35 Burst results for "D N. J Diagnostics"

"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

04:21 min | Last month

"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"5000 Ford certified genetic counselors in the United States. So then there's a lot more programs popping up. There's a lot of training programs are getting bigger. Typically, class sizes are very small. They're trying to expand it. One of the issues with getting trained for genetic counseling is finding training trainers. So then it's just tough to find genetics clinics. Genetics is really underserved. But Janet counseling was recently there was licensure in the state of Florida and that's a nationwide trend where we're now just being recognized as clinical providers. So then, yeah, it is great job security. It's only going to get bigger, we're only going to do more. So in that sense, it's very exciting. Even I've been doing this for over ten years now and things have really dramatically changed since I've been since I started. Yeah, I think it's going to be even more interesting. I'm really glad we talked about this because I think I would rather have a genetic counselor who is a little bit more of a psychologist than and who knows how to deal with people, communicator, then a scientist who has a bunch of numbers in front of them. And I think that I really see the magic in this. Luckily, we haven't had to interact with any genetic counselors because everything's coming out Rosie. But it's one of these things that I think going forward is I'm advising students. This seems like a really good place to think about because it just seems like our opportunities will be growing. And I think a lot of physicians recognize that as well, where we might have a better ability to communicate. I mean, literally, you take training and genetic counseling programs for risk discussion and how you give results. So then, I mean, these are things that we literally practice that we train for. So then some news probably delivered in a more empathetic manner the language itself is easier to understand versus maybe the doctor is very, very smart, but maybe not the best communicator.

Ford Janet United States Florida Rosie
"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

05:12 min | Last month

"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"So then information can be good, but information can be bad. And there's such thing as too much information and that might be one example where, hey, you know, it's not necessarily calls intellectual disability. It's not necessarily going to cause birth defects. Prenatal detection probably has a better outcome versus postnatal detection for the reason that postnatally, you're doing it, you're finding out for a reason. The kid has developmental delays. They're just more sick. Maybe they have a burst effect versus prenatally. It's almost always incidental just by accident. Oh, what's next for genetic counselors? I mean, what's the Holy Grail of prenatal testing that's not currently available? Like, what would you really like to know that could help parents make better decisions? That's a tough question. So Holy Grail, my first thought would be noninvasive diagnostic testing. I would think that that may not be so free, though. So, you know, just a maternal blood test to say definitively, yes or no about genetic diseases is still, it's still it's a pipe dream. So then, you know, where we're at right now is self re DNA is expanding. So then we've talked about autosomal aneuploidy, so trisomy 13, 18, 21. We've talked about sex chromosome and extra missing X's and Y's. Cell free DNA can look for microdeletions, so digeorge syndrome, 22 Q, creed shot, well, for sure, a few others. Whole genome cell free DNA is already available, but test performance is kind of unknown. So they can't necessarily tell you how good they are looking at other chromosomes besides 13, 18, 21, a whole exome sequencing, whole genome sequencing are already clinically available, but you have to do an invasive procedure. So then in terms of genetic testing, every day there's new tests added to the menu. The menu is only growing. So then the roles for the genetic counselor is only expanding the 21st century is going in the direction of genetics. So not everything is genetic, but just more and more testing you do, the more you learn and the more it just creates more and more business. Yeah, and I think that's really bodes well for job security. I tell all my students this all the time. I say stay in BioTech and stay in genetics because this is another interesting part. As we get into the area of personalized genetics, you know, I've had guests on the podcast who said that, before you go to the physician, you're going to have a blood test that's going and you're going to have a complete genome sequence that you'll go in and give a report to your physician about. Here's what's going on genetically with me. Yep. And will those kinds of reports how valuable will those kinds of reports be to take mom and dad and before they even consider losing birth control? I mean, are there certain people that maybe just shouldn't be reproducing and we can make those calls before they even get knee deep in the process? So

digeorge syndrome
"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

04:59 min | Last month

"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"Same time everybody's together on a Zoom call. Because we all live in different places in the country. And we had everybody on and my wife starts going through the report, and it doesn't say male or female. Or pink or blue or whatever. It doesn't give you a clear indication as to what they found. And so she spent about 15 minutes, everyone's bored, everyone's getting ready to hang up. And finally, I looked at it, and this is no Y chromosome detective. And that's actually what they tell you. So all I know is that there's no Y chromosome detected. I'm guessing that it is likely to be female. So it was just kind of interesting how that came together for us. But yeah, they definitely make you read through the lines. You know, one thing that this technology can tell you that many patients may not be aware is sex chromosome manually. So then you can have extra or missing X's and Y's and that's something that's not really on a lot of people's radar that blood test could also tell you. You may or may not want to know. How common is Y chromosome Manu ploidy? XYY is what you call Jacob syndrome so then my understanding, maybe like just as calm as down syndrome, if not more common, the thing about XYY, there's also other conditions, XXY, Klein filters, there's triple X. A lot of people who have those problems have no idea that they have that condition because they may not necessarily create problems that you have to go to the doctor for, where you can have some delays, you can have some learning problems, but maybe they're not significant. Significant enough that you're getting referred to a geneticist for microarray or Acura type. So then those things are actually very common, but also unrecognized in many people. I remember years ago, it was very controversial that looking at X, Y, Y suggesting that maybe they were more aggressive or more people in prison with X, Y, Y and that they really just kind of don't test for that routinely, unless it seems to partner with other types of physical abnormalities, or physiological abnormalities, is that still pretty much the case? No, not at all. So that's what I was taught to classic old school textbook would teach you that. The thing is, if you test abnormal populations, yes, you can find that type of thing, but once you start testing normal people, you find it a lot more common. So then they don't think XYY creates criminals anymore. Essentially, if you have a learning disability, maybe you would make a bad choice or perhaps you put yourself in not a great situation with other people. You know, you just maybe a little bit more vulnerable, and I think that's the explanation right now. But a lot of stuff is just variation of normal, so then X, Y, Y, yes, you might be a little bit tall, but if your family's tall to begin with, then you're probably just gonna be part of the pack. You know, if you're kind of shorter to begin with and you're an inch taller, well then you're a normal height.

Klein
"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

03:37 min | Last month

"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"The window where it starts, so most all labs except blood at ten weeks. There are a lab like one or two labs that might go earlier at 9 weeks. One of the issues with the early gestational age, it sounds attractive. Hey, we can get this done, but you might be limited in the songs that you need to get into your ob office. You got to have your first initial prenatal visit. So then sometimes you don't get it done exactly at ten weeks, just because of the logistics of the office. Yeah, that's true. But at the same time, you know, and maybe this is an area you don't want to get into, but with all the laws around termination of pregnancy, things like that, where which don't have any allowance for fetal condition or maternal health, that you may, at early as good, to be able to make decisions early in a pregnancy rather than having something that's detected at 16 or 20. Exactly. So, you know, without any controversial OB offices generally speaking, should be aware of what you're talking about. And at least moving in the direction, everything's going early. Everything, blood works early, ultrasound early, it's all going in that direction. And what about markers for things like neural tube defects? Well, okay, not everything is genetic, so then spina bifida, a whole spine, neural tube defects, ultrasound is the primary the primary tool for diagnosis of neural tube defects in the second trimester, you have alpha fetoprotein, but that blood test detection rates are maybe 70 to 80%, and you have a lot of false positives. So then in the hand of a practiced stenographer and experienced physician, ultrasound will tell you yes or no

"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

04:24 min | Last month

"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"You're going to have a complication because of one of those procedures, typically it's going to happen that day that night, you would know it sooner rather than later. What they are invasive, CVS is a placental biopsy, it's performed one of two different ways, amnio is the classic needle in the belly test. They take the fluid out, so they are invasive. They are uncomfortable. They do come with risk. When we offer these procedures, generally, when we offer it, what we're really communicating is that the risk that we're going to find a diagnosis on one of these procedures is greater than the risk for miscarriage. I see. So that makes a lot of sense. Well, I love this self free stuff. And you mentioned this a couple times. So let's clarify exactly what this is. So when a woman is pregnant and she's past a certain time, like I guess it's ten weeks into the pregnancy, that there is a certain amount of fetal blood that is present that circulating in her system that can be used as a diagnostic tool. I mean, do I have that right or is it fetal cells that are being shed or where are his placental or what's going on there? So close. Cell free DNA are small fragments. They may be 100, 200 base pair long. So what happens is cells from your body die, they break open, they release fragments of DNA, cells from the placenta die, break open and release fragments of the DNA. So then the laboratory captures these fragments and based on the sequence, they can determine the chromosome of origin. So they'll say, this comes from chromosome number one, this comes from chromosome 21, so they do what they the process called binning were basically they put the stuff in a bucket and they take the number of fragments from chromosome 21 and they compare it to a reference, certain stuff just has to be normal, like you can't have a trisomy one in a pregnancy for the most part because you wouldn't be pregnant. It's just not compatible with life. If the lab finds the proper amount of DNA, everything is in the correct representation, and the pregnancy are both normal.

CVS
"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

04:10 min | Last month

"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"Counseling at the university of Florida, a board certified genetic counselor who has helping parents understand the genetics of the unborn child who's coming along, and I ran in the Dan through kind of a circuitous method in that I'm expecting a daughter in May. And when we got news on this back in August, we were really lost because we didn't know what to do next. And both of us are advanced stage parents. And I sent a quick note over to someone here at the university and they got me in touch with Dan and he was extremely helpful in helping me understand what was going to happen over the next couple of weeks, and it's gone as planned and everything looks really cool. And it's been really fun. It was fun to go into this having a conversation with you first because everything the physicians came to me with was stuff I heard about already. So thank you for that. Congratulations. Yeah, thank you. It really was helpful. Some of the things that were really important that you mentioned right off the bat when we talked the first time was that there's advances in high throughput sequencing, which really have changed what this early diagnostic screenings are. And are things like amniocentesis even performed anymore or is everything really just take a little bit of maternal blood and do high throughput sequencing and either look for discrete genetic changes or maybe misrepresentation of specific chromosome parts. Like what's happening now? Yeah, so then just for perspective, maternal blood for things like down syndrome is never going to be diagnostic. It's never going to say a 100% yes or no. It has very high detection rates, for example, cell free DNA should detect approximately 99% of cases of down syndrome. So then if your child truly has it 99% of the time, it's going to flag it as a high risk, but as your risk a 100%, no, but it would still be very high.

university of Florida Dan
"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

05:03 min | Last month

"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"Are these tests all PCR based where they just get a little bit of maternal blood and then make a little DNA and test away or is that how this works? It depends on the nature of the condition, so then, you know, PCR, yes, in the sense that it involves genetic testing. Is it always sequencing or common mutation analysis? Well, there would be a nucleotide repeat disorders like fragile X syndrome, sometimes it's not even necessarily genetic testing rather you could do a hemoglobin electrophoresis test for sickle cell, made its Alyssa Mia. So then there's a few different ways that you can go about getting some genetic information. And when they talk about carrier screening, at the mother, maybe screen her blood for whatever number of recessive autosomal traits, are there or how many do they test for? And what are some common ones they might look for? American college obstetrics gynecology acog, American college of medical genetics, ACMG. They both have some standard guidelines to offer all women cystic fibrosis screenings, spinal muscular atrophy screening, hemoglobinopathy screening. So that's kind of the bare minimum that people should be offered, depending on the family's history, if there's a family history of autism or intellectual disability, you could do fragile X syndrome. Nowadays given the cost has gone down. From any of these tests, they would perhaps offer a pan ethnic panel where it may not necessarily be tailored to your identified ethnicity, but it covers a variety of different conditions from different ethnicities, the same concept is what you call expanded carrier screen, where you could test for one, two, three, but you could test for ten and 100, 200, even maybe more than 300 different traits. Yeah, there's one thing we learned from services like 23andMe is that most of us don't really know what our ethnicities really are. What the family story may not be accurate. Right. Yeah, and that maybe there may be their may be traits that maybe worth screening for. And so they don't really test the father unless the mother comes back positive or how do they, how do they draw that line? Yet, because of their autosomal recessive, so then if mom is negative or normal, you stop there if she's positive, then you're also for partner or the same tennis because it's the combination of the parents versus, you know, there are going to be sex linked conditions, fragile X, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, where you're only testing the mother or then she gets a risk of the habitat effected.

American college of medical ge Alyssa Mia X syndrome acog spinal muscular atrophy cystic fibrosis autism tennis
"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

05:20 min | Last month

"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"Your personal goals, beliefs, morals, and sort of helping decide how much information you want, how far you willing to go to get that information. So then really, in terms of just patient care, I'm a patient advocate. So then explaining test results, going through all of your different options, really creating a personalized plan, and then from the clinic background and really a big tool for that physician is to use just again, in terms of communicating with patients. So then doctors use lots of medical jargon. It can be really difficult to understand exactly the point that the doctor is getting across the physician has limited time in the exam room where then I just have more time to spend with the patient who more opportunity to talk about things with them and really again sort of personalize things for them and their family. So in terms of prenatal genetic counseling in the office, I see myself having two different holes, one would be seal risk assessment. What's the chances that your baby has? If it's down syndrome or birth defect and risk can come from lots of different places and then number two, prenatal diagnosis. So I'm not a physician. I don't touch people. I don't do procedures, but how good is your blood test? How good is the ultrasound? Do you need neogenesis? Those are the main two topics that I would sort of emphasize to a patient. Yeah, one part I didn't really appreciate is to counseling aspect. So it's not just enough to be able to interpret reports and understand the science. You have to be really adept at connecting with people at a human level to help guide them to appropriate decisions. And it can be a very stressful decision so then we can go through numbers and statistics all day, but a lot of Stanley planning choices are just based on personal factors. So then what number child this is for you, you know, hate to bring up money, but how much money do you guys make? How strong their relationship is, how strong in marriage is what your religion is. There's all these personal factors that people use to decide, you know, we would like it to be medical based, but in the real world, it's not black or white. People eat their shades of gray and it can be sort of hard to distinguish to choose the right path.

Stanley
"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

01:34 min | Last month

"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"Had ultrasounds that came along and other diagnostic tools that you could use, but nothing that could predict some of the major problems that could happen, things like down syndrome, for instance. Later on amniocentesis would come in and in other ways that you could start to assess genetic genetic integrity of the fetus. And we've talked about that a little bit here on the podcast. But recently I've learned of new ways that of diagnostics, new things that could happen. And I wanted to talk to an expert. We're speaking with Daniel weissman. He's a manager of genetic counseling, a board certified genetic counselor at the university of Florida, so welcome to the podcast Dan. Hello, thank you for having me. Yeah, this is super cool. Why is prenatal genetic counseling so important? It could be hard to explain the value the importance of genetic counseling. And the most part, not many people actually know what genetic counseling is. So even before you get to the value, the importance of it, a lot of people, they just literally have no idea what I do. So essentially, the biggest importance of genetic counseling would be communication. So hopefully your genetic counselor is an effective communicator where they can translate these complex ideas concepts. They can interpret your complex test result in ways that a patient would be able to understand. So into more digestible parts. And then from a, I guess from a patient's perspective, Jeanette counselor really should be a patient advocate. So one of the main

Daniel weissman university of Florida Dan Jeanette
"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:50 min | Last month

"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Diagnostics. These are companies that have a ton of cash and also a need to do deals and they actually haven't been very active. This is the biggest deal since actually two years ago to this day one AstraZeneca bought alexion for around $40 billion. And so it's actually been kind of a drought and so people that I talk to do expect there to be a pickup when it comes to especially big pharma deals because the problem that these companies are dealing with, which is that they're drugs are going to go off and hasn't gone away, even though part of what slowed the deal making has been a tougher antitrust environment. No one wants to be the first to do a big blockbuster Bristol Myers Celgene type deal. But this could be one of the first one of what opens the floodgates for that is what they say. So Michelle, I know Sanofi and Johnson & Johnson both backed out of this deal in part due to price. Is there concern in the marketplace that Amgen is paying too much here? You know, that's always the question. It looks like shares in the engine were trading down in pre market, but that's pretty typical in deals, you know, tend to see shares of the buyers go down and the target up. I guess we'll know over the coming days how investors are feeling about this one. I know for the no fee, you know, some of their big shareholders were even though this would have been a deal that would have been kind of outside their typical sweet spot. They were excited about the prospect of it acquiring a company that would give it a bunch of revenue, but ultimately Sam at these shares are rallying today. Just because people are happy, they didn't overlook for themselves to do this. So, I mean, if you're Amgen, I kind of think of Amgen as a BioTech stock. Yeah. How is Amgen perceived in the marketplace these days? You know, it's funny. There are a lot of people who probably, if you mentioned the names like the nofi and Amgen, they would assume that Sanofi is bigger than Amgen because it's a big pharma company, but actually Amgen's bigger with a $150 billion market cap. And Jim is perceived as one of the biotechs that turned into kind of a big pharma player itself. And now it's dealing with the same existential issues that big pharma is dealing with and this is its solution to that. This is its biggest deal since some since 2001, which gave it access to one of its blockbuster drugs Enbrel for rheumatoid arthritis, which the drug that's going to lose its specificity at the end of the second. Michelle, thank you so much. Michelle Davis with us here this morning on Amgen and horizon Therapeutics. With our news in

Amgen alexion Bristol Myers Sanofi AstraZeneca pharma Johnson & Johnson Michelle nofi Sam Jim rheumatoid arthritis Michelle Davis horizon Therapeutics
In a nod to JFK, Biden pushing "moonshot" to fight cancer

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 5 months ago

In a nod to JFK, Biden pushing "moonshot" to fight cancer

"President Biden is giving a nod to a predecessor as he lays out more plans to fight cancer 60 years ago today John F. Kennedy gave his moonshot speech We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things not because they are easy but because they are hard At the JFK library in Boston today President Biden will detail his administration's own moonshot a bid to as The White House says end cancer as we know it He will highlight what could be a game changer in diagnostic testing to dramatically improve early cancer detection a study that looks to validate using blood tests for screening against multiple cancers The American Cancer Society estimates more than 600,000 people will die of cancer diseases this year The presidency aiming to cut cancer deaths in half over the next 25 years

President Biden Jfk Library Cancer John F. Kennedy Boston White House American Cancer Society
Dan Horowitz: Will There Be Long Term Effects on the Heart?

The Dan Bongino Show

01:53 min | 6 months ago

Dan Horowitz: Will There Be Long Term Effects on the Heart?

"Sorry but this has me very concerned that I don't want to miss an opportunity I got this I've told my audience I got it I've really mistake I screwed up I wish I could take it back I can't I had cancer at the time Freaked out man I just knew it wasn't tested and I was just worried And shame on me I'm not trying to cover a frame of butt I worry about this long term I did not get any boosters or anything like that I got I think the Pfizer I don't really sure What do you think long-term here I was under the impression that oh maybe you're in the clear if nothing's happened after 6 months to a year Are you telling me that that may not be the case The biggest concern I think long-term is autoimmune but also heart The FDA warned a while back and I told you this before and for certain reasons approved it anyway but they warned Pfizer's you need to do a study on subclinical myocarditis In other words you might not feel symptoms yet but if you would do a cardiac MRI in some other tests you would start to see scarring on the heart tissue Basically a bunch of Thai researchers you know as soon as last week I wrote an article on this on the base found that the subclinical level is 3.5% of adolescent poisons in their central and 18% of them had abnormal markers on EKGs and other heart diagnostic tests so the hypothesis now that you have to be concerned with at least is that the people that you see dropping right away was the tip of the iceberg and there's a whole magnitude of order maybe 60 fold greater that might have subclinical myocarditis maybe it could stay that way if your whole life or it could go kinetic And we don't know that

Pfizer Cancer FDA
Paul Mango Describes Jared Kushner's Inspirational Attitude

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:14 min | 11 months ago

Paul Mango Describes Jared Kushner's Inspirational Attitude

"You mentioned Jared the president's son in law. He got several sub chapters dealing with his role in the task force. The morning meetings. A lot of conspiracy theories about Jared I've said on this show, I was an observer of the trade council for the president. I just saw a young man who wanted his father in law to succeed and who worked very, very hard. What's your take on Jared after what you witnessed with the coronavirus task force? Yeah, well, I would add to what you said, Sebastian. I think he's a very incisive businessperson with a very incisive mind. He would cut straight to the most important issue in any meeting. And you know what he brought to the table, which was very inspiring to all of us, was nothing is impossible attitude. All throughout COVID, nothing is impossible without standing up, diagnostic testing sites or Therapeutics or as we said vaccines, nothing was impossible for Jared and his team. And that, as I said, inspired all of us. We're talking to the former chief of staff at Health and Human Services. He is the author of the brand new book warp speed. You can order it right now inside the operation that took on COVID and the critics of that operation. You've got to read it right now.

Jared Sebastian Health And Human Services
Jack Posobiec Shares His Thoughts on the Bio-Labs in Ukraine

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:50 min | 11 months ago

Jack Posobiec Shares His Thoughts on the Bio-Labs in Ukraine

"More. Jack, welcome back to the program. Hey Charlie, I was a pleasure. So Jack, what is the truth behind the bio laboratories in Ukraine? There seems to be a lot of chatter about it. Victoria Nuland talked about it in her discussion with Marco Rubio, are these Soviet relics? Are they active? Was the United States involved in it? Was their potential gain of function research? The floor is yours. Well, Charlie, when it comes down to these bioweapons, you know, normally, if we hadn't lived through the events of the last two years, I would be so willing to just say, of course, these are simply, you know, diagnostic testing centers. There's nothing going on here. Don't worry about it. But what we've learned about the NIH is funding and what they were doing through eco health alliance in Wuhan, right? That has given me to the point where I do not trust these people anymore. I don't trust them when it comes to their statements. I don't trust them when it comes to them saying that they're not conducting shady research and foreign laboratories. Like we saw them do in Wuhan. So the question then becomes, why was it? It simply arrested this, right? I thought this entire thing was some ridiculous Russian or Chinese disinfo campaign, try to take the heat off of Wuhan, try to throw some of the Iraq War rhetoric back on our faces. And then all of a sudden, Victoria Nuland comes out and says, well, we have to be very careful about letting any of these research materials get into the hands of the Russians. And the minute she said that, the entire narrative shifted because wait a minute, if what's in there is active, this isn't just stuff that's on ice or something that's very deep underground, that there is something in there that could potentially be used. And then Marco Rubio again responds saying, well, if something was used, it would be by the Russians. Of course, of course, if you used by the Russians. So let me get this straight. What exactly is the magical thinking of the mainstream media now? And I saw you know all these like debunk pieces that have come out. It's this magical thinking that says there's no bioweapons, but even if there are, it's definitely Russians. How does this

Victoria Nuland Wuhan Charlie Marco Rubio Eco Health Alliance Jack Ukraine NIH United States Iraq
Africa detecting just 1 in 7 COVID-19 cases, says WHO study

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Africa detecting just 1 in 7 COVID-19 cases, says WHO study

"A World Health Organization study finds only one in seven cobit nineteen infections in Africa are being detected since the start of the outbreak Africa has reported more than seven million cases of code that nineteen and over two hundred thousand deaths a new WHO's study found that only one in seven infections are being detected end of your travel could bring a surge in cases Dr masterpiece of already is that world health organization's Africa regional director she says more accurate numbers of infections are needed to better curb transmission she says the U. N. plans to increase rapid diagnostic testing in eight African countries the initiative would test people who might be a symptomatic based on a ring strategy that was used against smallpox and Ebola you will target people living within a one hundred metre radius around new confirmed cases I'm Jennifer king

Africa World Health Organization Ebola Smallpox Jennifer King
The Latest: US to increase at-home coronavirus rapid tests

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

The Latest: US to increase at-home coronavirus rapid tests

"There will be many more at home corona virus rapid tests in the coming months the White House says the country is on pace to have about two hundred million at home covert nineteen rapid test available per month beginning in December that's about four times more than earlier this year officials add that the supply boost as a result of a new one billion dollar federal investment on top of the two billion dollars committed to increasing the availability of the convenient diagnostic test in September while less accurate than PCR tests at home kids are cheaper and faster they allow for screening of school children long term care residents and office workers I'm Shelley Adler

White House Shelley Adler
"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on The Long Run

The Long Run

10:10 min | 1 year ago

"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on The Long Run

"Needs to step in and purchase a lot of these things to pull them through to to keep the the trains moving on time. Well you know. I'm this is tough for me. I was saying you read my newsletter. I was saying in may june july that we should be testing for outbreaks. We should be testing for a long time. So i know that people were less aggressive about tasks at that point but i think that it's kind of indicative fact. The tests are not fully appreciate it. We need to be testing even if this was coming to an end or we need to be testing. Even if september october looks like june it will not go away. no pandemic or epidemic has just disappeared. It will trickle out over a period of hopefully months but maybe years so i you know what the volumes are and what. Somebody's costars versus. What their demand is. I can't speak twenty-one companies access that want their margin what how they think about it what the margins can be but So i can only look forward and say please. Let's not be either naive or stick our head in the ground and say it's going to be over in a matter of months and therefore we don't task that testing may change. it may be more wastewater testing. It may be More surveillance type testing than it is diagnostic testing but the technologies are here to stay. And i'm estimating in the developed countries you know two years if you look at nine eighteen more people died in nineteen in the nineteen. Eighteen epidemic pandemic more. People died in the second year than the first year worldwide. That's already happened and we're trying to desperately avoid that in the us but this is not going to go away that quickly then secondly As many have made the case even if we quote figure it out in the us and we go a month with no new cases. It's not going to stay that way unless the rest of the world guests at the same place. We tried locking down in in a historic way. And that didn't work. No no one has patients the lockdown anymore so testing demand is not just about one country. It's about the world so let's figure out ways that we can get the cost down and ensure the testing happens. Broadly not just one country. So can you talk about a couple of the practical ways in which workplaces and schools can implement a testing regimen to you know keep everyone in the office or the school safe and and also Just confident that they can go about their their daily activities without worrying all the time of. Yeah i'm so glad you mentioned that word Worrying because that is the number one issue. They need well. Maybe the better word is confidence. They need to be able to come to be confident about what it is and at asu with rockefeller. We did a a large survey and that was the key piece that people needed to feel safe in the workplace. But we'll let me start with workplace People are itching to go back to work even if it's not in the way they did pre pandemic five days a week and a traditional offense We found that the majority of employers wanted their employees back physically at least twenty hours a week. I think it's all about testing well testing and vaccine mandates vaccine mandates. Make a big difference if nothing else than the cost of their health insurance. But to for what i think is best practices. Is you tat Absolute best practice vaccine mandate and for those who can't and the few who have conscientious objections. you test them twice a week. And then you do occasional random testing of those vaccinated because we know vaccinated people can spread. That's the way you get back to work with confidence and the tasks acts you know. You're talking retail price of twenty twenty five dollars at a wholesale price in in a broadway. You can get them cheaper. That's what i think. Businesses need to do To get the full confidence going back for schools. It's a little bit different and we know the under twelve are not vaccinated but we also know there is a lot of money. Eleven billion dollars from the by administration for school testing. Lack of money should be no reason for any school in this country public private or charter not to task and a lot of people assume the government money was that eleven billion is only for public schools. It isn't the federal legislation said any kind of schools including now pre k. And childcare schools should be testing once a week certainly the unvaccinated which is the majority. But i think for schools given how important it is for people to be their kids and teachers every day and the reality in. Social distancing is really tough With you know at the young ages and in highschool Schools have done a value job. Trying it but it's it's not ideal. So i think schools need to be testing on a regular basis. Everybody wants a week in pool testing So at surveillance is relatively cheap. We're talking about single dollars per test. Many of the states who have made this public Are saying their tests per kid per adult is six seven eight nine ten dollars. That is doable with the federal dollars. They do those of programs they add a mask when possible and not mandated against stone. Don't start me on that Then we can have safety in the classroom in the spring in. I'll i'll stop here. Luke so i get really passionate about this in the spring. Only one percent of pools in schools or positive. I suspect it'll be higher now but even kids are getting covert now. It is still dramatic. The school positively ray is dramatically lower than the community rate. Schools are saver places to be for kids then the grocery store. Let's get them all in school us testing and use tests to stay even when there's an index case test everybody every day. Don't send them home and don't close the schools. Okay yeah i mean the spring That is a good time frame to to think of it I'm the parent of a nine year. Old just started fourth grade and she's ecstatic back to school Ecstatic is so important I think it is up to the theater to get vaccinated all around them but also to set up a a workflow that Takes a little bit of work should happen over. The summer could still happen in these early weeks of fall. But can you sail a little bit about what that might look like for the orange. Be listening here like they show up at the. You know the the parking lot outside the school on monday morning and everybody does a nasal swab and they drop it in a bucket for a pool task or do they all get individual tasks or what's the best practice. Yeah best practice. And i think maybe seventy percent of schools are using well are using a pooled nasal swabs and i'm cautious about best practice because any of these testing practices work but the majority today are using pooled nasal swabs so it either happens as kids are walking in to the school building or as they walk into their homeroom Each kid is given a swab. They pulled down their mask. If they're wearing masks. Personally i hope they are but even if they're not they use the swab anterior nasal swab just in about a half inch into the nose and they put it in. What's called the falcon tube. Which is a larger to that. Everyone from mrs brown's classroom puts it into the same tube. I love one of the kidney. Gardner said oh i understand. It's burgers down. Another gardner said if you can pick your nose you can do this You you use that swab. You put it in and for those part of the tap program. The national testing action programme. You get those results back to the school within twenty four hours. And then when there's a positive pool so mr mrs brown's classroom Is positive most of the time the teachers in that sample to so it's everybody in that classroom. Sometimes in large classrooms. It's too but you get a positive pool. Then you say okay. We need to d- convoluted and either they get another sample or more commonly they use one of these rapid energy tasks right there in the school and they say the twenty kids in this Need to do the same. Buggers down again swab themselves. Put it into the instrument Or into the tests cassette and then find out who amongst those fifteen or twenty were positive. That's it For nasal swabs. I would estimate less than a minute that it takes to do this for the saliva some schools do slide at home if you do saliva in the classroom. Most of the time. The kids are sitting at the wrong desks. Thanks takes maybe three or four minutes. This is not dramatically affecting their educational experience. But it's making the school safe to To you still believe. I know you wrote a piece for minutes. Report a few months ago about.

administration for school asu rockefeller us Luke mr mrs brown mrs brown Gardner gardner
"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on The Long Run

The Long Run

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on The Long Run

"Medicine basically prenatal and when i got into the diagnostics business i fell in love. I love the shored product development cycle. We would have an idea with great team and we could get that on the market in eighteen months in therapeutics they would have an idea and didn't get onto the market for eighteen years. It's not that much an exaggeration. I'll can work with the team. We would see things start and they'd finish in a short period of time and make an impact and at genzyme genetics. We were the first one to do more than eighteen. Different mutations in seattle. We eventually got to a hundred set. The industry standard. We were the first ones to be testing for rare disease during pregnancy and giving people the information to make educated decisions. So when i got there i never wanted to leave an stayed diagnostic since then as great. I love how you put it about information to make educated decisions Because too often were flying blind in medicine without good enough information to make those good decisions now but so you you were there fred genzyme for quite some time and then what was your next step was then tana or i think you did a startup inbetween but could you tell us a little bit about about vintana. Sure an I'd like to talk about the inbetween from moment there because at genzyme. Genetics we did forty two acquisitions of small labs to bill organic growth but also building and i had a great number two and abuse ready to take over so he. I was very pleased to hand him the rain. I did something highly unusual. I took a sabbatical mid career. And i worked at dana farber and harvard medical school. And why did i do that. I wanted to understand how doctors were trained han. How doctors thought about testing diagnostics. So i spent almost a year doing that. As i was ready to go back to genzyme i got a call from a venture capital firm and they said. Why don't you take over as ceo of this brand new company to do circulating tumor cells and long story short. We raised a lot of money. The time twenty six million we were like number one money raiser outside therapeutics that year But the company found we were too early and we did not have strong enough technology and it was during that time a i learned so many lessons. I think it's you don't you don't wanna will always confront your failures. But most of the time you learn more from your failures than you do with your success and so i think that's an important context 'cause during those two years of the startup up and the time at harvard medical school were about amongst the most intellectually challenging of my career. And i i still think about them on a regular basis but it was during that period of time. I got a call from roche who said we The ceo position open in tucson arizona. We want you to come out and become the ceo of town. Medical systems now called rose tissue diagnostics. So that's how. I headed west and got into the ivy de part of the diagnostics field and ventanas in tucson arizona. It is yes. So what did you do there. What kind of experience did you get. Well it was You know came in as ceo and this has been a very thriving company. Rose should come in a few years earlier to buy it and it was at that stage that it was a combination of independent many ways but starting to integrate into roche and it was an exciting time because cancer diagnostics becoming front and center mean. It's ten years ago wasn't that long ago but We forget so quickly how personalized madison companion diagnostics digital imaging. Were not standard. And i believe a little bit biased. But that van tanna roche were on the forefront of all of those trans to make companion diagnostic central There were essentially no business. We had to educate farm and tell them what companions are. And when i left. We had a robust team of twenty people focusing on creating companion diagnostics. Personalize medicine was granted. Not new but it wasn't the de facto standard When i laughed it was an clearly not just me and not just the great tanna team but it had become the primary way for people to be diagnosed. So it's no longer just about you have breast cancer. It was about. You have your positive. Pr negative breast cancer. And the nomenclature change. So i was really excited. And then lastly digital pathology came into its own during those years as well. It was all about glass slides. Now like radiology mammograms. It moved from the physical to the digital. And you know computers are only the result of what humans dead but computers do a much better job in understanding Pathology than do humans. That doesn't mean it could be done with out the human but the combination is powerful and we were again the leader. They are so really proud of the team and what we accomplished really is a new era of when you think about it. I mean In the way we use to define cancer and treat it In a in a more scattershot sort way and get lower a less good results. I mean it's happening now. You are so right. And i talk about this I call it diagnostics. Five point oh. And i won't go into the details but when you you start with diagnostics onepointoh which is all about the doctor. Mostly he at the time and it was all about using their hands in their eyes and their sense of smell and at and to diagnose patients and we move forward to the beginning of the automated era of three point zero. And now we're in four point. Oh and starting to get into five point now which as you said is to see changes to new era which is about genomics personalized madison and most importantly information And that this is where diagnostic shine. There's too many variables for a doctor to keep it all in his or her brain. It's all about those. The data information systems that allow you to understand one of a hundred types of blood cancers one of forty types of breast cancer one of thirty types of colon cancer and that is diagnostics. Five boy no so. I think it's around twenty fourteen timeframe that you're leaving roche fontana So much work Ted happened as you described. In those kind of the early twenty tens period to change the way diagnostics and therapeutics relate to one another and influence a clinical care. But you saw this this This gap here that you described a little bit earlier with the no real graduate training for people who wanna go into the diagnostics business despite all this interesting activity. So how did you kind of. Put this into motion there at creating a program at arizona state..

genzyme genetics genzyme fred genzyme dana farber harvard medical school diagnostics field and ventanas tucson tana van tanna roche arizona seattle breast cancer roche cancers madison roche fontana colon cancer Ted
"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on The Long Run

The Long Run

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on The Long Run

"As delivering a fully compliant. Solution that meets. Fda's strict standards explore. How answer think can streamline your business processes to ensure growth visit answer think dot com slash timmerman and get a copy of their e book top three barriers to growth for life science organizations. That's answer think dot com slash timmerman. Now please join me and mar aspinall on the long run mara aspinall. Welcome to the long run right to be here so mara before we dive in a little bit on your background. Could you say just a little bit about the multiple hats that you're wearing. Currently there's bluestone venture partners health catalysts and arizona state. What are you doing with these three entities. So Have privilege of working with a lot of great teams with center around Diagnostics so bluestone. Venture partners is a venture firm focused on what we call the native states new mexico arizona texas and oklahoma. We believe there are a lot of underappreciated. Great companies management teams in the mountains. Southwest health cattle is group is my small consulting firm again focused on diagnostics and health information technology firms in helping them grow but then to be fair. My real passion is around education for diagnostics. Seven years ago with president michael crow. We co founded the school of diagnostics at arizona state to create what is still the only school in the world with an independent disciplined. Focus on diagnostics. Diagnostics is so often the asterik on other disciplines. We need to make diagnostics center of zone discipline. And that's what the schools killing and part of that work at arizona's state is I was introduced to the team through our national summit at the rockefeller foundation. So with my asu had on. I am a grantee at rockefeller and a senior advisor to rockefeller advisor to rockefeller for. Testing is great. So you really do have a foot in the world of academia as well as the business world As an investor as a consultant. You see a lot of things but the revolving around diagnostics. Can you rewind for us just a little bit of your background like how you got here. I think it was at genzyme. Pioneering biotech company known for rare disease treatments but also had genetics and diagnostics work. How did you get started in diagnostics. So you're absolutely right. It was a genzyme and henry to mia who Passed away too much too soon but five years ago but in any case he was an early supporter of the importance of diagnostics. He took a lot of flack from investors and stakeholders Because they said you have a great therapeutic business y you bothering with diagnostics and henry really believed in the power of information. I like to think about diagnostics. Information business with a wetland on the side it's not about technology it's about information and I was a genzyme as i think. A fun story. I was agenda eight weeks and the diagnosis initially. Well it was a different business. It was the manufacturing business that was failing. But when i was working with henry he really emphasized the importance of creating a national brand national strengthened. Diagnostics we started with oncology and reproductive.

"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on The Long Run

The Long Run

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on The Long Run

"Diagnostics strategy to pair up with targeted therapies. Mara is simply one of the smartest and most experienced people. I know in the diagnostics business. I have sought out her perspective on the crucial in undercover diagnostic testing aspect of the pandemic response. She has written a few terrific guest. Editorials on timmerman report that i've been privileged to edit. I'll post links to those articles on the show summary report. There are a lot of people with opinions about testing. And some are better informed than others better than almost anyone i can think of mara is able to synthesize the disparate threads of science and business and the practical policy challenges of scaling up to meet the need for better cova nineteen testing. I will say as well. This episode was recorded. Friday september third. I was thinking a lot about the start of the school year and why we weren't seeing more widespread rapid testing in k twelve schools around the country regular listeners of the long run. no this isn't a news oriented podcast but this is a really timely topic that i had to ask more about. I did notice in the days after this recording that president biden and others have started talking more about increasing efforts to expand testing. So if this show feels a little dated by the time you listen recognized that everything moves fast in the pandemic and i was seeking to cover some of the big testing questions as they stood on september three. I actually think quite a lot of what mara had to say. We'll still be relevant throughout the fall and further into.

timmerman Mara mara president biden
4-Year-Old Girl Discovers Rare Stingless Bees in California

The Takeout

00:15 sec | 1 year ago

4-Year-Old Girl Discovers Rare Stingless Bees in California

"Four year old girl with a knack for nature, found two colonies of rare stainless bees that went unnoticed for 70 years. The bugs were taken to California's Department of Food and Agriculture Plant Pest Diagnostic Branch. We're scientists say it's a rare find as the Bugs live in

Department Of Food And Agricul California
"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on TechNation Radio Podcast

TechNation Radio Podcast

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on TechNation Radio Podcast

"Close to the pre pandemic levels. Meaning the two thousand nineteen in the second half of twenty twenty but hepatitis. C. confirmed cases by testing. Were still down by forty percent in july and hepatitis c. treatments. The drug prescriptions risk. Down about forty percent in july twenty twenty so we increased testing in large part because of the new guidelines. But we're still missing lots and lots and lots of people who should have been tested. Who didn't so we need to bring these people back in some way. I feel the same way about cancer. I mean Diagnose delayed could be fatal and if people are not going to the doctor because they suspect something may be wrong or could be found in routine testing That's that's essentially a very bad situation obviously. Are you seeing cancer. Testing absolutely and we had a study that was published in jama that looked at the impact of the pandemic newly identified patients with six types of cancer and we showed early in the pandemic. It was down forty six percent compared to baseline Primarily two thousand nineteen so dramatic declines in other data from other sources indicate that screening for breast cancer meeting mammograms colonoscopy in cervical cancer screenings. Were all down. Eighty five to ninety percent at the Nater which is april of twenty twenty. That's when the the the least amount of screening was occurring in the united states. It bounced back in most cases close to baseline. But there's still this large gap of people who did not get tested. We project that they'll be an increase of cancer. Diagnoses in twenty twenty one and beyond dr ned sharpness. Who's the director of the national cancer institute in others at the national cancer institute developed a model to figure out what will happen and what they project is that although we've seen years of decline in cancer deaths that in the next ten years we are likely to see increases in cancer deaths because of the skipped and delayed care during the pandemic. I've been speaking dr harvey kaufman the senior medical director of quest diagnostics. We'll talk more after a break Podcasts.

cancer hepatitis c hepatitis jama dr ned cervical cancer national cancer institute breast cancer united states dr harvey kaufman quest diagnostics
Vanessa Hudgens and Madison Beer Just Launched a DNA-Based Skincare Line

You Beauty

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Vanessa Hudgens and Madison Beer Just Launched a DNA-Based Skincare Line

"In beauty news. That happens every single week. Another celebrity is launching a beauty line. No way i know. It's totally groundbreaking. So vanessa hudgens has teamed up with madison beer. And i had to google. Madison beat workout. Who she was. As soon as i saw her face i knew it. She's an actress. She's born in one thousand nine hundred and nine. So perhaps that's why didn't know she's a little bit younger than me just to beat actress singer songwriter internet personality. So i think that's the term for influence. Aw justin bieber posting covers. That really helped her become famous. And of course. Vanessa hudgens pretty much needs no introduction. But if you haven't watched school musical go and watch it and you'll know who she is anyway. The to have teamed up to launch a skincare brand. And i thought oh boring until i saw what it was about. Its cold northern beauty. And it's all about the skincare you need diagnosed by your aren't dna so day-night tested by having a swab all the us alive on your cheek at sent away and then it comes back and the diagnostic tool then tells you why you have. Certain skin elements what you more susceptible to and then offers a range of products from them. I think this is a little bit of a different angle. And i wanted to chat about this because i have seen dna skin care. Cropping up here in australia aaron. I know you've had one of these tests. What was it like. Yeah so i did the skins to shoot my dna one so that was the end of last year. And yeah as you said. I basically received a kit. I swapped my mouth. And i sent it away to the lab a couple of weeks later i received my results and they came through with my kind of like genetic summary and it had like the percentage of wrinkles and collagen depletion and age spots and whatnot and then they gave me like a personalized skincare. Plan from that but yeah one of the big things that they came out with was like your very irish. Why are you living in a show. You have so much pigmentation around the corner like amazing so pretty much news that you already knew kind of yeah. There was nothing groundbreaking but it was one of those things you walked away from like. Oh damn

Vanessa Hudgens Justin Bieber Madison Google Aaron Australia United States
Shwen Gwee Describes How Voice is Transforming Diagnostics

VOICE Global 2021

02:42 min | 1 year ago

Shwen Gwee Describes How Voice is Transforming Diagnostics

"Let's talk a little bit about Diagnostics which i think is fast. Here's a lot a lot happening here. So i'm just gonna let you take that. The shirt i think on the front. And you know you're starting to see some of these companies e startups whether they're still startups now or whether the much bigger than that because the funding is a good question but some of them are starting to come into this space to really play that role of being more of a triage right. Where you're asking questions based and they'll ask you know they'll ask you about your symptoms and they'll start to narrow it down and provide a recommendation for what hype of condition you might have and so you've got a little bit of that fun end triage before seeing the actual healthcare professional specialists. You go through that kind of process examples of that Like a babylon health where they've actually become really popular globally especially in the uk where the nhl has adopted them as part of the process and then on the other end when when it comes to diagnostics to see some companies and startups really work on that audio channel. That the sample you get from somebody voice to be a way of detecting and diagnosing a condition or disease so really much more what we call it digital biomarker where we're at a voice sample analyze it and then from there detect if maybe you might have signs of depression or anxiety or ms for that matter. So it's really exciting to see how this feels really changing and leveraging these types of channels to provide new kinds of data that can be analyzed through a and machine learning to really start to provide that information and insight to predict what you might have in the suggests based on massive amounts of data and voice apples that were collected. And then if you think about that. I'm so complex. Human tools starting to also collect voice data As you know your apple watch can hear what you're saying go. Hey siri. I should say that. Early watch achmat. Picks up on that something like amazon halo actually picked up in Is able to record your voice and it's starting to be able to Provide information about your mood or or your your your overall condition that day as a result of that. But that's where it's getting really exciting as unique my own voice channels when we talk on the phone or we recorded I know a snapchat or tiktok recording or post and in what did it could be analyzed. Could pick up nuances that allow for that digital biomarker to be Detected and then realized that before you even knew it. You had a specific condition that you should probably go checkout out

NHL Achmat UK Anxiety Depression Apple Amazon
Joseph Turow Examines the Harmful Side of the 'Voice Intelligence' Industry

VOICE Global 2021

02:08 min | 1 year ago

Joseph Turow Examines the Harmful Side of the 'Voice Intelligence' Industry

"Call our industry voice tech industry. But i think it's interesting you use this term. The voice intelligence industry calls. Would you even see that is kind of a parallel industry to the voice tech industry and everything. Well yeah and i i to be clear. I'm not saying that. Voice technology per se is bad and the kind of stuff you do for gamma conferences. That i've been at one which was spectacular. Doesn't really talk about what i'm talking about. In the book so much development of they i when it comes to voice of natural language processing for example and a lot of stuff related to that is terrific. I don't that's not what the book is about. The book is about the use of profiling of the voice in order to make inferences about us that then lead to certain kinds of discriminatory activities. Right and we're that's happening most right now. Interestingly is in an people owning to think about which is context centers call centers. But if you look at the patents that amazon and google and even spotify have and if you speak to people in the end industry as i've done and if you speak to people in the auto industry and others related to that you can see the trajectory is far more related to profiling than most people think interesting. Yeah i think there's there's this you know there. I think there are a number of things happening. You mentioned the patents if you look at all the patents about you know recognizing Being able to make a diagnostic Analysis of our voice on there are there so many things happening. There is a you know. There's kind of a health and wellness piece of this where there's a bunch of potentially life-saving benefits but then on the flip side. You have the same technologies in the same capabilities flipping over to the marketing sides That can be used in a completely different way. But at the core of it like a lot of the same almost a lot saint patents and a lot of would apply

Amazon Google
Shuling Guo on Pharmaceuticals and Cystic Fibrosis

DNA Today

01:52 min | 1 year ago

Shuling Guo on Pharmaceuticals and Cystic Fibrosis

"What is bro says. How does it affect the body Cystic fibrosis all. Cf for sure is dallas being genetic disease. It's one of the most common life threatening inherited. Diseases affecting about seventy thousand people in the world and about half a witch in the united states have has been around for a long long time even in medieval times. They are were folklorist talking about if you kiss a childhood hey saudi. That child will soon die but it was not until the nineteen thirties that this disorder was recognized. Dr dorothy anderson who was a pathologist at that time working at a hospital in new york discovered any name. This disease cystic fibrosis. Since then there has been tremendous amount of research to understand the disease. develop diagnostic tools. And of course develop treatments for this disease when dr arnesen The disease he said something like fake on sticky mucus buildup in the lungs in the pancreas and auto owners leading to life threatening breathing and digestive problems so after so many years of research I think you made quite a bit breakthroughs. For example in nineteen fifty five. A sweat has to became available so this is to really measure the salt concentration in the sweat and this till today is still one of the gold standard for cf screening and then in nineteen eighty nine. The more likely cause of cf was discovered. It was found that it's the defect in the cfpb. G thou these two. Cf

Cystic Fibrosis Dr Dorothy Anderson BRO Dr Arnesen Dallas Saudi United States New York Cfpb
The Future of Ecstasy Plus Therapy for PTSD

Science Magazine Podcast

02:25 min | 1 year ago

The Future of Ecstasy Plus Therapy for PTSD

"We have staff writer and editor kelly cervix. She's here to talk about the future of md m a this is a controlled. Substance sometimes called ecstasy or molly that has had some success in clinical trials for ptsd alongside talk therapy. Okay kelly how you doing. I'm doing okay. How are you sarah. Good i'm good. Let's start with the recent clinical trial results of md m. a. and therapy that was tested on. Ptsd patients. how did that go. How did that work. So there were ninety people in this study who were revised to get kind of a unique course of psychotherapy. They had a series of preparatory sessions with a trained therapist and then they got three eight hour long experimental sessions where they got either. Md ama or a placebo and then they got this series of sort of integration sessions to process that experience and the results were that two months after the last experimental session the difference between the drug and the placebo groups was pretty clear. Sixty seven percent of the participants who got md may no longer met the diagnostic criteria for ptsd at that point compared with thirty two percent of those who got placebo so this is sort of the the biggest and most thorough study of its kind to really find potential benefits of this drug in ptsd. What are the effects of this drug and people. I think maybe from popular culture people might think of it as something you take in a nightclub. Yeah this has definitely a reputation of a club drug that. I think that these investigators are really trying to overcome and may have a lot of complicated mechanisms and we don't understand all of them but it's thought that many of its effects come from its ability to increase certain neuro transmitters in the brain including dopamine and serotonin and so people sometimes described euphoric experience. Sometimes a sense of openness and sort of a heightened ability for empathy and you can imagine that something that in the case of ptsd therapists might aimed to exploit if a trauma survivors facing intrusive flashbacks in israeli avoiding these disturbing memories of something that happened to them. This drug might give them sort of less. Fearful less judgmental state in which to reflect on and process. What happened to them. That's the

Kelly Cervix Ptsd Kelly Sarah Trauma
The Populated Intersection Between Trauma and Addiction

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

02:17 min | 1 year ago

The Populated Intersection Between Trauma and Addiction

"Today. Our topic is the intersection between trauma and addiction and recovery from both dr. Stephanie covington's a skilled clinician on inciteful author an engaging public speaker and our guest today. I've had the opportunity to hear. Dr covington lecture several times over the years. But this is the first time i've ever had the honor of interviewing her. Thank you stephanie. For joining us today bigger. Thank you. And i gotta ask you right off the bat. What is your interest in addiction and trauma and the intersection. Where does that come from. Well initially my interest in addiction came from my own experience recovering woman early in my recovery. I thought to myself. I wish one of the women could feel the way i do. A series of events led me into the addiction field. Abc focusing on women. And as i did that. I realized so many of the women i was seeing either in group in a treatment center or private practice i had had trauma histories and i realized nobody was talking about that. And begin to more and it was just. It was the evolution of my work really and those days. now. I'm talking about in the eighties. The addiction field did not want to talk about trauma. I mean i can't even tell you the negative pushback guy it was. It was fairly powerful in the mantra in the addiction. Field was when you're clean and sober. You have a trauma history you can deal with a year from now get a year recovery and then deal with it and i knew many people were never going to get a year pre covering. I wanna come back to having a couple of minutes. Let me ask you i. Can you define trauma for us. Sure the various definitions of trauma. I mean the one that mental health providers using the diagnostic manual is that it's really a life threatening event and it's a life threatening event in which can occur because you experience it or you witnessed so you hear about it happening to somebody else or you get it because you're surrounded by trauma and there has to be a particular response

Stephanie Covington Dr Covington Stephanie Trauma ABC
A Diagnostics Company Moves to Developing Precision Cancer Therapies

The Bio Report

02:22 min | 1 year ago

A Diagnostics Company Moves to Developing Precision Cancer Therapies

"Osama. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me danny. We're going to talk about four bio therapeutics. Its strategic shift from diagnostics to therapy dixon. Our seeking to build a pipeline of targeted therapies. Perhaps we can start with a little history though. Four was known as novellus deacs until this year. What was the name. Change meant to signal once again. Thanks for having me so let me let me maybe go back a little bit in time to come back to the present As you mentioned. Four prior to a few months ago was novellas novellas diagnostics company based out of jerusalem israel companies. About nine years old. It did start out as a diagnostic company The foundational product here was a functional genomics platform that helped physicians providers and pharma companies. Identify the right drugs for the right patients by looking at very specific molecular profiling by patient Over the years as the company was evolving in that diagnostic business model I think a combination of prior management and the board realized that there was a there was quite a bit of opportunity to think about diagnostics internally and develop diagnostics on their own because we were identifying unaddressed. Patient populations and matching them to therapies That were either being developed or already in the marketplace and so at believe early two thousand nineteen the board and the management team decided to pivot from a diagnostic business vital to therapeutics business model and leveraging the platform started to identify across a number of validated cancer targets unaddressed. Patient populations where there's a high unmet need and where the company could really help bring beneficial therapies to market under this scope in early twenty twenty the company in licenses its product from lexicon. It's a next generation. Be rafted addresses class one and class two mutations And within that again using the platform we have begged clearview into creative trial designs. That target high unmet need populations. These are commercially viable populations

Novellus Osama Dixon Danny Pharma Jerusalem Israel Cancer
GM: Software, New Battery Parts Will Solve Bolt Fire Issues

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

GM: Software, New Battery Parts Will Solve Bolt Fire Issues

"General Motors says engineers have found a fix to a battery problem with Chevy bolt electric cars GM recalled nearly seventy thousand Chevy bolt hatchbacks around the world after reports of fires two people suffered smoke inhalation and the house was set ablaze in separate incidents involving five cars after being stopped at first engineers tracked the problem to a manufacturing defect in battery modules major the Caribbean planned for may twenty sixteen through may twenty nineteen the defect can cause a short and a cell which can trigger a fire for now owner should limit charges to ninety percent of capacity as dealers install diagnostic software that will warn the owners of any problems once the final recall repairs are made owners can fully recharge their batteries I'm Tim McGuire

Chevy Bolt Electric GM Caribbean Tim Mcguire
SOS Messages, Panic as Virus Breaks India's Health System

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

SOS Messages, Panic as Virus Breaks India's Health System

"The by the administration says it will speed help to corona virus ravaged India India was seen as a pandemic success story and four months leaders have bragged to the worst was over now I think this is good friends with the go ahead for a fifth straight day India set a new record of inspections more than three hundred fifty thousand Manickam hauled me getting it even as government officials urge people not to panic doctors are begging for help in a call with India's prime minister White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki says president Biden pledged more aid they've identified rapid diagnostic testing supplies personal protective equipment and additional ventilators arch rival pocket stahn is also offering help including the oxygen supply kits Sager mag ani Washington

India Manickam Jen Psaki President Biden White House Ani Washington
US Racing to Send Aid to India as COVID-19 Cases Soar

WGN Programming

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

US Racing to Send Aid to India as COVID-19 Cases Soar

"Pledging immediate medical aid. India to help combat at Surgeon coronavirus cases Party to a White House statement. The U. S is working around the clock to immediately deploy the India drug treatments. Rapid diagnostic covert 19 testing kids, then listeners personal protective equipment. And a lot bore the

Surgeon Coronavirus Cases Part India White House U.
How to Tell if a Foundation Will Match Your Skin Tone

You Beauty

01:51 min | 1 year ago

How to Tell if a Foundation Will Match Your Skin Tone

"Can you please give stuff on five on. What is the best of quite to check that. The foundation that you'll put sing is going to net show. Skin can lays can have like a much better answer to that but my response would be to buy whatever and slap it of yourself. Because that's what i do and then pay. That's not the right shade kelly. I don't care. I blended it down to my nipples. We look like it is exactly it. Just go with it. Look at is really tricky. Good old carver times. Although i don't even think supermarkets ever had tested no it was more like priceline off. Did so there's a few options is a website called foundation dot com. It's a play on foundation and it matches your foundation shades to existing products. You already have so. You need to know your shade. And i think to existing foundations and then we'll tell you you're shading others so four also has an online diagnostics tool. I know we're talking. W and stuff like that. But sephora has a fantastic tool if you didn't want to do that. Some brands have their matching tools. So for example m beauty which is through big no The w would release the big place and there was a w they have their own tool on their website. So you can go on. Without what should i do. I've been hitting store or purchase online. Let's grab that shade. Mecca does give samples. I know that's not part of the question. But if you want perhaps look at investing because by the time i guess trial and error with the more affordable stuff you might go to make our get a little tiny. They'll give you a few skirts in apart that he can go home and try it. But i would believe it or not. You're look a bit strange. But i would take your existing foundations with you and hold up to the bottle because that's better than nothing. It's better than comparing to you. Skin on your hand on the skin on your face by holding up the bottom. That's really the closest you're gonna get on. It is trial and error yes. These are more affordable products knowing waste of money and product. If they don't

Priceline Kelly Sephora Mecca
"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on Core IM | Internal Medicine Podcast

Core IM | Internal Medicine Podcast

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on Core IM | Internal Medicine Podcast

"Now if you see a normal or an elevated serum cloudy you've got some work to do. That's right marty. But the first thing you probably done maybe without even thinking about it is to glance at the bnp if the un or glucose are significantly elevated boom. There's your answer. Yeah and if it's not one of those obvious osmo basic metabolic panel then go. Ask your patient about other commonly encountered alcohol. Or if you find yourself wandering around a mix up question you might go looking for some toxic alcohols like methanol and calculating odds muller gap. Okay so this is. Treacherous territory were approaching. I'm going to divert us before. We get to fucking. What else should we be thinking about here. So when the sierra mouloud normal you should also be thinking about pseudo hypoglycemia you probably all remember this nuisance which is really just a lab error. So if the serum moslems are normal check lipid level for elevated triglycerides and look for protein gap to consider parapro namias like multiple myeloma or. It could even be extra proteins that we give like. Ivig any of those might be the cause of pseudo hypo nutri mia who ivig good doctor house. Here's where things can get a little fun and by fun. I mean tricky and by tricky. I mean infuriating. Yeah you know what perplexes me about oz. Morality is when i get back normal serum ause morality in a patient who i believe has true hype treatment and i get frustrated because the algorithm tells me. Okay it can't be true hypoglycemia. If that oz moralities normal the algorithm is lying. Your frustration is so valid for so think about a situation where. You've got a patient with real hypo. Tonic hypoglycemia from beer mania. But they're also acutely intoxicated with alcohol right so then the patients odds morality might be normal even though he truly does. Have hyper. Tonic hypoglycemia right. So the big teaching point here is that normal or high. Sierra as morality does not rule out a real hypoglycemia may be going on it. Just clues in. There are other osmo around like ethanol and the case tim just mentioned and there are multiple things at play. I think about like this. It's sort of when you have a microsd. Anemia and a macro citic process going on resulting in an all normal. Mcv so don't be tricked with a normal serum we expect. The serum is morality to be low in hyphen premia and will link a table in the notes. That has all the extra osmo is to watch out for and which of those osmo actually changed iniquity something. That dictates where that free water goes and causes. Hyphen yes definitely. Check that out for some solid reinforcement. So let's talk about a rookie move. That's often made with ordering serum oz morality. Yes only check once please. I we get. We consulted on patients with hyper atrium. You in a daily ceremonies. We'll out like i don't you don't need to do that like once. You're confirming that. The sierra miles audi reflects that of the serum sodium. You're done you don't need to be checking it everyday. Say yup..

once one Sierra first thing hypoglycemia sierra
"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"d n. j diagnostics" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Biden administration, putting the United States back into the World Health Organization, Dr Anthony Fauci, thanking the W H O for playing what he says is a leading role in the global response to the grown a virus pandemic, the trying circumstances This organization has rallied the scientific and research and development community. To accelerate vaccines. Therapies. And diagnostics. President Biden promising to ramp up production of the vaccine is more on Joe Biden's swearing in the White House staff last night, telling his White House staff and appointees and I quote, point blank. If you're ever working with me, and I hear you treat another colleague with disrespect, talk down to anyone. I promise you, I will fire you on the spot. President Biden is not messing around with this, adding that that kind of decency has been lacking over the last four years in the White House, may also reminded his staff quote you work for the people. I work for the people maybe see senior White House correspondent Mary Bruce. I'm Sherry Preston ABC news and it's coming up on 11 32. It's been a year since the first case of covert 19 was confirmed in the US If I use Dr Railly, Marty admits we've come a long way and understanding and treating this virus but Obviously, we didn't start from scratch Reach. The researchers have actually been studying the corona viruses since the 19 thirties. They dealt with SARS nearly 20 years ago and then using a new vaccine technology with the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome were really piling on a tremendous amount of advances in infectious disease, molecular biology immunology. And other fields that we've really been working on. For decades. She believes Abide administration will put a huge emphasis on managing the pandemic, and with the Legislature's help, we can get control over the virus. Right now. Wall Street Trading is mixed. Dow just took a 25 point Hit a 1 31,063. NASDAQ Up 73, the S and P sat by nearly three points mornings at noon. More Brian Mud Next. I'm Natalie Rodriguez News radio 6 10 W Y o D 2021 in.

Joe Biden White House White House correspondent Dr Anthony Fauci President United States Dr Railly World Health Organization Dow Middle East Respiratory Syndro Sherry Preston Natalie Rodriguez Mary Bruce W H O Legislature Marty