September Twenty Twenty. It will be statutory for all state funded schools to deliver relation insect for secondary we relationships and health education imprimis relationship and health education and drugs. Now Co come under that. So that is a massive massive achievement. However and I don't mean to because it's amazing you know we should. We need to celebrate the fact that it is going to be. It's going to be something that all schools have to do but the next challenge then is is making sure that that's done well and not done badly. It's not quite different. Yeah yeah in. Terms of the guidances statutory guidance. That was out for consultation. And it's been fine lies now and there are schools from this. September that are going to be trying it out and the deer fees put six million aside for training for and kind of looking it's feedback and valuation and things but the guidance intensive drugs and alcohol. I mean it's the way that it's been written really but it but it's all in terms of people's will know so people will know and then a whole list of things whereas I think and I think the evidence base would support it. It'd be much better if it said stints will be able to because then it's about it's because it can't just be about knowledge. I think that's how they frame the whole thing so it's all about people's will now serve at everything but but in terms of the stuff that that it tends of all of these things really the rule things today but there are things you need to be able to know what you do with that. So that's the next challenge really is to is to resource and support schools to know how to do that. Well because again. There's no reason why they should know that and I do want to keep emphasizing that. I have huge huge sympathy schools and no judgement. Oh Chris nuttal because they are under so much pressure. Savigny challenges and a school doesn't exist certainly not that we've come across although I suppose we wouldn't because they would be asking us to go in but that doesn't care about their people's welfare is just how they do that is what's different so let's move away from schools now and there's a couple of things that you that. I want go into in a bit more detail. So sever you mentioned you've found buses. Can you tell us a bit more about those? Yes we have a team of us on buster's Spanning London boroughs all the way up to actually to West Wickham now not west Hollywood and they are kind of representatives within the school or or community group of the foundation. And they're there to help provide support and inform that pairs in school about the risks of drugs to actual school. But people ask usually they get eleven twelve so we preferred competitive training to equip them to support uninformed. There is a brown drug and alcohol awareness within affects pay pressure Managing Peer Pressure. Good decision making and also safeguarding. And they're fantastic resource for us in terms of bridging the gap between sort of adult and younger students in school and they bring so much to the foundation and and also so much to their peers setting. So how do the young people slain up to become a youth Well they can contact me via the foundation with an electronic very quick very easy application And then they'll be an interview Discussion about What that entails. Expect them and then And then some trying and support ongoing throughout the imitate what they want to achieve. We want to tap into their skills and talents so that they can really enjoy their time with us and also make the most of their skills and talent. Two's in them in the right way to help with the other young people fantastic and now both of you have mentioned a play so I'd love to know a little bit more about that. How did that come about that? Look like say that when I look back we did all of these things just crazily early on when we were just in complete shock couldn't just needed a way to do not think about things too much but I think when when Dante we we just left with such a passionate commitment to make sure we were doing all we kid to stop it happening because it's so avoidable. There's so many things happen in this life. There's nothing whatsoever you can do about them but this is hard from jokes. He's voidable so we started the charity registered with Companies House. Eight days after just ridiculous longer together charity registration but the play came along within That was in the accident in January but Dan neff drama. He was really good Easter fifty sixty dollars and he was in the suctions and he used to hang around in the drama studio mucking about putting on the costume zone running around in school drastically aims and and he loved his teacher and his. You know sometimes you can have special relationships with Drama teachers or one of those sorts of teachers that can have special anyway. Historical teachers absolute became one of offers trustees but she said just a few months after danae she said you know you really ought to think about drama because it can be such a powerful way of communicating a message. And I'm ashamed to say as an English teacher. I hadn't credited quite how incredibly powerful it can be. But she said this is playwright cold Mark Wheeler who I cheat. She taught him for for years. You said he writes so path for young people and Dan studied one of his place at school actually and he writes most of his plays. They're the most tree stories. And they're mostly forbidden. Place all the words in play or the actual words of the people who are in the story and she said we would. We mind if she contacted him so he said that's fine and so she did an amazingly he jumped at the opportunity. Came Straight back. You've always wanted to write a trucks play. He's written is such a cheerful chat mark. He say lovely but he writes these terribly. Sad stories about portion. Come to terrible ends. But he he was until just a couple of years ago. He was a heap all his professional create drama teacher. So He'd worked with young people and he worked. He knows what works in terms of youth drama and he's always run a you fit companies while until just very recently and when we met him he was point five drama. Teach point five Playwright and as part of his dramatic really had you third company so he came up and he was literally. This was six months after Dan died and it was all around the time of the trial and the sentencing and stuff so it was really raw looking back now and there were things. We found out through that process as well so the script itself is really raw. It's the only word I can think. Oh to use it. But he can't based something came up to Croydon. Spent a couple of days with US doing not seven to Hughes with with with me with ten. My Husband's Dad with Jacob is big brother with Jacobs Gopher with dance go friend with And with a whole bunch of his friends and recorded that he transcribed he made that into a script and then he worked for back. It took about eighteen months working on that kind of rule. Script to with his third company in South Hampton which is very much a community together. Titian thanks so they were really and very similar would've ages and they will kind of just gave their whole hearts to it. They're amazing and ended up with a play that was published by Bloomsbury in two thousand seventeen on their matthew in place young people schools list which is amazing when when he took on the commission he said. I can't make any promises. This will obviously a but it's now that play is it ended up being a two act play because there was somebody untold say much but also at ended up. Anyway it's it's it is an incredibly powerful play and that most of where that is we don't know we only know about it if somebody contacts us but we know that sold lots of copies and every now and then when we do get vestige. It's very clear that it's a lot more places than we realized. And it's being used in drama lessons. It's being used in a Batak. Gnc drama performance exams. It's being used for school productions across the UK and also overseas so we know about a production that was one in Tasmania about a year ago. There was one in Australia at Easter. There was this one school in Vancouver that stroke production moment. I'm wherever that goes that we know about the the young people that are involved in it. Just give it just the drama. Just I didn't know it has this power and I think especially with with teenagers. Actually one of the things. I absolutely love about working with teenagers is that they feel things they. I deeply care about stuff and can be so passionate about things that matter tutor before cynicism of old age. Yes yeah I think the something about that? Combination of teenagers of a powerful piece of drama. The has accardo special magic or something but the kids that are involved in productions. Get they care so much about they care so much about Dan. They care so much about all say they feel often a sense of responsibility for this message and they really want to get this message out to other people and it's so important and and then young people performing to the young people has such power as well. Because they're the age part from Timmy. Who are anxious that the rest of the characters a their age. So the young people's voices and being spoke being performed by young people we also though adapted to tour so we wanted to be able to have that play as a kind of a conscious part of our offer to schools in terms of drug education So we too long. It's ended up being and it's so difficult to get time freed up in school timetable. Because pressure so we commissioned motto adapted to talk so he shortened it forty-five minutes he adapted it for towing company for actors. And we've then commissioned a theatre in education company to take that into schools in and around London for the last three spring terms and they'll be another tool starting in January twenty twenty and that again but so it's fishing education production so it's a performance and then there's a an attractive workshop afterwards as well so again. It's not you couldn't say had the plan your nine so we've done drug education and but it's really good engagement activity it and it just. There's something about Life Theater. Which and something about the corporate experience. I think of life there too which is not like anything else is not like even sitting in the cinema watching amazing film with cinema full of other piece of something about you sort of become part of it somehow and. I think he is the English teaching but I think it's a bit more like poetry than prose. So you have to engage your imagination. I think in a way that sometimes something. That's a bit more explicit like drama on on television or film can be it tells you a bit more drama you've got to kind of that's why they're lifting that keep that well. That's why it just you have to you. It makes you engage with that much more and identify real people and so many young people never get to see live drama now. Another thing that school cups have unfortunately may difficult we funded that really. We have lost. We started asking schools to make a contribution to cook because it's so expensive. It's the most expensive thing we do. But I didn't say but I work that we do. Our work is with every every SORTA school imaginable say from some of the very most select independent schools to really struggling schools in very deprived. Two States to alternative provision faith. Schools Krems schools. Everything in between Boyce go schools because it's drugs are are say democratic. I really don't care what family or from what community you from and and for young people and especially with the role that social media can play that kind of your part of you in Habita- a much bigger world than you you than than young people who've done even just a few years ago and so it's relevant to everybody but we're so conscious that state school budgets are so tight so we do everything we possibly can for nothing. At all. In state schools we deal with the independent schools to help us do the rest of what we do. Are they generally budgets? But if anybody said we can't afford it even in the independent school because we just don't ever want to say no to any really accurate and say we madly fundraising and apply for growth. We're probably approaching the time we need to think about wrapping up but just before we finish. I just want to ask you if their parents listening to this who are worried about Children or not sure how to have conversations with their children. Is there anything from all that you've read more experienced? Is there anything you particularly? Sort of words of advice that you could give in times of conversations. I guess? Shade of conversations are those kind of preventive. Hopefully get in early when their ten eleven may be too is a good time to start all up to the conversation. Actually you know that your child's involved in something and how you have those conversations is quite different but one of the things that's really important. Is that you. Listen as well as talk that you keep that conversation open however totally natural and understandably is especially if you've got concerns to jump in with the big panicky lecture because of course you're natural instinct his apparent the first thing you want to do overwhelmingly to protect your child and say you just don't but keeping that conversation somewhere that your child can come back to you and if you have concerns than getting professional help if you need it and someone like drug fan has a helpline that you can call. If you've got concerns some Sun. That'd be right here frank. You can find.

Dan neff London September Twenty Twenty Jacob Mark Wheeler Companies House Croydon Chris nuttal US UK Dante Life Theater Batak frank South Hampton Bloomsbury Timmy Vancouver Australia
Qualcomm is at the center of 5G. Were still, almost, there.

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

07:47 min | 8 months ago

Qualcomm is at the center of 5G. Were still, almost, there.

"When it comes to rolling out five G.. There are a lot of moving parts at the heart hearts of the stories. It's qualcomm the company makes wireless chips for your phone and develops and licenses other technology in the wireless industry and it's been pushing five Gerard like future of the business hard but there are aspects of the five G. Rollout qualcomm can't control like how long it takes infrastructure to make it into you every neighborhood in the country. The company is also the subject of an F. T. C. investigation over whether it abused its monopoly. Position in four G.. Technology to charge too much for licensing. It actually settled a long-running lawsuit with apple over the same thing. Last April Cristiano Amman is the president of QUALCOMM. And we spoke about all of this at in Las Vegas starting with the promise of five G.. Basically as you bring the computational power of the cloud cloud all of the data that exists in the cloud to any device and one of the things we said in the very beginning of this transition in the five era era will develop side by side with five G.. Just because you're connected to Clo- you have a lot of data you can apply machine learning tool the data five days also technology that I think we've I've been waiting for right. We've been talking about the promise for a long time consumers. Being consumers people are getting impatient. At what point do you think people are getting frustrated. Or they're gonNA. I say this is all hype and no reality. I agree those things. Take time for you to have all of those benefits technology you have to have coverage infrastructure instructor needs to be built. There is no free lunch unless you have covers. You Not GonNa get there. We have a couple of things that would dealing with as an industry. I I if you look at United States one of the number one obstacles when you talk to operators its ability to get new sites up and they are working working with municipalities one at a time China for example have identified one million sites for five G. until the end of two thousand twenty. It also sounds like five day deployment is really important to your long term business success. I mean is there any world I can just hear the open source community city saying like listen you could potentially make some of this available for everybody to build on to accelerate the ecosystem. Well that's what we do if you were an automaker or if you're an industrial company and let's say you're Bausch and you're making manufacturing robots and you want to add five g you have to build. Put An engineering capability of a Samsung or apple. To be able to deal with this and what qualcomm offers is will provide you a license. Essence would provide you a chipset would provide a reference design. We provide your software. You can easily add seller to your robots industrial machine to your car and if you we don't have a model that is horizontal in creates eco-system. You actually prevent all of those other industries to get access to sell it. They have to build a cellular or phone company to be able to do it. And that is why we think five G. we're going to see an expansion of the licensing model not the other the other direction. Yeah this is a little bit of a left turn but we've been doing a lot of coverage on climate and how technology in the tech industry can help us adapt be more. Resilient may maybe maintain emergency communications. How do you see welcomes role in sustainability and resilience and climate conversation overall? Look I I feel I feel. It's a IT'S A. It's an interesting I agree with you. It's I didn't expect that question but The way the way we think about is I at the very basic. We're a company that developed technology for a battery powered device like we don't have the luxury extre- in into technology that we do to assume that we're going to be plugged into wall so we're probably being br building a lot of efficiency. That's no no Secret why we've been so successful in automotive because as an industry like any all of the industry really try to address How they can be more efficient consume laugh? You will consume less electricity and I think as a general. I think that's one of the things that we contribute. The other thing is by making everything connected it. There is a significant increase in productivity. Even when you think I'm trying to provide more of a vision but we always said that that every year that goes by you do more of your work and your phone And I think that's going to change over time with everything connected enact productivity people will be able to Damore to work at home. They won't be able to connect with other people without having to be there and I think there's a lot of in direct benefits of basically providing technology that allow everything to be connected. I do as long as we're in our awkward questions phase WanNa talk about licensing Because parts of that business model of come under scrutiny qualcomm Ben in a long legal battle with the Federal Federal Trade Commission over whether some of those this licensing agreements have reached monopoly status. Do Plan to approach five licensing any differently in light of those disputes. Look there's so much I can tell you about. You know the dispute. I think other than the public statements were made. Were very pleased and was the right decision. You know for us to be granted at stay and I. I think we're waiting for the appeal. But we can tell you is we. We actually have a very vibrant Licensed business more though. That equi enables competition competition. We're very pleased that we have many companies that sign a five t license with qualcomm independent of the dispute in even post the ruling and That validation that you know we have a competitive business model and actually won the provides growth in competition industry. All right last question because you first joined qualcomm. Welcome in Nineteen Ninety five when the company was just ten years old. And you've left income back since then but I just. I wonder what that journey has been like in this entire ecosystem system. It's an. It's an incredible company. Actually I was fortunate enough to join before the first. CDMA network was able to see. Every single transition of wireless ARLEDGE LENDS EIGHTY FIVE THIRTY ONE G two G to three G. to four G. Five G. so I've been to all of those it's really fascinating to see how seller changed the society. It's one of those few opportunities dead and I think all of our employees feel that you can work on something that you actually no that changed the society and It's also interesting to see that we. We may bet that everybody. In each one of those bats knowing exception told us that's That's not gonNA work or there's no need for this and And we'll we'll be able to see as we state with their vision to transformation and I don't WanNa go back all the way to CMA. But I'll tell you an example when when when we first talk about four g you know it was fascinating to see. All of the analysts on their blackberrys sending emails to each other saying a WHO needs a hundred megabits per phone. Nobody needs it. I have living I need to have my email I have all of the. DSM is good enough for email and blackberrys now and Ns US and now we see people say hi. Paul needs to be connected with the cloud and you know multiple gigabits of Speed Woolsey. Cristiano Amman is the president of QUALCOMM. All Com we spoke at. CAS in Las

Qualcomm Cristiano Amman Apple President Trump Las Vegas F. T. C. LAS United States Samsung Gerard Bausch Instructor Federal Federal Trade Commissi Damore Paul China
"dsm" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

03:29 min | 9 months ago

"dsm" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"AM right here on news radio six ninety K. DSM comfort away by a sweater and send lifesaving ice to a polar bear cub for send up the space shuttle or as New Mexico and save the earth with the new ERA beat carbon credit card your shoulder just at another press conference basically repeating what he said that this morning's press conference citing some bogus Washington post poll it says seventy percent of Republicans want the witnesses sixty four percent of Republicans want the way this is why does the president want to clear his name why doesn't the president want to present evidence if you didn't do it Hey that's not how it works you guys have to present the evidence that he did a new habit you don't have any yes it takes me off and I hi I am but if you get a deal with the legitimate I just got a new look at best you can the thing I realized he doesn't just make me man I know all of you who see at the same reaction to what I do not watching this stuff in the back and these people are actually they're digging a grave there literally digging a grave for themselves and they are not stopping if they don't have the discipline Hey if you're traveling for the holidays you are a light glare relying on free wifi somewhere it's offered in airports hotels coffee shops a lot of places and it's a great convenience for people but you should know that if you're using that free wifi it it's probably very insecure why should take on secure and even if it's password protected it's a likely not locked down because they're not going to go to the expense are not charging you for it it's free so they're not going to go to a lot of expensive curing it they're gonna leave that up to you and you can do something about it you can make yourself invisible on any network Iran with a V. P. M. every wifi network that's free there's a hacker somewhere nearby playing around seeing if an act you can identify everybody on that network checking to see maybe if he can in fact every machine that's connected to that the port plant malware on it for the fun of it or for actual damage but I hacker can't plant something on your device if we can't see it you could be sitting right next to the hacker on your iPhone or your your android device whichever you can be sitting right next to it he can be on his computer looking at everybody on the network and trying to find out a way to get in he will not see you you're sitting right next to it he will not see your connection if you are on a VPN that is a lot of VPNs it's a burgeoning business whatever you do don't go for one that's free I guarantee you they're collecting data on you and selling it somebody the best VPN we found we look long and hard because when it's a burgeoning business Norton secure VPN is the best three dollars thirty three cents a month and five devices you can connect.

K. DSM
Best Nintendo Switch Games Of 2019

Nintendo Voice Chat

09:31 min | 10 months ago

Best Nintendo Switch Games Of 2019

"Let's start it off with game of the year. Okay just to get the big the big. I guess it's not really an elephant in the room. I mean we talked about running for But Tom what were the nominees for the Nintendo game of the year for Nintendo Channel Game of the year. The nominees were three houses. pokemon sorting shield Luigi mentioned three supermarine maker to and the legend of Zelda Link's awakening. What a that's that's a pretty good year I party lineup to went back and looked at our lists from last year from twenty eighteen and it was really really good year right but like the the first party titles for is basically just poke them on smash pretty much and comparatively to xbox playstation? There's really really strong showing from Nintendo killed it. The three three of those were in our overall game of the year nominees as well whereas there were no there. There were no Playstation four or xbox one exclusives in our nominees for your overall essentially the middle of the switches life cycle than. It's pretty much kicking. But that's a that's a nice center point. We're in year three if the life cycle of this machine is more like the handheld like Dsm Gameboy. It'll be way longer. Yes the mid point is like in ten years or something. Yeah towards the last seven to ten years. That's when they sent out the garbage. And the Mario and Luigi Abby abby inside bouncers or what. We're going to tell people what one we're gonNA tell. Everyone went wine so we discussed extensively on a previous show Brian. I don't think you're yeah because I think you might have had a different opinion. What but I think most of US settled on? Fire emblem three houses. Probably being pick injury tunnel and and that is the one that won so gene has crown three houses as Nintendo game of the year and also won in people's choice awards for Nintendo switch game as Adema Adamus four percent of the vote choosing fire him. Because that's totally in tune with our community. I I think I mean honestly. LOSERS MANSION LINK'S AWAKENING POK MON monuments. And they're all really good game like if I score them they for me. They're all eight point five to nine point five range game and and then we also you know a couple we saw when we put out our nominations we saw a couple of people being worse. astral chain we only do five nine knees and I think if you asked her on the office probably probably astral train would be number six in that stray right it was Nintendo. Just had a really really good exclusive year. Even you know I didn't give it had huge glowing explosive review but like even though she's crafted world was fun. Game was a game this year. I think there's something like fourteen. Switch exclusive assist man crazy. Yeah I just I just talked about it and what happens when you don't support to systems at the same time this put it that way. I think that if you you look at or listen to NBC episodes from a year ago there was probably in the same way. We're looking at twenty twenty right now. There was hopefulness but also like a little bit of maybe be paranoia or skepticism. About how the year would roll out a year without like a big flagship. Three D Zelda or Big Three D Mario Game ultimately ultimately gave a lot of room to move around in for some of the slightly smaller. Ip's in their stable. And I'm pretty happy about that Firearms like not really my thing. But I think it's absolutely deserving to win link's awakening obviously from you as my favorite Nintendo exclusive deal but that's it's impossible with a separate fee from nostalgia. I'm feeling I mean the thing for me that I love about firearm limits. That Zach was such a can of like nick. He said. I'll check it out but I'm not gonNA play it much. And then he ended up completely getting lost in that game loving it and that just shows that firearm limbs taken another a step from being what we're really used to be this niche turn based strategy game to be something much much bigger and I think we'll see at the end of the. I think the sales are going to be really really impressive for that title. And I'm hopeful that this franchise will continue and continue to kind of experiment like this was a step in the right direction. Splitting the game into multiple copies apiece. That you had to buy like Pokemon was not a step in the right direction. Arise as Nice as it was to get that many. There's just so much in in three houses so you can play it again and get a different story. Yes Yeah I think like Zach story with this game is sort of symbolic of the larger story that's happening with a lot of people would switch You have lapsed gamers whereas you have new gamers and yet people that may never would have bought one of these things before are going in and connecting with these franchises for the first time. And that's really awesome and I think that was the hope with a game like Mario in rabbits to right there. That's a turn based strategy game and I think he was hoping that more people would pick it up. With the Mario Franchise sadly you know it didn't get quite that huge mainstream success and it was a really good game to it did pretty well. Yeah that's all that's I think that's the least for a while. Was the best selling third party. Switch which game yeah. Maybe we'll get a second one next year but I still want more you. RPG in that engine also shout out to Our best platformer of two thousand nine hundred supermarine maker to go away. Yes or that also won another major league best platformer should just be sponsored by Nintendo at this point that category brought to you by Nintendo. Because they are they kind of impossible to unseat in that carry despite some really good indie games coming out now in the platform of category. Still kind of own it to Super Mario Mario Maker is just ridiculous. Yeah the amount of stuff you can do with this. It was also cool that like just as we're having these conversations that game of the year to have an excuse to revisit that game and get the Master Sword which I did over the weekend so we should mention. Though the overall winner the overall winner was control and some lake and and friends MHM remedy. And I know this is a game that Janet really like Joe Championed and but our people's Choice Award was too straining which was a very divisive title here in the Office It was one of those games that I actually haven't been able to put that much time into it. They play like three hours and I did not get into even the me of that. Game is like dig it. It's Sifi animal. We'll crossing the chores and carrying around packages. I I like it. It's it's kind of Kooky but I I will admit that I can see a lot of people being put off by the game and in how repetitive it becomes after a while but like. I think it's really cool I forgot what the final tally was. Way over fifty. Thousand people voted for their Game of the year in the in the reader's choice awards and You know like Some Years Nintendo game will win both readers choice and our editorial Toyota pick across my arms but this year. You know the While we had multiple nominees fire MLB didn't quite make it into the into the top spot. It was I mean I think we knew a few months ago at least even probably halfway through the year that this was going to be really interesting year especially for game of the year stuff because the way it Kinda shook out was that there was a couple the front runners but then a bunch of games are also immensely popular and tied with a sort of third place voting area. The resident evil remake was very very very close. Yeah Yeah it was very close runner up and on. I think it's just there weren't very many stand out what masterpiece games sear like the last year like God of war in red dead came out in saint like that liberal college like fallen order was really good but it's also rough around the edges. Yeah performance issues issues and bugs and same with things awakening. Here's a good example. And obviously reviews are an individual's opinion but last year in twenty eighteen. We gave three tens and in two thousand nineteen we we and the years not done but having any right so that's I think a really good example bat said we gave like at least half a dozen. I think more board games and nine five right like this. This was exactly what you said right. It was a really good year of just create games really good games across the board but nothing that really just blew the roof off and stood out to everyone right right. Yeah when I tweeted out my favorite games this year listen I was kind of sort of taken aback at the variety. not only in genre but Like some of these games were incredibly tiny. Little Indie Games and others were massive. Triple A.. Action platforming games and stuff like that and it's really cool to see that there and then some VR games in there too. It's really cool to see just a mix of all that stuff this year. It'll be interesting next year. You know like like the kind of game of the year award. Darlings like Nintendo's Mario Zelda team were absent as rockstar naughty dog and stuff so it's GonNa be interesting next year with the new consuls and new Halo Halo in last of us. And see what we get from Nintendo with new councils. You always see Teams are sort of like figuring stuff out and there's that sort of like those hiccups that happened around on launch but intended is going to be really in the thick of solidifying. The switch is one of the best new platforms ever made. But we're going to get like their flagship title next year for as we know right now is animal Oh crossing which has historically never really one game of the year sort of like death straining and then it's pretty divisive games a Strand Strand on it is it is the national strategy gale and I love it. Ah Love Animals crossings. All that hurt me. That hurt me to here. I do want to give one shot out to our best strategy of winter which is sleigh. The spire fire which I could tell something was up the spot and get to say one of my favorite games.

Nintendo Mario Mario Maker Luigi Abby Zach United States TOM MLB NBC Adema Adamus DSM Brian Twenty Twenty Toyota Nick Janet JOE
The Urban Legend of the Slavemaster

Haunted Places

08:05 min | 11 months ago

The Urban Legend of the Slavemaster

"If you had an email account in the year two thousand you probably received a version of this cryptic message if a guy by the name as the slave master you're Chain emails for one of the most ubiquitous forms of early electric communication some were offers of money eh some were warnings that only forwarding this email could save your family from homicidal mental patients ghosts or curses some would supposedly be mother Theresa demanding you pass a painting of Jesus around the Web if you did not your family would die but hidden among the ridiculous warnings were some grains of sincerity while the victim cop may not have inaccurate there there was a man probably the Internet looking for young women to brutalize and the Web was trying to protect them from him he went by my name's but the most memorable was slave master the slave master is coming for you in terms of email subject lines it was bold enough to get anyone's attention Gabriel this is the first time I saw it in his inbox he deleted the email and forgot all about it but it kept showing up his mother said wanted his grandmother scented his great uncle sent it somehow this email kept finding its way back into Gabes inbox waiting to be read then betty went missing and Gabe open the email Gabes little sister always had taste for danger the night before she vanished betty had excitedly told him that she was finally going to meet the love of her life in person they'd it online and had been emailing back and forth for months Gabe had made her promise that she would be careful she told him he didn't need to be afraid of the intern age and she never came home the police tried to find her but missing person it's cases were difficult at the best of times they had almost no evidence to go on Betty's history was checkered to put it mild play any number of bad people in her life could have taken her or lured her out of town narrowing it down seemed almost impossible since her body had not been found yet the investigators were frozen by infinite possibilities Gabe wasn't about to wait around for his little sister Mr to turn up as the teaser in law and order episode if the police couldn't help he would find her on his own Gabe scrubbed through betty slide off meeting every person she talked to her job and her neighborhood but he kept thinking about those emails the ominous warnings that he got from everyone everyone except Betty Gabe finally clicked on the latest email there was a man add the email read who liked to prey on young women through DSM Internet message boards using the handle slave master he'd earn their trust and then set up a meeting the women were never seen again it was the end of the email that disturbed in the most the theories the writer had about what happened to the women maybe they'd been dumped into a barrel acid their bones disintegrating into a stinking human soup maybe the slave master lived on a secluded farm or he fed his victims a king bodies to pigs maybe he made furniture out of their body parts and sold it online it was all too easy to picture his sister golden hair laying the muck on some piece of farmland an arm half chewed a leg bone next to a pile of manure the silver cross she always wore around her neck sticking out of the dirt Gabe couldn't explain this particular email got under his skin but some part of him knew that this was her fate may be was intuition maybe it was something greater some force urging him towards justice he knew he should have stopped at handing the e mail over to the investigators he should have sought closure instead of barreling into a lion's den but all he could think of was his little sister lost it alone in the dark thinking no one cared about her maybe she was being held somewhere maybe she could still be rescued he defense nightmare had come true he needed to find her body he needed to lay her to rest

Study: Psychiatric Diagnoses Are 'Scientifically Meaningless' In Treating Mental Health

Dr. Daliah

06:58 min | 1 year ago

Study: Psychiatric Diagnoses Are 'Scientifically Meaningless' In Treating Mental Health

"Okay so this time I caught my eyes where psychiatric diagnoses are called a scientifically meaningless this is not something you usually see in headlines and the timing couldn't be any more worse cross my legs there could be any worse because we're trying to grapple with how we deal with our mental health and how to find the next shooter or the next you know Boston Marathon bomber you know or the next terrorist and you know we're we're trying to you know get a grip on how to diagnose and how to identify if we have a disgruntled employee and then we come in we find out that one of psychiatric diagnoses you might not have enough scientific merit and this study that was published in psychiatry research and it concluded that psychiatric diagnoses are scientifically quote worthless as tools to identify discrete mental health disorders this comes from the university of Liverpool so basically what they did a lot of the DSM an art diagnostic manual are are DSM four is kind of our Bible when it comes to psychiatric disorders that there really is our Bible when it comes to that and they look at that and they found that psychiatric diagnoses all use a different decision making roles that there was a huge amount of overlap in symptoms and that almost all diagnoses mask the role of trauma an adverse events and they say diagnoses tell us a little about the individual patient and what treatment they need now some of you may be like Hallelujah praise the lord it's about time somebody calls it like it is and I I know there's a lot of you out there many of you have emailed saying I got a diagnosis of depression or anxiety and I don't have that in so it is very subjective he I'm training that I got as a family medicine doctor we got a lot I it's not enough not enough for me to be confident doing psychiatry in my practice so I generally just like I treat I would diagnose mild anxiety mild depression I would diagnose I came up with this idea of you having low serotonin and that being a condition and maybe your low serotonin is making you here in a ball and causing insomnia and making you grumpy and giving you a bad day in giving you Val problems are causing your blood pressure to spike and so I would try some of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications and a lot of times we found great success but I was really reluctant to give you a diagnosis of major depressive disorder or anxiety disorder or adjustment disorder or you know another sort of of mental health diagnosis and it is subjective and unfortunately insurance companies have forced us doctors to give you a diagnosis because if I see you as a patient and you let's say we've talked about this on air a lot let's say you want to fall asleep on a plane and if you want some Xanax because it helps you fall asleep on a plane and then you can wake up and get out well when I was using an ex for insomnia and you don't really have insomnia you just want to fall asleep on a long flight so I don't wanna why so I have to choose okay well are you using a just a fall asleep insurance once a cult to pay for that visit and for us to write a medication like that I got to give them a call so then well do you have a little anxiety are you able to falsely but yeah I guess I don't see Paul on the plane may because of that so you get the diagnosis of anxiety but you really don't have anxiety that's not your diagnosis and so were forced to come up with diagnoses all the time maybe that's a pro with medicine maybe it's all about diagnoses well you have high blood pressure you have diabetes you have this person who's at risk for heart disease I don't know what it is eat like crap you're overweight you smoke you got a lot of family history of stuff why do I have to give you seven to ten different diagnoses we got the ICD ten code with millions of codes and you know these cold snow falling for life because we have electronic medical records so now we have you know more more patients one alive they don't want their diagnosis of anxiety to follow them because they may want to own a gun later and just because they wanted Sam axe to fall asleep on a flight they don't want that to prevent them from being able to exercise their second and the rights and so we're we're kind of in this Max and so psychiatry is there are certain diseases that afflicts people that are very very obvious that are very unpredictable we could very consistently diagnose such as like schizophrenia or major depressive disorder or an addictive personality or you know narcissism histrionic antisocial attention deficit but you know I come to learn that attention deficit is more of a symptom rather than a diagnosis you know people say yeah my kid as ADHD and so my second question is why why well does he have autism does he have as workers does he have hypoglycemia does he have a thyroid disorder these attention deficit could be a symptom of something else and so sometimes we get to the diagnosis of wood but we stop it there because well we got a right there by the hands of the concern of the medication well why isn't anybody asking why so what's good about this study is it makes this kind of re look at how we approach psychiatry and how we approach a patient that may have a mental health issue but do we really need to stigmatize do we really need to diagnose everybody you know if somebody can't sleep or somebody doesn't like the mother in law or somebody has a fight with their spouse or somebody doesn't want to be in Los for Christmas or if somebody you know is sick and tired of smelling dog crap in the house you know and they you know don't know how to deal does that really mean they have a mental condition you know so these are things that I think we do have to talk about I do not want anybody taking this headline to think that whatever they were diagnosed with this poppycock that's not the case okay you know if you were diagnosed with a mental health condition there's a very good chance you'll have that right there's a lot of overlap and when I hear people use the term bi polar all their bi polar all right where they diagnosed with bi polar I mean you didn't really have bipolar do they really have the press to do they really have anxiety I think we might need to re look at when we actually label and

NASA JPL Hacked

SPACE NEWS POD

03:09 min | 1 year ago

NASA JPL Hacked

"Hello. And welcome back to the space news pod. A daily podcast where we discuss space science and tech. space station. I'm your host And according will to Walden a report in on on Forbes this episode. dot com, Massa the GPO. deep space network The Jet DSM Propulsion array Laboratory of radio has telescopes had its computer and numerous systems hacked. other GPL Hackers systems got into were the system. affected during this hack They and Johnson enter Space the system Center, who's through responsible a raspberry for pi the international computer space station and disconnected, then. completely Hecht further from into the system, the network not just just GPO to make sure at one point, that nothing the were to international happen space to the station ISS was amongst other in programs. jeopardy And they of said being that part of of these these Johnson's attacks. attacks. officials But But were concerned the cyberattacks luckily, luckily, we we could had had move some some engineers engineers laterally from on on the board board gateway into at at their mission Massa Massa systems, that that potentially were were up up gaining access, to to and the the task task initiate to stop initiating the hackers malicious to signals stop basically to human unplug spaceflight the systems that use that were those systems. in contact So basically, what with happened the. is ISS hackers found a before way the hackers not got gonna control go into too much technical of the detail international here. But there's. Security violations. There is no ticket resolutions, and there were delays in patching security vulnerabilities that were known by auditors. So what happened was Hecker is basically targeted a system JPL, and they found backdoors into other parts of NASA systems administrators lax security certificates, no role based security training was in place, GPO, and unlike masses main security operation center, it didn't have a round, the clock incident reporting capability, so things like this are very important to security as far as NASA goes, and our people in space, as well as all the science that could be happening at NASA. And if hackers were to intrude on that and deleted information, well, that would be a sad day for science for Hugh. Humanity in Massa is a big target masses. High-profile target and Mike Thompson. Who's a security analysts said many purely associate them with space related activities, but their depth of research and development includes patents covering, cutting edge science, that nation states would literally kill for the hackers might still be in their network, without them, even knowing it.

Massa Massa Massa Nasa Jet Dsm Propulsion Array Labor Johnson ISS Mike Thompson Walden Hecht JPL Hecker Hugh
"dsm" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"dsm" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"All right, guys. Let's get back to the show. Yeah. You know, the funny thing is they'll do like the shortest aggression ever, but I love that. You're even bringing this up because I feel like there's always cool stuff in psychology that I want to talk about on the show. But because my shows an interview show, I end up being like let me talk about me. I feel kind of guilty. But there is this view of the DSM. So the Dems, diagnostic and statistical manual they call it like the psychiatrist bible. It's the way you diagnose things you go through and it's the menu. Yes menu. Exactly. There's also the which is the physician's thing and it has more than just mental illness in it. But DSM is mostly mental illness. So you got all the different diagnoses. It's changed over the years. There's we're in the five. Now, I was trained on the four TR the four text revision, so the five is, like, what now that I'm back in grad school, after ten years, I'm like, it's all new and weird in different. And they're these two I mean, there's probably a lot of kind of hypotheses or takes philosophies on it. But there's these two. Main ones that we often talk about, which is the categorical model and the dimensional model. So the categorical model is that like you diagnose, there, these categories, you either have the thing or you don't like in their certain disorders where it's kind of obvious. Right. Like that person has schizophrenia. You can kind of tell that's always the go-to schizophrenia, or but there are also some like sort of personality sorters like borderline personality disorder where they're like a little bit more obvious. And then there's this view, that's the dimensional view, which is the view that I subscribe to, which is that everything's on a continuum. And everybody has everything little tiny bit, and it becomes diagnosis. Once it interferes enough with your daily functioning. Right. So is it interfering with your interpersonal relationships?.

DSM ten years
Why Do Some People Eat Dirt?

BrainStuff

06:17 min | 1 year ago

Why Do Some People Eat Dirt?

"Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Vogel. Von here in gas stations and flea markets. All around the southeastern United States, you can find packets or boxes containing crumbles whiteclay in Kenya. You can buy reddish dirt on the street formed into little pellets that look like baby carrots in Uganda. You can buy Yankee doodle brands dirt at the grocery store, a website called earth's. Klay store sells Klay from all over the world and ships them right to your home. But what are you supposed to do with it? When it gets to you. Well, you eat it. You might have a vague sense that you've heard of people eating dirt before pregnant women. Maybe pica is the overarching term for craving and eating things that are not food in the sixth century, see the physician Flavius Asia's noticed people sticking nonfood items in their mouths the way that Magpies pica in Latin pick up random objects in their beaks e figured these people had entirely indiscriminate appetites for just any old thing and termed the behavior after the magpie. It turns out pica is kind of misnomer because pica cravings are actually very specific though. According to the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders or DSM. It includes a range of behaviors some people crave paperclips, batteries or coins. These potentially dangerous cravings are considered by the DSM to be actual disorders. But pica can also include cravings for Ross starch that's amylase g ice, that's pathogen and dirt. That's geology. Geology is one form of pica found an almost every country in the world. We spoke with Sarah young assistant, professor in the department of anthropology at Northwestern University. She said I was surprised when I first saw it. I was studying pregnant women nog Raphy in Zanzibar. And I asked a woman what she ate when she's pregnant, and incidentally, she said every day, I take earth from this wall and eat it. I was just learning. Sahelian was pretty good at it. But I really didn't think I was understanding correctly. My research assistant was like, yeah. You heard right. Young ended up writing her PHD dissertation on geology and winning the Margaret Mead award in twenty thirteen for her book craving earth, which detailed her research about geology practices worldwide in her research. Young tracked down medical literature historical texts research on animal behavior soil science in parasitology and came to the conclusion that there are four possible explanations. As to why people eat dirt. The most common longest running take on geology is that there's no good reason for it that it's a pathology. It's an aspirin behavior of some unknown origin, young explained, the racism sexism and classism behind that simplistic, take, quote, it's the women they know not what they do explanation. It was basically white men writing about this for the past few hundred years, and it was dismissed as abberant we can refute this. There are so many species of animals that go to great risk to get clan. Charcoal like the coldest monkey that steals charcoal from villagers, but even so we know very little about geology because for centuries. Scientists were stubbornly lacking curiosity about it. When scientists did start looking into it, the first hypothesis they came up with to explain why hundreds of thousands of people worldwide craven eat dirt is that. There must be something useful in the clay micronutrients of some kind young said the mother nature's multivitamin explanation is a really intuitive one. But. Fortunately, it doesn't really shake out for starters. Although the Klay her study participants in Zanzibar were eating was tinged with red indicating iron content investigations into whether that iron could be absorbed and used by the body came up empty, plus according to young people generally prefer whiter Klay. If you give geologist to the option of snacking on Georgia, white Kaelin or the reddish clay found on men's bar. They'll almost always pick the white Kaelin, which does not contain iron. So we turn to another hypothesis could hurt provide protection from germs the explanation that eating dirt somehow an immune system boost might not make sense on the surface. After all we're supposed to stay away from dirt wash our hands cleaner, close take off our shoes when we enter the house, but clay face masks can draw germs and oils and dead cells from your skin, and they're made of dirt. Right. According to young eating clay might collect stuff inside of the gut similar to how a mud mask collect stuff from your face. But why would somebody need an intestinal mud mask? The answer is protection from pathogens and harmful compounds many harmful microorganisms and compounds can enter your body via the things you eat. You digest the food and it's absorbed through the wall of your intestine and into your bloodstream, but lots of potentially harmful stuff can get to his in this way to Klay may stimulate the mucous membranes on the surface of your guts to create more mucus, thus forming a sort of protective barrier against those pathogens and compounds young said, it can also bind with whatever harmful thing you're eating for example, in the Andes people eat wild potatoes, which contain these toxic chemicals called glencoe alkaloids. But after they dip the potatoes in clay, they become safe to eat. But while eating clay might protect from pathogens and harmful chemicals, which is especially important in pregnant women. There's something of Goldilocks principle at play here. You want to shield yourself from the harmful stuff, but you also don't want to protect yourself from the nutrients you need, for example, if you eat a steak that's full of both bioavailable iron and pathogens. But you eat clay at the same time. The iron could also become bound by the clay and wouldn't be absorbed by your gut, although the claim might be protecting you from pathogens to some extent. It's also preventing you from absorbing the nutrients the fourth hypothesis for why people eat dirt or clay is that it might help nausea vomiting and diarrhea by coating stomach after all a number of anti-diarrhea treatments. Have Kaylynn in them. Kaelin puts the KO in kopech tape. Though, the reasons for geology are still rather mysterious young stresses that it's far more common than we realize partially because of those old stigmas against it. Young said people don't like to talk about it or admit it when I'm doing ethnic, graphic interviews. I always ask how much earth do eat instead of do you eat earth? Because so many people have sworn they don't eat it. And later told me that they do, but they lied because I didn't want you to think I was

Klay Zanzibar Klay Store Uganda Young Lauren Vogel United States Kenya Nausea Margaret Mead Kaylynn Flavius Asia Northwestern University Research Assistant Kaelin Sahelian Aspirin Ross
Pets on Planes: Are Emotional Support Animals Legit?

Science Vs

04:40 min | 1 year ago

Pets on Planes: Are Emotional Support Animals Legit?

"The show that pits facts against furry friends on your flight. These days. It's starting to feel like aeroplanes a going to the dogs. People with anxiety depression, bringing their pets onboard because they saving me them for motion support during flights, and it's happening more and more often. American Airlines says that in twenty seventeen they allowed more than one hundred and fifty thousand animals for emotional support to fly on their planes. That's fifty thousand more animals than the previous year. Meanwhile, the animals people I using four emotional support a getting quite unconventional. It's not just dog and cats owners are now getting emotional support from a range of animals pig. Monkey Turkey duck. Kangaroo and now up peacock tried to take flight two. On one point you have people saying that they really need if a baby on the plane, Sydney Torok at her emotional support, squirrel daisy boarded the frontier airlines flight, they told me I had to get off the plane that they do not accept rodents. How was that flight flying without daisy, your squirrel, it was emotional on the other Pau these animals ruffling feathers? I mean, these dogs cropping all over the place and even biting the passengers a lot of people are looking at the situation and saying what a crock so in today's Minneapolis owed Wegener find out if this a load of crock, oh these animals really helping people out on their flights. Emotional support animals, unlike guide dogs, they haven't been trained for a specific purpose. So to bring one of these animals onto a plane, you basically need to tell the airline that you'll catch to a dog. Go Turkey is helping you with a condition recognized in the DSM that's the psychiatrist bible and a lot of people bring their pets on planes because they say it helps them with things like anxiety or depression. The way through the research on a motion support animals we called up how Hertzog at western Carolina university because he's been studying animals for decades old kinds of animals. So I spent a lot of time in swamps knee-deep in water calling baby alligators in their moms. And you wanna know what? Baby. Alligator sounds like exactly what I wanted to know they goes out, and that's telling its momma, it's here. And then if you grabbed the baby start, for example, pinching it toes, and it starts to feel some pain that starts screaming for its mom. Sounds like girl. Oh, why would you do that? How why would you do that? It's it's ci-. Question is that from you people how has moved on from pinching baby alligators. And he's a professor who studies and through zoology, which is a fancy word for the science of human animal relations. So right off the bat. How told me that when it comes to animals and stress they eat something he'll the evidence that some animals can reduce stress in the short term for some people is actually extremely good. There are a lot of studies that have shown that and it's very good evidence. If for example, petting a dog for many people not everybody, but it can reduce blood pressure, reduce heart rate, really just from petting a dog. Yeah. Very good evidence. Very good. For example. One study found that when Keats were getting their blood drawn having a dog in the room made them feel less distressed and even made this stress hormones guard down on the studies found similar staff, and how has seen the power of perches fest hand like there was this. Therapy dog that he saw at Charlotte airport, and it had a vest. That said pet me here for half an hour. I just watched people walk by this dog dog's name was Dylan in the number of people that just bit down and petted that dog for just a couple seconds and talk to it. And maybe kids gave it a hug was just stunning. I played with them too. And it made me feel a little better dogs can make you feel good. The you know what else can a blanket? Yeah. Researches at Yale gave kids either blankie or a dog to play with and found that both of them made the kids feel less anxious. So this is my answer to the therapy dog problem that airplane are dealing with now blankie.

Professor American Airlines Turkey Hertzog Sydney Torok Peacock Charlotte Western Carolina University Minneapolis Yale Wegener Keats Dylan
"dsm" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"dsm" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Is genetically over determined impulse in uncontrollable urge nestled in our DNA, then punishing pedophile must be morally wrong this with Alli Olympic rights, science culture. Increasingly medical is as bad behavior finding a neurological components to everything from alcoholism to youth violence. We run the parallel risks of either absolving everyone for everything or punishing criminals or no guiltier than cancer patients. What science has revealed says lift wick about the moral medical roots of pedophile? Of course. Ambiguous. What is clear is that the binary choice laid out above is an over-simplification the medical community, which started to view pedophilia as a disease rather than a crime in the nineteenth century has amassed evidence that at least some violent and antisocial behaviors have genetic links and signposts researchers have been unable to isolate a biological cause for pedophilia or even to agree on a personality. Profile not to mention the terrific confusion within the medical community and defining what this disease really involves until a few years ago. For example, the DSM for the psychiatric associations diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders defined pedophilia. As disease only if the sufferers fantasies sexual urges or behaviors cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social occupational or other important areas of functioning in other words, it non impaired remorseless pedophile was apparently perfectly healthy, by the way. It is worth noting. That is exactly the same language that the DSM five now us with regard to transgenderism they suggest that transgenderism is not in fact, mental disorder unless it causes clinically significant distress or impairment, so. We will. We have been doing is medicalising transgenderism is not since pedophilia. Transgenderism is an adult making a decision presumably to behave in a certain way that does not impact other people in violation of their consent. Pedophilia is of course, the exploitation of children. I keep repeating this. Because they're going to be people who don't understand the argument that I'm making and seek to conflicts all of these things they are not the same. But the point that I'm making is that when we medical is evil, then we also run into the danger of suggesting that human behavior is not controllable, and that we are not responsible for our actions. And that is the death of a civilization. We'll talk about that in just a second. But first, let's talk about going to the post office. Nobody really has time to go to the post office. You're busy.

Transgenderism DSM
"dsm" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

The Virtual Couch

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"dsm" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

"So I want to get to a really good article by a PHD in sociology. Your name's Kristen nil stead, and she does a lot of research or research backgrounds in gender, sexuality sexual assault. But I love how she says in her bio writing about the dynamics of psychologically emotionally abusive relationships and doing socio promote awareness and providing evidence based understanding of hidden abuse. Because I think that is in fact, what happens a lot when people are in relationships with people who struggle with in PD, narcissistic personality disorder is that they are they are going through this hidden abuse. And she wrote an article called types of narcissists, including one to stay away from it all costs, and and actually let's do this real quick. Let's take a step back before we get into this article. Let me discover the diagnostic institute. Manual for mental disorders DSM five. And that is what we professionals use for diagnosis. So let's talk about what what the DSM five guidelines are for narcissistic personality disorder and actually before that is kind of fun. Let's let's talk about personality disorders in general. So okay, I saw this last and before that, but before we even get to personality disorders and just got so many things down here in my notes, but before we get to personality disorders. It's kind of important to know again in psychoanalysis, we've got these two terms once called ego sin tonic and one is called ego tonic. So so just bear with me for a second egos. Send tonic refers to the behaviors values and feelings that are in harmony with or acceptable to the needs or goals of the ego. Or they're consistent with one's ideal self image. The reason why that's important is when someone has a personality disorder. It's important to note that that what they're going through there. Experiences in life are typically in harmony with or acceptable to the needs or goals of their ego or consistent with their self image. Meaning when something's egos and tonic it means that the person what they're what they're experiencing this personality disorder is core to their central being of who they are. They feel like this is acceptable. And it meets the needs of their ego or it's consistent with their own self image. So this is that part that so hard to repre heads around where someone struggling with the personality disorder is just doing them. They're just living their life. And so they don't understand why people just don't admit that they are amazing or just do the things that they want them to do in their view people. Just did this. Everyone would just be so much better off. So ego dishonest is the opposite. So it's referring to thoughts and behaviors or dreams or compulsions or desires that sort of thing that are in conflict or dissonant with the needs and goals of the ego or encompassed with their their ideal self image. So ego dishonest things are things like depression, anxiety OCD. So it's things that. Go against the person who we want to be. And so they're things that we don't want and things that we have awareness of and things that we are going to work on so take that now and go for with now, we're talking about personalities orders, so personality disorders are a class of mental disorders, characterized by enduring maladaptive patterns of.

DSM Kristen assault OCD
"dsm" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"dsm" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"There's no entry in the DSM on homosexuality. Now entry at all. In nineteen eighty-seven the two hundred and thirty seven words that Robert Spitzer wrote about ego dis- Donna homosexuality were quietly removed. Meanwhile, the APA turned itself upside down in one thousand nine hundred seventy ninety percent of the American psychiatric association believed that homosexuality was a pathology today. Ninety percent believe that it's normal variant of sexual behavior. No more pathological than something like left handedness. In fact, it's now considered unethical to treat homosexuality in any psychiatrists who attempt to change the sexual orientation of his patient can face professional censure. If a gay person finds his sexual preference disturbing if he's interested in becoming heterosexual, and there are many people who fit this description de APA guidelines suggest that the therapist council has patient that changes impossible. My family always told me that my grandfather single handedly changed the DSM, but what's striking is all the different forces that had to be in place in order to make this happen. It took both Evelyn Hooker. And Dr anonymous John piece beagle. And Ronald gold people on the outside people on the inside and people at every point in between the change happened partly through scientific debate and partly simply because psychiatrists got to know gay, man. There. A couple of interesting postscript to the story..

American psychiatric associati Robert Spitzer Evelyn Hooker Donna one thousand nine hundred seve Ninety percent
"dsm" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

The Virtual Couch

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"dsm" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

"And it's kind of interesting to see also thanks research from bidding clearly outside you of of what are some of the nation's as well, as it would it could be I, you know, as an educational psychologist. I wouldn't be able to try to any of those kinds of theories, that's all it is at this point. But you know, over the passage of time, I think that will be flushed out to figure out what what exactly is is going on. Is there arise in it? Because of inherent visibility is increase disability, increasing. Okay. And you think you said what what do you if a parent thinks their kid may be on the autism spectrum? And I also wanted to know in. I think it was the DSM five where we don't even say aspirin, right? Yeah. It's autism spectrum disorder. Yes. How does aspirin fit into that? Yeah. Is. So a lot of people that I like this into the really smart people yet, you know, from Caltech MIT and all these schools a lot of them at all. I mean, this not everybody who has the schools is autistic or aspirin or anything. But but a lot of really really really people are do have aspirations or ADHD. Earth, aspirin or autism. But you know, how how's it differentiated? So this point again like you said is it's no longer in the DSM of separate Ryan separate. It's all combined altogether in into one thing. So we just be looking at higher functioning autism or or lower funky. Okay. Though. That would ask for now are aspects of old is that now hype puncturing batch it. Okay. So our pygmy into the world of so apparent is. Wondering is my child on the autism spectrum looking for where they where they even saying I noticed this. So oftentimes, so I usually might the bulk of my experiences with with with children or else anywhere from like five years old and up from there. But I do know I've spoken with. Scott psychologist psychologists who work with little children as well. Lot of things that they share is it the child is having difficulty with tracking so beating or. For example, if a look into airplane and points up in direction, and the the child autism may not locate at airplane at joint attention, not the tracking the joint, attention difficulty. You know, there's there's things to this is not a dead giveaway of whether autism. But I can't CAC can be seven research says about seventy percent of people with autism have or contact. Okay. You know, there could be other reasons to gathering the thoughts to start kind of putting together the pitcher, right? So the y'all did here of the the Braise. What is it? The social skills. They not is that led you because that's what I was gonna go next came out because that's where it's really at two. So social skills. Social perceptions understanding of you know, we can walk into a room, and we can get a filter room. You know, if the room is healthy, and everybody's happy contents and treating each other respect, there's a certain feeling real most people can walk into like. Yeah. I could deal with the moon is in you want into another maybe walk into court session tents. Yeah. You could just just walk into the room get that vied right right away. People who struggle with autism struggle with any of that perceptions. They don't they don't read the room. Okay. Let me okay. And it wouldn't understand people's emotions and perceptions all you can work with it in and help them with with those things teach them, you know, teach them how to get in contact and teach them how to understand people's emotions and things, but it's more of a they call it like more explicit instruction like explaining step by step helping you develop those hard to do with young kids. Yeah. I think it is..

aspirin autism DSM Caltech MIT ADHD Ryan seventy percent five years
"dsm" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"dsm" Discussed on Untangle

"Then that's an imprint where carrying with us in our bodies as opposed to just staying with whatever's going on allowing stir ration- being generous impatient and hopefully compassionate towards ourselves. Appreciative of her own struggle, then we're actually moving through something much quick and much more satisfied way as well. And we don't have to repeat the same thing over and over again, and where actually undoing our inborn fear of emotions. I just said that our unborn fear of emotions. Yeah. Is that like one of the challenges each about the challenge of self love had a self love? Help us to be. With these difficult emotions that we are afraid of both of those concepts are bound up with self acceptance as well. Exactly that what I'm going through doesn't necessarily mean. I failed or that. I'm wrong with knock good enough for unlovable in some way. As so many of us are quick to go to those might sets. It's actually just when I'm going through, right? Okay. So this also ties with your idea of the stories we tell ourselves, right? So image just something we're going down at tach, the meaning of it being a good story or a bad story than it takes on a completely difference tone in your body. And in your mind, I like that. I mean, you had a lot of greats ways of looking at things in this book, which I think is really great. And I like also your section called broken heartedness becomes relevant heartedness. So is that sort of the summation of what we're talking about? Here. Would you say or another piece of the story with what's difficult in life in how it's actually not bad? It's not necessarily a. Problem so much as an opportunity is that my friend suits Hiber wrote a whole book about this called wisdom of a broken heart that when we engage stockily with the disasters with clarity's in our lives where we're taking every is to life-affirming choices of some sort that win our hearts breaks. We might go through a low for little while my act out for a little while that eventually we get sick of that close up by bootstraps. Go back therapy. We maybe take our friends more. Seriously, we go back to learning how to play the tar or maybe we take our meditation path more seriously, we always do something that's really causative and creative in nature to pull ourselves out of those loans and not just that with enough repeat experiences. I been down before. But then I got resourceful, and it took me to a different place than I would have gone to in my life. If I had not been knocked down you repeat that enough times. And what starts to arise for person is confidence confidence I can meet life as it is. I don't need to be afraid or power from vulnerable experiences. I can meet with difficulty, and I'll be fine. It might hurt for little while. But I'm gonna be okay. And I think that's the ultimate choice that we all have and doing these practices. Help us to get clear that we do actually have a choice. Are there any other like sort of baked concepts in the book that you wanna share with us the guiding principle of the book, which is radical non pathology as a mental health clinician that has lived in the world of the DSM and symptom based notions of treating what's going on with us. I've come to see things in totally different way that everything about us are. Brains are really governed by three central drives which are for safety gratification and belonging or love those three impulses. Literally govern everything we think saying to and are the Silter through which we receive stimuli from the world. And so from that vantage point, yes at the surface level, our need for safety gratification belonging in very much get turned around and started into all kinds of not so great expressions. But you can't say that there's anything wrong with our base motivations with who we are at our core from that point of view..

Hiber DSM
"dsm" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"dsm" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"Problem, right? You can find a surgeon is willing to do that for you. Go for, it's a free country, but let's not pretend that science is on the side of all of the claims that are being made. I love this. The buried down in this article. Say genetics does play a role though. Oh, you think, oh, you think so. It's it's by the way you know how you know that it's not just trying to tell you because they mail were to have his twig and berries physically removed in some sort of accident. He would still be a male yet if he intends to do so in a surgery, we are now supposed to consider him a female. Okay, that is that is not logical. I wanna talk for Justice. I can about the sort of propaganda that's been promoted on this issue and really is insane propaganda. So the the notion that is pushed by the left that transgenderism is not a mental disorder is completely a scientific. Hey. Now what the left does that they like to say, things like the diagnostic and statistical manual because the DSM five suggests that gender identity disorder is no longer a mental disorder. Instead, what the DSM five says is that a mental disorder is a quote syndrome characterized by clinically significant disturbance in an individual's cognition emotion, regulation or behavior that reflects a dysfunction in the psychological biological or developmental processes underlying mental functioning. Now, this is the this is the the funny part socially deviant behavior and conf in conflicts that are primarily between the individual and society are not mental disorders unless the deviance or conflict results from a dysfunction in the individuals described about. So in other words, if you have something that makes you think that a pink elephant. Is stalking. You almost this makes you feel bad. This is not actually a mental disorder according to the DSM. The definition makes room for it's making clear room for politically correct posturing, right? If I am having a significant problem in and of myself, all I have to do is blame it on society's intolerance and it is no longer considered a mental disorder. Hey, so if you're suicidal because you're a man who believes he's woman, the DSM can still find a way to blame that on society. All you have to say is the reason I'm suicidal is because people are mean to me in society, not because I have suffered with this terrible conflict inside my inside my brain for my entire life. They now society's fault this, how the DSM five avoids the obvious implication that if you're a man who believes your woman, you have a mental disorder. If you're by the way, if you're a fat person who believes you are skinny or skinny person believes are fat. We all knowledge of mental disorder. If you're a skinny person who believes fat, it's called anorexia, it's dangerous and it's mental disorder. If you're a person who believes that you do not need a left arm where there's something called body just morphine. This is a mental disorder. But if you're a man who believes your woman and you. Need your penis, then it's not a mental disorder. It's society's fault. You explain that one to me. He none of this has anything to do with science and all that is specifically designed to blame society for what is clearly an obviously a mental disorder. The reason that I'm serious about calling it a mental disorder. The reason I do so is because you can't actually treat a mental disorder by blaming it on society. If you want to come up with new treatments for mental disorder, the way to do that is not by saying that society at large is responsible for the discomfort of people suffering from the mental disorder. I'm somebody who takes mental illness extraordinarily seriously. My grandfather was either by polo or schizophrenic..

DSM stalking morphine anorexia
"dsm" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"dsm" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

"Dot com. And there's a really amazing flow chart. It's taken from the community, but I think it's completely applicable across the board to anybody from touch of flavor dot com. And we have the link on our website called how to evaluate a scene gone wrong. Oh boy, and we're not going to go through this step by step. He's a lot of stuff. It's a lot of steps, but it's a really good tool if there's been an accident or some discomfort or something just went wrong. So this is written for a scene gone wrong, and they're a scene could be at a dungeon or an agreed upon seen. I haven't really built into this very far could be in a moment or seeing that you're having privately to absolutely could even be in a cuddle party or you know any sort of. Interchange. I like to say that head of the valuate an interchange gone wrong because I think it really allows you to go through and it talks about it has some really difficult questions which might not be really easy to answer, but there's really basic steps involves. We're gonna go over this at a really high level. The person who acted in a way that resulted in the violation needs to be open to taking ownership for what they did. And honestly, thanking the other person for allowing them to understand the impact of their actions. You do something is like, oh, that's just not working for me instead of being upset that I'm saying it's not working this time. Hey, thank you so much for letting me know that there's a problem there. I really did not mean to cause you pain. Let's talk about it. What happened? What can I do wrong? What do you need for me? And it's kinda going back and forth. You can talk about things openly again. You might need to give it some space. If you're right in the moment, emotions might be too raw. Yeah, definitely. Somebody's feel like they've had their consent violated. They're going to feel really closed off and unless they're able to be more self aware, we've seen people do that. Absolutely. But it takes time to get yourself to a point that you're able to address it. And then when the conversation or the communication seems to be coming to a close, at least that moment, one of the things that's really good to do is say, hey, do you need anything else for me does give you from what you need and maybe an additional one of. Do you need me to follow up with you in a little bit of time to is or. If you ask that most people say no, but, hey, is it okay if I check back with you tomorrow? Just to see if you're still okay. I'm really wanna. Make sure that you're ok road shows. Empathy issues care shows that you didn't mean to hurt this individual. It shows that you're taking ownership and moving forward to help the person that may be feeling like they've been violated or pushed to maybe understand that it wasn't intentional and if they say no, please don't. That's okay. You can then follow of, you know, I'm here if there's anything further you need and it lets them have the power to take back their power. So how do you move forward after you've had a consent violation? And we're most focusing on accident move? So if the consent violation accident was between people who have long term friendships relationships or who are. Or who are looking at starting one. This can also be the starting point, although maybe not immediately giving a little space for healing for motions to calm down. You know a fairly good idea to negotiate preemptively around situations in the future and how accidents can be handled. Yeah. I mean, some really good examples of that, and you'll see a lot of conversations around consult consent and building consent and creating consent and safe environments borrow heavily from the DSM community because they have an entire community in culture foundation built around consent discussions. One of my favorite things to do at the start of a relationship or early on in a relationship and relationship for me does not necessarily mean a sexual one. It could be a good friendship. A deep foundation is understanding what happens or how you react in how Iraq. If I get angry, hurt, upset, stressed route. I personally need space to calm down. Think about things, and then I'm coming back..

DSM Iraq
"dsm" Discussed on Parenting Great Kids with Dr. Meg Meeker

Parenting Great Kids with Dr. Meg Meeker

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"dsm" Discussed on Parenting Great Kids with Dr. Meg Meeker

"Autism spectrum disorder. I want you now to listen in on a conversation I had with Tammy Morris, your going to love this episode whether or not you have a child who falls into the autism spectrum disorder. Well, Tammy Morris, thanks so much for joining me on my podcast. Thank you for having me Dr Meaker. Sure. Now, as an autism expert, can you explain to everyone listening the difference between autism autism spectrum disorder and aspects? Yeah, I can do my best. You know there have been some recent changes in the DSM criteria for diagnosing autism. So what that means is there are folks that prior to the new DSM which is the diagnostic statistical manual, where we classify diagnoses, there was a recent change, so there will be folks. Right who've carried and a diagnosis for perhaps their whole lifetime. They've been characterized has asked burgers and they will go through the rest of their lives. I'm assuming, right, right with that diagnosis. And so it will take many, many years for the actual community to change some of the terminology around that sort of Ashby Asperger's diagnosis. However, what the DSM five did was recategorized something. So previously there were separate categories for autism spectrum, aspirin or syndrome. And then PDD and OS, which was pervasive, developmental delay, not otherwise specified as well as some other child disintegrated disorder autistic disorder. So now relieve the DSM is given just one broad umbrella of autism spectrum disorder. So ASID includes all of that includes any element or any symptom or something of autism. It's all under the same umbrella, right? So by forming such a broad umbrella, now they also had to change the characteristics of autism right in order to be -clusive of everything under that umbrella. So previously and the DSM four, there were three domains of autism symptoms. Those were social impairment language or.

Tammy Morris DSM Ashby Asperger aspirin Dr Meaker
"dsm" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

The Michael Knowles Show

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"dsm" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

"Left embraces democratic socialism right now, the DSM membership has increased seven and a half times in just two years between twenty sixteen in two thousand eighteen. The membership is increased almost seven and a half times the dues paying membership, which is ironic because I didn't think socialists paid for anything, but they are paying their membership dues. Now to this, there were forty two candidates across the United States who are now endorsed officially endorsed by the Democrats. Socialists of America. There is obviously Alexandria Casio Cortez. There's another one though. This guy Zach Ringel Stein up in Maine, he he says, he stands with the democratic socialists. He wasn't comfortable calling him. One before, but now he is comfortable calling himself one. This is spreading you have the sort of cackling lefty hyenas on the view there, embracing socialism, they're saying, isn't it? Just a like liberalism isn't? No, it's not. It's not real socialism. It's democratic. Socialism ladies repeat after me. There is no such thing as democratic. Socialism repeat after me, there is no such thing as democratic socialism, amiss. Alexandria, ocasio Cortez. Is there any such thing as democratic socialism? I am not the expert geopolitics on this issue as good. Fair enough. You're right now. I bet the New York Times is going to yell at me for spreading fake news. He didn't really interview her. He didn't raise your right wasn't that was just a clip. It was just a clip New York Times. There is no such thing as democratic socialism, their contradictions in terms, you know, there's a really depressing number that's been coming out according to two separate studies millennials, the majority of millennials identify as socialist they they would. They call themselves. Lists. They rather live in a socialist government that that number has risen dramatically over the years, even Prager us will wit, who I think was constructed in a laboratory made by Snapchat, will wit went out there and talk to these millennials, look what they had to say sh- we have more socialism in America..

Zach Ringel Stein Alexandria Casio Cortez New York Times America Alexandria Democrats United States DSM Maine Prager Snapchat two years
"dsm" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"dsm" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

"We haven't really talked much about what the dsm is but the dsm is the diagnostic statistical manual it's a medical model for diagnose same mental health disorders that was a lot of words not is scary as it sounds i promise so you just put on your therapy pan that there are three different anxiety anxiety disorders pacific phobias panic disorder and generalised anxiety disorder and the generalised anxiety disorder is the one i kinda wanna explain a little day here because we all feelings i eddie on some kind of the spectrum and that doesn't necessarily mean that we have generalised anxiety disorder when it shifts from just feeling anxiety to actually be nee disorder it's something that persists at least six months more days than not it's extremely difficult to control you have this excessive anxiety and worry it may be that you're very restless mayfield easily fatigues you could have difficulty concentrating and all that was always like me in school like again i felt a lot difficulty concentrating by i wouldn't have diagnosed myself and i wasn't diagnosed by therapist with generalising zeid disorder so just having like one of these things does not mean that you have the disorder there's several different kind of symptoms and when you actually become diagnosed with something is when you have at least three of them persisting more days than not for at least six months so the restlessness the easily fatigue difficulty concentrating ask them irritability perhaps some muscle tension and also sleep disturbance to like you can kinda towel that it's it's a little bit more intense and at times our anxiety does feel so intense by it often fades and being diagnosed with generalised anxiety disorder is very treatable you know just how anxiety as a feeling itself passes and is something we can learn to cope with it is as well when you are diagnosed with it.

muscle tension anxiety six months
"dsm" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"dsm" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"Sixty two fifty two number one duke all overseeing france's 124 sixty seven cal addressing this weekend the hawkeyes on the road at rutgers friday night wyoming at iowa state saturday night seven pm northern iowa hosting the un i opened that will happen inside the unity dome all day saturday that's a quick look at sport side mark allen for news radio 1040 who now here's kind of words during i'm not sure what to think about this but i know we've done announcements for the east and south the morning chamber of commerce is and the the merged in they have yesterday they announced a new brand they have a new name because there was too long it was too much right mouthful so as called fused des moines its views dsm f you se dsm so they had a party till watch this new thing and a public relations sperm apparently ah did this forum so um they had this party and they gave out um sticks of dynamite helped pero ones or sangatte humor real yeah and complete lift using thank heavens yeah and that was you know like a party favor deal announced the name and the brand and um uh one of the people attending the party currently left the the fa cup stick of dynamite in a downtown parking ramp prompting emergency calls duly d'alene police department the bomb squad was activated and sent to the parking ramp only to discover it was a party favour mary see your tax dollars at work listen you're you're you're getting the publicity you hope for that's right sort of use dsm and we're sitting here talking ateret that's exactly right you got what you wanted lot of conversation going on yeah that's right so there you go that is to find is that something yeah all right seven twenty three years this morning bob quinn joins us i bob yeah back from the iowa farm bureau zone first day of the annual meeting by the way farm use the.

france bureau police department fa wyoming rutgers hawkeyes des moines chamber of commerce radio mark allen un iowa state bob quinn people cup