35 Burst results for "DOS"

9 Minutes and 29 Seconds: The Derek Chauvin Trial

Court Junkie

02:13 min | just now

9 Minutes and 29 Seconds: The Derek Chauvin Trial

"Thirty pm on may twenty fifth two thousand twani at the intersection of east thirty eighth street and chicago avenue in minneapolis. Minnesota was the aftermath of something. Horrific that had just occurred there. Donald williams was calling nine one one of the emergency designing killing In front of chicago He is pretty noisy. Guy wasn't the rest. Yeah neck the whole time. I'll do ninety man win. Went by breathing was arrested. Nothing you've already made green light these stupid. If not responsible when the ambulance you're area cattle. Donald was talking fast. He would later say he called nine one one because he didn't know what else to do about what he had just witnessed. He told the dispatcher that he saw a police officer quote pretty much. Just kill this guy. Who wasn't resisting arrest. He had his knee and this dude's neck the whole time. He said officer nine eighty-seven referring to the officer's badge number he had seen. He said the man hadn't been resisting that he was already in handcuffs when the officer knelt on him pinning him down on the ground then. The man stopped breathing and was non responsive when the ambulance came he said. Would you like to speak with us sergeant. That would go. What a wasn't the rest for. Let me get you over to the best thing for thing. Don't be his own off. Duty firefighter day. Your washing it. As well jacob go the one person he told the dispatcher he had been standing there watching with a woman who was an off duty firefighter. That woman told the officer to check the man for a pulse. He said but the officer refused

Donald Williams Chicago Minneapolis Minnesota Donald Trump GUY Jacob
Joe Biden Has Done Nothing to Add to Our Medical Arsenal to Fight COVID

Mark Levin

01:52 min | 7 hrs ago

Joe Biden Has Done Nothing to Add to Our Medical Arsenal to Fight COVID

"Folks Joe Biden has done nothing Nothing To add to our arsenal of medicines to fight this virus Nothing He hasn't announced an operation warp speed He hasn't put anybody in chart Nothing He keeps saying when I came into office only for me but people were vaccinated It's because the vaccines it just come out More of the lies and the lack of virtue just lie over and over and over again This is why people like me say talk to your doctor your personal doctor Get the facts from your own doctor And if you want my opinion if you don't have some kind of underlying malady then get vaccinated But I've said over and over again there's a difference between supporting vaccinations and supporting tyranny There's a big difference People who are unvaccinated if they have to be that situation because of underlying maladies well why would they get vaccinated if it could harm their health And if you've already had this this viral virus and you have natural immunity why would you get vaccinated If you don't want to get back why do I care And I'll say it again So what percentage of the population is it What percentage When you add the vaccinated to those with natural immunity to those who can't take the vaccine because of a malady what percentage of the population are we actually talking about Nobody will tell us Nobody

Joe Biden
The Science Does Not Support Needing COVID Vaccine Mandates

Mark Levin

01:59 min | 7 hrs ago

The Science Does Not Support Needing COVID Vaccine Mandates

"And this is that the desert dot com site Do people die from COVID after getting the COVID-19 vaccine New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggest 99.999% of people who are fully vaccinated against the virus did not have a severe breakthrough case that led to hospitalization or death This was according to CNN According to the CDC more than 166 million people have been fully vaccinated it's now over 170 million It's 76% of the population that is capable of being vaccinated The new data suggests 1507 people Now this is in August or about .0001% of those fully vaccinated people died from getting the COVID-19 Meanwhile 7101 people of those fully vaccinated people or .005% were hospitalized for COVID-19 And almost none of them died because of the Therapeutics that are available According to the CDC most of the severe breakthrough cases about 74% of the tiny tiny tiny tiny percentage had been among seniors who were 65 years or older Reports CNN About 20% of the people who died from COVID-19 after a breakthrough case died from something other than COVID-19 though they had a breakthrough case when they died according to CNN And that's always very murky In terms of breaking out the numbers And so this is accurate back to August Because that's what I have So all this stuff about mandates which came on the heels of the disaster that Biden had in Afghanistan Remember that's when he did it mister badass in America At 20 announced he was putting in place mandates And osha and all the rest of them remember that folks

Covid Centers For Disease Control An CNN Biden Afghanistan America
Barack Obama's Stance on Borders 14 Years Ago

Mark Levin

01:04 min | 7 hrs ago

Barack Obama's Stance on Borders 14 Years Ago

"Do I think about the control of our borders What would I do about it Ladies and gentlemen no great country Can say it is secure without being able to control its borders Period What I would do about it was that I propose to do about it almost 13 years ago I would radically ramp up the number of border security guards we have The use of electronic surveillance material we have to guard the border And the number of what they call virtual fences are not literally fences Virtual fences from aristoc balloons on to where we whereby we can control the border Much much better Yeah he doesn't sound even stupid there It's stupid stupid man but all that said all that said Totally different position 14 years later same with the entire Democrat party They've decided to change their constituents change their base So what they've done And you're required to go along with them

Democrat Party
Every Founding Father Said You Cannot Have Liberty Without Virtue

Mark Levin

01:38 min | 8 hrs ago

Every Founding Father Said You Cannot Have Liberty Without Virtue

"And this is in my book read discovering americanism I would argue that the three most important books I ever wrote American Marxism liberty and tyranny and rediscovering americanism Rediscovering americanism being the heaviest He explained in his book and I quote liberty in short can not be discussed in the abstract As if it were totally independent of public virtue and the framework of institutions John Adams knowledge that freedom is a delicate plant that even watering it with the blood of martyrs is dubious nutriment Impels them to outline a practical system for liberty under law Liberty must be under law There is no satisfactory alternative The liberty without law endures so long as a lamb among wolves Even the compass of civil laws does not sufficiently hedge liberty about Under cover of the best laws imaginable freedom may still be infringed If virtue is lacking Damn near every founding father said you can not have liberty without virtually Kirk says what sort of government then will stimulate the indispensable private and public virtue comprehended in the golden rule And the answer of course is a constitutional republic that's on

John Adams Kirk
U.S. Immigration Used to Be About 'Contribution'

Mark Levin

01:48 min | 8 hrs ago

U.S. Immigration Used to Be About 'Contribution'

"One You know in the heart of some of the most extensive immigration to the United States Over a hundred years ago if anybody ever been interviewed who wanted to come in Americans say I want to use your healthcare system or whatever it was they would not have been allowed to come into the country Because the standards have been completely eviscerated The standards are what can that contribute to this nation Are they going to be a drag or are they going to be contributor Today that question is not asked or even considered Period Immigration was always about what contributions foreigners can make to the United States and how many should come and from where should they come today that again those questions are not asked and they're not to be asked And I would challenge anybody to tell me any nation any nation that can or has survived without borders Name one just one There's not a single nation on the face of the earth that's doing this None Some of the European nations did it but now they're tightening up And they will pay a price and have paid a price But not to the extent of America we have more people coming into this country Than any country in the face the earth year after year after year after year while the American Marxist within our country are teaching propaganda about how often the country is And so you wind up with second generation individuals like joy Reid Or Omar or Talib in Omar's case first generation Who come to the country and then hate the country

United States European Nations Joy Reid Omar Talib
What Kind of Program Is Social Security Today?

Mark Levin

01:54 min | 8 hrs ago

What Kind of Program Is Social Security Today?

"What kind of program is social security today The trust has been broken They stole all the money out of the trusts If that's okay why can't you do that in the private sector If that's compassionate and righteous why can't you do that in a private set You do that in the private sector you go to prison So they tell you in your payroll you're going to make a contribution to your own account And social security administration is such a fraud It even sends out information about how much you have in your own account You have nothing in your account You have IOUs in your account The Treasury Department has taken every plug nickel out of every social security trust fund at every account and has spent it Medicare Same thing Almost $300 trillion now In IOUs to entitlement programs for people who have a right They've destroyed them It's only a matter of time till that presents itself though that's manifested It's only a matter of time This stuff can't go on forever Well market hasn't happened yet but when it does it'll be a horrific Human collapse Because people become dependent on you promised me What else is wrong with social security Well it's a universal program So people who don't need social security still pay in the social security People who do need social security have paid into social security getting a pretty good deal right now But their children are not going to get a good deal at all and their grandchildren are going to get nothing Nothing Just like Medicare Nothing

Treasury Department
Xi Jinping Takes a Page From Mao Zedong's Red Playbook

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:40 min | 8 hrs ago

Xi Jinping Takes a Page From Mao Zedong's Red Playbook

"Start at the top bill. Let's talk about who now runs the world's largest communist dictatorship who is xi jinping. What do we need to know about him. And what changes he made recently to the constitutional order of that communist state. Xi jinping is the ruling dictator of communist china He assumed that position in two thousand twelve and immediately began to undo many of the reforms that had been taking place under deng xiaoping began after maoz demise in nineteen seventy six Basically these policies have been taken in ended attempt to re communize china. I would describe xi jinping a neo. Maoist he's a his as reported in my book. Deceiving the sky his his His favourite leaders are hitler-stalin. And now and he is working very aggressively to return China to its communist roots almost in the style of north korean totalitarianism. We've seen him go. After the business leaders in china who wielded enormous power by becoming billionaires Many of them have been imprisoned. Some have been killed. Some others have been driven into exile. And this is all part of xi jinping plan to once again make china a dominant world communist

Maoz China Xi Jinping Deng Xiaoping Stalin
'Deceiving the Sky' Author Bill Gertz Explains How China Views the USA

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:10 min | 8 hrs ago

'Deceiving the Sky' Author Bill Gertz Explains How China Views the USA

"He's the national security correspondent for the washington times a good friend of the show author of deceiving the sky inside communist china's dry for global supremacy bill. Welcome to one on one. Hi sebastian great to be on the show. Thank you for joining us bill. Follow this gentleman. Bill gertz g. rtz on twitter question to quote wasn't trotsky who said olenin trust. You said you may not be interested in war but war is interested in you. That china is not our enemy. What does china think of america. Bill this is an amazing disclosure by the chairman. The chinese view the united states as their main enemy vanquished in fact within the chinese strategy which is encapsulated in something called xi jinping china dream china will achieve global supremacy at the expense of the united states. In other words. China's dream can't be reached until the united states is diminished and ultimately

China Bill Gertz RTZ Olenin Trust The Washington Times United States Twitter
Bill Gertz: Diplomacy in the Name of Appeasement Is Still Appeasement

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:45 min | 8 hrs ago

Bill Gertz: Diplomacy in the Name of Appeasement Is Still Appeasement

"Universal is this in terms of the establishment understanding of china. The private sector's understanding of china. And way did it begin. Was it really kissinger. And nixon saying we have to open towards china. Can you give us the general following this for decades. Where did the rot big in. Yes this this process has been ongoing It's the reflection of the internal debate within the us government Specifically involving the climate change fanatics led by former secretary of state john kerry and the more realist policy makers Led by the china's are at the white house. kurt campbell. In the beginning of the biden administration the policy was very close to some of the trump administration's policies As i wrote in my column recently at the united nations joe biden made clear that he's reverting back to the appeasement policies they call it. diplomacy oriented but diplomacy in the name of appeasement is still appeasement. And that's what we're beginning to see. There's some welcome of this new policy on wall street which again has been seeking to do business in china for many years under the idea that if we just trade and do business with this communist state that it would have a modifying influence. It's been another failure. A lot of the wall street executives wanna go to that the banks however many of the us and international banks are recognizing that it's time to pull back from china. That things are going south very quickly there.

China Kurt Campbell Biden Administration Kissinger Nixon Us Government John Kerry Joe Biden White House United Nations United States
Liberals Transfer Wealth From the Middle Class to the Lower-Income Groups

Mark Levin

01:56 min | 8 hrs ago

Liberals Transfer Wealth From the Middle Class to the Lower-Income Groups

"A massive expansion of the welfare state You know they're both intended to do something right They're both intended to destroy the existing economic and constitutional systems You need to think about this What's going on here is in our country today massive redistribution and wealth transfer Not from billionaires and multi millionaires from the upper middle class and middle class to the lower middle class and lower income groups That's what all these programs are intended to do Massive redistribution of wealth wealth transfer And unfortunately more and more are elections are about redistribution of wealth They're not about liberty They're not about the things that the nation was founded on There about redistribution of wealth So government centric bureaucratic left wing politicians deciding on who should get and who shouldn't get Hence the war on capitalism that we're on liberty the war on competition Massive taxes proposed and massive power and redistribution And that's now how the Democrat party use election Empowering itself empowering itself to redistribute wealth You're now voting to transfer funds from a stranger to yourself You're now voting to transfer funds from somebody who earned it To you and your family This is decadent

Democrat Party
Should the Climate Movement Embrace Sabotage?

The Dan Bongino Show

01:53 min | 13 hrs ago

Should the Climate Movement Embrace Sabotage?

"So Gerald byer who's a right leaning guy I'm not particularly friendly I don't really know him that well But he noticed that there was this article up in The New Yorker Should the climate movement embrace sabotage Apparently this was an actual article up at The New Yorker Should the climate movement embrace sabotage The core of the article the court tenant was that left this should consider environmental sabotage of pipelines bombing pipelines and whatever as a reasonable means to stop energy production in the United States ladies and gentlemen this is The New Yorker So buyer put out on his Twitter feed He put this gas commentator literally calls for blowing up pipelines not a metaphor The New Yorker again he says literally platforming a terrorist Now this is nothing unusual I mean of course the left is in love with violence They have been in love with violence for a very long time But what I found unusual about this is I went down and started scrolling through the comments Folks I could not find one left this comment on this thing from a leftist That was condemning this thing outright I couldn't maybe it's there I didn't scroll through the whole thing to be fair There were quite a few comments on Gerald's tweet But the ones I scored here's just a screenshot It's taken from my phone I got it right here Of just like the top ten I saw These are leftist responses to bombings and environmental actual and not figurative not metaphoric Actual environmental terrorism that could get people killed and disrupt the entire energy industry in the United States One person commented what oil companies do to get their pipelines is terrorism Sabotaging them is self defense

The New Yorker Gerald Byer United States Twitter Gerald
National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan Pushed Alfa Bank Claim at Center of Durham Indictment

The Dan Bongino Show

01:50 min | 13 hrs ago

National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan Pushed Alfa Bank Claim at Center of Durham Indictment

"Jake Sullivan Obama's national security adviser Ladies and gentlemen this guy is knee deep in the peepee hoax The collusion tape the collusion nonsense stuff He is knee deep in it and he is connected to a number of different people And he's got a real problem Now I am not under any illusions that the Republicans are going to grow a pair up in the hill and actually do anything about it But this guy's in real trouble right now And I'm wondering if John dorm the special prosecutor who indicted one of the Hillary Clinton lawyers involved in this case I'm wondering if he's looking at Jake Sullivan This guy is the national security adviser now to Joe Biden This guy is in on the highest of high level meetings folks and there's two things about this guy He either has the worst judgment in the history of a human being who sat in that NSA position or he is a liar potentially involved in a big conspiracy to frame Donald Trump There is no option C okay It's either one of those two things Why Well we unearthed some old video audio of Jake Sullivan on CNN which I'm going to get to in the remainder of the hour And some old comments by Jake Sullivan on CNN and Jake Sullivan who was Hillary Clinton's at the time foreign policy adviser seemed to be one of the biggest promoters out there of the whole peepy hoax collusion hoax I mean he's got these statements on record I'm going to play the audio and then I'm going to show you how he must have known the entire time Jake Sullivan that what he was saying was a fabricated lie He told everyone that tech experts were telling Hillary and I oh my gosh there's this big connection between Trump and the Russians Trump Tower in this alphabet server It's real but that's not what the tech experts were telling them How do we know because we have an indictment now in the case And we got our hands on those records ourselves

Jake Sullivan Jake Sullivan Obama Hillary Clinton Joe Biden CNN NSA Donald Trump John Russians Trump Tower Hillary
How Dare Anyone Tell These Heroic Healthcare Workers What to Do

The Dan Bongino Show

02:42 min | 13 hrs ago

How Dare Anyone Tell These Heroic Healthcare Workers What to Do

"Imagine all of these people work in these medical facilities In the early days of pandemic try to get your mind in the right spot Remember those early days nobody knew how infectious this was nobody had any idea the fatality rate I mean the fatality rate of the virus early on There were people saying crazy things like oh it could be 20% 10% Thank the lord That it's nowhere close to that and wasn't But the point is early on you didn't know that Nurse your janitor and again you're a neurosurgeon It doesn't matter You had the guts to go into a medical facility with a potentially lethal virus you knew nothing about You sucked it up you put your work boots on You put your scrubs on and you did it You got a lot of guts doing that It's not virtue signaling or me trying to kiss anybody's caboose I don't need to do that and you don't need it either But you had a lot of guts doing that For what it's worth if it matters at all to you you got my respect I don't know what that means or not to you but it means something to me So early on in the pandemic you go to work you wind up catching coronavirus like hundreds of thousands of healthcare workers if not millions did Around the world you catch it It's not fun It's a pretty nasty virus for a lot of people who get it You catch it You manage to survive it because a lot of people did die right Thankfully if you're young and healthy the fatality rates quite low But a lot of people didn't make it tragically You survive it You're a healthcare worker You had the guts you showed up You put your scrubs on you put your protective gear You went to work You showed up You survived this thing and now because you're a healthcare worker and you understand actual science unlike the leftist lunatics running our government right now you fully understand that your natural immunity has kicked in You don't know how long it's going to last But you understand that at least right now you have memory B cells memory T cells and probably a decent set of antibodies as well To fight this virus maybe as effectively if not more effectively than the vaccine itself So you tough it out you go to work while a lot of people listen folks Me included me included We got to stay home I got to work from home But you couldn't You had to go and save people's lives You get infected and now you recover You recover from this virus and now you're being told in New York City by these crazy lunatics including this new governor who is arguably as bad if not worse than Andrew Cuomo you were told double barreled middle finger Yourself you are gonna go get a vaccine no matter

New York City Andrew Cuomo
Some Trump Supports Wish He Would Drop the Whole 'Election Integrity' Thing

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:21 min | 14 hrs ago

Some Trump Supports Wish He Would Drop the Whole 'Election Integrity' Thing

"Been talking to a lot of trump's supporters in my life a lot of people who are enthusiastic about him running again. They are huge trump supporters. They think he's are essentially our only chance to get the country back and can't wait for the prospect of him running again but they wish he would leave the election integrity issue alone and i say to my friends who say that and there are many of them. Do you have any idea how many people have told me that. If we can't resolve twenty twenty mainly right then we will never have a a pure and true election again if we don't fix the democrats diabolical effort to upend elections based on covert using co vid as the excuse to change all the election rules or many election. Rules we're doomed.

Donald Trump
Israeli PM denounces Iran, ignores Palestinians in UN speech

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 14 hrs ago

Israeli PM denounces Iran, ignores Palestinians in UN speech

"Israel's prime minister has denounced Iran and ignored Palestinians in a United Nations General Assembly speech in his maiden UN speech Naftali Bennett made no mention of Israel's decades long conflict with the Palestinians and instead sought to portray Iran as a menace to global society but it appealed to the international community to stand together against Iran accusing Tehran of marching towards the development of a nuclear weapon and threatening to act alone if the world does not take action off the four inconclusive elections in two years but it succeeded Benjamin Netanyahu in June by forming a diverse coalition of small and mid sized parties spanning the Israeli political spectrum I'm Charles Taylor that's not

Naftali Bennett Iran Israel United Nations General Assembl UN Tehran Benjamin Netanyahu Charles Taylor
Pelosi, Democrats Wrestle Over Biden Agenda

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:58 min | 15 hrs ago

Pelosi, Democrats Wrestle Over Biden Agenda

"Morning. Glory america. Let's not talk about numbers. Let's talk about values because boy. It's going to be quite the debate jake. Sherman joins me hugh hewitt inside the beltway punchbowl news reporting on the intricacies of the dilemma facing nancy. Pelosi and chuck schumer. How much of other people's money spending who to give it to good morning. Jake how are ya you good. How about that line. Let's not talk about dollars. Let's talk about values. That's a great way to avoid talking about the problems in her caucus. Well you know. I'll i'll say this in defensive for. I'm not defending. But just the actually let me provide some context. We know the top the top the ceiling here which is three and a half trillion. What she's saying is let's have a discussion not again. I'm not defending or to try to put some context around this She's saying let's have a discussion on the policies and then we'll see in in what window that will That will fall fair enough. that's but i mean. listen. I think the problem is is that pelosi's not in the driver's seat here completely. She's in the driver's seat to a large degree but in the copilot's seat is is joe mansion and cinema and the democratic moderates House democratic moderate agreeing to three and a half trillion dollar bills. So you need to talk about the top wide. 'cause topline is what matters some people you know. And she says it's all paid for yes. It is paid for by tax increases On a whole host of of of individuals and and things of that nature But she can't decide individually to not talk about the numbers that's something that democrats have to agree on. I mean they don't have enough. They need a top line. Number people are curious what that's going to be because he has you know if your people are going to go home and campaign in two thousand twenty two republicans are and they're going to say they spent three half trillion dollars and or they spent doing out whenever it ends up being so people are curious right police. What that number will be

Beltway Punchbowl News Hugh Hewitt Chuck Schumer Joe Mansion Sherman Democratic Moderates House Pelosi Jake Nancy America
Business economists lower growth forecasts due to virus

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 15 hrs ago

Business economists lower growth forecasts due to virus

"You may have noticed those sharply higher prices for goods and services this year well now experts are weighing in on what's to come the good news many business economists apparently think the higher prices are only temporary a new survey from the N. A. B. E. the national association for business economics predicts inflation will come in this year at a hot five point one percent year over year but they expected to moderate next year to two point four percent the leading factor in how the economy will do for the rest of the year and then to twenty twenty two the corona virus they say the economists predict five point six percent growth this year and three and a half percent next year I read a folate

N. A. B. E. National Association For Busin
"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

Entre Dos Podcast

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

"I think about my three year old who is about to start Preschool, and he's already enrolled in the. The. School district's Preschool, which has a Bilingual Program T. B. E. Program. And as of now, we only have the option. If we want to do it online, we only have the option of an English only curriculum online. He's three years old. He does not speak English. He is merely proficient in Spanish. You know. So when you think about those students that are just entering you know. And there are not gonna be able to continue developing their native language about how much this is affecting them not only linguistically but culturally, you know their their identity, it's being affected by this, and ultimately you know when they went on a continuing to language program when it's time to go to kindergarten and take that access test air in see if they qualify as native Spanish speakers, many of them won't be able to qualify. So then what do you do if you don't have enough native Spanish speakers to enroll in door language program that has a fifty fifty population. You know when they have half of native Spanish speakers, half of native English speakers. But now you may not have enough native Spanish speakers because you remove that when they were three, you know. So it makes me think about the future of the program and it really makes me sad and I really hope that they reconsider you know because we have three days to the side and has of now we don't have any response. We don't have you know that that's the only thing that we have that statement that said how the support would look for El, else. But that's it. We don't have anything else bright, and what do you nobody's going to change her mind in three days if right choice for your family about safety right and hell league that's more time. Might you know it helps but it also? By now, most families know what they want to do and. And I. I, wish that schools. were. Thinking of beyond the emergency a little bit and thinking more about the long-term what we're talking about here. And I'm so glad that that this campaign has started in that year creating sort of a pathway for a lot of parents that are going through this So thank you so much. Thank you. Thank you. We really appreciate you reaching out to us and You know giving us a voice outside of school district You know we they contain we are working together. We have a very strong group of parents and I'm hoping that more school districts do this especially because we know that it is possible I personally know teachers who are GonNa be working doing language teachers who are GonNa be teaching online and I know that it's doable other school districts with less resources. This is this is an amazing school district in all the resources of other school districts with less resources are are making it work, and that's what we are expecting of this amazing school district..

Bilingual Program T. B. E. Pro El
"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

Entre Dos Podcast

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

"That article helped us <Speech_Female> get into legislative offices <Speech_Female> that we might not have been <Speech_Female> able to get so <Speech_Female> what I would say is <Speech_Female> take those little steps <Speech_Female> I do. Your personal <Speech_Female> reflected inventory. <Speech_Female> Who Do you know <Speech_Female> how do you know them? <Speech_Female> What's your history <Speech_Female> with them and who <Speech_Female> might be willing to listen <Speech_Female> not <Speech_Female> then bring it <Speech_Female> up at a PTA meeting. <Speech_Female> I think <Speech_Female> that for too long and again <Speech_Female> I'm speaking <Speech_Female> not as Jane <Speech_Female> Nichols Representative Right <Speech_Female> now but as a parent. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> I WanNa say <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> our PTA <Speech_Female> meetings across the <Speech_Female> country have <Speech_Female> turned into <Speech_Female> mostly <Speech_Female> fundraising opportunities. <Speech_Female> Mostly are we <Speech_Female> going to build a playground? <Speech_Female> I I see <Speech_Female> less influence. <Speech_Female> The parents have been having <Speech_Female> in curriculum in <Speech_Female> school development <Speech_Female> over the years. <Speech_Female> And I want to say <Speech_Female> that. I think <Speech_Female> that we need to harness <Speech_Female> that power. I <Speech_Female> think we need to go in <Speech_Female> and say this is important <Speech_Female> and this is why <Speech_Female> I think <Speech_Female> an opportunity that I would <Speech_Female> love to continue to <Speech_Female> work on with parents around. The <Speech_Female> country is to <Speech_Female> take the information <Speech_Female> in the congressional <Speech_Female> reports <Speech_Female> on the value of language <Speech_Female> education. And the need <Speech_Female> for. I think <Speech_Female> there's a combination <Speech_Female> of things that we can <Speech_Female> do. The first <Speech_Female> steps are very simple. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Take <Speech_Female> personal inventory. <Speech_Female> Think about who <Silence> you know and how they connect <Speech_Female> to you <Speech_Female> go to your PTA meeting <Speech_Female> with information. <Speech_Female> Go to your board <Speech_Female> meeting with <Speech_Female> information and even share <Speech_Female> it with members of <Silence> your board of Education <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> then really <Speech_Female> consider joining <Speech_Female> a group of parents. <Speech_Female> You know <Speech_Female> your group <Speech_Female> here is phenomenal. <Speech_Female> Way of sharing <Speech_Female> information. I've <Speech_Female> developed a facebook <Speech_Female> group called parents <Speech_Female> for language <Speech_Female> and anyone <Speech_Female> will <Speech_Female> can join it as I <Speech_Female> said. I want <SpeakerChange> to create <Speech_Female> this well <Silence> of of <Speech_Female> of <Speech_Female> Active <Speech_Female> able <Speech_Female> and interested <Speech_Female> people <Speech_Female> who want to talk about <Speech_Female> how important this <Speech_Female> is so that when I go <Speech_Female> to a legislative office <Speech_Female> or when we find out <Speech_Female> that we're working on <Speech_Female> trying to solve a problem <Speech_Female> we have <Speech_Female> people who ready <Speech_Female> to to speak up <Speech_Female> in the same way <Speech_Female> John Nicolas has <Speech_Female> built an advocacy <Speech_Female> arm <Speech_Female> meal so to speak <Speech_Female> or an advocacy group <Speech_Female> network <Speech_Female> of professionals. <Speech_Female> I would like <Speech_Female> to see the <SpeakerChange> same thing happened <Speech_Female> for parents. <Speech_Female> Another small action <Speech_Female> parents can take <Speech_Female> sending up for the <Speech_Female> day. Infield Nicklaus <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> news brief <Speech_Female> to stay informed <Speech_Female> about legislation <SpeakerChange> <Silence> and calls to action. <Speech_Female> Sometimes <Speech_Female> you can do <Speech_Female> your part with something. <Speech_Female> Simple like sending <Speech_Female> a petition. <Speech_Female> Regardless of how much <Speech_Female> time you can devote to <Speech_Female> help the key <Speech_Female> is for parents <SpeakerChange> to <Speech_Female> get involved. <Speech_Female> I know that this is going <Speech_Female> to be an uphill battle minute. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I do <Speech_Female> think that we have to set these <Speech_Female> goals. We have to <Speech_Female> believe that this is <Speech_Female> this is the pathway forward <Speech_Female> as parents <Speech_Female> and I say this from <Speech_Female> the bottom of my heart is apparent <Silence> <Speech_Female> I believe <Speech_Female> we have to set these <Speech_Female> goals. We have to see them. <Speech_Female> We have to know the value <Speech_Female> of the outcomes <Speech_Female> of them and then <Speech_Female> we have to forge <Speech_Female> a pathway forward <Speech_Female> and I do also <Speech_Female> believe that the only <Speech_Female> way we do that is together. <Speech_Female> I really <Speech_Female> believe that parents <Speech_Female> in Miami parents <Speech_Female> in Texas <Speech_Female> parents in New Jersey <Speech_Female> and parents all around <Speech_Female> the country needs <Speech_Female> to be a part of <Speech_Female> this and I think it needs <Speech_Female> to be parents who are bilingual <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> and parents <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> were not <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> thank you to Amanda <Speech_Female> Sea World for <Speech_Female>

Nichols Representative Jane John Nicolas Miami New Jersey Amanda Texas
"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

Entre Dos Podcast

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

"Testing standardized. Testing is gone. Which you and I. We all know as parents. That's not happening anytime soon. Watching apply for college and dealing with the sat's and all of the other and the Act's and all the challenges that we still face with with even college entrance and standardized testing indicates that we are not moving away from this anytime soon. So if that's the truth than what we need to do. As educators as parents is to know that a valid proficiency driven assessment of language one that looks at how my child can use. The language can speak in the language can think in the language can understand in the language that those are the tools that will ultimately demonstrate the type of growth that makes us a value and that helps us grow our programs again. Those assessments though also need to help us think about our curriculum growth. Our curriculum going back to that same idea has to demonstrate that it's about more than a list of words and grammar and so the advocacy to me is both legislative and instructional. And and that's the way I've always seen it both as you know as an educator as a parent also as a business owner I straddled a whole bunch of different worlds myself and so as I think about this I have to think about it in many different ways and and I always come back to the being apparent. I say that just because You know everything that I've done in this field and in my entire career I when I reflect on it goes back to my children knowing that when my daughter was born in Arlington Virginia. Had We stayed in Arlington? She would have had educational opportunities in their county based immersion program that she wouldn't have when I moved back to New Jersey and I knew that so I I felt the need to create something right and so these these types of things as parents as bilingual parents yourselves and as you know your listeners think about this we have to look for those opportunities. Find those tools and speak up and I. I honestly believe that parents haven't harnessed their power enough yet. A lot of this work will be organized via the America's language caucus the caucus will act as a form for policy ideas from its members in order to engage legislative. Here's more the America's Languages Caucus is designed to raise awareness to about the value of language education than need the.

America Arlington Virginia Arlington business owner New Jersey
"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

Entre Dos Podcast

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

"Transition of non native English speakers in monolingual schools and their role in developing dual language program historically ESL has been as you said transitioning students out of their own heritage or a native language which has been an error. It has been a huge error on on the public education part in the United States the realization of that error Kane in the development of additive by programs not transitional bilingual programs which are describing up trends. Either it's an ESL program. Or it's transitional bilingual in which case you're either just working on English Development. Or you're having a transitional bilingual program where you're just using. Let's say the Spanish until they can speak English well enough to me. That is an unacceptable outcome. I believe that most language education all language educators and I believe all. Esl teachers believe that that is an unacceptable outcome as well but traditionally in the United States that has has been the way that it's developed now the movement towards dual language immersion a movement toward two way dual language. Immersion where you have half of the speakers are native speakers of language and the speakers may be non native speakers of the target language it native English speakers. You also have one way to language immersion where you have programs. That are trying to get students where it's densely populated with English language speakers native English speakers. You want them to become multi-lingual well bilingual as well. So you're working on. I believe that both of these models are essential. Not One without the other and we can't make anything about it'd be elitist and we also can't leave out schools that need it where they're worried is the best model of building. English and Target Language Literacy All I can say. Is this if we move teacher education? Esl Teacher Education to a model that insists on link on language proficiency beyond English for the teachers that the teachers must be more than one language. That helps US empower a new group of teachers. It helps start to think about that. Bilingual education model in more of a way of valuing the heritage a native language as an additive by literacy model. You are not looking to move someone out of it but moving people forward the best models where you can see this. I've worked with the program in Delaware in In Wilmington where half of the speakers are more eating maybe more than half are native Spanish speakers and the other native English speakers. And what we're seeing is. The growth of additive by literacy to students are developing literacy in their native languages as well as a target language that allows for the the student's cognitive growth the students social and emotional wealth at a pride that I can tell you. I've watched come out of these children. In a way that you will not see in any other situation. Amanda believes that the future of language education including ESL education license having more immersive and equitable models. The giants Nicklaus works to improve opportunities both for world language education but in the world language education. You also have English as a world language right. So we're working to make sure that legislation represents English language learners as well and that's why even in the bet staff that in some of the other in the spell act we're looking at ways that we can make sure that there are equitable opportunities for English language learners in World Language Education and in a native in heritage language development and literacy growth. In addition to that it's about improving how we work together Giants Nicholas Works with the National Association for Bilingual Education in the table for English. Language learners Here in my own State of New Jersey. I'm working with the N. J. T. saw..

World Language Education National Association for Bilin Esl Teacher Education giants United States Kane New Jersey Wilmington Amanda N. J. T. Delaware Nicholas Nicklaus
"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

Entre Dos Podcast

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

"But how do we go from having legislation in place to getting the funding necessary to make it happen years? Amanda yes that is really the fight. The fight is where can the funding come from in a consistent way? One of the things that we've realized in advocating for language education in the United States at the federal level. Is that a lot of that funding. A really the best place to look is in the field of national security and in the Defense Department and the funding that we mind is often more consistently available in the Defense Department than even in the Department of Education. Ironically on but we knew years ago there was a the foreign language. Assistance Program was called the flat program many years ago in under that amazing program So many fantastic world language programs developed immersion programs started dueling immersion programs developed all over the country as a result In languages beyond you know Spanish French and the is really just incredible opportunities but when that funding was cut off even though in for for some time the legislation stayed in place they zeroed out the funding for it and we lost it and so what ends up happening is we have to continue to create new legislation to create new pathways at the federal level. The challenge that I see beyond which. Anc Nicholas is able to do at the federal level is also looking at it from the local and state levels. And that's that's where the work continues for our advocates the organization hosts an annual meeting in Washington. Dc where advocates get training and the opportunity to meet with representatives of their legislative districts. But then when they go home depending on what state you're going to what your local situation is you then have to take that idea and apply it to your local and state situation. I see it every day New Jersey as I fight for language. Immersion legislation here. I see the barriers. And there's just a where you think he would have an easier time of it sometimes in the state. I think it's deceptive often. It's harder in the states. Then you find other examples like in Utah and in Delaware where there is an a huge governor's initiative to promote do language immersion education across the entire state the variation in what's happening at different state levels and of course the way that the schools the districts are set up at the state levels really vary so much Just one other example is in New Jersey. We have over six hundred districts as tiny little districts like everyone's just like one town pretty much whereas when I started my career teaching I was in Virginia where you had county based school systems.

New Jersey Anc Nicholas Defense Department Amanda Department of Education United States Washington Virginia Utah Dc Delaware
"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

Entre Dos Podcast

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

"Okay well so as you both know. I'm sure language education in the United States has been marginalized forever. The history of were language education in the United States is that it's always been marginalized. It's always considered in the schools. A special and not a part of the essential core curriculum And that is a challenge that we've always faced. It's often pushed off to related arts or like I said as a special. It's often the class that Kids are pulled from for whatever things going on And that poses a challenge. The reason behind that marginalization. I think there are several different reasons. One of them is that there have been a instruments for assessment that are required at the state level. The way that some of the other standardized tests require passing them or students to take part in them now. I'm not saying that assessment is is the answer to it. What I'm saying is that because there even if you have policy in place like new New Jersey. We have policy in place that by a certain grade you have to. Have you have to be able to communicate? But there's the teeth of legislation like that are cut because it doesn't work if you don't have an assessment tool or some mechanism by which you assess this on on a consistent basis. So that's one of the challenges. The other reason that I think that language education has been marginalized and there's two others one of the other. Reasons is the history of instruction model instructional models in language education. I think we have to be honest with ourselves. In my profession we have for the last fifteen twenty years had a huge paradigm shift in the way that language education is is taking place I mean. I talked to teachers all the time. I work with teachers around the country at every group. I walk into the first question I ask is what happens when you're at a party. And you tell someone that. You're a.

United States New Jersey
"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

Entre Dos Podcast

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

"But we don't want this if you like homework so we don't want to do math sheets in Spanish we want. We want them to be able to have fun with whatever they're doing but still be learning something about their culture and their heritage and one thing that a lot of these digital activities have shown us as that kids really crave structure also interaction right Like what Powell was saying about Amelia. Were she felt like someone was listening to her right outside of her parents and actually answered her question That's something that with. My daughter is the same thing with these digital events. I think she does best whenever she feels like. Maybe she's being seen or heard at one point because that's what they're missing. They're stuck at home. You know they they mean that sort of that sort of community feeling so. These events are providing that the structure for the parents too. Because Hey Guess. What on this day at noon. You're going to do you're going to be doing this. It's hard to do those things On Your own when the day sort of blends into the next so this is actually really really nice to have maybe one or two things to do a day. There are certain time. And you're going to be sitting in front of the computer and maybe there's a camera on us that you have to. Maybe put an ice t shirt on and you know and then you it. It creates a divide today creates a little bit of normalcy So I I mean we are really grateful that that you're providing opportunities for this having kids at home and seeing them go through this you know and knowing that they don't fully understand what's happening It's it's it's comforting to at least see them smile and you're in New York right. Yes I'm in New York. My sister is in Atlanta. And the what's interesting about the Corona Vires Zaid? I think because parents all over the world are in the same position. Our network has all of a sudden stretched out to Sweden or at least as far Sweden. Has We can tell. We've had some people come in from Australia to talk to us. So that has been. That's been enormous for us but it's also been another challenge and scheduling these events so for example the the mom that's in California doesn't necessarily. She's not necessarily crazy about the fact that our events are usually around ten thirty right but I am aware of when nap time happens and I want to be able to fit. That sort of structure has well so for story time. I think we've settled on ten thirty. Ten thirty is early enough on the east coast where they're not cranky before nap time. It's very early on the west coast. They can be having breakfast if you know screen time is allowed with breakfast and in the UK. They can be having a commit lunch snack so it works out. It works out really well. I hadn't thought of that. That's a good point. You have something you have a lot of less and less. I think I mean we've learned. I've learned also though that I mean like for example. I've learned that the QNA function in Zuma's very cool. That's very helpful and that I would use it again but I also think that that instagram live might be like where it's like no matter the cons to it like that really might be our best. Our Best Bet. Just piles you. You can interact with with whatever the kids. The parents were texting you while you're talking again it's like you said it might be more accessible to some to some extent although. I feel like everybody has them these days for something and Elected to close out the interview We wanted to ask you for any advice that you might have for bilingual families. That are at home right now. Mostly from what? I see friends going through I. I would say to just be very forgiving if the bilingual aspect of your normal routine isn't holding up so if you know the kids are stressed out as a routine has changed and you're stressed out beyond sending their home in your routines changed than I would say That certain rules that we would have advocated before before we would have said. Hey try your best to speak in Spanish all the time than than that probably goes out the window. Ray just do do the best you can. And conversely other rules are being loose loosened screen time is being being something is is something that's being loosened than Pile on the Spanish with the screen time trying to find a balance that works for now. this won't last forever and then you'll be able to go back to whatever routine you had but right now just make whatever. Works also work for the bilingual aspects of your of your plans. Thank you Alexis. We're speaking with us on this episode. Make sure you follow me on instagram. At dot co for the latest updates on events and activities you can also visit them at their website baillio Darko that feel dot com to download their color sheets and for other resources as always stay in touch with in our facebook community or instagram. We're here to help with suggestions and moral support and if you like what you hear. Share Anthony Lewis with a friend. It would be really helpful as a proxy Nos Vamos..

New York Alexis Sweden Pile instagram Powell UK Darko Anthony Lewis Zuma California Atlanta Australia Ray
"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

Entre Dos Podcast

14:57 min | 1 year ago

"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

"Indicates a podcast about waiting bombing length. This is Paula. And this is Monica. Being Benita Zion thrills. A podcast about racing bilingual children. Welcome everyone. We hope you're holding up okay. We're working on bringing you more frequent episodes that will hopefully help you through these times of covert nineteen so be on the lookout. Today's guest Elizabeth. Kim Dial is a dear friend of mine. We met in a birth class and our children. Amelia and Grayson practically grew up together until Elizabeth and her family moved to Spain. Elizabeth is a writer and she and her husband. Aaron just started a creative agency called. The new antiquarians will link to their website and social media profiles in the show notes. Elizabeth talk to us about her experience moving to a country without knowing the language and about how she's creating some routine for Grayson while they're on lockdown. Here's our conversation fifth. We wanted to open up by asking you about your personal experience With language you grew up in Houston but your family is of Mexican descent and we were wondering if you could tell us a little bit about how that was that they speak Spanish too. You're kind of. What was that relationship you had to the language growing up old? Thank you guys for having me. I really appreciate being here I Love Your podcast and I love what you both are doing with it. I think it's so important and so needed for for families right now and I'm just really grateful to be here today. but yeah so a little bit about meager and I'm Mexican descent. I grew up in Houston born and raised but my family Didn't grow up speaking Spanish. My Grandmother had made the decision that she really wanted her. Kids to be American She had nine children and she wanted to make sure that they felt like they were American And it was a time when she was raising kids that we still had brown versus board of Education. That there was a lot of discrimination going on in this house and their accents was just not something. She wanted her kids to have. She wanted to be sound like they were here. They were born here which they were all born here but she wanted them to feel like that so she decided to not teach them Spanish and for her in the time and the place that she was in made a lot of sense but when I look back on it now it's like oh because I feel like we lost so much by not having the connection to our language the language of our ancestors and language of our roots Her and my great aunt still speak Spanish. They speak Spanish to each other but they did not teach their children and so therefore our parents didn't teach us and so we're twice removed from the language. And yes we know the choice words here. There we know a lot of spengler's some slaying But we don't have the same connection to the language that I wish I did. And now you took your belly Your family to Madrid. And so now you've transitioned to a country where English isn't the dominant language and So tell us about that move. And and whether any of you. Whether you're airing your husband or Grayson new any well how your Spanish was before you left in how it was to kind of make that transition language ways. Yeah it's been a challenge to say the least and we knew zero Spanish. Well like I said I knew slaying and some Spanish but nothing Not really knowing Spanish and Aaron News Zero Grayson new zero when we moved here about two and a half years ago and everybody said Oh you'll pick it up so fast you'll pick it up so fast you'll be immersed in it and really we didn't. We did not pick it up fast. Our son on the other hand did he I think has maybe he was more immersed we put him in international schools thinking it would be easier for him to transition but it turns out the school we chose was actually had more. Spanish families than international families so he ended up with a whole class of all-spanish families so the dominant language was Spanish for him and he was really the only one who's Native language is English. So he did pick it up fast. I would say maybe. Within six months of being in the school he was pretty much from it and this point he's pretty fluent conversations that I can't have so it's it's really interesting. Turn of events I find it funny because before my career before I had my son I worked in a homeless shelter and we would have a lot of Spanish families mainly Mexican or South American but the parents would not speak Spanish or English and their children could so the children would translate a lot for the parents and now I find myself in that very same situation but reversed where my son as translate Spanish for me sometimes. So it's a quite a circle that I've made Aaron I getting by we. We still are not fluent. But we're better are listening better. We understand things better but our vocabulary still struggles So they are working on it. But it's it's a process My husband he lived in France and Japan abroad before this move Before I met him. And he says it's definitely different. Moving with family It was much easier for him to pick up French. It was much easier for him even pick up parts of Japanese. Because you're just single on you're by yourself in your younger said but with a family. It's like we have all of these other things with an international move besides learning the language so I feel like it's It's slowed us down a bit but I can get food anywhere. I go whether it's the marketer. I can only will always be able to eat in Spanish. No matter what Grayson your son is has picked up Spanish so easily and kids do because you know what they want to play and they want to have fun and if they realized that the way to do that is to learn another language they will. They're very focused on on the important things in life right and And Are you right now? Working on his English for instance. Do you think that that's something that is provided by the school? Does he have a curriculum in English? Or is that something that you're doing at home so he So his original school we sent him to. They did happen English and half in Spanish but the primary subjects were all taught in Spanish. Like reading math. anything that was a core curriculum was taught in Spanish in kind of the extracurriculars. Were mainly English but we changed his school this school year because we needed a different structure for him. So he's actually going to an American Montessori school now here in Spain so his primary lessons are all in English and then he goes to Spanish Two Times a week so we kind of flipped it a little bit but he's keeping up with the Spanish and it's he's maintaining his levels and actually for him reading this what I struggle with most is. He is such a better reader in Spanish than he is in English and he doesn't WanNa read English because it's just harder for him Because the letters he understands better in Spanish he's reading so we do English at home. He has English at school but he also a Spanish at school to Grayson. I totally understand you. There with you. English is hard. It is very difficult. I stand in solidarity with Grayson but the in a you know it's funny. My my daughter likes to read in Spanish swell. Even though her school is English is all English but Spanish. Because it's just it feels like it's it's much more phonetic so you what you see on the page is what it is essentially So it's it's much more enjoyable especially when you're starting to read when you're starting to develop that skill so I totally understand where he's coming from. He's constantly arguing with their age versus the F. He does not he visit. He's it should just be an F. Wiesner just an F. So does he reach you in Spanish at home. Yeah so Actually right before. We got on complete lockdown here in Madrid for the quarantine. I went and took him to the art store in the bookstore to pick some things out and he picked out this chapter book. That was all in Spanish and I was like Greece. It may be. Let's not get that booklets. Maybe let's get some English books like some early readers. Let's needs like no no. I've been wanting to read this in like okay so I had so I let him get it and he ended up reading finishing the book within the first week and we made tell us what it was about like so I wanted to make sure he understood what he was reading and not just sounding out the words in he did a little presentation fries with his drawings and was able to explain the whole book to us So it's really kind of meat and Elizabeth. You just mentioned what's what's happening right now. Well really it's happening everywhere but particularly where you are in Spain Urine lockdown and We wanted to hear a little bit about that. How how are you guys living? How is it going? How does it feel Oh Lot John? There's lots of feelings you know. I will say it happened so very quickly. It was literally like one week like Milan. Got Locked down and my brother sent me the Milan in Italy and my brother sent me the news report or whatever that it was getting lockdown. Why they're locking line. That is crazy and then Madrid had a couple of cases. It wasn't really a big being. Nobody was really like stressing out about it was just kind of like Chitchat in the streets. It wasn't like A worry there is not a lot of cases in almost a week later. We were in lockdown just like Milan So it happened so incredibly fast and I think that's I think the whirlwind. I've eight is what takes people like kind of throws you off emotionally. 'cause you're not prepared for something like that So I know his school announced that they were gonNA close because this being government or Madrid government said all schools need to be shut down and so it was more of like how am I gonNa work with him at all. What am I going to do? And then not even a couple of days after that. We were on complete lockdown entire not just Madrid but the entire country all of Spain Where we can't leave our homes except to go for food or medical If you're an employee that requires you to leave the house Which is only essential employees at this point not a non essential looking from home so it was really quite fast in it kind of took us for for a loop and I think for me personally. I'm an introvert so I don't mind Anna homebody so I don't mind being at home But the thing that really I think caused me some anxiety is not being able to take grayson out at all because kids are not allowed at all so like if I have to go to the market to get food. That's fine but he can't come with me. I'm ever so he literally has to be in the house at all times and as a parent with an extroverted child That that lake sent me into kind of a little bit of a Some anxiety because he loves to be outside he has a ton of energy and the thought of him being indoors all the time without any sun. Direct some being able to go out was like ooh is a parent. You just Kinda feel that heavy like at least I can go outside and walk the dog. I can go out and get stuff at the market. But he can't at all And we live. We don't have A BALCONY OR THERESA. We JUST HAVE WE HAVE BEAUTIFUL WINDOWS. Which is nice in kind of a little Juliet? Area like a Juliette Balcony. I think they call them. But it's like one step. You can't really sit out there anything but at least we have though so we can let the sunlight in but it's not like riding your bike or going for a run or even just walking to the grocery store So it's it's the first time I've ever missed my backyard in Houston probably will be meal. Lupine but Yes so it was. It's it's been You know there's some days where we're like this is fine. We're okay and then there's some days it's like. How long is this going to last summer in certain? Thi This is. It's quite scary. Numbers in Spain. Continue to go up I think we pass China a number of decks So it's it's quite intense and how as Grayson taken it. Though he's he seems to be making estimate he such a resilient kid. It's it's quite funny like I remember when we first moved to Madrid. Everybody would ask me while health. Gracing adjusting is he okay. How's he doing and he really? He really just suggested he had no problems. He just kind of just did his own thing and lived his life. He didn't really have didn't have any real big issues with the move with him. And it's kind of been the same with this. We haven't had any really big issues. We explained to him why he can't go outside Aaron my husband did take Grayson Down. Wants to walk free our dog which literally just walk across the street because In front of our building we have like I don't know what you would call like a grassy area so you just across the street goes. She goes to the bathroom. We walked back across the street. It's very.

Grayson Spain Madrid Elizabeth Aaron Milan Houston Paula Benita Zion Kim Dial writer American Montessori school Amelia spengler board of Education F. Wiesner France Juliette Balcony
"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

Entre Dos Podcast

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

"It has been an amazing year. We can't thank you enough for continuing to listen. We're really excited to come back here. In the meantime stay in touch with us through our facebook group in our instagram at invidious podcast. Now we're in the midst of the holiday season and with that all of the traditions that make them special in this episode. We wanted to showcase scare traditions specifically the ones that help keep the heritage language and culture. Charlize it was fun to read through your submissions and we really appreciate you taking the time to share them with us. Let's start with a tradition. That is near and dear to our hearts be little three. CBS Mongols Island Need Landa born and raised in Puerto Rico. Row To us to share with us. How she celebrates the Christmas tradition I went to share is? The other EH is Michael's or the other little race which is the day of the epiphany on January. Six as we do I Santa. We write a letter for the race when I was growing up on the fifth my family would put grass under the bed for the camels but with my daughter we put it under the tree. Then on the morning of the sixth she wakes up to the race gets. It's on the fifth back in Puerto. Rico the family would have get togethers. NPS here we have invited friends or we just celebrated the three of us my husband my daughter and I why we sink but Rhonda songs with typical instruments like the. We'd opened at that and cuss. We're not good at singing are playing the instruments and my husband doesn't speak that much Spanish vanish. But we all sing. I'm hoping soon we can take my daughter to experience. Import Derrick Isla need. Thank you for sharing. I've been lucky to be able to celebrate. Laura yes in Puerto Rico with my daughter and it's beautiful. I hope you can bring your daughter soon. Followed I'll tell about our next listener tradition. Our next vision comes from Elizabeth a close friend from Houston who now lives in Madrid. She shared how she and her family incorporate her Mexican traditions and her husband's American traditions into their celebrations in Spain high. So I'm going to share a little bit about some of our holiday traditions which come from multiple cultures. Actually which is kind of Nice. I know for me see when I was growing up. We always celebrated Christmas on Christmas Eve. we're Mexican American and that something that I think carries over we'd always please get started really late on Christmas Eve around seven or eight. PM All the family would come over to one location which is always so great to have so many cousins and aunts and Theo's the OS and WELLA's and everybody would just come together and celebrate and one thing for me is food memories and so we always have have the Myla's e arose conference hall as and that was just so important because weren't just having traditional American Christmas foods but we'd also bring in some of those it was delicious Mexican Christmas foods And the great thing was I remember being a little kid and being able to stay up until midnight because we couldn't open I president until midnight and so that's something that even though we live in Spain or even if we are traveling for Christmas holidays we still do with Grayson. We celebrate on Christmas Eve and we wait until midnights openness first gift. My husband's family on the other hand. We celebrated Christmas on Christmas Day and it was always early early early in the morning. You wake up and you open your percents and then you have an early Christmas lunch. And so we also try to incorporate that so. We have Christmas morning presents for Jason and an early Christmas like kind of branching. So it's nice to have both of those and be able to celebrate in both ways and now that we live in Spain. Spain it's great to incorporate some of the things we've learned while we're here some of the traditions and the Spanish holiday Christmas Eve and Christmas Day is not as big as three three kings day which comes a week later and so we celebrate three kings day we go to the parade. We eat the traditional food for that evening. And it's also just a really nice addition to celebrate and bring in all the cultures. The ones where we came from the ones where we grew up. And the ones that we're experiencing now now celebrating. Both NACHO winner in Christmas morning is something that many families with different backgrounds seemed to. Do we do it in our home. As well are are an extradition comes from lists and Houston. She sent her submission. In Spanish Monica let's Quinto Kayla Newcastle Emphysema Petr Skudra strategy. But if I mean it has been `Solana Newsreel Nemo's listens jam. alaskans sellers menas. Yes soon on the mosquitoes participant. He lasagna Muscat on this yellow. Listen to this. I'll let me set the Muslim convivial. The Curve Amelia triumph led to compete the uproar. HMO's Dombi emperor will start asking me has been in Celinas. Delay can come open. They whenever Aso also get suspicious list. That sounds beautiful. We are a part of a big Venezuelan community here in Miami and recently celebrated liberated with them with Dothan around us. It felt like I was back in Puerto Rico and maybe realized how much our cultures have in common some families bring and more than two cultures into their celebrations. It may take some work to figure out just how to do that as our next submission shows. Hey Paula and Monika. It's Emily Hans. Berger how're you doing. I saw you put a call out there for how you're keeping your heritage slash heritage languages alive during the holiday season and I have what I think is a curious interesting situation. which is that my both my parents and entire extended family is Jewish but my parents broke from Judaism? In the seventies season became Christians so culturally I had a lot of influence from my grandparents and going to some holidays and everything. But I personally don't really know what I'm doing in terms of Jewish holidays and I have recently come to the decision that I want my kids to know about that part of our family and our Jewish heritage on my side so oh we're going to be celebrating Hanukkah for the first time and I'm trying to figure out in what language are going to be doing this. There's can you be some Hebrew words and the dribble and What kind of things am I going to say? When we're lighting the candles? I did find one one bilingual book about the holiday of Hanukkah Another book that's an English. About what makes someone a Jew and I asked my son if he had ever heard. I heard the word. Julio Julia Jewish and he said no and I'm like I got a lot of work to do so it's GonNa be interesting. I'm I'm Kinda just just shooting from the hip here and We'll see how it goes. All right fiestas. We'd we'd love to hear how your Hanukkah celebration turned out. Emily let us know please. Music is a huge part of the holiday that an easy way to bring in language to our celebrations in Lisi's family. Emily one song makes this season special. We Sing Phillies Navy. That by Jose Feliciano every night under the Christmas tree. The kids screamed the choir. No spun ally. We love to include it in our Christmas carrying with English speaking friends. Thank you to everyone. Who sent in their tradition? We wish all of our listeners. A wonderful holiday this season. And thank you for supporting our little podcasts. I stood up. SIMA KNOWS Bay. Moose Dan.

Puerto Rico Spain Emily Hans facebook Puerto Mongols Island Need Landa Houston Rico CBS Derrick Isla Rhonda HMO Michael Madrid Julio Julia Jewish
"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

Entre Dos Podcast

13:30 min | 2 years ago

"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

"But that doesn't that hasn't worked for me at least leased Sometimes I'll tell her case begin. Can you speak. Can we speak in Spanish and I try to make it kind of playful and sometimes they'll show switch sometimes she won't but but you know just thought well. I have to kind of come to terms with this idea that English at is a a big part of our life not only outside the home but also inside the home and so you know I just keep as best I can to speak with her and to three to her and that hasn't changed she's still enjoys me reading to her in Spanish and I don't know if that will change I don't know how that will look look like a few years from now is you know as the Spanish GonNa continue to drop as she's going to go through phases where she embraces and others where she doesn't I have no idea so I just keep doing that but I would like to do more structured things for her but there aren't a lot of things for her to do do a lot of activities for her to do in Spanish so hopefully you know I have ideas and maybe maybe create some groups or something for the older kids or classes where they can do something fun and enjoyable but all in Spanish because her school her school the instruction is in Spanish they have some arts programming that they you know they bring arts organizations from Houston who do work with the kids right now in second grade they have one called writers in the school which is creative writing and they do it all in Spanish and so I love that and that's great but still I think part I think the conversation piece is what's harder to develop you know her feeling comfortable having a full conversation in Spanish it's not that she can't it's that she'll leaned quite a bit on English sometimes and that's fine I think we all do it even here and sometimes she'll start telling a story in English and halfway through she'll switch to Spanish finish the story in Spanish and I'm guessing it has certain things come easier to her her in one or the other language but but yeah it's hard to kind of come to terms with it and figure out okay how auto I encourage this more because even when we we traveled to Spanish speaking countries this summer and yes she'll speak Spanish to to other people but to me she'll speak English it's almost like because we're there and she speaks to me in English it's just between the two of US type thing and it's really odd sometimes unlike English wearing Colombia or were you know but you can't force it you can't no aw yeah you just can't force them to speak what you want so it's it's it's an it's been interesting to watch it's an interesting dynamic because once they start getting older a it things slip further out of your control and I feel like there's only so much you can do an every child scan is going to kind of develop differently But I always I think back to our conversation with that Tho- where he says that you know as a teen. He went off to Mexico and really perfect Spanish. Nice ed well maybe you know as uh-huh collected or maybe she'll embrace it when she's in college. I don't know it's not that she doesn't embrace it now by any means she but she definitely looney prefers or it seems that way to me to speak in English at one point there is an and I think that Emilia will value her Spanish and will continue and take it on and I do think that at one point in we have to sort of understand that. That's what's going to happen in order for them to continue because as long as they get older. You know there's more stuff going on. That doesn't Kamov you. So if you're the main source of the language right then it's going to be difficult right now or for oriented with Soya. We do I do get to have a lot of alone time with her at home because you know when we get home from school that read is not there yet and he comes home a little bit later. So that time for me is all it's like Spanish overload in when she's not allowed to watch TV in English. Which is one thing that I told her? If you WANNA watch any cartoons it's in Spanish or nothing would she doesn't love that idea but because there's some stuff that it's not available in Spanish but Netflix is amazing. It defaults the Spanish now for us. I don't know exactly how did it. I think we just pushed it so much like okay okay. You guys want Spanish but she she will watch in. That has helped a lot. I put music in Spanish. We talk. I mean it's just all of it every day so that helps and now. She's tutoring that Spaniel do he'll read to her in Spanish and I'll hear her correcting him every other other word which is cute you know but I told her look problems to be bilingual so he needs to and you know at this point more than he does really I mean he can speak Spanish mission all of that but her pronunciation is more native he still sort of. Has You know issues when when he reads so so she's it's very cute but trying to create that environment fireman right at least in the house where it's it's an expectation but it's also valued is important but she's five. I can do do that because I mean control every but eventually there might not be the gave you know eventually she I mean she speaks English with all of her friends friends and she will have her moment of Spanish depending on the context but I know with all of her friends her close friends all English and it's funny because I can tell when she's been speaking English because when she comes to me she opens up in English it she code switches but I can and then she switches again she's like oh if vanish with Mama so so so far. She's sort of understand that with me and she's asked me she said you speak English with Papa. Why are you speaking Spanish with me? She's asked me several times and I told her well because I feel more comfortable in Spanish and which is a truth you know. I'm not trying to track her. I feel more comfortable mothering in Spanish than I do in English but I tell her that Papa understand a lot of Spanish and I can't speak to him the way that I speak to her so I have to adjust for him but that I would like for for her and I have a relationship in Spanish so and she's so far has you know believed it and absorb dead and she has you know she's okay with it. We'll see moving forward. You know how that plays out and how she feels about it so but for now it is working but one thing I've realized I mean ever since we started you know kinder- is that things change quickly and you have to adjust and you have have to sort of adjust expectations and adjust your your your your your program that you have for Spanish if you have it outside of the school and you have it well planned like I I had to drop the Spanish tutoring now. I had to increase our weakened in our weekends. You know we we do so else you'll still which is mel. It's exhausting for me. Sometimes I mean it is a weekend and I'm taking on an entire morning alone with her. Which is really fun to do but it is still still? I'm tired and we have errands to run. But we have to do it. Because that's that helps her so I'll take her to the public library. Read in Spanish. Banish we do you know I take her to take her to some parks in Miami where I know that there's a lot of native speakers. We have a list of parks which I could share with listeners at our Miami if they want to go to a to a public park that has mostly Spanish speaking children but but we do that too and she actually actually. It's it's it's really amazing how you can find these little pockets here but that's been really useful. We go to our when Gwen does we do all about it is exhausting costing and and we had kind of stopped doing that a little bit over the summer because she was in her preschool. That was bilingual. You know and and and I didn't have I didn't have of that pressure of pushing it so much so you know although Spanish has been workable I mean I still what it causes. Some you assertive pause in terms of the realization that moving forward I might be able to make so many concessions right and I might not have access to to to sort of these different options that I have now. Because she's so young right. I'm nervous about how how her academic life will be so full that making space for Spanish will be even more challenging. You know and I know that it can be done but I have to be thinking about that now Especially if I am not able to put her in a bilingual program right now in first grade. I'm I'm still when you go to first grade. I I am still able to apply for some of these programs and I am definitely doing it and considering it Because I am seeing seeing already. How how in kinder- English is sort of you know everything is in English? And that's just kinder- what's going to happen in fourth grade when she doesn't have any Spanish and we have a lot more homework and projects in all of in. It's all going to be an English and I'm not going to be able to do the same stuff that I'm doing now because it's just going to be a lot more work and it's the competition is going to get more intense so so I mean that's something that you have to plan. I mean you have to get prepared early and think about what you're going to do because otherwise it's going to take you by surprise and then you're not can if he's able to react quickly enough it. It really takes a lot of energy to do this stuff it crazy. Yeah and it's it's a constantly evolving process so I I would say if there's something that take away from this conversation is the AH We as parents have to be bilingual. Children have to be flexible and kind of just like Monica said to the changing dynamics With our children because we we can't predict them they will definitely change and some of them are phases is a some of them. Maybe won't be so I don't know maybe. In a year we do another episode to see where we are in our homes that third completely different. Not that will stop with not that. You won't hear talk about this stuff in other episodes but maybe we we should make this an annual thing to Jim in assessment of where we are with our kids in what we're doing so we hope you found found this episode useful and if nothing else we hope you find comfort in the fact that all of.

Papa Miami kinder- English Netflix Mexico looney Emilia kinder Mama Monica Jim Gwen
"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

Entre Dos Podcast

12:32 min | 2 years ago

"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

"Angry as I go. My Gosh these kids. I wonder how they would be doing. If if this this was part of their daily curriculum. Right I mean really even a small amount of time did with them. Yeah just a little tip of the hat kate. This is something that I vowed like. This is something that we will recognizing in this context and value it and they're not getting that and just a little glimpse into seeing. Oh my gosh you know. This is like another thing that I can do. This is a skill that they have and it's very rarely recognized that outside of the home and in the end academy context which is a context where kids are being rewarded for things on their own. That's the first time that you feel like you know chemic- accomplishments and all these things and that part of them is not being recognised at all. So I that's sort of like I felt the very. I was very emotional after that and I was like Oh my God and I told the principal. I message to teacher. I communicated good my my experience in my frustration and my desire for for the school to do something about that because I think that that that would benefit their experience in the classroom significantly just based on the tiny I was with them for an for forty five minutes. That was it but it just changed changed everything around so that that was really cool. Yeah that's something. What was the principal's response? She said well they all. The I've mentioned many times like this is all talk about what the administration the I mean. I think we're planning. We really want to do a full like bilingual curriculum curriculum. For the whole school you know. But that's like unique funding for that and also you need to start from the beginning because it is true. You can't just go bilingual with the third grade class. They do have Spanish starting in second grade every every class. Every kid gets Spanish class starting in second great. I have no idea why it starts second-grade to be honest with you I. That's silly to me. I think it should start from the beginning if you have the staff to do it. But that's just how it works and they have one bilingual classroom per grade. So it's a it's a strange system but but the administration is very open to that. They wished that they could do it. I they haven't really explained to me very clearly. Why not but I think it has to do with funding? And that's something that you know. It's that's a problem problem every every public school in America right now but. I'm glad there's Mum's like you. Who Do oh yes I think that sometimes it has to be you know these opportunities have to unfortunately be parent led not entirely? Unfortunately but you know it. It's unfortunate that schools and other institutions. Don't have more opportunities in Spanish. But you know we've seen a lot of parents who start their we'll play dates and start their own groups and I think that's that's really helpful even if we have to take it into our own hands specially as they get older and we were talking about this the other day opportunity seemed to drop the older. They get begins a lot of this. The play dates a lot of the Story Times are aimed kind of like to the preschool set. Maybe up to five or so but then once the kids get to seven A there don't seem to be a lot of activities for them in Spanish and you know that complicates. I feel like that. It's a lost opportunity almost because you want it. You want to have that outside of the home even outside of the school in my case. Emilia has her dual language school and she gets a lot of opportunities in Spanish but the peer interaction is still in English. So you almost want there to be opportunities outside of the home and outside of the school so more in a social setting are in a setting where they're learning something new cooking or a stem activity or whatever So that they have the opportunity to to use the language in different context and to have that expectation that when they come into the space they're going to to use the language and you have spaces like that in Miami but they're even in Miami not everywhere Miami. I think there's a big drop off when kids reach around third grade. I think that that there's a big drop off of activities that are in Spanish. For instance in there is kind of. I think it's something that I've been thinking about a lot because you know even for a younger crowd in terms of how to really learn a language outside of school as an extracurricular right and because so it has had a tough time transitioning positioning to that heavily didactic curriculum of of of kinder- especially coming from a preschool. That has a child child led approach. She was in a Reggio Emilia Preschool. That was bilingual You know I have to say that. So much of what I've seen happen in her. Elementary School is to me grossly developmentally inappropriate. I think that this is happening in a lot of public schools in America. Ah that kinder- is sort of like first grade at this point and there's a lot of expectations that are not especially when you look at the range of The ages that you can get in kinder- you can get really young fives and also really old five in terms of like when there birthdays are and that's like an eternity in terms of developmental gain. So that's I feel like the all that stuff it's inappropriate and it's weird you know there's not enough play. There's too much worksheet time. They're straight up screen time 'cause they're in computers which is getting on my last nerve but And part of all of this sort of picture sure is why I had to take soy out of her. Her Spanish tutoring. She was going once a week to Spanish School of tutoring her berry. Didactic to to sit down and do the work kind of school and she did not she she used she loved it while she was in her preschool. She loved going and it was is fine. But once we started kinder- she didn't want to go to another classroom setting after being in school. All Day doing worksheets and whatnot. She gets outside of school and she wants to play. She wants to open up. She wants to go bike. She wants to do something fun. And so we had to drop that that that that resource source that was really it was really valuable and it's why also we've been able to keep her in the art and theater classes that she's in because because it's immersion and you know she gets to play and she gets to do use her imagination and to move her body and I feel like this is something needs to tackle in a in a future episode. Because I don't understand why so. Many of these sort of language learning opportunities are so didactic. Lactic especially the tutoring aspect of it. I feel like even in her Spanish class. It also wasn't developmentally appropriate and it only worked because so it wasn't a school where she was getting what she needed developmentally so it was okay to take her once a week for an hour to the school but once everything turned in Grad. It wasn't it she couldn't take it and I get that there's a need for instruction but it it should be so regimented particularly for younger younger children who learns so much better through play you know and you don't want Spanish should become a shore right you know language learning as a discipline and it's important and you know but it's also important to remember that we're pitching our kids here. The language right at some point they're going to need to take the rain right they have to take the reins and that won't can happen if they have a negative association with the language. If it feels like work and we talk we talk about dread dread ride because it becomes like another the thing that I have to sit down for and do a ton of work for and yes. You have to do that at some point. You have to do that because it is important. You know you have to put in the time for reading it and and you have to put in the time to learn the grammar and and and the rules around it and you have to practice it but but it doesn't need to be like that from the beginning you know I and we talked about it. In in our I think it was on heritage language and identity episode with Sabine Little about we talked about everything and how parents sort of have to trust their children and let go a little bit and really also really understand that when your kid tells tells you hey you know this is not something that I want to do to sort of. Just listen to them because if you forget it if going to become another another thing and that's what we did with Spanish tutoring we just sort of like you know why we can't i. It was painful because she was really really improving her. I I mean that's why I think she started reading in Spanish because of that this summer because we put her in those classes and it was really hard to just drop it because it was the only structured Spanish class that we had. I can't can't do that at home the way that they were doing it in the classroom and they gave her homework and all of that but it just became too much so yeah. It's a lot for them specially in kindergarten where they're transitioning from preschool to a mark democ setting and you know it's also depending on the child. I mean there's so many children who have so many exactly who knew tutoring and do all these extra classes and they don't have an issue with it but and not all of them thrive they need that break and I think most of them probably at the break some just handle it better than others and Yeah but I as far as you know what we discussed with being you know definitely put that in practice in our home Because like I said I don't have any structured way in which I am trying to foster oster Spanish other than what we already did which is speaking in the home and reading in Spanish and she reads very well in Spanish. She writes well L.. All she speaks it but you know it's evident that she's more comfortable in English or that she at least at this point she enjoys speaking at more and I I have my moments of frustration but lately of taken a look at myself in our home dynamic namic and I think to myself how can I expect for her to speak in Spanish all the time when aside from her. I'm speaking in English all the time. And that's just the reality because my husband speaks in English we both work from home. So were here the three of us when she she gets home from school most of the time the three of us are in the home already at a period of time with her by myself per se when we get home from school although we do spend some time doing her homework and that's mostly in Spanish but I was thinking the other day and like trying to take a look at myself and I think we'll yes. I speak in Spanish to my family. I speak in Spanish. I have a lot of Spanish speaking friends now through the school and I speak with them in Spanish Nash but in the home I speak a lot in English even if it's not her although sometimes it is to her because it involves all of us and it just becomes comes easier right so I've tried to and I say this I say this for the parents who might be struggling with that like you know. My kids begin a lot of being in English. But it's kind of hard to let a be a little bit like Sabine suggested listed. It's you know there's always this temptation to to fight and push press harder for Spanish..

Spanish School of tutoring Sabine Little America Miami principal Elementary School Reggio Emilia Preschool kinder Emilia Story Times Nash forty five minutes
"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

Entre Dos Podcast

13:32 min | 2 years ago

"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

"Bilingual children in one of our earliest episodes Spanish as a warm cookie we spoke about what we he had done in our homes up to that point to foster Spanish in our daughters recently we listen to it again and it struck us how different things feel now so we decided needed to record an update on where we feel. We are in this bilingual path. Money you've written a couple of blog post recently about about your experience so far now that soy has started kindergarten at an all English school. And you're being incredibly intentional about supplementing her schoolwork with extracurriculars in Spanish. So tell us how that's going aggressively. Intentional is a good way I've laid some of this in my blog posts and willing to them in the show notes but overall it's going very well And of course if you look sort of backstage you will see their sort of this frenetic constantly like changing scenario because it is a lot of work and I expected it to be. You know a lot of work but but I didn't expect to be so at odds with the school school and her curriculum and that has been really stressful. You already had to opt out of a computer assessment program program because essentially it would eat away at our family time our language time and also it would give her screen time which that's another show right completely not even our show but I do have a problem with a five year old being in front of a computer every day. You know we've made homework. Bilingual oiling will which means that whenever we have to do reading it's done in Spanish which is great. I spoke to her teacher about that and she was really open to anything that we wanted to do. At home in terms of Spanish literacy you know. Math has also really the object to do subject to doing ineffectual. So that has happened as well even though David does most of the math homework with her and he's doing a lot of it here at home because because I do want her to learn some of the terminology in English because her classroom is all English so I do worry sometimes I feel that pressure of like oh my gosh. I'm I'm teaching these things in Spanish. I wonder how that will be received in the classroom right but right now she's reading Spanish which is amazing and As a result there is some confusion about how do identify when something is in a specific language and how to read it when she sees is the printed word she has yet to be able to identify what language it's in and because she's so comfortable in Spanish she reads it in Spanish in undermined. vowel sounds are in Spanish was. She's reading an English which is perfectly normal but I worry about how that plays out again in the school because she is in an environment that doesn't value her Spanish right in and creates a context that we will turn the very typical bilingual behaviors into a potential issue and by the way there is peer reviewed research that came out recently that says that reading skills in Spanish in particular. I'm not sure about other languages. I'm not sure if that study mentioned other languages but the reading skills in Spanish are transferable to English so if if your kid is reading in Spanish that will likely help his or her. English literacy literacy literacy skills moving forward and we'll post that research in the the show notes. I think it came out this week right. Yeah I saw. I saw the article and I was going to bring that up because I've I've seen it in my experience the media even though it's a little different context because like you said she's in an environment. where Spanish is the expectation in in the younger grades? But we don't do any reading in English at at home really and it's one day it's like a switch flipped and she started reading in English and I think there's something to be said about how you learn to read Spanish because it's phonics Ryan and we've been her teacher. Her kindergarten teacher told some concern parents who were worried about. Well is my kid because it's a dual language. School is my kid falling behind Hind English. And I remember she told the parents she's like look maybe right now. It feels that way but soon they will be there. They're reading gene skills in Spanish will really help them. read English because I they might read it with a Spanish pronunciation but since they're familiar with the English language it's almost like it'll click like if they say I remember she said let's say they say fish but they they're looking at a picture of a fish will though they'll quickly correct themselves fish. That's how you pronounce it. And then you know once they see the word though they start knowing that that's how you pronounce announce it so in my experience. I've definitely seen that help. And I don't know if it goes for any language or if it goes in reverse like if they were learning to read an English this ship it would translate to Spanish but what I've heard from her teachers even her teacher this year in second grade is that they really encourage parents to to foster the language of the home whichever language that is because that gives that gives them a really good foundation to learn the other language and and to become proficient in it or do to eventually develop those those literacy skills right and that is something that we talked about in our previous episode with Melissa Vault about. How'd you know using the language of home? It whatever language it is dominant language. That should be what you use at home because the input ah for your child is going to be much richer because what you feel comfortable with that is where you have the vocabulary in the abilities. So yes and I mean I I can say that. I've seen with soy that her because she started reading in Spanish I mainly because it is a phonetic phonetic it. I mean if you know how to pronounce vowels you can do it and if you know that letter sounds so also During the summer was doing she. Taking tutoring Spanish tutoring classes. Which helped her a lot with learning how to sound out and learn the phonetics of of of the language but I you know I do when I hear her read in English. I mean she sounds like it's a say she sounds like Chita Rivera hilarious and I love it. I think is great and she and I think it does she doesn't it doesn't in click with her. She reads it but we do have to correct it because eventually I mean at one point she will be tested. That and I don't know if that will be a hit against Mr and eventually I'm sure she will catch on but right now. It's an all of the reading comprehension that we're doing in terms of the school. The homework work. I'm doing it all in Spanish. Because reading comprehension works in any language right. That's the point of it. So we we are working whenever she is reading a book by herself. We do work on that too and now we have all these really fancy childrens books right. We've acquired throughout her early childhood and none of them work now for reading which is hilarious because the fonts are not appropriate appropriate for her to there too. It's just or the language is just to the words are too long. The sentences are too long too complex for her. So now we're trying to find all these sort of very heavily sort of early learning didactic reading books in English and in Spanish which were sort of in a rush to get these now because she wants to read and I don't have them thankfully are public library has a lot of those and she has a school library. That's providing all the English books for that but it is. I didn't plan for this plan for that. Get books they can read because does she. We still read a lot to her she. I mean that's most of the reading that gets done at home. It's US reading to her but she wants also try and read something and she'll get frustrated even with the people very simple short illustrated book that we have because their artistic tick. The fonts are crazy and she doesn't understand what she needs something very clean and she's a what if this letter so so. I think that there's definitely email that's something to plan for that. We didn't expect and anticipate because we have so many books. I assumed that was covered Hubbard. Yeah Right Yeah No. That's true. We have some books that have cursive. Yeah the current. I remember early early on. Emilia was like what. What's that letter? What what is that like she she can recognize it now? It's a little better but not in kindergarten. Yeah and I think when I said in the intro that we struck us how different things feel. Now I think for me at least it's because in that early episode we were. I feel like we were just saying no. It's just Ri to them at home. Just just do this us through that and it it almost sounded so easy and I feel like now as they get older like. You said it's a ton of work and and you. You really have to be maybe aggressively intentional. And that's why I feel that it's so different now because you have to try different things. Every kid is different. Every family's different. You might get a kid like mine. Who has big long spells of just speaking in English? Even if I speak to her in Spanish sometimes I laugh at our conversations because literally I am speaking turn Spanish and she responding as know it all the time time but so you some of the things you've been doing outside of school aside from the home things aside from what you do at home are also finding opportunities for so it do right to be exposed to the language and you have wonderful opportunities entities and May. Oh my God. I don't know about those. I'm a little jealous. I mean I feel like I don I feel like I'm the I feel like I don't know I'm aging myself here a little bit but if anyone watched sex in the city they would say that New York was the fifth character in the show and for us. Miami is like the fourth character in this bilingual show because it is really essential to us to have to live within the context of of a community that values Spanish so much. Soy in her world understands that Spanish is necessary even even yesterday we were at a public park and there was a little girl that was speaking Spanish with her mom and so he goes up to her. She's like hey I manage to do. They were playing banish time. And I'm thinking of I mean that that was great. You know the kids here. I think I laid this out in my second blog. Post host But there's a program in so a school called lunch bunch. which is parents going to the school to read to a small small group of kids During lunchtime so you'll bring a few books. You sit outside in a blanket and you read books while they eat their lunch and it's great. It's really fun and of a the first time I did it. I thought that I should bring. Maybe you know half of the books in Spanish the other half half an English. Because I mean we're Miami. I think most of these kids will very likely know. Spanish will be able to understand it and they all did and it was great and when I pulled out these books they were so proud to say. Hey I understand Spanish. I'M BILINGUAL I. Yeah and they started one one up each other in Spanish to which was amazing. Like oh my gosh you know this is like heaven and and and in it was so nice they were so Excited to be recognized for that and I felt like after that I it was beautiful and then after that I sort of felt when I left and I started really understanding what that meant for them and how. The school wasn't providing for that at all in their classroom. Because these are all kids from so. Oh it's classroom. I got.

English school Miami Hind English Chita Rivera US David Melissa Vault Ryan New York Ri Emilia Hubbard five year one day
"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

Entre Dos Podcast

07:38 min | 2 years ago

"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

"Is not just a a mixture of errors or these transfers from english right there har- there are reasons. There are rules. There are patterns to the way that speakers of spanish in the u._s. Are speaking. This made us wonder. Is there a u._s. U._s. spanish and if so what are its correct terrific's. Is there a common thread that runs through the diversity of spanish bokan in the united states there. Oh wow so you're hitting really really big questions that we are still dealing with but these are great. This is exactly what what the scholars who are working on spanish person u._s._o. Trying to answer him than we can break down the question of do we have such a thousand needles or that. We have a <hes> day those meals and that's kind of the the question that we're doing like it isn't isn't there a u._s. Spanish or not <hes> and end overall what we can say so far. Is that arguing for this. You're kind of right actually with this arguing for a monolithic dialect right of u._s. Spanish is really difficult because of the variety and diversity that we're finding <hes> because of the mixture of different national origin varieties the spanish and how they integrate with mainstream team u._s. English dominant society right they don't interact in same ways in miami verses los angeles versus chicago new york the interact in very different ways and on top of that the spanish that spokane is in each area is different so it's like looking at new york in particular navy. The same thing happens in miami in chicago. You have have not only the contact of different types of spanish reds. You're saying like in miami. You didn't have your puerto rican community so you were mixing with other types of spanish honest there but that also intersects with being in contact at the same time with english so that's a lot for speakers in the u._s. To the deal with children often have to confront strong language ideologies early on in school and they stay with them later in life good as good intended ended as they are teachers are often the times you know pushing along these ideologies about which way to speak in which way not to speak right because their students have to take some type of exam usually on that test their language abilities right <hes> and this happens even if we take spanish out of the picture and look at different varieties of english spoken the u._s. right many speakers of variety say african american vernacular english right are perceived negatively and held back oftentimes for speaking the way that they speak in their communities right so the same thing happens to a lot of u._s. <hes> young spanish speakers right there heritage speakers of spanish cash so if we're looking at say their english oftentimes you know we find that students are placed into the english language learner classes even though english as their first language interesting <hes> right but it just happens to be that they speak english in a certain way that reflects their own identity and history. It's still structured in. It's still pattern. There's nothing wrong with even though it's perceived that away right but that has an actual of sociological educational effect to <hes> and then the same thing happens with their spanish right so imagine you know a dual language language program or a bilingual program in a place where there's children's speaking spanish in cuban-spanish in puerto rican spanish etcetera etcetera cetera all in the same classroom right. You're gonna get a lot of different. You know head turns into saying well. What was that word the use. I don't use that word but my mom says this word right uh-huh and there's the way that we look at it. There's there's beauty in that right. There's something that needs to be celebrated about that but oftentimes sometimes when you have those sort of competitions between words or different sounds right one has to come out as winner on in a certain in context and there are many many reasons as to how one gets picked over the other <hes> but you know again we would argue that there doesn't doesn't i have to be a winner. We just have to recognize the diversity and we can use it as a tool to teach kids about ever see spanish so that they you can hopefully have less linguistic insecurity about their own spanish about their own english events <hes> because that's the problem that we find with with kids so for example one example of a feature right that comes out in spanish is an it just the the the borrowing of words right that come from english rain this gets into into spanish right so words like etro cup for a word that you hear a lot of times in in texas would be preceded in spanish as quote unquote wrong right that there are other words that could be used in that in that context but in that community are those communities. That's the word that is used for truck right and that's that's kind of where we leave. It like is it. You know there's mutual. Intelligibility people know what these speakers saying. You know this links often to heritage language classrooms. This happens a lot of the university level where reteach stash courses to heritage speakers kids who grew up speaking spanish at home <hes> and they're they come in and saying well you know my spanish is is from the ghetto only speaking get with my grandmother so i don't know a lot of the words and what we try to the goal of these. These language programs is to a make sure that students are feeling in a less insecure about their spanish raped invalidating. They guess they can speak spanish even though they think that they don't the <hes> and be giving them more tools writes the questions shouldn't be about which which word or which sounded that is correct right it should be can i can. I ask the teacher. Give you the tools to know when and where to use which word or which sound right can i give you more of a linguistic repertoire to pull from in different context and i think that's.

miami united states chicago texas spokane new york los angeles
"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

Entre Dos Podcast

15:16 min | 2 years ago

"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

"N._f._l. A podcast about waiting bombing liked length my momma. What kind of spanish do you speak our perceptions about what kind of bilingual we want our kids to be <music> are rooted in what we feel is acceptable spanish as native speakers. These expectations hinge on our countries of origin are geographic location in the u._s. And also underlying underlying colonial narratives in this two part series. Were coming to terms with this interactions with you. Our listeners in our own experiences have shown the more a deep rooted anxieties that parents have about the heritage language their kids speak producing episode has made me very aware of my in other people's perceptions and it all came to a head during an unassuming spanish story time that i frequent with soy one of them others said that sawyer sawyer has a gringa accent when she speaks spanish. She even made a face when she was saying it. How something a person feels comfortable saying hang out loud is beyond me and so i didn't notice so. I didn't make a fuss but i was so angry. I wondered if this would be hurtful to so it if it would make her feel less ownership of her heritage because in that moment i felt like an outsider and i also realize that maybe this mother was was insecure about how her much younger daughters accent might evolve into sounding more american. It was a very loaded moment. I can imagine i'm not even sure how i would've reacted to something like that and i can't imagine what it would do to someone's confidence in speaking a language judge yet while we may not comment on it out loud. The truth is that we all make assumptions about people based on how they speak a language we have these ingrained ideas of what is correct and what's not today's conversation explores just that we spoke to a site about califano a socialistic researcher and instructor dr at the university of texas austin who studies linguistic production and perception in u._s. Latin x communities. He did a study on the relationship between between linguistics and social perceptions using miami as his case study..

sawyer sawyer u._s university of texas miami researcher instructor
"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

Entre Dos Podcast

08:27 min | 2 years ago

"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

"Things are going to impact brain development and behavioral development so to study itself is is a huge deal in the sample size makes it so that you can really get at some of these very subtle differences because in smaller sample studies you often don't have enough representation of different levels of complexity but with the larger sample you do have that representation and you can start to interrogate him more carefully. Could you tell us about your study's findings because we've I don't think we have this gus knit. That's important so tell us what you found about executive function bilingual's yes so we did we looked at the first data released which had forty five hundred. Kids in there were nine to ten years old when they were tested and we measured three different executive function measures which sort of measure attention one of the measured attention one of a measures what you call task switching so the ability to sort of shift between different tasks in an easy way and then we also looked at conflict resolution so resolving conflict between two potential decisions so those are sort of the executive function measures we also measured their English vocabulary. We didn't measure their vocabulary in other language because over forty languages were represented in the in the sample were Spanish. We're speaking but it was still very high representation of other languages so we focused on the English vocabulary because all of them were English speaking children in about sixteen hundred of them. We're also speaking another language and the great thing about the sample is because it's so large there was a very good representation of race ethnicities that are representative of the of the general population of the United States. There was a good representation of socioeconomic status so we get a lot of studies suffer from the problem that they they sort of oversample. You know like middle income households all sold because those people are tend to have the means inability to go and participate in research studies but it was a lot of effort made to try and sample across a range of socioeconomic levels so that made it so that we could look at the socioeconomic status effects and then a lot of the the people the children in the study along with their parents some of them born outside the United States and <hes> had we had a large representation of immigrant background so we can look at those things so we we collected those data we measured bilingual status just by self report so that the child said <hes> whether they were could speak a second language or not but then we also wanted to get it a little bit more into what that meant so we we also ask them. How often were they speaking the other language with with friends and family and so that allowed us to look at sort of it's sort of a proxy measure zero bilingualism or a little bit crude so would have been preferable to have a better measure I think but it turns out to replicate the the vocabulary finding from previous research so I'm not as concerned about it? I think it gets at the idea of bilingualism pretty well but generally we looked at whether if you spoke another language quite often with friends and family did that predict higher executive function meaning if you were sort of the person who was fluent in two languages using one using in the school system probably and the other with with family and friends that should predict according to the literature that was out there should predict better executive function and we didn't find that across the three tasks in fact we did a little bit of an analysis which looked at whether the finding on executive function looked any different from random data and we founded did not but the finding for the vocabulary difference did look different from random data so so that replicated in I want to emphasize a very slight disadvantage for English vocabulary not overall vocabulary we didn't we weren't able to measure that but for English vocabulary. Gaebler and I mentioned the reason being that if you're trying to learn to vocabularies you're sorta splitting your time across the two vocabularies so you may end up with a slight disadvantage for English vocabulary if you if you're learning a second language although in my opinion and the benefits far away those disadvantages so that's generally what we've found is that we couldn't we couldn't replicate the executive function advantage finding but we did replicate the the slight disadvantage for English vocabulary yeah and and and one thing we like to tell our listeners is that language is a continuum and in many ways so as the developing research that surrounds it we have seen an explosion of this bilingual and multilingual brain in development research happen in the past decade and it seems that we have yet to reach a consensus about these very big important questions well I. I think you make ah great point about science. Scientists love to argue with each other. There's at least there's a good bit of people on the other side who who would look at this study and say okay well. That's one study and it didn't measure bilingual well bilingualism as well as we would have liked and some people have said <hes> while you only looked at three executive function tasks you'd probably find it in other stuff so scientists like to poke holes and other studies and they're right. There's no one study that is going to decide whether something is or is not true if you study if you identify more people who are bilingual and you study larger samples that should give you a closer to you correct answer about whether there's something about the population of bilingual's that's different but obviously it matters how you measure things so it's important to get good measurements as well and this study that we did it is part of a larger study that was not specifically designed to look at bilingual advantages so we're sort of pulling the data out that that we could use to address the problem but I think if <hes> if you really wanted to know if this was something that's a real effect or not. I think a very large study with a lot of different measures that tries to really get at and measure bilingualism really well and uses a lot of different executive function measures that would get get at the problem and probably bring a lot of people on board who who maybe you know if they found there was a bilingual advantage. I would believe there was if it was a very well controlled large sample study if they didn't find it I would. I would be inclined to believe that so I think you have to have compelling evidence and part of the compelling evidence is that you need to do large sample studies and this is why I think the A._B._C._D.'s study such a game changer because it was only with this twenty twenty one different universities across the United States getting together in a big consortium to try and collect all these data at the same time and it has been really a sort of a Herculean effort because F._A._U.. Florida International University's one of the <hes> the sites in the study. I get to see firsthand how complicated it is to try and collect these data but those kinds of studies going forward. That kind of investment is going to really change how we understand.

executive United States Florida International Universi representative Gaebler A._B._C._D. ten years
"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

Entre Dos Podcast

14:15 min | 2 years ago

"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

"Nah Welcome to enter those a podcast about racing bilingual children as parents bilingual children. You've likely heard about the bilingual advantage this idea that people who have two or more languages developed cognitive advantages particularly particularly within the realm of executive function which is responsible for things like attention and task switching research to date has yielded conflicting results and according to some researchers the debate over whether there's bilingual advantage advantage or not has reached stalemate and this episode we talked to Dr Anthony Dick an associate professor of Developmental Science and cognitive neuroscience at Florida International University. He published a study in May that found no evidence disadvantages and executive function in bilingual children. We went into learn more about his study in the state of the research into the cognitive advantages of bilingualism..

Dr Anthony Dick executive associate professor of Develop Florida International Universi
"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

Entre Dos Podcast

10:22 min | 2 years ago

"dos" Discussed on Entre Dos Podcast

"The Houston listeners who are coming to you once again on Saturday may twenty fifth our first ever literary picnic presented by in. Thrills and glam your box is a fun family event where you can kick back relax and read in Spanish with your kids at the bar, and there's more our friends book land, I will be leading a storytime and morning. Co host oven throws will be joining us from Miami are picnic book starts at three pm at Evelyn's park in BelAir. Visit and bills podcasts dot com for slash events. For more information, we hope to see you there. Well, we. Factual. In a similar winter blues. Those Bruce meet out on cornerstone cave. Our whole at the era VM better Sonus comb BS KOMO back. Those key has latter. Gus where Los night Isa's enormous lows Diene this I'll eight anthem fails guests that they neon paula's economy partisan models where you just heard is a snippet of Venezuelan myth told by caroliina kit Augusta. It's a Colombian storyteller. Living in Texas to find out. What happens next you'll have to listen to her podcast that squinting thrift winter stealth myth legend and children's stories from Latin America in both English and Spanish given that there aren't many podcasts for kids in Spanish. We were very excited to learn about it. Although most of the published episodes are recommended for children and fifth grade and up Catilina just launched a summer series geared towards younger kids. And for this episode of what we love look mass. No. Costa? We talked together Lena about risk winters and how it came about. Caroline. Thank you so much for joining us today in come to the show. Thank you for having me. Thank you so much. I really appreciate his invitation. Tell us about your podcast, it's called three squint those tell us a little bit about it. It is a podcast dedicated to the traditional narratives of Latin America and bilingual. So my my hope is the contribute to the other standing appreciation of our very diverse cultures all across laughing American the Hispanic world, even here in the United States. So yeah, mostly is midst and legends and folktales of all across Latin America or the Hispanic world. And how was the idea born, well, I'm from Columbia, so Inca Lumbia. I grew up listening every Sunday to this amazing woman. Her name is beyond ODU in. She had a radio show every Sunday where she would talk about. Stuff about history of the world. And and so on she began to build up a whole program about the independence of all the Latin American countries or mythology of grease, the the Greeks or the Roman and in. So in a way, she was educated as while telling us a story about the world. And so I became obsessed with the idea that I wanted to have something similar in a way that I was also telling a story, but I wanted to do it only about the myths in the legends and the folktales of Latin America in I wanted to have it bilingual. So people could actually not only lapping American skin here about the program or their own stories. But also, the people that perhaps don't speak Spanish, but also consider themselves Latinos or people that are interested in Latin American cultures could also learn about us. So. I became obsessed with una the in when I came to a master's in storytelling about setting years ago. I began working on the little by little in eventually just last year. My husband at been bugging him in everybody around me with that idea. I wanna do it. I wanna do one day. I will have it one. They will do and finally less last Christmas two thousand seventeen he got me out yeti, Mike in he said, just go ahead and do it. And so. Yeah. Right after that. It took me about a month to start like working on that in last year. I launched the bud cast. I did it I in English in the night began working on the Spanish version scuttling, how do you pick the stories I listened to a few of them and they span a wide array of Latin American countries and cultures. So how do you look through sort of this rich history and find the stories you want to retell? Well, I've been reading a lot of collections of Latin American stories I have a very decent library in France. Actually, sometimes they just find books, and they just sent medical expense. They know I'm gonna read them in. So what I do is. I read the books in I make notes on each story. And I I say, okay. This one is good for for the podcast or this one is good for performance or this one would be good for these in that. So I have all my notes in. In in. I have a list of topics every time I'm reading like these would be amazing. I should be talking about this type of ghosts, or this type of myths or this type of things so I make my list than eventually when I failed that have about three good solid stories. That's when I start working on a whole program because brisk went, those means that for an entire program of three episodes. I will be telling three different stories, and I try my best to find the stories from different countries. Sometimes it's not that hard. Unfortunately here in the United States, most of the literature that we find about Latin America's mostly Mexican. So of course, have a lot of Mexican stories, but is really hard sometimes to find from other other parts of Latin America. So that's when my friends come in. My family comes in like, okay. I sent you a book this book is from Brazilians Brazil. Folktales from Brazil or from Argentina from chiller. So yeah, that's pretty much. How I I work is is just I came across the topic in just kinda wait until a half the whole thing radiant than I go with it. What is there a reason you focused on on myth and like ghost stories I saw your series? So we we have led ONA and lead in than Laura, which is a Colombian myth. What is it about these stories that you feel either lends itself to to storytelling, or is it more about just saying something about the countries that that they come from? I would save both. I mean, I was just talking to an author like an hour ago. She collects stories from the Hispanic world in New Mexico. And now she's doing it from all across the world in. She was telling me in her name is that is up one. By the way. She is amazing. All her books are incredible. And she was telling me that the only way for us to remember the people is through their stories. That's when we bring them back alive, even if they passed away, or if someone is ignoring that culture in particular that's stories retelling them over and over does the best way to bring them back. So. I would say this is what I wanna do. I want to bring all the stories that lapping Americans have back to life in a lot of times. We don't realize how much we have in common in in. Sometimes we don't even know how how many stories we all we have in our own countries or in our own cultures. Catalina you have a children's story series coming up for the summer. Can you? Tell us more about it. Yeah. So is the summer programs are coming. I'm going to be performing all summer. So that's what I thought. Well, I'm pretty sure 'cause it happened to me before every time I go in do a performance most of the audiences are children in families in. So I tried to promote the podcast to the talking to the adults. But of course, they always assumed that all I'm gonna let my children listen to it. And I'm like, well, how old is your child in there? Like, no there. Four five like where there's a couple stories that perhaps you can definitely share with them. But this is stories I would think that are better suited for children that are fifth graders or above. So that's when I came to react to the realization, just I I need to have children's stories in summer is coming. I think is is perfect time for that. In the to the stories that are coming up are. I'm not sure about the top the name yet. But the topic is children. There are heroes in Latin American cultures in there's a lot of stories of that. Because I think that a lot of times we assume that the heroes are always, you know, young good looking people, but they're never children. You hardly see any children's that are heroes in any stories, unless it's a cartoon or pigs are dismayed that kind of stuff, but I really found I found stories in with children in in different cultures are actually saving their families or saving their whole entire community that great, and we noted that you

Latin America United States Houston paula ODU Miami Bruce Texas BelAir Sonus cornerstone cave Columbia Catilina Brazil Lena ONA BS KOMO Caroline