36 Burst results for "DON"

Fresh update on "don" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:40 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "don" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Breaking news, Virginia congressman Donald McKeon has died after a long battle with cancer, he was 61. His chief of staff says McKeon, a Democrat was diagnosed with colorectal cancer in 2013. He had just won reelection earlier this month for a fourth term in Virginia's fourth district. We're getting reaction tonight from two U.S. senators from Virginia who have known McKeon for decades in a statement senator Mark Warner says up until the very end, Don was a fighter, even though he battled cancer and faced other trials in recent years, he never lost his focus on social and environmental justice. Tonight, Virginia has lost a great leader, and I have lost a great friend. Senator Tim kaine, in his own statement, says I was last with him on election night three weeks ago, celebrating his win. He was a gentle giant, a compassionate champion for underdogs, a climate warrior, a Christian example, an understanding dad, a proud husband, a lawyer brother, a loyal brother. I should say, once again, Virginia congressman, Donald Lake kitchen passing away at age 61 of cancer. This was one of the most eerie sights in our area in quite a while, a small plane flying into an electrical tower in Gaithersburg and getting stuck in the power lines. This evening, we're learning more about the crash that left two people stranded for hours last night into early this morning, WTO stets and Miller says an investigation is underway. The small plane crashed in Montgomery village around 5 30 on Sunday Night, and an initially struck the power lines of one tower. They've got stuck

Virginia Mckeon Congressman Donald Mckeon Senator Mark Warner Cancer Senator Tim Kaine Colorectal Cancer Donald Lake DON U.S. Gaithersburg WTO Montgomery Village Miller
Gen. Don Bolduc (Ret.) Discusses New Hampshire Politics

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:44 min | 1 d ago

Gen. Don Bolduc (Ret.) Discusses New Hampshire Politics

"The granite state general Don bulldog. Welcome back to America first. Well, hello, sir. How are you? And I hope you listen as well. Yeah, we're preparing for Thanksgiving. We're having debates as to which is the best pie I can't decide between apple pie and pecan pie, but we've got bigger issues to discuss today. So I love the granite state I spent every summer there and offered my winters as well. I'm so sad the old man of the mountain fell off the mountain above franconia, more than a decade ago, but will you help us understand because we still can't work out the fetterman success in Pennsylvania, pennsylvanians, what have you done? Can you tell us what happened to you and what the people of New Hampshire did? Well, I think basically what happened was, you know, $56 million spent by senator Hanson on lies. And the lives were targeted based off of abortion, social security and Medicare. I saw them doing that across the nation. Marilyn's 8 by ten, people getting them every day, you know, she did for every one of my commercials, she did 5. And the money playing out the lies, I think, had a lot to do with it. It's fear. It's uncertainty. It created that in the younger generation, created that amongst women in the elderly, and then the fact that the Democrats do very well here in New Hampshire by taking advantage of same day voter registration and mail in balloting.

Don Bulldog Senator Hanson Franconia America Apple New Hampshire Pennsylvania Marilyn Medicare
Car Coach Reports' Lauren Fix Talks the Audi Diesel Truck Trial

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

00:47 sec | 1 d ago

Car Coach Reports' Lauren Fix Talks the Audi Diesel Truck Trial

"Question we've only got a minute left. You got to follow her car coach reports dot com Lorraine fix lord and fix on Twitter. You sent me a story. I haven't even had a look at it. What is the disaster of the Audi diesel truck trial? Just give us give us a little tea so everybody can go and read your report. Okay, it's Anna website on YouTube called vin wiki, VI and wiki, and I've submitted 7 stories to him. I went down to his place in Atlanta. And we tell car stories and one of those was a very interesting accident. I had in the desert, we talk about how it was Oprah's automotive expert, whether you like her or not, it was really good for promoting my brand. And of course some racing while pregnant. So if you go to Ben wiki and you put my name in there, Lauren fix, you will find him a little bit different. All right,

Vin Wiki Audi Twitter Wiki Youtube Atlanta Oprah Ben Wiki Lauren
'Car Coach' Lauren Fix on the Impact of a Potential Rail Strike

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:11 min | 1 d ago

'Car Coach' Lauren Fix on the Impact of a Potential Rail Strike

"The car coach, Lauren fix. Welcome back to America first. Well, thanks for having me. Lots going on and I'm really, really excited. I was able to get you some safe breaks put on your vehicle. 'cause those drum brakes. Yeah, a little bit spongy. And when it's raining, not so exciting. So I've got disc brakes all round. There is my baby, there is my 66 Mustang. I've got the 2020 as one, a 2020 as well for the everyday stuff. And the new steering wheel, thank you for the recommendations and your contact. Last thing, and I'm not going to touch it, some period correct rims. And then maybe some AC, I might put some AC in because it gets a little hot and sticky here in the swamp. All right. Enough about me and my pony, although I do need people to go to my website and tell me a name. I need a name and not Sally. Okay, I'm not doing the stupid Mustang Sally. I need a female name, go to said gorka dot com and send me a little message that said gorka dot com. All right, you've been sending me some fascinating stuff. First things first, it's not cars. Right now he's allegedly negotiating. But what is the impact going to be if we have a rail strike Lauren in America? Oh, it's going to be huge. Now I know everyone's talking about what you're literally looking at billions of dollars of losses. Because everything goes cars get transported from the manufacturing plant. To the sub area where it then goes to your dealer. So that means good luck getting cars. We can't get them now. That means all the components, tires, metal, just think of everything that you need gets from point a to point B from the West Coast to the east coast, usually by rail, then it's transported to a diesel powered rig and then from there to the final destination in the last mile to your store or to wherever you're going. And that includes like Amazon packages, U.S. Postal Service, FedEx. That new planes, but they also use rail. And without rail, we're in a lot of trouble. And we've been using it for years, plus passengers, Amtrak, which is owned by the government as well. They can't seem to organize the postal service or Amtrak. But the fact is without diesel and there's a shortage of diesel and without the railroad system we have a supply chain that nightmare.

Lauren Gorka America Sally West Coast East Coast U.S. Postal Service Amtrak Fedex Amazon
Lord Conrad Black and Sebastian Discuss Former Press Sec. Jen Psaki

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:23 min | 1 d ago

Lord Conrad Black and Sebastian Discuss Former Press Sec. Jen Psaki

"You mentioned, I played you a cut from the current White House, press secretary. She was very, very angry today as Fauci gave his last speech from the podium before he retires. You said, who do you prefer more Jen Psaki or the current incumbent? Well, Jen Psaki was more competent. I mean, this was competent, frankly. But I find her rather an amiable personality where I found Jen Psaki really rather obnoxious. Well, let's talk about Kayleigh McEnany, which is the champion. I thought I thought she was great. Let's talk about the predecessor. Let's talk about Jen Psaki because she's in the news. This is from Fox News dot com. Former White House press secretary Jen Psaki said Monday that there wasn't a lot Democrats could have done to change the inflation reality. A federal judge ruled Monday that the former White House press secretary must comply with the subpoena and offer a deposition in a lawsuit that claims the Biden administration colluded with big tech to sense a speech. Now, her response and I must read it to you. This is directly from Jen Psaki to the judge, lord black. Sitting for a deposition would be extremely burdensome for me. I understand that I would need to devote several days to preparing for the deposition, as well as attending the deposition itself. And that would be highly disruptive to both my work and my family. My response on social media or black is, well, that's a great excuse that president Trump can use now that there's a special counsel coming off to him. Your response. That's just nonsense. But self indulgence self serving pompous statements. I mean, she knew when she was took that job on that there was going to be a good deal of controversy because her party. And so addicted to stirring up spurious litigation against its opponents, she might reasonably assume that some of it would come back at them. And as press secretary, she might have to testify and give evidence. And the president current president did her the honor of conferring that important position on her. And she had to know that something like that went with the therapy. So what did she talking about? I

Jen Psaki White House Kayleigh Mcenany Fauci Biden Administration Lord Black President Trump Fox News
A Recipe for a Hollywood Fight

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:19 min | 3 d ago

A Recipe for a Hollywood Fight

"Michael viner was the owner of dove publishing. He had a number of decent books that came out in the 90s, the most famous one was you'll never make love in this town again. And when I was dating Jermaine Jackson's ex-wife, Margaret Maldonado. She was working for him at the time, but for Michael viner. And one day she sneaked me in early copy of this salacious book, and no one had seen it yet, Margaret got the proofs and begged me not to show or tell anyone about it. I said, no, no, I won't. I'm not going to write about it. I just want to read it myself, okay? So I go back to the hotel or wherever I was and start reading this book and the proofs and maybe two years ago, I read a couple of the more filthy chapters on this show. The book contains a bunch of stories written by three prostitutes and one actress about this sexual encounters with a bunch of different Hollywood celebrities. There was a Robin and Liza grier, Linda Hammond, and Alexandra daddy. And inside are all these lurid tales of what these girls discovered while having sex with the likes of Nicholson Warren Beatty, Don Henley, Bruce Willis, Robert Evans, John Claude Van Damme, Mickey Rourke, on and on. And a very, very detailed stories. Whether they're all true or not, I don't know. It's just the horrors point of view. So my jaw was on the floor when I started reading this. A couple of days later, I'm at Evans house for one of his great get togethers. Robert Shapiro, Geraldo Rivera, Jacqueline bessette, Beverly Johnson, Neil sedaka, a lot of luminaries in addition to the dynamic to all of Jack Nicholson and Warren Beatty, who are always at Evans house back in the 90s, and now I have all this information inside me bursting out and I don't know that Jack Warren and bob know about this. And then my eyes couldn't believe what I was seeing. The publisher Michael Weiner walks into the party. And he lived a few doors down from heaven, so it kind of made sense, but I know all this information from the book he published and I grabbed Margaret and I go, what the fuck is he doing here? She's like, what's the big deal? I go, he's publishing a book about what a few hookers have to say about a few of the men at this party. But balls on this guy,

Michael Viner Margaret Maldonado Evans House Jermaine Jackson Liza Grier Linda Hammond Alexandra Daddy Nicholson Warren Beatty John Claude Van Damme Margaret Jacqueline Bessette Robert Evans Don Henley Mickey Rourke Bruce Willis Robert Shapiro Robin Beverly Johnson Geraldo Rivera Jack Warren
Mark Shaw and Eric Discuss the Shady Dealings of the Kennedy Clan

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:41 min | 3 d ago

Mark Shaw and Eric Discuss the Shady Dealings of the Kennedy Clan

"1960, Joseph Kennedy, the father of JFK, RFK, teddy Kennedy. He had been a bootlegger. He had been involved with dark forces during prohibition, so he has these connections. He wants his son to be elected president. He makes a deal with these old colleagues. And as you just said, basically says, if you help me to get my son elected president, I will leave you alone. Exactly. And so then I had an eyewitness who was right at breakfast where Joe ordered JFK to a point Bobby Kennedy attorney general. And you can just imagine the reaction from those mafioso had helped him get in The White House because Bobby Kennedy during the mcclellan hearings, which were those racketeering Harry earrings years earlier, had gone after all those guys. James hoffa, Carlos Marcello, traffic Conte, all the Mickey Cohen, all of them. So they were alarmed and they should have been because one of the first things in 1961 that Bobby did was go after Marcelo, who was the New Orleans Don worth millions and millions of dollars, racketeering, prostitution, all kinds of things. This is a 100% classic portrayal like out of a movie. You make a deal with the mob and as soon as JFK appoints his brother, which is its own bizarreness, but appoints his brother. Everyone knows his brother RFK hates the mob and is going to go after them. So at that moment, you have big trouble brewing because as far as I know, the mob doesn't like to be double crossed.

Teddy Kennedy Bobby Kennedy Joseph Kennedy RFK Harry Earrings James Hoffa Carlos Marcello Mickey Cohen Mcclellan Conte White House JOE Marcelo Bobby New Orleans JFK
Don’t Settle on a TMS. 5 Tough Love Tips to Choosing the Best Software

MPO Blog

01:03 min | 4 d ago

Don’t Settle on a TMS. 5 Tough Love Tips to Choosing the Best Software

"6 p.m. Monday, November 14th, 2022. Don, tea settle on a TMS 5 tough love tips to choosing the best software. Having spent many years in business development and sales, I've spoken to many supply chain and logistics executives from a range of industries. More and more organizations these days see how their competitors are digitally transforming and they don't want to be left behind. Everyone wants to be leading their industry, but leading an industry requires taking risks and thinking differently about technology strategy. I've seen businesses make choices that they've come to regret. In fact, according to Gartner, 73 of tech purchasers who have bought but not yet implemented their product solutions indicated high regret. Acquiring the best transportation management system for your company's present and long-term success is doable, but it requires a certain amount of due diligence and change in perspective. Here are the top 5 strategies that will help you get the TMS selection process right.

DON Gartner TMS
CNN Bans On-Air Drinking During New Year's Eve Broadcasts

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

05:29 min | Last week

CNN Bans On-Air Drinking During New Year's Eve Broadcasts

"Again, one of those shows that not exactly what you signed up for, but it's Monday and that's the way it is. Also on CNN, I watched the history of sitcoms. The other night oh, by the way, big news. The head of CNN. Chris licked, my told you is going to do great things at that network. He's still making sweeping changes. You know, he got rid of Brian stelter as we know, the guy who also the guy who was jerking off during the Zoom call, Jeffrey too, but he's gone. He took Don lemon's prime time shell away, and now he's really changing things. It was announced that there will be no more drinking alcohol during CNN's New Year's Eve broadcast. Doesn't Chris lick no, that was the only reason why any of us tuned in to see Andy Collin lit up with Anderson Cooper who could barely handle a shot. We used to have a drunk Kathy Griffin with a lot of fun people, Don Lennon was loaded, dancing, it's fun. Give him one day a year to be assholes. Well, seen in their assholes, all year long. But you know, one day is not that big. But no, he cut it out. No more alcohol. So I'm watching this show, the sitcom story, you know, no show ever, ever says anything nice about rosemary. You guys know rosemary. I don't think all of you do. You might act like you do, but you don't. Those of you under 40, 45, probably have no clue. Rosemary was great on the Dick Van Dyke show. She was married to Maury Amsterdam on the show. Van Dyke was something you always want. And he'd walk in and trip over the sofa, a little cushion, and it got home and had his Martine. It was one of those shows, whatever. It was easy viewing, you hear the dogs? just as loud. But rosemary at 5 years old, she was offered a 7 year contract and became a radio star at NBC radio network. And then she made a bunch of films. At 5. Could you imagine what her me too stories were about? I mean, she's dead now, but could you imagine the stories she could tell you about running around desks and who was trying to nail her? This is back when women were secretaries and housewives on librarians. I also saw a bunch of stuff how great to watch Ed Asner as Lou grant on the Mary Tyler Moore show, saw a clip where he got all hot and bothered by Mary's friend, wrote a morgen star, remember Valerie Harper house I loved rhoda. Rona was like before Laverne on Laverne and Shirley. Before Laverne defazio, rona Morgan stern was the first girl on a sitcom that, as an Italian kid, or as a city kid, you'd go, I mean, I grew up a Long Island, but I still had a little bit of Brooklyn in me. You see that girl and you go, oh yeah, that's my cousins. That's our Friends. I know wrote a Morgan stern. Jewish or Italian same thing. Laverne de fazio, same thing. I didn't grow up with Cindy's. I grew up with Laverne's. And I grew up with rhoda's not Mary Tyler Moore's. And it was wonderful to see her because then you said, oh my God, there's a chance for all of us to get work. It's a lot similar, it's very similar to what black people felt when suddenly they thought to appear. There are people began to appear in sitcoms. You know, build caused by was huge and I spy and it made them go, oh my God, we can do this. One of our own is there. So I get that. But there's one part where Lou, Lou grant walks around rhoda as she walks into the newsroom. And he goes, you, you're different. I like you. Then he goes behind it, and he says, I like it from back here too. An old Valerie Harper can say is, I think he's about to kick my tie is what a different world. Thinking back when I was a kid, I had no idea that kind of talk bothered women. Because I saw my mother and my sisters laugh at those comments. So how could any of us think that what they were saying was improper? You know what I mean? And then Betty White, they showed Betty White. I know Betty White way older than me, but I can't explain it. I had a crush on him. I remember being a teenager. And thinking, you know what? When I never married, it would be great to be married to a woman like Betty White. Look at that dimple on her left cheek, you can hold a couple water in that dimple. She's so funny. She loves her men. I just felt like Betty's the best. And that was a kid. I was right.

CNN Brian Stelter Rosemary Chris Lick Andy Collin Don Lennon Van Dyke Laverne Maury Amsterdam Valerie Harper Don Lemon Rhoda Lou Grant Mary Tyler Moore Kathy Griffin Anderson Cooper Laverne Defazio Rona Morgan Jeffrey Laverne De Fazio
Donald Trump Announces His 2024 Presidential Bid

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:26 min | Last week

Donald Trump Announces His 2024 Presidential Bid

"He's back. In order to make America great and glorious again, I am tonight announcing my candidacy for president of the United States. I kind of jealous of Sebastian gorka. He was at Mar-a-Lago last night. Nobody invited me. I think I'd have gone. Been pretty fun to be in that room. Packed room. Just barren? Barron is 7 feet tall. That kid is so big and it was funny because he's not often in public view, but he suddenly looks just like Ivanka or kind of a, I mean, he is a Trump. And he was smiling last night, waving a little bit to the crowd. He seems like a pretty shy kid, but there was president Trump with Melania. Eric, I didn't see Don Junior, but Eric was there, Barron. Notably absent was Ivanka, Ivanka was missing. Ivanka was out. She's no longer going to be a part of politics, which is really a shame because she's a smart lady. And she's very effective. It's going to be an interesting ride, isn't it?

Sebastian Gorka Ivanka America Barron President Trump Melania Don Junior Eric
Could Liz Cheney Become the New House Speaker?

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:42 min | Last week

Could Liz Cheney Become the New House Speaker?

"Some rather bizarre information coming from Capitol Hill. So I didn't think this was a possibility, but it sort of makes sense. So there is some concern that if the Republicans only have a one or two seat majority in the House of Representatives, that you could have some establishment or moderate Republicans. Siding with the Democrats and installing Liz Cheney as Speaker of the House. You say, well Todd Liz Cheney's she lost her congressional race. She's not in Congress, doesn't matter. According to the rules of the House, the speaker does not have to be an elected member of Congress, which is why so many people were suggesting, oh, let's get Donald Trump as the Speaker of the House. Well, I don't think you're going to be able to do that if you've got some renegade establishment Republicans out there who would be threatening and there are some and we're going to be naming names who are suggesting they would be supportive of Liz Cheney. This is one of the reasons why MTG and by the way, one of those individuals is congressman Don bacon from Nebraska. So this is why Marjorie Taylor Greene came out yesterday and said that she is supporting Kevin McCarthy. She's afraid that people might jump ship and that there would be enough votes to install Liz Cheney as the Speaker of the House. This is how crazy it's getting here, people. Can you imagine?

Liz Cheney Todd Liz Cheney Capitol Hill House Congress House Of Representatives Donald Trump Congressman Don Bacon Marjorie Taylor Greene Kevin Mccarthy Nebraska
As the Votes Are Counted, The GOP Needs to Do Some Soul Searching

The Trish Regan Show

01:51 min | 2 weeks ago

As the Votes Are Counted, The GOP Needs to Do Some Soul Searching

"Political side of things, I am kind of hoped by now. We have some more answers, but at present it looks like it's going to take a little bit of time. It's going to take a little bit of time before we can safely say that the GOP has the house. It looks like that might happen. But again, you got to be careful until every last vote is counted. In calling any of these things. And then simultaneously, you have a Senate, which doesn't look like it's going to be conservative after all, and that's because of some notable losses, including Doctor Oz, they're in Pennsylvania. I had been a little bit reluctant on him all along only because he didn't quite have the same pedigree as, by the way, the guy who I think should have run, who was the Bridgewater guy. The pedigree in terms of having lived there and from there, most of his life. And I think that that sort of came through for people and came through for voters. So there's that situation Maggie Hassan, I told you, remember the other day, on the show that she would be very, very hard to beat in the state of New Hampshire, a state I know very, very well. Maggie has and I can tell you somebody who New Hampshire voters like because she's not too liberal, but she's sort of mainstream and it's not that populist state. So I think having Don Baltic there was going to be unfortunately for the country and for New Hampshire, not a successful endeavor. This is time for a regrouping. I've settled along with a lot of the policies of the previous administration that made a lot of sense. Certainly from an economic perspective, certainly from an international security perspective, and certainly from a domestic perspective in the analysis we're trying to do is really promote American values, American work ethic, American productivity, all the things that would make us stronger as a country, but

Doctor Oz Maggie Hassan New Hampshire GOP Bridgewater Don Baltic Senate Pennsylvania Maggie
Mitch McConnell's Unforgivable Betrayal

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:49 min | 3 weeks ago

Mitch McConnell's Unforgivable Betrayal

"To comment on the Republican establishment as well because I've been pretty upset the last couple of weeks with what I've been seeing, which is a betrayal of amazing candidates across the country that are left to fend for themselves. It's a very serious problem. And we should never forget it. We're not going to know for probably a week, so brace yourself for impact. Georgia, Arizona and Pennsylvania are already telling us that it's going to take a week for us to get election results. So just get ready for that. Remember, you get what you put up with and Brian Kemp and raffensperger and do see an Arizona. We're not bold enough to get the election reform changes necessary. Now I hope there's no fraud. I hope that we overwhelm the fraud. I think we will. I think that Carrie Lake is going to win the governor's race in Arizona. I really do. And so we're fighting right now like crazy to make sure Blake masters wins against the fraud of Mark Kelly, but let me tell you the problem. Blake masters has raised about 15 to $20 million. Mark Kelly has raised $75 million and Mitch McConnell is instead spending money in Alaska to go defeat a great Republican. $9 million has been spent on defeating a Trump endorsed candidate Kelly shabaka, meanwhile, Blake masters is being outspent in Arizona. Meanwhile, he pulled out all the money in New Hampshire with a great candidate Don baldick, and he goes up in the polls and he says, maybe I'll do a million. You see McConnell is not counting votes. He's counting seats. And this is a huge problem. I'm telling you right now, he has betrayed the grassroots of this country and has allowed our candidates and left them on an island. $9 million in Alaska, while our candidates can't raise money while we are being outspent at every single corner in turn. So you ask the question have we done enough with election integrity? No.

Arizona Brian Kemp Mark Kelly Carrie Lake Blake Kelly Shabaka Blake Masters Pennsylvania Georgia Don Baldick Mitch Mcconnell Alaska New Hampshire Mcconnell
How Would the GOP Be Doing If There Was Parity on TV?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:28 min | 3 weeks ago

How Would the GOP Be Doing If There Was Parity on TV?

"Republicans be doing. If there was parody on television. I mean, a New Hampshire, Maggie Hassan and spent $36 million to Don bollocks 2 million and he's up a point in the polls. And one of the reasons this has happened is because every major power center, every major kind of opinion shaping institution kind of any place that there are elites in America have gone completely off the rails in the direction of the woke of the postmodern of the deconstructionist of the post structuralist. Warnock outspending walker 76 million to 32 million. Cortez masto 47 million na laxalt's 12 million. It really is a testament to these candidates of how hard they've campaigned how they've been on message. It is important for us to acknowledge that for the foreseeable future, Republicans will be outspent in almost every single race across the country for the next decade. There is a price of becoming the muscular class party. There is a price of becoming the party of the plumber, the electrician. And the price is that when inflation comes your way, it's really hard to finance campaigns. People have less discretionary or you should say disposable income to be able to spend on these things because they're getting crushed by all these policies that the oligarchs are doing just fine. They have more money to spend than ever before.

Maggie Hassan Don Bollocks Cortez Masto Laxalt New Hampshire Warnock Walker America
General Don Bolduc Is on the Brink of Changing New Hampshire

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:53 min | Last month

General Don Bolduc Is on the Brink of Changing New Hampshire

"Don baldick joins us right now. General, welcome to the program. How are things on the ground in the beautiful great state of New Hampshire? Charlie, thank you for having me on. It's great to be on your program. And, you know, things are going great. We have the momentum. She does not her, you know, senator Hassan's campaign has stalled. I wouldn't even call it a campaign. I signed up for 7 debates and we were only going to really debate twice. And that's coming up on Wednesday, the second one. The other one she has changed to forums where she speaks and then she leaves and I come in and speak. So she's afraid to confront the voters. She's afraid to stand in front of the voters and explain to them why her vote, which in many cases would have been the deciding vote has caused people to choose between heating and eating significant diesel fuel, shortages, significant natural gas shortages and open border, high crime, crime is going up here in New Hampshire as well as it is in any other place, the police have been defunded to the point where we can't recruit. We can't retain our state police has openings at a record high. I mean, what she has done to the granite state in America with her votes, she can't account for and she refuses to. On the other hand, I've done 75 town halls. I've been campaigning for over two years, I've been every town and city multiple times, and people are looking for a change. This hurts the Democrats independents, Republicans, libertarians, and free staters up here in New Hampshire. And they are sick of it and all she does is distract from the issues. And everybody is on to her game and we have the momentum.

Don Baldick Senator Hassan New Hampshire Charlie America
Biden to welcome first responders' kids for Halloween

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

Biden to welcome first responders' kids for Halloween

"President Biden and his wife Jill doled out Halloween candy to trick or treaters at The White House I'm Ben Thomas with a look at who showed up Became dressed as witches and ballerinas a chef and more than one unicorn Fairies Jedi and even one little angry bird Despite rain some 5000 were expected on the south side of The White House the invitation list included children of local firefighters nurses police officers and National Guard members Children of administration officials also joined the group What's that They sparked the president just wore a navy raincoat in a baseball cap For the First Lady donned a purple wig and butterfly wings Ben Thomas Washington

President Biden Ben Thomas White House Jill National Guard Navy Baseball Ben Thomas Washington
Zach Wilson and the Jets Stall Against the Patriots Once Again

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last month

Zach Wilson and the Jets Stall Against the Patriots Once Again

"The Patriots beat the jets for the 13th consecutive time with the comfort behind 22 to 17 win Mac Jones threw for a 194 yards in a TD The defense played exceptional and we kind of knew we were just going to wait and let them kind of take over the game and special teams played great as well Nick fole kicked by fuel goals jets quarterback Zach Wilson through three an exceptions Bill Belichick passed George halas for second place on the NFL's career coaching victories list with 325 Don Shula tops the list with 347 Mike mancuso east Rutherford New Jersey

Mac Jones Jets Nick Fole Patriots Zach Wilson George Halas Bill Belichick Don Shula NFL Mike Mancuso New Jersey
Don Bolduc: Maggie Hassan Is a Career Politician Saying Lies

Mark Levin

01:42 min | Last month

Don Bolduc: Maggie Hassan Is a Career Politician Saying Lies

"It is just a career politician being a career politician Making up lies exaggerating the truth trying to turn things emotional hoping that I will strike back at her in create a war Among our supporters and I just stay away from that because I just simply say listen you have created 40 hot 40 year high inflation and soaring interest rates record high gas prices diesel shortages natural gas shortages wide open border 98 people this year on the Tara watch lists have been taught does knows how many have got away Fentanyl opioids are killing our kids we don't have any Law & Order because of the fact that you have supported defund the police Our education in our schools is at an all time low It's indoctrination not education CRT gender identity instead of teaching them reading writing maps history and civics have been forbid if we teach our children about this great country's decoration of independence and constitutional republic that you keep referring to as a democracy because you still will not admit that we live in a constitutional republic You don't even understand your own oath So that's what I say And that's what's resonating because her logic is not resonating because it's not logic It's simply a denial of doing her job and taking care of the people that she's been sworn to take care of

Don Bolduc: Investing in People Like in the Military

Mark Levin

02:00 min | Last month

Don Bolduc: Investing in People Like in the Military

"All these years you were general you also learned leadership You've also learned how to communicate You also learned what matters to the country You're not a lifetime politician you're a citizen candidate Why do you think why do you think you're kind of to see is picking up such steam right now Well it's picking up steam because we've invested in the people much like I did as a leader in the military I took care of my people their families and the mission And by doing those three things you proved to people that your accountable responsible transparent and that they can trust you And once they can trust you you get the momentum that you need But you have to spend time with them And that's what we've done We have created momentum It is uncontrollable right now She is stalled because she's done the exact opposite She's failed to talk to granted stator She failed to take care of them We just had a house party tonight and the man that was introducing me was brought to tears by what senator Hess and his failed to do for our granted staters are citizens for our country And this was a guy who worked for her when she was governor here And he has seen a completely different person in senator Hassan then he saw as governor in this really disturbs him And he says that's why she doesn't get my support He is not doing the right thing for granted status and has not She's lost her way And everybody sees it and knows it and therefore they want a change and they're looking towards a guy that was born here raised here was a police officer in this state and served his country for 33 and a half years and is going to go to Washington D.C. and work for them

Senator Hess Senator Hassan Washington D.C.
"don" Discussed on Gambling With an Edge

Gambling With an Edge

01:51 min | 4 months ago

"don" Discussed on Gambling With an Edge

"And then of course, you're right about the final piece of the puzzle. Very clever people when their backs are against the wall, find other ways to make money. And so other types of advantage play James gross genes to marvelous books beyond counting and the sequel to that identified lots of other ways to make money in a casino. And other ways that blackjack as well to make money, shuffle tracking, whole carding or what have you. And people were finding that the returns were better than from straight counting. And harder to be detected as to what you were doing. So they looked elsewhere. And that really became the wave of the future, which is the present right now as card counting becomes somewhat less attractive when compared to these other possibilities. Don, thank you very much for sharing with us tonight. You have been gracious with the information you have. Thank you very, very much. Well, thank you for having me. It's been a pleasure. I enjoy your show and good luck with it in the future. Yes, thank you very much, Don. Okay, good night, Mike. Okay, that's it for another throwback episode of gambling with an edge. If you liked it, let us know. Also send us your questions. We're always looking for more questions to answer on our mailbag shows. We have an episode coming up with Russell Fox, who is a specialist in doing taxes for professional gamblers. So if you have questions for Russell Fox, send those to us right away, because we'll be recording it. Tuesday.

James gross Don Russell Fox Mike
"don" Discussed on Gambling With an Edge

Gambling With an Edge

05:49 min | 4 months ago

"don" Discussed on Gambling With an Edge

"Good afternoon, everybody and welcome to another throwback episode of gambling with an edge. I am Richard munchkin, but you will not hear me on this episode because this episode is from April of 2012 and during that time I was not on the show. I had been on the show and then because it was too hard traveling back and forth to California, I took 6 months or a year off and Michael shackelford was the co host. So this is an episode with Michael and bob and our guest for this episode was Don schlesinger, who all blackjack players are familiar with. He is the author of blackjack attack. Hope you enjoy it. Michael, why don't you tell us who Don schlesinger is and how come he's hanging on the phone line now? Okay, Don schlesinger is another one of the great names in blackjack to appear on gambling with an edge. Dawn started writing about the game in 1984 for Arnold Snyder's blackjack forum newsletter. After 13 years of addressing some of the most challenging questions in blackjack, Don put together the best of his work in his book, blackjack attack, playing the prose way. The third and latest edition of blackjack attack us over 500 pages of the fine points of blackjack for true aficionados of mastering the game of blackjack, there is no substitute for Don's in depth treatment of the game. Don doesn't just write about the game, but he has been playing it at a high level for decades. I've seen him in action. He appears to be nonchalant as he makes small talk at the table while playing a clean game any counter would be proud of. Besides his mastery of blackjack, schlesinger holds a bachelor's degree in mathematics and a masters of philosophy in French. While playing and writing about blackjack, Don somehow managed to also be a family man and have a successful 13 career as a New York investment banker after teaching for 16 years. On a personal note, Don has been a proof writer on my site for about three years. I've tried to pay him, but he won't hear of it. His guidance was tough at times, but it has helped my own writing a great deal for which I'm very thankful. Here to talk about the fine points of blackjack is Don schlesinger. Don, welcome to gambling with an edge. Oh, thank you very much, Mark. It's a pleasure to be here. Mike and bob and I look forward to the show. Well, thanks for coming on.

Don schlesinger Richard munchkin Michael shackelford Don Arnold Snyder Michael bob Dawn California schlesinger New York Mark Mike
"don" Discussed on MMA Roasted

MMA Roasted

03:56 min | 6 months ago

"don" Discussed on MMA Roasted

"No. Sometimes I do. I go through my Y CM just because I know because it's all my friends making fun of me on her post. I'm like, thanks. Well, first of all, she's barely on social media at all. You know? And then that most of her social media is just falling ferret videos. So, I mean, now I don't think about it. I don't even worry about it. Don, you ever have girls go through your DMs? Are you gonna go through your wife's DMs, your exes? No, well, I caught her shit, yeah. They're at the end. I got, but it wasn't on GM. It was like her fucking email. Computer, you know? And wow. Yeah, we always shared everything. When I caught her, she said, I didn't say that. You're impressed me. I didn't think you were smart enough. I mean, back in the day, Don used to cheat by payphone. And carrier pigeon. You said a pigeon over to him. He'd gone, keep going..

Don GM
"don" Discussed on The Poetry Magazine Podcast

The Poetry Magazine Podcast

08:28 min | 7 months ago

"don" Discussed on The Poetry Magazine Podcast

"We'll be talking with the Korean American poet translator and Macarthur genius, Don miche. The more time I've spent with Don mi's work, the more complex her poetic world has become to me. I first knew her as a translator of avant garde Korean poetry. I was on a jury that awarded the Griffin prize to her translation of Kim hye soon's autobiography of death. Then he got to know her poetry better. It reconstructs her family history, which is also deeply complex. She's a poet whose personal history is also the history of the Cold War, and the images that have shaped how those wars are pictured, internationally, because even if you haven't read Donnie's poetry, you've probably seen the work of her father, a photojournalist who filmed much of the news footage that Americans saw of the Vietnam War and the Cold War era in general. Now, Don me is at work on a new book. This new book, I'm calling it wings of utopia, and I think I'm basically orbiting around my father's memory. War and violence. Wings of utopia is the final book in a trilogy. A sort of unintentional trilogy. Don mi set out to explore the dictatorship era of South Korea in her book hardly war. But to understand part Chung he's dictatorship, she felt she also needed to delve into the 1945 national division of Korea. So she wrote a second book DMZ colony in what would become a literary trilogy. I first had to deal with the historical division, the national division, the ideological division, I had to understand that to understand what really took place during the dictatorship. Today we'll hear poems from wings of utopia, which Don me is still in the process of writing. I wanted to sort of delve into what took place during the Guangzhou massacre. But from my father's memory, as I had also explored the Korean War through my father's memory. Don mi's father, in jib che, was born in 1928 during the Japanese occupation of Korea. After Korea was liberated in 1945, he trained to be a photojournalist. Distributed newspaper as a boy when he was in high school, and that's how he saved his money to buy his first camera. And I think he was really obsessed with photography. So he said he read everything about photography. Even before he actually had a camera. So he used to refer to himself as a photographer without a camera for a while. And then once he had the camera, he started taking some photos, and his first photograph that he actually published, it took a photograph of a Japanese mother and her children in a hurry to leave a soul, and this was right after the liberation. And he said, just because Korea was liberated didn't mean that Japanese went there and it took a while for everybody to leave Korea. When Don mee was ten years old, her father started working for ABC News and switched to filming newsreels because it paid better than photojournalism. He was able to relocate the family to Hong Kong, while ABC News sent him on assignment across Asia. So many of the news clips that you saw on TV about the Vietnam War, there were my father's. Moving to Hong Kong was the first step in her father's effort to get the family out of South Korea. Because it was very politically oppressive and you couldn't speak anything against the government, you can criticize the government. And also, you know, after the war, South Korea was extremely poor. So in the 60s I, you know, I grew up seeing a lot of poverty around us. I didn't think that we were poor because we had a small house and we could eat, but you know, I grew up seeing beggars all around me. Also, there were a lot of things at that time too, so of course I was always reminded how lucky we were not to be orphans. And also my father knew a lot about what the dictatorial government was doing and he didn't want us to grow up in that oppressive environment. So we first landed in Hong Kong. And I lived there till I was 19. Then the situation in South Korea dramatically changed again. In 1979, the dictator park Chung he was assassinated by his own director of intelligence. So when he was assassinated in a people really thought that this could be the end of the dictatorship that we could finally have democracy and more economic equality. But Pak Chang is general Chengdu Huang came into power and of course he was very close to Reagan at that time and he was supported definitely backed by the U.S. again and then there was protests all over that broke out all over South Korea. The South Korean military was sent to suppress the student led protests that started in Seoul. And then spread to more impoverished regions of the country. This led to the infamous Guangzhou massacre in 1980. The South Korean military can not operate without the consent of the U.S. Military command in South Korea. So without the U.S. consent, that massacre could not have happened. It looks just civilians were just brutally beaten to death and they were tortured. And what took place in Guangzhou was it was severely censored, Koreans in Korea did not know what took place in Guangzhou for about 5 years or 6 years. Don mi's father was working for ABC News in South Korea. Filming the student protests in Seoul at the time. When he heard about the unrest in blind you, he traveled down there to cover what would become known as the Guangzhou massacre. He told me he so many corpses, he knew that by then many had been killed. At that time it was announced as about 200 were killed, but he said that wasn't true at all. They were mass graves. That was the turning point. When her father felt the family could not return to South Korea. We had to sort of find places to go to. He encouraged on me to apply for schools in the U.S.. My geography teacher wanted me to go to UK and study geography. I mean, I loved geography, but I just loved art. And that's what I wanted to be. I wanted to be an artist. Don me applied to schools across the U.S. from the east coast to Chicago to California. And I chose Cal arts because he was in the desert and I've never seen the desert and I thought, well, I think that would be an interesting place. And it was also the most kind of experimental school. And my art teacher said it wasn't the right school for me. So of course, then I knew it was the right school for me. So I chose that school. What kind of part were you making at the time when you were in Hong Kong and then in the U.S.? Well, I think in Hong Kong, I was just sort of learning the skills of drawing and painting. So there were mostly sort of, I don't know, technical. I also enjoyed copying, drawings by van Gogh and I loved his drawings of clouds. And in Hong Kong has really great incredible cumulus clouds. So that was very fitting at that place. At Cal arts, donned me first made sculptures and installations. And after finishing her BA, she went on to complete an MFA in visual art there as well. For my MFA, I sort of switched to super 8 film and then also to 16 millimeter.

Don mi Korea Don miche Kim hye Guangzhou Wings of utopia national division of Korea national division jib che ABC News Hong Kong Don Don mee Vietnam Donnie park Chung Chung Griffin Pak Chang Chengdu Huang
"don" Discussed on MMA Roasted

MMA Roasted

03:07 min | 9 months ago

"don" Discussed on MMA Roasted

"Yeah, I'm rich, so I don't really look at prices too much, but I think it's only like a hundred bucks a month or a 125 bucks a month or something. But it wasn't very much. Got it. You definitely are the one of the most odd people. I never understand it. You made a $1 billion. Married, now you're new wife. You don't leave the house, your back hurts. You're in and out. You're always laughing. I'm crying on the inside. We always have some crazy scam going on, but it's not really a scale. The best was when I was 20. What? It got worse. How did it get worse? I'm driving down my dirt road right now. I dumped in my drug, I'm driving down my dirt road, I got physical rehab here in about 25 minutes. Is there a topic? What? Does your car have a top or no? Come on what? It's like a flintstone car? I feel like the flints are yeah, yeah. I feel like the road is a tag and that has to hatch open as like, that won't happen at the time. When was the last time you got laid? It's a dirt road. I got a one gun pickup truck. That drive one ton dually. Sometimes on dirt road. So it's gonna make the noise. When was the last time you got laid, Don? What do you mean? I got wearing banging at my falling at my door all the time, man. I gotta let them out. Dude, you honestly, I get texts from girls that are like good-looking. They're like, hey, is Don single? They're like young. I was like, damn. They're like young. I mean, they're young for you. They're like in their 20s. Oh, my saddles are older than that. Let me tell you that. Yeah. Oh God. My tripod right now. My truck holder in there. Of course it is. Of course it is. Well, listen glad I got the visualized down wearing a saddle with a 20 something year old woman. Like I said, I was just thinking like dog putting on his saddle and like kept a ride, baby. Don, do women have to.

Don single Don
"don" Discussed on MMA Roasted

MMA Roasted

05:12 min | 9 months ago

"don" Discussed on MMA Roasted

"With that? Don? Okay. All right, next. Yeah, Don's issue is that he loved a good barn burner. Eager on the other hand has burned down a lot of those barns. Dry had a hell of a chin back in the day, and he just played it with tank, turned his face into mush. I think that's the way a fight between Igor and Don would have turned out, except Don getting laid out. Oh, so that's how somebody is saying, you wouldn't have won. Don, do you want to comment? Yeah. I'd like to think that they're wrong. And then somebody else wrote, except Hank had more power as punches than Igor. If fry can survive tanks onslaught, there's no reason he couldn't survive Igor's onslaught. Don. Ah, come on. Give me some good connection, man. I'm about to have a meltdown. I swear to God. I'm just trying to have a great show. Don, please, how come you do a show with other people and it's the greatest connection ever. And with me, Don, just yell, just hello? I am here..

Don Igor Hank fry
"don" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:33 min | 1 year ago

"don" Discussed on How I Built This

"He died of a brain aneurysm. And this was, you know, one of those moments where I realized I was the only person of the 38 of us who'd ever experienced sudden loss and trauma. And I brought in actually a great friend who was a grief. Counselor, and we kind of worked this through together. But it ended up, I think stealing those of us who were left to a survivor mentality that probably served us well. All right, so you guys go public in the fall of 1999. And by the spring of 2000, the dotcom bubble burst. It crashes. So I think when a company goes public, the officers have to hold their stock, right? They can't sell the stock immediately. So I mean, did anybody make money off of audible going public? Yeah, a bunch of venture capitalists certainly did, because they could. Yeah, 'cause they got a couple of them, and here's the term in the day was like, you know, yeah, I would never have sold. I mean, I thought, you know, I thought it was like, you know, I was told it was immoral for a founder to sell a sheriff's stock. And I took that fairly seriously. But some of our VCs right after we went public began to as the term was puke out their shares in very public filings. And they were right. I mean, they made a lot of money off of old and because what happened next was not pretty, but, you know, I should say for context, I've heard that there were 1500 public Internet companies at the beginning of 2000 and 140 at the beginning of 2003. So there were combinations there. There were some things that went on. But it was that kind of decimation. And the stock price. You know, which was once $29 or something, it went down to four cents. Wow. At the end of 2000. Four cents. When we come back in just a moment, how Don was able to chart a new path for audible with help from one of the smartest and scariest people in Silicon Valley. Stay with us. I'm guy raz and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. This message comes from NPR sponsor, Griffiths, senior director of corporate affairs, vesta hakes, explains the science behind the plasma derived medicines the company produces. Plasma contains proteins and antibodies, there are people who are missing those antibodies or they're missing a protein that helps their body function. And while growth then does is we collect this plasma, and then isolate those proteins and antibodies to produce a medicine. To learn more about donating plasma and to find a riffle center near you, visit griffo's plasma dot com. Support for this podcast and the following message come from living proof. Does your hair need a fall reset? Reveal your hair's full, healthy potential with living proof. They're award winning products are engineered to solve the toughest hair problems never conceal them. Designed to leave you with cleaner, healthier, more brilliant hair for longer. Living proof products never contain silicones, parabens and sulfates. Unlock your hair's natural brilliance at living proof dot com slash built. Hey, welcome back to how I built this. I'm guy Roz. So it's 2001. The dot com bubble has burst. Audible's stock prices plummeted and Don cats is trying to stay calm. I was incredibly anxious, but I just kind of had an attitude about it because we weren't out of capital yet. And we had investors who had not given up hope. And it felt like there was just always another reason to keep fighting. But still, Don, I mean, your stock was down. You guys weren't profitable yet. The market for what you were making hadn't really taken off. So how are you strategizing? I mean, how are you going to guide the company through such a tough time? Well, what happened during this period of time is we did hunker down, and when you went public, you had to basically be trained to say one thing to all the fund investors, which was we are technology agnostic. And what that was code for was that we will not build or say the word platform because the word was in the 90s and life has changed a lot is that if anyone said they were building a platform, Microsoft would make it their business to destroy your company. Right. And so, you know, if you look at some of the suits against miss Suffolk, there was good evidence. It was true. Yeah. So we decided to not be technology agnostic and during this period when nobody was looking. We decided to take our pretty good science and call this the audible ready platform, which would be the de facto way that spoken word was transmitted and played back in the new generation of MP3 players that were coming up. Okay. And we not only got all those deals done, we had Texas instrument chips that were already audible ready. So when the dust started to clear a little bit in life started to get a little bit better, we come out with all these MP3 players, which people were buying at the time with our bits inside the device. And our marketing collateral inside the box. So it kind of got hard to compete with us and that particular time. Because we were of all these different companies that wanted to be during the same kind of thing in a pretty good position. So that was one of those, you know, I always think, you know, you get to where we got by having about 51% of the things you're doing being smart. Named us the number one entertainment app on the web. And you know, things that made us feel pretty good. But as you also point out the financial stuff got really dark. Being a public company was not fun. I mean, it would still take a couple of years before MP3 players would take off and of course that happened with the iPod which we'll get to in a moment. But how were you getting rights for audiobooks? Because audiobooks were still books on cassette and books on CD. So how are you getting the rights to get digital versions of that? Was it harder? Was it pretty easy? No, it was definitely hard and it was difficult to bridge a world that is very much not technology focused. Publishing. No. Book publishing is the people who love books, meaning that they're willing to get paid less or they have the wherewithal to.

vesta hakes NPR griffo Don cats Don Griffiths Silicon Valley Roz Suffolk Microsoft Texas
"don" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"don" Discussed on How I Built This

"Podcasts or tens of millions of different songs. Back before any of that, a former journalist turned writer named Don Katz, had a problem. During his daily jog in New York City, he would listen to books on tape, literally on tape as in cassette tapes. And Don wondered, why do I have to lug around a cassette player and then flip the cassette to side B in the middle of my run? Surely there must be an easier way he thought. And in fact, at the time, there was. MP3 technology existed except almost no one used it. In the mid 1990s, compact disc sales were on a tear. It would take another 7 years before CDs began to decline. But Don was optimistic. And at the age of 42, he decided to ditch his successful career as a writer, and try to start something he knew nothing about. A tech company. A company that would create a digital audio catalog of books and storytelling and spoken word, and deliver those stories to users through a device specially designed to play that audio. And as you will hear, in the early days, not many people came to the party. The technology was way ahead of its time, probably too ahead of its time. In fact, audible, the company Don founded, almost collapsed in the early 2000s when its stock price hovered at around four cents a share. But today, of course, audible holds the biggest audiobook catalog in the world. It dominates the space with a library of over 600,000 titles. And the company is now part of the Amazon family, which bought audible for $300 million in 2008. But getting to that point was painful and full of setbacks, and the story includes a cameo appearance from none other than Steve Jobs. Dot cats was a staff writer for Rolling Stone magazine during its heyday in the late 70s and 80s. He grew up in Chicago in the 50s and 60s and strongly identified with his dad, who owned a small business. So my father was just incredibly kind of smart, kind and, you know, it's a cliche, but he was one of these guys you would want it to be your kind of best friend. I looked up to him. I probably wished he was home more because he was frankly like I became someone who worked a lot. And he was also, he had been a war hero. He ran away from home basically with 17, and was behind enemy lines, highly decorated. Italy or he was in the it was in the black forest in Germany. And he didn't really talk about it. He wasn't one of those guys, but he had a different purple hearts every time I broke a leg and hockey or something, I would wake up and find the Purple Heart and my pillow. And your dad from what I understand. He hit a music store in Chicago called I guess called K musical instruments and it was. It was actually a guitar man. It's hard manufacturing. Yeah, my dad made guitars. He made them for Sears. Silvertones, but I remember that there were some pretty great bands of the era and one called spirit that had a fantastic guitarist named Randy, California who only would play K's and the like. But my dad's kind of claimed to fame at that time was that he put chord books in guitars and started this whole idea that you too can play the guitar, and it alienated a lot of the musicians, including Barney kessel and Las Paul and people that he was friends with because they were infuriated to say that their instrument was easier to play than a thinner than a violin. And of course, he said, yeah, but you know it is. And so it ended up that my family was all in newsweek magazine, taking our guitar lessons together because my dad had decided to be part of this U2 can play the guitar, which was part of the whole mid 60s folk music kind of movement. So I think back and he was definitely somebody who also liked to challenge the status quo, which I think I have come by honestly. So was he financially successful? He was financially successful in the way of a rising entrepreneur of his time. But very tragically he went out to play tennis at 47 years old on a Saturday and I got a call when I was in college saying that he died playing tennis. Very suddenly of a massive heart attack. Wow. And it really marked my life in so many ways. It was definitely a formative experience. I've heard and you probably have heard this too that there's a lot of patterns of fatherlessness in highly entrepreneurial people, whether it's through abandonment or early death, including taking ridiculous risks as a journalist in the early part of my career, where I could have easily gotten killed several times. I think I was working out his heroism and other kinds of things. So, you know, you come to these things a little later in life, but it is interesting to reflect on it. So for college, I know that you went to NYU and you majored in English and from what understand Ralph Ellis had be Ralph Ellis at The Invisible Man Ralph Ellison was a professor there. And you kind of had an opportunity to sort of work with him to be tutored by him. Right. He taught me how to read and Jorge that I fully didn't understand. And I knew that I loved more than anything the sound of literature. And I was just and how it felt to me, but I Ralph actually kind of flushed it out in a way that it became something that I was fully able to understand. He also, he also gave me the I think the confidence to try to be a professional writer, which I proceeded to do for 20 years. Was Ralph Ellison you're like your thesis adviser? Yeah, he basically was. And Ralph was a deep and exacting intellectual. So I had to work really hard and read really hard. Anyway, it was an amazing experience. He would sit with a big stokey and he was amazing story for telling voice with his Oklahoma. I've said that his voice was like a coal car coming out of my mind. And I would just be mesmerized and it was a big supporter and later even the audible transition right at the time. He died. He was incredibly supportive of what I did. So you graduate from NYU and you're sort of thinking that you want to be right, but it's not that easy to do so and you did what lots of people do, which is you decide to go to graduate school and to continue studying. I'm assuming you went to London to London school economics. Am I assuming correctly that you didn't really know what you wanted to do, you wanted to kind of buy some time? Absolutely. In fact, I thought at the time almost everybody thought if you didn't know what you should do, you should go to law school. Yes. Right. But I studied the European economics and politics and international history. And I was living with my old friend, Barbara, who was a rock writer. She had gone to be a rock and roll writer in London. And so we just paired up and shared a flat, and so I would come home and there would be, you know, Rod Stewart and Keith Richards.

Don Katz Don Ralph Ellis Barney kessel Las Paul Rolling Stone magazine Chicago New York City Steve Jobs Ralph Ellison tennis Amazon Sears newsweek hockey Italy Randy Germany
"don" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

07:57 min | 1 year ago

"don" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"Gorgeous you get with a few drinks out tough and and the stories just. I can't even believe the whopper stories. Can you remember any of them. But just talking about whatever you know i could. I could tell them that. I was a famous race. Car driver and Or you know talk about you know. I just bs just bs. Around that time. I did get a job once in awhile in film laboratories processing film and i got fired out of a lot of them but i did start making a little bit of a living in hope that i could Change my life which never happened. Eventually but Right so you're you're drinking a lot. Your you've got a part time job in a film lab. What what's the next step in your life. Well i think when saints started changing me. I'd married to older women. Not at the same time by the way but the one that i had my son by then i had a drinking partner a using partner for a few years and then Got a divorce for the second time. And i'm just starting to think when i when i hit thirty i started really thinking while what a loser i was but i i had no way out. I mean i couldn't think of anything that would help it. And so i kept wanting to do better and i. I was really interested in racing at the time. And i was trying to be a professional racecar driver and I met this gal. That was eighteen years old and We got married when she was nineteen and i was married to her for six weeks and i got arrested for drunk driving and i woke up in jail in So you were thirty. she was eighteen. I was thirty four thirty four and she was eight two. I thought the two older ones always expected too much out of me at primarily younger when i teach her the sh- itchy needed to know and i wouldn't hear any of that Back talk but that didn't work either by the way. Yeah but it was a it really did make a difference. I really wanted to be somebody better than i was for her I really you know. I thought she's cute. She deserves better than me. I didn't know how to do it. But i wanted to be better. In six weeks into our marriage. I went on a job interview at a bar and a good idea. Yeah it was a good idea But i got hired. And i got hired as an apprentice. Animation cameraman and The guy and i both drank a lot and he left when he started. Feeling a little woozy. In i stayed there because i was feeling a little woozy and wanted to get wiser and i got arrested for drunk driving at night and I was in jail all night. And my My brand new wife was calling. My mother's saying where's don. He didn't come home all night. My mother said you better get used to that. He's been doing that all his life. And when i called her from jail she said. I can't live like this. And i thought what the hell is wrong with her. I've had six good weeks in a row. You know. I was working on a personal best. And and she She just went on. And on. And on and i said well you know what i'm gonna quit drinking and i'm gonna quit using drugs and i'm going to make something of myself and little by little from that day i really did. I searched out some some help. and I i worked on myself and i I got a lot of help. And i got but she was gone by that time. No she wasn't gone. She that six weeks because you only married to her for six weeks or is that was was. The first time i got in trouble was the sixth weekend of the marriage. I was married to her for twenty two year. And sorry i misunderstood. I thought you were saying you only married to the eighteen year. Old girl for For six weeks. I was married to her for six weeks. Before i'd gotten in any trouble i was. I thought i was doing very centers and see why she was. So angry. I gotcha but You know That job the animation job lasted seven seven months. I didn't have a drink for the whole seven months. The guy laid me off and he bought a bottle and we drank it. And i got drunk again and i went home and she yelled and screamed about that and i said hey guys entitled anyway you know the same old bs and i went on my first live action job. I became interested in aerial photography. And i met a guy that Built a mount that fit and helicopters and he did all this really fun stuff for movies and he took me under his wing and i learned the equipment and i became his assistant and Thought that i would become an aerial cameraman and it looked like something i could do and it looked like something that I you know. I've always steered clear of anything that you had to open a book and learn and i always Technical stuff left me totally in the dark. i i just. I'm not a very technical guy but anyway he showed me what i needed to know and he sent me on my first job and he gave me. This is forty five years ago and he sent me on my first job and he gave me a one hundred dollars per diem. Which was a lot of money forty five years ago and i got on the airplane and it was first class to philadelphia and i was going to do my first job out of town that i was going to get paid for and i was gonna make more money in one day than i made in a week doing animation. I was gonna make more money per day and we didn't work every day but i was going. I had opportunity. Like i'd never had in my life and this guy really liked me and he really thought that i had what it took to do the job now. This is something that. I assumed that i was looking for all my life. Yeah but when. I got on an airplane. And the gal says mr morgan. Would you care for a drink. I thought well. I don't wanna hurt the girls feeling. So i got drunk on the airplane and you but you had been sober for a little bit in until then yeah. Bits and pieces. I was sober for seven months and got drunk that one time and then Got sober again and stayed sober for a couple of months month or two and got on the airplane and got drunk got took the hundred dollars down to the bar that night and got this smashed went upstairs and passed out and my very first day in the movie business. I missed the call. And you don't do that. And i woke up an hour after i was supposed to be downstairs and i thought well this career's over but being a loser like i was for all those years. It didn't seem to bother me. I thought well you know. What don morgan does he blows all these opportunities and the phone rang and they said don were sorry..

saints mr morgan philadelphia don morgan don
"don" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"don" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"Here with with my good friend. Don morgan there are few careers of people that i've interviewed yet. That are is lengthy and as to me as interesting and And cool as as yours. You're a a cinematographer you've been nominated for nine as you've won five of them you the cinematographer on one of my favorite movies ever star. Man starring jeff bridges. You also did christine what which wouldn't list one of my favorite movies a good movie but not a movie that that is up there with starman in in my mind and your story is is so interesting to me. Tell the tell the people about What your child. Who was like where were you. Come from. well as you can tell. I'm not the youngest cat on the block. I'm seventy nine years old. So i was born in nineteen thirty two It was Depression time My dad came from missoula montana. Came to california to be a singer which never happened. and He met my mom who's from saint louis and they they connected and And along came me They were together for the first two years. And then they divorced and My mother my mother's favourite tradition wants to marry people and she She brought home a few stepdad's so it was kind of a different childhood. So your mom married a lot of different people. Yeah yeah she was busy and my dad remarried and they both said kids and i was sort of the odd man out you know because i was older and they both had new families right so i don't blame this on any of my My problems I early on and this was not diagnosed by anybody until later. On in life i had learning disabilities and of course they thought i was acting out so there was a lot of conflict about don. Do your homework. And i couldn't do it. I just couldn't do it. I am practically illiterate. Yeah and I have no explanation. Why i can't do some things right. What's what's the line that you have about Being cinematograph. I'm a cinematographer. I don't know how to spell it. But i are one and And that's that's pretty much the truth through the years. I've certainly picked up. You know. I can spell a little better than i could but it just goes through my head. Is it dyslexia that you have. I have that also. Yeah but that has nothing to do with the spelling in the reading and I read a lot now. I i don't know where that came from. But i read a lot. I read a lot of spiritual books and What we call porn no i. I'm beyond the porn. Actually heard about you. Eckert tola from from you you were touting the power of now and and i. It's funny. I bought it and i literally had it sitting next to my lazy boy for a year and a half thinking. I'm going to get to it tomorrow. I'm going to get through it tomorrow. And finally i was like all right i got i gotta read this thing so i can know what don morgan is. Talk about when he runs his fucking mouth about this book helped him and and i read it and i was like wow this is. This is a pretty profound profound book. Yeah my wife bought it For me several christmases ago. And i liked the title but it never clicked the power of now right. I think it meant. Why don't you read it now. You know right at their on the back of the toilet for For probably a year. Before i opened it up and it helped a lot because now it's all we got you know when i started getting into tomorrow or yesterday You you used one of the words on my favorite words. I'm fucked and when i get into either one of those Those areas but You know childhood was was Was rough for me. I acted out a lot. I ran away a lot. I got in a lot of trouble By the time i was thirteen i was sent to a boys home By the court. Because i was Just absolutely you know. I was carrying a gun when i was thirteen. I thought i was going to be a gangster you know. I've tried so many things my mother used to say. Don you've got to go to school or you're just you're never going to amount to anything and i thought you know. If you've gotta fuck and gun you don't need to amount to much. You know. I thought you know so you pull a few bank job. I love gangster movies. I love cowboy movies. And i ended up being very poor at both of those. By the way really i wrote in professional rodeos when i was sixteen That workout can we change. This wasn't it was fun. Yeah you know. I met a lot of guys and we drank a lot. i had a phony. Id that said. I was twenty six. When i was sixteen or seventeen and i'd go into the bars those days and they'd say you got an idea and i'd plunk saint down. It said i weighed a hundred and sixty five pounds. I weighed one hundred. I think one hundred and twenty seven pounds at the time said. I had blue eyes brown but no one cared in those days. It's not like today right. You know if you had an id at an id right. I drank in bars. And i got a lot of fights and as you can tell by looking at me. The audience can't but I'm slight- built But i have a very tough mouth. Yeah i'm able to invite guys out to kick the shit out of me and it usually got done. You know the other thing they used to say. I've been been How many fights. Or i've been six hundred fights lost them all by knockouts. The next guy that fucks with me. He's gonna be in trouble due for a win. So you had this kind of painful childhood searching for for for something some some place to fit in in the world. Which i think so. Many people can can relate to You know when we think back to two being young we ought to be so great to be young again to have that that young body. But i wouldn't trade it for anything to have all that anxiety in that questioning of where where am i gonna wind up. Am i going to be special It's it's torture. Especially if if the feedback that you're getting from your surroundings is that you're fucked. Well yeah i..

don morgan Eckert tola jeff bridges missoula saint louis christine montana Depression don california Don
"don" Discussed on SpyHards Podcast

SpyHards Podcast

08:18 min | 1 year ago

"don" Discussed on SpyHards Podcast

"Hello and welcome back to part two of our spy. Mazda interview series celebrating. How one year anniversary and twenty third anniversary of this week's film nineteen ninety eight the avengers and cam we four shouted in las upside. What we spoke to the director of the film jeremiah. Chechik and i recommend anyone pulse back and listen to that one. If you haven't listened to it already but who do. We have joining us this week. Yes we are talking to don mcpherson the screenwriter of the nineteen ninety eight avengers film. He has the sole screenplay credit on that film. It's going to be a really interesting journey. I think into how he wound up You know a fairly new writer with the sole credit on this film this major summer blockbuster and was it supposed to be a blockbuster so many questions to dive into and i think dawn is more than willing to give the answers to those burning questions so helping the bentley with us as we go for a ride and about the story behind the story of nineteen ninety eight avengers with the writer. Don mc fussing camp rolette cliff and joining us today the writer of the film this week which is the bengals from nineteen ninety eight. We are joined by don mcpherson dawn. Thank you for joining us. It's great to be here. I see you're enjoying a glass of wine. That's a. That's a good stock for about avenged clock. Here it's what their clocks. I wish i could say the same just on water currently so when we took people before we get into the particular film that covering the we'd like to get a little bit information on their background so the first question we generally ask is. How did you get started in your case in screenwriting. In my case i was A critic for time out magazine which at one point was considered a quite a big deal. I was about twenty four twenty five but in reality. I've been movie crazy for both remind teens. And the beyond and when i was about eighteen i hitchhiked down to the canned film festival and long story short. I got Very well the kids. American screenwriter ben. Bosman lived in cam. Was one of the screenwriters to be thrown out of hollywood during the coffee. Airings worked with joseph lousy and then what would enter the man and people in europe and He was. I was crazy. Ben was the first real screenwriter. I ever met because you. You don't really see them and luckily for me. I knew a lot of the films he'd worked on so i could chat with him I thought it was fantastic. And then when he and his kids went back to la by our friends family. I went out to And became friends with a lot of the kids in the generation of friends. Who'd been blacklisted. Basically so i knew that about this strange creature called a screenwriter but then in my own Work over here. I was a journalist and critic. I found book code absolute beginners which i pressed upon a friend. Who's a director. Julian temple and another friend. Stephen willie was becoming a producer and we ended up working on a film Of that took a long while. And i worked on the music and on the script of that and then after that i I had to make a choice in leap into this weld of screenwriting on my side decided to do that. I got a some films made of the bbc. I did a film of a sheridan loofah. New novel cold oncle. Silence is petri tool jay latte and Strangely director peter hammond had actually directed some of the early t. exits of the events. A strange thing. I window night bat and i started doing my own screenplays and got reasonably successful like that and then one thing led to another i can. I can tell you lead from one. Another way based i was Nuts about movies. Hollywood movies frenching vis also some movies all through my teens and I wrote about them. I watched them. I would see like sodhi movies a week. You know and It was a mine tie. So i Only stopped watching a ton of movies. When i became screen. But i haven't done basically a kind of a memory of So many movies in my head and had a love of comic strips was servicing. That norman dad would tell you about having a wasted use. I am about comic books. Tv and films i manage to spend a lot of time doing and then that's ended up being what i gotta do because i love him. Well it seems like someone who has such a background in pop culture in this era and sort of comic book style seems perfectly suited to be adapting the avengers but the sort of the background leading into actually getting the job. Seems like a bit of a leap. How did you actually go about getting towards actually being attached to this property. Well i had written a script code. Jonathan wild which had received a lot of attention. It got voted a the best unmade scripts in hollywood in a set. The the two other ones were confessions of a dangerous mind by Charley complement. And i think it was kafka by lamb chops which i think i've made by stephen Book and there was my jonathan wild jodie foster boat that and on both neil jordan was wanting to directed after the crying game and because of that is rather eccentric violent berry british berry cinematic scripted. I'd written on went past all the to develop people and produces heads of studios had to read what george wanted to do. Next and less humid This so a lot of people read this. And i started getting offers from hollywood but i got an offer and that went over and i started working at warner brothers. I can tell you what i did that. I a brothers. First script i got offered was tale of two cities by charles dickens. This and i'm someone might Kobe up one time And said you've won the terry gilliam lottery. I said what's terry gilliam lottery. And it said he reads all description. Cia which is one of the big agencies in la. That i was with terry was and out of all this plot of hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of things and he hates them all. He likes your script known could work out why it turned out. I was living in highgate london and he was leaving. I was leaving down. The he was living up the hill so i ended up working for about a year with terry on that film. Abbas for mel gibson. That didn't get made. I'd worked on another script of frankenstein which was full. Great combo.

don mcpherson Chechik Don mc rolette cliff joseph lousy Julian temple Stephen willie jay latte peter hammond Mazda jeremiah Bosman bengals sodhi hollywood las Jonathan wild ben Ben stephen Book
"don" Discussed on American Ag Today

American Ag Today

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"don" Discussed on American Ag Today

"Jesse allen here for the american league network and joining us the president elect of the ncaa. Don chief iovine don great to have you here at the kennel industry convention. Oh i'm tickled to be here. Happy to be with you here today. Well don we have a lot of things we could talk about. I think a good place to start with you being a minnesota. I know you're kind of minnesota's on in the drought on the edge of the severe drought in parts of the dakotas..

Jesse allen Don chief iovine don american league ncaa minnesota dakotas
"don" Discussed on Art of Failure

Art of Failure

07:57 min | 1 year ago

"don" Discussed on Art of Failure

"Hey everybody welcome to the art of failure. I'm your host steve friedman. Thanks for tuning in. Yes this is the art of failure the podcast that explores what it means to fail as a human person we all try so hard not to fail on a daily basis and we also forget on a daily basis. That failure is part of life and that we can use failure as a catalyst for growth and movement towards bigger and better things. Don wild men is fast becoming one of the most recognizable faces in documentary television as host of mysteries at the museum monumental mysteries and greatest mysteries the guy gets around and when he gets to the places that he's getting around to for the travel channel he does things he does big things like spelunker skydiving space expiration scuba tanks and gear tools and devices. And he's done this exploring and getting around his entire career before mysteries wild and served as the intrepid host of history adventure series cities of the underworld where he also explored tunnels and catacombs and crips and bunker systems. He's not a guy who sits still puts his speed up so i'm especially grateful and glad that he did take the time out of his crazy explorations to explore the art of failure for a little while with me. Don freaking wild men with the thing in the background. That's what happens is new york city. It's not a recording studio. It's my living room. And i'm so happy that you're here. Thank you i i want i start off by saying are we failures. Because we're both. I'm holding them and you're wearing reading glasses. I'm not looking at any. But i'm wearing reading. Glasses are is have failed but we continue on what we're at that point in life. Steve where one uses glasses not only to read but to hide from the world. A little bit. You heard the introduction. The man's been around the block. He's been around the world. He's been in front of microphones in front of. Tv's in front of tv's. for years as a host. I met him hundred seventy seven years ago doing a play together in new york city. Yes and we've been friends. I've been saying for those of you who don't know out there if people were listening to this know about my life they don't but don has been a good friend of mine. My best friend for thirty year in my wedding. Say no more. You're in my wedding. Yes we come from a similar background and we've also followed the same path and yet forked off at different places. But we're still sort of. You're the you're my closest friend in terms of my career as well as my life and that's very important so you wanna talk about failure know ours is failure with our. Our friendship is a success story. That's true that's true. But i do have people on this podcast to talk about failure. What it means to them thinking about a couple of things that May or may not have happened to them where you know. I guess you could look at it like this. Didn't work out. But here's what happened. And it's it's your call. It could be a positive turnabout. It could also be a negative but i do think that failure is universal. I think everybody goes through it. I think it's a bad word You can't call the podcast failure. No what are you crazy. I think it's a healthy thing to do. Because you automatically turn a negative into a positive because and that's the point of your story is that every. I'm the perfect guest for this. I know it this thing. Because i default to failure. You asked me to ask myself what events of my life were perceived as failures and then but actually became epiphanies of success right perceived by you received by other yet. It doesn't matter. The the point is that this was a fulcrum moment in my life and it looked like it was going bad and then it went when good right. That's typically what you're looking for. You want just miserable failures. I went to fresh in. I want no uptick. I want everything i want. People vomiting the end of this thing. No of course really. It doesn't matter if you failures failure. If there's a turnaround great. I am so i gave that some thought when you asked me to and it was interesting because my mind went directly to one of i failed at in life and i don't think of myself as a failure. I don't think i am but a few years ago. I was in a therapist office. And i said so i wake up in the morning and i get up in the first thing i feel like is like on the worst. I'm just a minute. I what's wrong with me like those are the first thoughts in my brain. I'm telling this woman. And that wasn't even when i was there to discuss and she at some point maybe a few sessions later said to me. You know that thing that you feel when you get up in the morning and you're like failing miserably that's not normal when you're in a bad place that's depression and i said what and she said. Yeah there's like drugs i can. You can get that. Take care of that problem enemy bills. No she sent me to a psychiatrist. And i went down this path that i never understood happen. Which was you could actually break the cycle of of that feeling of that sort of misery in your head and interrupted which was indeed what had happened. I got into a loop. And i'd been thinking failure a lot in those days. Suddenly i wasn't feeling that way. Thanks to some pharmaceuticals and it was a real real eye-opener that there was a new way of thinking compared to the rest of my life. And so when you asked me to think about this by the way. I don't feel that way now and it's been a great bunch of years afterwards but when you asked me think about it i thought back. When did that start. When did that phenomenon start. Because it was a big factor in my life. And i realized i began to feel that way because never felt like i understood my life strategically. My father and i sat down when i was a kid. And he says. I'm going to teach you how to play chess. And he would get frustrated with me and say dan. You gotta think of a strategy. And i'd be like okay. But how do i think of strategy except i wouldn't ask that. I just assumed that i was wrong. By not being able to think of a strategy so we would play and he would beat me and over and over again in my life. Chess has been miserable experience. Because i have approached at each time thinking i should be able to strategize and admit that. I'm completely incapable of seeing the playing field. The board so it was one of those experiences that has translated over time and been confirmed by other situations. I was not accomplishing. What i wanted to do in our profession and i said i can't live the rest of my life like this so i gotta have a very specific thing. I'm doing and accomplishing. Were failing at. But i gotta know what the game is because this whole wide playing field of the acting profession that we were experimenting with trying to figure out in those days was was too broad and i said here take this handful fills donald play chess and the day that i decided. You know what. I gotta start being myself and understanding that this weakness is not necessarily weakness if you put it into a strong position becoming a tv host. Which is what. I went to suddenly like started getting a lot better I hope that's applicable to somebody's life. The other thing. I'm thinking about coming up here is like all i wanted to do. In life is universally applicable not loved applicable my experience and that which i described to be sort of relatable to people and and useful in some way. But it probably isn't. Oh my gosh. Wow let me just go back to first of all. I believe i don't know. But i think that you're describing. I appreciate your honesty. I think you're describing a lot of people i mean. I don't know that people wake up.

steve friedman Don wild new york city Don don Steve chess depression Chess dan donald
"don" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"don" Discussed on WBUR

"Don, in your view, Do you think consumers would willingly by speculative tickets if they understood? What they were buying speculative tickets. Here's what I'd like to say to that is when you go to a hotel and you book a room in a hotel. Do you think you're booking the actual room that's available? You're not you're booking from this is what it was like to try to get answers out of Don. He would change the subject or answer. My question was another question. He even flat out denied that his company has received complaints recently. I don't think we've had A complaint in the longest time from anyone. This is just not true. On top of complaints like Sharon's that I got through records requests others about ticket network are easy to find. They're on the better business Bureau Yelp Twitter. Don says Ticket network is not the problem. He points his finger again at the big primary sellers like Ticketmaster, he says, customers are worried about being able to transfer tickets to someone else, and they're concerned about the data that they give up and that they share when they're buying a primary ticket or their transfer to primary ticket. This is not what fans mentioned in the complaints. I read. Almost all of them were worried about getting deceived and gouged by companies like dance. Although don did admit, well, we're not perfect. No one is perfect. We're here to make Our sites better. We can always do better. Uh, one of the people in charge of making Dawn's company do better is Rebecca Kelly Slaughter. I think having competition in the ticket marketplace is great at every level,.

Ticketmaster Twitter Rebecca Kelly Slaughter Ticket network Don Dawn Yelp one of the people Sharon
"don" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"don" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Don show podcast. alive and we want you to join us at 51283605 90. Now here are Todd and done. That's right. I'm Todd Jeffries and Patrick Osborne is in for the vacationing Don Prior. I think he went down to the beach. I think you went down to Galveston, Texas is gonna break his shoulder again down there. It's very but I told him to stay off the boats. No fishing, because, you know, this guy can't stand on the boat without falling and busting his shoulder. Graham cracker shoulders, I think. Is that what you call them? Just stay on dry land set in a lawn chair. Sip on your drinks. You know, it's not bad advice for anybody really know. No, no, no, especially the launch here in the drink Part. It's words that live by words to live by. Listen, you can jump in at 51283605 90. We want to pick apart a couple of stories here that and we'd love to get your reaction. What kind of new police chief does Austin, Texas want? I mean, considering this current City Council, the district attorney, your county attorney. Some of them are card carrying Democrats, Socialist of America, in their own words, What kind of police chief will this City Council require Well, Austin is still without a permanent replacement for the former police chief, Brian Manley. An assistant city manager, Ray Ariano. He says he expects the search to wind down over the next four months or so four months to get the chief's position, at least identify who that individual might be. Now. Monday was the final day for the candidates to apply for the position, and then he had a few does about three dozen applicants so far in Ariano says they're now going through the process. Joseph Kony is the ascent to the interim police chief. And, Yeah, he's among the applicants that are applying for the permanent position. So I want to throw the question out there. And maybe some police officers want to weigh in on this and you don't have to use your name will protect your identity. What kind of police chief do you want here in Austin, Texas, the 11th largest city in America. Is a big deal. I mean, this is one of those coveted. This used to be one of those coveted jobs, a big city police position. You get police chiefs that apply from all over the country. But as you know, over the past 10 years or so that position has become very political, very art. Acevedo was considered a very, very political type of police chief Brian Manley served this city for 30 years plus Starting out as a young kid, basically as a as a police officer and, uh, kind of fell into the position as the years went on. But what kind of police Chief does this city? Uh, demand jump in here at 51283605 90. I hope it's not the kind of police chief that the way Joe Chikane has been acting over the past couple of months, actually testifying and holding a press conference against HB 1900. Which is the bill that was approved by lawmakers that would well take away tax dollars from cities that defund police without a public vote. And and and she con. He was he was very supportive of this new cadet class that got underway this week. He could be a little bit more supportive of the rank and file if he supported HB 1900. However, he chose to be the mouthpiece for the City Council and Mayor Adler. And what we don't know yet is whether or not Joshi Koen is among those three dozen or so applications that have come in for the permanent role. I This is a tough job, though. I feel like if you're going to be a police chief. Now you have to be willing to wade into the political spectrum. Whether or not you want to, and so you look at the way Chicken is handling things, you know, He's been criticized by a lot of people. But then there are a lot of people who are liking what they're seeing from the guy. Listen, we got activists, especially. We've got a homeless crisis. We got a spike in violent crime robberies, armed robberies. Things like that. We've got a real problem in this do we do and it's going to be the we need a police chief. That's going to be able to address those things before he addresses the political dreams of a city council. And this is being highlighted. I mean, part of this is this homeless crisis and now the City Council. They kind of snuck this in without a whole lot of talk This this purchase of the Candlewood Suites Hotel there in District six. It's in the city of Austin. However, this portion of Austin is in Williamson County. And there comes the rub between the county and the city on this issue. Williamson County is very pissed off because the City Council never even reached out to Williamson County on this issue in the early going negotiations and Williamson County commissioners, they're not backing down in their opposition. In fact, they're drawing a line in the sand as Austin plans to buy and transform that Candlewood Suites hotel into a homeless shelter. Here's Williamson County Judge Bill Gravel. It has come to my attention that the city of Boston continues to move forward with their plan. To seize a hotel within Williamson County and converted to a homeless shelter. Now the city of Austin has decided to spend $11.2 million on this project, and it will be voted on this Thursday. I'm deeply disappointed in the mayor. Not too long ago. On May, the 17th I received a letter from the mayor of the city of Boston. That said, and I quote out of many words. Here we are committed to working with Williamson County and their leadership. As soon as practicable to work together on transactions that involve both of our communities. I took this letter in good faith by the mayor and by the council members that signed it. I took them at their word. And they have chosen not to again communicate with Williamson County. I want to be unequivocally clear, Mr Mayor, if you choose to continue to go down this path You are forcing Williamson County to do something and to hold.

Joseph Kony Joshi Koen Joe Chikane Todd Jeffries Patrick Osborne Brian Manley $11.2 million Candlewood Suites Hotel Ray Ariano Ariano 30 years Williamson County Todd Don Boston Monday America 51283605 90 Democrats Don Prior
"don" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"don" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

"Interesting things or email at three interesting things at g mail dot com right. Find me in on all your podcast app. Windy your episodes come out. We come every tuesday. I usually schedule them for five in the morning eastern standard time. So you're going to wake up and have it ready to go on your phone. So tuesday morning you'll find new episodes of the show. Well don we will have you back i am. I enjoyed visiting with you. The time went way too. Quick etienne's man. That's the way it worth to you and your family are staying safe during all this crazy pandemics. We are thinking safe. You know why. Jesse 'cause we're wearing a mask well. I just was going to end listeners. Please remember to social distance. Remember to wash your hands. Do not be like the texas governor wearing masks and let's all be good to each other because that's the only way we're gonna get through this. The freeman brother. Amen thank you goodbye. Doing a podcast at times can be a one way conversation. And i hate that so please let me know what you like. And don't like about the work i'm doing. You can reach the podcast via email at settling brusett gmail.com..

"don" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"don" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

"He So have you watched the broadway play on net flicks. I have not watched it yet. I've seen clips of it. Because different people have shared different aspects of social media so seemed different things And i remember when i first heard that he was doing broadway. I thought that doesn't seem like a fit. That i think would work but apparently it did. And so what the hell do i know. I don't know if you you know he's currently doing a podcast split. The some guy named barack obama. I heard that that's funny of the two of them. That's what spotify money will do for you. Yes and they were telling the story that At the end of the obama administration he had reached out. Bruce said i wanted to do something for my staff. They've been here the whole time. Would you mind perform me and brusett. Yeah i'll be glad to do. A semi could bring the whole band. That would just be kind of you know. That's strange but i'll bring a guitar and i'll sing a few songs. And and he said he was talking to patty and patty said well. You could read from the book. And bruce said he tried to reform the book but that seems stiff so he ended up paraphrasing the stories and so he ended up. Doing like you know. Sixty seventy five minute show. They are the white house and for aids at basically him telling stories and singing songs and and afterwards and you know President obama is telling the story in the podcast uses. You should do that. You should do this. Show somewhere else. And he said that was what led him to going to broadway the idea to do that. Yeah and so he did it It is my wife could not make it through she And what's funny is The very first part of the part of the show talking about his father and his relationship with his father and the town is very depressing and my wife said i don't. This is just too dark. This is depressing. I gotta go jesse. And what's funny is like five minutes later. Russa's piano says okay. I'm going to get you off. Suicide watch about my mom. So it's actually because on tunnel of love the one song about his dad walk like a man. That's one of the songs that i skipped through. I it's fine but it's you know it's not one of my favorite. That's my least favorite song on the. It's funny you say that. About bruce by the way doing that. At the end of the obama administration coming in sorta like. I'm done here. And i want to sort of do something nice on my way out. 'cause that's exactly the same thing that happened to him with letterman right. When letterman left late night he was like what was the one guest. I haven't been able to get in. The last guest. Of course was brousseau so that that seems to be bruce's Gig gave on their way out of their good. I would love don for you to watch it and then join me again and talk about it absolutely. I think that would be a great episode. I think really fun So how do you. Let's talk about three interesting things. That's the podcast. I assume. available everywhere. Podcast star there right everywhere pilot. Yes i did make stephen colbert made the joke. That now than that. Bruce has a podcast He he did a parody. Colbert did of. i'm on fire. Basically saying i'm going to the post office using post office. dot com dot com.

stephen colbert Bruce Colbert Russa spotify bruce patty obama first barack obama Sixty seventy five minute one song one guest five minutes later one of the songs brusett three interesting things first part white house brousseau