35 Burst results for "DNA"

The Mystery Of The Mummified Twinkie

Short Wave

07:52 min | 1 d ago

The Mystery Of The Mummified Twinkie

"Colin purring in Pennsylvania wanted the world to know about his accidental fungal experiments involving twinkies. So what happened next? So he posted photos on twitter and they were seen by two scientists, Brian Love it and Matt Casson at West Virginia University, they study Fungi Casson says fungi are everywhere and they have this amazing ability to break down all kinds of substances. Fungi growing on jet fuel. Wow. So he means fungi can grow on pretty much anything and everything. Yeah and in the past their lab has tested how well they grow in peeps. You know that classic marshmallow tree tour hasn't says fungi found the peace challenging because you know they don't have a lot of water in them in a way they're kind of like an extreme environment, right? The food industry has crafted the ability to to make foods that have a long shelf life. You know I could test that out right now I got some old peeps in my house my kid. Kept from Easter like years ago. But anyway back to the twinkies. So these researchers were intrigued by Collins Posts on twitter and Colin was only too happy to mail his twinkies right to their lab. They suspected that whatever had mummified the twinkie was some kind of fungus but they wanted to confirm that and then find out exactly what kind of fungus. Okay. So twinkie mummy gets shipped to the lab obviously, they had to open it up. I'm guessing and as I look at the photo, the plastic wrapping around the shriveled twinkie looks like it's been vacuum-sealed like it sucked inward like. Right right. So the scientists thought maybe the fungus got in before the package was sealed, and then as it grew the fungus was using up more air or oxygen than it was putting out I mean, here's how love it described it. You end up with a document. And very well, vacuum may have halted. The fungus is ability to continue to grow We have the snapshot of what we were sent but who knows if this process occurred five years ago and he just only noticed it now yeah five years that's forty times the shelf life of a twinkie in eternity for twinkie anyway they had expected this horrific smelled hit them. When they opened the packaging, the smell would possibly kill one of us. But because of them of -cation there there really was no smell at all, which was really a pleasant surprise. So twinkie mommy is unwrapped smells like nothing what happened next? Well, they took a quick look with a magnifying scope and Juhasz some signs of fungal spore formation on the twinkie. So that suggested a fungus of some kind and the next step was to take a sample. So casting used a bone biopsy tool to sort of drill through the tough outer layer of this grey mummified twinkie, we certainly hit the marrow of the twinkie and quickly realized that there was still some. Cream filling on the inside. So, the inside was still cream-filled. Yeah that was a surprise they thought it would be sort of hard all the way through of it says, whatever did this to the twinkie it seems that the fungus was more interested in the cake on the outside. Then the filling on the inside see, this is a smart fungus because cake is clearly the superior part of the twinkie same with Orios same with cupcakes. You know what I'm talking about right now I don't know to me. It's like the combination of two things that's key. So I can't really separate them in my mind. That's fair I. Accept that. So the scientists have taken samples from the twinkie, do they go about determining what kind of fungus growing on it? They actually sampled multiple twinkies. Okay. So one was the mummified twinkie we've been talking about the other was the second twinkie from Collins box that was not mummified. The one that was just you know marred, it had that weird little blemish on the outside of it, and then they had this control scientific experiment they need scientific control, which was a what they called an as symptomatic twinkie from the same box. So they put those samples into lab dishes with nutrients commonly used to grow fungi, and from that little blemish twinkie the one. With just the little. Marc, they were able to grow a very common indoor fungus called Klee does sport him common indoor fungus, right? It's one of the most common airborne molds worldwide. Okay. So what about from the mummified twinkie? Okay. So that's where it gets even more interesting. Love. It says, they have not been able to grow any fungus from that particular sample. It may be that we don't have any living spores on store certainly dying depending on the fungus they could I very quickly and remember because the twinkie had been sort of vacuum sealed by whatever was going on there. You know it seems like it couldn't grow anymore inside it's wrapping. So there's truly perhaps no life in this twinkie. Well, the scientists you know weren't going to let that stop them they. Samples from both the marred and the mummified twinkies and he sent off to DNA sequencing company and twelve hours. Later, they got the results back the mark twinkie was a ninety nine point six percent matched to a fungus called close Boreham zeile film. The mummified twinkie was eighty one percent to a closely related clear does for him species. Plato's Boreham Tenuous Sim. CASSON's says DNA from the mummified twinkie was pretty degraded. So they actually probably are the same fungus. I'm so amazed they were able to identify these fungi from these twinkies. It is the mystery of the twinkie over I remain confident that science will continue already one researcher Kate Wallace at the University of Illinois contacted them and asked for a bit of the mummified that she wants to put in a scanning electron microscope. One that can get really really close. Up Images and hopefully you know see something cool and Kasim says he's not turning his lab entirely over to twinkie studies but you know they could still do some more research. We thought about inoculating some healthy twinkies with some cletus forum may be doing some transplants with the bone marrow biopsy tool where we replace a healthy plug with a fungus colonize plug. And see what happens from there. This twinkie line of research is just relentless. There's so many of questions still I mean what's the overall moral of the story here that you can try to hold onto the past but nothing gold can stay not even a twinkie well, that's one moral I mean another moral of the story is that Colin, purring ten should've listened to his mother and had more respect for expiration dates but you know people are really drawn to this myth that twinkies are immortal. I should mention we did reach out to hostess brands for comment on this story and I have not heard back from them at all You know the mummy twinkie is this different kind. Of disturbing vision of what the future could hold for twinkies and you know for all of us I mean Matt and says, this story seems to be gripping for people maybe because the grey mummified twinkie is such a dramatic contrast to this golden iconic twinkie that lives in our memories when those memories are tainted by like a visual reality like the twinkie experiment, we're kind of like caught off guard and we're like wait no, that's a symbol of my childhood. You can't take that from me to. So basically, like you said, emily, nothing lasts forever. You know here's Brian Love again, we're living in a time where we're all really grappling with our mortality eventually, all of us are future fungi. On. Seeing. That is sort of facing the the reality. Of. Holly and Our destination now, I did not expect a twinkie experiment to be a meditation on the human. Condition

Fungi Casson Colin Brian Love Twitter Pennsylvania Hostess Brands West Virginia University Plato Collins Orios Emily University Of Illinois Holly Marc Kasim Researcher
Why Are Whales So Big?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

06:19 min | 4 d ago

Why Are Whales So Big?

"This is but why a podcast for curious kids from Vermont Public Radio? I'm the host. Jane Lindholm. On this show you tell us what you're interested in and what your questions are about that thing you're interested in. And we use your questions to guide what we talk about on the show. Your curiosity dictates what we explore. When I was young, I really wanted to be a marine biologist that's a scientist who studies things that live in the oceans and lots of you are interested in marine biology to we've done episodes about fish about why the sea is salty and other things related to oceans like our jellyfish really made out of Jelly spoiler alert they're not. But now we're going to focus on one particular type of animal that lives in the oceans that like me a lot of you are fascinated by. Can you guess what animal we might be discussing? Well. That is the sound of a humpback whale singing. And, that sound comes courtesy of the federal government's no of fisheries website. But we're not going to focus on the way whales communicate today that's going to be a future episode. So be sure to listen for that one too. We want today to have a better understanding of what whales are and how they move through the oceans and occasionally through rivers to here's our guide for today's episode. My name is Nick Pinson. I'm a paleontologist at the Smithsonian in Washington DC. Tell me what paleontologist is healing tallest looks for any trace of life that lived a long long time ago, and they tend to look for fossils which can be bones footprints leaves any kind of trace of life that isn't around now, but we know existed millions billions of years ago. One of the challenges and one of the things I like most about being paleontologist is that you don't get all the clues that you'd like to. So we don't get a full skeleton sometimes you do but mostly not see have to make the best you can do with a little bit of information, and that's what makes paleontology for me a lot like a detective story. So neck, some of the kids listening now might be scratching their heads because they know that this episode is about Wales and you just told us you're a paleontologist. So you look for signs of life that doesn't exist anymore, but Wales still exists. I got into science because I really liked looking for fossils and that led me eventually to looking at Wales because Wales are mammals that live notion and some of them live in the rivers but you're probably more familiar with ones that live in the oceans that are really big that have flippers that have flukes They look from the outside a bit more like a fish than. A Mammal, what's really neat about them is that we know that they're mammals and that they're closely related to other hoofed mammals specifically the hoofed mammals that have even toes to toes and those mammals are cows, pigs, deer, camels, sheep. That's who whales are most closely related to, and if you look at the wheel and you look at all of its near cousins that are live today. Realize that whales look really really different and what explains why they're so different has to do with how they volved, how they came to be and going back to fossils were really fortunate and being able to find fossil whales tell us how those changes happened. So I'm lucky enough to be able to work with teams of scientists to go round the world and look for fossils. Of Whales and then try to understand how those fit in with what we know about whales today, and also where they're going because the earth has always changed and it's still changing I want to get to some of the questions that our listeners have sent us. But just before we do I, want to pick up on something that you said, which was that whales are really closely related. Even toed hoofed animals, but they look really different. So if they look really different, how can to animals be very closely related because you'd think they'd be more closely related to something else that they look like like a shark or a fish right just because something lives in the water or looks like a fish doesn't mean they're all related to each other whales, sharks and fish the last time they shared a common ancestor was probably nearly half a billion years ago. Let's get more precise about. Wales as related to other mammals, we have a lot of different ways of knowing how organisms are related to each other. We can look at their DNA which tells us directly about their relationships in a way. That's that doesn't connect to how they look as more to do with their genetics. Right DNA tells us that whales fit in with all these other mammals whales are mammals, and that's something you would know probably from just looking. At the fact that they re there, they have babies drink milk from their MOMS do have hair. If you are ever get the opportunity to close enough to whale, and even if you seem photos of baby, dolphins have little tiny whiskers on their snout they lose them pretty quickly. But those are all telling you about their deeper ancestry and you want to use all the different kinds of evidence available to you whether it's DNA. That might tell you one story or fossils that tell you a story that maybe sometimes is a bit different and that's why I say that fossils tell something that we wouldn't otherwise. No. We can have a a family tree of animals based on DNA and then fossils tell us about this branches of the tree that we wouldn't otherwise know about and for Wales. That's what tells us that the earliest whales lived on land

Wales Scientist Vermont Jane Lindholm Washington Dc Nick Pinson
Trump Vs. Biden: How Russia Sees The U.S. Election

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

05:47 min | 5 d ago

Trump Vs. Biden: How Russia Sees The U.S. Election

"To move on to our next section, which is national security, and I do want to start with the security of our elections and some breaking news from overnight Just last night, Top intelligence officials confirmed again that both Russia and Iran are working to influence this election. Most countries have obtained us voter registration information, these officials say. And Iran sent intimidating messages to Florida voters. This question goes to you, Mr Vice President, What would you do to put an end to this threat? You have two minutes uninterrupted. I made it clear. I asked everyone else to take the pledge. I made it clear that any country no matter who it is that interferes in American elections will pay a price. They will pay a price. Has been overwhelmingly clear this election game get into the last one. This election that Russia has been involved. China has been involved in some degree, and now we learned that that that Iran is involved. They will pay a price. If I am elected. They're interfering with American sovereignty. That's what's going on. Right now. They're interfering with American sovereignty and the best of my knowledge. I don't think the president said anything to Putin about it. I don't think he's stalking them a lot. I don't think he said a word. I don't know why he hadn't said a word to Putin about it, and I don't know what he has recently said. If anything to the Iranians, my guess is he'd probably be more out spoken with regard to the Iranians. But the point is this folks were in a situation where we have foreign Company countries trying to interfere in the outcome of our election. His old Oh, National security advisor told him that what is happening with his buddy? Well, I will his buddy Rudy Giuliani. He's being used as a Russian pawn. He's being fed information that is Russian. That is not true. And then what happens? Nothing happens. And then you find out that everything is going on here about Russia is wanting to make sure that I do not get elected the next president states because they know I know them and they know me. I don't understand why this president is unwilling to take on Putin. When he's actually paying bounties to kill American soldiers in Afghanistan when he's engaged in activities that are trying to destabilize all of NATO. I don't know why he doesn't do it, but it's worth asking the question. Why is it that being done any country interferes with us will in fact, a price because they're affecting our sovereignty? President Trump. Same question to you. Let me let me ask the question. You have two minutes to respond for two elections in a row. Now there has been substantial interference from foreign adversaries. What would you do in your next term? To put an end to this two minutes? Let me respond to the first part as Joe answer, Joe got $3.5 million from Russia. And it came through Putin because he was very friendly with the former mayor of Moscow, and it was the mayor of Moscow's wife. And you got $3.5 million. Your family got $3.5 million in You know, someday you're gonna have to explain. Why did you get through to him? I never got any money from Russia. I don't get money from Russia. Now, about your thing last night. I knew all about that and threw John who is John Radcliffe was fantastic DNA, he said. The one thing that's common to both of them. They both want you to lose because there has been nobody tougher to Russia with between the sanctions, nobody tougher than me on Russia. Between the sanctions between all of what I've done with nature. You know, I've got the NATO countries to put up an extra 130 billion going to $420 billion a year. That's to guard against Russia. I sold while he was selling pillows and sheets. I sold tank busters to Ukraine. There has been nobody tougher. On Russia than Donald Trump. And I'll tell you they were so bad they took over the the submarine port. You remember that very well during your term during you and Barack Obama. They took over a big part of what should have been Ukraine. You handed it to him. But you were getting a lot of money from Russia. They were paying you a lot of money, and they probably still are. But now with what came out today, it's even worse. All of the e mails, the emails, the horrible e mails of the kind of money that you were raking in you and your family. And Joe you a vice president, when some of this was happening, and it should have never happened, And I think you owe an explanation to the American people. Why is it somebody just had a news conference a little while. Ago who was essentially supposed to work with you and your family. But what he said was damning. And regardless of me, I think you have to clean it up and talk to the American people. Maybe you could do it right now. Ice President Biden. You may respond visions and I don't want to follow up on the election security. I have not taken a penny from any foreign source ever in my life. We learn with this president. Paid 50 times The tax in China as a secret bank account with China does business in China and in fact is talking about me taking money? I have not taken a single penny from any country. What so ever ever number one number two This is a president. I have released all of my tax returns. 22 years go look at them. 22 years of my tax returns. You have not released a single solitary year of your tax returns. What are you hiding? Why are you on Willie? The foreign countries are paying you a lot. Russia is paying you a lot Chinese paying a lot on your hotels and all your businesses all around the country all around the world and China is building a new road to a new guy. Ah, a golf course you have overseas. So what's going on here? Why don't release your tax return to stop talking about corruption. President Trump you're

Russia President Trump Putin China Vice President Iran Nato Ukraine JOE Moscow Florida Stalking Barack Obama Rudy Giuliani Advisor
Chicago - Human remains found in field near Champaign identified 25 years later as a woman never reported missing

WBBM Evening News

00:58 sec | 6 d ago

Chicago - Human remains found in field near Champaign identified 25 years later as a woman never reported missing

"County have reportedly identified remains found their 25 years ago as a woman from northern Illinois. Now their mission turns to finding the killer. Her name was Carrie Lynn Wiant, and she would be 49 years old. Her remains were found in a field in Champaign County in 1995. The Champagne News Gazette reports that authorities identified her by comparing DNA from the remains to DNA uploaded to genealogy site. She was born in Gail's Berg. But officials in Champaign County say Wyatt left home when she was a teenager and lived for a while in Peoria, then joined a carnival and went south to Champagne County. She gave birth to a son in 1994 the year before her remains were found. Now, authorities say they're hoping to find someone who knew her so they could bring closure. Hawaiians parents Steve Miller

Champaign County Carrie Lynn Wiant Champagne County Champagne News Gazette County Gail Steve Miller Illinois Peoria Wyatt
Chelsea man released from prison after serving 34 years for murder he says he didn’t commit, Boston

WBZ Overnight News

00:48 sec | Last week

Chelsea man released from prison after serving 34 years for murder he says he didn’t commit, Boston

"Decades in prison for a murder. He said he did not commit now. Chelsea Menace home freed after a Supreme Court justice ruled he deserves a new trial. There's W B. C's Carl Stevens 34 years. That's how long Tommy Rosa was in prison until being released just a few days ago. He could hardly believe it. When freedom arrived. Tell us about when you found out you were going to be coming home today, he said. I have some happy news and I got very sometimes you always thought this day would never happen that interview courtesy of the New England Innocence Project. They're the ones who filed the motion for a new trial, arguing there's plenty of evidence, including DNA evidence indicating Rosa did not murder Gwendolyn Taylor in 1985. Live, the group's executive director, issued a statement saying We will not stop fighting for Mr Rosa until this wrongful conviction is overturned. Carl Steven stop

Tommy Rosa Murder New England Innocence Project Carl Stevens Carl Steven Supreme Court Gwendolyn Taylor Executive Director
Father of Anthony McClain, Black man fatally shot by Pasadena PD, northeast of Los Angeles, files lawsuit

KNX Evening News

00:47 sec | Last week

Father of Anthony McClain, Black man fatally shot by Pasadena PD, northeast of Los Angeles, files lawsuit

"Pasadena and several of its police officers are being sued over a deadly police shooting in August, and Lenny McLean was shot and killed while running from police following a traffic stop. Nearly two months after his death. His father is following a federal civil rights lawsuit. Attorney Michael Corio says Dashcam footage shows McClane pose no danger to police officers officers. The first thing that he does is he whips out his gun and Anthony's running away with his back toward the officer. You'll see this on the video video with with Anthony. Anthony. Nothing Nothing in in his his hands. hands. This This officer officer fired fired twice. twice. One One struck struck him him and and ultimately ultimately was was the the kill kill shot. shot. The The other other one one grazed. grazed. The The Pasadena Pasadena Police Police department department says says McLane McLane was was armed armed at at the the time time of of the the shooting, shooting, and and detectives detectives recovered recovered a a gun gun at at the the scene scene with with McLane's McLane's DNA DNA on on the the city city of of Pasadena, Pasadena, declined declined to to comment comment on on the the pending pending litigation. litigation. You You could could see see the the video video of of the the shooting shooting on on our our website website Ko next 10 70 dot com.

The Pasadena Pasadena Police P Mclane Mclane Anthony Pasadena Officer Mcclane Lenny Mclean Michael Corio Attorney Dashcam
Best Of  Reputation, Reviews, Recommendations & Referrals with Mark S.A. Smith

The Bacon Podcast | Brian Basilico - Marketing Strategy Expert Interviews to CURE Your Marketing

06:12 min | Last week

Best Of Reputation, Reviews, Recommendations & Referrals with Mark S.A. Smith

"Welcome Mark sa Smith back for the third time and I do believe that essay stands for super awesome. Is that correct or something? The adapter smart-ass depending on how you doing. Actually it actually stands for Steven antin with a name like Smith, you know, you need to have extra names and for me, it's my brand. Right, right. You're Brian Bacon off of the three big I Delight to be with you and I love our conversations and I'm honored to be a three-peat with you. And let's Dive Right In cuz we've got some hot stuff off and only yeah, we do. So as I was telling you in the precursor and earlier this week, I did a podcast and blog on managing your reputation. And today I gave a presentation about managing your reputation. So what I wanted to talk to you about because I mean you work in the the corporate world. I mean you're in the big you're in the big pond and you know, damn fortune five hundred companies. Yeah. Yeah. So you're playing with some big fish and we talked about I mean the two things that we did before was managing disruption. And then how do you catch a whale so yep Working with these whales the question that you know, we're going to get into today is about getting reviews in managing your reputation. So let's let's start off by talking about wage. You know, how do you get people to give good reviews? What's your what's your process or what your thoughts on that? I love this. Well, I want to frame this up just a little bit. You know, I'm a small business doing business with big business and that has benefits and has distractions and attractions, you know, the benefit is that the checks tend to be large the distractions is that as you pointed out constipation compensation constipation. They tend to be slow payers. So you just have to manage all that and that said today we are all driven by reviews. So consider this listener a.m. The last time you bought something from Amazon that you had never bought before without checking out the reviews. How about you Brian? I'm just joined Amazon Prime this year and I can honestly say yo, Coolest thing ever you get something delivered on a Sunday. But hey always check the reviews. I mean, that's every time it's price and reviews. Those are the two most important things to me and you know, we look for a couple thoughts and reviews number one is we look for you know, how many five-star reviews and we look for people that are having genuine problems. And for me. I also look for the negative reviews because I want to find out what kind of problems people have so I can say no that's not a true problem or I don't expect that problem or or to say, you know that I appreciate that Insight. I think I'm going to choose something else. I'm sure it's the same for you know, absolutely. Yeah. I mean that's you know, I'll definitely look at the negative reviews and if it's if it's something, you know, if there's enough of the same thing that's usually because there's always a troll or somebody out there that's going to be something negative cuz they just were not happy that day, you know competitors do it all the time competitors frequently troll products and so in the world of Amazon you look for a job. Flight purchased it they really buy it if they didn't really bite. Forget it. I'm going to ignore that. So the point that is that we do we're we become we become a review page driven society and the second example of that is Yelp know when do we go to restaurants without reviewing them on Yelp or without having somebody say, oh, you gotta go try it out right now with have to have reviews and it's built into our DNA now. So with that it means that we have to collect reviews we have to ask for reviews. We have to post reviews we have to manage reviews and the best way to do that is to actively ask for them. So, how do you go about it getting reviews Brian see now? This is a place where I disagree with you because when you ask for a review page, you ask for a testimonial what most people say they say, yeah sure. No problem. I'll get through and then it just sits and sits and sits and then you remind him a second time you think about it a week or two later and say hey, can I get a name? Review. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Sorry I forgot about it. And then you ask him a third time and then they started getting annoyed cuz you're bugging them. So the way that I do it and the way that I found the most success and this is actually based on a book that I read called The Hundred zero principle and it's buy one of my mentors is name is Al Ritter and you can actually get it on Amazon. It's written by it's a by company called Simple truths and his principal is not give a hundred percent of yourself a hundred percent of the time expect nothing in return and Watch What Happens the way that I get reviews so ask for I give them a lot of used to people that I work with. I'll go on LinkedIn and I'll write them a review. What is LinkedIn do that? LinkedIn actually says, hey you got a review from Brian Basilico. Do you want to return the favor of nine times out of ten? We are competitive we as we get a review we're going to say, well, he wrote a really nice review. I'm going to do a better one and I'm going to put more thought process into it and I'm going to do it now because Want to return the favor at this moment and I would owe you right about 70% of the time. You not only get the review a lot faster or the testimonial lot faster. But what you end up getting a much more glowing heartfelt thought-out review beautiful. I love the idea of give a review to get a review another strategy that I suggest is to ask for a review when somebody compliments, you know these days when people say thanks a lot of really appreciate what you did for me. Most people say no problem don't ever say that you're wasting an opportunity. No problem. Lies that what you did has no value and the world was sales as in politics is run on a favor bank. So if somebody says thank you put a favor in your favor Bank. You're welcome. I wage you do the same for me. Would you do me a favor and which case they're going to say sure. Would you mind just typing that up that those same things and I know you also record it when people are dead. Online and so you just asked me if you can transcribe it. That's a brilliant strategy. Yeah,

Amazon Linkedin Brian Mark Sa Smith Steven Antin Brian Bacon Yelp Brian Basilico Principal Al Ritter
Neanderthal DNA May Be COVID Risk

60-Second Science

02:05 min | 2 weeks ago

Neanderthal DNA May Be COVID Risk

"The risk factors for covid nineteen are many old age obesity, heart conditions. But early genetics studies have identified another trait that some people who developed severe cove nineteen seem to share a cluster of genetic variations on their third chromosome and that DNA sequence likely derives from neanderthals says Hugo, Siegburg of the Max Planck Institute it is quite striking that S-. This veterans has lingered until house years fifty thousand years ago is. The approximate time humans and neanderthals interbred, and over the Millennia, those neanderthal variants have become more common in some homo sapiens populations than others for example, about sixteen percent of people of European descent carry at least one copy of the neanderthal stretch half of South Asians do and nearly two thirds of Bangladesh's, and that's kind of fascinating is so high that points towards that it must must've been beneficial in the post. I mean it's much higher than we expect. Undone. It's totally expunged in east as shown in China. Some something has happened driving the frequency often certain placing removing a token, the other places they details are in the journal, nature. See Bergen is colleague right that perhaps the NEANDERTHAL DNA happens to boost the risk of developing severe covid nineteen and they point to the fact that in the UK people of Bangladeshi descent have twice the risk of dying of cove nineteen than the general population. But as Epidemiologists Neil of the University of Nottingham pointed out in an email people of African descent in the UK are also being hurt more by the virus. Despite, having hardly any neanderthal genes instead, it's social factors like crowded multi, generational households or working frontline jobs that are more likely to be driving the trend seen in the UK that's according to Andrew Heyward Director of the Institute of Epidemiology in Healthcare at University College London, and as both epidemiologist pointed out, it's worth remembering that you can only develop severe covid nineteen if you're exposed to the virus in the first place.

UK Max Planck Institute Andrew Heyward University Of Nottingham Hugo Bergen China Institute Of Epidemiology University College London Director Bangladesh
How Clinical Genetics is Paving The Way in Precision Health with Dekel Gelbman

Outcomes Rocket

04:44 min | 2 weeks ago

How Clinical Genetics is Paving The Way in Precision Health with Dekel Gelbman

"Welcome back to the podcast that I have the privilege of hosting Dekel Gilman. He's the CEO at F. D.. N. A.. F. DNA is a company that initially started with facial analysis and hence the F. in the D. N. A.. He's the founding CEO of the company there. He leads the corporate and business strategy that turned the company from early stage startup developing next generation phenotype and GP technologies into a global leader a genomics and precision medicine FDA is the developer of face to gene the leading female typing platform in the clinical genomic space powered by the largest and. Fastest growing phenotype database in the World Dekel has extensive experience in Business Development, legal counseling and regulatory compliance Mr. Goldman has worked closely with dozens of startups, companies, including some of the most innovative technological companies from a wide variety of fields following them through from seed stage to exit Mr Government previously worked at the corporate finance group at Scadden ARP slate meagher, and Flom, and affiliates, and so it's a true pleasure to have him here on the podcast to really touch on a lot of the things that are forefront on the mind of healthcare leaders today a genomics precision medicine. So Dekel Inc so much for being with us. Absolutely, thank you very much for having me. So why don't we start with the Genesis of it? All Dekel what got you into healthcare? We'll you know solids. It's funny I don't recall ever making a conscious decision to get into healthcare. You know about ten years ago I was in the peak of my career as a corporate attorney I, represented many of the entrepreneurs basically that are in position that I am right now and I guess I always wanted to be on the side that created value rather than helping others create. Value, the medical space itself has so many opportunities for creating value. What's almost guaranteed that this space is that the value that you're creating is going to impact people's lives in the most significant way. Possible. So ten years ago when I met Multi Schneider Bergen or wolf the CO founders of FDA in when I heard, what they're trying to do I saw unbelievable value immediately left my comfortable job and teamed up with them to pursue our mission, which is saving lives of kids with rare diseases. Well, I think it's it's it's fabulous that you took that risk that goal and. Your Rear View Mirror. There was no looking forward. There is no guarantee of success in looking back now you're like, wow, this thing workout. So you know you you've been through a lot of different things. Now, a lot of different companies as well. I love to hear from you what you believe needs to be forefront on the mind of leaders agend doesn't healthcare and how are you an FDA approaching it. So today I'm a bit biased towards this subject, but I think that every medical leader should be considering how A. Fits. into their agenda, whatever it is specifically, there are a number of topics that we pay a lot of attention to, and I, think that everyone should first and foremost how to separate the hope from the hype. So in other words, what can I actually do and what it can do I? Think that's even more important to understand and realize you need to understand what to embrace in what to reject. So that distinction is extremely important for any medical leaders agenda beyond that this falls kind of into the subcategories of AI is. How to control the quality of data everyone knows the saying garbage in garbage out. So how do we avoid biases inequities that are inherent in in a I artificial intelligence then and this is a little bit more specific to the medical space. How do you integrate a successfully into the workflow in the medical space? Specifically in healthcare professionals workflow that that really is extremely important. I can't really emphasize how important that is and another thing that I think should be important for for medical leaders when considering a I is starting. To talk about how to share data because if we don't share data, we ended up working in silos and that kind of ties back into the biases, the inequities and other really bad stuff that is associated with a unfortunately, and finally you know being an ex lawyer, I always preoccupied with the legality and ethics specifically in this evolving space where the legislators are lagging. So we have the think as as leaders we have to take corporate responsibility in think how we form this this new fields fuel dekel

Dekel Gilman FDA Dekel Inc Flom Multi Schneider Bergen Scadden Arp Mr. Goldman Mr Government Attorney Developer AI
Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to two women

Here & Now

00:55 sec | 2 weeks ago

Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to two women

"A biochemist from UC Berkeley is sharing the Nobel Prize for chemistry this year. Jennifer Donna has one for breakthrough work on genetic editing committee science reporter Molly Peterson has more Doubt. Niko invented a tool called CRISPR Cast nine What the Nobel Committee called Genetic Scissors. This year's prize is about rewriting the code of life down, and French researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier discovered a way to cut into broken genetic material, Remove it and replace it. Scissors, Concetta DNA of people, plants and animals, creating cancer therapies and curing genetic diseases. As Donna told Ladies Forum these are all things that are within the realm of possibility now, and so we have to really start thinking about how do we use this technology responsibly down and sharpen today are the first women ever to share the chemistry prize? I'm Molly Peterson. The

Nobel Prize Molly Peterson Jennifer Donna Nobel Committee Uc Berkeley Emmanuelle Charpentier Niko Reporter Ladies Forum Researcher
2 scientists win Nobel chemistry prize for gene-editing tool

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:18 sec | 2 weeks ago

2 scientists win Nobel chemistry prize for gene-editing tool

"A Nobel Prize for chemistry was awarded today to scientists who discovered the gene editing tool known as crisper Jennifer Do DNA of the United States shares the award with a Manuel Charpentier of France. They are the first women to jointly win the Nobel Prize for

Nobel Prize Manuel Charpentier United States France
Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to two women

KCBS Radio Midday News

01:11 min | 2 weeks ago

Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to two women

"Another day, another Nobel Prize for a Cal Berkeley faculty member. Today It's the Nobel Prize for chemistry and as KCBS is Mike Dewald reports. It's a huge win as well for women in science. For the first time, two women have been awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry together. UC Berkeley biochemist Jennifer Donna was awarded the prize this morning along with her colleague Emmanuelle Charpentier. Down as the first woman in UC Berkeley's history to win the prize. I'm over the moon. I'm in shock, and I couldn't be happier to be representing UC Berkeley. The two scientists earned the honor for their work on what's called crisper. It's a method that's been like into molecular scissors away to change the DNA of plants or animals, allowing researchers to precisely edit specific genes. The roof errors that lead to disease with an eye towards affordability, accessibility and sustainability that will make the technology go from a laboratory tool, too. A standard of care or someday in genetic disease. Prestigious award comes with it a gold medal over $1 million in prize money and possibly Justus important, a free parking spot on the UC Berkeley campus.

Nobel Prize Uc Berkeley Mike Dewald Emmanuelle Charpentier Gold Medal Faculty Member Jennifer Donna Justus
Nobel prize in chemistry goes to the pioneers of CRISPR gene editing

KYW 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 2 weeks ago

Nobel prize in chemistry goes to the pioneers of CRISPR gene editing

"Of this year's winners of the Nobel Prize for chemistry for her work on a gene editing tool. French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American biochemist Jennifer Tao DNA were awarded the Nobel Prize for developing a gene editing technique. Known as the Chris Burke has nine DNA snipping scissors. The technique means researchers can selectively disabled or change DNA in living cells. It has already contributed to new cancer therapies, and there is hope it can one day help cure inherited diseases. Has also been used to improve crop resilience. Elaine Cobb,

Nobel Prize Emmanuelle Charpentier Elaine Cobb Chris Burke Jennifer Tao Scientist
Nobel Prize in chemistry goes to Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna for developing a method for genome editing

Morning Edition

00:52 sec | 2 weeks ago

Nobel Prize in chemistry goes to Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna for developing a method for genome editing

"Berkeley is sharing the Nobel Prize for chemistry this year. Jennifer Donna has one for breakthrough work on genetic editing. Science reporter Molly Peterson has more doubt Niko invented a tool called CRISPR Cast nine with the Nobel Committee called Genetic Scissors. This Year's prize is about Rewriting the code of life down, and French researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier discovered a way to cut into broken genetic material, remove it and replace it. The scissors can change DNA of people, plants and animals, creating cancer therapies and curing genetic diseases. As Donna told Cooties Forum. These are all things that are within the realm. Of possibility now and so we have to really start thinking about what? How do we use this technology Responsibly, Donna and sharpen today are the first women ever to share the chemistry prize. I'm Molly Peterson. The

Jennifer Donna Nobel Prize Molly Peterson Nobel Committee Emmanuelle Charpentier Berkeley Crispr Cast Reporter Niko Researcher
Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

Healthcare Triage Podcast

09:05 min | 3 weeks ago

Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

"Let's start with. Sharon who has not been here before we usually like to struck these podcasts by talking to our guests about specifically what they do and how did they get their sort of talking to the public about how does one become professor of medicine or a division director of nephrology or interested in the research that you do. So I started in research when I was in a froggy fellow at the University of Chicago. I was motivated to be honest by a patient on dialysis who kept having bleeding into their shoulder joint that I had to actually remove the blood for her to be able to use her arm on a weekly basis, and this was due to a rare disease that patients on dialysis get that deposits in the bone called amyloidosis. So that made me start doing research on bone learning about bone I worked in someone's. Lab and then when I came to. INDIANA. University in thousand hundred two I came really because of the strength of the Bone Research Group at Indiana University? Not Necessarily in the nephrology division from there I have held a lot of different administrative positions. I am kind of an organizer and get things done type person. So it comes pretty naturally to be able to put all that together. I could say I've been truly doing. Translational, research since my fellowship, as I hadn't during my fellowship, a clinical research paper and a basic science lab paper published in one year. So sometimes I feel like the word translational isn't really new and novel, but I'm happy that people are finally understanding that when you do something in the lab, you ought to be thinking about who the patient is. That would benefit from this at least some point in their life. So can I get you talk a little bit more about that like what do you? What do you think translational research is because I'd agree with you it it does seem like one of those things that people are treating soften is it's a new thing but it is it. So how what does it mean to you? So it should mean that there ought to be a potential and the back of your head. As to where this was going to go at some point in the future I truly believe there is an important area for research just to do research to understand, for example, and identify new and novel gene, and what does that gene do on the other hand translational means that you actually go from a patient and you work backwards to try to figure out what makes that patient tick? What makes them have this? Disease, what makes them prone to this disease? Both of those kind of approaches from science perspective are absolutely needed. But the whole emphasis of the he sl is really to actually take discoveries into humans and overtake humans back to bench discovery so that we improve their health to see this as something that doesn't do that. There needs to be a focus or we just sort of doing more no I think the difference between. That and very focused research is that in order to really cover that spectrum, you have to have collaboration you have to actually have other people who can work on different pieces of that Longitudinal plan again from patient back to bencher bench to patient, and so it is hard for someone to do all of those facets and so you have to have this ability or desire to get there and you need to collaborate. And that's really what the chess is all about. It creates an infrastructure that people can go to so that they can understand how to take that part that they're doing in that trajectory and make it happen. Can you give me some hard examples of some of the work for structure talking about? Yeah, I mean this is I. It is absolutely fabulous and I give talks and visit places all around the country and. We are truly one of the best and most advanced CPS I in my book from start to finish, you have an idea you think might actually be a drug down the road. We are working to try to figure out how we can actually benefit people who are not sure if it's going to be good. So connecting them with the right people to understand drug discovery, we then want to know if you're doing. An animal work is that gene that you're studying that protein actually present in humans because there's a lot of discrepancy in animal models of human disease, and so we have a giant bio bank samples that people can gain access to to actually measure the DNA and try to understand the Hamas between an animal and human, and then if you do have something and you have an idea and you want to implement a Clinical Research Study, do you need to know how many patients you have? So we have a connection where the Reagan streep data set to help to feasibilities. Do these people that you think exist really exist? Is there something unique about them that you need to know who the people are that you want to study, and then we have a pool of trained research coordinators and infrastructure setup to actually conduct clinical research and? Then from there, we have an ability to help people learn how to communicate how to publish how to write a grant. Harman's all these other things through our professional education opportunities the whole beauty and the fun of research is that it's never a dull moment. So every day you think you're going to be studying this and something send you to a tangent and you go wait a minute maybe I should be doing that. And that's how you end up needing collaborators and resources and methods and infrastructure to learn how to do it. Otherwise, you lose those tangents and discoveries are errors initially and someone takes a different look at it from a different viewpoint and they turn it into something really positive. So the CY is an effort that involves just more than Indiana University School of Medicine Right? Absolutely. So it's really Notre Dame purdue IU Bloomington. And many other hospital systems as well as the medical student campuses. So it it really integrates everything and it's very fun to actually learn what people are doing at different institutions and to actually get people excited and have a pathway forward to maybe something that isn't at their institution. Bring it back to what the research is that they're doing. So Sarah I'm not gonNA ask for full introduction. I think you may be the. Frequent. Guests on our podcast dates. So if the audience is familiar with anyone, it would be you but I would love to hear a little bit about how you became involved in community and translational research as well as what you see is the distinction between say clinical and translational sciences and community in Translational Sciences my research has always focused on vulnerable populations and health equity related issues and started with geospatial concentrations of poor health outcomes among adolescence and I was doing a project that was enrolling team girls on the West Side of Indianapolis and tracking them, and when we recruited from the clinic for the study just to give you an idea, we were using blackberry pearls. So that dates long ago this was. One hundred percent of the girls we had approached agreed to participate so much so that the I R. B thought perhaps the protocol was coercive because we were offering free cell phone service while we attract their locations and they were wondering if even after our main criticism with this grant to the NIH, which was like this grant isn't possible no never is going to let you track them Things have changed since I started asking those questions in any case my point is, is that when we brought it into the community because we didn't want a clinical sample because it can be quite biased for an adolescent population, those who are seeking healthcare, we were not meeting our enrollment targets and so what I learned after a lot of errors that engagement with the community in this case our target population of teen girls on the West Side we realized they weren't seeing sort of the Ir be approved flyers. replastering everywhere. That, there were all kinds of things that we needed to reconsider and it had nothing to do with the protocol itself. So the science was valid. There wasn't anything that was sort of keeping them necessarily from participating in terms of the incentives or what we're asking them to do. It was that we were not effectively engaging with them and as part of that as well as some I think innovative at least at the time collaboration with a faculty member from Herron. School of. Art and design in Santa Matsu we sort of employed this human center design research approaches sort of our how community engagement in any case because of that sort of experience for me personally as a researcher I learned the value of engagement and really beyond just meeting recruitment targets to getting to something much more meaningful from the participant's perspective, and it's just grown from there. So it has taken a lot of different trajectories for me and my own research relating to data, sharing partnerships to what's. Now Research Sham the patient engagement core to various community engagement in between but I guess where my role now as associate Dean as well as CO director of the CSI, plays in Israeli extending that translational spectrum in with the community and back rights as a bidirectional relationship, and so it's extending those collaborations to stakeholders in the community. My definition of team science and sort of that collaborative space is not restricted to individuals within the academy and really absolutely needs to include community folks at all. Levels of the translational spectrum. So this is not just from like clinical to community in my book it's you know community engagement even within the basic science from.

Indiana University Translational Sciences Bone Research Group Disease Clinical Research Study Indiana University Of Chicago Amyloidosis Sharon Professor Of Medicine Hamas Bloomington Division Director Santa Matsu Reagan Streep Associate Dean Harman Faculty Member Herron
Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:32 min | 3 weeks ago

Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

"Let's start with. Sharon who has not been here before we usually like to struck these podcasts by talking to our guests about specifically what they do and how did they get their sort of talking to the public about how does one become professor of medicine or a division director of nephrology or interested in the research that you do. So I started in research when I was in a froggy fellow at the University of Chicago. I was motivated to be honest by a patient on dialysis who kept having bleeding into their shoulder joint that I had to actually remove the blood for her to be able to use her arm on a weekly basis, and this was due to a rare disease that patients on dialysis get that deposits in the bone called amyloidosis. So that made me start doing research on bone learning about bone I worked in someone's. Lab and then when I came to. INDIANA. University in thousand hundred two I came really because of the strength of the Bone Research Group at Indiana University? Not Necessarily in the nephrology division from there I have held a lot of different administrative positions. I am kind of an organizer and get things done type person. So it comes pretty naturally to be able to put all that together. I could say I've been truly doing. Translational, research since my fellowship, as I hadn't during my fellowship, a clinical research paper and a basic science lab paper published in one year. So sometimes I feel like the word translational isn't really new and novel, but I'm happy that people are finally understanding that when you do something in the lab, you ought to be thinking about who the patient is. That would benefit from this at least some point in their life. So can I get you talk a little bit more about that like what do you? What do you think translational research is because I'd agree with you it it does seem like one of those things that people are treating soften is it's a new thing but it is it. So how what does it mean to you? So it should mean that there ought to be a potential and the back of your head. As to where this was going to go at some point in the future I truly believe there is an important area for research just to do research to understand, for example, and identify new and novel gene, and what does that gene do on the other hand translational means that you actually go from a patient and you work backwards to try to figure out what makes that patient tick? What makes them have this? Disease, what makes them prone to this disease? Both of those kind of approaches from science perspective are absolutely needed. But the whole emphasis of the he sl is really to actually take discoveries into humans and overtake humans back to bench discovery so that we improve their health to see this as something that doesn't do that. There needs to be a focus or we just sort of doing more no I think the difference between. That and very focused research is that in order to really cover that spectrum, you have to have collaboration you have to actually have other people who can work on different pieces of that Longitudinal plan again from patient back to bencher bench to patient, and so it is hard for someone to do all of those facets and so you have to have this ability or desire to get there and you need to collaborate. And that's really what the chess is all about. It creates an infrastructure that people can go to so that they can understand how to take that part that they're doing in that trajectory and make it happen. Can you give me some hard examples of some of the work for structure talking about? Yeah, I mean this is I. It is absolutely fabulous and I give talks and visit places all around the country and. We are truly one of the best and most advanced CPS I in my book from start to finish, you have an idea you think might actually be a drug down the road. We are working to try to figure out how we can actually benefit people who are not sure if it's going to be good. So connecting them with the right people to understand drug discovery, we then want to know if you're doing. An animal work is that gene that you're studying that protein actually present in humans because there's a lot of discrepancy in animal models of human disease, and so we have a giant bio bank samples that people can gain access to to actually measure the DNA and try to understand the Hamas between an animal and human, and then if you do have something and you have an idea and you want to implement a Clinical Research Study, do you need to know how many patients you have? So we have a connection where the Reagan streep data set to help to feasibilities. Do these people that you think exist really exist? Is there something unique about them that you need to know who the people are that you want to study, and then we have a pool of trained research coordinators and infrastructure setup to actually conduct clinical research and? Then from there, we have an ability to help people learn how to communicate how to publish how to write a grant. Harman's all these other things through our professional education opportunities the whole beauty and the fun of research is that it's never a dull moment. So every day you think you're going to be studying this and something send you to a tangent and you go wait a minute maybe I should be doing that. And that's how you end up needing collaborators and resources and methods and infrastructure to learn how to do it. Otherwise, you lose those tangents and discoveries are errors initially and someone takes a different look at it from a different viewpoint and they turn it into something really positive. So the CY is an effort that involves just more than Indiana University School of Medicine Right? Absolutely. So it's really Notre Dame purdue IU Bloomington. And many other hospital systems as well as the medical student campuses. So it it really integrates everything and it's very fun to actually learn what people are doing at different institutions and to actually get people excited and have a pathway forward to maybe something that isn't at their institution. Bring it back to what the research is that they're doing.

Indiana University Bone Research Group Disease Clinical Research Study Amyloidosis University Of Chicago Indiana Bloomington Sharon Professor Of Medicine Hamas Division Director Reagan Streep Harman
Finding Your Authentic Self

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

05:20 min | Last month

Finding Your Authentic Self

"This show is going to be so interesting and I'm hoping that it will open you all up in ways that you haven't. For example, how many days have you felt grateful for your nice home and you're healthy children and your caring husband. But you still feel like a piece of the puzzle is missing you feel like there's a hole somewhere and you think to yourself is this all there is it's because you're Hartfield. For something more if you can relate to that, you're not alone because we couldn't believe how many women share this silence struggle. You're probably thinking you're the only one but listen. Dear Oprah I'm happily married woman and mother of two children. I've been blessed with my health and my financial stability I'm looking for ways to satisfy an unsettling feeling. It's like a void in the center of my soul. Why am I here my spirit keeps telling me there's more to this life. There was something tugging inside something. That's me. You have more to do looking for direction in my life a sense of purpose something that defines who I am want something more just don't know how to get there. I have a good life, good family and good friends. But I still feel like something is missing I have tried to find and fill the void with food money. Sex possessions self groups. Still. Have this feeling that there should be something more. Well I know there are millions of people feel that way men and women it's that undefinable something that Sarah Brenick explorers in her book called something more excavating your authentic. So Sarah of course, is also the author of the bestseller simple abundance which inspired us all to start gratitude journals and to begin to cherish the richness in everyday life, and now Sarah says with something more that joy is our birthright. Now, that's hard for you. All to take in that joy is your birthright, but the path to finding it is seldom clear and never easy. Please welcome back here. have been able to do for women in this country is just amazing. I. Am so proud of you. Out of you and this looks something more is exactly what we needed. Let's talk about why. So many people feel this lack this need for something more. Well something more isn't a million dollars in the bank I think it is. A home and architectural digest fame. Or a love affair with a movie star. And that is what we've bought into in this society is going to be the something more of our life. So something more is that thing that? that. Our soul that that small dread in the middle of the night that undefinable thing that especially when we're so grateful for the things that we have made us feel mildly guilty or downright shameful. We should pray about it and that is what? The miracle is because this desire for something more is divine discontent Oh. Fabulous. The way you described that why was this the hardest book you've ever had to write? Because I had to tell the truth. With, might sound might sound strange. The book that has now out is the fourth version two years I throughout three versions almost three hundred pages. Because I was trying to tell these stories with my mind. And I realized that the soul Longs for communion and connection. And I knew what I wanted to say. I. Did not think I had the courage to say it because I was talking about the three. Secret wounds, our souls, and no one else has talked about that. I thought really do I have to. But these have been things I had been wrestling with my whole life because you say you went into the cavity of your soul in sweated it all on the pages. Yeah. That was the only way I could ride it and the three secret. Wounds self-loathing self loathing self-loathing betrayal. Betrayal in the sense of understanding what betrayal is because we only betray our so can't. Betray ourselves. And finally marital indifference. Nobody. Else's talked about that. Not I wasn't quite sure that I had the courage to and then. Finally I thought this book is going to kill me if I don't write it. So. Let's get down there. You Save died twice in your life already died metaphorically I know that but yes. No Brian the Irish writer says, death comes as much as surprise to us as birth does when I. Say that I died one through my health and then when my marriage of two decades ended and each time months later when I regained consciousness I was a different woman I was a a stronger woman more passionate woman a wiser woman but I was so different from who I had been that it was as if my DNA had changed and when I say my DNA what I mean is my destiny, my nature and my aspirations was complete. Transformation

Sarah Brenick Architectural Digest Self-Loathing Sarah Brian Writer
Sonic Territories Explored With Sixieme Son

Sound in Marketing

05:39 min | Last month

Sonic Territories Explored With Sixieme Son

"Are people taking a chance on this thing that they've been hearing about sound and the importance of sound. During all of this total changing of our lives. Obviously led the branding. Sector to could blow. Some project postponed a we had great project with the Olympics got postponed in will only start picking up in in twenty twenty, one but Yeah. To said that once he would notice suspended so. I feel like people don't relate in the same which brands I think started. You know it's something that was already happening before the Bendon you mentioned it but you know all this brands are thinking way more about devil quote entity way more. I think. They. WanNa. Audiences in a more. Conversational way now on a more conversational level and also create this in Tennessee, I feel like you know like people are looking for transparency on. People tend to not believe advertising in those in those particular moment, they want that truth Ray. So. In our industry tendency that music conveys meaning will complete. DNA. and. But when we work on collide entity, even though it's still influence from our understanding of the brand. We tend to say that the voices mostly the. The personally fixation of the soul of the brain, which is a total different thing I mean. It's there's a lot to hear behind the voice like a obviously a gender tone. Accent. It's we work for different brands through the pandemic any and we told them like diversity is important. It's important that we know. That where you located. We devoted for your people. You know you value your roots and your origins, and that's that's crucial. That's that's important. Because you want people to engage with your brands through voice and if they don't know it, it's robotic. If it's international and that's so generic dated. So neutral, then they won't commit to your. This led to Tony Gender a timbers well, accent. Branding is obviously a language that is universally understood. In this language to make sure that it's pronounced. By the proper person and this person has to belong to the family of the prime. So these were project we worked on the law during the pandemic. And we wrapped up a couple projects as well like in terms of creating different territories. So it's just like things are economies is a Spiga but very, very slowly. So This. Has We. The needs and expectations from the consumers and brands they have to. Find this appropriate in in responsible answer to that. People are looking for more honesty transparency clarity as well. Sonic identity sonic environment that can help you create that engagement on a more emotional level. Of Physical Experience through retail or human interactions. Than need to find this This proper expression, his proper musicality, not only the proper tone of voice. I don't notice that a lot of brand changed the way they were talking about themselves in the rest years I think starbucks did a great job as well doing that. To reconsider your expression. To be once again, unifying, the thing boys could help you do that basically. Through the pandemic, we have to bank finding a new role model. Now, this new vocal figure. We help to Elan company working on stunning territory and creating this soothing reassuring environment. Vulnerable territory it also comes with finding the right voice with proper accents. And we worked on skills as well. Once again, had you created this conversational relationship was was devices. So we are developing more. Skillful vocal assistance. What industries would you say in particular are most interested in sonic branding in twenty twenty and post pandemic and beyond I wouldn't say like any industry has been more interested in sunning branding. Just think that they consider different things way more I think local it's going to be crucial especially because. Eagle nuts as inclined as touching devices. So how can I help you? But you stay away from you you know what I'm saying. So how can you commend? How can you pay? I, can you make interaction transaction in a more? A vocal way. But also in a safeway safe zone. Where we're heading into a touch less. I don't WanNa say touch less, but touch less community and culture through this. Sure. We're going to be much more weary of what we do and what we touch and what we say where we go everything's going to be different and. I feel like southbound and. Experiences is something that the consumer has wanted a better experience up until this point, but marketing and advertising has had their failsafes and people accept what they've done so far. So they haven't really pushed. But now with you know everybody wants an emotional connection, they want people to understand they want brands to you know. I feel like kind of sit with them out like they don't want to sell. They just want people to connect with, and this is the time when they're going to. They're going to start demanding and they kind of already are to get emotional experience and you get that through sound and through audio. So I in my opinion I think that the pandemic is just going to spur forward the voice industry as

Bendon Wanna Starbucks RAY Elan Tennessee
"dna" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"dna" Discussed on Reveal

"So jed match change their policy again this time swinging the pendulum in the opposite direction it completely cut off access to police unless customers specifically opt in overnight law enforcement lost I access to all one million or so genetic profiles on Jed match since then people have started opting back in. CC explains the current status to her class so we only have about one hundred thousand profiles to compare against now which is a huge blow obviously but it doesn't mean that cases are unworkable Kabul. It's just a lot harder after CC's talk. I want to know what police think about all this and are you also in law enforcement. Would you mind chuck. Anderson is a detective give in Oregon. He tells me police need to be careful about how they used Annetta genealogy so they don't lose it once we start using some maybe legal but not necessarily savory techniques to get information in there. I think that's when we're GONNA start having problems. What comes to mind is as an example I'm not really a fan of the submitting the anonymous profiles for that individual site so that would be like crime-scene. DNA is has put up onto ancestry but it's not disclosed that it's law enforcement posted it there. I see that can be done. I I have no idea but I guarantee you. If if it's possible somebody is trying it in fact something like this has been done in the very first case using genetic genealogy to catch a killer the alleged golden state killer investigators created an alias to not reveal themselves as law enforcement then they uploaded applauded crime scene. DNA into genealogy site and found a relative. It's you know a mistake or two away from overzealous agency before they decide that they're not open to law enforcement anyway. One person who'd like to see genetic genealogy taken away from police is a Maryland legislator named Charles said nor we need to combine breaks. Go look at what's going on on Charles believes it's wrong for innocent people to be scrutinized denies by police for no other reason than sharing. DNA found at a crime scene. There's no suspicion of that. Law Enforcement should have about us yet we are now caught in this. DNA Dragnet almost as if we I've turned the whole concept of innocent until proven guilty on his head in fact he's so against it he wouldn't even WanNa let it help his own family family my cousin he shot and killed in in Baltimore and to this day I I don't think the case has been resolved wouldn't wanna find out by going through Jed match and letting the police comb through other people's People's. DNA No no this too much constitutional collateral damage Charles's mistrustful of code the national criminal DNA database because it holds a disproportionate number of minorities DNA and he points to police overreach as why they should not have access to them much more powerful consumer DNA databases when they're looking into my DNA they're looking at my parents. They're looking at my children this past year. He tried to get a bill through the Maryland legislature to ban police searches in these databases but the bill failed without state or federal rules to regulate when police are allowed to access these databases and when they're not it's it's been pretty much a free for all with individual companies having the biggest say as we heard jed match decided to restrict.

Charles Jed Kabul Anderson Maryland Oregon Baltimore Annetta
"dna" Discussed on The Lady Vanishes

The Lady Vanishes

07:37 min | 1 year ago

"dna" Discussed on The Lady Vanishes

"And <hes> it just feels like it shifted into something different so do you feel like when she left. She didn't know whoa that was going to happen you. Did you feel like that happened while she was away or she'd already planned it before. I feel like it happened while she was away. I i feel like she was sort of happy. Go lucky and then she met somebody probably guy and then he led her into for this and she started would be you know rewarding and fun and and then it just sort of spiraled. That's what it feels like. It just spiraled out out of control in recent weeks selling consulted full psychics and they all said marian was did i just i just feel like that to be honest with. You feel that she's in australia somewhere. I don't believe that she's alive and i still would not be surprised if she might seem silly choice itself on that was sean main wilson who's based in stanford south west queensland then there was tracy roy from the gulf coast who uses pen and paper to communicate with the other side. I was with sally when they met up but unlike ham ham and charlemagne tracy sees a different final resting place for marian you feel she came back to australia when she went to the UK <hes> i i'm dying delays side so it was someone else maybe yes sally has now been to seven psychics about him and doesn't rule out seeing mole cool. Why do you want to do this with the socks well. I just you know we've said many times. We wanna leave nice. Turn on tune so by boy. Doing this element of investigation. Just gives us something else to go on. You know like we've had a couple of socks told me that that she's buried under the floorboards. I had to actually say that <hes> but one said she was in birmingham in the UK and she didn't believe that she came back to australia and and later that she saw taking money out of bank account with someone who looked like her but not her <hes> i've had another lady said that she could see her under floorboards could johny name the street but couldn't didn't know exactly location of where she was. That doesn't mean that she's not ashes. It still could be that but yeah look. It's confusing. We have also had many tips about people who could be marrying including one woman they featured recently on TV. Living at a regional new south wales retirement village another spotted online living in victoria and several people have seen as pictures of members of the public. They think look like marion brain additionally. We've had several anonymous tips about women in small towns in new south wales though they don't often give us much to go on one suggested a woman who may be marrying was accustomed fees ago in a pub in town but supplied no images auditable to follow up. We can assure you that every late has been or is in the process of being investigated and confirmed unfinished as not marian all possible as promised noise stein. He's being left on turned. Okay so this on the news room for channel seven at martin place in sydney now. I'm going to send an email to new south wales police. We need to request some god. It's it's on the investigation into marion's disappearance going forward okay so he's what i'm asking. We understand detective constable. Gary sheehan has fallen allied one of two reports relating to the referral of the case to the corner. Can you please let us know if or win either or both of these have been referred to the carter next question. Is we understand addictive inspected glenn brown is visiting sally liden to collect evidence for DNA testing. Can you advise if he's now taking charge of the investigation. Into the disappearance of marion badeah. The knicks point have is we have a number of leads and information which can only be properly investigated bodley's we request a meeting with investigators to hand over evidence contacts and leads and to answer any questions they might have. That's particularly <hes> <hes> important as you know our listeners that <hes> much of the information much of the chicks that we've tried to do. We've continually been told we can't do them. Those requests and checks have to be made by the new south wales police gloss twenty. One particularly strong avenue to check with tillstrom is to discover to whom the number in this personal ad was registered registered in nineteen ninety four. That's the personal ad in korea australia and the number we list the <hes> we point out that we've officially asked till stra tre if they can identify who had that number. It wasn't listed wasn't registered. They've told us they cannot give us any information judah privacy. They'll have to come from police <hes> <hes> now. We're just going to add one more than the end and that is that <hes> the IFP is advised sally. The new south wales police can request a reward for information about marion aww but that application needs to be my by the officer in charge through to what's called the rewards evaluation advisory committee or react within the new south wales police force so we're asking if that's something the new south wales police can do and <hes> look the police have been very good in keeping the lines of communication open through what's been a very very difficult investigation them and of course <hes> might might more problematic by al cossack investigation because so much of this historical commission has had to be tracked down seoul's gone through so <hes> as much as it can be frustrating at times these sees a twenty two year old case and and <hes> we do have a lot of people in the new south wales police who are doing their best to help us. We're grateful for that and we're hoping that that will now more than ever lied to funding finding onces facility so let's send this off and see what we get back. This is brian again in the newsroom police. That was quick because it's pretty much the same response. We've been getting for wall now. <hes> it's daylight of these timber five and i have an email response from ainsley blackstone in the place media team newsouth boss police. It rains hard bron. Thanks for your email investigation. Into the disappearance of marian bader remained under the responsibility of tweed barn police district any information you might have can be provided either through crime stoppers or in person to tweet heads police station investigators. There's two guys have indicated. They will review the material you provide and mike contact if they have questions. We won't be providing any further details about the investigation. At this time on regards i honestly blackston so there you have it. <hes> we are continuing to provide the information we have leads <hes> the names the <hes> questions and <hes> fingers crossed. We're going to start hearing <hes> simmons zoll getting some action on following up on at least some of these really strong late so <hes> your fingers crossed.

south wales sally liden marian bader marion badeah australia south wales retirement village UK sydney knicks birmingham IFP tillstrom victoria Gary sheehan charlemagne tracy tracy roy korea mike carter ainsley blackstone
"dna" Discussed on Slate's Dear Prudence

Slate's Dear Prudence

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"dna" Discussed on Slate's Dear Prudence

"That they're going to be really mad at me and it's just like you cannot be friends with somebody only because you're afraid of what they'll do if you stop doing all this work to make them happy or like you can dan but you'll be very miserable. That's like your like sort of black mailing yourself you know and to convince yourself to stay like if if if you do stopping stopping firms with this person and this person does st tell people they stopped being friends with me because there are bigger or whatever like that sucks and it always sucks to be accused of something that it feels unjust but like you can't control that and that can't be something you focus on when you're assessing whether or not a relationship is toxic to see your welby right frankly. They may do it anyways. Thank and again. It's not like you have to you know you're not even saying i'm at the point where i want to like block them. You're writing like i want to scale back and i think that's super super reasonable and it's entirely possible that if you do scale back they'll realize that they need to do more frio and maybe the french recovers but right now. You're not happy and i think that's the bottom line. Yeah yeah all right. Finally we have the tricky woo yeah. This one's gonna we're gonna have to. I'm still not sure how i feel about this and i'm reading it right now so we'll have to. We'll figure it out in real time <hes> i'm. I've read it before. I mean i'm reading. It aloud right right now. You know what i mean. You got me. The readers very very smart. They pick up putting down. I think <hes> subject overreaching adult add up t- dear prudence. I was adopted at birth with no knowledge about either of my birth parents recently. I'm in my mid forties. I took a dna test undiscovered my biological michael mother's family. It has been an amazing experience. I have new siblings and they are incredible. My biological mother was very kind and shared the name of my biological father they were young and in love but unmarried they gave me up for adoption and did their relationship and both eventually married other people. One of my siblings learned my biological father's address and i wrote a letter to him telling him a bit about my life and including my contact information i also said i understood this might be a surprise and that i would not reach out to him again. If he didn't want to hear from me several months later i learned he had died of alzheimers shortly. After i sent the letter my guess is that his wife read the letter and chose not to respond god from his obituary. We share the same profession look alike and that one of his children lives only ten minutes away from me. Should i reach out. I'm tempted. I i worry it might be breaking my promise. I don't want anything other than to get to know them and to hear more about his life so i do think here that they're this does feel like one of the limited <hes> situations where a dna test does not seem quite like planting a bomb yeah this one. I mean like it. It's it's brought so much joy into your life so that's nice yes. I like the d._n._a. Test book ends this week right right and you came from the perspective of like everybody already knows that i was adopted like that's not going to be a surprise..

alzheimers ten minutes
"dna" Discussed on Slate's Dear Prudence

Slate's Dear Prudence

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"dna" Discussed on Slate's Dear Prudence

"Frank <unk> brisk cheerful conversations about rental agreements and you know totally get if you can't start paying anything until like a year now or whatever it doesn't have to be any particular taylor set of rules that you are used to having these kinds of conversations now <hes>. I don't start to feel like with me forever right. I just think like i think it would be hey good to get her out of that situation but i think it's important to really assess whether you can provide that by yourself and whether she is is able to do that like sh- right now. She's very upset as she should be. Your parents sound horrible but you know will she is. She actually actually feeling able to make that leap. She's very young so some people can't do that and i. I don't know if she can or not. I don't know her. I hope that this works out for both of you because getting her out of there would be great. <hes> and i don't think that this family is going to heal in in anytime soon. I think that this is the kind of thing somewhere years down the line. Your parents might realize we made a mistake. We've lost our children. Maybe we need to reflect or they might just not but right now. I don't you think there's anything you can do that will make this a better situation for you or her besides getting her out of there or getting her to somewhere else. That's the other thing like <hes> right. Do you have other family members. Who are 'cause. I mean based on your age and you said you went away to college. Everything like you're a student presumably presumably like i'm just worried about you. Supporting all of this and i'm worried about like that i don't want you to end up in a situation nations where the environment isn't great for the two of you inter personally either and then that becomes a you know what i mean especially when it's like sort of you don't want it to become a thing where two years down the line you have a huge fight and she's like i reject our parents for you and now you know not that i'm saying she would necessarily do that but again. I don't know her and this is such an emotional situation. So if you guys is have other family members that could also help older family members who are more sort of established in their careers or whatever that might be a good thing. You know that's not to say. It's absolutely something you have to get. I'm just thinking of ways that it could be potentially easier for you to make this transition. You know community unity members also like friends of friends of yours friends of the family. Just i would say you shouldn't try to go this alone. You should ask for help wherever you may be able to to get it because i think people will understand the scenario when you deliver like pretty clearly yeah just again like you feel guilty for what happened blake what happened you went to a party with a haircut. Do you really like you're absolutely all you did yeah like the situation is yeah. It's not like a situation where like your parents were eighty percent in the wrong but you were twenty percent in the wrong and it's important to own your own part. No you showed up with your hair. Someone tried to say eighty something nice to you and your mom argued with them. The aunt is the one who made me think of like what's up with. The rest of your family because aunt was trying to signal to you that she supports you. <unk> expressing yourself the way that you feel comfortable so if the aunt is the one who was like your hair looks nice that's to me if she knows your parents or homophobic sort of availed. I'm a safe person message to give to you right right and so maybe she would be willing to help because i just think what's important here. Is that if your sister gets out of that environment that she have a stable environment to arrive in if at all possible so you know good luck. This is really complicated and i know this is a tough. I wish someone lovely and get a lot of distance from your parents just a lot yeah. They gotta work on themselves and even then you're not obligated gated to like ever speak to them again. In my opinion frank in exactly what if you're abbey.

taylor Frank blake eighty percent twenty percent two years
"dna" Discussed on SAPIENS: A Podcast for Everything Human

SAPIENS: A Podcast for Everything Human

10:44 min | 2 years ago

"dna" Discussed on SAPIENS: A Podcast for Everything Human

"So the saliva or cheek swab sample are usually mixed with some kind of a solution to preserve them after they've been taken away from your body. This is ever bowl, Nick. She's a professor of anthropology at the university of Connecticut, and she's been studying DNA tests like the ones we took for a long time. I called her up a few weeks ago because I was looking for some answers. How do we know anything about DNA and how accurate and honest are these tests? Basically, I wanted to know how they took a sample of cells from my cheek and turn it into a string of super specific percentages in then initially in the laboratory, there's a process of essentially just mixing that saliva sample with a variety of chemicals that will rake down the cell walls and star to allow the different components of the cells to separate income apart. Art and one of those components is DNA. Right? But DNA is so tiny. Yes, it's really, really tiny, not something that we can just look at and see them Allah kills in. So typically there are some kind of a process of making copies of the sections of DNA better of interest in order to be able to analyze it. And then there are variety of different technologies that have been developed that allow us to read if you will, the DNA sequence and not knowing which company used and exactly what the protocols are for each company. I don't know exactly which method they use to assess those. I don't know if maybe you can tell me a little bit more about what kind of data you got back so that I know more specifically what kinds of analyses they ran. Sure. So why kind of got two kinds of information back. I got what they called the Dini kit, which was an excel sheet filled with a bunch of numbers. And then basically I got five percentages so fifty, three percent north and west European thirty, seven percent talion which wasn't surprising. 'cause I'm I generated talian and then six point, five percent, north African two percent, Middle Eastern in point, eight percent Nigerian. Okay. Yes. So to get for them to produce those kinds of percentages, what they're doing is targeting a whole suite of single Witter called single nuclear tied polymorphism or single letter variants throughout your genome throughout all of the DNA in your. Cell. And so they're looking at these places in our DNA where we have different molecules that we represent by the letters AT c. n. g. I recognize those from biology class is at an inside is in g Guangming and tease thiamine. But what exactly are they doing with those letters? What they're doing is looking at a particular point and seeing whether you have in a at that position for example, or say a t. there or another position, whether you have a c. or perhaps you have a g and they're making note of those for presumably hundreds of thousands of those positions in the DNA. With that kind of information there. Then comparing those results from your DNA to a database containing that kind of information for many other people that have been previously studied and looking to see where are their similarities in genetic markers that you have the as TS that you have and similar markers found in the DNA of other individuals in this database, and the the broad assumptions that they're making here is that if you share of significant number of these markers with people from another place in their database, then those are individuals that you are related to that you share those genetic similarities because you've inherited them from a common ancestor at some point in the past. So it really depends on who's in the database. It depends a lot. On who's in the database. That's a really critical piece of this equation. And in particular, one thing to note is that, well, they're framing the results that they give you as telling you about your ancestors where your ancestors lived where they came from what ethnic groups they were affiliated with, what they're actually comparing your DNA to our DNA samples predominantly from other people who are alive today. So they're making an inference from where people lived today that are related to you to claim something about the past. So for instance, let's say I have an actual family member in Italy, which I do, and they maybe did this process with a different company than our material would not be matched against each other because it's my understanding that the, you know, from what you're saying that each company has its own database. Yeah. So each company has its own database. The specific contents of. That database are proprietary. We don't know all of the details about who is included in that database. Companies will tell us usually broad numbers about we have so many thousands of people, thousands of samples in our database. We have samples that represent forty two different geographic regions in the world or fifty six different ethnicities, but very rarely, probably not ever as far as I know do these companies actually provide specific details about how many samples come from a particular place? And if they say that we have samples in our database that represents say, northern Italian, ancestry ethnicity, we don't really know what that means. Does that mean that they've sampled twenty people or have they sampled five thousand? If they've sampled five thousand people do all five thousand people come. From Rome or do all five thousand people come from Florence were? Are they scattered across many different communities in LA, and depending on where those samples come from, it could affect sort of what kinds of comparisons can be made. And it could be then that if they're samples are really concentrated in one portion of that region, when they tell you that you have twenty percents northern Italian, ancestry. What they're really telling you is that in your DNA maybe about twenty percent of your DNA looks very similar to DNA samples that they've collected from this particular place in Italy in the last few years. If your ancestors come from Italy, but came from a different part of Italy, that and that other part wasn't sampled for their database, then the results might not be as accurate. They might misdiagnosed that genetic pattern and think that it comes from somewhere. Else they might not know exactly where the most similar people live today. And then the other complication of course, is that if we're making comparisons with people alive today, we don't necessarily know for sure if the patterns of variation that we see in the world today are exactly the same as those that existed in generations. Past the genetic variance that we see in northern Italy today might have been there five generations ago or five generations ago, maybe individuals with those genetic markers lived in what's now the Czech Republic or lived in France. And so we're the tests are Suming that the patterns we see today are accurate representations of where people lived in the past, but Mike ration- could complicate that, yeah, this does sound really complicated way more complicated than what you got. On the twenty three miutes seond. Kennington. I saw one recently that showed woman visiting all these exotic locales and participating in local culture, dancing with people in the street, sitting in a sauna. And when she was sitting in that sauna, it showed graphic that said, three percent, Scandinavian DNA connects you to the world, it thirty percent that's telling you you're related to people who live in a particular place or identify with particular ethnic group today, but that doesn't necessarily tell us where you're shared ancestors lived in the past or what ethnicity they identified with. I mean, we know that ethnic identities are very, very fluid. They change sometimes identities change within a person's lifetime. Someone may identify with one ethnic group as a child and a may come to identify in a different way as an adult. They may identify in different ways in different contexts that there are some people who may identify with in one way when they're around some peop-. And have affiliations that they identify with in another way when they're around other people as people have moved across time and space, as political and economic situations change are affiliated group affiliations, the groups that we feel like we are members with may change through time as well. And so I as American, my. Grandmother was American. My great grandmother was Russian. You go back another generation or two before that, and people identified as Ukrainian or Hungarian. And so I just within four, five, six generations in my own family, the ethnic identities have shifted even while the DNA markers have stayed the same. And so that linkage of. Is complicated. There are there is overlap there. There are some connections, but it's not. It's not a perfect connection are ethnic identities, don't math exactly onto the DNA markers that we possess on our bodies and vice versa. It's

Italy professor of anthropology university of Connecticut Nick Witter g Guangming LA thiamine Florence Russian Mike ration Rome Czech Republic France three percent thirty percent twenty percent eight percent seven percent
"dna" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"dna" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"To know things about how you're responding to your environment i wanna know what genes are being turned on turned off because let's just say you have one hundred genes you have much more than that but let's say you have one hundred you don't need all one hundred all the time so your body's not going to waste energy expressing on one hundred all the time so maybe right now sitting here talking to me you're just trying to keep your eyes open so you're only using those twenty to do that trying to pretend you're doing great so if i wanted to know what this that this environment of me talking to you was doing i would want to know which genes are turned on and turned off in space that is kind of the goal is is how how're organisms how are living things responding to space and how we do that as looking at what genes are on and what genes are off so to turn a gene honor off you you transcribe transcribe it into ra so that dna makes ra which eventually goes on to make a protein which will do something but it's that aren a that's that's telling the we can look at in see what kind of environment you're in so we know the gene expression changes every time we've done a space of spa space experiment or we'll look at a living thing we see their gene expression changing it's just it does because you're gonna you you need certain things in space certain genes need to be on and off that aren't the same as they would be on earth whether it's due to radiation or microgravity or you're changing your diet all of these things we're really now just trying to understand all this pick it apart so if i have a capability to where i can sequence aren a directly without having to turn it back into cdn a which we do for most of the sequencers on earth and i can do it right there i can gain a lot of insight into how these things are responding in win and it's really important because they change over over time and so to be able to track that and do it would give us just a huge amount of inside that we haven't had so with this experiment that's what we're gonna do is we're going to sequence arnaiz directly and actually have the crew arnaiz a little less stable than dna it's a little more difficult to work with so have the crew go through all the steps of preparing it and sequencing it so i'm trying to think of an example to sort of wrap my brain around this so if you were if you were to swab i guess some of the microbiome and this station say the dna would tell you this is the kind of microbiome what what would it say what would the ordinary ho you about how it's reacting what are you expect that's what it was so dna would tell me who is there yes arna would tell me what genes were being turned on and turned off so tell me what that system as as the whole what they are doing so are they metabolising the surface that they're on are they being able to are they producing are they giving off some kind of you know different different compound or is it just as simple are they just are they just responding so it would tell us the function more what they're doing it gets more towards that functionality and so with ourselves it tells us again are you able are you building up muscle are you tearing down muscle are you those types of things that yeah to really get at what's going on in the whole system aaron is my analogy guy should have asked him for gee because he's a great analogy is good but that's that's it's really it's it's what the dna tells you what capabilities are there are tells you what's actually happening so it's like okay so i'm going to scale it up a bit to to humans and tell me if i'm wrong again so the dna would tell you this is let's just say gary flying in space this is gary he has brown hair and you know brown eyes and he's this tall that's what the dna till the arna is going to tell you he is losing muscle in this area his eyes are changing this way.

"dna" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"dna" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"To know things about how you're responding to your environment i wanna know what genes are being turned on turned off because let's just say you have one hundred genes you have much more than that but let's say you have one hundred you don't need all one hundred all the time so your body's not going to waste energy expressing on one hundred all the time so maybe right now sitting here talking to me you're just trying to keep your eyes open so you're only using those twenty to do that trying to pretend you're doing great so if i wanted to know what this that this environment of me talking to you was doing i would want to know which genes are turned on and turned off in space that is kind of the goal is is how how're organisms how are living things responding to space and how we do that as looking at what genes are on and what genes are off so to turn a gene honor off you you transcribe transcribe it into ra so that dna makes ra which eventually goes on to make a protein which will do something but it's that aren a that's that's telling the we can look at in see what kind of environment you're in so we know the gene expression changes every time we've done a space of spa space experiment or we'll look at a living thing we see their gene expression changing it's just it does because you're gonna you you need certain things in space certain genes need to be on and off that aren't the same as they would be on earth whether it's due to radiation or microgravity or you're changing your diet all of these things we're really now just trying to understand all this pick it apart so if i have a capability to where i can sequence aren a directly without having to turn it back into cdn a which we do for most of the sequencers on earth and i can do it right there i can gain a lot of insight into how these things are responding in win and it's really important because they change over over time and so to be able to track that and do it would give us just a huge amount of inside that we haven't had so with this experiment that's what we're gonna do is we're going to sequence arnaiz directly and actually have the crew arnaiz a little less stable than dna it's a little more difficult to work with so have the crew go through all the steps of preparing it and sequencing it so i'm trying to think of an example to sort of wrap my brain around this so if you were if you were to swab i guess some of the microbiome and this station say the dna would tell you this is the kind of microbiome what what would it say what would the ordinary ho you about how it's reacting what are you expect that's what it was so dna would tell me who is there yes arna would tell me what genes were being turned on and turned off so tell me what that system as as the whole what they are doing so are they metabolising the surface that they're on are they being able to are they producing are they giving off some kind of you know different different compound or is it just as simple are they just are they just responding so it would tell us the function more what they're doing it gets more towards that functionality and so with ourselves it tells us again are you able are you building up muscle are you tearing down muscle are you those types of things that yeah to really get at what's going on in the whole system aaron is my analogy guy should have asked him for gee because he's a great analogy is good but that's that's it's really it's it's what the dna tells you what capabilities are there are tells you what's actually happening so it's like okay so i'm going to scale it up a bit to to humans and tell me if i'm wrong again so the dna would tell you this is let's just say gary flying in space this is gary he has brown hair and you know brown eyes and he's this tall that's what the dna till the arna is going to tell you he is losing muscle in this area his eyes are changing this way.

"dna" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"dna" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Wouldn't well everything the wave of the sequencer works your dna is in a fluid it's in a buffer and there's some some salts some other things that there's the when you turn on the sequencer basically these things start to flow through these these proteins these are actual proteins we call them nanno pores so it's a nato poor sequencer so they're the same type of proteins that your cells have in my souls have that let ions in and out of ourselves it's those same proteins in a membrane and as the dna will move back up as those salts that are in the buffer flow through their current is created as the dna molecule passes through it changes that current it's the change in current that the software then takes and changes it into the gt sequence that we are looking for so with that the fluid and the buffers all of that anytime there's fluid involved you never quite know in microgravity we on the ground we have issues where if accidentally when you're loading your sample a bubble is introduced that bubble is very problematic was that going to be the same in space so it was some very pretty simple fundamental questions in terms of just the operation of such a small device and you know the crew working on on a small scale then back to kind of the fluid ix issues with bubbles things that we just really didn't know until we got it up there one of the things i always go back to with fluids i mean if you just see any video of water in space as one of the coolest things to watch because you think the primary force on earth that controls water is gravity that's what helps it stick to a cup but at the same time you're gonna get a little sweat beads and that's the surface tension surface tension dominates in microgravity and i could see that really really messing with the but i mean so you said you didn't have any problems how much of it was because yet kate rubens who's an expert in this sort of thing dealing with it versus the capability of the machine if you said everything's working perfectly i'm thinking so ladder i think i think it's the latter as well i think that right now we've been so fortunate we've had kate rubens and then pay within so couldn't couldn't couldn't ask for better hands in terms of come from lab i mean that's what these are these are scientists are scientists what they do right so for them it wasn't a foreign thing we have again microgravity isn't a play here but we have had multiple astronauts test this for the last two nimmo expeditions which is the nemo is a stains nasa extreme environment mission operations so it's a florida international university owns this habitat that says on the ocean floor off the coast of key largo aquarius there we go thank you and every nasa ritz and out for a couple of weeks during the summer to send some of their astronauts down the train so last two summers we've had a lot of different astronauts get their hands on it from this so we've actually had far more than just kate and peggy run the sequencer in an extreme environment we just haven't we're working on writing up those papers and they just haven't gotten talked as much about but i think that speaks to the just the device itself and how well it was designed that it really is we're doing something very very complex but the system is pretty simple to use and then i like to think that the process that we've developed to do the sample prep is also pretty simple of course there's we're trying to make it better and even more simple and more automated but it's working and i were really excited to to see where it all goes so what were they identifying in aquarius where they scrubbing like the ocean floor or something so here's the kicker with this so we are still focused on the inside of the habitat but we were what we were doing was we were having the.

"dna" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"dna" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Wouldn't well everything the wave of the sequencer works your dna is in a fluid it's in a buffer and there's some some salts some other things that there's the when you turn on the sequencer basically these things start to flow through these these proteins these are actual proteins we call them nanno pores so it's a nato poor sequencer so they're the same type of proteins that your cells have in my souls have that let ions in and out of ourselves it's those same proteins in a membrane and as the dna will move back up as those salts that are in the buffer flow through their current is created as the dna molecule passes through it changes that current it's the change in current that the software then takes and changes it into the gt sequence that we are looking for so with that the fluid and the buffers all of that anytime there's fluid involved you never quite know in microgravity we on the ground we have issues where if accidentally when you're loading your sample a bubble is introduced that bubble is very problematic was that going to be the same in space so it was some very pretty simple fundamental questions in terms of just the operation of such a small device and you know the crew working on on a small scale then back to kind of the fluid ix issues with bubbles things that we just really didn't know until we got it up there one of the things i always go back to with fluids i mean if you just see any video of water in space as one of the coolest things to watch because you think the primary force on earth that controls water is gravity that's what helps it stick to a cup but at the same time you're gonna get a little sweat beads and that's the surface tension surface tension dominates in microgravity and i could see that really really messing with the but i mean so you said you didn't have any problems how much of it was because yet kate rubens who's an expert in this sort of thing dealing with it versus the capability of the machine if you said everything's working perfectly i'm thinking so ladder i think i think it's the latter as well i think that right now we've been so fortunate we've had kate rubens and then pay within so couldn't couldn't couldn't ask for better hands in terms of come from lab i mean that's what these are these are scientists are scientists what they do right so for them it wasn't a foreign thing we have again microgravity isn't a play here but we have had multiple astronauts test this for the last two nimmo expeditions which is the nemo is a stains nasa extreme environment mission operations so it's a florida international university owns this habitat that says on the ocean floor off the coast of key largo aquarius there we go thank you and every nasa ritz and out for a couple of weeks during the summer to send some of their astronauts down the train so last two summers we've had a lot of different astronauts get their hands on it from this so we've actually had far more than just kate and peggy run the sequencer in an extreme environment we just haven't we're working on writing up those papers and they just haven't gotten talked as much about but i think that speaks to the just the device itself and how well it was designed that it really is we're doing something very very complex but the system is pretty simple to use and then i like to think that the process that we've developed to do the sample prep is also pretty simple of course there's we're trying to make it better and even more simple and more automated but it's working and i were really excited to to see where it all goes so what were they identifying in aquarius where they scrubbing like the ocean floor or something so here's the kicker with this so we are still focused on the inside of the habitat but we were what we were doing was we were having the.

"dna" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"dna" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"The lab on the ground here and for our microbiologists to be able to process them in in provided answer and we do that through dna sequencing so now with jeans and space three we were able to take one of those samples that we would normally return and we were able to actually have the astronaut take some of the cells that had been grown and put them through our many process into the mnay on which is the dna sequencer and actually we were able to get the data down of what was growing on those petri dishes before we even got the petri dish back so that was again that's really something we need to be able to enable you know human exploration beyond beyond i s s so it was for me that was one of the most exciting moments i've ever had in my career was seeing you know sitting there watching the data come down and watching us analyze it and see the id's popup just because it's not a capability we've ever had and so you're you're basically scrubbing the station and putting it into here hey is this is this going to hurt me and then you put it through the dna sequence there and you can find out pretty quickly now i'm good yep and that's really the benefit whether than waiting for a return mission back okay yeah because imagine if you're you're not on i s s and you have a limited supply of antibiotics if you have a wound infection do treat it with antibiotics because maybe it's something we need to worry about or is it you know is an acne causing bacteria let don't waste the antibiotic let's save it because we can't resupply and same thing with the disinfectant white if something's growing up on station which we've seen it do we need a waste all of our disinfectant wipes to clean that up or is it something that we don't need to worry about until later down the road so it's really those types of questions that we get into that i think the sequencer is going to be hugely powerful in helping us address yeah okay yeah i can coexist with this for a while it's not gonna hurt me but then also identifying okay this if i have this particular type of bacteria now you're talking about officiency of pharmaceuticals you're talking about you don't waste don't waste this one because it's not gonna work because the dna sequence are identified it as this therefore you need to use this from different yep wow that's significant yeah and it's it just just you know and this is again this is all very micro specific because that's what i do but those we talked about early on that's really the research is starting to be there on on the human health front you know how our our humans responding to things and and you know measuring changes in the crew members gene expression and things like that that really you know i think so much beyond just microbes but for now the micro part for me is an exciting you're there's those steps right unless there with the micro now but then eventually will be able to identify that's dot sarah wallace yet we'll get there we we sort of addressed it in the beginning but i don't think i circled back to it one of the one of the main things for the min ion is what we call it right whenever you refers testing and onboard the station was to see does this thing work in microgravity right so what were the concerns that it.

"dna" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"dna" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"To the lab on the ground here and for our microbiologists to be able to process them in in provided answer and we do that through dna sequencing so now with jeans and space three we were able to take one of those samples that we would normally return and we were able to actually have the astronaut take some of the cells that had been grown and put them through our many process into the mnay on which is the dna sequencer and actually we were able to get the data down of what was growing on those petri dishes before we even got the petri dish back so that was again that's really something we need to be able to enable you know human exploration beyond beyond i s s so it was for me that was one of the most exciting moments i've ever had in my career was seeing you know sitting there watching the data come down and watching us analyze it and see the id's popup just because it's not a capability we've ever had and so you're you're basically scrubbing the station and putting it into here hey is this is this going to hurt me and then you put it through the dna sequence there and you can find out pretty quickly now i'm good yep and that's really the benefit whether than waiting for a return mission back okay yeah because imagine if you're you're not on i s s and you have a limited supply of antibiotics if you have a wound infection do treat it with antibiotics because maybe it's something we need to worry about or is it you know is an acne causing bacteria let don't waste the antibiotic let's save it because we can't resupply and same thing with the disinfectant white if something's growing up on station which we've seen it do we need a waste all of our disinfectant wipes to clean that up or is it something that we don't need to worry about until later down the road so it's really those types of questions that we get into that i think the sequencer is going to be hugely powerful in helping us address yeah okay yeah i can coexist with this for a while it's not gonna hurt me but then also identifying okay this if i have this particular type of bacteria now you're talking about officiency of pharmaceuticals you're talking about you don't waste don't waste this one because it's not gonna work because the dna sequence are identified it as this therefore you need to use this from different yep wow that's significant yeah and it's it just just you know and this is again this is all very micro specific because that's what i do but those we talked about early on that's really the research is starting to be there on on the human health front you know how our our humans responding to things and and you know measuring changes in the crew members gene expression and things like that that really you know i think so much beyond just microbes but for now the micro part for me is an exciting you're there's those steps right unless there with the micro now but then eventually will be able to identify that's dot sarah wallace yet we'll get there we we sort of addressed it in the beginning but i don't think i circled back to it one of the one of the main things for the min ion is what we call it right whenever you refers testing and onboard the station was to see does this thing work in microgravity right so what were the concerns that it.

"dna" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"dna" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"Not very intensively okay he's he's he's this guy who who has the sends research foundation and they research longevity and specifically the reasons that people get chronic disease or the things that one could do to enhance antiaging and i interviewed him on the show and he and he has like seven different proposed reasons that aging damage occurs and he for free chose seven reasons like every single one has to do with proteins right so mutations right like changes to nuclear dna that contain genetic information or proteins that bind to the dna junk right like cells constantly breaking down proteins and there's this buildup of literally harmful junk protein that accumulates outside of cells like like a amyloid plaque in alzheimer's patients cells secreting proteins that might be mutated or might be harmful that that's basically known as like cellular senescence right or or cells that are cross linked dry extra cellular protein cross links he calls them where cells are held together by special linking proteins i went to many cross links form the tissue loses elasticity in that causes like for example arteriosclerosis in in vessels or fibromyalgia in muscle tissue and so i think is interesting you're talking about proteins and chronic disease and and when i interviewed him like you know every single reason that people get old is basically because of dna damage or some kind of protein damage or build up of junk proteins you're kind of speaking the same language as him.

alzheimer dna damage
"dna" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"dna" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Dare on the uh the evidence that has been purported to show the existence of yeti in this case so they use dna analysis on some of these samples what did they find well so you know the the collected a bunch of samples and actually wore the researchers was working with the production crew of a uk a documentary called yeti or not and you from all that she got a lot of the samples we've been talking about the hair samples the bone the scat things like that and all day the team analyzed twenty four samples nine of those were purported to be from yeti and the rest were were known to belong to various heirs at inhabit the region including the himalayan brown bear that i bet and brown bear in the black bear and the reason they looked at the bears is because of previous study that had been done a couple of years ago which syrup you remember you and i actually talked about on this podcast was trying to do similar thing with the sas watching north america and that it's sort of come up with conclusion that some of these sample seemed to be bear samples in fact some of the samples they analyze were actually putative yeti samples which also indicated though samples were actually bear samples of the team wanted to see how closely bsamples actually resembled bears that the region eddie the early yeti sample one of them us stretch of the dna the thought was may be a polar bear which also is very unlikely earlier bellevue were and actually took the oath a will maybe there's some sort of hybrid or bear block bear or brown bear living in the himalayas which would also be interesting without was sort of inconclusive as well so what they did here was they said well blitzed you know rule out yet he but also let's figure out what's going on with these bears right and so what they did was they looked at the might oaklawn drilled dna samples and this is the dna that lives inside the might of condra of cells or the powerhouses of cells it's a little bit easier to analyse also it's passed down from the mothers only and they do this sort of a a very thorough analysis of the mitochondrial dna of these samples what they found was that of the nine quote unquote yeti samples eight actually turned out to be from.

dna analysis uk north america bellevue oaklawn
"dna" Discussed on True Crime Garage

True Crime Garage

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"dna" Discussed on True Crime Garage

"Sure leads on these do cases initially they weren't going to be jumping through hoops to help out todd so todd matthews he did the detective some detective work himself as much as he could and after he put together a proper presentation which after hearing would leave any one would just a you know one thought it's time to exume the body of the tent girl and conduct dna test right and the grant tests the dna of tank girl with barbarous sister correct it was it took a little over a month but in march of 1998 tent girl was exhumed in her remains were sent to a laboratory in frankfurt kentucky the first thing they were able to conclude was that the tent girl was between the ages of 20 and thirty years old so you know you keep pointing out new technology and you're exactly right captain with our technology now we're saying well we we had the the age wrong it wasn't she wasn't sixteen to nineteen we believe are now to be twenty to thirty years old so older than originally thought and good for todd because he was right with his what he suspected and still possible that rosemary is right that this could be her 24yearold sister after finding that out it was time to see of rosemary was related to the tent girl so they collected dna four comparison it was in april of nineteen ninety eight they got the results back the tests found that rosemary's dna genetically matched that of the tent girl who therefore had to be barbara and hackman taylor wow that's awful yeah and once again and it's so crazy to that the the guy that found her his son in law goes on to attend a fire yeah i don't wanna some two hippie you know but it's almost like maybe her spirit was there.

todd matthews dna test frankfurt rosemary barbara hackman thirty years
"dna" Discussed on The CyberWire

The CyberWire

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"dna" Discussed on The CyberWire

"In substance dna is very similar to digital data because it's discreet because there's only four the basis so it actually is a pretty close analogue to digital data in so you have a lot of control over dna in what she can create it so gives you a lot of control over the types of input you can send to these systems what are some of the bad things that people could potentially do nino exploiting the things that you will have learned i would just say i would just start by saying that dna analysis is getting verbally ubiquitous and so we're seeing dna sequencing being used in all sorts of domains like medicine so genetic testing personalized medicine forensics the new fields of sort of bioengineering gymnich lee modified organisms in so there's a lot of difference assets and things that attackers might be interested in manipulating our stealing or modified so you could imagine someone could use monet's of actor to just steal sensitive sequencing data so this could contain things like i'm intellectual property or just dna sequences from individuals they might also be able to modify in malicious ways say genetic tests so could they you know a few control a system that processes dna data you could use that to manipulate sage unedic testing to make people look like they have genetic seizes they don't actually have or the opposite make a mask known genetic diseases um i think forensics is very interesting because if someone is able to free dna that they know will eventually be sequenced so you could think of it like a crime scene and then that data's than sequenced through some particular workflow and processed they're vulnerable programmes then you could imagine someone uh manipulating forensics systems for example we're going to enter a world in the near future where.

dna analysis genetic testing
"dna" Discussed on The CyberWire

The CyberWire

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"dna" Discussed on The CyberWire

"Two manipulated in particular ways in so for example you might say generate sequences so that when they're sequenced a particular algorithm gets into a weird state or processes it in a particular way so that it would maybe save is pressing data that's larger than it would expect say you can think of like buffer overflow vulnerabilities or um different things like that and and i would also point out that you might ask lakes sir what kind of analysis are you doing too and i think the idea is that the data that comes out of these sequencers it's really quite raw innocent for a useful by itself because which are actually doing its you're taking these long dna molecules say like a full chromosome from a human genome and you actually break it into little tiny pieces which are actually doing our sequencing you know hundreds of millions of really short dean imali cules and then to actually kind of reconstruct larger dna sequences or to ask particular biological questions you're going to do all sorts of analysis and complicated algorithms using these short dna fragments that you've sequenced and one of the things you all discovered in your research was that this software that is used for the dna analysis was lacking some basic security best practices yeah doubt that would definitely be true i think it would be it's helpful to understand your who is writing the software this whole spaces meant changing so much that a lot of utilities that are used by scientists to analyse dna data.

human genome dna analysis buffer overflow dean imali cules
"dna" Discussed on The CyberWire

The CyberWire

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"dna" Discussed on The CyberWire

"To see whether you could actually starting all the way with uh dna molecules end up with uh sequencing fouls that would target say a vulnerability that was discovered in the software so we were really more interested in kind or trying to understand the limitations of both generating artificial dna molecules and the sequencing process and then later on we actually did kind of his security analysis of existing uh dna analysis utilities we have the ability it's called to novo dna synthesis so we have the ability to make completely artificial dna molecules that don't derived from biological sources so in some sense you can think of us as having the ability to rate kind of arbitrary dna sequences the problem is is that both our ability to make dna molecules is somewhat constrained you can't just make any dna sequence there are limitations there as well as the dna sequencing process has lots of noise and randomness that that happens just inherent in how sequencing works in so it's not totally clear up front whether you can actually have enough control over the uh information it's flowing to digital data files to actually create mauer is that was really are research question in terms of creating dna uh from whole cloth uh did you have to deal with the fact that the scanning software was expecting to see certain things yes so at the end of the day which are still getting out of the sequencer is going to look like basically dna sequences but the thing is that these utilities for doing all sorts of analysis on this data in all sorts of complicated algorithms.

dna analysis mauer