35 Burst results for "D._V._D"

Kenny Rogers Estate Sues Longtime Friend Over Farewell Tour DVD

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 3 d ago

Kenny Rogers Estate Sues Longtime Friend Over Farewell Tour DVD

"When the whole world know well, looks like when it Kenny Rogers. Longtime friends didn't know when to fold them. Apparently, he's in hot water now with his estate after Allegedly producing an unauthorized DVD of Kenny's farewell tours is, according to TMZ. Apparently, Rogers has insisted it was to be uses personal use only. And not for commercial release. It's an

Kenny Rogers Kenny Rogers
Taylor Swift Rips Scooter Braun For Selling Her Masters For $300M

Bloomberg Businessweek

04:52 min | Last week

Taylor Swift Rips Scooter Braun For Selling Her Masters For $300M

"Well as I mentioned earlier, I've been dying to this story across the Bloomberg late yesterday about the celebrity talent manager kind of arch nemesis of Taylor Swift. We're talking about Scooter Braun shaking off and selling Swifts master recordings from our first six albums to L. A based investment firm, a Shamrock Capital advisors. So writing about it, as only he can do, noting that Taylor Swift is a bulletproof investment. Their own. Alex Webb Bloomberg opinion European technology media columnist with us on the phone from London, where it's evening, so thank you for agreeing to do with this because I know it's getting late. They're over in the UK, Alex Love love this story. So why is Taylor Swift, a bulletproof investment? But in the bars we can sort of in very broad terms. Um, DVD after its office three categories. There are those that have clearly suffered things like hospitality tourism. There are those that have done really well, you know the likes of zoom and telling health companies and gold, for instance. And then there are those which haven't necessarily been well if it affected possibly by the virus, but equally when Sorry. I'm being like next kind of ours. But equally when life hopefully returns to new, normal, they're not going to see a drop off either. And, frankly, music streaming fits into that category on dumb Taylor. Swift is, of course, one of the most desirable catalog of music right now on, so private ecstasy is nothing up. Yeah, it's really is kind of fascinating. I think the more that we are. Unfortunately, in this lockdown, like we continue to see those companies that are figuring their way through are benefiting as a result of it. On you Do think about right. As you say, Spotify. I mean, is one of those that I mean, we really seen that stock shoot up tremendously, but the subscriber numbers you say you're growing and much the same pace as they did before Cove it But nonetheless, people are thinking about content to put on these platforms. Exactly. And so this fund Shamrock Capital, which actually originally the family investment vehicle from Roy Disney and his heirs, they raised the second Fund this summer to invest in content. That's not just music. That's also film and video games, in fact, But the Lions are certainly the biggest investment so far. We don't know how much it's going to be funded by debt, but they're ponying up 300 million for this tastes with Captain Officer First six albums. And it's also remarkable piece of business for the Carlyle Group and Scooter Braun because they acquired the whole label, but 300 million as well just a year ago. They also have some big smiles and that one day I'm gonna ask you could you say it's bulletproof investment, but my dollar daughters really into Taylor Swift said. There's been a lot of Taylor in our house. On. I like her, too. What's interesting, though, is she has been in a battle with Scooter Braun really kind of ticked off that she has basically lost control of her music. And she has talked about re recording those early albums and then putting them out again. Would that reduce potentially The value of this investment. I think it would. It would certainly lasted only limited upside, I would say, you know, I think in an ideal world she would be helping them promote music because, of course, she will still get a cut. From the publishing royalties on bond there. Unfortunately, she's not willing to play with them on that, because into Braun is still going to be getting some sort of residuals from many further plays as part of his deal with Shamel. Nonetheless, I think as a listener, there is still great loyalty in any music to the original version on D s so while around the edges, it might reduce a little bit of the of the upside. I really don't think it's a death now. Well, I love this story 11 because you write about Taylor, but I also do love this kind of big takeaway that you talk about this third category as you mentioned of companies that have profited. Were modestly for the pandemic, but they're unlikely to see their businesses negatively affected when it's over. It's an interesting way to kind of look at this market environment We just have about 30 seconds left. Yes. And I think that you know, the key point here is the steady, predictable returns. Spotify is quite a good business not possible at the moment, not generating met. Great was sent to shareholders beyond the stock price so that they think the great appeal for private equity. Do you have a favorite Taylor Swift song? But I was too embarrassing to say that I don't know how it happened all that well, But let's shoot for London boy, right? Because that's really where I am. Yeah. I mean, come on, Alex. She date somebody from the UK right for like 50 from where I live. Same. Same. All right, Alex, thanks for sticking around

Taylor Swift Shamrock Capital Advisors Alex Webb Bloomberg Scooter Braun Alex Love Braun Shamrock Capital Taylor Bloomberg Roy Disney Spotify Carlyle Group London Shamel UK Lions Alex
Rep. Cedric Richmond to vacate House seat for spot with Biden administration

The Troubleshooter

00:35 sec | Last week

Rep. Cedric Richmond to vacate House seat for spot with Biden administration

"With forward the thieves, with to his 0 transition Other 16 Canepa noise team, 22. adding and so senior we're transitioning staff Liberty from Mutual a DVD when Insurance company he takes over Company into the White a Connecticut presents House. company. Louisiana I'm representative really interested Cedric in Richmond the science on and is I'm being going Doug, to go tapped by the for way a senior role I Fasten within am going your seat the to Biden go belts. to Trucks Harris calls will administration be prepared for and takeoff. somebody has today a Remove in question New Orleans. How for you. cool If Richmond, is you could this? please Your who first served stay time at as flying? the Biden him campaign and Oh, then co chair, I didn't mean announced I also Listen, he we're is Li Mu, leaving going you to take might calls office. not for Howard of The title anyone has that I them will have and then for you, Will Jamie, be senior advisor what I'm interested to in the is president. this. How much It will be do we assistant know about to the the other president Canavan and oId director and have of public they identified engagement. Jen O'Malley. Which Dillon, cannabinoids Biden's do campaign certain things manager, If you will could serve outline his deputy some of chief that we of have staff, Mork coming right President up. Trump is still not

Canepa Biden Richmond Li Mu Cedric Connecticut Will Jamie Louisiana Doug Harris New Orleans Jen O'malley Howard Canavan Dillon Mork Donald Trump
Marketing in times of crisis with Meagen Eisenberg

The SaaS Revolution Show

05:26 min | 3 weeks ago

Marketing in times of crisis with Meagen Eisenberg

"Welcome to the revolution show. Megan Eisenberg's actor factions welcome Meghan. Thank you. Thank you for having me rates. Have you looked costs for the for the first time we had you speak at a couple of suspects. Now I think being Dublin twice once with Mongo DB A. Trip back trip actions I miss. It may say it would be well, obviously would be next month right ends. Yeah I mean. Everybody's not just not just saying that a lot of the conversations having the moment because I think it's impending at, it would be next month. A, lot of people saying all It's one of the top two events that went missing this year and. We're definitely failing fading that. Make do without the online. Brings. US, up, a line in different. but. Certainly we're trying to bring a lot of that fatty online but us, you call events in that is against the pumps up. Missed the Guinness. That's it. That's a great on on the PODCAST. For those that don't know you, can you tell us a little bit about yourself? WHO's mega noise? Sure. I am CMO trip actions. I've been here almost two years prior to that I was at Mongo DB as their CMO for four years took them public in October, two, thousand seventeen, and just prior to that I was at Docu sign. That you signature company. That's both doing quite well in the markets right now for three and a half years running demand Gen. Your base in the US area with just chatting about Louis. Flyers. S. airy sad to see and the air in the skies have been orange. So yeah, we're hopeful that the firefighters get that out sooner than later. In. The Bay area. So I was born in, Texas? So and lived in Minnesota in Illinois for a brief amount of time. But most my life I've been in California live in Belgium for year as a nanny. For Two kids are I guess and then I lived in Japan in Tokyo for a year during college raising. Up. We. Want a little bit of about. The I guess the Addington, two factions and leading Moxie. During What is being much challenging year. We. Can Certainly, the the travel industry as as many as the events industry You know we we've had a very. Difficult moment. Don't try to find a way You Know Karma through this and. Understand how are you guys done it and the and and I guess. I mean. Tennis. Just a little bit about through factions. What it does a little bit. Why did you join trip actions when you see among a DVD? And you you know you to join trip absolutely better. Yeah. So trip actions is a full travel management system from bookings expense. So you book your travel than we have travel agents that support you while you're on the road, and then we have a product called trump actions, liquid that corporate card for expenses and and managing anything on the road or even at home you know some of our companies are using it to expense office supplies, stuff like that and software I joined. Last year weather reside is one it's a massive market I think One thing when you're looking at companies to join is to look at their size of the market it's a one point, five, trillion dollars just business travel online as one point, five trillion even if we cut that in half with Cova, let's say it only comes back to half the levels in the next year. That's still an eight hundred, billion dollar market, and there's a lot of legacy players in it that haven't really innovated in a long time. They were all born before the iphone they weren't there in legacy technology and infrastructure outdated models. They're dispirit systems They're not designed around the traveler, the user, and they don't usually have very people don't love those solutions typically. So I love going to a player that's very disruptive. That's modern that was born after the IPHONE and designed around on new technology is very similar to to be born after the iphone they went after a very large forty, five, billion dollar database market that was growing to sixty billion and they're taking on a large incumbent which was. Oracle and they were bringing a whole different way of doing it and tractions doing that it's a very, it's one platform. It's just a very different model than what's out there, and so I was excited to join the company and we were growing quite fast. We added a thousand employees last year until we had to hit the brakes with covid and that definitely was a punch in the gut I, think for the entire industry and we've had to make a lot of pivots and moves in order to adjust for this environment. But we know ultimately travel will come back. Businesses are reliant on meeting in person and accelerating deals and so I'm here to help us get through this external. Event with the pandemic and build the right product and support our customers and what they need now, and then

United States Meghan Dublin Megan Eisenberg Oracle Tennis Texas Japan California Moxie Minnesota Louis Tokyo Belgium Cova Illinois
How To Deal With Depression

The Emma Guns Show

05:24 min | Last month

How To Deal With Depression

"Hello, Hi and welcome to another bullet points episode where I posed the question. Feeling. Sad and I don't mean sad as in all you feeling a bit blue I'm talking about sad that seasonal affective disorder. In the throes of seasonal change and given how odd the year has been overall for all of us wherever it is that you're listening to this episode wherever you are in the world I thought it would be worth liking this up because it's just a useful thing to watch out for and perhaps more importantly just check in with yourself to see how you doing and if. You're feeling what I like to call funky right now because a few tweaks could actually help you navigate away from that down blue low feeling. Now, before we go any further, it's obviously very important that I say very clearly that I am not a medical professional and any concerns about your health, your mood, your mental health are best discussed with your doctor GP MD or family physician. and. I'm sure we can relate to feeling different and by different I. Mean we may notice a drop in energy feeling a bit lackluster, less enthusiastic all of those things during the cold months and especially. So when eve morning might start looking at summary and then quickly and you get to mid morning and it's definitely winter CEO kind of in this hopeful period of its today going to be Nice Oh actually, no today is going to be really wet and cold. So during the colder months when the days are shorter and the evenings all longer, it can just be a little bit harder to get motivated to feel. To feel that get up and go that just seems to come naturally in the summer, and if you feel a drastic change in your in your mood, your disposition or enthusiasm in the autumn, then you may very well be suffering from a form of seasonal affective disorder and obviously there will be a spectrum it'll be mild, and then they'll be more severe instances. So in the UK, it's on the website and it just being the National Health Service as the seasonal affective disorder is a type of depression that comes and goes in a seasonal patterns. So it makes sense right? So in the wind down in the summer summer you up. And the varying degrees of that down and that will be unique team. It goes on side is sometimes known as winter depression because the symptoms are more parent and tend to be more severe during the winter. The symptoms often begin in the autumn is the day start to get shorter and they're typically most severe during. December. January and February and that's not only when it's dark but also usually when the temperatures really do drop Now I personally can relate to this and I feel as though. When it comes to winter I, have to really fight the urge to hibernate especially in this this time October. November. December I really have to fight that urge and but then I mean I have this instinct to get on the blankets or stay in bed longer will. It sounds really dove preserved my energy like a hibernating bear I have honestly at times had to catch myself and say you're not a bear. You don't need to preserve unity and you don't need to eat all of that. So just don't do it and every time I get that urge to have a D.. Day. I have to remind myself how great it is to go for a long walk on the Crisp win today or even I mean even this weekend I went up for a really long walk and it was budgeting with rain but I had to test out my new rain jacket. So I made into I, made it into something exciting and I tried on the walk to notice how fresh everything smells like when it rains and you go for a long walk in the woods, it just smells incredible and I have to remind myself at that. There is nothing wrong with the DVD I hasten to add we. All benefit them from them. They can be absolutely wonderful but it's just making sure for me personally and I don't know about you that I'm not having too many in a row. So seasonal affective disorder is brought on because the brain is exposed to less natural light and vitamin D during the autumn and winter, and this intern disrupts our production of Melatonin Serotonin and Melatonin is the sleepy hormone and Serotonin is the mood hormone. So if those two are taking a bit of a battering or if they're affected anyway and they get out of balance, you're definitely going to feel in how you sleep and your mood. And you're suffering with sad. Then you may feel quite extreme changes in moods across the season's usually a in autumn winter that'll be characterized by depression. With periods of not feeling depressed throughout. Spring. Summer. The lack of light and exposure to vitamin D and the shorter days mean that the actually pretty prevalent in the northern hemisphere and the instances tend to increase further north you go which makes sense when you think about it let's daylight the signs look out for are things like hypothermia. So that's that feeling of extreme lethargy sleepiness just that feeling that you just want to. Curl up which sometimes valid because you're busy and you really do need to rest but other times if it if it's tipping over the edge and it's just getting all the time, remember what I said about me wanting to be a bad. The other thing to look out for is the urge to an you are overeating or you're craving carbohydrates about some part of it. Also part of it is a notable lack of motivation and energy. You might be irritable and your mood might be noticeably depressed or down. You might also just not enjoy the things that you normally like. He might be withdrawing socially and he might be struggling to do the things that you normally do or even think clearly,

Melatonin UK CEO National Health Service Family Physician. Intern
Episode 41 FTN Watches A Movie Part 1: Cruel Jaws - Drive Of The Week

F That Noise

03:20 min | Last month

Episode 41 FTN Watches A Movie Part 1: Cruel Jaws - Drive Of The Week

"Introduction long as we're here. Yes. Yes every episode we start with the driver the week. If you don't know what a drive is. It is a line from a movie or TV show said with exceptional velocity and volume and the stage belongs to mister Klein. All right, ladies and horror fuckers. What we have here is the 1983 Stephen King horror. Flick Christine. This is a classic one for me. It's grown up kid because it was one of the few R-rated movies was able to watch which shockingly because it's got so much bad language in this and there is a lot of drives in this and it was hard to pin-point flash drive to use is there is one point where a character just goes black for no reason, but I chose this one because there's always a reason yeah and the reason which is not the third reason but the reason off there to drive right back to back and it is it's checked estimate. So so here is to drives of the week from the Motion Picture film Christine off. I care about you. Like I love you lie, but I think we deserve one more try. Don't you give me a fucking ass? Hello, Arnie, please don't do this to me wanting to speak with me. Okay, you've had right? Or fuck you, bitch, just like they were burning Arnie. Please don't do this tickets pissed off drops the fuck you bitch stay with me that you've had it, right? Well, fuck you bitch. And then we anything about it runs back to the phone. I'm sorry. I'm sorry wrong with me. Okay, you've had right? Or fuck you, bitch. Come on, Lee expects her to still be on page other than kids today won't know that if you if you're slammed the phone down hard enough, it actually bounced and didn't hang up. So the other person might actually still be on the other line. It's true. That is true. But that's pretty much after you do the exact you bitch and she assumes you hang up. She's not going to hang around that kind of thing is so easily misunderstood, you know, don't like is it I'm just saying this isn't really that clear what he means right? Well, there's stuff. He just wanted a yes or no and you can't really fault them there and just yesterday. I think we give me a fucking no. I mean just because you make it because a lot of pressure is Dad is you know, Rodney Dangerfield and right right, right. He's gotta make that swim team. Yeah. Yeah. I thought that was the driver of the week brought to you by Trashman media for all the latest DVD and Blu-ray commentary go to trash man media and also on Facebook and Twitter. I feel good to check out www.cbs.com latest news and no bulshit. All right. So we're going to

Arnie Christine Rodney Dangerfield Mister Klein Stephen King Trashman Media Facebook LEE Twitter
Equity Shot: The DoJ, Google, and the suit could mean for startups

Equity

06:09 min | Last month

Equity Shot: The DoJ, Google, and the suit could mean for startups

"Hello and welcome to an equity shot. My name is Alex Wilhelm. I Have Danny Crichton on the phone Danny, how are you? I'm doing. All right. Alex how are you today? Better than Google who has been sued by the DOJ and eleven state aid over anticompetitive behaviour. Now, Danny we have known for a long time that this was coming. It was pre sage tr- think rather heavily I had a chance to dig into the actual filing. I have many many opinions but just going to set the ground people are tuning in and unsure of why we've reached this moment why Google and why? Now why did take me a little bit of time to find the filing I using bang and after I gave up and Use Google which may be part of the problem but let let's let's boil it down. Obviously big tech has gotten really really large over the last decade there's been increasing concerns about all the big tech companies everything from facebook to apple, Google and onwards and onwards. What are the angles that the government is trying to take on unto regulating these companies is around antitrust. In the United States the major antitrust act is the Sherman. act. That Jay filed under this morning under section two it's specifically focused on search and particularly search advertising and so. One of the things on the conference call with journalists. This morning that the wd was talking about is obviously there's a lot of concerns about social media bias. There's a lot of concerns Abou- Anti competitive practices around android and chrome, and a bunch of other issues all around tech. This lawsuit from you Jay is only focused on searching particularly search advertising and the reason. That sort of comes out of some of theories out of Yale and some other law schools which are focused on Google's consolidation of the ad market over the the arts and teen to its acquisition of Doubleclick and a bunch of other at tech companies over the years. So they've launches lawsuit they have eleven Geez all those agencies were gop, agee's and it's filed this morning. To point out that this is all about focused on search search access in some way more than I expected the circular benefits that Google gets scale as google has more data coming into view usage you can improve its products and therefore it's better than everyone else, and so the is how does Google maintain all of this market share and my read of of of the lawsuits some of the points are pretty good. Some were bad. So I think that there's a key paragraph that I went to bring us everyone listening. That I pulled out from the filing. This is from deeper into it. So if you go just meet the I won't see it but it's a good summation. So if you'll excuse my terrible reading voice here, we here's a DOJ's opinion about all the stuff google has unlawfully maintained its monopoly by implementing force in a series of exclusionary agreements with distributors or at least the last decade particularly when taken together Google exclusionary agreements have denied rivals rivals access to the most important distribution channels. In fact, Google exclusionary conduct cover almost sixty percent. Of US search queries be things like it's android device agreements. I'd add almost half of the remains are funneled through properties owned and operated directly by Google. So essentially, this boils down to Google has used commercial relationships to essentially force other companies specifically device manufacturers to pre install google software and give Google search preeminence. Google then gives manufactures often cut revenue back to make it look like a transaction but in reality if you want to run ANDROID, you have to use Google on your phone or you can't get access to anything. That you need, and then therefore you become a partner and the consumer gets Google kind of pre installed and pre defaulted. It might my issue at this is a pre default or a preset default is not a death sentence and this DOJ filing kind of treats a preset default, the end of the conversation for that consumer. So if consumers were just more active in picking what they wanted us, there won't be much of an issue here. So I'm curious about your view on their relative strengths of the different arguments as you've rhythm. To me the with nuts here is to think back to use v Microsoft you know what? Two decades ago in one was a landmark trust case particularly in tech but even just generally, it was focus on defaults of browsers within explorer explorer on windows and twenty years for we're still talking about default search engines that are browsers but through browsers, it's not even about the browser. Today. But basically, what search engine is in the bar up I, think that this is an interesting angle. Again, I think the advertising pieces much more critical. The advertising market Google is very dominant and it's network effects is very, very strong and network only exists because Google owns a frivolous vertically integrated sort of add operation right now and can really join in any part of the tier. Tracking the can't do analytics because Google owns a whole stack and so to me that has always been the strongest part the the browsers are tricky, right so so Google does pay apple for instance, billions of dollars to be in safari and particularly mobile safari. It pays Mozilla hundreds of millions of dollars of not billions of dollars to be the default search engine in Mozilla, and that's one of the largest revenue sources for the foundation and the company. Google's argument has always been consumers have choice. In fact, BING DOT COM is less characters than google dot com it takes less work to get to Bengal com a crazy as it sounds but the reality is that has this victory in search for reason, is because they own so many different components they have you know excerpts from different sites that are built around technologies that you know even here tech-rich we have integrate with Google search to ensure that our articles are given priority in those search engines so we can't just. Ignore, Google entirely, and so I i. think the argument is fairly decent. Now, the challenge here is that there's so many different angles there seventy lost his the democratic. AGEE's have their own lawsuit underway and they've said they're going to continue to do that separately from the DOJ congress's looking into second to thirty, which affects more facebook but also potentially goodwill as a sort of open harbor and forgetting the term. Now you say her safe harbor harbor it's a safe harbor I think safe harbors would have opened component they'd be lake. Exactly, the pond. Yes. The savings bond, but you know there's all these different angles I think what's interesting is the timing obviously the the DVD and his staff this morning really emphasizing this sort of the right time he said, it was after sixteen months of investigatory work on the antitrust division happened to be exactly two weeks before major US election to the reality is is as has been a discussion at the DJ. For a decade. So you know it is obviously particularly all-time. The reality is they've been doing this work since you've only years possibly even to the Bush years as well.

Google DOJ United States Alex Wilhelm Danny Crichton Facebook JAY Agee Apple Doubleclick Microsoft Yale Partner
Why Not Just Be The Best?

Marketing Secrets

07:20 min | Last month

Why Not Just Be The Best?

"All right. So Last weekend was insane I duNNo. If I told you this yet private and county deep. But I chance to go speaker Gingrich Season Tony Robbins Event Tony's studio which he built a huge studio and covert hit Zoom rumors like this huge stadium, rapin zoom walls and. It was crazy scam. You saw that pitchers but it was really special and really fun and we're actually flew there in Tony's private plane, which was crazy she his house and just it was really special weekend but. Telling you too much of that. I was thinking go deeper. So many crazy. A three call talking about although haase antiquated from that. I. Will drop out to you throughout the next few episodes but. There's one thing that's interesting. So We decided women, there were six days, which is kind of cool. We had out some really cool people and just relax and take a break a little bit and you know at the hotel there's so gets the scoop massages. So we started from Sasha two different days and obviously now the Cova, there's weirdness Boise Lovato. Idaho's is different but in Florida, were at, they have different rules rights face masks more often all sorts of stuff. So go get our first massage and He didn't there and it was only sixty minute massage because that's all they had time for that day or whatever, and this comes out she puts on plastic gloves, which was kind of weird Mike wasn't my favorite by Monica. Whatever. So And It was not it was not my favorite massage. Partially because they anyway, there are a lot of reasons why I just it was. Annoyed like it wouldn't feel good. It was just like she was technically giving massage but was not getting Sasha so much. So by the end of my sixty minutes like normally get a ninety minute massage and my sixteen massage like I just wanted to be done I was like it was like the longest sixty minutes life miserable I didn't have a good time and is even thinking like I hate massage like maybe maybe changed mental like the January maybe whatever and I'm so annoyed and finally got Donald. Kevin's is over I give me out of here and I just like Laugh A. Beautiful SPA and all these like I'm done like I don't I don't do beside I don't do. Anymore despise like I just had a horrible experience I I make. ASSANGE again anime rafter. GotTa massages later and then met afterwards and and I was like that was horrible. I don't ever want to give me Josh again and he said we have booked for tomorrow. May I know him? I don't really want to go as we cancel and. anyway it was just it was interesting. So. Next I go back because they have a twenty four hour cancellation periods have to Sasha like massages. This is GonNa be ninety minutes I'm going to be miserable. Just the whole thing right. So get there and kind of bad attitude and talking to Susan she's different person in super. Nice, and we we out massages she starts. The same thing has for the plastic gloves, which is kind of annoying but whatever. Does massage and this time it is a complete experience. was like an artist like it was it was amazing. Everything. It's Chris spend the same amount of money both massages. Right and the first one I wanted to die I wanted to get off the table on the right next person was insane. They were amazing like the ninety minutes was over and I was like, are you kidding me like I want to give you some more money? I spent flip back over and keep doing this back and forth all day. Until your to your shift or whatever like it was it was it was amazing and I remember laying there thinking about how like just twenty four hours earlier massage from person CEO same same spa everything and how I hated it, and this was amazing. Why would they compete anything to continue this experience longer and I started thinking about? This right both of these people would consider themselves from sizes masseuses right Both and got paid to say May to do the job but one was artist one was great. What they do and one was just did the thing, right? And I started thinking about my life lake. Everything. I've done I've tried. I don't know I always wanted to be the best I remember when I was wrestling about this this. This tape has s tape pre DVD's. And it was. The story about Tom Terry brands were twin brothers who are wrestlers, Iowa. Remember the movie started with I tom brands he comes and says, my name's Tom Brands my goal simple going to be the best wrestler in the world. Next thing came up as Terry brant my goal simple. I want to be the best wrestler in the whole world and that's how starts and boom. It goes into training montage and stuff and I was just like, yes. I remember thinking I. Can make my name's Russell Brunson the great wrestler in the world right and so I because I didn't want to be a good wrestler I want to be like okay. I wanted to be the best in the world and obviously never got there. That was my belief because I got way for the night probably ever should've gotten my skill and talent level right? I've state champ. I was an all American second in the Nation High School into college. Rank the top ten college never place NCA but but you know I did I heard your career and which to business was the same thing I got into business I wasn't on make moody who I was like. The greatest market ever lived like if I'm doing this job anywhere might as well take the amazing it right like. and. And I was just thinking about during massage just like people have the same job title. One's amazing ones like. You know and I think about for all of us like my kids. I. Keep with my kids and I don't care. We don't care what you WanNa be when you grow up like don't be like, okay. Be The best in the world like. A how do you? How do you become amazing not just give amazing. What are you have to do different I don't know I don't know how to teach that exactly more. So than just like helping has want that desire like don't be the crappy I think about funnel building right like th. There's tons of you without teaching fungibility and doing fun bill and you can hire someone and you will they hire someone in they get a funnel in the funnel stocks and she's like. You know your federal building become the best in the world obsess about designing copying all these things that when you build someone to funnel like you handed to them, it should be art they should be away by just like you know the second has blown away like. That's experience when a gift somebody if you can't give some experience like you need to geek out more, you got to go deeper you had become better. Become the best in the world that you are in your craft whatever it is right. If I was a dentist locators dentist, but there's there's amazing dense chiropractic. I won't be good chiropractor on the best in the world.

Sasha Tony Robbins Tom Brands Tom Terry Gingrich Idaho Haase Cova CEO Assange Boise Lovato Terry Brant Donald Trump Kevin Josh Mike Russell Brunson Susan Nation High School Chris
Diversity 'is a commercial imperative now': Brand Advance CEO Chris Kenna

Digiday Podcast

06:15 min | Last month

Diversity 'is a commercial imperative now': Brand Advance CEO Chris Kenna

"Hello and welcome to the PODCAST. I've Riley did today's senior correspondent based I've read the UK and it gives me great pleasure to welcome a fellow Brit to the show. This week Christopher Kenna is the CEO brand advance the UK based global diversity media. Network. Said welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks for having me. She is Chris So yeah, it's fair to say I to start kind of right at the beginning because I think it's fair to say that you didn't take maybe the most conventional well traveled route into the into the media industry. And I won't stick if our listeners a little flavor if I may of the years that led up to you founding your your current company. So I didn't know where we start kind of at the very beginning Many of our US listeners probably know where the olive man is but. But that's where you were born. Very, very small British island has relation of what like eighty thousand or something like that. Yeah. So let's start there. Yeah the Ottoman. From people on the other side of the potent if you look in. The UK map you've got the big and then you've got islands, which is small bit this a little island right in the middle of the big being. England Scotland Wales on the small bit be an island is a little dot in the middle never rarely shown on whether ups Whether symbol but. Yeah population about eighty, seven, seventy, eight, hundred, thousand. A blockade everyone. You know which Just as. It's off with a with. From the very get guy. I was destined Dabo. Trophies and certificates got a significant for that UH. I don't remember getting obviously I was born but. When could so skip I was in cash in. And when you come out of, can you get like a big thing achievements event? On pretty much anything, anybody's ever written about you open to that point of until you sixteen on the very first thing in now was this. From Jane. Critical Hospital From you spend a number of years in the in the British army. Is that right wherever you based? Yeah. So I was based out a Jimmy Fest So did my member basic training here in England in Boston bond went to blunt it, which is the army school of signals. To do sort of second phase training which is. I was a on communicate so to go. Out to use a radio not but you know what I mean and so I was destined for comes. So maybe not all is so far apart as you think. You. Know army to media we basically doing the same thing. So then yeah I was boasted out to Jimmy went out seventeen. Met My now ex way. My kid when I was seventeen. So. We start on the fatherhood on your after kits. Now they're both off German English they live at JEB new Madonna goes to union bellied son goes to high school and beautiful in Jimmy. Yet did tell us to of Iraq one tour of Afghan and what led you to leave the army. awhile I was involved in an ID so I've epilepsy now. Because of injury on so yeah I icon. Epilepsy in a rifle mix. Ni- I imagine. That's not good company. So and then media came calling for you. Well well, you came cooling for media well I. Don't know who, but but I think I'm good at this. I've lived sound a little arrogant now but I think definitely media needed needs people like me. You. Know just the background I don't mean specifically there's nothing particularly special about May. The I mean you don't people from my background's people that didn't you know two Family Income Kofi Union blind you don't we need diversity of vices. We need diversity of thought. So yeah, I think it needed me as much as I needed it. But no so I started off. Is So when Columbia Street back Manchester. I'd spend a lot of time to care and Blah Blah Blah. Back Manchester. On then. Yes. Fell into acting and presented done even. Go too much into that. 'cause it's a problem, a life of China Forget. But yeah, ended up doing presenting things like price drop TV. MTV completely is. Got My own show on sky which was puppies the most watched show on TV. What was that show? Cope the Chris Candido show. I was destined to be an office as well. Then, I made a production guy start up production company. Of. Factual shows such shows like queer three did drama series those on TV code the ends I wrote in direct produced directed quish. Couple of football documentaries champions one about. Munches to CEOS an official release DVD for Manchester, say did one class rages as well? Yeah a Sold the rights to a lot of the shows that came to London on that's how it got into. Sort of. Went into. Media An. Advertising. Agency wouldn't worked a DO DOT com. And partly, Connecticut now. But yeah.

UK British Army England Scotland Wales Manchester Chris Candido Christopher Kenna Jimmy United States British Island England Iraq MTV London Dabo Kofi Union Connecticut Boston Jane Official
Episode 38: Best Saturday Morning Cartoon - Drive of the Week

F That Noise

03:12 min | 2 months ago

Episode 38: Best Saturday Morning Cartoon - Drive of the Week

"But we started every episode was the drive of the week what a drive is a line from a movie or TV shows with exceptional velocity and volume, and this segment belongs to Jimmy Klein. Alright. Lis fucking titties. Here. Mr Klein to. A film that hardly anyone is seen and you just have to check it out just on Blu Ray. It was just reviewed on trash men media. It is a film called cruel jaws the in some countries that was known as jaws five. It is an awful Italian rip off of jaws film actually using footage of Jaaz one, two and three. However, this film is actually better than jaws the revenge I still say check it out but it is absolutely hilarious and. It's got quite a lot of screaming quite a lot of drives, but this one in particular was one of my favorites. I'm sorry I couldn't You know what you gotta do that. What you're going to have to offer award of one, hundred, thousand dollars whoever the head of that shark. Have Already I mean. Without without what? Without I. Gather birth. Absolutely levels at thanks. A. Awful so awful. It has Hogan impersonator in this. See. It's like Hulk Hogan stunned wwl filming the Brian White Story. Look five to two hundred. and. Already. Series without. Yet. Without. Without. Talk. Without what? What you? Without what? This is an underrated draft because he doesn't really like get all of his lungs behind it. What you? But like last week with Eddie Murphy it's all about the F. Word Fuck. The bottom two. That's the. Title. That so. I don't know what language that is whatever country that language is from. Our podcast can read. Just going to have to ask Watson along or something. That was the drive of the week brought to you by trash men media for the latest. Blu Ray. DVD movie commentary go to trash men, media dot com also on twitter and facebook. And don't forget to check out Here Zarb dot copier is news and no bullshit.

Hulk Hogan Blu Ray Jimmy Klein LIS Eddie Murphy Twitter WWL Watson Facebook Brian White
Stumbling block: the battle over WeChat

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:50 min | 2 months ago

Stumbling block: the battle over WeChat

"A new battle is shaping up in the legal wrangles around. Social Media APPS operating in. America. The trump administration's attempt to block we chat and Tiktok from American APP. Stores was overturned by a federal judge on Sunday. Yesterday, America's Commerce Department said it would appeal. The wildly popular video sharing Tiktok has been the subject of jockeying from American firms for ownership after President Donald Trump said he would ban it unless CEOS was agreed. It can't be controlled for security reasons by China too big too. Invasive and it can't be and here's the deal I don't mind if whether it's Microsoft or somebody else a big company secure company, very, very American company by it. That seemed to be solved on Saturday when he approved a deal involving Oracle and Walmart. But that still left, we chat a platform with a huge following in China and among the Chinese diaspora if you as battling TV use of which had that would ask. For examples, I can use the. In. The US Li Tang is Chinese but lives in New York Bats. The hub was blocking China's. Savings so The government binding dvd from using the reach hats not means my connection with China is totally being cut off. The administration's wish to block it entirely now lies with the courts, but that battle will be very different from the one over Tiktok. This was going to cripple these we just in America for about three and a half million Chinese Americans who the majority of its users and the California judge has sort of paused this in order to examine. Around freedom of speech in doing this, how Hudson is the economists Asia Technology correspondent. The ruling kind of acknowledges that while there may be national security questions, it doesn't appear immediately that Aban is the only way to deal with those questions and the ban does appear to impinge upon the freedom of speech of those Chinese Americans, and so it's kind of a we're gonNA take a moment here in to check how legal this is and that makes sense because nothing like this has ever happened before. So in in what way What what are the rights that are that are under threat here? Well, it's pretty broad brush. We shot is kind of everything up and both in mainland China and and in America people, use it, use it for loads of different things they use to send money to their families. They use it obviously to communicate to the most obvious analog. There is something like what's up but also has personal finances. It has news it's kind of like. A little internet in a box and for a lot of people that's the whole Internet, and so that's why cutting it off is such a risky thing and yet the fact that it's sort of all of the Internet in a single APP is particularly important in China where not only are other services. Particularly Western services blocked Yukon download them from APP stores in China, things like twitter and facebook and what's up, but the communication on we. Chat itself is censored according to the Chinese government sort of prescriptions and so in a way, this freedom of speech argument is actually a question of whose freedom of speech you know do we want Americans to be free from Chinese censorship or do we want them to be free to use a service that they want to use? It's a it's a difficult question and so on. What grounds is the trump administration trying to ban it. Well, the stated reasoning is that we chat presents a national security risk to America and to American people. As with Tiktok the idea is that data about American sort of intimate data communication with their families. Businesses can be harvested through we chat and sent back to the Chinese government for various purposes. The other concern is that we got sensors conversations on its APP and both of these have grounds. In fact there there's research from the group. Called the citizen's lobby in Toronto which does showed that we chat is censoring various kinds of communication, not just in mainland China but all around the world for its extra China, which users. But there's a more skeptical angle to this on the government's motivation, which is that being tough on China looks good for trump in the run-up to an election and it puts Joe Biden in a corner to sort of force him to take position on closeness with China. To how does the discussion around we chat fit into the the rather longer running one about Tiktok the difference between the two of them is that TIKTOK has American investors tiktok has its roots in the acquisition of an American company, and so that gives America sort of jurisdiction over to talk because America's always had control over investment in the United States, and that's the kind of starting point for the examination of Tiktok and the administration's talk on talk we chat doesn't have that. We chat doesn't have any American acquisitions that formed it. It's a much older piece of technology and it's much more sort of purely Chinese. So the only way that the administration has to attack tiktok is through this very unusual executive order that resulted in a list of transactions from the Department of Commerce. That again important to remember doesn't have a precedent and so you know when we're looking at what this the results of this temporary stay from the judge in California will be. It's very hard to say because nothing like this is awesome before. So in in that regard, the long run outcome of this won't be the kind of division and selling jockeying that we've seen about Tiktok no, there's no latitude for that. I mean the fact is as well that we chats three point five, million users in America doesn't represent like gigantic sort of social media growth opportunity that tiktok one, hundred, million users, a brand new APP that you know all the kids. Are On that's a much more exciting proposition for companies like Oracle at Walmart that are you know supposed to be taking stakes in? TIKTOK. But the other way in which these two things are joined up is in the American government's increasing efforts to control the kinds of things that happened on the Internet and this isn't just about versus China America versus China is kind of catalyzing a much much bigger discussion about what happens online and who gets to be in charge of that. But all of this seems to be getting away from the you know free on splintered on almost entirely unregulated Internet that America pioneered. Yeah. It undeniably is is just a factual observation to say that this source of activity very top down very directly political. You know trumped basically in charge of these things and and a group of bliscoll allies starts to look. A lot like the way that China does business online and I guess that's not necessarily a problem at Priori. But it's definitely a change in the way that America does its business and it is important to remember that it's not like America. Star should this to China has not allowed loads of different American services in for a very long time and you know one. Potential. Outcome of this is that you'll see the people who really need these services using them sort of illicitly. So you start to get a kind of grey market for digital services where your ability to route around the controls that your government puts on. You dictate your ability to access the services you need, and that's probably a bad thing. Hell, thanks very much for your time. Thank you Jason.

China America Tiktok President Donald Trump Commerce Department California United States Chinese Government American Government Walmart Microsoft New York Oracle Aban Asia Toronto Joe Biden Yukon
Episode 36: Drive of the Week

F That Noise

01:58 min | 2 months ago

Episode 36: Drive of the Week

"Absolutely, we start every show with the drive of the week, and if you don't know what to drive is as a line for movie or TV show said with exceptional velocity and volume, and this segment belongs to Jamie Klein. Right Lis Fox. Here. Is a little extra three. This is the. Show a lot of people love it Steve. Never Big Fan of it by do love George C. Scott, endorsing, Scott I. Think. Has a drive in every single movie. Holy Pretty Damn good. So. Getting ready for the Halloween season. So might as well throw in a little exorcists three. Take it away. George. I think it fucking. You want to know about the man and set eleven. Stretcher memory was very. That was quite some time ago. Dressed, like a priest. A priest renew signs of injuries blood lacerations. That would be in Firefox. In the file. In the file. It is not in the wild. It is not in the. End. I. I would love to see like if she looked at him going but wait is it in the file. Because that's exactly what I want. Drive of the week brought to you by Trestman media for the latest DVD and move commentary head to trash men, media, dot com, and also on facebook and twitter. And don't forget to check out www. Here. Latest News and new bullshit.

George C. Scott Trestman Media Lis Fox Jamie Klein Facebook Steve Scott I. Twitter
What's new for TV, Movies And Video Games This Week

Geeks Under the Influence

02:32 min | 2 months ago

What's new for TV, Movies And Video Games This Week

"Hello everyone and welcome. It is the Gui recap. It's a recap of all the things that are going to have the week of September seventeen, twenty, twenty before it happens. My name is Bruce and let's get started with the Gui pick of the week. I'M GONNA go with Superman Man of tomorrow comes out on DVD and Blu Ray this week This is yet another year one slash origin story of the man of steel like we really need. One of those does anybody not know how Superman got his powers and who he is and Blah Blah Blah seriously. Are Right for TV pages on Monday ABC has the bachelor's greatest seasons ever finale NBC has the Premiere of American Ninja Warrior and Nat go has the premiere of life below zero for Tuesday ABC has a finale of what would you do? For Wednesday CBS as forty eight hours suspicion that's a premier. For Thursday ABC has the finale of Holy Moly and NBC has the NFL Twenty Twenty season begins with the Houston Texas taking on the Kansas City chiefs. Thankfully, some amount of normalcy is coming back. We've got football. Art for Friday, paramount network has built tour MMA live Saturday. CBS as the premiere of forty eight hours and. Has. The premiere of birds of prey and Sunday CW has the finale of fridge wars. For movies coming out this week you have the broken heart gallery This is the film about a young woman living in New York. City, who after being dumped decides to start a gallery where people can leave trinkets from pass relationships or for the items of love has left behind Oh whatever for DVD's like I said, you've got Superman man of tomorrow and first cow. For On Line Services Net flicks you have so much love to give get organized with home edit season one la- Alina shadow of narcos season one, the social dilemma. Julie and the phantoms season one, duchess season one and family business season to Hulu you have the premiere of woke season one for video games you have kingdoms of Millar re reckoning for the PS four, xbox one and P C.

ABC Kansas City Chiefs CBS NBC Bruce Paramount Network Hulu New York Julie NFL Houston Texas Football
A surprise celebration fit for a plumber, Super Mario’s 35th anniversary comes with new merch, games

Pop Culture Cosmos

03:22 min | 2 months ago

A surprise celebration fit for a plumber, Super Mario’s 35th anniversary comes with new merch, games

"Celebrated the thirty fifth birthday this past week with a surprise Nintendo direct and I want to hear your thoughts on some of the big announcement that were there including Super Mario all stars supermodel three allstars. The New Mario Kart Home Circuit, which is going to include I believe something that's. Actually physical as you know Nintendo, less to do these different things as far saying that just a regular video game. Super Mario, brothers. Thirty five, which is going to include thirty five players online battle game that's going to be very interesting to see I'm GonNa maybe delve into that one Super Mario Three d world plus browsers fury, and then on top of that to to add extra. Cuteness a Super Mario Brothers game, and watch which I thought was really Uberpool ripped takes me back to the old days on that one. I mean they just had some great announcements when it concerns the the thirty fifth anniversary of Mario that bundle of Super Mario Brothers. All Stars just with Super Bowl Sunshine Superman sixty four super. Mario Galaxy coming to the switch in a single package. I understand Nintendo making some chunk of change thereby rebuff bundling a lot of the stuff and repackaging lobby stuff. But my gosh or Mario isn't a bad thing I mean was it was cool. I. Liked the the Three D. all star remake. I am really excited about that by one beef with it. Is that why make it a limited release? They're saying you can only get it between September eighteenth and thing March thirty first or something, and then you won't be able to get it anymore. So that was more get it for now. I guess you know if they're doing like going back in the vault type thing but like that just felt feels really weird to me because switch like switch games don't have issues selling like looking at Mario Games, they go on sale. Ten dollars off. That's on a good week so. I. Don't think they'd have any issues. People would continuously by it as for the game itself I am excited I am going to get my preorder in this week I don't like I guess they I would have preferred like a more remastered version of Mario Sixty four because if you look at the video of it, it has the black bars on the side they kind of did A. I guess an up convert much like a a BLU ray player will up convert a A. DVD. So they did that bill excited about super excited about Super Mario Three D world that was one that I wanted to play but just never had the opportunity to S- announced coming back. So that's cool. Really interested not gonNA say excited but interested in that Mario Kart, the kind of augmented reality type thing which is really cool because you're driving the cart and it's creating this track on your screen that you have to follow. It's keeping your car from running into things so. Really Cool. But yeah, a lot of good stuff coming out of that. Well, what are your thoughts more Mario is not a bad thing. So whether or not as the the new Mario Kart that thirty? Online battle Mario the reimagining of the the bundle package that they're putting with all the older Mario Games in there. Yeah it's an attendance way of revisiting that nostalgia and making the chunk of change but we keep buying it. We keep sucking in we keep eating it up. So I just tell you marios one of the favourite characters that I enjoy the to me. That's not such a bad thing at all.

Super Mario Brothers Mario Galaxy Mario Nintendo BLU Uberpool
Get Ready to Watch Disney’s Live-Action Mulan from the Comfort of Your Couch

Geeks Under the Influence

04:22 min | 3 months ago

Get Ready to Watch Disney’s Live-Action Mulan from the Comfort of Your Couch

"Hello everyone and welcome it is the Gui pre have to recap of all the things that are going to have happened for the week of August thirty first one, twenty four. My name is Bruce and let's start with Gui. Pick the week. There are few choices this week but I'm GonNa go with the boys season two. It's coming out this week on Amazon Prime they're back to expose the truth about the seven I have yet to see the first season I have wanted to but I just haven't had time but I'll probably take somebody's Amazon prime account and just watch it. All right for TV pages on Monday nothing Tuesday. NBC has the premiere of the transplant and a and he has the finale of what it's worth for Wednesday CBS as the finale of tough as nails. Thursday ABC has the finale of to tell the truth you as network has the finale of cannonball and f x x has the finale of cake for Friday nothing. Saturday HBO has premiere of spies in disguise and for Sunday knit none. For DVD's you have blood quantum and rogue and you've never heard of either one of these movies and you'll never hear of again for on Line Services. Net flicks, bookmarks season one, the chef's table barbecue season one I'll fondue Dari classless away season one I'm thinking of ending things season one prime like I said, you have the boys season two and for Disney you have Milan vis is the remake that they WANNA put out in theaters but they couldn't. So they're gonNA charge you an extra thirty bucks to watch it. For Video Games coming out this week you have crusader kings three for the P. C. M. X. versus ATV all out for the switch. Tell me why chapter two for the xbox One and the PC. Door Amman story of success for the PS four Marvel's avengers the PS four xbox one PC NBA Two K. Twenty one for the PS four, xbox which and PC and Tony Hawkes pro skater one and two for the PS four xbox one an PC. Fergie Y news you've got new episodes of gigs under the influence. Smack my paycheck deeply upsetting from the mouth of Manus Geek father and beautiful disasters. For one more thing yesterday Ubisoft announced that it will remove the raised fist imagery from the opening cinematic of its new mobile game com clancy's elite squad following widespread criticism that the game's intro plays right into right wing conspiracy about the black lives matter movement elite squad, which came out for the IOS and android. Last week begins with a narrated video laying out the game's premise with paints protest movements as fronts for organization called Umbra a global terrorist network is trying to take over the world protesters claimed to promote egalitarian utopia for a popular support while. Behind the scenes umbra organizes deadly terrorist attacks to generate even more chaos and we governments, the narrator says at one point and then a series of black fists raised appear on the screen Yeah. That's stupid. This opening leads raise the outright conspiracy about the black lives matter movement protests, and other just movements which to cast them as fronts foreshadow organizations trying to stabilize world government Ubisoft has apologized on twitter but seriously dude, what were they thinking now? Not Fair UBISOFT has donated one hundred thousand dollars to the end of Lacey Pe- in the past. Also. The game developers are from. France I know that's not exactly an excuse. But still in this time of unrest, you need to be a little more careful We have enough people in this country right now that are spreading alt-right conspiracies but Yeah. This may not be the time to have a a story line like this.

Ubisoft Bruce Amazon HBO ABC France NBC Disney Amman CBS Line Services Tony Hawkes Lacey Pe C. M. Twitter
Freedom Summer: Datra Dee Dee Jackson

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

05:37 min | 3 months ago

Freedom Summer: Datra Dee Dee Jackson

"Many. Of the faces that we have seen over the past few weeks leading the black lives matter movement have been those of young black women theatric DVD. Jackson is one of those dynamic women speaking truth to power as a leader, a black youth project one hundred while attending Florida International University. She became active at the height of the murder of Trayvon. Martin was led to founding the local chapter, a dream defenders at her university. Today, we chat with Yatra, how young people are seizing and owning their political power at this moment. I'm really excited to talk to you today I've been such a big fan of B. y. p.. One hundred in really excited that you were able to join us. So thank you. So I I want to talk about the fact that at such a young age you have done so much for the black community and the Black Youth Community you've done organizing as a CO founder or of the Durham Chapter of the Black Youth Project hundred supporting black mamas bail out, which is one of the favourite causes that I donate to and just so much more especially during the racial pandemic that we've been in these past few weeks. What brought you to this work? What made you wake up one day and say, okay as a young person, I have to get involved as a black young person I have to get involved. So I am from Philly or and throughout my years I was in public schools I grew single mom. Single mom household of three girls and. So grew up in inundated southwest philly end of there's many things of my experience that really informs where end today but that's not quite where I was politicized. I was in Grad School. Down in Miami Around Twenty, twelve, twenty thirteen and so I, was living in Florida. At the same time as the murder of Trayvon Martin and all of the marches in the energy that was being built up in that time and I was pretty apolitical leading up to that point and was going to a black sitting union meeting because our school where I know black people. So the black student union because that's where we were and this organization out to folks from dream, defenders averages a state based organization down in Florida Cain ended presentation on the work that they were doing and police brutality and immigration. Reform. School to prison pipeline. We're talking about these different issues in was really activated started to pay attention. To. That as an opportunity to be partners to the apartment organizations actually doing the work that was really where I started really a moment that similar to where now I love your path that you just talked about and I feel it's so important because A lot of young people you know when I talk to them, they just feel that can I just show up? Can I do it in? That's really what you did, and that's what a lot of the people involved with the. One hundred have done and I would love for you to talk a little bit more about the work that you're doing. In particular I'm a fan of the safe. We save campaign, which is something that I also think is a very timely conversation that we need to have in this country. Yes. So she said we save is one hundred national campaign It's our transformative moving campaign to end gender-based violence against like women. Like girls in black gender, non conforming people especially comes. In there is more origin even how we got to deciding orange she sees as national as I national campaign we had this huge visibility of black boys and black men that were being murdered brutalized by the police It was carrying this very long history erasure, black women, black girls, an our stories in the way that we have been brutalized by the police, and so we wiping one hundred among many other organizations really uplifted. Hashtag say her name. As a demand to also remember the stories of black women and black girls be harmed on a regular basis by the police and really pushing a bit of an intervention into the visibility of who stories are being told. And so we help these different events honoring black women and black girls who stories were not being pushed to the front and also talked about the a specific nature of black women in the way that the system harms us that doesn't that doesn't necessarily apply to black men in black police in. So we've been pushing. On, lifting up story of Ricky Boyd Renisha McBride. Happens Melissa Alexander. In just a number of Ions Stanley Jones might hall that list goes on online. Envy making sure that that this was also part of this time. The stories of black women grows they're are always forgotten

Black Youth Community Black Youth Project Trayvon Martin Grad School Murder Florida Florida International Universi Ricky Boyd Renisha Mcbride Jackson Philly Melissa Alexander Stanley Jones Durham Co Founder Miami
There's A Better Way To 'Dub' Movie Audio For Visually Impaired Fans

Tom and Curley

03:23 min | 3 months ago

There's A Better Way To 'Dub' Movie Audio For Visually Impaired Fans

"How much blind people like to watch movies and that there is a special feature that allowed blind and visually impaired people to do this, so just like you would do close caption. If you couldn't hear and have subtitles, What they do with movies is besides hearing the people in the movie speaking, they have voice actors who are describing the scenery what the characters look like what emotions they are displaying On DH since 2017. The Americans with Disabilities Act has required movie years to do this. So if you need the service, you'll get to the theater. You'll ask for a headset in a transmitter box and then it's also baked in the DVDs, just like the subtitles are so here is an example of that. Here is the Lion King and a little bit of what it would sound like if you watched it. If you were visually impaired, hundreds of animals gather at the bottom of pride rock a tall, flat ledge that towers over the rest of the Savannah. Zazzle, a small blue bird with a large deke flaps to the ledge. He vows to move us a powerful, dignified lion with a thick red mane. So this scene didn't have any touch. Besides asked the music Yeah, but I just wondered, how would they do this in a scene with a lot of dialogue, like if there was two people arguing, and they were speaking very quickly. I feel like it would hardly be hard to say. Her brow wrinkled up when she was angry. His lips were pursed. The wallpaper is green. Well, why don't you find a scene like that? And then play that for us will wait. His brow is first. Yes, the blue Bird was very angry. So the reason this article came out that was not to just describe that this service exists. It was saying that this doesn't exist for foreign films that only exists for big Hollywood films. And the only reason that it does is because of several lawsuits. Apparently, Netflix, Lulu and AMC all were either suit or settled out of court. Because people said, Hey, you have to provide these services. Eso won per Joel Snyder. He directs the American Council of the Blinds Audio Description Project. He thinks that the reason is that they don't think there's enough money in it that these foreign films don't bring enough money and at the box office, so it's not worth it to go through the trouble to adding the surface are sorry service. So are they susceptible to a lawsuit? Then if you want to see a great foreign film, and they don't offer the services, or is the law just indicative for big movies, Big commercial movies? Yeah, I couldn't find anything like that. It just said, like, why don't you look for that more weight? Man, you're a joke, and I don't like, click the button, and now I can't find my Eleanor. Eleanor again. Idea what you look for the answer that and then we'll wait. Animals hundreds of animals, So the reason that this came up was because the film parasite that won best picture at the Oscars was the holy nominee in that category. That didn't include the audio description, so nobody who is Blind or keep seeing in Paris. That's not how you say it. What is the issue of visually impaired could watch that movie and that was very popular. So I think that's what brought it to the officials. Face turns bright red with embarrassment, eyes this too many, John Think three was funny for that is the rule. By the way you

Eleanor Joel Snyder Zazzle John Think Netflix Savannah ESO Hollywood American Council Paris AMC Lulu
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | 3 months ago

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. 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The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
"d._v._d" Discussed on Data Engineering Podcast

Data Engineering Podcast

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"d._v._d" Discussed on Data Engineering Podcast

"Think of a data product manager is like working for oracle or being in charge of shipping database but that's you know that's sort of a bit older school at at this point and there's all kinds of other interesting applications of data infrastructure data technologies that are not directly in the database world where real world product managers in the modern modern era. I'm sort of need to understand how to interact with the stock and then how to build data tooling whether it's internal tooling for developers or customer consumer facing feature sure so i think <hes> embracing the product manager at the top of the stock has been super helpful for our community as well and i find it interesting that you are bringing in the product arctic manager because there has long been a division in particularly with technical disciplines where you have historically the software engineer are who is at odds with the systems administrator and then recently the data scientists or data analyst who is at odds with data engineer but there has been an increasing creasing alignment across the business case and less so in terms of the technical divisions and i'm curious what year view is in terms of how wow the product manager fits in that overall shift in perspective and what their responsibility is within an organizational structure to to help with the overall alignment in terms of requirements envision and product goals between those different technical disciplines yeah well. Hey hey i think i think this is just a super. This is a this question's a microcosm of what's really happening in the engineering world because i i think software engineers at the core at the central location are actually eating disciplines and roles that used to be sort of beneath beneath them and above them on so again. I'm sort of thinking in terms of this vertical stock but you know most modern tech companies. Don't have d._v._d.'s because the software engineer is now the the d._a. And many companies don't have designated infrastructure teams because a software engineer is responsible for their own infrastructure in some but that is because of cloud another dynamics but sort of copying. Is you know at its core. The engineer is eating the world and it's bigger than just software in the world engineers in the world and so i think the the absorption of some of these older roles into what's now considered course offering has happened below and i think it's happening above suicide think some product management is collapsing into the world and software engineer or engineers are sort of flattering up in product management and i think part of that is the nature of these deeply technical products that were building so i think many engineers make awesome product managers immune. Perhaps they have to step away and be willing. We not tried as much code anymore but because they have an intrinsic understanding of the way these systems bill. I think engineers are just sort of like reaching and and and <hes> absorbing a lot of these other roles and so some of the best product managers that you know i think we've seen <hes> have been a suffrage near so i just think that there's a a real merging aging. This is just a larger perception that have of the world <hes> into the software engineering related disciplines and i think it's actually not a far leap to sort of see how an engineer a product manager who's informed with an engineering discipline is super effective in that role so i just think this is a broader trend that were seeing overall thumbing sense..

product manager engineer software engineer analyst d._v._d.
"d._v._d" Discussed on Data Engineering Podcast

Data Engineering Podcast

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"d._v._d" Discussed on Data Engineering Podcast

"Think of a data product manager is like working for oracle or being in charge of shipping database but that's you know that's sort of a bit older school at at this point and there's all kinds of other interesting applications of data infrastructure data technologies that are not directly in the database world where real world product managers in the modern modern era. I'm sort of need to understand how to interact with the stock and then how to build data tooling whether it's internal tooling for developers or customer consumer facing feature sure so i think <hes> embracing the product manager at the top of the stock has been super helpful for our community as well and i find it interesting that you are bringing in the product arctic manager because there has long been a division in particularly with technical disciplines where you have historically the software engineer are who is at odds with the systems administrator and then recently the data scientists or data analyst who is at odds with data engineer but there has been an increasing creasing alignment across the business case and less so in terms of the technical divisions and i'm curious what year view is in terms of how wow the product manager fits in that overall shift in perspective and what their responsibility is within an organizational structure to to help with the overall alignment in terms of requirements envision and product goals between those different technical disciplines yeah well. Hey hey i think i think this is just a super. This is a this question's a microcosm of what's really happening in the engineering world because i i think software engineers at the core at the central location are actually eating disciplines and roles that used to be sort of beneath beneath them and above them on so again. I'm sort of thinking in terms of this vertical stock but you know most modern tech companies. Don't have d._v._d.'s because the software engineer is now the the d._a. And many companies don't have designated infrastructure teams because a software engineer is responsible for their own infrastructure in some but that is because of cloud another dynamics but sort of copying. Is you know at its core. The engineer is eating the world and it's bigger than just software in the world engineers in the world and so i think the the absorption of some of these older roles into what's now considered course offering has happened below and i think it's happening above suicide think some product management is collapsing into the world and software engineer or engineers are sort of flattering up in product management and i think part of that is the nature of these deeply technical products that were building so i think many engineers make awesome product managers immune. Perhaps they have to step away and be willing. We not tried as much code anymore but because they have an intrinsic understanding of the way these systems bill. I think engineers are just sort of like reaching and and and <hes> absorbing a lot of these other roles and so some of the best product managers that you know i think we've seen <hes> have been a suffrage near so i just think that there's a a real merging aging. This is just a larger perception that have of the world <hes> into the software engineering related disciplines and i think it's actually not a far leap to sort of see how an engineer a product manager who's informed with an engineering discipline is super effective in that role so i just think this is a broader trend that were seeing overall thumbing sense..

product manager engineer software engineer analyst d._v._d.
"d._v._d" Discussed on Kinky Katie's World

Kinky Katie's World

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"d._v._d" Discussed on Kinky Katie's World

"Toilet. You hit your button so it knows it's you and a ah warm the water so you get warm water air blow air blown dry d put in what you ate so it knows how how hard to spray it connects to your sushi maker. They'll talk they talk. They're smart appliances so immediately. Lee your sushi knows what kind of sushi print you here and do. Don't even ask the toaster took now. Trust me. Eh dishwasher's really seats shit. It's we've gone through this shit man boogie bid. Do the fucking shit your your jobs. You don't know the horrors that i fucking see. Magic lead up cry reclaimed up the horror. I heard some of the stuff that you can also do and find him. Play with at <hes> at buchan is they do booty. Facials are right yeah. I i will wipe my ass on your face. People's big bucks for that shit. That's different party. Yeah this cheeky workouts they had had a squat and can you know build your but i'll philly exercise seminars yeah seminars and all things like that. There's even the mascot. It's <unk> a big big but but on the face no you're facing ours face. Your face is the whole all right your face no so it's it's like frank pigs but yes but for your head i've got papers. Just you guys haven't seen the movie frank. It's a cease to check it out. Go fast bender in it. It's a good movie weird very strange then again you listen to the show so they can. You'd probably like it. I liked it all right so i'm gonna talk a little bit about tampa bay screams that was recently family and what what is pray tell tampa. Bay screams is a horror convention. There was horse everywhere. That's mrs fame whores. There's it's. It's a very very specific kind of movie. It's like the own exploitation or yeah bloody loudon nudity lot of gore <unk> reason yes see movie bad acting you know and it's it's. It's the whole yeah exactly. It's a whole sub-genre of people who make movies like they came out of the eighties even if they're not sexploitation yeah what i mean yeah but they remake the style of eighties on v._h._s. Yes ed's v._h._s. Sells out faster than anything. Oh it does well. That's it really does and i and i the guy who who the the ax murderer. Whatever you are in a cover the daily acts they did that intentionally put girls on the cover that weren't in the movie because that was a thing straight to video movies with you all the time back in like video store days right it so day. They did it intentionally yeah because they did it in the eighties like click pate and i didn't realize i had i had a ah i never signed that many autographs and d._v._d.'s and posters and taken so many pictures is it was just here's a lot of fun as a lot of fun. Outfits were successful yay very happy. <hes> i had a skeleton dress on the friday a than i was dirty filthy hooker looking nine on saturday and then sunday i <hes> i did sort of like a pinup thing. Though what outfits fits do you have where where the beginning description does not start with dirty filthy shut up. Why why are you going to say that with with with downtrodden. This is your big. It's on my way you can choose to feel how you want about your dirty. Salote outfits as sushi shirt. Put it stop censoring whores or sluts much censoring you at all..

tampa bay tampa frank Salote gore ed d._v._d.
"d._v._d" Discussed on Phil in the Blanks

Phil in the Blanks

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"d._v._d" Discussed on Phil in the Blanks

"You don't give people the benefit of the doubt. If you think that someone's armed you're quick to do a pat down search to make sure that you're all safe there and you find yourself <hes> when you enter a room just sort of unconsciously looking for cover or concealment and you know if shattering out where's the closest car engine black where i can take cover behind. You won't always be thinking tactically like that because some start start shooting at this moment and you don't want to have several blank slate you wanna ready set of thought your way through that and be prepared when you go to a domestic call. Somebody calls domestic violence. You're going into a house or an apartment. It seems to be that's a highly dangerous situation situation true it is i think if you talk to most cops they'd say that the harry situation they'd been in have been devi calls. <hes> you know you have have you have passions that are running high and readings reasons running low <hes> if you're in a house anywhere in the kitchen. There's probably half a doesn't weapons there. You know people in d._v._d.'s have used knives against their partner against the officers <hes>. They've used a part of scalding coffee. You really have to be angered. There's an officer going into a situation like that because i've seen these situations where you go into a house. The lights are off. There's a long hallway. There's different rooms in different doors and you do go in because there's a victim in there somewhere right. How do you protect yourself in a situation like that. Obviously somebody could step out of there with a shotgun and somebody could step out of there. With who knows. Do you have your gun drawn. What do you do usually if there is any indication that a weapon was used in the the call that you're going to then you'll have your gun out <hes> they teach you <hes> in the cadmium beyond <hes> with the call room clearing techniques just so <hes> just sort of blunder through a room. There's techniques you can use to enter an attack in tactful way and then used. I used you know he uses many capsules. You need to make sure that the that the scene safe and you don't automatically just because the call comes in that say the husbands has bettering the wife to be the case that <hes> the wife is the actual suspect gets arrested so you don't pretend that you have the whole thing figured out before you really sit down and start investigating. I've seen officers come in to a very dark restaurant bar. Go deep back in to it where there's trouble in the back. It just seems to me that hundred different things could happen in that situation. I've always wondered why they don't like the situation up big time before they go in. You know it's funny. You say that i have been in situations myself. I've been in exact situation you've described and and i've had my flashlight out in a couple of cops over there flashlights out and then someone will say hey genius. Why don't you in her. Once you look for a light switch and then someone will turn it on you know good thought but you you get used to respond to let a homes where the light bulbs are all burnt out or they don't work that sometimes it's it's crazy sounds. That's not the first thing you think of you think well. I got my flashlight. I'm good you just trying to be self-sufficient right. There's a friend of mine that produces sousse cops so i've watched that show a lot and it's interesting to me that in almost every episode where they go in a house there's a guys sitting on the bed in the back bedroom either with no shirt on or one of these strap shirts on that looks up and is not the least bit surprised that there are two cops in his bedroom. Where do they find these guys. I mean he's sitting there on his bed and he he looks at a high. We're the guys that he's not surprised that. There's two cops in his bedroom. She said you notice that that's just a wednesday night for that guy..

officer harry d._v._d. partner
"d._v._d" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"d._v._d" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"The biggest one was this <unk> gas station in santa monica which basically was offering thirty cent a gallon gas and it fucking caused so much. It's traffic the cops. They didn't understand what's going on. 'cause there's this bottleneck. By the ten men took down anyway on the cop said to get there and just basically shut the fucking thing down there like no this. Is your your fucking up the entire flow of traffic which is kind of like this sad thing where on one hand it's like you see just how entrenched this city is in this show biz machine that they can be like hi. The city will be an ad today right and then also like the terrible able disparity between haves and have nots in the city where you have people being like ha ha thirty cents a gallon gas and other people like what thirty cents thirty cents a gallon gas go there. I will right title right now yeah yeah and it was i mean you know they had things like a scoop of ice cream for eighty cents from haagen-dazs more fucking a cupcake for for for a quarter but yet it seemed like this gas station thing was the biggest disturbance and also like just the power that fucking amazon has two-wheeled or like yeah. We'll eat all that all the losses on this promo and pay for subsidize it. This is a bit of a humble brag but i am an emmy voter amazon is fucking relentless with the d._v._d.'s and there are streaming service right like during the whole like nomination process. It was amazon. Hulu netflix sent out more d._v._d.'s anyone i was throwing route fifty countless right yeah. It's something that i'm already streaming for free. It's funny what they should do is just give you if they're gonna be sort of slick about it. Just give you the fucking temporary pass to to stream it yes and data code but then some networks do that yeah but like in h._p. Like for the golden globes. Those members are a a little bit elderly bresso. D._v._d.'s help because they're like they're code. I it's fucking d._v._d. You remember that right right but yeah it does. It does seem odd for something thing like as ubiquitous as like amazon or netflix. Yeah i know what helps larry cudlow blockbuster stock but yeah. I feel like some cool. Packaging can help sometimes. I don't know i like getting a cool package in the man the packaging press right like a child from the sixty s pack from the postman..

amazon netflix santa monica D._v._d. golden globes larry cudlow h._p d._v._d. one hand
"d._v._d" Discussed on We Hate Movies

We Hate Movies

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"d._v._d" Discussed on We Hate Movies

"I don't even trust cursive anymore not at all like once just because you can't read it to winton. Also i'm like parchment. The declaration of independence was pinned on on going to steal that. I'm gonna steal this letter. Two summers. I'll secret map on the back to the honey. Bee marks the spot any kind of futz around like he goes yeah. He asked his friend like hey could you. I guess it goes all the way to the police force just to be like yo dude. I'm going to be gone for a couple couple days. Literally no one's gonna miss me. Guy goes the guy goes. Hey man. Are you back like no guys like all right. Well police business to conduct doc. Please leave. She's going to legal investigation to states up. It's totally out of jurisdiction. This is insane what he's trying to do. I'm gonna expense it. That's okay right right meals an hotel so you get a ferry and he's gonna go there. He's in washington now. He tries to leave his buddy media message dan. He's like you're probably gonna laugh about this owner of service do that. Two days two thousand six man that cell phone cuts out release yeah. Just there was a cloud that went over. They lost the signal this. This ferry ride starts my favorite part of this movie that comes up a couple of times the totally unnecessary hallucinations having he keeps seeing this girl get ram truck. It's and it gets funnier every fucking retired. He has nightmares in d._v._d. Menu does pale white from the movie that you've already the and he's not even hearing during like what's going on. It just says special features cast bio in the corner and it's one over and over and over and all about the first x. men demand humana takes a while to get anywhere. It's a bunch of doors open. I man thank you. I hated that you guys remember. We're talking about. It's like you just. I just wanna fuck in watch x. Men and you got to solve puzzles or the season a season to buffy d._v._d. Yeah really you go through a fucking graveyard. A hayride watch a gut their episode where they had like. I had the box set of all the nightmare on elm street three movies and i was like oh you wanna watch part three navigate your way through a haunted house. Fuck you play it. I'm already kind of drunk. This is not helping a big the simpsons ones you selected it and then they danced for like twenty minutes that was longer than the episode so yeah. He sees this girl old man rance about d._v._d. That dead art art yeah uh he wants to get to the to get to the island. He has to bribe like a harbor pilot there yeah and he's he this is his main business bringing things over there and he's i can't take you over there about one hundred bucks. Y'all throw roll.

d._v._d Guy washington buffy twenty minutes Two days
"d._v._d" Discussed on The Short Porch

The Short Porch

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"d._v._d" Discussed on The Short Porch

"Nickname now understand that i believe if they decide these before in spring training which is weird. Why can't that just change. I guess to a degree. It's like okay. We don't have to worry about this. One in the middle of of penalties <music> but all-star break can't send a survey room do they. What do you want in jersey. Just have one guy in the clubhouse yeah do it. It takes three seconds and sound like it takes hours to make months is to make a jersey i dunno. It seems dumb but anyways some are regis. I did like d._v._d.'s sir m._j. That's just his <hes> initials. <hes> merck's in the middle name is but then gregorious obviously sir in their history just be served exclamation point like waterboy santos sir because last year it was just sir. I believe right but i want. The exclamation tanaka says mukunda pretty sure is his name in <hes> in japanese whatever so yeah day caracas for or <hes> glacier ice from there so sure big funding for lemay limousine but obviously he didn't have that in spring training but right the big fundy pick fundamental by far is carlos. I was actually going to a sucker for a good pun. Pom pom carlo arlo that is one of the worst teams in the history of the planet. That's funny farmer giancarlo chip please you so much. <hes> jay hops is dot dot. One of my buddies love this. What is your love about so. I don't like it how it looks so weird when you you say j. dot dot..

caracas giancarlo chip lemay d._v._d. three seconds
"d._v._d" Discussed on The Librocube

The Librocube

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"d._v._d" Discussed on The Librocube

"Was sort of depriving myself of the fact that i could get to the end and i will say now. I've got one book. Go do believe <hes> if my figures correct <hes> so once. I get finished that last book. All i'm gonna do is start right back at the first one and start rereading them again whenever i walked because every i don't know three months or so when i want a really good read which these are consistently. I don't know if i've ever given anyone five out of anything other than a five hundred five some some six hundred five probably in there so a sort of not been living life not been living life <hes> i. I hope you take that advice <hes>. If you ever find yourself in a similar situation life advice why not <hes> it starts with moist savant lip puig so he's the the the main character in that although this this you know what this book had a different feel to who some others <hes> iconic at the feeling and maybe this is true. Maybe it's not that he he did no he was going to die. He a he knew he was going to pass away and kind of get the feeling that in this book he was trying to throw in a lot of a fan service so normally with terry pratt book almost feel like they stand alone and you not having any experience with with the world could just pick one up in read it and they'll be things in it that are nods to previous books but <hes> but nothing that would were were you would lose your excitement and your and your amazement at reading a terrific book a however in this one. The fan service was so much so oh that <hes> he almost delved a little deeper felt like into individual characters from previous books to the degree where <hes> if i were going to recommend terry <unk> books <hes> for someone who'd never read any. I definitely wouldn't say this one now for me. I'm giving it a five at five i because i've forgotten loved it because i have read all the previous books but <hes> i think this is the least likely starter book which you know it's the fortieth book in the a series of it sort of makes sense but the the other thing about terry project books which he sort of famous for his there's not really a necessarily chronological ness oh how about afterward for word to them so like the each book will focus on a different character and it's not necessarily surly chronological spoiled down because rather time talk you pronto time ironic. Maybe today's game sponsor is blue method pharmacy. Thank you for that sponsorship. Okay yes so this is the reason that <hes> this'll be episode. I will and have and will continue continue to do so actually <hes> red recaps of games. D._v._d.'s sessions that i've run. I've read recaps of sessions. I've played eidan. Which is what this is and this is session number. One of a new campaign i just joined <hes> so far we had session to yesterday actually so right the recap apt to that hopefully today and that will probably be in the next episode anyways. It's going very very well having a lot of fun. I know i must mentioned <hes> <hes> when i did my sort of sessions zero talk of this that the d._m. has been deming on and off since nineteen seventy nine so let's sort of incredible resource for me to take advantage of as a player no been very very cool. There is the nervousness n._s. I have i guess i will just say of being old school. <hes> famously old school d._n._d. Is a lot tougher. I i'm likely used to have some worried over the safety of my character oxford britannica anyways the one thing that has been cool that sort sort of came of this which i almost feel like maybe i will continue going forward with other characters. Though i guess i can't when i'm writing recaps from d._m.'s perspective on the the thing about that anyways <hes> the suggested i write my recaps from the point of view of my character so my character you can listen to a a previous episode where i read his backstory. He's eight gnome wizard. Just boil it down a little or rather a lot <hes> so okay..

terry pratt d._m. D._v._d. deming three months
"d._v._d" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"d._v._d" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"The biggest one was this <unk> gas station in santa monica which basically was offering thirty cent a gallon gas and it fucking caused so much. It's traffic the cops. They didn't understand what's going on because there's this bottleneck by the ten men took down anyway on the cop said to get there and just basically shut the fucking thing down there like no this. Is your your fucking up the entire flow of traffic which is kind of like this sad thing where on one hand it's like you see just how entrenched this city is in the show biz machine that they can be like hi. The city will be an ad today right and then also like the terrible able disparity between haves and have nots in the city where you have people being like ha ha thirty cents a gallon gas and other people like what thirty cents thirty cents a gallon gas go there. I will i title right now yeah yeah and it was i mean you know they had things like a scoop of ice cream for eighty cents from haagen-dazs more fucking a cupcake for for for a quarter but yet it seemed like this gas station thing was the biggest disturbance and also like just the power that fucking amazon has two wheeled or like yeah. We'll eat all that all the losses on this promo and pay for subsidize it. This is a bit of a humble brag but i am an emmy. Voter amazon is fucking relentless with the d._v._d.'s and there are streaming service right like during the whole like nomination process. It was amazon. Hulu netflix sent out more d._v._d.'s anyone i was throwing route fifty countless right yeah. It's something that i'm already streaming for free. It's funny what they should do is just give you if they're gonna be sort of slick about it. Just give you the fucking temporary pass to to stream it yes and data code but then some networks do that yeah but like in h._p. Like for the golden globes. Those members are a a little bit elderly bresso. D._v._d.'s help because they're like they're code. I it's fucking d._v._d. You remember that right right but yeah it does. It does seem odd for something thing like as ubiquitous as like amazon or netflix yeah. I know it helps. Larry cudlow is blockbuster stock but yeah. I feel like some cool. Packaging can help sometimes. I don't know like i like getting a cool package in.

amazon santa monica D._v._d. Larry cudlow netflix golden globes h._p d._v._d. one hand
"d._v._d" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"d._v._d" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"If i ever come home with a guy hi then it's like here. We go again guy. We thought that we weren't if we didn't talk about it. We wouldn't giant the corner slipping well. That's when you when you said when you were talking about. <hes> folks like sort of completely separate himselves creating this other a community like that. That's why i said i know just what you're talking about because i think there's specificity in being being my sexual that that's not just true for the black community through early every community where there's like this hyper queer identified part of culture where it's like. No i just go to gay bars. I like love track. I mean we know what it looks like right that thing and because of what it is to be by i i would imagine it's like you can't fully live in that space or you. Can i guess you could be by date men for the rest of your life. Never you know because you might occasionally like have this <hes> shift in how you read by the outside world. It's like you're straddling this line. Where like kinda can't fully dive into that community. It's like i think about. I mean again just talking about t._v. It's like i think about the show noah's ark detroit's show i did. It's like fanta. Anna knows i love noah's ark but it's also about a very self contained community. When my show got announced i remember there was an account. Uh one of those entertainment type accounts that tweeted my show was would be the first show with a queer black lead since that. Let's show and i remember replying to that like pets. Gain polk was like my savior when i was a kid like when i was in college collagen show was out because you have goosebumps on my arm actual and he replied to it it was one of those things where it was like having that show seeing that even though they were all gay it was still like just seeing black men being anything other than straight was amazing and i remember at the time when i first discovered the show i bought the d._v._d.'s these and i hid them as i didn't want anybody to light just stumble upon them and be like what's this this oh really into the church just like variances saving animals to to. It's just like just a good show that i watch no reason but yeah like having until i watch that in secret as like a college was twani <unk> had i had to be like in my early twenties torch into college. Maybe the same age older you thirty three okay. I'm thirty six a little older than you but like same thing where i was like discovering that right 'cause like that show was on not like sort of concurrently with the l word after queer as folk so there had been like literally lake three yeah shows that had at all a great community but then queers folk. I don't know if i don't remember any black characters on the always there was one rose one who likes like stood for all the how it is right and then but was great 'cause there's actors also had like chemistry with each each other. Yeah it was a lot of care and they weren't like they were being fully who they were like in polk did a great job with just being like back. I'm gonna make these characters like the people i know and it was just great. See even if you like they didn't necessarily care for the content or whatever it was. It was like these people are living a version of my life. I remember how you heard about it. I'm curious. I think it might have come from <hes> might might even saw an ad on logo or something right because i used to watch when like i remember when logo got announcing outside channel like what would stuff off with anything that i'm like might be able to relate to in another way and it was like such a big deal like kate. Mckinnon was on that like vacation vacation absolutely <hes> shoes she was that was great in. I think it was because i saw an ad for it because it had been. I don't think i'd had come into it in season one..

noah polk Mckinnon detroit kate Anna d._v._d.
"d._v._d" Discussed on Kinda Funny Games Daily

Kinda Funny Games Daily

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"d._v._d" Discussed on Kinda Funny Games Daily

"Ooh That was going to be able to talk about it today. The Embargoes Tomorrow uh-huh at least you caught it yeah right exactly. I'm Jim on the video portion of the pockets. We have a special episode going into the podcast feed. It's just US talking to folks from obsidian entertainment but in the main podcast it's our feature segment and we've got some gameplay that I captured from both my game play and Steiner's game play so if you guys want to see that AH head on over to our Youtube Channel but when it comes to everything happening in modern warfare I know that after you and I I saw this revealed during judges week there was a lot of chatter among the judges about like how it's going to play when we got to see the multi-player there the first thing that struck me was that this this kind of juxtaposition between there's like the Super Gritty realistic story that they're trying to ripped from the headlines and and then there's the multiplayer which you can't deny is so much fun being call of duty is to play with absolutely alien sex so they are really pushing the envelope and it doesn't I still am conflicted and I think the fact that I feel something means that they're doing something right right because because otherwise we would probably just like handed away and be like dumb right because there's been way more controversial things in the video game space than this but because it's call of duty beauty all eyes are on activision and feeding award like are they going to stick this landing and there's so much baggage associated positively negatively with call of duty right absolutely absolutely and I don't want to rehash everything you and Gary spoke about yesterday but my kind of like t l D._R.. Opinion is you know if you're gonNA take issue with the white phosphorous. You should take issue with all of the Celtics in the game. Anything should not play this game. You should have a problem with this game at large picking out this one individual thing is a a bit Asinine to me sure Taylor tweets Mu and gary last night. Act Pat was us again. I was thinking about how you can still buy. D._V._D.'s despite all the video streaming options but realize that isn't true Netflix exclusive shows where they want ah to drive to you to their platform. You are confident it will continue to be possible to just by individual games but do you think certain games could start being made into into exclusives exclusives for the Subscription Services Game Pass.

Pat gary Steiner Celtics Youtube activision Netflix D._V._D.
"d._v._d" Discussed on AppStories

AppStories

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"d._v._d" Discussed on AppStories

"To have the new weather line which is an excellent alternative to the apple weather APP for example but for flight and instead. I think flighty is a is the logic pretend of flight-tracking d._v._D.'s and not not everybody needs that yes and I think this points out a couple of things first of all. I think that business models now more than ever are important when we're reviewing an APP because and this is something I mean I guess for the developers out there to think about is letting people like us no as far in advance as possible. How your pricing your APP because I didn't you know I didn't know till fairly late in the game with the pricing was going the be here and you know in a world that we had five years ago when most apps were five dollars or less? The price was not a very big factor in the review but an APP. That's priced at seventy dollars a year. Are That's not something that we can just act like anybody is going to want to pay for it right. I mean this this narrows the audience for this particular APP especially when as you said I think we both had the sense that a lot of people were expecting this to be more of an APP for. Everybody and I don't think it really is <hes> so there's that I just think that you know pricing become a bigger part of our jobs in terms of figuring out who the APPS or four and you know whether it fits that audience well and and then secondly I don't want to pass by the fact that there is a free version you can use this APP for free and it'll give you the basics the kind of stuff that you and I care about like departure times and gates and baggage claim and all that sort of stuff the problem though no is is that what they do in the APP is they they take these sections that are pro that have pro and they blurred them out and interspersed between those blocks of blurred and it's the data behind the blurring you can read it. It's not totally blurred but it's not the actual data. It's placeholder data so it's really just like it's like dummy data so fake data <hes> Yes yes. It is so it's it's all it's doing then for someone who's using the APP for for free is making the view a lot longer and requiring you to scroll past some of that in order to get to the data that is part of the free plan and that really bothered me just because I just feel like it was a bad user experience especially since those blurred sections in the corner had a little try pro badge in the corner which there were five of those and you know part of the thing to sell it part of the marketing of this was that it's Ad Free I have a hard time calling all in that it's not third party ads but its ads for the pro-peace hours yeah right right and and you know especially an APP that is also marketed as.

apple d._v._D. seventy dollars five dollars five years
"d._v._d" Discussed on How Did This Get Made?

How Did This Get Made?

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"d._v._d" Discussed on How Did This Get Made?

"All birds DOT COM to get your very own pair of the best shoes I've even heard that God wears them all right. Thank you to our sponsors. <hes> <hes> no it is time for mailbag. Yes that is the mailbag theme but unfortunately I am on tour right now and I do not have access to my mailbox but I do have a story for you. You know how I've been harassed by Michael Bay every single week on this many episode guess what Michael Bay came to one of our live shows not only to come he came with a stack giant stack of transformers revenge of the Fallen D._v._D.'s and was handing them out to audience members. He was wearing a mask he had a partner who was a woman. That's what I get and handing out masks so when we went out to the Bell I looked down to the audience and saw a bunch of optimus prime faces out there people were carrying the D._v._d.. And then this happened now before we get into the main part of the show. I noticed that my arch nemesis is here tonight. I don't know if you know what I'm talking about but if you listen to the mini episode you know that I have been harassed week in an week seek out by someone calling themselves Michael Bay sending me ransom letter notes written in Crayon and always sending me a copy of transformers revenge of the falling. I don't know what it started. I will easily say there's about Sixty D._v._D.'s that air will because they keep on coming. Sometimes they're indifferent D._V._D.. Boxes like you'll get a box and it'd be like Shawshank redemption and you open it up transformers revenge of the last week we received a region to like a British version two-pack a transformers two-pack and they took out the first movie and just put two versions of the other movie. There's a twitter account called anonymous prime sends me threatening messages about reviewing transformers venue the fallen. There's an instagram. The grand count also doing the same thing and what I heard tonight. was that someone well not someone that person Michael Bay anonymous prime was out in front worrying a transformers mask passing out copies of transformers advantage of the phone. I feed people in the masks. I see masks. I see the D._V._D.'s. I don't know the game but is is that person I don't want them to reveal themselves to which I hope I told that person please wear masks because I don't want us to ever end but until that person goes bankrupt and pays the ultimate price for this dumb bitch but is that person here you can just shut out yes or no wound and balcony. I Care See frankly surprised. It's dude. I can't see Z.. WHO's up the balconies? I'M GONNA ask one more question. Would you like to make your case. which is me to come up? There and you can make your case yes or no the getting better I I is GonNa be a good. That was the best answer. The bit is amazing and he knows how to no no. I'm thrilled. I'm on our hi. I'm back on the higher that I got one quiet. It's signed with the clippers after that answer yes for nation learn how we do Michael Bay. I love you more and more every day..

Michael Bay D._V._D. clippers twitter partner
"d._v._d" Discussed on Boomer & Gio

Boomer & Gio

15:19 min | 1 year ago

"d._v._d" Discussed on Boomer & Gio

"I don't think so not sure sometimes. It's hard to tell maybe a questionable memorial. Here's another Memorial Day weekend barbecue from Al.. If you're going to a barbecue this weekend be sure to bring along a pair of sunglasses not to protect your eyes from the sun but to be able to check out hot chicks bikinis by the poll without them knowing. You're staring at that those bell if it's a family barbecue barbecue forget this whole idea checking out your own relatives in Bikinis is Disgusting Happy Memorial Day of Robotic Three Day weekend. There's nothing wrong with that in a father's day so here's another father's Day gift tip from Al Dukes. If you don't know what to get your dad for father's Day ask yourself this question. Is My sister a stripper. If the answer is yes that means does he paid no attention to her and must have been focused completely on your literally career thinking. He had the next Derrick jeeter on his hands so you have to pony up with something expensive like a d._v._d.. Player or something happy father's Day everybody T._v.. D._V._D.'s the idea.

Al Dukes Derrick jeeter D._V._D. Three Day
"d._v._d" Discussed on Notsam Wrestling

Notsam Wrestling

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"d._v._d" Discussed on Notsam Wrestling

"Everything so everybody's got a different opinion on it but I think the one thing especially when I was watching some of that stuff was <hes> ultimately like being aware of what was happening and then just fear that some of your favorites were going to go away that you never see your favorites ever again. Sandman Dreamer R._V. Like the list just goes on and on and it's like we're never going to see these guys again. Where are they going to go? You know what's going to happen and if we're if we're speaking honestly there were a lot of guys that were perfectly positioned in an e c w environment you C._W.. Is a very unique environment so even if these superstars are moving over to a W._W._e.. Or wherever else it's not the same. You know what I mean like W._W._e.. Isn't positioned to have a guy like the Sandman on top. Just Not GonNa happen so you never know no. That's the crazy thing is that and it gets talked about nowadays. There's five brands within W._W._e.. Alone when I was like okay maybe one guy on this brand make sense on this one but if he came here it'd be completely outlandish right so it's just finding where that book on the shelf so to speak but it's interesting that we that we talk about that because you chose EC w one night stand two thousand six now. This was a year end to kind of the resurgence of e C._W.. As a brand EC W goes away in the early two thousands and a few years later W._W._e.. Puts Out This D._V._d.. The rise in the fall of E C W and it's great it's on the network. The documentary part is on the network. It's almost three hours long and they go through everything. Everything is great. It's awesome. I love it. It's still probably my favorite W._W._e.. Home video release ever and it sold like crazy it sold. I think only Wrestlemainia sold more D._V._d.'s the year that then d._v._d.. D._V._D. came out so you know raise a lot of eyebrows and then the story goes that Rob Van dam was the first person that actually pitched Vince McMahon on an e c w reunion pay per view and said you got all these guys here wanting you to NEC W. Pay Per view and then the wheels start turning the D._V._d.. Sales are with the D._V._D.. Sales are and in two thousand five they put together this one night. Stand pay per view at the Hammerstein ballroom which is done in a way the W._w._e.. Never really had or it really has since done it. It was totally different totally different if it didn't look like W._W._e.. It wasn't polished. It looked like the people producing EC W pay per views were truly given free reign and and they produce this pay per view in the paper was super successful. I think it did three hundred thousand pay per view buys it sold out Hammerstein ballroom and it was one of the first pay per views that they offered on W._w._e.. Dot Com the website crashed so apparently you were even more than the three hundred thousand that wanted to see this thing and then of course the D._V._D.. And everything and they go okay. WE'RE GONNA go back next year and we're going to do one night. Stand two thousand six and this pay per view is unique because this this isn't a reunion show because right around one night stand two thousand five Shane Douglas was doing what was it was the hardcore homecoming and doing his own independent e c w revival brand that kind of lasted actually a few shows independently <hes> and there's a couple of D._v._D.'s.

Hammerstein ballroom D._V._D. EC W Shane Douglas Vince McMahon Rob Van Wrestlemainia D._V._d. three hours
"d._v._d" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"d._v._d" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"Just you have to be really careful about money. <hes> I think always write. Thank you cards. After you have a big meeting. Show your subjects the movie even though makes you want to Gouge your eyeballs out to show completed movies and this is what this is not. You don't want the feedback you're just saying. Here's it's coming right editorial involvement whatsoever win. It's locked in the can you show prior to premier date in. What does that get you do for you for them? It's really about them not feeling confronted with the fact put that it's on each beyond people are commenting on before that they've had a chance to process it really about respect people giving you their time and you allowing them time to process it. There's a brutal scene <hes> I was thinking about this watching it. <hes> where <hes> Conrad Roy's father acknowledged that he'd beat him and you've just shown footage of pictures of his face <hes> from I guess the police report <hes> and he talks about what he says. This is a little embarrassing and sort of tries to defend it but I can't imagine being on first of all sitting being on camera for that question in answering not walking away and then knowing that's going to be shown what was the reaction when he saw that so asking Conrad's Dad why in the circumstances that led up to his sons concussion precluded him from being able to see the film before it aired. I showed Lynn Roy his mother that did not have a history of violence with her son. What do you mean precluded? He just didn't show it to him I didn't I didn't you know I feel like I owed a debt of gratitude to his mother but I did not do the same thing for his father. His father didn't respond to my email when we when I tried reaching out to him I mean I'm assuming that by the time he got to the Roy's and everyone involved a lot of exposed to media a lot of them had thought about whether or not they wanNA participate participate in a thing like this they might have thoughts about whether or not they want to get paid <hes>. Do you WANNA deal with subjects who are sort of aware of what's happening to them. Aware of what your role is that you're GonNa make a movie that they may not have control over or they will have have control over or would you rather have them come to really fresh. It's a great question like for Mommy Dearest. No one was trying to ask them questions. I was just like I was this girl and it was like the grandparents talking about D._v._D.'s ashes in the toilet and like I don't know there's so much it was so much easier. 'cause there was a bit of humor and like with the Conrad Roy family there were so harangued by the media and so sought after that just a phalanx of cameras out to national and they retreated league celebrities like chased after contacted. I really felt like a cultural vulture being at that courthouse and dragging all my camera kit and sweating and just being like you know I can. I'm going to make a long form documentary and we don't care kids kids dead like you know I think that they they ended up participating but I think it was through a ton of careful contemplation because you look at my trajectory as a filmmaker..

Conrad Roy Lynn Roy Conrad D._v._D.
"d._v._d" Discussed on Radio Free Endor: A "Star Wars" Podcast

Radio Free Endor: A "Star Wars" Podcast

06:50 min | 2 years ago

"d._v._d" Discussed on Radio Free Endor: A "Star Wars" Podcast

"About fetch quit for three D._v._D.'s but I was quite happy without that. I bet you now charging double unanimity. Both I've got them and it's to see them but say man Youtube I bet you for going youtube. What could probably get him now for free well streak as the stiffen the Blair idea so she's really north to finally see all the all the old <hes> you know make it off in the Empire S._p._F.? Eggs in allies gonNA vote all duck as but there are a few the the on now I keep thinking is seen rely. I have to figure out to <hes> V._H._S. to <hes> to to to to U._S._B.. Conversions because of sang many have <hes> like old brash programs and breakfast TV and things like that with into interesting into us on the of just you know they've been lost time really apart from people's old V._H._S. tapes you nine so it's is one of these days left to do those transfers share them with everybody is it's a shame in that stuff goes away and I think there is a lot transitory. Median incomes to stole was because everybody just programs about adding especially when when one of movies really really big force awakens was when it came amount is look just like every channel wanted to put special. Didn't they yeah they. Did you now free. You know you're talking about these old T._v.. Specials I remember sitting down <hes> for breakfast and I don't know if you remember. It's <hes> <hes> poll but there was a.

youtube D._v._D. Blair