35 Burst results for "DR"

Judge sentences ex-MSU coach to jail in Nassar-related case

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 39 min ago

Judge sentences ex-MSU coach to jail in Nassar-related case

"The former head gymnastics coach at Michigan State University has been sentenced to jail for lying to police about what she do about abuse by university Dr Larry Nassar Cathy Clegg is said at trial that she did not remember being told about abuse by former Olympic and Michigan State University doctor Larry Nassar she was found guilty by a jury in February of lying to police and today she's been sentenced to ninety days in jail and eighteen months of probation Nassar was sentenced in twenty eighteen to forty two hundred and seventy five years in prison for decades of serial abuse to hundreds of athletes several of Nassar's victims testified the greatest knew about the abuse two of them spoke ahead of the sentencing Larissa Boyce sekaligus held up a piece of paper in front of her when she was sixteen and older if she filed a report there could be serious consequences for her voice that she was representing her sixteen year old self was silenced and humiliated and all of the hundreds of girls that were abused after her I'm Jennifer king

Michigan State University Dr Larry Nassar Cathy Clegg Larry Nassar Jennifer King Larissa Boyce
U.S. government begins two trials testing Eli Lilly's coronavirus antibody drug

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:29 sec | 2 hrs ago

U.S. government begins two trials testing Eli Lilly's coronavirus antibody drug

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Kobe Khun California Cove White House Donald Trump Director ELI Undercount President Trump Collins.
Trump is losing big to Biden in voter polls

Scott Sloan

10:01 min | 3 hrs ago

Trump is losing big to Biden in voter polls

"Used to the day not to the date, but to the day we go to the polls all over the United States. Of course, there's massive mail in balloting and elect the next president of the United States. It will either be a reelection of Donald Trump or Joe Biden will be the next president of the United States. But where do things stand? Really? As we're now 90 days out from deciding who the leader of the free world will be a lot of the poles that are out there. Have Joe Biden up if you look at battleground state polls Here in Ohio. Biden is up plus 2 2.5 He's up in Michigan. He is he's up in New Hampshire. Trump is up in Texas barely up in Missouri, and Trump is up in Iowa. But apparently it is Biden, who is making hay and a lot of the states that Donald Trump won back in 2016 and needs to win for re election now, But how accurate is polling? And did we learned any lessons from 2016? That should look at polling now with somewhat of a jaundiced eye? Standing by the way in and all of that is one of the great political minds of art of our lifetime. Someone who understands the INS and the outs of elections how people get elected, what polls really mean and the taste of the voting electorate in this country. He is Dr Eric Morrow, the head of social sciences and political science professor at Tarleton State University. And Dr Morrow. How are you on this glorious Tuesday? I'm great. Can we've got some cooler weather here in Texas. So, ah, not break from the summer. He had some rain last week. So that's the best we can ask for in Texas in the summer. Well, you know, it's cool in a lot of places not bad here, but it's tartan. Or, as we say, here in Ohio, fixing the heat off politically, Let's Just get to the landscape as it exists right now, As you look at this presidential race, is it really Joe blind that has the lead and if it is, how much of a lead not necessarily and popular vote, But as you look around the landscape of the country in these battleground states, how much do we put How much fate should we put in these polls that air out right now? Well, I think it's uh It's a mixed message at this point, and I say that because we had the experience in 2016 with the Poles and a lot of polling places, especially the quality ones, learned some things and it made some adjustments. But you know we're still 90 days out, and there's a lot happening and And part of this, too, looking at each individual state. And what is the makeup of the voting? The registered voters and turnout expectations there how they're handling elections. I mean, this is this is where we're on the ground now and where the challenges are. And polling while it does give us some some glimpse, Ah, take Texas is a great example. Ah, they most the polls show that they're basically even between Trump and Biden. But ah Ah, we've got a ways to go here and one of the things that really impacts voting and the and the results of an election is tech in Texas. Not just your big metropolitan areas. We have a lot of smaller metropolitan areas. And if turnout is strong there those air Republican bases and so I still give the lead to trump on DH. Not just that they're even but I give us a little bit of a lead to him in the state right now, because we just don't know what that That result will be with turnout in those areas. Well, Trump, I think still has his base. If you look a TTE, a TTE, the various polling among Republicans, he's he's been consistently at 94 95 96 inside his own party. If you look at that what he's doing from an approval standpoint, there's some Poles, the rest missing pool, which has traditionally favored Republicans. It's it's Ah, it's it's I think has Trump right now at 50% approval, but most of them have him in. At best, a load a mid forties. It seems to me that Trump is having a really difficult time getting past his base and energizing people that might Either be fence sitters or undecideds. I don't think there are a lot of undecideds or people that he just hasn't connected with. I don't think he can do much until he gets coverted under control because To me. That's what everybody is, is consumed with whether it's from a health standpoint or an economy standpoint, he can't get covert under control. Not that I'm not saying he but we can't get Cove it under control. And because of that, I think it kind of stymies him in picking up those that are not in his base. Would you agree with that? I do. He needs a win, and he's been. It's been an uphill battle on this all along. And ah, this recently Ah, put some things out on federalism, where I think that the Trump presidency is a victim of that, especially in relation to this. Ah, pandemic on that is because of the challenges with working with states and That comes into theologian process now is that you've got some of the more challenging conditions related to the pandemic in states where without the pandemic, he would say, Well, well, Trump has that state and it wouldn't be any questions now about whether someone has a lead or not. It would be a good thing could be a very, very close race at this point, but Where it's not is that people are starting to question what's happening and how this is being addressed and just not seeing results, and that's what people want. They want. They want the economy six. They want a vaccine. They want cases to go down. They want results, and we and he really needs to see something happen. Significant. Well, there has to be something that happened significantly to get Joe Biden. Out of his basement and out on the campaign trail. And so far, there's no compelling reason for Biden to go out and do that is there and now there's not no, he can play it safe. At this point, it seems I mean, I don't know that that's the the best overall strategy. But, um, one of the things Heard recently in terms of strategy coming out of his campaign was that that they're looking at what the right moment you know when, when is it time to Ah, that it won't, uh, create additional challenges, depending on what he does or what he says. But when he can jump out there and put himself forward, even Maura's the person to say, Well, look, he's not Trump's not been able to fix any of this. Our address it in the appropriate way and and thus try to seal the deal on the election. A Sze Yu look. ATT at Joe Biden. And you hear some of the rhetoric that's been out there in the last couple of days about debates and whether there will not be debates and whether there will be. I think once you wed your way through that, I don't sense the Joe Biden can say. At the at the 11th hour. I'm not going to debate. We're not going to have any debates. I think at that point he would look weak. There will be debates this year. Don't you think I do. I think that I think that's what their strategists are looking at. Is that the point in which he inserts himself more into this? I think one of the challenges or one of the things they have to be looking at. And this is really for the Trump campaign is that In the debates and part of the previous election, so he benefited from a live audience. He was able to play to the crowd. He was able to kind of make it work for himself, both visually as well as the The effect of having a live audience. And that may not be the case this time. And so that may be a challenge for Trump. But he certainly not goingto back away from the and, in fact, Ah Biden doing that. They would certainly make that an opportunity to say that he's not willing to engage in a public forum in these difficult issues that we're facing. Former vice president obviously commits a lot of gaps there. Some who think he may have cognitive issues whether he does or he doesn't. I don't know. Nobody knows unless you're his doctor or those close to him. How much how much of a liability. Do you think A live debate would be to Biden particularly If he continues to behave like he does in some of the few public events he does. I think these extended debates with just two candidates are going to be more of a challenge. We saw him kind of moved back and forth. He was challenged in a few debates recovered and a few others and and so it's gonna be interesting to see this over an extended period of time. As to how you can engage. You know, Biden has a long career in government and with policy, and when you get him going with that, and he's in the depths of it, hey, can show his his ability to really engage with it the challenges in communicating that because as we've seen for many elections when they run the studies, people start tuning out when you get into the details of policy, and I think that's where In addition to what Biden might say that he doesn't intend to say is that when he started jumping off in the depths of discussing policy specific policy issues, people are just going, they're going to fade, and that that isn't necessarily help is well, so I don't think it is his strengths or they're just I think it's going to be. Where are we with all of these issues and what Trump Has been able to accomplish or see happen under his presidency. And then how Biden portrays himself coming into that engagement with him,

Joe Biden Donald Trump Texas United States Ohio New Hampshire President Trump Michigan Tarleton State University Iowa Dr Morrow Dr Eric Morrow Missouri Sze Yu Vice President Professor Maura ATT
Puerto Rico added to Chicago's emergency travel order

Chris Plante

00:49 sec | 3 hrs ago

Puerto Rico added to Chicago's emergency travel order

"Travel order list. 22 other states remain AHMET List, which means a 15 day quarantine upon his return to Chicago for travelers. Dr Allison already making the announcement. Just a short while ago, she says by next week's on states may come off the list. So I will. Kansas and Utah are on the travel list right now because they went over that 15 per 100,000 per day mark, But just this week they've dropped below 15. And so if next week they continue that progress, and they have a second week of being below 15. Next week. We hope to announce Iowa, Kansas and Utah would come off the travel order letters, she says. Households and social gatherings, not nursing homes and prisons. They're playing a role in Chicago's recent rise in covered 19 cases. Divers continuing their search this

Ahmet List Dr Allison Chicago Utah Kansas Iowa
Health officials warn there may never be a "silver bullet" for coronavirus

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:16 sec | 3 hrs ago

Health officials warn there may never be a "silver bullet" for coronavirus

"Of the World Health Organization says there's no silver bullet for Corona virus and may never be won. His warning comes as half a dozen companies are in the last phase of testing their experimental vaccines. Dr Ted Rose points out that most people remain susceptible to the virus, even in places that had severe outbreaks.

Dr Ted Rose World Health Organization
Dallas - Free coronavirus saliva testing site opens in Frisco

News and Information with Dave Williams and Amy Chodroff

00:34 sec | 5 hrs ago

Dallas - Free coronavirus saliva testing site opens in Frisco

"Is Kayla F. News to new covert 19 testing sites now open in North Texas for No fire Battalion Chief J. Cohen says Drive through saliva testing is set up at the Dr Pepper Ballpark in Frisco is the first high volume drive through testing site in the North suburbs. Chief Owen says the testing is open to anyone in the Metroplex, not just Frisco residents. Me time. Dallas County has opened Cove in 19 testing at East Hill College in Mesquite, which replaces testing that had been done at the University of Dallas, The Frisco site. Open until two o'clock daily. The East failed. Testing

Frisco Dr Pepper Ballpark Chief Owen Chief J. Cohen North Suburbs Dallas County East Hill College No Fire Battalion Kayla F. University Of Dallas North Texas Mesquite
DNA & EOs with Dr. Lindsey Elmore

The Essential Oil Revolution

06:30 min | 8 hrs ago

DNA & EOs with Dr. Lindsey Elmore

"All Right folks, I'm here with Dr Lindsay Elmore. One of my favorite human beings on this planet, she's a speaker author, brand strategist podcast host am world renown wellness expert, she translates. Science into understandable stories and travels the world educating audiences about natural wellness Lindsey. Welcome back to the show. Thanks for back. Absolutely thanks for having me back. It's an honour. Well, you're one of my favorite guests becoming a recurring us which I love so I'm glad that you're here today and I'm super excited to talk about this particular topic of DNA and what our DNA can tell us about essential oils, and we've actually had a number of guests on the show before to to cover this topic. But I feel like you're gonNA just sort. Sort of put the icing on top of everything and make it click in people's minds because that's what you're best at just breaking down complicated things and making them simple. So this is part of your thirty podcasts in thirty days. Tell us a little bit more about that. Well I recently started a podcast called the Lindsay elmore show, and I, some of my guests have been have been educating me on how you can. Can Get your podcast out there. If you go on a podcast tour and a few months ago, I was at an event called pod Max and one of the speakers was a writer for four herbs and she had written an article about how she accomplished doing thirty podcasts in thirty days, and I just thought, wow, that sounds really hard and I decided why not give it a try and book as many as you. You can get the word out there and really share all the different facets you know. I. Love Essential Oil. So I'm excited to be here to talk to your audience, but we're also looking at podcast that encompass all of the entrepreneurship that I do the Vegan cooking yoga. Even my new little cat. We've applied to some to some broadcast to talk about you know my first couple of weeks having a kitten and so. A great way I, don't know. So it's a great way to meet New People and to share topics that I care about right. Well, I, love how the podcast world is. So multifaceted in that way, like we are human beings, we are complex creatures and we are both passionate, right. So have been able to find. There's a podcast there for everything. So whatever little passion or hobby or? Or thing that's like in your heart that you want express share with the world. There's a show out there to do just that for people who are hungry for that information, which is one of the reasons I just love podcast. Absolutely. I. Completely agree there. We have come across some crazy crazy podcast and we even applied to one and there was only about the health benefits of olives. Like was like, how do you have a podcast only about that? But there is legitimate podcast for anyone and everyone. That's hilarious. I'M GONNA have to add that into my book that I'm writing about podcast. Dina's is just an example how niche you can make these things. So. Let's dive into the Science DNA. Tell us what gives us like the kindergarten version of what is DNA, and what can you tell us about our bodies. So DNA is basically A. For your body, every single person has DNA and there are building blocks of DNA called base pairs, and we each have about three point two, billion base pairs of DNA, and what we have is these base pairs make called genes. So there's a sequence of the base pairs that make gene the gene in codes, a part of your body bit either contributes to the structure of your body. So you can have a gene that helps to encode for tissues or four bones or for tea. Or you can have genes that encode for the function of your body, and so this could be perhaps an enzyme or it could be a spleen soul that is destined to help clean your blood cells. So DNA it's a blueprint, it's built of base pairs that make up jeans, and then genes encode the structure and function of our bodies. Okay. So with that basis of information there how why, and what, why do? Do essential oils differ in their benefit based on different DNA types like I used to think that all essential oils just kinda did the same thing to everyone and then I started using essential oils in seen how center oils did different things in different people's bodies and I'm like Oh. Why is that his dad because of our DNA? Well, it could be because of your DNA. So within your, DNA, we have. Have things, called snips and the snips Stanford single nuclear tied Holly. MORPHISM 's this is a really fancy term that basically means mutations. We are all mutants because we don't all have matching. DNA. That's what makes us human? That's what makes us beautiful in diverse. So mutation has a bad connotation to it, but really, and truly all mutation is is where they're within those base pairs that are building your DNA there. there. Is a change with one of those base pairs and that is called a single nucleotides polymorphism. So when we look at the population as a whole, we can identify what is the most common nuclear tied sequence within our DNA. This tells us at every single point within the DNA, what is considered the normal trait? Some people have different nucleotides. That's where those snips comment those single nucleotide polymorphisms. So these abnormals. Tides lead to our genetic mutations. Some of them are benign. So some of them don't make any difference. You know you and I could have two different SNIPS and our bodies still functions

Dr Lindsay Elmore Lindsay Elmore Brand Strategist Morphism Writer Dina Holly
Trump claims authority to issue order on mail-in votes

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 9 hrs ago

Trump claims authority to issue order on mail-in votes

"The president school trump year claims has started he has for the authority many kids to issue and parents an executive are facing order tough decisions on mail about in ballots whether to send them the to president classes says even he has as president the right trump to do it pushes we haven't for all gotten schools there yet to but open we'll see what happens it's tens unclear of thousands though what of kids he could returned actually to school do in person other than yesterday issuing an order with more formally to come saying later he this doesn't week like many mail in voting will stay which home he's for argued distance without learning evidence though leads the president to massive continues fraud insisting he's that's now not citing the way delays to go in a daily deciding we want a winner to open those noting schools some we states want to open led them ballots Dr be Anthony received Fauci up to a agrees week after that the should election be the supposing default is position down to that one but state it entirely that means depends on you where have to wait the seven school days is and if argues the infection a flood of ballots rate is would so overwhelm low the postal that service there's very I don't little think chance the post office is of prepared their being for infection anything like spread this his comments then come you days should feel after okay bipartisan about doing backlash it but felt after she says he publicly the primary floated consideration delaying has November's to be the health election of kids Sager teachers make and ani school Washington staff Sager mag ani Washington

Executive President Trump Fraud Anthony Fauci Washington Ani Washington
Parents struggle as schools reopen amid coronavirus surge

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 9 hrs ago

Parents struggle as schools reopen amid coronavirus surge

"The school year has started for many kids and parents are facing tough decisions about whether to send them to classes even as president trump pushes for all schools to open tens of thousands of kids returned to school in person yesterday with more to come later this week many will stay home for distance learning though the president continues insisting that's not the way to go a daily we want to open those schools we want to open them Dr Anthony Fauci agrees that should be the default position but it entirely depends on where the school is if the infection rate is so low that there's very little chance of their being infection spread then you should feel okay about doing it but felt she says the primary consideration has to be the health of kids teachers and school staff Sager mag ani Washington

Donald Trump President Trump Dr Anthony Fauci Ani Washington
Parents struggle as schools reopen amid coronavirus surge

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 9 hrs ago

Parents struggle as schools reopen amid coronavirus surge

"The school year has started for many kids and parents are facing tough decisions about whether to send them to classes even as president trump pushes for all schools to open tens of thousands of kids returned to school in person yesterday with more to come later this week many will stay home for distance learning though the president continues insisting that's not the way to go a daily we want to open those schools we want to open them Dr Anthony Fauci agrees that should be the default position but it entirely depends on where the school is if the infection rate is so low that there's very little chance of their being infection spread then you should feel okay about doing it but felt she says the primary consideration has to be the health of kids teachers and school staff Sager mag ani Washington

Donald Trump President Trump Dr Anthony Fauci Ani Washington
New York DA cites "possible criminal activity" at Trump Org in tax fight

Anderson Cooper 360

00:34 sec | 16 hrs ago

New York DA cites "possible criminal activity" at Trump Org in tax fight

"The potential legal storm surrounding the president new your prosecutors have asked a federal judge dismissed the President's lawsuit challenging subpoena for his financial records arguing his legal team claims have been rejected by other courts and sharing that they're investigating other transactions that extend beyond hush money payments to two women during the two thousand sixteen presidential campaign who alleged affairs with trump. The president has denied the affairs. We don't know what quote transactions they might be looking at, but prosecutors noting in their filing that. There are quote public allegations of possible criminal activity, the plaintiffs, New York County based trump organizations, dating back a decade

President Trump New York County
COVID-19 testing and contact tracing key for safely reopening schools, two new studies suggest

Anderson Cooper 360

06:42 min | 16 hrs ago

COVID-19 testing and contact tracing key for safely reopening schools, two new studies suggest

"Some classrooms begin to open the US Dr Anthony Fauci said today that schools should proceed with caution and make safety a priority down. She also said that students need the psychological nutritional benefits and pretending in person classes although acknowledges that parents have to quote. Dramatically modified their work schedule this as we touched on earlier, two new studies suggesting scaled up testing and contact tracing of those who test positive being key factors in any school reopening. To professionals who are facing these issues in different dates. Becky stone is the director of Alcoa City schools in Tennessee and Brian Woods Superintendent of the northside independent school district in San Antonio Texas, appreciate both of you for for being here tonight Becky the for the first day back to school in your area. Tennessee was July twenty second week and a half ago you. I know you've had four confirmed coronavirus cases. You expect so many. So soon and and how you responded that how does that change thing? Is. When we decided that we were going to open wing knew that we would have cases We unfortunately didn't go into it thinking that. No one was going to get sick because lots goes on those folks are going to get sick if they're in school or not but the first one we had was Just right. After we opened school and we met together and as attain. We did our contact tracing and because I felt like we had some really good protocols in place we really didn't the exposure was very limited and the second time it happened was last week and again I feel like because of the protocols we have in place in the safeguards there was very little exposure Interesting that that you're doing your own contact trae saying as a school That's a that's obviously a smart thing to do given the problems we're seeing with contract tracing on kind of you know on the large scale. Bryan Texas you're facing a different timelines. Schools haven't opened yet in your district, but once they do they'll be required to have full person learning after the first eight weeks. I correct me if I'm wrong on that do you think that timeline will allow you to keep your students and teachers say It's a good question and it's one that I hope we don't have to contemplate obviously our preferences not to have a a set timeline but rather to allow a local school leaders in elected boards of trustees to make decisions about what safe for their students in their staff. So a it is concerning to us that we have kind of an arbitrary time line of eight weeks, and then whoever wants to be back in the building. Ganvie. Becky I. Knew Your district did stagger started with students coming in for in person classes I think only one day week, which means I, think he'd only have a twenty percent occupancy at any given time. How is that working out? What are the difficulties? That you're finding just for other educators who are out there. That's true. We have about we're a small district. We only have about twenty, two, hundred students system wide good part. We're all on one campus with four schools on one campus we did decide. For. An option our our students could also choose to do all online and to do virtual learning. So when we say we brought in twenty percent, it's a little bit less than that because of those virtual learning students who are already online, but we did we stagger. So students are in school one day a week, and then they do digital learning the next four days until they come back to their in person day and it's worked out very well for US I can say. Got Of great feedback from parents teachers from other from administrators It does create some difficulty and you touched on that a second ago parents. It creates a difficulty for parents and I understand that and we want to be sensitive to that. But at the same time we thought why with the pressure to open, this is the only way that we could open safely and that was our first priority, and if if I know with contact tracing if a classroom if the student has positive. What happens in terms of quarantining D- do does the teacher they were in touch with does that person have to then leave school does the classroom what happens? Well. Again, because we open with such small numbers, it's very easy for classes to social distance and so Alvar staff are required to wear masks all times. Our students are not required. They six through twelve. We have strongly suggested that they wear and then pre K. through five. We have suggested that they wear if they're going to be in close groups. However. It's been good because most all students are wearing mask as well. But again, a classroom if a student test positive. There may only be for their students in that class right and they've been distance, and so when you do the contact tracing, what we have found is that very few of them have been in close contact for ten minutes or more within six feet of one another, and so the exposure has been very limited and most of the time both have on mass. So they can continue come to school and the teachers continue coming to school. Even though they they've. Been in the area of of a student, but not for a prolonged time. That's correct. Now, the student that tests positive obviously would corentin for fourteen days. Okay and and then anyone else that we find that may have been in close contact with that person and may have some exposure. They would also contain for the fourteen days. Brian's Brian the guidance for Best Practices for schools has been a moving target of both federal and state levels of Texas Office of in a hot spot for the virus in recent weeks how has that changed your plans and preparations have? It's changed dramatically when we surveyed our families in early June, we had about three quarters who indicated they wanted to come back for in person learning than we sent the same survey out in mid-july that was down more like a third, and so it has altered plans dramatically unfortunately in Texas we've had constantly shifting state. As well, and so I don't honestly know which version of the plan were on at this point I lost track a long time ago. But the the prevalence of the viruses. Shifted our plans but I feel good that we got a good plan on. Nimble plan. Going forward, and we'll be able to serve families either in the building or in distance learning well O'Brian woods and becky stone I appreciate can't imagine how difficult it is to be an educator right now and not appreciate all you're doing. Thank you very much.

Brian Woods Tennessee Northside Independent School D Becky Stone United States Dr Anthony Fauci Becky San Antonio Texas Becky I. Texas Bryan Texas Trae Alcoa City Superintendent Director Alvar Texas Office
State, county officials call for continued COVID-19 eviction protections in California

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

01:09 min | 18 hrs ago

State, county officials call for continued COVID-19 eviction protections in California

"Public health officials and lawmakers today came together to call for the extension of eviction protections in the state of California. Hey, CBS is Mike Dewald has story as members of Congress continue to debate unemployment benefits. The statewide protections are set to expire in California next Friday. It's creating conditions that public health and lawmakers say could bring about an eviction crisis in the state. The county public health officer Dr Cinderelly May says they're strong connections between health and housing. Noma County residents like many across California. Fazing housing screens that was undermining all of our health. Homelessness is a big big issue as well. In Sanoma County. We have one of the biggest home of populations in the country in terms of urban centers, may says that the existing housing affordability crisis was already putting the strain on renter's Dr Margo Kushell with UCSF says that as of two weeks ago, almost 1/3 of California's renters Said they either missed their last housing payment or didn't have confidence that they could make their next one black and Latin next Californians who have already experienced the disproportionate burden of the Corona virus infection. Face the highest risk of eviction. Michael Walled, KCBS California

California Dr Margo Kushell Noma County Mike Dewald CBS Sanoma County Michael Walled Dr Cinderelly Ucsf Congress Officer
Dr. Birx says coronavirus is "extraordinarily widespread" in rural areas

Here & Now

03:02 min | 1 d ago

Dr. Birx says coronavirus is "extraordinarily widespread" in rural areas

"Into a new month, and Dr Deborah Birks of the White House Corona Virus Task Force warns that were also in a new phase of the pandemic. What we're seeing today is different for March and April. It is extraordinarily rides spread. It's into the rural as equal urban areas and to everybody who lives in a rural area. You are not immune or protected from this virus. Works told CNN that no matter where people live, they should wear a face mask and practice social distancing. Today, President Trump called her pathetic in a tweet. Joining us now is NPR's Eric Whitney, who's keeping an eye on the latest news about covert 19 around the country. Hi, Eric. Hello, Jeremy. We just heard. Dr Burkes mentioned the spread in rural areas give us more details about where we're seeing spikes in rural parts of this country, So I'm based in Montana. It's a mostly rural state and like a lot of rural states, we've had very low numbers until about June. And since then we're seeing our overall case can't grow exponentially. Following rollbacks on restrictions on businesses and visitors. Last week, we saw a construction site at a mountain resort here blow up with more than 100 positive cases. I know there's a people in tourist towns were really concerned about all the out of state plates. They're seeing across many states, their frontline workers they're concerned about being exposed to the virus. Reporter in Tennessee tells me the outbreak there has now moved beyond Nashville and Memphis and become widespread across much of the state. And I think that's also the case in a lot of southern states with high infection rates like Mississippi and Alabama. Still pretty Communist e big spikes in rural places with big meatpacking plants or other agricultural operations where people worked closely together. Jails and prisons are often located in rural areas, and we're seeing spikes there, too, when you mentioned some of the states that are in the south. In fact, six of the top seven states in terms of the new cases are in the south. The other Being California are things starting to level off at all in those states that have seen spikes in recent weeks well, California's daily case count has dropped from a peak on July 25th of more than 10,000 new cases today. About 6400 yesterday. You know that's good news. But it is far from assured that trend will continue in 6400 cases a day is still huge that Khun spawned a lot of new spread. No, Arizona has seen a more sustained drop recently, the state's weekly average of new cases. Has been going down since early July. But health officials in Arizona and even that state's conservative governor Doug Ducey, are not saying that they're out of the woods yet Governor dues He paused his previous plans to continue broad reopening. Hospitals in Arizona have been strained. That's eased a little bit, but it's not over yet. And then, if you look a test positivity rates in many Southern states like Florida and South Carolina, there's they're often in the double digits. Mississippi's test positive the rate is over 20%. Georges is more than 12% in public health officials say that anything over a 5% positivity rate is concerning, so I don't think we can say that things were leveling off in Southern states.

California White House Corona Virus Task Arizona Dr Burkes Dr Deborah Birks Eric Whitney Doug Ducey CNN President Trump Mississippi Jeremy NPR Khun South Carolina Reporter Georges Tennessee Montana
Coronavirus Impact on the Food Industry: Cameron Mitchell Restaurants CEO

Squawk Pod

06:06 min | 1 d ago

Coronavirus Impact on the Food Industry: Cameron Mitchell Restaurants CEO

"Joining us right now on the topic of small business and what he's seeing is Cameron Mitchell. He's the founder and CEO of Cameron Mitchell Restaurants, which owns nearly sixty establishments across the United States and Cameron. It's great to see you. It's been a while since we've spoken good morning break plagiary back with you today. So. The first time we talked to you was in the midst of the shutdown when all of your restaurants had been closed down and you laid out a plan for what you were hoping to see. Two weeks ago on March third, I was in Washington DC to meet with my bankers and I expressed them what a great start year we had were up seven percent same store sales record profitability for the first two months of the year. This was March third tomorrow I believe March Eighteenth we will be completely shut down I laid off forty, two hundred people on Monday. The last time we talked to you things we're looking pretty good business was was back and was booming. I think we're going to survive, but it's going to be a while before we get to the hospital we expect to be open in hopefully back to full employment by the end of June or into or end of July somewhere in that neighborhood. So what's happening right now? The best way equate it to is we're in a hurricane in the first. Landfall, the hurricane was back in March fifteenth and. It was is detrimental as it was terrible. It's was We end up getting the money and we're able to get out and get open and it was a lifeline. We would not be here today if it wasn't for the original P P P loan and June came and sales, we're doing pretty good. We're about seventy five percent of last year sales were feeling very optimistic and and when I came to realize is we are really just in the eye of the storm and then July the beginning July head and and the case counts rising. Across the country and met, metropolitan. Areas Rolling back opening guidelines and in further restrictions on our business and sales fell down to now fifty percent of last year and that is just not sustainable. So here we are today you know August second and I feel just as nervous about the future as I did back in the beginning of March when Corona virus was coming over the horizon. So we're looking for a second round of P P P to help us get through the other side and and help us sustain for the future so. And the thing that we're hearing mostly Congress is about the stimulus checks, the unemployment but there are thousands and thousands of businesses like ours out there in the country they're hurting terribly at fifty percent decline a forty percent decline sales we cannot survive. We're losing between five, hundred thousand and a million dollars a month, and we need the additional P P P dolorous in a in a terrible way and you know the the curb puzzle is for a two million dollar cap on that which. last time was ten million dollars and so for a company like ours and many others that reduction of eight million dollars just when we need it, the most is is very difficult for us. Camera now is the decline in your business coming mostly because states or local municipalities have have forced you to not open as much into close things down or much of the decline is coming from people who Are, afraid to go out what and how would you measure that a difference while it's both clearly when you have a reduction in capacity from use spell. Example Beverly Hills we were closed all restaurants California closed for indoor. New York City we were not allowed to open our whole restaurant that was just for the Patio Philadelphia. We're not allowed to open that was got rolled back from August I now to September first. So some of our businesses are not even open yet So but the main driver of that reduction of sales is the increase case cow corona virus around the country and people becoming more and more nervous about going to restaurants even though there's no science dates that that says inherently restaurants, Kobe case outbreaks, her Dr Been Driven by restaurants seating. Indoor and outdoor see. Cameron. What? What are you doing in terms of your relationship with your landlords? particularly in some of those places, the restaurants haven't even reopened yet. Are you getting any forgiveness or any easing of things from them? Well, that's the thing becky you know we had almost all of our landlords help out in some way or another not all but some or most they should say, but that money is just a simple deferral that's So we have an additional three, million dollars we got deferred in. April May and June but that money has to be paid back over various schedules over the next two years. That's just additional debt on the balance sheet, and we come out of this without P P p. one of the things cameras restaurants we built three or four restaurants a year, and if we're saddled with millions of dollars debt if and when we get out of this I don't see a building an aiding the economic rebound in the country in Twenty One and twenty two point further were saddled with all this debt. What have you heard from the the senators you've spoken with on this? I've spoken. Personally to both are centers in the state of Ohio and. They understand our plate and and but I, think they're. All. The negotiation right now over the six hundred, a week stimulus for unemployment benefits. So I don't think it's getting much attention that it needs right now and I hope by the time we get this bill and some sort of agreement between both parties on this bill that we can get this P P P round two stimulus, which has one hundred and ninety billion dollars earmarked for it, which should be more than enough for these companies passed the stress test that show they actually needed. To keep with the original PCP levels P P one camera I want to thank you for the update We we have to check in with you again soon, but we appreciate your time and wish you good

Cameron Mitchell Restaurants Cameron Cameron Mitchell Founder And Ceo United States Washington Ohio Beverly Hills New York City Congress Philadelphia California
Dr. Osterholm: Americans will be living with the coronavirus for decades

Hey, It's Cory Hepola

00:35 sec | 1 d ago

Dr. Osterholm: Americans will be living with the coronavirus for decades

"Top infectious disease experts with some sobering words this morning on vaccines factor, my closer home, told ABC CEOs Paul Douglas. Even with a successful vaccine, the virus will remain forever. There's a 1,000,000,000 plus people in the face of the Earth, for which many will never have access access to a vaccine so that transmission continue around the world and because the world is one big mixing bowl, so we're always going to be challenged by having this virus around from here until eternity. He also told Paul that a recent study found that cloth masks are not doing well enough to protect people from contracting the virus.

Paul Douglas ABC
Nourishment for our Mind and Body

Plant Strong

06:05 min | 5 d ago

Nourishment for our Mind and Body

"Dr Jerick Conrad. I want to welcome you to plan strong podcast. This is season two and season two Israeli about. Welcoming people at the heart of a hero and you know and reading up on you reading your book the fragile, mind. The beautiful introduction that was given. To me of you through our mutual friend Dr. Elizabeth linings. Yes I feel really. Really fantastic about having. A very open conversation with you and let me just frame it up right now for people because obviously right now in America we have. All these conversations that are going on around racism and Antiracism and I think it's really important bit you and I can have a conversation that will bring value. To this current narratives? and specifically, I'd like to have this conversation be more around kind of nutrition and health or lack thereof. Going on in this in this country at let let me also say Jerick that I know that you you are so well educated you're a intercultural sensitivity expert and I want to say up front that if I'd say anything that is inappropriate or you know like, Hey, dude, that was not cool I. Hope you'll call me on it and then and then helped me figure out the best way to say it or phrase it because I'm I don't even want to pretend like a nuanced or or or very good at this. Let me let me let you in on a little secret as we get more. Make these words expert. You gotta take that kind of stuff with a grain of salt you know. I am studying this stuff a talk a lot about it but you know all of us are still trying to learn as much as we can about human behavior. What makes us tick and why and so same here if I never abs you the wrong way I. Hope you say what's Eric? Louis. Feels like this what are you me? Because, we don't have these open conversations than We can't move anywhere and anytime you engage in some discussions when you start talking about things like race for instance a, it can get dicey for people but but I'm always willing to take that risk because I'm looking at toward the other side of it where we can all learn and grow together. So so don't be don't be worried about that. Good. So it's okay if we get a little uncomfortable, it just allows us to get more comfortable on the road ness, right? Absolutely. All right. Good. So I I WANNA just start out by. Just a little bit about you, and then I want you to correct me or go back if anything you know. I missed something to add something. So I and I think it's important that we say it is you're a black man right and start out and to start out. And to start out. Because a lot of people are just going to be hearing this on audio and not right. is that the correct way to refer to yourself when I referenced you? So I'm fine with African American with black I I'm I've I've really been trying to think about these labels and I'm really urging people to use you know American from. Descent. Something like that because I am in some ways, I think when you put something before American is serves as a little bit of an asteroid. And it almost subconsciously makes people think that that's a different kind of American. Of American not full American so I would prefer even though I'm the only person probably saying this right now I prefer that we move away from the Asian American or African American are you know Latin x American I prefer that we say you know American of African descent I want to emphasize the fact that we have that shared experience as Americans. But on a personal note, you know black whatever. Best. That's fine. Okay. Okay. You you grew up in east Saint Louis in what's what's considered probably the most distressed I think part of town in America. Probably said yeah, right. This had some challenges. Yeah and and I want you to talk about that You are like I said, you're incredibly well educated. You've got a bachelor's degree from the University of Illinois. You have two masters degrees from Cornell University and you've got a doctor of education degree from the University of North Florida. Okay and I know you've got a lot more degrees that maybe you can tell us about but I'm GonNa stop there for now. You your family. Eat a whole food plant based diet absolutely and. We're going to dive dive into that. Is it fair to say that today are you the CEO and President of Conrad Consultant Group? Yes I am I am. So I still have I have the kind of consulting group also work a fulltime with an HR software company OATEN software that soon to Change Our Name, we've just merged with the KRONOS. So I'm the quote unquote thought leader I run the thought leadership group of for ultimate software where I get to delve into some of these issues around of nutrition. And Wellness and all of that as well. I spent twenty years as an HR practitioner So so this really gives me a chance to to go back to my roots and little bit with still think about these ideas and try to solve these. Really. Complex problems that we're we're still struggling with.

America Dr. Elizabeth Linings Dr Jerick Conrad East Saint Louis Louis University Of Illinois Antiracism Eric Cornell University Kronos University Of North Florida CEO Conrad Consultant Group President Trump
"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

03:43 min | 5 d ago

"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Welcome DR PODCASTS everybody support those export us, , check deposit Dr Dot Com. . Let. . Me Get ready to my guests and my treatment <hes>. . Dr Abby Live. . She decided bay area. . CBT Center is where you can find her. . Online. . Dot Com she's the founder she's a US ideas. . Psychologist and she has three relationship books acceptance and commitment therapy for couples acceptance and commitment therapy interpersonal problems. . And interpersonal problems workbook <hes> Abby walpin program. . Thank you. . I'm excited to be here. . So he two things I WANNA do today. . So <hes>. . People talk about CBT all the time, , right I always find that I ended up waving my hands and CBD practitioners Kinda grandmothers a workbook. . We change your thinking and there's lots of sort of vague descriptions of would see bt is so one thing I'd love to do a little bit today is you to do some CBT on me? ? Yes yeah, , okay and and just Today to in the middle is Kobe or a perfect data dulas DVD. . Yeah. . Yeah it is. . But this this situation is pretty depressing. . Yes. . Yes. . Now already started working on me but. . Before we do that. . I WanNa talk a little bit about <hes> acceptance and commitment there. . What is that? ? Acceptance and commitment therapy takes its third wave behavioral therapy. . So on the more third wave, , cvt therapies take a more acceptance and mindfulness based approach. . So rather than challenging thoughts too much they help us create some distance from plots and mindfulness and be able to diffuse from thoughts that they're not pulling us towards certain behaviors. . Thoughts have less power. . In. . Controlling our behaviors. . Zooming you example would be your in conflict with somebody and you have to become aware of your thoughts and how they're affecting the conflict. How . is it different than dialectical behavioral therapy where you're trying to pull in your thoughts and awareness of the other person's thoughts and feelings right. . Right, , well, , dialectical behavioral therapy is a form of cognitive behavioral therapy. . So there's like a cognitive behavioral therapy umbrella. . Cognitive behavioral therapies a DVD t would be one of them act would be one of them. . <hes> emotions compassion focused therapy would be one of them or functional analytic psychotherapy would be one of them. . So there's a lot of. . Therapies that are considered to be more behavioral. . Like psycho dynamic therapy is not so much behavioral. . It's more insight focused and cognitive behavioral therapies more behaviorally focused. . We do techniques and exercises under certain thoughts and feelings act as barriers to. . <hes> to actions to behaviors. . So it's not so much like figuring something out or having insight about something. . It's more about practicing certain skills that help you change your behaviors, , the fourth component for form. . Therapy functional analysis which called. . ME. . What does that? ? Functional analytic psychotherapy is a form of behavioral. . It's it's a very behavioral intervention where you're thinking about your own behaviors as a as a therapist what are some behaviors that you want to do more of or less of, , and you're thinking about your clients cavers and you're doing a lot of. . Against punishment and reward in your own interactions as to shape behaviors

bt China
Toxic Stress

PODSHIP EARTH

06:04 min | Last week

Toxic Stress

"Just as we saw light at the end of the covid tunnel, we now find ourselves back in the darkness. The psychological impacts of this pandemic being felt acutely. We live in fear of losing a loved one to the virus, a friend being killed by the police because of the color of their skin. Parents and kids exhausted of being cooped up together. Certainly told school will be online this fall millions who have lost their jobs a terrified by having to choose between buying food or paying the rent. Essential workers as stressed by the lack of effective protective equipment. The list of legitimate to worry about has grown nearly endless. Stress takes many forms and manifesto, myriad of symptoms at its was stress can elicit a toxic shock to our system that changes who we are at the very fundamental level. During covid acts of abuse neglect in household dysfunction are all on the rides while the stay at home orders help stem the tide of the pandemic. There's a mounting evidence that lead to violence in the home, becoming more severe and frequent. When we think of environmental factors that contribute to health problems like asthma, the impacts of stress from abused neglected dysfunction are often overlooked in the last decade understanding of both adverse childhood, experiences and toxic stress as adults has evolved. In large part, this is due to the work of Dr Nadine. Bug Harris an award-winning physician, researcher and advocate dedicated to changing the way society responds to Childhood Trauma. Doctor Doug Harris was appointed as California's first ever surgeon general by Governor Gavin Newsom in January twenty nine team. As California in general Nadine has had a bold goal to reduce adverse childhood experiences also known by the acronym ace or aces by half in one generation Dr Buck. Harris's career has been dedicated to serving vulnerable communities and combating the root causes of health disparities. After completing residency at Stanford she founded a clinic in one of San Francisco's most undeserved communities, Bayview hunters point it was Ed's. That Buck Harris observed that despite the implementation of National Best Practices for Immunizations Asthma. Obesity treatment and other preventive health measures a patient's still faced outsized risks for poor health, development and behavioral outcomes. In Two thousand eleven, she founded the Center Youth Wellness and subsequently grew the organization to be a national leader in the effort to advance pediatric medicine raise public awareness and transform the way society responds to children exposed to adverse childhood experiences and toxic stress. Dr Bernard Harris Is Talk. How Childhood Trauma Effects Health across the lifetime has been viewed more than six million times have book. The deepest will healing the long term effects of childhood adversity was called indispensable by the. New York Times I stopped by asking. What is like to be surgeon general during the time of Kobe? It's a little crazy. Yeah, it's a new role within government. It also feels really important. Because in this moment I think a lot of people are recognizing the importance of public health, and it's coming to a new level of awareness for a lot of people and so i. think that creates a lot of opportunities that I'm really grateful for. We will say this, but we kind of take our health for granted. Nadine we. We we go about our lives and this has been such a shock to the system. That is nearly all that we think about now for a lot of us. We're not just in this moment of covert nineteen, which is has been this incredible health crisis, but it's also showing all the cracks in our safety. Net it showing how much there are so many people who can't live without paycheck at. At showing how many folks are on the front lines it showing how dependent we are on healthcare, it's also showing how mental health is a huge issues, the stress of the pandemic and it's also showing up in the racial disparities right when we look and see that black and Brown folks are dying at a higher rate like there's a pandemic that comes across our country across the globe and yet. Yet in the United, states what see is that black and Brown people are dying at a substantially greater rate than others when I see the racial disparities around Kovin I feel outraged every day and I think about my kids and everything that I'm working for to ensure that they live in a state and in a country where they simply have equal opportunity right now. I'm not asking for a leg. Asking for any kind of you know anything special, and simply asking for equal opportunity for my children to be healthy, and well for my children to have their God given right to grow up and make themselves whatever it is that they will make of themselves, and so from that standpoint, it's been terribly challenging time if I'm speaking honestly because you know, we're all working around the clock, fighting Covid, and then we also have to be fighting all these other pieces fighting racial discrimination structural inequalities, all of these different pieces and for me, the fight has never felt more important and it. It feels like we're right on the front

Dr Nadine Doctor Doug Harris Covid Tunnel Dr Bernard Harris Buck Harris California Covid Governor Gavin Newsom New York Times Stanford Obesity Asthma Dr Buck San Francisco United Researcher Center Youth Wellness Kobe ED
"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

09:45 min | 2 weeks ago

"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"About you can follow Dr Newburg at at Andrew Newberg and HE WBRC DOT com. Twitter at Andrew, Newberg and Dutch newer. You came highly recommended by Dr Dan Een. WHO said you must speak with him, so we all well. He's a terrific guy and I. would have told you the same thing in reverse. Yards a three way again, so so talk first. Let's start with the book. What what what did you learn writing? This could prompted you write the book and what is in there? Well you know I've been studying the relationship between spirituality in the brain for many many years and and that has kind of developed into this field of neuro. Theology you know what? How we look at and understand the relationship link between the human rain in our religious and spiritual cells. Part of why I got into the discussion. Autism was that I'm sorry it's all good. We Love Dogs against. During the quarantine everyone does it guy I know I know? so part and part of the reason why I got into hopping rabbis, brain is the idea that. We can really start to think about neuro theology from the perspective of different traditions, and of course my own background is Judaism. I was raised in a reform Jewish household up armistead, and so it just seemed like a very natural kind of approach to be able to start with that but ultimately neuro theology is something that is really for every type of tradition, and so hopefully this is really just the start of it's the ability for us to look at a Christianity, and it's denominations. Islam. Hinduism Buddhism all the traditions from this perspective to see what we can learn what we can understand in terms of how the brain health us to be relig- religious and spiritual. And, so you know this this whole idea of neurobiology anthropology spirituality stuff. That's how I found Jordan. Peterson I'm interested in people that combined anthropologists psychology. Then ask the question. Why do our brains do that right? And then is there some transcendent meaning? That's a whole other question, but wire. Why did the human trains do that and? It gives me A. Absolute intense fascination. So how'd you? What's your posture as somebody that evaluates these things from the neuroscience recovering from multiple different perspectives. Where where are you evaluating this? Well, certainly you know I. Do feel like Neuro Theology as a as a field based on the work that I'm trying to do is is something that is very multidimensional, and and really does kind of come at things from a variety of different perspectives I suppose. Because my background is neuro imaging I'm there certainly that? But as you mentioned just a moment ago? You know part of what excites me. in in terms of all of the information that we can get at from this perspective is that it ranges from the very practical to the very esoteric so on a very practical level. We can ask questions about well, if somebody. Is Religious Is that protective to protect them from depression. Does IT PROTECT THEM FROM SUBSTANCE ABUSE? Obviously a big area that I know you've been involved in for many years. And, there's a lot of evidence to support added. Certainly you know programs like alcoholics, anonymous which really invokes a spiritual concept. has also been very effective for helping people with alcoholism, so they're very tactical piece, yeah! Stay. With us for a second. Is there something about spirituality that changes the brain in such a way that you can look at the imaging and say oh? That's why they're regulating better. That's why the oncologist so. What changed in their brain. That might help them. There substances well there. There are a variety of changes that occur. does depend a little bit on what practices in what the person is doing so for example you know when we study a practice like prayer, we find that perhaps that happens to increase the activity in their frontal lobe. We've actually done some studies that have looked at certain transmitters in a found a spiritual retreat program in intensive retreat. Officers the amount of dopamine in their brain, and these are the lives up to regulate our emotional responses. So when you're talking about you know having an addiction being anxious having. If your frontal lobes are working better because you are engaged in spiritual practice or bears religious spiritual beliefs. Then that's going to help you psychologically and similarly. If, you're really immersed in this then it changes your tone in levels, the dopamine levels in the brain much like the drugs that people would take an antidepressant or a drug that might help them to calm down, and so we really see this kind of an impact of these practices on a lot of different levels, and it also changes the other important set of structures of the LIMBIC system. The emotional centers of the brain and these practices helped to calm those down so that people aren't quite as reactive and you know when when you think about what religions do I mean? mean part of the thing is. There are a lot of ingredients right I mean they're. They're the practices. We were just talking about, but there's the believes the comfort that they get. There's the social support they get so there's a lot of different elements that are very contributory to helping people when they're engaged. They're religious or spiritual south I'M GONNA. Keep drilling on the alcohol for a second, because they will often talk about these moments of change where they feel like something has stepped in from the outside and they're. They're different. Sectors of Swish changed, and I will tell you. Look very carefully. At these folks they usually are preceded by some sort of experience of novelty in a relationship like the as though they are seeing them, so they can see themselves with a new pair of glasses and that moment causes. What they want to call you a you as a spiritual shift. That fit with the by what you're observing. Absolutely one of the other books that we wrote a very recently called how enlightenment changes your brain, and we talk all about those very momentary experiences, and obviously they can be deeply spiritual somebody Julie Hits Enlightenment and kind of understands the universe in some kind of metaphysical way but they can have that more practical nature's people. Just you know it's those moments where there's this dramatic shift in the brain. And suddenly everything that they thought before changes and heart of what we think. The frontal lobe is also becomes part of that impact interestingly. When people meditate or pray, their funnels tend to go up, but when people have these experiences, their frontal lobes go down in the front lobe. Is normally involved in kind of helping us to be ourselves the egocentric self that he controls everything for us, and when that shuts, Menaj drops when people these enlightenment of these Aha moments suddenly everything that they ever knew all the ways in which they thought about themselves, kind of get thrown up in the air and completely rearranged and so It is a very dramatic. Thank usually, there's some trigger. Sometimes it can be the you know the proverbial hitting rock bottom. It can be something that you know they they. They have a different perception in a new way that they never had before. They can be very tedious, but. They dramatically changed the brain and. What are evidence shows from studying people who have had these kinds of experiences is it changes the way they think about their lives, their relationships their jobs. Everything has changed very dramatically through this moment, and you know from a brain perspective. This is quite remarkable I mean that's not typically how we think of the brain working. It does and it raises an interesting practical brain question, which is these? Were these circuits always there and people just couldn't access than before, and now they suddenly do, or did the brain literally just get completely rewired? And now they're able to thank and do things in a completely different way. The I would guess the wiring is less likely given the I have worked at people's brains for a long time. The wiring issues take forever. It's like you've got to do things a lot for the wire the. And that's why these these enlightenment kinds of experiences are so remarkable, because it really does, that is the way we normally think about things taking time working with people going through things, and then suddenly in an instant it just changes everything and we don't really understand that fully, but that's part of you know to me an exciting area of neuro theologies to look. Look at that and try to understand that and capture that isn't there. An -regulation right post your parietal or something at the same time as these am I right about as or is there Brian Lopez? Also very involved in in goes back to even one of your earlier questions. About what is it? This turns out when people were being spiritual so. On the PARIETAL lobes in I've been very focused on over the years. It's an area of our brain that normally. Helps us to create our spatial representation of ourselves. Our self relates to the world, and we have found actually is typically when you have these right profound experiences bridal of actually tends to go down. It tends to shut down, and which I think makes a lot of sense, so it normally turns on to help you create your sense of self when it shuts down long. Long you kind of lose that sense of self and you lose the ability to see things spatially distinguish yourself from the other, and so it's associated with those experiences. The people described the famous ones, a one being one with everything being one with God rat the loss of the south, and at sense that something is kind of taking over the brain and so. That tends to be very involved in these kinds of experiences, and that's part of why we think they become such an intense powerful experience for the person.

Andrew Newberg dopamine Twitter Dr Newburg Dr Dan Een alcoholism armistead Peterson Brian Lopez Swish Julie
"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

11:32 min | 2 months ago

"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Let me just dispense with all the usual rejoinders. I hope everyone is doing well through this trying times. The Chinese curse or something I think of often which is may you live in interesting times? I think we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA do well with this but it's not gonna be without pain of all sorts economic and physical for those people who actually get the infection so we are recording this obviously in the shadow of the krone outbreak. We are all quarantined away and by Zoom. I Have Dr David Ray-ban David welker program. Thank you for having me. I really appreciate it and and so good to be here and huge fan. Run my childhood all my God. That's that's a big deal. Because you're about to geek out of all your training so let me let me and it's a perfect time for us to be talking Hopefully people can gain something from our conversation for the time so Dr Ayman Has Spent Fourteen years researching treatments to combat the negative effects of stress on physical and mental health? And I don't know about everybody else. But I'm feeling it right now. He's a board certified psychiatrist also a PhD neuroscience where he's a translational neuroscientist and inventor specializing in treatment. Ptsd depression anxiety substance use. We're GONNA talk a little bit later about his research with hallucinogens. Which was the original reason. I Sought out Dr able to be a guest on the show but with all this going on in the world and by the way he's working with maps jail and their see another under really leading researchers on psychedelics used. Md Ama in therapy these things. We'll talk about it but right now it is. The it's the Apollo and wearable technology that uses neuroscience touch and vibration to combat the negative effects of stress. The website is APOLLO NEURAL DOT COM. Apollo twitter is add. Apollo H. R. V. That about summarize it that sums it up Dr Drew All Right. So let's talk about stress. Let's talk about the spent half my day. Talking people off the ledge. It is stressful time. Likewise Yeah Yeah I think I think this is one of the most stressful times We've had in the last few decades. I think that it's important to acknowledge that it's important of knowledge what that stress does to us It's you know it. Increases Heart rate increase. Their reading rate it makes us sweat more makes us our thoughts moon faster and I think most importantly that stress over time it impairs our body's ability to enter recovery states. So what I mean by. This is and this is really critical. I think for all of us understand and I wish I had been taught us in medical schools something. I figured out my later. Reading and studies of the autonomic nervous system which is the balance of the stress and the threat in the safety response system and basically the sympathetic system is responsible for helping us maintain survival in situations that require fight flight or freeze responses to get to a place of safety while we're under acute survival threat Many of us feel that way right now. We feel like we're under a survival threat that we have to constantly protect ourselves. Be Hyper vigilant. Anything around us. They could possibly result in US getting sick. And this what this does is it shuts down our recovery response system which requires safety to actively. This is the system. That's responsible for recovery sleep creativity. Reproduction Digestion Empathy all of these things that our bodies do that make our lives enjoyable and warning and fun and so what happens. Is it up to us to remind ourselves in as many ways as possible One of the best ways used breath work training meditation. Yoga mindfulness biofeedback and things of this nature. Some other techniques include things like Apollo in psychedelics But ultimately it's up to us to figure out how to build strategies that strengthen the balance in our bodies balancing our minds between these two nervous systems to remind ourselves that we are safe. Were not in an acute survival. Tried to scariest things are were actually okay and we actually are in a place where we have time to spend with our families. That's something that who would have thought we wanna know what had happened right. Everything's kind of slowing down. There's there's many different ways to look at this situation and I think that's cold was calling it a four sabotage tab and we all these years that we're going to have our but pay our debt to the Sabbath for a few months. Well although I a couple of things I We have I started actually spoke to Stephen Porges and Alan Shore Gary if you can give me the show numbers on those. They're out from behind the pay wall now so you can listen to them. As importers of course the polly Bagel theory and really elucidated some of the mechanisms whereby the person pathetic system which is part of the automatic nervous system gives us our free response and how it can be a problem sometimes particularly for those of us that had trauma early on in childhood and Dr Alan Shore Young Guy that worked on this when the earliest research well co-leaders it'd be information of all this gary deal. Those numbers chance scary. There lost Gary goes show. Sorry Yup I am here. Alan shore is episodes. Sixty five possibly more. But I'm not that's I what I'm seeing and I think that was an important one. Okay and then. Porzingis was sixty three ninety and more recently three ninety five but back to the the fourth Sabbath I. He actually part of the problem with Uh spending a lot of time together is everybody is in that automatic heightened state. I've noticed actually in a time when we all should be coming together. I'm I'm witnessing and I'm hearing about lots of ability and conflicts just the time when we should be killed during our time together. People are too geared up right. And that's and that sort of the. That's a threat pathway. Really taking hold right and it's up to us to to remember that there are two. There are multiple choices with the way we approached this threat The way we're approaching it with constant fear and hyper vigilance were constantly overwhelmed and surrounded by overwhelming stimuli news People talking about people dying and the contagious of the of the illness. All these things are are really scary to be surrounded by anybody hearing about that stuff. All the time would be expected to be stressed in irritable. That's not unusual so it's important to remember that when we're surrounded by all that stuff. It's normal to feel afraid scared irritable but I think the opportunity here is that is the opportunity to be grateful for recognizing that this could be so much worse and that this is hopefully justo based on what we're hearing. This is hopefully just a warning sign for us to get our butts in gear and really start taking care of not only our house but the health of our communities and health of the world is a whole because this is really a sign of is the as you said in some ways right. It's a four Sabbath. We've been neglecting a recovery. We've been neglecting our day of rest. Now it's also neglecting our health health ourselves our communities and our our earth hole. And so you know I think I am when I'm really hoping is. This is a wakeup call. All of us to take a step back and say what? Can we do to be grateful for this time to use it as best as possible to improve? Our health decrease our chances of getting sick to build resilience and to just you know really think sex think again about what we want out of our lives. Yeah it's funny. I was thinking about this today. I noticed In where are you where you calling us from? I'm calling you from Monterey California Monterey so I noticed in in New York City today I've got a lot of people I love the city and it's it's the population that's getting sick. There is are people that are sort of chronically. We're making a big population or chronically. Ill people and we you know sort of these horrible living environments that maybe aren't even working and exercising and I don't have a lot of engagement and sort are really feeling worthwhile about themselves and so are taking care of themselves why these people are getting sick now. Right and I I don't know what we do about that. Because that's a population. That's hard to get mobilized. That's the really tough problem and I think you know I. It's not. There are no easy answers to that other than creating better education as much can and I think honestly it's people like you and I and the healthcare you know the senior healthcare providers the the people who are in a lot of ways elders in our society nowadays right that are the people who have the most education that have the most of the story can step up and say you know we would understand how you got to wear you got and that's not your fault but here's how you can get to a better place that you would rather be. Let's figure out where you would rather be. We're not gonNA tell you should be. Let's ask you where would you rather be? Let's figure that out most of most of these people that we're talking about are chronically. Ill would rather feel better most of the time. And so it's The practice I think what we actually using Substance Abuse Disorders nowadays In for the last three years which is motivational interviewing. It's helping to understand. Just empathy helping understand where somebody wants to go with their lives. And then what helping them understand. What they you get there and over time as we start the brain is not as complicated naked out. The it's really a practice makes perfect system and the more we gradually practice Small Habits and and small positive changes those lead to bigger positive. Changes OVER TIME. At practice makes perfect system. Kicks in we start feeling a hell of a lot better pretty quick until Apollo is sort of a way to tap into that by helping people feel safe enough to make change. I think part of the thing that we oftentimes forget is that threat in constant fear. Make US afraid of everything including change itself and so how do we embrace recovery and embrace positive change in our lives when the the constant threat makes us feel like we have to have tunnel vision on the same habits? We've always hat and the literature. Echoes Scientific Literature shows that without a doubt. It's always harder to make change Michael. You're stressed out It's hard to meditate already. Haven't it's harder to learn meditative you already have a diagnosis of PTSD right. And so what what Apollo and the reason we built Apollo for this purpose was if we could prime the body to feel safe and present and in the moment I remind by sending a signal just like somebody holding your hand on a bad giving you a hug on a bad day at tells the brain or reminds the brain. Hey wait a minute..

Apollo Alan Shore Gary US Apollo H. R. Dr Ayman Dr David Ray-ban APOLLO NEURAL PTSD twitter David welker Alan shore Stephen Porges Scientific Literature Dr Alan Shore Monterey Porzingis Michael
"dr" Discussed on Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

08:02 min | 3 months ago

"dr" Discussed on Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

"They're not willing to give it time to heal and your body takes time to heal things. It takes quite a long time. So it's you know that's why we base the treatments every three weeks to give it time to work but in in in a sense it's still working when we when we get to. The next treatment is still the old tree so working they. It's sort of healing cascade. We're starting and keeps going and going and going until you finally Bloomfield. So sometimes people will say well. Gee it didn't work for all something couple comb through you know. I feel pretty good now. You know because they're not really wait. You know they want. They want everyone to have immediate results. And that's that's you know that's not the way it is you know and sure healing the body's healing itself and takes a little time. My wife had full rotator cuff chair. I treated her. She had treated. I guess about six or seven times. No no surgery. No sling no physical therapy. She was back playing tennis again. Five months which is unheard of unheard of you so it's a very effective treatment for people and the more the more they would realize that and and that would catch on. You know that's why we that's why even the other prolotherapy Dr Hauser Myself. We've we tried to explain to people what this is because we want more people to do it. You don't care who they go. Just get it done because I don't that'll make it make Other people doing it and make it more viable for other people to go into this business. And that's why we're doing this program today. I Live live is a fair fairly educated population. But they don't right. They have no idea. They think you're crazy that I was gonNA talk about this today so hope you're listening out. They're my friends but You know this is something you should look into it Nancy on line one. Did you ever question? No I'm taking it all. I Really WanNa read up on this Because I right now I just look at look at the Internet. There's so much information out there on it. As plenty of it works works very well. Sciatica by the way thank you. I definitely check that out. Okay Howard. Did you have a question? So all right. Thanks so So there's two lines wavering. So doctor Dr Sergio. I think maybe we we have to do this again. jerk this free educational purposes. Because as I said my my goal is to make people the CEO their own body and the way medicine is going. And how is getting fraction? It there's nobody looking at the whole body. You know the pulmonary guy looks at the lungs heart guy looks cholestorol the the Skin Guy. Just all he can see is cancers. He's gotTa take off and no one knows what the other ones do. Nobody's looking at the whole system and so Trying to get people to think of this as their bodies that assist system and there are part of a bigger systems. We're all connected and you're doing a great service great well. I really appreciate you taking the time today. I'm GonNa let you go because they I want I want our listeners. The digest what they heard today and you. We'll we'll schedule another another podcast just on parole or or the and you know and and just go the deeper into it and You know I wanNA find out why why they put. V Twelve of these ships. I have no idea Well Yeah we put it in there sometimes because it seems to make the muscles heal faster than tendons ligaments heal faster. I is it myself that it doesn't hurt so it helps people feel better anyway. You know give it a little more energy if it was meant to give you energy a little more energy in. The healing process also helps. That's a good point all right doctor you God bless you. Thank you for taking the time and we'll be in touch and Ladies and gentlemen if you only heard it on the doctor raw unfiltered on the PODCAST He'll get you in and the you know in life. You weigh the benefits against the risks. The risks are very minimal benefits. Very every great and it's not like taking a drug were like I told you last week. Two hundred fifty thousand people a year die from drug reactions You know so. You're not taking any drugs with this okay. It's they're being injected into. Yeah no doubt but You know there's their solutions that of course inflammation There's no opioids. There's nothing that depressure mind. So we we. We have to keep coming back to this so Dr Sergio again. Thank you. We all thank you and we will. Okay Nice talking in general I. I really appreciate doctors. You taking the time and I'm a believer prolotherapy. I've done it myself When I was in practice and it's it's just a procedure that can hurt and most of the time helps especially to someone that knows what they're doing There is a society of pro a therapist. And you know if you if you're not in the in the South West Naples areas epaulets Florida area you you can look them up but You have joint pain elbow view playing too much tennis playing too much golf You know you might WanNa look into it. Yeah it's probably not covered by insurance but You might want to look into this okay so ladies and gentlemen. We've been talking about prolotherapy next week. I'm going to talk about modeling. And the Fergus Guy Ferguson from the UK and how his models have never been right and talk to you more about fear and loneliness and how this plays right into the hands of this closing down of our economies and fear is just like a love and we have to get this country back and working. take care of the elderly and those with with home morbidity he's But we have to get get going again and we have to get our positive outlook back And I'll repeat whatever it is. Science said the differs retrieving Genius Stupidity. That genius has its limits. I'm forget that and we'll talk about next next week. Also about Denmark passing the first mandatory Vaccine Law. I'm GonNa tell you about these vaccines again how they incorporate into your DNA and changed forever so with that. We're GONNA call today. I WanNa play just a little something for Hispanic a Mexican friends. And we'll see you next week. Thank you for listening You With Lucy yes Ladies and Gentlemen. Thank you for listening to filtered uncensored hose doctor on here each and every week.

Dr Sergio Fergus Guy Ferguson rotator cuff Sciatica Bloomfield tennis CEO Nancy UK Howard Lucy Denmark South West Naples Florida
"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

04:47 min | 7 months ago

"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"And that's what. I think that that is what the job well listen to me anyway. But I that's sometimes is all it takes to solve. A problem is is to be fully lear and lists. We talked about this before it. You know we talked about it than I. Second Street Y.. which is it's fully president? Aware listening with your whole body. uh-huh I remember. I was kind of talking. Well we were talking about porridges die where he talks about how you sent me the article or Gary Hart artem. Here's your ears will adjust jess to the person you love. It's it's the obstacles it's the tiny bones in your ear have to muscles. Attached them in the muscle will adjust so he can get the tone on the property of say. Mom It will tune into Lyrica Tuning in sort of a mechanism and it's connected to our vegas nerve and our nerve is the main outflow from our heart Interest it's fascinating. Your body is this gigantic instrument and we have all these huge plexus of nerves in our gut and our chest and abdomen that we don't know what they're processing they don't know how they they work but we do know a lot of information's coming back And so when you get a feeling a gut feeling or my heart hurts. That's really happening. Yeah that's what that's for feelings feelings come from your body and they are processed in your brain and they are reflected and things in your brain but the real experiences in your body and you can listen with your body. I mean in our Western society eighty. We always sort of chop off our heads from us. Audio cards. Error is is is but you should know that. Now they really the conversation conversation is about the embedded brain. No thank you for man's planning again great band. I'm saying my field data bust your balls. I recognized yeah. But but but that in the in the field of the the the move it's moved to the embedded brain and in the brain is not just embedded in a body. Right right it's embedded with a spinal cord it's better body the body's embedded in a environment and better than a society in an interpersonal context. And so this embedded nece it they take heidegger to his whole. Philosophy was about being in the world that they were sort of a fundamental inability inextricably of being and being in the world. You're born into the world. He called throwing this. You're thrown into the world. You're not floating inspe- even that's being in an environment and You cannot extract the person from the environment in a meaningful way fully. The complexity is amazing. Right you really think yes. Yes we usually don't think about in terms it's now now now Gary you've sat through how many Sean Carroll interviews at at least two or three yeah do you understand why did that his stuff and really interest me as the next layer on this so we're talking about existing as beings in the world in space time in Sean tells the episodes those went win finished talking. is talking about the fact that there's something more fundamental than space in time our space time And that we're all part of were probably more emergent properties of some wave function. That is mine. TASTIC HOT FOR I. Listen I listen to Sean Sean. Carroll he's a Caltech professor and I got his podcast which is called mindscape and I dragged me. Okay let's have at it. So what numbers. Three eighty nine and four zero three and there may be another one coming out soon. Arizona's email them to Dr. Very all. Right listen you said at all I love you I love you love you this except what accepted I accept. EMC ACC access. I accepted except for Dad. Except for you're looking at your phone all the time I get enough of that home. Trust me but here we are so privileged again. Thank you thank you for the New York trip. I really the enjoyed that whole experience. Yeah it was great and even the whole challenge of the classroom and stuff like that everything about it was fun and good and I think and I think ever in that room had an experience. Yeah and I thought that was Kinda cool. Thank you for saying yes anytime. You don't say no Judicata tatum. Marriage and divorce or time. Travel to turn All right but again always a privilege. Checkout.

Sean Sean Gary Hart professor heidegger Sean Carroll president Arizona Caltech EMC New York
"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:25 min | 7 months ago

"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"I guess I don't like the word founding because it's not doesn't make sense but virology discovered the field of virology in its lobby rule. No Hopkins Soya and he was there sitting chair. I think we're like thirty years or something like that and that is very true. So so what you're saying very similar about they're sort of this bellboy built in a way. Yeah grandiosity in Jerusalem. I remember this and I I I witnessed. We reported this back in those days A physician come do take care of his daughter in a hospital pulling insisting under her pelvic exam himself. Okay because he wouldn't dare have another person toucher. Yeah that wasn't that's kind of crazy. Yeah I just do for sure Tarver seventies yeah so. Are You saying that your dad had this happening that he not yet boundaries because he would take care of family and stuff like that but but he was taking care of my mother in some way and keeping her glued together. It's not good codependent. It's good penalty. Yeah then that too and And then I would you know for sure if he knew what I was absorbed. He wasn't aware that or hobby. Never got exposed to what I what I was supposed to always and my sister thinks I'm just an evil person for being mean my mom for talking for in the other other than glowing way I absorbed all time you can have. You can have complex. Thought could have more than one feeling. You can love someone very mature. Sure memories to in whatever it was that was my experience and so it was like I said I remember the that kind of screaming and yelling that I'd never overseen except in a psychiatric hospital interesting. Do you think that's why you got into the field you're GONNA do. Well I think the it's it's hard to say but in the Adolescent I got interested in adolescent health. Which is what love line was all about because when I was in college at Nineteen I started having panic attacks? Ax and depression really daily panic attacks and I was mismanaged completely for a couple of years and it was suffering and that because there was there was no adolescent health. Didn't exist then there was no experts in the field. No nothing I I remember. I went down to the collegiate as small college New England. I went down to the health center. Something's wrong with me and the doctor looks at me. Some old retired physician was giving his time to the college. You know a couple of days a week looks goes to get your shit together. Take walks in the woods. Just take long walks. I was like if that that would do it. I of course I do that. He can my shit together happily. I I was disabled with panic and depression. Totally mismanage and I thought I'd never want anybody else to through that in their adolescence. They're should be there's there's and clearly even as a LS myself nineteen years old. I could see their unique needs that just nobody was there to me. I love to hear stories about people who get into their field. We're really and they're able to be honest about themselves. You know this happened to me. I want to make sure it doesn't happen again. Like it and I the the psyche getting involved. This addiction medicine was a total fluke and even the psychiatric stuff was kind of a flu. I've just moonlighting during our medical residency and just got more interested in it. I wouldn't say it had the same kind of Dr That adolescent thing did that then really was like I don't everybody goes through that anymore. They there's got to be and the field developed. I thought I want to be part of that. That's an that's an amazing story. I've never heard that before that one before from you know saying listen to your podcast. All the time just never heard that one shooter so and so so anything like that for you I I fell at a very early age. I was this given the flag to problem solve and I think that I grew family. Yes so I think that I Someone the hero someone gives you a flag and you can either take it or not. I don't know but there's different roles that people are calls. I mean families no it it was all done with straight line. We also hero to the family. Come I think that you know the name Venus so so like going back to the name. We've come full circle so we have like. Victoria's the oldest Catherine Danielle Matthew and I'm the second oldest and Venus so in a way it it kind of sets up that you have to be doing something. Why are you on your phone? You're not even listening. I am listening to you because somebody takes me. I'm interviewing yields. Somebody texted W I had to respond fucked up listeners. Just want you to know that. He's on this about him all the time every day. But if I look at my phone he has a Shit Fatso also really oil. While we're going to ship it but I'll call you on it Do you want to hear. The story is okay so at the end of the day I just would. We would sit on the stoop all of our houses connected because we lived in a row homes and it would listen to the women talk about these problems as if they were unsolvable they would talk about these issues and I remember this very young age. I must've been four or five years old. When I was laying? Condom from just relational problems. Money problems but it wasn't and I was obviously as I got got older. I was able to be like. Oh this isn't about that. This is about this but I I never really said anything I just was like these. Problems are solvable. We can solve scar cool and silver. I am and that's really how I got into it like this. This is we can do this. You know and I I really do believe in. I don't think people need more psychologists I think people need more community and friends with you and I and we have you. Did you have come along at a time. When the the cognitive revolution has occurred too so you can can help them solve their problems as community in France They don't need psychologist so I I think that that was my early lesson in like okay. What what am I gonNa do with my life and so I started doing that as a very young age and probably badly and so I decided to do it as a as an older adult? Come to me with Steph too and I think about it in college particular but I I was not the right person. That'd be a good listener. Always well that's.

depression Soya Jerusalem Tarver New England Steph France Catherine Danielle Matthew Victoria
"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

03:31 min | 7 months ago

"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Couldn't believe. Have you actually done it. I was like Holy Shit. He we were in the kids quick to. He's so nice really is do you have trouble saying no. Oh Oh yeah yeah I would have said no to say no I thought about how guilty and came back stopping ever seen no however it manifest different kind of time horizons to it. I was at the newer craigslist. Tell you why I liked it because you took care of everything for me. Tribe tried. Yeah so it made it. He made it very easy. That was nice and and it was funny and fun to get to know his family and what they were looking at stuff and think about it. So it's as far as good. You also mentioned something. The last time I was here about codependency and really loved what you said that people love. It is co dependent which is true but I think I was probably talking about enmesh not a measurement so much as fusion That that real intense love a fusion. Right you lose your bowed or you lose your body boundaries you lose your emotional boundaries with that other person but to be able to do hit and still be yourself and be able to move in and out of it lexa bleed easily That's where it becomes the difference between health and not health some people the boundaries stabler. Stabler it all the time. That's very common And that's that's where the co-dependency becomes. Would you describe yourself thought I because he knows Judy Likud officiating. What's getting better at saying? No you getting better when you get older guesses just like kids really. I agree with you just older. And you're like you almost don't have the emotional. You can't please everybody what it's I'm just laughing at myself thinking about. Why one of the things that makes it easier for me is I have have? I had an insane memory when I was throughout my life. Like like like I can remember might the the furniture my room and I was on the wall when I was under two years of age and it was just I just had this crazy memberthon. That's kind of faded so I can say no and not keep thinking about Forget that is true because I would be this. I'm this well. I'm getting better at not ruminating over things as much where I did before Trauma in your because usually that's what set your story off. Yes it does not rehearsing things and you who grew up in trauma to similar you know my mother was a traumatic traumatizing and in what way like emotionally emotionally abusive yelling yelling yelling. I would say that I had never heard yelling like that until I spent time in the locked unit of the psychiatric Patrick Hospital as a as a caretaker. I would occasionally hear people yelling like that. No that's that's suffering from something but my dad was a physician and covered hovered and made sure it didn't get out or who knows what the hell they were doing. Whatever that that generation of physicians had been bad boundaries horrible boundaries? They took it on family members. They didn't they just terrible. My husband's father Was Dr Richard Johnson and he he is one of the.

Dr Richard Johnson craigslist Stabler psychiatric Patrick Hospital Judy Likud
"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

04:12 min | 7 months ago

"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"And then I I I just saw her from across across the room and I knew that she would be my life. I just knew it that I was gonNA spend the resume with our men experience that phenomenon on like ten to one over women. Okay so that is true. 'cause I tell the story this way I looked across the room and I said I'm GONNA I can't wait to fuck him. This is going to be amazing. Think we tell the story very differently For for men I talked to another anthropologist who had studied this and she said because she was studying love at first sight and she felt men way more than women have experienced that and she said but really what she's finding is that it was lust at first sight. That worked out that it goes down to the memory. So you're you're actually. Maybe you had the same experience Roy Moore honest about it. Can't fuck his brains out. This is going to be great. Yeah so that's how how we met and You know it was. It's it's interesting because I always described when you meet someone like let's say you're in an airport and I have a red suitcase and that other person red suitcase and you're like Oh my God you have a case taste whiskey. I on this plane together. We would fly somewhere and so you then get into a relationship and you're flying you know wherever you're going across the world and then you're just a nation happens and you open. Put up the luggage and begin to take out all of your baggage and all different. When it's all you know what I mean so I always say that like I? I feel like my husband and my baggage Mesh. You know what I mean like twenty. He would kill me for this. Yeah he's the counter. No Twenty seven twenty two twenty three and so I would argue that scripts people say you know the similar script Yup similar is that you expect marriage similar likes similar to be married. I never wanted to be married or have kids. They were the two best decisions I I never made. He made them. He is a great family. Person and key makes good family choices. I just didn't want to be. I just never saw that for myself after mm-hmm yes yes I was like. Why can't we just live like Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell like? Why can't we do that? He said well when you have kids. It's a little bit different and Blah Blah Blah. None of that matters. I just sort of was afraid that maybe wouldn't be a good way for a good mother mother the end of the day. I was scared of I think that I watched my parents are still married but they were children when and they got married and my mother never went to high school My father's an auto mechanic they had been married for over fifty something years So Oh like it's well. Actually we see Lord Sicilian fiddler on the roof so I watched them grow up like my mother was sixteen sixteen and a half when she had me like fifteen when she had my sister. So it's a lot so I kind of looked at this and I'm like oh I don't want to have that Matt and I just didn't feel confident in the my my parent's relationship did not look happy to me. So you married then you die. Sort third hour you get married many get unhappy. That's the four motion the life look at how how did you. How did you overcome that? I had a shocking experience at the altar where I was like. Oh my God this is exactly where I want to be this fucking by the said anything bad about this relationship or marriage. Generally this is precisely where I wanna be and then we indicates pretty quick and that's just suggests that we were. We were overnight. You kind of have a little bit of this Gary Ya. We became parents but we were a weird thing. Where I was at the alternate was like fuck? That's Dr drew outstanding. Did their wedding brilliant. You ask for it. I.

Goldie Hawn Roy Moore Gary Ya Kurt Russell Matt
"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

03:52 min | 7 months ago

"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Drew. Do it now and it's still. It's still for the most part the same data just being reinterpreted which is fine which is good so we've got to do a book on that. Well it's already been written. You should read. It was a bunch of the. There's a ton of them because I'm booker. met with my daughter it and she's a gender everything. Fender fat feminists seven. We're reading all kinds of stuff And the gender zone and Most of the science that I have found that she's throwing me as the universally the definition the reason we should have certain interpretations of the the data most of the science is very bad It's I'm looking for good science. Oh great yeah so we'll find it. Good there's a podcast I will listen to me. I think it's called in court not enquiring minds. And she did she's really a great scientist. Enquiring interim folks thoughts conscious. She's unbelievable crowds rationally. Speaking Rashly. Speaking and she's she's a she's a well trained scientist and she's constantly constantly like wait. A minute these. These positions are built on bad signs on CD bunking staff so rashly. Speaking is a very good episode of good podcast interested in that stuff. Yeah I love podcast crazy and they only really listen to yours. That's GonNa the answer I don't really. I don't watch any television and so I do like listening to things because I feel like it's it's more imaginative But I'm a big reader. I love reading I have over ten thousand books. Crest historian now is a lot just got done reading this book that I absolutely loved Amazon. No you it's so good and then I am now. I'm reading out such a strange name. But it's about raising boys and boys and they're teenagers and let me see what else. What are you learning? Have you ever read the omnivores dilemma. Thank you I have that. It's one of my favorite books of all time. I read it it probably every year go. Well that's cool. Is that Michael Pollen. Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah. I love his stuff. He's fantastic. Did you read his loosen stuff. I'm reading that now. I have to put it down though it's not for me. It doesn't feel like a easy breezy. Read like it isn't a take on the beach. You you have to really take a good two hours at a time. Like I'm going to read this book. Jerry eight hundred degrees in here. Could you help us again with the with the temperature. Thank you You have a Michael's great writer integrate and he and he. He asks the right questions in that in that particular book and Yeah I'm not sure he has a full lead you to drive your own conclusions. uh-huh which is smart because the data just against silly with we are so behind so many scientific pursuits in particular comes to certain chemicals. Undecided were evil for a long time. Yeah Yeah so I I love to read. I don't really watch a lot of television. I don't really I think that's that's Oh let me tell you I just got done reading. Fugitive pieces which is fiction and it is a meeting with an old book you have to. You just have to read. I want to give it away but it reads is like poetry. It is beautiful and I usually don't breed fiction. I usually such a non fiction reader sort of information seeker But at this is beautiful. Ms Really be petrified away to it. My mother in law. Who passed away? I found it in my drawer..

scientist Michael Pollen booker. Drew. Amazon Jerry writer
"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

01:42 min | 7 months ago

"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"You're a runner or a cyclist heloc. You can save you up to forty one percent. Because physically. Active people have lower risk of heart. Disease Cancer Diabetes Health at Q.. Is Not just oh thank. You takes the customer through entire process of applying and the policies than underwritten by one of the top insurance partners but be savings are exclusive to help I q you. You won't find anywhere else. And you must qualify to get that special rate so to see if you qualify go to health. IQ Is one where H. E. A.. L. T. H. I. Q.. Health I Q dot Com slash drew not Dr drew to take the Proprietary Test Health Iq quiz depending on your scores. Other related qualifying factors. You could save up to forty one percent in your life insurance premiums compared to other providers again that has helped IQ dot com slash drew to let them know. We sent him and start the process with the health. IQ Quiz no commitment. And you'll learn even more about potential opportunities be rewarded for your commitment to living healthy one. More time that is health I q dot Com slash drew. Well of course. Our friends at blinking blinking is for anyone who cares about doesn't have a Lotta time. Isn't that all of us. blinked takes the key insights over three thousand nonfiction context sellers and over twenty seven categories and condenses. Them down to fifteen minute. Blinks texter audio explainers. That help you understand more about the core ideas ideas in each book. I used blankets on. When I'm working out I mean it's a perfect time to her when I'm driving? I mean I I like double dual tasking until it makes great. Use my time things like well Sapienze a brief history of humankind thinking fast and slow Dang Oh countable Katamon I mean these are great books and they are complicated..

"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

01:57 min | 7 months ago

"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Over the Thanksgiving holiday. Everyone who had a vagina was in the kitchen. No dicks were there. All the Vaginas were there and that too and I live in home. We're it's incredibly. You know I talk about this kind of thing all the time so my husband's husband's very aware would it have been uncomfortable for the women in the kitchen of a male suddenly join them. I think they would appreciate it. I don't think men know that and women even find men very sexy. who were who are taking part in household chores? And that's been shown a lot so I question question a lot of the research that has been done on women and men because most of that research is done by men so is functional right data. So I think that that you would love this book. It's called untroubled Wednesday Martin. She scored the functional. MRI data which is just some just numbers. It says no men or women men and women on the team that are that are evaluating the numbers of course But it absolutely mirrored. What I saw in every single room in every single part of the country for years and years and I think that's because women are conditioned that in order to have sex they have to feel emotional about it they have to? They'd been conditioned but it needs to be intimate. I don't necessarily early. No if that's actually true. I think it's conditioning so I mean you hear it when you talk to him privately and you're their private stories Sometimes sometimes they just want to have sex. They don't want to have a conversation they don't WanNa Talk Ra. They actually turned into what we perceived as masculine qualities so. I just think it's interesting around different different times. If in some different different around different people yeah for sure sure anyway if I find that ah the research. The newer research fascinating in terms of gender. And what what is true..

"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

11:22 min | 7 months ago

"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Gives her the raccoon. Were good yeah which is which is why your new book will be interesting. Fun knows how many crazy things most people get exactly goes back to what you were talking about really with your bad advice about sex. Sure a afraid need to talk about sex. Fill puritanical society that but it it dovetails into biology biological operation and people just can't get their head around the fact that their biological and so they still kind of magical thinking about biology and so they love folk tales and folk wisdom and folk whatever and so they they'd prefer that to you just basic biological studies major. I find deeply disturbing the ruin event. Could you say it's religion that's it that's all that's all in there right so morality religion and ethics human behavior and guilt. You get right down to it Symphonia for how did we get into this topic. But I'M GONNA go. which is that when you think about the history of the human being throughout human history history until about fifty years ago think about that? The entirety of the human experience throughout history until fifty years ago sex meant and pregnancy pregnancy meant death at least thirty percent of the time. If it didn't mean pregnancy and death it meant an S. T. D. and pelvic inflammatory clamato disease meant death Infection meant death. There was nothing that you'd get your anyway. Nothing nothing so everything about sex and you're a inherent and you know the power that drive and you know of this child gets going with it di- Not only we're GONNA have a child that our hands her for eighteen years this woman but this growth could dive scary scary gotta make it seem. Just him and weird. We'll give it weird names venereal disease as did name. We're we're the were they come up with that Venal Venal what's that venereal. Because we only in the modern era I started calling it sexually transmitted disease. So these are I really believe. That's where a lot of weird stuff that we have. Culturally is take care kits because we didn't know how to shape their behavior throughout much of history And the things that resulted from improper shaping of the behavior and we're really really dangerous. Yeah for most of human history got a loved one. You Mann's blamed things to me. You're so sexy thank you Venus. Which means I I knew that was then? I knew that was going to happen. I was hoping that he forgot about it. Dan at Gerry. He's always on it. Gary does not forget us me of not listening the Astros. Are you listening always listening. So that's I can't wait to get that book that's GonNa be good fun Are you gonNa like you like call together you and Emily Morris show. I'm going on her show next month actual gate when you go on. Ask for advice. Yeah Yeah exactly exactly so. That'll be fun to write And I I I loved the creative process of actually actually writing I'm able to my daughter right now. Oh do tell. It's about consent for young adolescents. Apparently it's great need huge need and We are trying to pull consent away from the medical legal jargon and out of the Hostel Camp Jargon and into into how do you just have empathic relations with good boundaries and though yourself and listen to the person and guess what if you do you'll be you'll make good choices you're good consent Sort of building it up that one thing. You're not drunk yet. There's no consent when you're I I. Would you know. I'm sorta hard core on that. Maybe maybe a glass Sawai but beyond that. I'm not sure we're talking about consent anymore. Because we're altered Seattle altered. It's like no. That's Yeah Yep you don't know that thou like like making it making it less hostile. Gather it's more relational. It's a lot of the stuff I look at. Yes it's exactly what it'd be relational in about healthy relations nations and less about on pest because yeah because so much of the literature authors. I'm pissed and we've kind of moved past that. I don't want to say that I do not. It was quote me on that. I'm not saying the this isn't necessarily a need and an important conversation but to remain just in these pissed zones not necessarily moving forward. Yeah it needed to be loud mid needed h fall in needed that and now it's like okay. How can we really deal with this issue? And it's GonNa stay angry for a long time because I'll tell you what I used to go around. I don't think I talked about any of this. And we were Nice. Second Street Y.. But I used to go around and give talks colleges and I was just always challenging the hookup culture thing because there was all this data that showed women were very unhappy unhappy with it that they perceive their social choices in college. Life throughout the land as random. Hook up Friends with benefits. It's or There was one o- or a boyfriend girlfriend That's it those your three choices. Nothing else and they were very unsatisfied with all all the choices but the organizing experience was hooking up and so I said well of hooking up so an end the one piece of data that was omnipresent was when somebody engaged in a random hook up there always loaded one hundred percent So my question the audience would always be. That's the organizing experience of your college college life. Why don't you fucked up to man? Why do you have to fight up gary wine? College fucked up to go to a hookah. Random hookup confidence. Do you mean another other words for that. That's what I always hear. Things like this but inhibited produce rings. I'd turn yeah. It's really really want to do this. But Man Matt a tall order. I can hurt somebody hurt myself. I could is anxiety reject anxious. There's also the social factor that we just talking about a random hookup. God like thank. You would be seen for women as well so so. That's God's whatever so the men but they do not worry. They're concerned was this is a taller. Makes me anxious and I'll l. call ups helps me deal so I would always give to give them to talk first and then we'll go okay. Ladies you've heard the men all of them what are you. What are you drinking for? Silence silence not a hand. Goes up now. The hand goes up eventually and goes beer goggles right. Okay got it on your good luck. Burger got it but still room with silence and inevitably right in the front third audiences always distribute themselves in really interesting way. It's always the front third there in the center of the room. Always any sense Gary I guess what I would hear grow would always have very coyly go. I don't know if it'd be the first thing but I would. To of DOC review was saying earlier about how you can be perceived. That's a bit of a get a job. You get a little bit of that sometimes. Sometimes get some women going. Oh I can blame the the blame of Vigo. Did I hear that he the guys they need something to blame some white. Why do you have been blamed something against silence? They don't WanNa talk. They're all ashamed. And and then we'll go goes. I make sure I drink so when this thing happens. I don't have any feelings every room I've ever spoken to throughout the country. That comes at me within about three minutes of asking the women in the room they answer is that's devastating. That's sad it is. Yeah and I'd be pissed if I woke up from that now which I think what's happening right. So they're like what I've been putting up with putting up essentially with rape because I at my of course their past. Yeah of course and so. I didn't know I used to try to bring it out and we could. Do you know what would be better. And then the same same. So I'd I'd go guys this familiar there now. The guys go silent like this is stunning information and I go so ladies. What could we if we had a clean slate? I could create a social order. That was to your liking what would I do. I just have infant powers. I can do it now and again. Silence then one hand goes up our wished guy with just sit and listen to talk with me talking to a Saxon you talking about always and then the chorus would come in. Yes they would assume. Listen listen to talk and exchange and I would just point out to them I go yes. We used to call that a date. It's called date so you would like to date. You would like to uh-huh and I go. How about you split a meal crazy? Talk Crazy and then I would point out to them all this. Fm I research that shows that males ails you. Can you activate appetite appetite of desire with visual imagery. They want what they say doesn't work that way with about eighty nine women women. You activate appetite appetites desires with intimate conversation. Well I just want to tell you that there is an amazing book that you would love. And it's by Dr Wednesday today Martin and it's called untrue and it it debunks all of this shitty research done on Really Gender relations about what women want about what men want One of those is that Men Are not as monogamous is women which is not true actually women want want novelty. Yes women wind Too many one partner in need of repair like marriage is an institution made by Chinaman forming it works for men and historically true. I'm not sure that's true that's true. Well that's apologised Lionel Tiger Woods who is a famous mischaracterize anthropologists would say no. That's that's to keep you around to provide while they need the safety of child rearing phenomenon. He's a man it's vulnerability ability but marriage ultimately is an institution made by men for men for men to the extent that men were charged. That necessarily true yes so so on. Every quality of life measure men's Quality Blake when they're married goes up they have more sex in their single counterparts They get paid more more They're just happier. They live longer for women. It's the exact opposite so I think today some of the issues that is challenging alleging in twenty twenty soon to be is how do we make marriage appealing for women. Because I can't tell you drew. How many times? I hear a woman tell me that she's working full-time she's doing the laundry. She's taking care of the kids. She's doing the shopping she's doing everything of America should be doing that letter. Settle Too. Well I mean there are when you're living with someone. There needs to be the point that I'm getting at. Is that under the house. There is still huge. Ism Man that sexism where and I noticed it. I live in incredibly liberal house. Okay my my. My husband is amazing but I took notice that.

gary wine Symphonia Hostel Camp Jargon Seattle glass Sawai Emily Morris Mann Lionel Tiger Woods Astros Dan America Blake rape Burger Vigo partner Martin
"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

10:31 min | 7 months ago

"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Don't forget the after dark there. You might like that Gary. I just signed you to watch their Robert Paul Champagne series and at the home visit. I do to him well that I make on his behalf and one of the more dramatic experience that I've been through. I think you need to vote on that I I. I was actually just googling him in the first things that come up are deeply concerning for those of you that are why maitree mom's house fans. He's the tried out guy and I went and visited his home and it was quite enlightening and bring cameras and we'll check it out Tried out you got to see the real thing Also set setup. You don't want a doctor DOT TV streaming show every week where you can interact and we send out a blast me go live with that and it's been pretty cool interesting show on multiple platforms zone. Whatever you're watching it and we will be there on those afternoons where we do those shows for a couple of hours? It's my privilege to welcome Dr. Venus Nichelino back to the show. Welcome DR V. Thank you for having me and you you said. That's how eloquently. I have a lot of people choke over all the vowels Ravioli. And that name bordering on Hawaiian all right. I mean I like it. I'll take it continents and they made that exactly down kept the V.. In the Noor and those are very very powerful continents. Yes so how his marriage boot camp going It's going We actually have our Finale I believe next next Friday. Thank you thank you for that. Thank you thank you for that. So yeah it's it's it's going I mean it's it was an interesting season as as you know. I always say that you and I live in the same house but you live in the house I live in the garage. You do the more fun stuff and maybe even slightly more legitimate but hey can help your marriage. A- sure you have plenty we do we do for sure for sure. So yeah that's good I. It's been a it's been. How many seasons so the show has been on the air for thirteen seasons? Which is insane I think about it? I have done a housecall with doing addiction. House spell rainy intervention on somebody half of them yes actually a lot I know and then the way reality works. is they carefully. Hide that when you deal with it or or offer later. Whenever it's part of the story are well? You had said it so eloquently the last time I was here which was The production of those shows and what the doctors are on their to-do are consistently running In opposite directions so I find that really stuck with me because I couldn't really figure out what exactly is it. That at times causes me to feel like incredibly uncomfortable uncomfortable. It's so uncomfortable. Yeah yeah because they are undermining. You're you're there because obviously you know people love to see conflict. Navy is boring boring boring to being healthy as boring so I feel healing you on that in a in a very real TV show scripted. Show unreal. I heard of it so I assigned Gary some viewing you. I'm assigning I knew. Just the first episode. You'll have to watch one episode and you'll get a feel for it right away. Yeah and you will be able to recognize many of your staff on that. They're actually actually people represented on the show from your staff heard. I heard that that is the case. It's very even though it's scripted. It's true it's very accurate. Exactly goes a little over the top but but the the basics of it are quite accurate. Yeah yeah so I I always remembered that are our goals are running an opposite direction action right and and you couldn't and that can be okay to appoint right you can just you gotta put certain lines in the sand for the production team and then you and then you on the other hand have to have faith in them that they know how to create things that people wanNA walk. It's across purposes. But but if you don't get is whatever you're trying into would you ever hope to get out get out anyway. So you have to figure out a way to navigate it where you can keep it safe. Do what you need to do them. I am not totally damage your patients and still get maybe they want and even now you bring up a good point about addiction. oftentimes we don't show that I know I. It's I find that fascinating that it's really a topic that people want to stay. Stay away from me come help you yes. I'll just be a Scottish swing swing by just or even do a little lecture about addiction or something and respond to that and then you can go deal with with them once they start spinning seeing them so down for that anything like that thrill. Dr Drew Happy to do it. By the way you can find Dr vs website. It talked to do the number two D. R. V. Doctor and then Dr Underscore V. Underscore tweet is the twitter handle. Is that a new twitter handle. No that's the same but I'm so so impressed with your ability to sail because I don't know people are like what are your interests. I have no clue. Wait cursor fucking awesome. Thanks man so. So what's what's ahead for you. What do you think we're thinking about well? I I love the fact that you're brainstorming coming on the show but what I WANNA do is with my book. The word ice okay. The one Gary was in New York City the Ninety Second Street y Yeah Presentation Yeah it was so let me tell you what would have happened. So Gary Listening. Thank you So what ends up happening is I asked drew to do me a solid and come and talk with me or interview me at the ninety. Second Second Street Y.. Thinking that like I had the main stage like this is Harper Collins were dealing with like a real publishing company so drew says. Oh Oh yes. Of course the Great God. It's going to be so amazing. I'm proud to sing. I'm like thinking about what I'm going to say I'm thinking about it throughout the the I just wanted to go so well I've lay all the way out to New York City drew. Thank God there. we get there and we are in I swear to God the tiniest little classroom and there were people packed. It is eight was a classroom. I got the early show children in that classroom. Four orange blossom things just restate drew from the bottom of my heart. I love you because you made me feel. You helped me feel so good. Good guardless was happening around us vet so I just I would just a weird. They stuck in that low road. Fuck it anyway. It was so beautiful. I remember you were talking to A woman in the front row started crying. It was so powerful so beautiful so So bad advice how to survive and thrive in Asia. Bullshit that I would love to make that into a TV show of all the bags almost could be a moving all the bachelor dykes script. That's true but it also could be almost like I don't know if anybody watches doctors anymore but a better doctors where like you're talking about all the better base you get but then you're like dozen apple a day really keep the doctor away. You know that kind of go through some of the stuff that you talked about a a lot of interesting stuff in an advice. Well now. We'll give all the way we'll give it always but so for example there's one chapter called. You can't love anyone until until you love yourself. What a crock? Shit like and people repeat this horn over and over and by the way I just want to point out why. I think it's important that we stop saying this kind of BS. Because look there was at one point where we thought the world was flat so we revolved our allies run a flat world. We thought bloodletting would help people we thought lobotomies were good. Exactly there's this idea that theories matter how we think and how our worldview is affected by theories matter so if you believe you can't love anyone until you love yourself it's going to affect affect how you see yourself and how you see other people. So the book sets out to scientifically and biologically inform warn. People are these statements true and if they're not true why are they not true and what is really the good advice to that so without giving too much away of the book a little more because there's so many great in there so another one. I don't talk about this one that much I'm I'm I'm I'm glad of the opportunity. Honesty is the best policy. Is We Li- Fifty two times a day so while it might be the best policy. It's not the real policy rain. It's not the honest policy and little little tiny polite light lies make the world go round. You know what I mean just like if I were to tell them. It's great or even like your grandmother. Who gives you that fuzzy sweater every Christmas? You know this is so ugly. I can't stand that like you would never do. That was courtesy. So there's there's a difference between these polite polite. Let's say I don't even like the word lies. I don't even like the word white lies but there's just there's something about helping the world go around the courtesy sort of Greece for the wheel rain and I talk in the book. How people love to hide behind being truthful? I mean it's the worst. I'm just being honest. No you're not it'll be because I'm on it. Yeah no that's actually not true. Just mean you know what I mean. So and that that distance is like oceans apart between being mean and being honest right So people hide behind that so so that's one of my. It's later in the a book but it's a chapter that added because I heard someone saying during.

Gary Listening New York City twitter Dr Drew DR V. Dr. Venus Nichelino Robert Paul Champagne Navy Greece Harper Collins Asia apple
"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

01:41 min | 7 months ago

"dr" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Thanks for listening to the Dr Drew. podcast on podcast one friends at social. CBD Legal Lots of questions about CBD products. Lots of claims are made out there difficult answer with certainty because the clinical science just is not there yet. I've luckily connected with an Oregon based company. Anthony that's all about high quality ingredients and manufacturing standards no high they previously been called select. CBD But they've just relaunched as social CBD SOCIAL CBD focuses on broad spectrum oil. Something else you about that. CONFUSED HEMP has over sixty non psychoactive cannabinoid. CBD Of course just one of them broad spectrum oil goes beyond CBD islip contains additional active compounds that work together to create with known as the entourage effect effectively than deliver calming relaxing effect. Some people are looking for social. CD's broad spectrum oils contains two zero T H C so. There's no high and the risks associated with hamper cannabis. They're available in great tasting tinctures like Vanilla Mint pomegranate. Not Meyer Lemon. Typically dropped under your tongue from accent on the fact social CD products are available in range of formulations each of which is clearly described so you can make an informed decision without all all the promises that well. They're just too good to be true to learn more go to Dr do dot com slash social. CBD That's my website Dr Dot Com Slash S. O. C. I.. Ah Lcd for a limited time. You can save twenty percent at checkout with code Dr drew and everybody welcome Dr Podcast Keep the winds in the sales of those Corolla pirate ship this big here gorilla the pirate ship and check everything. Dr Dot Com. We're GONNA family podcast there..

"dr" Discussed on Attack Each Day: The Harbaughs' Podcast

Attack Each Day: The Harbaughs' Podcast

04:35 min | 10 months ago

"dr" Discussed on Attack Each Day: The Harbaughs' Podcast

"Here's a big one the red-eye coming back right traveling to California that's a blessing for us but coming back on that red eye and then seeing how they respond to student athlete so then that but for us to as you know we're part of this conference and we respect it and we represent it but we're also big ten school which makes us proud right to delays all coach it's been coming up next Jack Talk here on attack each day the podcast if you like our show you're gonNA love the official Lakers podcasts on podcast one join Emmy Award winning sports reporter shuster and Co host Aaron Lawrenceville as they discussed the Lakers news of the day break down the games from.

California Lakers Emmy Award shuster Aaron Lawrenceville official reporter
"dr" Discussed on Attack Each Day: The Harbaughs' Podcast

Attack Each Day: The Harbaughs' Podcast

11:55 min | 10 months ago

"dr" Discussed on Attack Each Day: The Harbaughs' Podcast

"That I have ever seen to where he had he had alternate game jerseys and pants and socks and t shirts and underwear and no every time the guys came back into the locker room they had had some dry to put on and they could get the get the water off of them and it was incredible I mean not only our own team but I mean there was the pre-game the pre-game was unbelievable to with the amount of VIP he's came came by and the development office which is bringing into the the equivalent room because you know somebody who didn't have the right rain jacket or something every carew Hazlitt was taking care of our players that he's spinning around and take era of the ultimate compliment I'll put compliment today here in the office was John faulk praising Gary has let the one of the greats of all time recognizing another another great John Fox that he said it's one of the most remarkable jobs he has ever seen in football and he said Gary just made it look easy and it was so seamless with with him in the staff and everything that they did it was it was it was amazing getting an endorsement from Winston Churchill it really is you're right a couple of stories as of When he was here we go with that came about twenty minutes yeah so we continue talking a little bit about the Michigan Notre Dame game because you talked about second third week early in the season you were looking for that second run act to go along with Zach charbonnet in the backfield and needless to say Hasan Haskins his come about the and one that job and he was absolutely terrific Zach the running game overall but almost a hundred ninety five yards combined between the two of them just terrific yeah really really good I mean Assad was running inside plays he ran trap he ran power or he ran outside zone inside zone and you know sometimes there was holes there and sometimes it looked like it was going to be attacked oh for a loss and he picked out two or three or four yards of the really good backs are the ones that can get more than what a plays block for the plays black for zero you know they they find a way to get to you know if it's black for two they get four if it's blocked for six they get fifteen you know it's and that's that Hassan Zakar both showing that kind of ability both freshman Asana redshirt freshman and and Zaka true freshman and also true Wilson you know you back to full health and he had a heck of a good ballgame to and Good to see Chris Turner who you know some of his wraps the Dow but he's you know he's done everything he can to get on special teams he's on kickoff now and he's he's trying to get I'm more special teams and and he really showed you know real flashes when he got into the ballgame late and so did and Ben Ben Summer in as well but you know those two backs of have really taken off and they're getting they're getting better and better and getting getting more and more of the of the Rapson and doing a heck of a job do one other thing you mentioned the running game tight ends in often in the running game and and then the blocking and there's there's two or three of them that you have to come in there and really put their nose on people the way the fullback you was to do and then Ben Mason sprinkle him in there a little bit I watched I watched watched him a little bit he gets locked on a guy I mean it is it is he aches him for a ride as as the other tight ends due to I think we'll get tremendous production out of that group Yeah Sean mccune has always been the guy that's you know really lead the way ah the blocker and set such a great example and Nick eubanks you know is really taken off as a blocker he's he's really made that an emphasis and he you know now you it's tough to tell the difference between Shaw mccune and Nicky banks when they're blocking Eric all when when he who knows who to block as violent as as good as as you could ever want and he's and he's more and more every single week really getting dialed and to who to block Luke Kuhn maker has has really ascended as a football player pass catcher and and as a blocker because you just got it you just gotTa do it in that Room Sharon Moore has done a done a great job of that a source of pride and blocking is is the name of the game and that will lead to the to the receptions and and and things of that nature so that's been terrific and he said you point out Ben Mason of course that's do we have a more favorite player on the team I don't think we do and then the the the not in defense every time he was in the game in the back there is forty two forty two's right there he's right there he was you know where he's going who is blocked ah you guys are doing a great job with him as you laid him up and he can where you come across the four may not always running direction the old days of the wall back salacious linebacker I know he is coming back we'll take your right to the ball it's not anymore blocking the defensive end on the other side he could be blocking the defense and to his I could be in in a certain himself in blocking any linebackers along the line of scrimmage and not just him I mean the other tight ends are doing that too I think that's really in have gotten better to the receiver blocking is is improved you know really steadily especially over the last two three weeks and they're they're sending that that that played a huge role in rushing for over three hundred yards in the game true Wilson's touchdown the Patterson answer or returning back to big ten plays guys out to Maryland this weekend early thoughts on heading down to play the types yes it's always a tough ball game every team we everything we play is he's really good and Big Rogaine force and we were completely dialed in now that this is the most and you know this is the biggest game on the schedule and put together great game plan and we preparation and practice will be key and we're GONNA have to we're going to have to play our best Daddy ought to tell the story I just thought of talking to somebody earlier the debt Perry with Perry would say about a game I mean they're good before they can they could blow us clear out of the stadium and we're good enough to blow them clear out of the stadium it's PRI- in reality it's going to be there you go all three ways locker five minutes before you on there you get your helmet on the sweats come down over your call it come on and Fellas fellas commodity close nice and towed I I've got this game figure it out I've watched a lot of picture he's didn't call it film Lotta pictures on this team and again I'm pretty well figured out this team is good enough all of us right off the film telling you good enough to or you know what we're good enough to blow them right off the field or this could be one a hell of a game and we're all thinking blow us out we've blew them out what else can happen screw that up I said all three ways by that's a reality that's I mean if we play as good as we're capable of and they don't play as good as they're capable of I mean you can and you could blow them out or they could play as good as they're capable we don't play as good as we're capable and they're they're good enough to blow us out or both teams as good as they're capable let's one heck of a game I need to apologize you said very very well one thing I love to hear my voice the listeners of course I screwed that up turps and we will of course talk more football next week so you've probably heard of shy Nola detroit-based design brand known for luxury timepieces maybe you go down main street name you see the Shinola store they have unbelievable watches coach and apparently they got an even brand new watch that matches everything in our wardrobe the Wolverine detroiter so the I call it the Wolverine it's Beautiful Watch it's it's got the the maze face and only watch where the the shy nola company has has been my favorite Tom Carsodo says honoree captain here for us multiple occasions agents and he's a he's a dear friend and he has done an amazing job with this company he's and he's an even better friend and I'm GONNA say that Tom Tom he always gives me a ten percent discount I bought all of our coaches Shinola watches Few years ago I bought your watch that was a while ago dead what it's time for you to get a new watch white herd in I will be by Jack Harper so maybe if you say if you mentioned Jim Harbaugh Sancha and you want to get to wolverine maybe they'll give you ten percent discount they might be that also maybe I have nothing to confirm that I'm GonNa go on record and say I'm not talk to Tom About this or or the end end but give it a shot but there should be rambling going on right now it is a beautiful time piece as you mentioned the May space with the blue detail at the numbers and the second marks it's got the blue watchband it is well built it hold up tailgates victory parties and based on everything we've heard it holds up through monsoons as well as we found out on Saturday from numerous people that were wearing the troll at the game on Saturday so it holds up through the weather holds up of course for tailgates and Game Day it is a beautiful time piece and you can find it at the cheinal and our per location go online to Shinola DOT COM but hurry they're in demand especially this time of year to pick up this beautiful time go down to main street we got the Shino store right on main street it's a great watch company but they also do bags. They also do bikes bicycles so leather leather leather goods so it's just more than watch company top car sodas he originally made this company in Detroit and hire people that were out of work and it wasn't wasn't looking to to make money he just wanted to employ people make a great product and American product and have it right here in Detroit Michigan and they've done such great work such quality were work that this company is is one of the best run Tom Lewanda are WHO's a graduate assistant here when I was here is the the C O wonderful product is fantastic to watch that where and if and Jack Harbaugh in the future and eventually will also and that's what I'm counting on uh-huh and you can find out all the information about Nola at SHY NOLA DOT COM coming up next we're going.

Detroit Jack Harbaugh Nola Tom Lewanda Michigan graduate assistant C O ten percent hundred ninety five yards three hundred yards two three weeks twenty minutes five minutes four yards
"dr" Discussed on Attack Each Day: The Harbaughs' Podcast

Attack Each Day: The Harbaughs' Podcast

01:58 min | 10 months ago

"dr" Discussed on Attack Each Day: The Harbaughs' Podcast

"And then ball still loose almost recovered then it gets to five and then you saw Arrow going through snow recover that that fumble there's another play in the boundary where opposite sideline he had really good coverage quarterback through it and he just knew he fast as a football player with with everything he's doing and go ahead data one of the things I thought was very very interested in the game we're I must admit I didn't stay in the weather I went up in the press box to get out of the weather I'm feel guilty about that uh-huh the pre-game the pre-game our team came out dressed differently than they know I don't think maybe in the old days back in the seventy as I don't know if we were shoulder pads became pre-game but talk about that a little bit and the pre-game and the way they came out to warm up well we we didn't come out in the uniforms and the pads we came out a somewhat repellent Rain repellent top that Gary Hazlet and and sunny got it's just with the idea of keeping them dry and then when they went back in the locker room they wouldn't be wet and cold for another twenty twenty five minutes before for they went out and keep the keep jerseys and the pads is as dry as possible and with that we are going to right a letter of accommodation to Gary Hazlet and his staff because it was one of the most remarkable equipment manager efforts that I have ever seen to where he had he had alternate game jerseys and pants and socks and t shirts and underwear and no.

Gary Hazlet football twenty twenty five minutes