35 Burst results for "D._n._a"

Superpowering Teams with Ilkka Paananen

Invest Like the Best

08:07 min | 13 hrs ago

Superpowering Teams with Ilkka Paananen

"I've been so excited to do this with you for two reasons one. I've been spending so much time thinking about in in kobe. Playing video games with myself and my young son. I think a great way to begin. This conversation is with one of my favorite lines of yours. Which is that you want. Said i am the least powerful. Ceo in the world. I love this concept because it'll introduce the idea of culture teams and people that we're going to spend most of our time talking about which may send a little strange for a video game company. But i think it's amazing and critical. So what did you mean by this line. Why did you say that. What does it mean to super cells. Culture i thanks so much for having me better. I think some are behold point. The ball trays that the more decisions that the snake and i make the better in an ideal were like if i five no decisions then but would make me. I guess is far full. Co the whole idea about supercell on what is at the core of our culture is this idea is small and independent themes that equal cells and these independent gained things sacred inside supercell way to think about them think about smaller start ups bidding raider company. That's why we think about them. I'd love to go back before super cell. Because i think your career up until that point helped inform you in how to build supercell with less focus on command and control and more focused on decentralized trust and i think our lessons today will be applicable across creative pursuits and industries. Not just in gaming what were you doing. Prior to founding supercell and what lessons that you learned or were taught by your experience before this business. I need to go back to the year. Two thousand so. I will still a student at helsinki university of technology. I had a business major vote on my actually like in my early of my studies for some reason. My dream job was to become either a management consultant. Thouray investment banker simply. Because because everybody else in my cloth wanted to catch and so deny then at some point in my studies. I was really interested in about entrepreneurship. And i started to think. Well this would be really cool. You know trying to build your own sing with a group of great people. And then i just looked like super lucky. I happened to bump into this group of people who wanted to found a company and it had to big games company on earlier. Especially in my dna cheers. I had to be a massive game. Iran still played a little gains. And then these guys may creating afford to pay any salary on threes and there was nobody else will what's gonna applying to join them although us nevil gains and they needed somebody else to do everything else and i was probably the only applicant assay and then i got the job done. I didn't get any pay funny. Anything is these guys for that. Okay you gotta do all the sales for us than me to give you like a proper titles and the people would actually like to see you. I guess they didn't know what to call me seven. They decided to call me the ceo. And i think. I was twenty two years of age and absolutely no idea what i was doing at never had a proper job except on summer. Jobs are my parents. They probably never had a proper job. Because all i've done. I've been ceo gaming companies. But anyway that's how they're going to start it. I know i had no idea what we were doing. Learnt by ewing an end eventually managed to graduate some there in bethany. and so. that's how we're gonna start in the thousand so set up a games company on funnily enough Ballgames the time if you recall those days assistant feature phones but they're coming to markets mostly from manufacturers like nokia for example of course based here in finland and of course never snow app stores. Nothing like you would need to distribute this job based gangs through. Carriers was very different at that time. But that's how book started. He founded the company almost exactly at the finding the dot com bubble burst onto members financing available so we basically like financed it bites doing work for hire work and then on the side be developed our own. Ip and our own games. I think miller able cut deals with most of the european carriers in big some of the us based carriers and then a massive amount of these jobs based phone scam the market and actually make some money on the company started to grow and back in two thousand four. We sold our company to company each chocolate. Which will say followed. By game industry legend strip wilkinson funded by sequoia on inclined burke in on the joined forces to them and then over time. The company grew to like four hundred people so relatively sizable game. Developers confident. I would call that down. Nba in guessing entrepreneurship and management learned. Lots of lessons. What were the key lessons that you learn positive and negative all combine the time at both digital chocolate and your company that was acquired by digital chocolate. What were the things that it installed in you that you brought with you into super cell and what were some other things that you reacted to a reacted against when the about how supercell would run as a company that they could've kept and what i learned that all domestic. It's all about the people and digital chocolate. I was very lucky to berkeley luck. Such amazing people. I kinda fought at those times that we are going to like had the best strategy the best plans the best processes in place and digital chocolate and mostly because of my doing so sexy quite a sort of a structured and also when it comes to innovation so we had pros almost forever thing if you off me like okay. How digital chocolate. Think about new games development tenure like a slight dick flex sixty slides expense. Exactly things for and they had all kinds of prose essays fall like how do they green like games the almost full we are myself and mike on leadership team over. There had a crystal ball as he kind of knew the best declare. Send a cornerstone. Humorous won't and then they put together like all kinds of control mechanisms to make sure that the company x. develops products and gains the direction. But then all of the years. I realized that there are a lot of negatives above this type of way of thinking. Because isn't the great the best creative people in the world. They don't get the feeling of ownership and oftentimes the reality is but actually the people who are best. What is best for the game for players. Those people are actually people are building the game. It's bill leadership. The people like me. And all the years. I realized our job as leaders. They should enable people to do their work better. We'll try to control the spent so much time carring the best people in the world also digital trump anything about why on earth tried to control them by. Don't do trust them to do the best thing. One of the things that made me fully realize this at some point. I start to look back with. Okay let's look at the heat gains but our company has pulled out early sort of a coma nominate these gangs. One is that may have really amazing people and raised themes it'd behind the games but interestingly the other thing was that most of these gangs some had nothing to do with all of these fantastic pros instead had besides the usual story was just need into anything else for these guys do their sunbury their on during the corner of the office and they were just doing whatever they want to do. And there's some flying under radar so to speak and then the next thing you know. This amazing game comes out. And then i start seeing whoa that. These amazing games may come out because of me or together they come out despite the spiteful things

Helsinki University Of Technol Kobe Strip Wilkinson Ewing Bethany Iran Finland Sequoia Nokia Burke Miller NBA Berkeley United States Mike Coma
Chester County nonprofit takes on new role in feeding the hungry

KYW 24 Hour News

01:06 min | 22 hrs ago

Chester County nonprofit takes on new role in feeding the hungry

"Nonprofit known for serving at risk Children and Families recently launched a program to feed the hungry and in doing so. Went about his Paul Kurtz tells US help save a restaurant on the verge of collapse. Kris Lucas was ready to close down his West Chester restaurant pens table after Governor Wolf ordered another round of dining restrictions in November. Then a group of friends and customers stepped in to help. They donated money to the believe and achieve foundation, which was about to roll out its 1st 100 meal campaign. DNA's Kate McGee says the foundation provided funding to Lucas to cover the cost of the meals and help keep his restaurant afloat. And we're going to do it for five times with Crest on, But he's been more than generous and the meals are delicious. Lucas is no stranger to feeding the hungry but says This is the first time he has ever been in need. I'm not one to take handouts. But if I can work for it, and it helps my people, it got me right through the next five weeks here, which has been tremendous believe and achieve is accepting donations and nominations for additional partners through its website and Facebook page. I'm Paul

Risk Children And Families Kris Lucas Governor Wolf Paul Kurtz Kate Mcgee West Chester Lucas Facebook Paul
EMA emails altered before release in apparent disinformation effort

The CyberWire

06:11 min | 2 d ago

EMA emails altered before release in apparent disinformation effort

"The threat actors who stole covid nineteen vaccine documents appear to have altered them before releasing them online. The european medicines agency says the material stolen. Ama says included internal confidential email correspondence dating from november relating to evaluation processes for covid nineteen vaccines. Some of the correspondence has been manipulated by the perpetrators prior to publication in a way which could undermine trust in vaccines emails about the vaccine development process. Where altered to give the appearance that this process was less credible than it might otherwise have been believed to be and ema standby the effectiveness and credibility of its reviews the corrupted alter data thus appear to have been emails about vaccine development and not data collected in the course of the development or evaluate of vaccines symantec reports another discovery in the salora gate threat actors armaments. Barium raindrop a back door used to drop. cobalt strike. raindrop bears some similarities to teardrop now where earlier identified as having been delivered by the sunburst back door both load cobalt strike beacon but raindrop uses accustomed packer. Cobalt strike raindrop also appears to be used to propagate across networks and may have been used selectively against high interest targets. Various sources are warning against seven vulnerabilities in the widely used. Dns forwarding client for unix based operating systems. Dns mask vulnerable. Systems could be susceptible to dns. Cache poisoning seven. Vulnerabilities are being collectively tracked. As dns spook jas off has a page up. Devoted to dna spook and users of affected systems are advised to apply patches as they become available on friday the us fbi renewed and updated a december warning about an iranian campaign. Enemies of the people intended to exacerbate us domestic mistrust and division by quote threatening the lives of us federal state and private sector officials using direct email and text messaging and quote. The operation also involves menacing dachshund. The bureau's warning says quote the iranian cyber actors have sought to intimidate some of the officials with direct threats including an image of an apparent text communication between the eeo teepee actors and an unidentified individual in the united states purportedly supporting the operation individuals. In the united states' intent on disrupting the peaceful transition of power potentially may be inspired by an act upon these influence efforts to harass harm threaten tack individuals specifically identified and quote enemies of the people represents an extreme form of this tendency and influence operations cyber scoop reports seeing a us intelligence assessment that claims russian and chinese services are using the capitol hill riot as an occasion for propaganda and disinformation. Those two nations styles have been consistent with that on display in past campaigns. Russian disinformation has been negative and disruptive concentrating on producing red meat conspiracy theories about the capitol hill riot. Chinese disinformation has been characteristically positive. That is not positive in the sense of or optimistic but positive in the sense of persuading its international audience of a particular position more accurately two positions. I the united states is a power in decline. And second this is what happens when you tolerate democratic demonstrations you get anarchy which is why in beijing's line. It's a good thing. They cracked down on hong kong at the end of last week. The fbi also issued a private industry notification warning of increased rates of fishing aimed at theft of corporate remote access credentials with a view to furthering privilege escalation. A common gambit is an invitation to log into a bogus. vpn page bleeping. Computer observes that this is the second such alert. The fbi has issued since the onset of the pandemic the fbi sees. This particular warning is calling out a new style of criminal activity quote. Cyber criminals are trying to obtain all employees credentials not just individuals who would likely have more access based on their corporate position. The alert says once they have some initial access even relatively lowly access. It's then the criminals task to work their way into other more sensitive precincts of the organization's network and finally the fbi is investigating whether pennsylvania woman identified as riley. June williams stole a laptop or a hard drive from. us speaker. nancy pelosi's office during the capitol hill. Riots with the intent of selling it to russian intelligence services. The washington post says. The suspect has now turned herself in and been arrested politico which broke the story over the weekend calls. The charges bizarre by which they mean startling not inherently implausible. The fbi says it was tipped off by a source identified only as a former romantic partner of the suspect. The ex-boyfriend as the new york times describes the tipster said that ms williams intended to sell the computer device to a friend in russia. Who then planned to sell. The device to svr vr russia's foreign intelligence service the transfer of the device to the russian middleman seems to have fallen through for unclear reasons if indeed there was any actual plan to do so and ms williams is believed to have retained the laptop in her possession. Investigation is continuing the laptop speaker. Pelosi's staff reported stolen is said to have been used only for presentations. But it's unclear. What if anything. Ms williams may have taken and what if anything hoped to turn over to the espn

European Medicines Agency FBI United States AMA Symantec Ms Williams Beijing Hong Kong Nancy Pelosi Capitol Hill Riley The Washington Post Pennsylvania Williams Russia The New York Times Pelosi Espn
Warning of possible nationwide attacks as D.C. locks down

Lynda Lopez

03:08 min | 6 d ago

Warning of possible nationwide attacks as D.C. locks down

"And law enforcement from Washington to Albany across the country will be on high alert for the next week in the lead up to inauguration Day after the attack on the U. S. Capitol. If FBI has warned of armed attacks and all 50 state capitals, former national Homeland Security adviser Fran Townsend spoke to our WCBS reporter Peter Haskell and says last week's assault on the Capitol is now showing this wasn't some ragtag insurgency. This was likely a well organized and well planned event. It's sort of appeared that way from just the images. But when you find two different packages of pipe bombs, one near the RNC and one near the DNC, you understand implicitly. That there had to be component parts gathered. It had to be someone with knowledge. There was they'll be a signature to that bomb. They'll be fingerprints and DNA's. They had to planet travel with it planted there. Ondo. It suggests sort of a wider, better organized event. The other really troubling thing I think we've learned in the Capitol police is undertaken an investigation as his congress is that there were individuals in the Capitol police Who either participated or aided those who were involved in the insurrection to have been charged. There's been a number almost a dozen have been suspended as part of this investigation. And so I think those are the key facts that we've learned on bears more right that will have to uncover to understand really what's going on. When you talk about the planning and the organization. What does that tell us about the risk going forward? So I think people now will take quite seriously the threat both against the inauguration, and the calls were protests in all 50 state capitals. Um, we've seen the FBI put out a bulletin warning about this threat. I know that the FBI through their joint terrorism task forces and DHS, through their local representatives are working with state and local authorities. Um, to be sure that they're prepared and have whatever intelligence the federal government him. Extremism is new with have Thies force his screaming and social media purees places for years. What do you think it was that unleashed this mob? So, look, I think that the president there's direct responsibility here, you know, often hear the phrase a dog whistle while the president was on Twitter calling for his supporters to come to Washington. For a rally that he would participate in. He incited them when they were there. Told them tow walk up to the kids to go to the capital. And so, look, I think that the president has to bear some responsibility here. For more on the conversation with Fran Townsend on protecting the capital and extremism. Listen to this week's 8 80 in depth podcast. Find it wherever you get your

Fran Townsend U. S. Capitol National Homeland Security Wcbs Peter Haskell Capitol Police FBI Ondo Albany RNC DNC Washington Congress Thies DHS Federal Government Twitter
The (Beauty) Business of Philanthropy with Karissa Bodnar

Fat Mascara

07:25 min | Last week

The (Beauty) Business of Philanthropy with Karissa Bodnar

"Lot of people you know. They write gen generals and they say i wanna be in. You know this part of the business. How do i get there and to be really honest. I don't always know how to respond. Because you know. I know where i am in the business and i know the steps that i took but You know they might say. I wanna be a perfumer. I wanna start my own liner. I wanna be a makeup artist. And i don't always know how to respond How how would you respond to a question like that because for you. You didn't know how to get to where you were but you got there. What was the thing that means you get. There was just focus or asking around. Like how did you get to where you are. Oh it's such a great question just so specifically to being beauty product developer. I took any job. I could get in the beauty industry and ben was always looking at it through the lens of okay. I'm a makeup artist right now. But how would i create a product. Let me learn everything i can about. Let me google got ingredient. Means if i don't have access to expert and really a lot of it is just that passion coming through. And i think when i got hired on xtra. Sonic graduated from college. I got my foot in the door always with an eye. I wasn't directly to impact development. When i started but it was always expressing how much i wanted to be in product development so then when i finally got the chance i was like i am not gonna let this go by and i think just so many of the skills when you're starting out in your career or transferable whether it's product development or marketing and so at the end of the day when you're first starting out a lotta censure making power points on spreadsheets. You're you're doing a lot of a lot of tasks that you can. You can transfer But i would say a showing that initiative in the passion for whatever you want to do so for me. It was product development. I think people will pick up on that and they'll wanna mentor. You okay. that's really great advice. Okay thank you. plus your husband's a product developer. So we have to save his his advice matches up with choruses. I'm gonna ask him later. He jesse my husband. I meant chris's husband or something. Yes yes i. I just think it's interesting because i really do feel sometimes a little bit after somebody writes. I don't know how you feel john. Somebody writes us like why be x. Person i don't really know if i'm giving them the best advice I can just tell them how. I reached my thing but yeah like absorb as much as you can express your interest to anyone who will listen. I wanna be you know here and hopefully you know not everyone is going to care and take you under their wing. Unfortunately that's the reality but somebody will know somebody will hear what you're interested in that i'll tell you this person or that's and showing expressing that interest but i just think it's awesome that you did know that you wanted to do product development and you just kept on finding away you know that. Make up artists to product of outbursts. Such a cool trajectory. We don't always hear that on fat mascara t tell us more. Let's keep going. Let's keep going into your story. Yes well and and i do have to say like i recognize what a gift it was that i knew that when i was so young. And not everybody's past and so what i do want to say is that first of all. I don't have all the answers. Second of all you're never too young and you're never too old to be who you always be so you can always invites You know you can always change your mind and at the end of the day my wife and my driver is philanthropy that i get to do every single day. Our incredible employees in product development. Like i get to do the thing that i have dreamt of doing my entire life so i feel really blessed awesome. It's very inspiring. You're never too young. Says like twenty eight year olds for you when you when you started your company. Well that's that's the funny thing about the term ceo. I'm such a work in progress right i. i'm. I'm absolutely not oh come on to answer. The question pat started. I believe was twenty-five but please it's a person. Thank you so much. Yeah you know. it's funny. I have really long hair out saving. Cut it for over a year. Oh my gosh. Look the pandemic who and i have always had longer hair in one of the things i love to do as locks of love but i was actually just talking to some of our team members about it. I said you know to me when i when i started writing. Cosmetics is really tried to look older because nobody really took me. I like to wear that right Cut my hair shorter to look more mature. And look more like i could fit in manhattan and everything like that but So so now. Having longer hair is like. I'm by thirties. Now and i can have longer hair but you know it was the. I've made plenty of mistakes an absolutely a work in progress. But it's i've had a lot of grace From from people around me throughout this journey can can. I ask you about when you started this company. I mean from the very beginning you know. Social good was sort of baked into the premise. Right yes can you tell us about why that is if and do you think that's a necessity of every business. These days or was that was that unique. That the time that you did it. So i'm not here to say what other people should do for their business. But i can absolutely say that my y. End what has truly been in. The dna of thrive cosmetics from the very beginning is our philanthropy giving back that we do from the very beginning. When i started the business in two thousand fifteen that every time somebody bought a product we would be giving back and now it's grown bigger than i ever dreamed given over one hundred million dollars worth of products. Now it feels it feels so surreal to say it out loud dollars. Isn't that crazy. But honestly it's thanks to our customers. Our community are giving partners and our boys are are giving powered by our community which you know our employees have a say in who we give back to our customers have a say in how we give back and that's why it's when a say do have like vote. How does that work literally are if you want to tell us a charity that you want us to give back to. You can go on five. Cosmetics dot com and we have a giving page where you could nominate a giving partner. And then we do have internal giving committees. You know in the beginning when it was just a couple of us in a room working together and shipping product and everything like that we mer service all same time as worshiping product of everybody went to every single giving events and We're involved directly with every Charity and we want it now that our company has grown from an employee perspective. We wanna make sure that our employees are still involved so people do have the option of one nominating a charity that they want us to give to whether they're an employee a customer or somebody who's never bought from us but they just in our our community and then also we haven't internal Committee where people any employees no matter what department their engine joined the committee.

BEN Jesse Google Chris John PAT Manhattan
Max Levchin's Affirm pops nearly 100% in market debut

BTV Simulcast

04:15 min | Last week

Max Levchin's Affirm pops nearly 100% in market debut

"Hit the market today, almost doubling in its public debut in the latest multi billion dollar tech company start trading significantly higher than its initial offering. Price. Joining me now Max Levchin, the CEO of a firm, so Max, obviously this is a resounding endorsement endorsement of the firm from investors by You also potentially left a lot of money on the table. What is your reaction to the day's events? You know? We know each other for a long time. I think you'll you'll have to agree. When I say I'd like to take the long view. I think it is really, really important to know what this is all about. We're not this is this is not an exit is not on Finish line, and we didn't No. Leave something way started a new labor journey and it's super exciting and the goals were very clear. We wanted to raise at least a billion dollars. We really want to tell our story and we wanted to recruit. Lots of professional and retail investors to join what we think is a almost a revolution in consumer finance. And so all of the girls were accomplished very happy about that. Market will do what it does it'll prices and I just I really hope people evaluate our performance as a stock. In increments of quarters and years, not in one day. Well, and now you are a public company, and you've got to keep up the momentum. I'm sure you were somewhat prepared for this. We saw this happen with Airbnb. We saw this happen with door dash, but, you know Are you at all concerned? This puts additional pressure on the company T O live up to very high expectations. No, I think we've always been very clear and relatively thoughtful. And certainly it's in our DNA to be transparent. What we think we're going to deliver what we think we're gonna build and our job is to tell our story clearly and Yeah. Forecast where we can and guide where would we would we would we take what we can do and be held to that account. It's my first day as a publicly traded CEO, ask me again in a few months what the pressure is like. We most certainly will. Max. You know, I gotta ask you we are in an incredibly volatile, unprecedented political climate. We have the president being impeached for the second time, the first president in history to be impeached. Twice, You know, certainly this impacts sentiment and you are your customers are consumers who many of them are suffering because of a pandemic. They've lost their jobs. What is your outlook on the next year? Given these remarkable circumstances. I couldn't agree with you more. And that's uh, we live in the strangest of times. Certainly in my memory. Um, you know, I think first of all years without saying, but I'll say it anyway. What we witnessed in DC a few days ago is that his grace and as an American and a You know, a relatively late stage in life, American by choice. I take great pride in my citizenship. I Leave in tenets of democracy and rule of law and allow the building blocks this country really important to me, and both as a private, individual and executive founder, So we we saw. I think it was It was, frankly, I get our face for lack of a better term, and I hope to never witnessed that again. And I hope we do better as a society. That said. I think the dream I believed in is this idea when my family came to America is that you could be anything and you could recover from any football And I believe that Our economy will recover and affirm certainly has a major part. To play there where we're excited to to help in the in there in the regrowth of hopefully all the lost jobs and Business. Can you going to use the sales and the customers, But I'm optimistic, but I'm probably semi permanent optimist just by by training and trade.

Max Levchin Airbnb MAX America Football
Fans of "Jeopardy!" say goodbye to Alex Trebek as his final episode airs

WBZ Midday News

00:55 sec | Last week

Fans of "Jeopardy!" say goodbye to Alex Trebek as his final episode airs

"Last night marking the end of an era. It was an especially somber night for fans of jeopardy, and the show's late host Alex Trebek, the longtime host final episode air last night. Trebek died in November after battling pancreatic cancer. CBS is Vladimir Duty a spokes Jeopardy! Executive producer Mike Richards. Who said Alex Trebek spirit will live on in the show. When jeopardy returns next week. Trebek won't be the host. But Richard's tells us his devoted staff and crew will continue on in his honor. The man made being smart, cool. And what a great legacy that is, and we've got to keep it going. Let's go to work. His DNA's in that show in the way we run it in the way we write it in the way we cast it. It's everywhere, and we're not changing it along everybody. Alex Trebek, host of the hit show for Over 36 years filming over 8200 episodes of

Alex Trebek Trebek Mike Richards Pancreatic Cancer Vladimir CBS Richard
Identical twins aren't always genetically identical, new study finds

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:32 sec | Last week

Identical twins aren't always genetically identical, new study finds

"It's new scientific research that may cause people to stop referring to identical twins as identical. Scientists in Iceland have turned up evidence that identical twins are not exactly the same. Genetically study looked at DNA's sequences from 387 pairs of identical twins that is those produced by a single fertilized egg study shows The average set of identical twins have more than five early genetic differences, but about 15% of those twins. Have more genetic differences, in some cases, as many as 100.

Iceland
Identical twins don't share 100% of their DNA

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:25 sec | 2 weeks ago

Identical twins don't share 100% of their DNA

"Called a clone of your sibling, scientists say, you may have a point. New research shows identical twins are not exactly genetically the same. Scientists in Iceland sequence DNA's from 387 pairs of identical twins that allowed them to find early mutations that separate twins. The researchers published in the journal Nature, Genetics. 39 degrees clear We are going down to 30 here

Iceland
Identical twins aren't perfect clones, research shows

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | 2 weeks ago

Identical twins aren't perfect clones, research shows

"You're an identical twin, who's always resisted being called a clone of your sibling, scientists say You have a point. My name is Julius and I'm your twin brother. Now, Obviously, the moment I sat down, I thought I was looking into a mirror. New research shows identical twins are not exactly genetically the same Scientists and Iceland sequence DNA's from 387 pairs of identical twins that allowed them to find early mutations that separate the Twins. The researchers published in the journal Nature

Julius Iceland Twins
Pharmacist allegedly had false belief vaccine would change DNA

This Morning: America's First News with Gordon Deal

00:36 sec | 2 weeks ago

Pharmacist allegedly had false belief vaccine would change DNA

"Police say a former Wisconsin hospital worker who destroyed more than 500 covert vaccine shots was a conspiracy theorist. According to prosecutors, the pharmacist Stephen Brandenburg, has admitted he intentionally tried to ruin hundreds of doses of the vaccine because he felt the shots were not safe. Brandenburg was arrested last week. According to investigators, he deliberately removed 57 vials of the most during a vaccine from refrigeration. Those vials contained enough doses to inoculate 500 people. The FBI and Food and Drug Administration are also involved in the

Stephen Brandenburg Wisconsin Brandenburg FBI Food And Drug Administration
Pharmacist allegedly had false belief vaccine would change DNA

America's First News

01:26 min | 2 weeks ago

Pharmacist allegedly had false belief vaccine would change DNA

"Pharmacist, meanwhile, convinced the world was crashing down, told police he tried to ruin hundreds of doses of Corona virus vaccine because he thought the shots would mutate People's DNAs to That, according to court documents released Monday, a detective riding in a probable cause statement that does Stephen Brandenburg is an admitted that conspiracy theorist. He appeared in court Monday. Law enforcement was alerted to this on December 30th by or hospital. Detect this. Other one really discussed this with one of their investigators who Ford them an email from the defendant where He gave a statement that he'd removed these miles from refrigeration. He done so in two occasions is intent on doing so was to render them inert because he'd formed this belief that they were unsafe. But the Arnie Method of creating these medications rendered them unsafe. Mr Brandenburg in order you released on a $10,000 signature bond. While you're subject to the terms and conditions of bail set by this court, you are not to, uh, work or be employed in any health care related function, including serving as a pharmacist. Also not to have any contact with Aurora. Or any of your Aurora co workers. Misinformation around the vaccines has surged online with false claims circulating on everything from ingredients toe possible side effects.

Stephen Brandenburg Mr Brandenburg Ford Aurora
Wisconsin pharmacist tried to destroy COVID-19 vaccine doses because he believed it would mutate people’s DNA

News, Traffic and Weather

00:33 sec | 2 weeks ago

Wisconsin pharmacist tried to destroy COVID-19 vaccine doses because he believed it would mutate people’s DNA

"Pharmacist who admitted to destroying over 500 doses of Corona virus vaccine is free on a $10,000 signature bond. Steven Brandenburg charged with criminal damage and reckless endangerment. Ozaki County, Wisconsin district Attorney Adam Gerald says Brandenburg explain why he did it. He gave a statement that he'd removed These miles from refrigeration. He done so on two occasions is intent on doing so was to render them inert because he'd formed this belief that they were unsafe. Specifically, Brandenburg thought the vaccine could cause mutations in human didna,

Steven Brandenburg Ozaki County Adam Gerald Brandenburg Wisconsin
Wisconsin pharmacist allegedly had false belief vaccine would change DNA

Wisconsin's Afternoon News with John Mercure

00:36 sec | 2 weeks ago

Wisconsin pharmacist allegedly had false belief vaccine would change DNA

"About the motive behind a graft in pharmacist accused of ruining doses. Of Corona virus vaccine. Prosecutors say the pharmacist admitted to trying to destroy hundreds of doses of vaccine by leaving them out on refrigerated because he felt the medicine wasn't safe. The Journal Sentinel says the pharmacist has now been released from jail. However, this after prosecutor indicated he's not positive the vaccine was actually destroyed. Wrapped in police arrested the advocate Aurora health pharmacist last week following an investigation into the 57 spoiled vials of the more they're in a vaccine. He has yet to be formally charged. Eric

The Journal Sentinel Aurora Eric
CEO Michelle Gass Answers the Question: What Is Kohl's Exactly?

Influencers with Andy Serwer

02:07 min | 3 weeks ago

CEO Michelle Gass Answers the Question: What Is Kohl's Exactly?

"Hello everyone and welcome to influencers. I'm Andy serwer and Welcome to our guest Michelle. Guess the CEO of Kohl's Michelle. Nice to see you. Good to see you Mandy. So Your Head Quarters up in Wisconsin, right? I am Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin. Yeah. So want to talk to you about everything that's going on. First of all, let's let's talk a little bit about cult because everyone knows what Kohl's is one of the largest stores in the United States, but they might not really understand sort of well niches. Maybe not the right word. You're so big but what sort of space you guys still what is Kohl's exactly then Michelle? Yeah. Well to your point. Yeah. Let me let me just talk about calls are coming. Our brand and then talk about the exciting pivot that we're making as as a business. So first of all, as you said I hope everybody knows calls, but we we do Serve American families. Literally Coast to Coast where in forty-nine States. We we serve about 65 million customers one out of every two American house goals actually shop Kohls have a very big loyalty program about 30 million members and a fun stat that we like to share is that 80% of Americans live within 15 miles of a Kohl's and that's within our store Fleet. So we have moved to 1200 stores, but we also have a growing e-commerce business that last year penetrated about 25% of our business obviously in this time. It's penetrating a lot more but it has been a terrific growth engine for the company, you know historically and eat your question. Well, first of all, I would say from the very beginning and the heritage of the company. We've been all about Ice so we serve families diverse families and we're all about meeting their needs and we have a great purpose statement. We're very much a purpose-driven company and our purpose is to inspire and Empower families to lead more fulfilled lives. And that's true to the DNA. And so we sell lots of categories to accomplish

Kohl Michelle Andy Serwer Wisconsin Menomonee Falls Mandy Kohls United States
Rapid DNA tests expected to help Houston police with rising murder investigations

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:41 sec | 3 weeks ago

Rapid DNA tests expected to help Houston police with rising murder investigations

"To help. Fight the increase in violent crime news. Eight sevens of vasquez tells us more about how it works. And how the city plans to use the new tool the houston forensic. Science center will soon be receiving a device capable of generating forensic results from things like fingernails and hair within a few hours. It currently takes at least twenty four hours to get a dna result while the new rapid dna. Tremaine cut that time down to about six hours or less the device will be used to quickly confirm and compare known. dna samples as well as analyze samples. That come from sizable pieces of evidence. Such as a pool of blood. The city has seen a sharp increase in violent crime this year in houston police department says this instrument can help identify potential suspects much faster. Lucille oscars in houston. The mexican american legal

Vasquez Science Center Houston Tremaine Police Department Lucille Oscars
Applications and Impact of CRISPR/CAS9 in Bioprocessing

Cell Culture Dish Podcast

05:48 min | 3 weeks ago

Applications and Impact of CRISPR/CAS9 in Bioprocessing

"Today. I'm joined by fanling. Wong director of cell line development and protein sciences and zane starkey wolf director of corporate development from wishy biologics. I'm excited to be speaking with both of you. Today about crisper cast nine technology and its possibilities in the discovery and development biopharmaceuticals. We will also conduct a deep dive on its potential impact on bioprocessing and bio manufacturing. Welcome fanling and zane to the podcast. Zinke randy glad to be here. Thank you brandy before we get too far and because of our audience is quite diverse with regards to their experiences in life sciences. Fenland could you please provide some background on. Crisper cast nine as molecular biology. Gene editing tool. Yeah sure so christmas. Nineteen action system is actually adapted from a natural procure arctic defense mechanism to bacteria to simplify. What could spec assistant can do is took leave the face she and i was. It has been incorporated into the bacteria routine on so that to keep the fate from reproducing. Crisper is actually akron stands for clusters servers regularly interspace. Shot had a dramatic repeats and kissed by the most well well-researched variant of the class outcasts nucleus. Which has been used within the gene editing function. So i think the research community have actually adapted this mechanism to revolutionize how we perform the genetic modifications Not only in pro arctic. But or so. You can arctic sales since the system was first published and zane i know from our previous conversations that you were saying that crisper casts has an intriguing origin. Would you be able to elaborate. Yes interesting research can be found on crisper that dates back to the late. Eighty s Other work has been conducted throughout the first decade of the two thousand however it wasn't until two thousand twelve that two pivotal research papers were published in the journal. Science one by jennifer down nov uc berkeley and manual shopping chair of the university of vienna and then another pianist by doctors cross unanimous and sickness at vilnius university. All demonstrating the use of bacterial. Crisper cast nine as simple programmable. Gene editing jewel. But i know that the story doesn't stop there does it no. It certainly does not in less than a year in two thousand thirteen. The labs of dr fung jong and will chong of the burden student. Mit dr george. Church's lab at harvard reported success in adapting. Crisper cast nine for genome editing in your area cells and both mouse and human cells. And i know that we could really spend an entire podcast. Just on the history of crisper so i wanted to stay focused on the technology here. There's been a lot of excitement since discovery about this molecular biology tool. Can you explain why. Sure the remarkable functionality of this tool is that it allows scientists to target specific locations within the genetic code of an organism to cut out or replace a segment of dna due to the high specificity and exactness of utility. The applications have far reaching potential. And it has already become a much to walks game changer. In many fields of life science because it enables efficient cost effective and precision gene. Editing that has a wide utility for development of biological therapeutics including so and gene therapy disease modeling diagnostics agriculture industrial biology and more. And this has me thinking just about alternatives to crisper casts altogether Are there other ways to edit genomes. And if so what makes a crisper cast so much better. Great question brandy many of the other gene editing systems utilize today such as zinc finger. Nicholas's talons the use of mega nick. Liaises or other by all vectors like a. Iv compared with christopher cast nine are in the end very complex and time intensive often requiring many more steps and thus are more costly as well also and this may be greatest benefit. Is that crisper chess. Nine as a low off target affects profile which again makes it an ideal gene. Editing tool justify along with that. I've read many Recent advances using crisper technologies. Could you elaborate a little bit on those. The advances are extensive and continuous. We speak one example includes crisper a crisper i which are techniques to up and down regulate gene expression using dead cast nine dead cast nine removed the nucleus capability of cast nine but still allows for the targeted binding to a double stranded. Dna sequence of interest using the highway. Specific guide are a that is one of the cornerstones of crisper genome editing. I'd like to add that another application. It's a using crisper for hamas directed repel or so called a the are so this technique in simple terms can repel a double stranded. Dna break which is very important for genus ability. But what does the crisper made. Sdr can do is that. It cannot only to repel a break. But or so crew. Eight the break and then replace it with a small mutation or as elijah sequences so this techniques have actually substantially opened ability or researchers to make gino added more quickly and more efficiently

Cell Line Development And Prot Zane Starkey Zinke Randy Arctic Dr Fung Jong Dr George Wong Vilnius University University Of Vienna Zane The Journal Berkeley Jennifer Harvard Nicholas Christopher Chess Hamas Elijah Gino
Suspect in Christmas explosion in Nashville died in blast, investigators say

Mark Mason

01:35 min | 3 weeks ago

Suspect in Christmas explosion in Nashville died in blast, investigators say

"Now, though, I want to go to Matt McClure, NBC News radio national correspondent with more on this Nashville car bomb explosion. Matt. What's the latest looking like? Blues I made there is no immediate threat to Nashville. That is what Metro National Police chief John Drake restated yesterday after Anthony Warner was confirmed as the Christmas morning bomber federal investigators Saturday doing a lot of work to search the Warners home. They also got DNA's from unknown relative. They match that with the human remains found at the scene of the RV explosion. Outside about a TNT facility in downtown Nashville. That is how they were able to confirm that the 63 year old man, Anthony Warner, was the person who was inside that are dirty as it exploded about 6 30 in the morning on Christmas Day. One of the stranger things about this whole thing is, Of course, there was this warning playing out over a loudspeaker a few minutes before this explosion happened prior to that blast. Also playing out over that loudspeaker 1964 Song by Petunia Clark. You might be familiar whether it's called downtown and when you're alone, and life is making you lonely, you can always go downtown, one of the more well known lyrics. They're just kind of a strange thing about 41 businesses in downtown Nashville sustaining damage in this blast. Along with an 18 T facility downtown, and that really caused a lot of havoc for a lot of people's cell phone service, data service and even Internet services, not only around Nashville but around the region, Okay.

Anthony Warner Nashville Matt Mcclure Nbc News Radio National Metro National Police John Drake Petunia Clark Matt
"d._n._a" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"d._n._a" Discussed on TechStuff

"Is key huge any new gordon moore explained that back when he did his paper about cramming more components onto an integrated circuit his point was not just technology was advancing to a point where we could shrink stuff down and fit twice as many components onto a square inch of silicon is we could a year ago. It was also that the manufacturing process was becoming efficient enough and cheap enough where that made sense yeah so same sort of thing here well all right so we've we've determined that dna contains information it because of its very structure it can contain a lot of information in a small volume oh him <hes> and then it wasn't until about nineteen ninety four and i remember the it was the fifties the early fifties when we started to really understand what d._n._a. was and how <unk> how it <hes> formed and help then it structured and everything like that yes in ninety four a man named leonard edelman came up with this idea he's sort of <hes> introduced the idea of using dna to solve math problems and it was essentially this idea of coding dna a as if it were a strip of binary code and so he took this idea any any sort of ran with it he began to formulate an idea about how to how to create an experiment that could show that this would work and it's funny because it's talking about d._n._a. Computer but if you read about the experiment it sounds more like someone in a chemistry lab mixing various chemical compositions together together and then coming up with a a a solution at the end of it and that's it turns out that this is a computational solution not just chemical solution solution. I see what you did there little wordplay there yeah. It's little incredible so he yeah he dissolved to my objections right chris. I have more to say about d._n._a..

gordon moore leonard edelman chris d._n._a.
"d._n._a" Discussed on Marketing Trends

Marketing Trends

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"d._n._a" Discussed on Marketing Trends

"You have competitors coming in and competitors are subsidized to you can't serve unilaterally disarm this arm but all that money in that market in general actually made it hard to figure out what would happen without all that money in the market. What about you know we touch in geography a second ago and thought it so interesting with a lot of these marketplace businesses that you have so much is location asian-based. If you have <hes> is different because your pet is wherever you are so if you're in toronto but your pet is still at home. I guess it doesn't necessarily matter as much but you know you have <unk> a two sided marketplace in whichever city obviously you absolutely do yeah and it's and you have whether it's wagner uber you think the two side marketplace in a city but it's actually not a city it's like a sub part of the city grape and then you want to slice it by time of day because your your pet parents in your walkers maybe walkers wanted kind of happen to be available here your parents there and it's like zip code level so the whole matching and figuring out what to do and how to fix in your acquisition channels don't work working code level. Even if you don't really acquire people in a certain zip code you can try and some of these platforms claim they can but they can't write you fundamentally acquire people to d._n._a. <unk> level is refined as you can get keeping things reasonable and then you need to have other tools to sort of make those adjustments for whether it's time of day or the sub geos. I always thought it was funny. Whenever out talk to like performance marketers are acquisition marketers and they were structured sure d- like in geographical areas and then you have bran which is like. We're doing regional campaigns. This isn't a brand campaign. Eh right and i saw those things are are so funny. It's like but like the district of columbia is within the broader landscape. So if you're running your grandad's people there are going to see it like you know..

toronto columbia d._n._a
"d._n._a" Discussed on The Journal.

The Journal.

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"d._n._a" Discussed on The Journal.

"Ben greenspan and his passion was genealogy. He has loved genealogy. He said since the age of twelve bennett has been interviewed about my grandmother died and later that night when people came to the house to offer their condolences. I was walking around with a piece of paper in a pencil saying essentially tell me about where are you from and where were your parents from and what were your aunts and uncles names and when they died died and when his wife sparked him to start thinking what's my next act. What should i be doing next. He decided that he was really interested in genealogy testing and he started the company in nineteen ninety nine and they started offering the test in two thousand family tree d._n._a. D._n._a. was one of the first companies to make dna testing. Commercially available greenspan took a technology that was mostly used by academics and turn it into a test this kid that everyday people could take it home mail back to the company and find out who they're related to and even where their ancestors came from now twenty years later. It's one of the largest d._n._a. Testing companies with a database of more than a million people. It was that database of customers that the f._b._i. The i attorney who called up greenspan about the rape case wanted to access and the f._b._i. Attorney said look you know you have a d._n._a. D._n._a. database that would allow access to a a wider pool of individuals. Could we somehow have our that.

Ben greenspan attorney bennett rape D._n._a. twenty years
"d._n._a" Discussed on The Atheist Experience

The Atheist Experience

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"d._n._a" Discussed on The Atheist Experience

"Is a blueprint for for a factory holding. It's a blueprint for a cell like a blueprint would-be for effect so if a blueprint is to a factory as a cell as as d. n. A. is to a cell. Is that what you're saying even form inflammation in d._n._a. Instruct how to may for example a minimal crew pain set which is necessary who has a set of replication biological cell right and you need minimal number for example science say that you need at least five hundred sixty proteins and each protein. We weeknights each size that we know so. Can you answer my question. I'm trying to understand you but you just keep talking about other things. Are you saying that a blueprint sprint is to a factory as d._n._a. Is to a cell. How do you know that those two things are equate. I'm curious. Are i'm trying. Explain it to you you have d._n._a. Sequence of the nuclear type that looks like a map is a coke you can see it doesn't matter i will say it is a sequence of duke suitable nuclear tides and this sequence specifies or instruct. The rival saw me sell the sequence to test to be assembled so i would say that displays not instructs. You're saying instructs as if you're assuming that there's a personification there other. There's somebody telling me what to do. I think that what you're describing sounds to me like it just displays what's <unk> happening and then if it doesn't work then something's missing and that just sounds like physics ultimately. It's a chemical right but i i you have us so. Do you understand what i'm saying. Do you understand why i'm confused. Why i'm not following what you're saying you're okay. I'm trying to you understand why i'm not following. I'm asking you if you understand understand me. Okay go ahead. Try to explain why. I'm asking you if you understand me if you if you're not trying to understand me so so this is how a conversation works. I tried to understand what years trying to say and you try to understand what i'm trying to say and then we see what happens but if you're not trying to listen to me i don't know. I don't know why we're talking long. Okay go ahead. I'm already done talking like i talked and then i asked if you understand and you're like okay talk. Explain again what you don't understand. I don't don't understand when you are describing to me how you know that d._n._a. Is is a blueprint what you're telling me is. It sounds like it's a map where you're saying that. It's instructing me on what to do to build a cell where i'm saying it sounds to me like it's a like. It's just displaying. How a cell works are exists or whatever. I don't understand why you're assuming that there's somebody somebody. They're telling me to build a cell. I don't understand you. Do you understand. Why i'm confused. Is my question. I understanding you and i would explain these following a mentor all the time. They're instructing the sequence sequence of d._n._a. Okay we have. Let's suppose imagine i leaving south okay okay. I think so that's i. I leaving sal needs a minimal amount of specified complex sequence stewart in d._n._a. Which instructs drug a minimal set of proteins which acelle functional okay hey. Let's talk about a cell wall for example did you. You know that it's it's possible for there to be a cell without a cell wall. Extremely how is that possible. There can be different types of clays that act act as a as a type of protectant for it or different pours materials and so it's possible to have a minimal a minimal <hes> <hes> biological capability without a cell wall and so it maybe that this magic number that you came up with is much smaller than you think thank god i am saying i am citing the science paper which was raised in two thousand and five and a lot later than five now but michael he he. I'm guessing no it's. It's a secular science paper. It's about what is required commendable south to to maintain the basic living function some living the need living today by itself right so so sounds for replicating leaving fail and you're saying that there had to have been a god to to have made.

d._n._a d. n. A. michael sal stewart
"d._n._a" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

PodcastDetroit.com

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"d._n._a" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

"<music>. I'm sean davis vince out on the expedition with his kids over in europe and <hes> today we have our i guess i'm gonna let him introduce himself. Good friend of mine justin call. Thank you sean for inviting me onto the show man i i appreciate it honored honored that <hes> you feel i would be adequate replacement just about myself <hes> grew up bug blue-collar lower middle class <hes> to great loving parents <hes> a person in long term recovery <hes> have a bachelors in social work master's in social work <hes> certified colin jug counselor and <hes> <hes> certified trauma practitioner <hes> currently work in clinical social work and um ooh yeah when you asked me to be on here and <hes> <hes> you know knowing talking to you and watching summoned the episodes with you and vince <hes> you know and you allowing me to choose a topic <hes> it was easy for me <hes> to want to get in and dive into <hes> the idea of anxiety and <hes> it being the most prevalent mental health disorder and and in the nation <hes> <hes> specially problem and america <hes> many causes and conditions <hes> <hes> you know when it comes down to the human condition and <hes> anxiety is is would but i think maybe the epidemic and hopefully <hes> hopefully something that leads to a greater human evolution in the future. That's also you know i don and identify much with <hes> you know any any titles or degrees mostly just <hes> you know try to identify with being a human human being that is super curious about other human beings and their lives and you know the evolution of society society and and what led us to where we are now and and certainly being a dad <hes> <hes> <hes> you know concerned about <hes> where the condition leads us in the end of the future. You know what i mean yeah. Let's just get right into it. You know i <hes> a lot of uh of i think anxiety comes in more forms now than anything thing i think just by the environment that we're living in today when you have a single parent households or even two parent households to make things <hes> everyone's working everyone's working. There's a lack of time there's more confusion. There's more confusion. Amongst adults right with children children see that <hes> i think children can inherit inherit a lot of stuff and i think you know didn't even go back to the womb for mother who's pregnant is having a lot of anxiety and <hes> the life that she's living chaotic while she's pregnant a lot of that little trance transfer over to the newborn and then you you you still have it in d._n._a..

sean davis vince europe d._n._a
"d._n._a" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"d._n._a" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"You don't need them to do it and many of them are just scans. They're not gonna do anything they're just convincing you to send them to twelve hundred and fifty dollars and it's just another scam the nigerian prince letter and then became an email later was the most absurd thing i've ever seen and i couldn't believe people ever fell for it and then when i started doing this show i actually so i found many many people had fallen for that basic scam and that one's really bizarre i mean it's like something out of tales from narnia or something for every day that you read about like in the grandparents scam or something like that and they tell the person go down the home depot by ten cards and call me back with the gift card number on the back ax. You would say to yourself who do that but unfortunately some people are just. They're basically honest. They don't have it deceptive mind. They think it's very legitimate. These people people are very convincing and if someone hasn't told you up front they feel that way that that it's probably real and when you can send out millions of emails you know years ago. Oh and i talked about the nigerian scam. The agents and training would say to me well. Where did they get all the stamps to send out these ten thousand letters. I said no the stamps are counterfeit. They're not really doesn't cost them to send the letters out so they were limited to how many letters now you can send out millions of emails and you're only looking for one tenth of one percent of respondents then unfortunately there will always be someone who does you know. How do you protect your phone from being hacked these days. Is that much you can do. One of the big scams going on now. Is you know we put out so much information about us on social media that these people call the phone company. They say they're you. They ask them all the security questions. What's your mother's maiden name. What your social security number all these questions that you have the answers to the mall and then you basically say you know my sim card is broken in myself and they said well. We'll send then you news and they seem card. You put it in your phone and now i have everything that was in your phone. Though you know years ago i worked with a lexus nexus developed. A technology called dollar baseball then occasion but now that doesn't work anymore because we tell everybody everything about it so they know everything about it. Wow frank thank you for stopping in the book is scam me. If you can go to talk to you. Sir gave my pleasure sir. Thank you and years ago. I became obsessed with my scottish heritage. I wanted to discover a story so that i could pass it on to my kids and my grandkids and thanks to ancestry. I did ancestor mr d._n._a. Gives you.

mr d._n._a lexus fifty dollars one percent
"d._n._a" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"d._n._a" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Women reproduced for everyone man on analysis of modern d._n._a. Uncovers a rough rough dating scene after the advent of agriculture. That's how yeah sucks for them right now. How is that the patriarch matriarch because the women got to breed but it was one guy on top. I don't know either. You shouldn't just like the idea of of i'm all about the individual right and sixteen out of seventeen individual men and could not breed and i could not breed. I mean they really couldn't because they had been. They'd had their parts chopped off when they were young. That's there's a lack of freedom for you. Yes having to carry the baby of this up shaker salton or whoever the hells run in the show not exactly freedom me either but hey let's not forget. Freedom historically really hasn't existed but because it's not about of female oppression patriarchy is not about matriarch. It's not about women. Being oppressed are being oppressed. It's about individuals being oppressed by the state apparatus yep. That's that's pretty accurate. That's exactly what you're describing what was going on back then sure they were being oppressed by having that part snapped and that sucks but the women were also being oppressed. It wasn't that men were being compressed. More or women were being oppressed. More of the entire population was being used by its ruler. The cbs is goes on here is gonna love this version of me but the more i dropped into my most authentic self. I wonder how i see a picture here of this person. She looks like she might pinner twentieth so i doubt she's even founder authentic self but whatever the more attracted he was to me and i'm glad to hear that the relationship's going well now that we have not because a header relationship oppressive and now we have a more intimate relationship. I wonder what marcy is going to have to say about that part of the intimacy. I thought that was marcy. That was juliana juliana or whatever anyway sorry. That would be a part of my confusion. Then part of the intimacy entailed telling her husband that she was not straight but had chosen to be with him. This is an inspirational statement. It's bold. It's brave. No it's not it's just somebody we'll be talking because it offers and by the way ladies if you tell your husband that you're also attracted to women. He is going to like that just like this is not going out on a limb. Okay now. Try it in reverse. What's that tell be a man telling your wife that you're also attracted two men that it's probably goes well. It doesn't always go as well it does it does tend to go better than most men would expect but it's still not going to go well all all right. Well mel privilege. I suppose i guess it just makes me wonder what it's like for. These guys that have their wife wander are into the bedroom while they're trying on. Her underpants like that must be a fun conversation. Put start over 'cause i can probably answer the question. Have you ever been trying trying on your wife's underpants and she walks into the room no she. She knew i was wearing them okay. That was a fun conversation itself though but i i like to wear your i'd i'd like to wear underpants your underpants. The underpants fun in quotation marks. There was nothing fun whatsoever thoroughly unpleasant. I would think okay. This is just a thought here. I would think it's uncomfortable. Aria been women's underpants are made for women who are shaped differently especially in that spot that men are so i mean i'm thinking that things will get kind of bound up and squish to the side and more so than men's briefs. Men's briefs are designed for what they do. Wear briefs crazy about this is the most.

founder juliana juliana marcy d._n._a cbs
"d._n._a" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

Mark Bell's Power Project

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"d._n._a" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

"Enjoyment. You know your entertainment just having fun is focusing on the quality of your relationships because your relationships control all that stuff and so i think the biggest influence on our health is our equality ever relationships because i know that and it's really difficult to to to focus and be creative creative. If there's a problem with family member for example was difficult for you to eat good food if everybody around you is he's eaten pizza hut. You know what i'm saying is like eight. I said that when we first met to us in that mood little brother would go there with our little five dollars and crushing so but it's very difficult to do those things if your relationships and your environment or not conducive to you doing those things so i would focus is on high quality relationships. I you know especially the people closest to your friends making sure that you are having some standards and communication there so that they can support with the other things and <hes> so yes. That's what i say man. Yeah we wanna sprinkling of all that stuff but the biggest thing for personally for me is the focus on is good relationships kito carnivore counting calories vertical diet where he thoughts and some of these. There's a lot of different ways to lose weight all all of it just whatever all of his good all of his good all of it. I love the frameworks you know because a lot of us need the frameworks. The thing is i don't want people to make it a religion jin because chances are that diet won't work for you forever. I want people to have the the basic tools to understand their unique metabolic fingerprint. You know being able to have some flexibility flexibility right. I think that within the construct of all those frameworks to be able to personalize things for you because you're a little bit different is super important but <hes> in general the research clearly shows that easing back on the carbohydrates for most people in upping their ratio of proteins and or fat is going to be helpful just from the perspective of what's going on with indifference system. You know if insulin's always getting called in action you're going to have a higher in and his of insulin resistance taking place in the classic sign of bad is carrying more belly fat and then that's gonna lead to increased risk of heart disease and cancer and in the list goes on and on and you know what i'm saying so <hes> but that doesn't mean you can't have carbs right. You know what i'm saying so if especially if you really enjoy donuts you you got like a homer. Simpson is in d._n._a. Kind of thing like that's stupid too just like go full kito and you can't have a donut you know and you're like pissed off because you can't have a doughnut right right and so i love you mentioned marxists in earlier. He's got great message in talking with mark he. He wrote a book on kito but he does it. Do it all the time now. His thing is like making yourself metabolic flexible so that if you do have the donor like your body can bet get back adjusted to burning fat for fuel burning carbs arbs for fuel or burning body fat for fuel because it's flexible to be able to do those jobs but if we're just addicted our bodies are just not addicted by just hardwired fire. Just burn carbs because that's the main fuel source and man is going to be a lot more difficult than so yeah working people. <hes> get your book where can people find out more about u. A. a hearing your own studio recording for my show <hes> tell us about your show about your books and stuff like that awesome man people listening to this podcast. You're awesome walk as far. My show is called the model health show and man. It's crazy to say but it's just like it's it's been the biggest passion outside outside of my family and you know it's been regularly features number one health podcast country which is nuts and i was doing this out of the mid west you know for all those years and so we do masterclasses different subject matters so we're talking about fat loss..

Simpson u. A. d._n._a five dollars
"d._n._a" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

Mark Bell's Power Project

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"d._n._a" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

"Enjoyment. You know your entertainment just having fun is focusing on the quality of your relationships because your relationships control all that stuff and so i think the biggest influence on our health is our equality ever relationships because i know that and it's really difficult to to to focus and be creative creative. If there's a problem with family member for example was difficult for you to eat good food if everybody around you is he's eaten pizza hut. You know what i'm saying is like eight. I said that when we first met to us in that mood little brother would go there with our little five dollars and crushing so but it's very difficult to do those things if your relationships and your environment or not conducive to you doing those things so i would focus is on high quality relationships. I you know especially the people closest to your friends making sure that you are having some standards and communication there so that they can support with the other things and <hes> so yes. That's what i say man. Yeah we wanna sprinkling of all that stuff but the biggest thing for personally for me is the focus on is good relationships kito carnivore counting calories vertical diet where he thoughts and some of these. There's a lot of different ways to lose weight all all of it just whatever all of his good all of his good all of it. I love the frameworks you know because a lot of us need the frameworks. The thing is i don't want people to make it a religion jin because chances are that diet won't work for you forever. I want people to have the the basic tools to understand their unique metabolic fingerprint. You know being able to have some flexibility flexibility right. I think that within the construct of all those frameworks to be able to personalize things for you because you're a little bit different is super important but <hes> in general the research clearly shows that easing back on the carbohydrates for most people in upping their ratio of proteins and or fat is going to be helpful just from the perspective of what's going on with indifference system. You know if insulin's always getting called in action you're going to have a higher in and his of insulin resistance taking place in the classic sign of bad is carrying more belly fat and then that's gonna lead to increased risk of heart disease and cancer and in the list goes on and on and you know what i'm saying so <hes> but that doesn't mean you can't have carbs right. You know what i'm saying so if especially if you really enjoy donuts you you got like a homer. Simpson is in d._n._a. Kind of thing like that's stupid too just like go full kito and you can't have a donut you know and you're like pissed off because you can't have a doughnut right right and so i love you mentioned marxists in earlier. He's got great message in talking with mark he. He wrote a book on kito but he does it. Do it all the time now. His thing is like making yourself metabolic flexible so that if you do have the donor like your body can bet get back just to burning fat for fuel burning carbs arbs for fuel or burning body fat for fuel because it's flexible to be able to do those jobs but if we're just addicted our bodies are just not addicted by just hardwired fire. Just burn carbs because that's the main fuel source and man is going to be a lot more difficult than so yeah working people. <hes> get your book where can people find out more about u. A. a hearing your own studio recording for my show <hes> tell us about your show about your books and stuff like that awesome man people listening to this podcast. You're awesome walk as a farmer. Show is called the model health show and man. It's crazy to say but it's just like it's it's been the biggest passion outside outside of my family and you know it's been regularly features number one health podcast country which is nuts and i was doing this out of the mid west you know for all those years and so we do masterclasses different subject matters so we're talking about fat loss..

Simpson u. A. d._n._a five dollars
"d._n._a" Discussed on Never Seen It

Never Seen It

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"d._n._a" Discussed on Never Seen It

"They give away too much the spoilers more than i actually quite like spoilers to be honest and i do this and maybe i'm the one who ruined the culture but like if i watch a pilot of a show and it's been jabbour all like i can you know like oh for example like i started something pretty recently. The and i was like okay i can't wait a season a figure of this visual and die because her i am going to get drunk and jealous girlfriends. Her name's not living an diane. That's fine. I have no idea refunds are like right like truly like gone. We compete and be like oh. She let me watch the the rest of the show all right all right. <hes> thank you so much for never having seen a star is born. I had so much fun with you. Guys today honestly i. I hope audience thinks it was fun because i just be talking right no country for old man 'cause i fucking love that movie by by the way you know. We're gonna have gas yeah here. We saw it can't right no country for home country for old men. Okay okay <hes> love parody parody <hes> trust me. I know porn pairs career strokes which is also just a straight a porn parody title different right strokes. Oh okay because you know. We don't tell anybody but recently i well. I'm telling you i recently watched <hes> a not. The cosby show and the guy who was playing bill really good with his is really good. I acting it's the cosby porn parody. It's legit the cosby show and the end like vanessa fucks her dad. It's so strange anywhere. It's made recently. This season porn is all el nino. It was <hes> gosh it was. Maybe like five years ago but yet you know so right now. A lot of stuff is like taboo stepson and step mom would be called the cosby porn edge uh-huh uh-huh okay. Let us know where to find you on twitter at raisani <hes> r._e._i. Double and i and on instagram rough fizzle eighty-seven tell anybody i was into snoop when i made it and you know watch a black lady sketch show on h._b._o. I'm very very excited and proud of it it and i i was lucky enough to be invited to be on this historical writing staff so <hes> enjoy it. We worked really hard. Thank you for having me man. I we always enjoy you. I've had a crush on kyle like from since i don't know new york stand up. Maybe like four or five years ago. He's like one of the cleverest. The people i know do parts good kyle not like gonna jump your bones crash. Go like kylie shot. I just made it really awkward. I'm into san in order to find your instagram at dana v._g._a. Chen d._n._a. v._g._a. Chen because there's a member of a boy band name. Dana vons <music> grocery store. Oh way back yeah i. I think that i actually dan avon yvonne. Yeah dan a vegan guy. That's my new food. Blog bonnet's too common a name to be greedy about anyway. Fuck him nah well. He also has a plural von but it's it's like a grocery store but with jeez yeah that's the end go vote on the shame bracket wreck it on instagram only three more stab fuck in princess bride making crazy run. Will it beat the asked. It has to be better not be godfather and we'll see but thank you so much. Thanks for listening everybody the sterling's a podcast network..

cosby kyle Chen d._n._a. instagram twitter Dana vons vanessa kylie dan new york five years
"d._n._a" Discussed on Eating For Free

Eating For Free

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"d._n._a" Discussed on Eating For Free

"Podcast. I and you can course call one at ten each free to leave as a voicemail tips tricks. What have you if you have any info on the voicemail. The likes to believe leap or censor out we of course will do that for you as well just leave the info in their formal edited it so it sounds fantastic and yeah questions infre- dot com for anymore listener letters or if you have any other additional infantry mentioned in this episode we always ask for that. If you're in the industry no some of the industry have looked into the long time we take any submissions <unk> at all <hes> eat mass marianne williamson like we have a record during the debates some sure lots of what happened since then but the stance still holds true and will hold true for eternity eat my my fucking on the fucking astral plane bitch it's on. I have nothing left to say. I can buy three go to one. I said good fucking bye wendy three good. What do i think of i. I don't think of her job. Yeah yeah jaren the one in new york talking post us one more thing joe egan. I just think it's really funny to make us like n._h._c._d. Animation major any major them friends with like called this lion king remake flopped from the beginning 'cause like obvious is gonna be so list like any two d animator artists could tell you that this is is not the approach to take but <hes> i remember one other really fucked up aspect of it is the fact that it's advertising market as a live action remake like it just takes attention away from the fact that it's animated in the fact that there's labor an animation one of the most laborious art form like there is so meticulous in time day so yet another really aspect that they market it as a live action feature so nobody really questions like oh. Where's this thing animated. If it's an animated feature to the answer is sweatshops and outsource studios but are just on a gig or on a contract with disney <hes> and are paid as such in the economy economy like the animators at the studio can't unionized there on a gang <hes>. I'm pretty much at the mercy of disney and really not making any money <hes> <hes> i would love to hear you guys talk <hes> about like the anime industry box that are really good article on anime because does this is another problem with anna man to d._n._a. Nation as well this epidemic of outsourcing though completely onions unionized -able <hes> studios overseas a lot of producers out these days just to find studios that was for the bare minimum because technology the point where they can pretty much do it as well as each other so it's pretty and city <hes> to me also doesn't look good from anchorage like your future that <hes> about things again <hes> you guys are great by.

marianne williamson disney joe egan new york d._n._a
"d._n._a" Discussed on Brains On!

Brains On!

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"d._n._a" Discussed on Brains On!

"All the same so how do they know what kind of cell to be well. The d._n._a. Has instructions one set of instructions is all all about how to be hair. Growing sell another set of instructions about how to be a tongue cell or a toenail cell or whatever we call these different sets of instructions directions genes which leads me to the end of the song once more from the top maestro there once was a body. I made up of cells inside those cells the chromosome strahl. Do they like it. They're where they think it's swell and the chromosomes are made of d._n._a. What's that you say oh just d._n._a. It's actual name is a mouthful to say the oxy. Ribonuclease acid ed very good now. Let's wrap this up their d._n._a. Comes was sections called jeans their instructions for stuff like eyeballs and spleens. They determined traits or so. It seems like whether your eyes are merom rain very well done mark. Thank you thank you so cells have come zones chromosome demand of dna and d._n._a.'s is broken hill seconds call jeans at the mouth will say but i think i got it exactly and it's those genes that determine your traits so when someone says you inherited in your eyes from your dad what they mean is you have his eye jeans and also in my case what you have is a mouth harp on fire the mouth andy harpen stein that set forth for next adventure. Wow what an exit. Where's it that horse come from many ways. I have no idea right so where were we. Oh yeah traits. They come from her jeans and you have a lot of genes around twenty thousand different ones and as mark mentioned they're part of the d._n._a. That's packed in your chromosomes. So here's where things get even more interesting. Your chromosomes genetics stuff dwelling in your cells. Most people have forty six of them half of them so twenty-three come from we're by a logical debt. Thanks bio dad and the other half come from your biological mom. Thanks bio mom so that means. We have chromosomes d._n._a. D._n._a. in jeans from both of our biological parents that we get traits like dick. They've got their moms is he has his dad's ears. She definitely has her dad's nail beds breath but even though all of our genes come from our parents chromosomes. It doesn't mean you have all the same chromosomes that they do. Your parents have two sets of chromosomes just like you but before they pass those onto their child something happens the two sets of chromosomes from the biological mom get tall shuffled around sort of like a deck of cards and then she passes down just one half of those shuffled up chromosomes the same thing happened with their bio vile dad's chromosomes so the kid ends up with one set of chromosomes. That's a mix of their dad's chromosomes and one set of chromosomes. That's a mix of their moms chromosomes uh-huh. That's why we look like our parents but still unique. It's sort of complicated also awesome <music> endre before we on. We're going to take a little break from talking and do some listening instead <music>. It's time for them mystery sound. Are you ready. Yes here it is. What do you think that might be. I think it's a puppy whimpering who very very quick guests excellent guests when we're going to hear it again and get the answer a little bit later in the show right now. We're working on an episode all about space suits you know the super cool and super functional outfits that let astronauts do stuff into cold dark void of space space exactly and that got us thinking what if we could have cool super suits that let us do something right here on earth andrea. What would your super suv you do. Well mine would probably be marine and most suit. Let me become any meridian mall and breathe underwater that would be so cool. Like what marine animal do you have in mind right probably a dolphin.

mark d._n._a. andy harpen
"d._n._a" Discussed on Brains On!

Brains On!

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"d._n._a" Discussed on Brains On!

"You have millions and millions and millions of cells and they make up everything your body and that's how it is going to get it. Oh yeah oh oh yeah mark. You just dropped a lot of knowledge there. Maybe a little too much too quick. Would you explain that again. Oh i would love to molly in fact. I prepared a little song on this very subject ready for the first verse. Oh we're ready there. Once was a body made up of cells inside those cells the chromosomes dwell. Do they like it there. Yes they think it's swell. Sales are these teeny tiny pieces of you and of any living thing we're each made up of trillions of cells but they aren't all the same every cell is specialized to be and do different things you have special hand cells in your hand no cells in your nose brain cells in your brain rain and pastrami and you're you mean stomach cells in your stomach though yeah those two so each cell has something called a nucleus and and in that nucleus chromosomes chromosomes are these collections of string like material. I'll squiggly like spaghetti so you ready for the next i go. Yes yes okay there. Once was a body made up of cells inside those cells the chromosomes dwell. Do they like it. They're uh well. They think it's swell. The chromosomes are made up of d._n._a. What's that you say oh just d._n._a. Its actual name as a mouthful to say him so d._n._a. Stands for get ready. Deoxyribonucleic klay acid go ahead. Try saying deocracy riberio nucleic acid nice but since rows what we can just call it d._n._a. and d._n._a. D._n._a. is amazing. It's a super long chain of molecules containing tons of information in fact it has all the information needed to make your body. It's like the entire recipe for you. Wow that sounds important. It is and that's why it's inside almost every cell in your body but like i mentioned before for your cells aren't.

D._n._a.
"d._n._a" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

11:23 min | 1 year ago

"d._n._a" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

"Metabolism. Everyone uses the same few hundred molecules to thus to do life to basic process of life so yes we have incredible diversity in anatomy and physiology but on if you look at the bio chemical level everyone does d._n._a. Irony pro teams. Everyone uses this crappy catalyst called rival something like proteins. It's there's not that much variety cleverness in the engineering and their special governess for sure but there's not enough variety of righty should say yeah okay so we can generalize. We cannot say life as a general biochemical phenomena. Does this or dad because we just simply don't know it because we only have one life right now the study and i i really got into the whole idea of the lipid. A by lipid membranes is by because they have two leaflets. Let's so tell me what limit is talk about the hydrophobia in hydrophobia and all that stuff goes. It's amazing to me so yeah. Let's really call lipid has a tail go ahead yes lipid molecule and it has to be classified as a lipid has to have a tale ahead and the head is polar which makes mexico hydraulic and tail is non polar which makes it hydrophobic liking water heating water liking. What an hating water so head loves water water pale hates water so now drop it in water. What happens is heads. Get all happy because there's water around so they stick their heads into the war tales. I hate water. So what are they going to do. They're going to snuggle other tales and that's how a membrane is formed details. Do not like to be around water so details fac- charter and heads stick up the problem is if you have pale spacing each other they still have the problem of the fact that there is water at the end of them so they solved that problem by inviting other tales to back them up so imagine two tracks backing up into each other. That box of the tracks are facing each other. Franc's of the tracks are facing outside so the front likes water too front quarter and stare into the water and that makes the membrane inside of the membrane in can hide all this hydrophobic incited and it's an incredibly stable conformation. They really hate to not do that that way. Membranes form spontaneously obviously when you drop lipids into water yeah the other nice thing is they're pretty easy to make them. Just they just happen. They just happened exactly and that's why i'm a big fan of lipids because we know it it can be synthesized a biologically. I'm so there were lipids around even before they were life around and once you have lipid you're going to have by layer membranes and once you have by larry membranes membranes. They like to be spherical. It's not another amazing thing right yeah. It's not healthy for a membrane to be flat. It wants to be spherical basically like a soap bubble. I mean membranes are essentially soap bubbles. So if you make a soap bubble you cannot make a flat open so bubble when you make a sabat end up being sphere whether you want it or not and that's what led by layers delay end up being fierce and then once you have that spear you can put stuff inside and start living yeah so these lipids very naturally. Give us a way to compartmentalize. Are there other ways besides lipids you can make protein compartments and we do we as life do you can make compartments that are amorphous. They're does awesome proteins that are called intrinsically disordered proteins that can undergo face change face changed transition depending on external environment and we actually have them. We have those membrane less arganil's in our side of plasma that creates this kind of islands of different the chemical composition just because they want to like property of those molecules so that's a way to compartmentalize things you can also use completely different kinds of molecules. You could imagine sugars making some sort of a compartment. You could imagine other polymers making some sort of a compartment or you can imagine imagine just rocks making a compartment okay but most life as we know it cells. The membranes of the cells are made of these by layers <music> all life as we know it was a slept putting their by layers on the one hand. It's easy to make on the other hand. They're not completely watertight right like some things can come in and out which is important to being yes and the really good ones they're highly evolved by the bacteria and above evolved life <hes> has pretty watertight membranes to get anything across the membrane unit memory tunnels and that's actually really good because then you have control over what goes across your members thank you control your channels so in some sense the cells like little island bridges across the membrane so they have control over those and there's border patrol just letting some things in an app so you can see how things are beginning to get a bit more complicated yeah. That's one of the problems when you think about the origin of life is a good membrane in will not be very permeable so life had to pretty early figured out how to get stuff across the membrane using membrane channels membrane transporters right right okay so we have compartmentalization <hes>. My impression is in the origin of life community among the aspects of life compartmentalization. Metallization is one of the easiest one to understand how it could have gotten going set right. It's the one that we made a lot of progress on experimentally. It's it's it sounds easy but experimentally these are one of the toughest <hes> project to run because lipids they do form those those light but some one if you want them took actually working with them handling them kind of a pain in the lower box so it's i that's that's all. I've been doing grad school so to me. It's not that incredibly hard because i was trained to do it but in a great scheme of things there are a lot of other experiments are easier but the origin spilled might great prominence in making compartments good and then the other things we mentioned were able to replicate and you need some sort of engine inside you. Are you need some metabolism so that's that's how i think of what life is it has those three aspects of compartmentalization metabolism and replication is that is that fair airman oversimplifying now. That's not fair. That's not the oversimplified fair and what what qualifies exactly metabolism i mean and this is where we get into physics right like life uses fuel. It uses the low entropy energy from its environment one way or another. I'm the worst person to ask about. It's because i think of it from the practical functional point of view to me. Metabolism is taking simple building blocks and making something different than more complex out of it and that ties very strongly to maintaining her stasis basically taking your environment has a certain chemical composition. Your guts have different chemical composition. If you want to life you have to take stuff from your environment and process it so it makes the inside of your so basically clean. Your environment has something that doesn't look like you and you're the reason you have. Metabolism is because that basically means you have machinery to take something that is not you and make it into you and that's the easiest definition of metabolism to me at least is that processing building blocks that don't look like doc and result and making an end result the end result being you in this case. It's asked me to me because this is definitely a field where there's a lot of things had had the character of we know it when we see it metabolism and we're still searching for the precise definitions absolutely and we're kind of again hampered by the fact that we don't have anything to compare with. We only have one. We only know one way of doing metabolism because we only know one life form. If we had few other tunnel cut we could try to generalize more and that one way we have is the story of a._t._p. And things like that we have little batteries basically a little fuel storage services inside ourselves up and they're all made by one company. Everybody who's this a._t._p. So that's kind of hard to generalize monopoly monopoly and the monopoly and is it. I mean as a cosmetologist. I want to ask or as someone who has been involved in debates on the fine tuning of the universe this is it or would it ever be clear that this is simply the best way to do it rather than just some accident of history. That chemistry happened to make use of <hes> it would be clear once we find a completely independent life forms <hes> if we find let's say twenty seven different life from all over the universe and they all use a._d._p. Then there's definitely something about a._d._p. But i don't think there is anything special about a._d._p. I think it just happened to be around and we started using it. Okay that's good so the other special thing. Then is the rep on the reputation side. We dna right dna rene both both involved and then like you said the ripe zome tells the r._n._a. Or actually takes the r._n._a. In and make proteins fairway to say right and this also seems very specific <hes> i know friends of mine who what they do for a living they build little computers and robots out of dna and my i guess was that that was because d._n._a.'s all over the place we know about it from being living beings but but it was explained to me that you know forget about living beings d._n._a. Is a really good information storage mechanism. It's great information. Storage mechanism are but it's definitely not the only one you can imagine in a two part two d._n._a. One is the backbone which would give stability and flexibility and that i think might be one of the more common ways of doing it. If i were to bet how those twenty-seven random life forms all over the universe would look like i would not be surprised for them to have something resembling the backbone of our d._n._a. But then the information is starting to claw basis those for d._n._a. Club aces and these i think are relatively rondo are because you can imagine different kinds of nuclear basis that could easily do the same thing right and there's is this weird thing that therefore different nuclear basis and they appear in groups of three so four times four times four the sixty four ryan says sixty four different possibilities and we use all of them but in kind of a redundant coding scheme rightly the only sort of twenty of the categories that so we actually make use of his handwriting play on twenty one okay stop. Oh yeah there's one that the period of the end of the sentence you need that right okay and so you're not sure or you. You're suspecting that these this choice of four nuclear abassi's could've been very very different. If you're on if you tell me you can run a prophetic radicalization on earth over and over again ten times i would say all of those ten times we would end up with <hes> in information in starch polymer that would have slightly different club aces as many different types of nicole basis that could work <hes> chemically to do..

hydrophobia mexico Metallization ryan d._n._a. one hand
"d._n._a" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"d._n._a" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"H._M._g.. CR inhibitor a Tortoise Staten Statins can produce rhabdomyolosis through two distinct pink mechanisms. One is a direct toxic effect on muscles and the other is the induction of auto antibodies to the enzyme H._M._g.. CR controlling crisper cast nine gene editing a clinical implications of basic research article by Stephen Dowdy from the University of California San Diego Crisper cast nine mediated gene editing has the potential to permanently reverse pathologic Nick D._N._A.. Mutations but a major concern about gene targeted medicines is the possibility of off target effects with the permanence of gene editing comes the overarching problem of terminating cast nine enzymatic activity after it has completed the Therapeutic D._N._A.. Modification so as to avoid potential off target editing as well as on target editing in non-target tissues into this void step the authors of a recent study who used an anti all go nuclear tied approach to regulate crisper cast nine gene editing in human cells in culture. The recent study provides proof of principle of an all go nuclear tied based aced clincher that blocks. It's activity this simple approach has the potential to open the door for the enhancement of the safety of clinical crisper cast nine gene editing applications new guidelines funds for a statistical reporting in the Journal and editorial by David Harrington..

Stephen Dowdy David Harrington Nick D._N._A San Diego Journal University of California
"d._n._a" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

KROQ 106.7FM

10:08 min | 1 year ago

"d._n._a" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

"Kevin being on k rock i can hear your brain those screaming agony as they slowly l._a. alternative rock no here at the show we tackled the biggest issues of life Already killed Valentine's Day. On friday. We started having an argument about flaming hot Cheetos. tell ya i was thinking about this corolla is famous for being able to complain about anything right how jensen is able to find anything wrong with hot cheetos because they are very nearly perfect that's not the problem i love hot cheetos i think they might be the best snack on the rack if you know what i'm okay my problem is and this is very real i don't want anyone that i'm doing this for the radio or anything like that as someone who has o._c._d. one of my bigger issues is that i don't like food on my hands so barbecue stuff like that that i love i love barbecue might be my favorite food but the issue gloves i would love to put on a drug for me i don't enjoy food on my hands i've always wiping after every pretty much after every usage of it flaming hot cheetos is a g._d. nightmare it is a disaster for hands a disaster for fingers it doesn't and not only that your argument was the other day that goes away with washes right that is not true that this is the part the fascinates me because it really does no it doesn't it definitely does not you're saying even after you wash your hands you still have flaming hot sheet a residue on your finger will be a red coloring that stays on your fingers and if you have problematic unical under your fingernails if it can get to that spot they will stay there for a small amount of time also if you were to pick up anything white when you have that on small amounts of do show up on the white for a decent amount of time all you know how it is with jensen everything has to be pure whiter hates it don't bring blackout so we didn't understand whole idea that it wouldn't come off just by washing your hands i don't even get that he's eating some odd tito's now i'm going to join him don't ever tell me that i haven't done something for the show because this is my hands on those right now Disaster. You're rubbing your fingers on these hot Cheetos, only to rush only to rush the process. have a lot in the segment but say that i have a half a bag okay i'm going to be touching them a decent amount and also i put them in plates imagine putting your hand into the bag like an animal On your bear. Imagine putting your hand into the bag and then getting all of it on your way back now. Number one, as you can see now. Yeah. What other food do you know? What other food do you know that leaves hands this, it looks like I painted something for you? All right. Here's what I do. For you. Barely. Right. very intense bring down it is still there i see the residue it is still they're still on my hands so now i'll use this white towel so now imagine a towel at your house i understand paper towels probably smarter but let's go over this just out number one this is insane this looks like a clown wipe their face off there's a lot of cheeto residential so much residue on there now i've wiped my hands i'm not doing zoff just so everyone sees them doing it hard it is still on my fingers right because you haven't washed your hands so i have some water here god i can't prepare guys over the carpet mister wizard water of a hand and now i'm going back to the towel which by the way again more read this this is insane this can't happen look like you're cleaning up crime scene it does and then back to my hands it is still i know it's minimal but it is still there on the top of the finger has kevin continues to snap your entire bagci while you're talking now i have washed my hands in front of you i have wiped my hands in front of you i have left a towel honestly looking like look at this i mean it's it's got a little residue what's her name this is a problematic snack by all hey but you love it i think it's one of the best in the world How do we change this for Andrew in Los Angeles? Good morning. guys morning guys judge i'm asian i h he does with jobs and by the way i have chopsticks next to me and i appreciate because i think he's right i've never done it before but i do think what a dream this would be also i want to throw out with my hands getting near my mouth i think that this is such a problematic thing that i think it leaves a red leaves red marks around your mouth even if that if the what do you call it the if even the small amount of red residue gets around your mouth right yeah it leaves d._n._a. is what i'm saying but now going to try i'm using it right now this looks like a pretty good solution it does You can. Wits to the wall. Clear your lips. Right. Do you have OCD don't but I taught chopstick residue residue on my fingers? It's a message that sticky. Eating the network. It just isn't that these days. Right. don't to get something when something documents what others do you know that makes it look like you murdered your wife Right. East LA? I think he's gonna give you nightmares with what he's calling into say. All right. Good morning. Good morning. What do you have on the hot Cheetos controversy? I have the perfect answer for you. Okay. So you go to these Mexican places anywhere. and the serve you hot cheetos with nacho cheese in the ford that's great that's a great idea doesn't afford break it apart well jeans disintegrate that the hot cheeto but it's still amazing what the kicker is not so if you haven't had hot cheetos nacho cheese you haven't sounds great but that doesn't help you if you're just at home and all you have is a bag of cheetos right no i have to find a mexican store near my house but i'm willing to make the track i see the love you have for the food and that's why you're willing to go through so much but you're gonna have to accept that you're gonna have cheeto dust on your hands it's just go with it's like being a coal miner you can't go down there and work all day not a little similar i just want everyone to know that if you see me like christmas or if you see me like april foolishness and you shake my hand and i leave behind residue on your entire outfit please understand it's hot cheetos and it's because you people aren't willing to transform and bring chopsticks with you when you're ready to snack i would like to add that finally thanks to this segment i now know why my penis penises always are Kevin Bain show on k rock..

Kevin Bain Cheetos jensen Valentine tito d._n._a. LA Los Angeles Andrew
"d._n._a" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"d._n._a" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"And today we're discussing de extinction using technology to bring back long gone species every joined by Paul Hawkins the president. Of, humongous, media and, the, former, tech, editor of the today. Show out of Cambridge. Massachusetts so Paul explained this whole thing about de extinction sure first of all currently impossible however it's it's it's possible soon they think the extinction is the idea. Of grabbing DNA if. They can find it and that's the real challenge they're gonna find DNA from long-dead literally thousands or hundreds or millions of, years old species and get that DNA an into and basically get it. And reconstructed and build a new animal. So d- extinction means taking animal that no longer. Exists in the earth and bringing it back in Jurassic Park is the most famous sort of quasi science Perfect. Example. Of that but that's the idea but that's, distinct from conservation where for example an animal that's just just literally recently become extinct like the northern white, rhinos a famous example and that is? Easier to bring back because the DNA has? Not broken down so those are the two. Big divisions of. This world plus you also have a very close living relative to that where I know that you can, use as sort of a surrogate in this case so that's one thing that's sorry starting or, but. That's exactly right but the the existing rhino is. Terrific. However what you, get, back, when, you, do, take the DNA. Of that recently extinct rhino is you get a brand new exactly exact copy of. That rhino the problem with. The extinction grabbing DNA from these from say dinosaurs is it DNA breaks down and so it's very hard to do it exactly so is this a case like injury park where when. They didn't have all of the DNA they spliced in some from say a frog or something or how do they deal with that if the DNA isn't complete enough that is exactly right and that is where ethics and look there's a there's a big economic question here like look a lot of eco-systems will benefit mightily if some of these animals come back that's great for farmers and other businesses and large income and countries of course but the challenges that you're not doing it exactly just as you said with d._n._a. that's broken down too much what they do is they get cousins if you will like the woolly mammoth versus the the elephant our cousins genetically you grab some of the genetic material from the existing living animals like the like the elephants and graft what they've found of mammoths d._n._a. and you get a cousin but the question is ethically is what did you just produce did you produce something that should be on the earth will well we have unintended consequences it's both exciting and scary follow l. ask your opinion i don't know if you have one but what do you think should we be bringing back dinosaurs and woolly mammoths and such I'll tell you. What none, of us know as much as we, think, we should as as we think we do and I don't think so I, mean just going out personally on a limb I don't think it's, a great, idea to bring back something which was adapted perfectly to an environment that's a hundred million years old what will. Happen to us or to other species if you bring, back something which belonged one hundred million years, ago but, now you know would cause huge disruption so I the answer is no all Hochman and since we're talking about Willie mammoths and dinosaurs being president of humongous media makes a, lot of sense today former tech editor for the today show? Of Cambridge Massachusetts always great to talk with you join us? At, this time tomorrow for. Entrepreneur Friday and still to come McDonald's sees a big. Slowdown of growth in the US while, yum China is in the? Sights of.

Paul Hawkins editor president Cambridge Hochman Jurassic Park US Massachusetts Cambridge Massachusetts McDonald yum China d._n._a. Willie l. one hundred million years hundred million years