35 Burst results for "Czechoslovakia"

Ivana Trump’s death ruled accidental by medical examiner in report citing 'blunt impact injuries' to torso

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last month

Ivana Trump’s death ruled accidental by medical examiner in report citing 'blunt impact injuries' to torso

"Ivana trumps death has been ruled an accident I'm Ben Thomas with the latest The New York City medical examiner's office says Ivana Trump died from blunt impact injuries to her torso suffered in an accident at her home Two people familiar with the matter tell The Associated Press police are looking into whether she had fallen down the stairs She lived near Central Park on Manhattan's upper east side The report did not say when the accident took place born Ivana Zelda kova in 1949 and then Czechoslovakia she was a ski racer in businesswoman She was married to former president Donald Trump from 1977 to 1992 and the mother to his eldest children Donald junior

Ben Thomas Ivana Trump Ivana New York City Ivana Zelda Kova The Associated Press Central Park Manhattan Czechoslovakia Donald Trump Donald Junior
The Four Biggest American Media Celebrities of the 1930s

History Unplugged Podcast

01:33 min | 2 months ago

The Four Biggest American Media Celebrities of the 1930s

"In the 1930s, the biggest American media celebrities were four foreign correspondents, Dorothy Thompson, John Gunther, HR knickerbocker, and Vincent Shea. They were household names in their day, and just as famous as their novel writing lost generation counterparts, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway. These reporters helped shape what Americans knew about the world between the two world wars by landing exclusive interviews with the most important political figures of their day, including Hitler, Mussolini and Franco, as well as Trotsky, Gandhi, nehru, Churchill and FDR. But they also went beyond state press releases and listened closely to the dissidents in Europe and heard alarming reports of violence against anyone who opposed these authoritarian regimes. The reporting made waves at home and abroad. HR knickerbocker was the only foreign reporter whose dispatches Mussolini bothered to read. Joseph gobel is called knickerbocker in international liar and counterfeiter. John Guthrie shot to fame, but the book inside Europe published in 1936, arguing that, quote, unresolved personal conflicts in the lives of various European politicians may contribute to the collapse of our civilization. In the face of increasing violence in Europe, these reporters had to decide whether they would remain on the sidelines or advocate for their readers to respond. They were the readers of the dictators wouldn't be satisfied with their territories they conquered, and the objected to the policies of appeasement and predicted the coming of the Second World War. Putting together the stories they covered, the Italian invasion of Ethiopia in 1935, the Spanish Civil War broke out the next year, the German annexation of Austria and the karma book Czechoslovakia, and made very accurate judgments about what would come next.

Dorothy Thompson John Gunther Vincent Shea Mussolini F. Scott Fitzgerald Joseph Gobel Ernest Hemingway John Guthrie Europe Trotsky Franco Gandhi Churchill Hitler Ethiopia Austria Czechoslovakia
Ronald Reagan's Best Speeches Against Tyranny

Mark Levin

01:58 min | 2 months ago

Ronald Reagan's Best Speeches Against Tyranny

"A relatively short compilation Of some of the things Reagan said during his presidency an enormously successful presidency Where he got enormous popular votes won the Electoral College numbers never seen before since probably George Washington And had a fantastically successful foreign policy Take a listen This is from again a group of his speeches just clips from the speeches Some of his best speeches against tyranny Cut 24 go And to every person trapped in tyranny whether in the Ukraine Hungary Czechoslovakia Cuba Vietnam We send our love and support and tell them they are not alone My message must be your struggle is our struggle Your dream is our dream and someday you too will be free There's poop John Paul told his beloved poles We are blessed by divine heritage We are children of God and we can not be slaves History shows that it is precisely when totalitarian regimes begin to decay from within It is precisely when they feel the first real stirrings of domestic unrest That they seek to reassure their own people of their vast and unchallengeable power through imperialistic expansion or foreign adventure So the era ahead of us is one that will see grave challenges and be fraught with danger Yet it's one that I firmly believe will end in the triumph of the civilized world and the supremacy of its beliefs in individual liberty representative government and the rule of law

Electoral College Reagan George Washington Czechoslovakia Hungary Ukraine Cuba Vietnam John Paul
Compilation of Ronald Reagan's Successful Speeches on Foreign Policy

Mark Levin

02:01 min | 3 months ago

Compilation of Ronald Reagan's Successful Speeches on Foreign Policy

"I just want you to hear a relatively short compilation Of some of the things Reagan said during his presidency an enormously successful presidency Where he got enormous popular votes won the Electoral College numbers never seen before since probably George Washington And had a fantastically successful foreign policy Take a listen This is from again a group of his speeches just clips from the speeches Some of his best speeches against tyranny Cut 24 go And to every person trapped in tyranny whether in the Ukraine Hungary Czechoslovakia Cuba Vietnam We send our love and support and tell them they are not alone Their message must be your struggle is our struggle your dream is our dream and someday you too will be free Hey miss poop John Paul told his beloved polls We are blessed by divine heritage We are children of God and we can not be slaves History shows that it is precisely when totalitarian regimes begin to decay from within It is precisely when they feel the first real stirrings of domestic unrest That they seek to reassure their own people of their vast and unchallengeable power through imperialistic expansion or foreign adventure So the era ahead of us is one that will see grave challenges and be fought with danger Yet it's one that I firmly believe will end in the triumph of the civilized world and the supremacy of its beliefs in individual liberty of representative government and the rule of law under

Electoral College Reagan George Washington Czechoslovakia Hungary Ukraine Cuba Vietnam John Paul
"czechoslovakia" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:29 min | 5 months ago

"czechoslovakia" Discussed on Fresh Air

"This book is a very personal one in a lot of ways because you fled fascism twice. Your family is from Czechoslovakia where you were born. Your father was a diplomat. The family fled fascism when you were a child. First from Hitler, you moved to England and then after World War II, you returned to Czechoslovakia, but fled again when the communists were taking over and came to America. What is the warning you want to send to Americans about what is happening here? Well, first of all, I'm delighted to be with you, but let me say the reason that I wrote the book and the warning is, as you've pointed out, it's something that I saw or have certainly heard about from my parents. And part of the reason for writing it is to say that, in fact, this can happen in countries that have democratic systems that have a population that's interested in what is going on that is supportive because so many of the things that have happened and happened in Czechoslovakia were steps that came as a result of ethnic issues with the German minority, but mostly steps that seemed not so terrible that there couldn't be a deal made. And so that's what's so worrisome is that these fascism can come in a way that it is one step at a time and in many ways then goes unnoticed until it's too late. One step at a time within the system. Within the system and partially because it is a way of undermining democracy and the democratic institutions that are the basis of democracy or criticizing the press or thinking that there are those that are enemies of the people and are the cause of distress or bad economic situation. And it kind of works on the fear factor rather than the hope factor. And with your father, for instance, he was a diplomat he was close to the president of Czechoslovakia. And so when your father sensed that the communists were taking over, the president of Czechoslovakia was saying, no, it's going to be fine. Don't worry about it. And your father left in spite of those reassurances, the whole family left in spite of those reassurances. And you were lucky that you did. You write your father would have been put in prison, had the family state and Czechoslovakia. So another example of how one fascism or authoritarianism or communism is coming, not everybody sees it. And that's absolutely true, because part of it, both with the fascism, and with the communism, there really was not enough pushback from the people and to some extent the authorities there at the time, or there's an outside power that doesn't support. So for instance, what happened when the fascists took over was the period that is known as appeasement that, in fact, was carried out by a friends and allies like the British who gave in to what this group that was organized to help Hitler in what is known as sudetenland, the small part of Czechoslovakia that was occupied by a German minority, and people thought, well, if we give in on this, nothing else will happen. And that's exactly what did happen. One step led to another, and if you are trying to feed the beast and the beast is a fascist, then it makes it very hard to push back..

Czechoslovakia Hitler England America
"czechoslovakia" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:10 min | 5 months ago

"czechoslovakia" Discussed on WTOP

"Albright The nation's first female Secretary of State died today of cancer she was 84 The native of Prague Czechoslovakia came to the United States in 1948 as a refugee and would serve under president Bill Clinton as his Secretary of State from 1997 to 2001 Joel hellman dean of Georgetown university's school of foreign service joined WTO's Mike Morello earlier today to reflect on albright's life and career She had this remarkable ability to use humor and personal warmth to disarm anyone who underestimated her or anyone who dared to oppose her She managed I think to be a diplomat in the truest sense of the word She would understand what people's interests were what people's desires and objectives were She was ready to disagree when she did the disagree but rather than be confrontational rather than try to assert her own ego She always managed to find warmth the personal touch whether it was talking about her brooches as an icebreaker whether it was a war chest of zingers hilarious zingers that she seemed to have for every occasion She was someone who really managed to use her own personal spirit and the generosity of that spirit as a great tool of diplomacy And talk a bit about her impact on the student from your perspective For all her achievements her global achievements for all of her impact around the world For all of the glass ceilings that she shattered She always said first and foremost I see myself as a professor And for 40 years she dedicated herself to training generations of students in what she called the foreign policy toolkit And she taught not just theory not just analysis but she made students live the practice of diplomacy She had a famous role playing exercise in which the students lived through a crisis that she generated And she just delighted in constantly sort of throwing various different arrows into the crisis during the course of the case The president just died There was another invasion from a neighboring country There was a natural disaster Anything she could do to encourage the students to understand the complexities and contingencies of the world to get them to think on their feet and to get them to practice the values and theories that she was teaching So she taught literally thousands of students during the time that she was here at Georgetown Many of her students have gone on to deeply impactful careers around the world they took the lessons that she gave them and I can tell you I speak to a hundreds and hundreds of Georgia and alumni who say she changed my life and she changed the way I think about the world Again that was Joel hellman dean of Georgetown university's school of foreign service just ahead in sports a big trade involving a star NFL wide receiver a 13 Chow.

Joel hellman Georgetown university's school Mike Morello Albright Czechoslovakia albright Bill Clinton Prague WTO cancer United States Georgetown Georgia NFL Chow
'Putin Plays the Nazi Card' With Paul Kengor

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:27 min | 5 months ago

'Putin Plays the Nazi Card' With Paul Kengor

"He is the director of the institute for faith and freedom, professor Paul kangar. Hey, Seb, how you doing? Good good. A superb superb, I didn't think I'd be seeing articles using these phrases so redolent of the Cold War, but of course we can trust on you. We'll talk about that story in a moment that you one of your pupils shared with you, which gives you an insight into who this man is, but I have to say, let me prepare you, prepare the ground for you by sharing with you my analysis from yesterday's show from Wednesday's show where I said, it is stunning, has so many people who've never studied Russia, have no idea what the KGB is. So willing to say he's crazy. He's mad and why did he do this? I guess they've been asleep for the last 30 40 50 years, Paul. Yeah, I think that's exactly right. And in fact, I know we're going to talk about another article, but I did a piece for American spectator last week's called Putin plays the Nazi card. And that one, that was in response to me right away getting emails from people when he first, when he first invaded the Ukraine, saying, look at this, Putin's going in there because he's claiming he's going in there in order to in order to de Nazi phi, the Ukraine, a D nazification of the Ukraine. What in the world is he talking about, right? I mean, if there's any sort of like hit Larry and analogy here, it's somebody like Putin doing what Hitler did, conjuring up Hitler invaded, well Hitler went after Czechoslovakia and Poland by saying that the native ethnic Germans were being persecuted in the sudetenland, right? In these different territories. And Putin did the same thing. He said that the Ukrainians were guilty of genocide against ethnic Russians and so forth. So what's this idea of Putin saying he's going in there in order to de Nazi fi? Well, this goes back to our lack of sense of history and as the guest we had on the show the day before yesterday constantin kissing who's a Russian Jew who lived in the Ukraine who has family members in Ukraine said on our show. If there were genocide of Russians in Ukraine, I think my family would know about

Institute For Faith And Freedo Paul Kangar Putin Ukraine Hitler Poland KGB Paul Czechoslovakia Larry Constantin
Allen West: Europeans Need to Confront Evil

Mark Levin

00:58 sec | 6 months ago

Allen West: Europeans Need to Confront Evil

"You know when I look at it and being a student of history we tried to do the European powers tried to do the exact same thing with Adolf Hitler They said Sudan at no big deal take it ethnic Germans And they said Czechoslovakia no big deal Take Czechoslovakia The next thing you know you have to blitzkrieg action against Poland We'll look at what is happening here with the eastern Ukrainian region with Crimea and all of this happened during the Obama administration with Putin saw weakness We held Amit bay during the Trump administration because he saw strength Ronald Reagan peace through strength But now with the Biden administration he sees this as a window of opportunity not just him but also Xi Jinping will see this as a window of opportunity So I think we have to get back to having a strong foreign policy a strong national security posture and somehow the Europeans got to step up and understand that they've got to confront evil and I think one of the things that I'm reminded of So Edmund Burke who said all that is necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing

Czechoslovakia Obama Administration Amit Bay Trump Administration Adolf Hitler Biden Administration Sudan Crimea Poland Putin Xi Jinping Ronald Reagan Edmund Burke
Ric Grenell: U.S. Weakness Led to Brexit, European Borders Changing

Mark Levin

01:18 min | 6 months ago

Ric Grenell: U.S. Weakness Led to Brexit, European Borders Changing

"But when I hear this stuff and you may disagree with me I don't know your view The American people don't care about Ukraine You know the American people didn't care about Austria The American people didn't care about Czechoslovakia The American people didn't care about Poland at one point And then all of a sudden we have the Third Reich I'm not saying this is the Third Reich I'm not even saying this is the old Soviet Union but I don't think we should be so cavalier as people with a public microphone that just blow this sort of thing off I'd be curious about what you think Yeah I actually agree And I would go one step further in that it matters for NATO and it matters for Europe I spent a long time in Berlin hearing from Brussels and Paris and Berlin about why the transatlantic relationship was really about strengthening Europe And I told Chancellor Merkel that the reason why Brexit happened the reason why Crimea happened rewriting of the European borders which is Absolute nightmare Scenario The reason why we've had the borders rewritten in Europe In the last ten years a couple of times is because of weakness from the United States That's just a plain fact

Czechoslovakia Ukraine Austria Poland Berlin Chancellor Merkel Europe Nato Brussels Paris Crimea United States
John Zmirak on America's Historic Censorship Crackdown

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:58 min | 8 months ago

John Zmirak on America's Historic Censorship Crackdown

"I talk to people everywhere I go. And most people have they're completely confused about this stuff. They do not know the basics. They seem to have this idea that, hey, my children need to get the vaccine. You're telling me the guy who invented the technology says absolutely not. And he's being silenced and his name is doctor Robert Malone. That's right. He was just kicked off of Twitter permanently. His videos are banned from YouTube. The 23 year old Yale graduates with degrees in gender studies and queer theory are deciding what legitimate news and what is not. The people who control your Yahoo feed, the people who work in the censorship department of Facebook, it's they, not researchers like Robert Malone, who invented the damned vaccine. No, no, they are obscured. They are radicals, their fringe, their anti vaxxers. We are experiencing the kind of censorship crackdown that happened in Eastern Europe in 1948 when the Soviets squeezed the Soviet the Eastern Bloc into obedience. The same thing that happened in 1968 when they cracked down and Czechoslovakia, the same thing that happened in 1933 when the Nazis started their lifestyle glacial tongue. I don't know why I couldn't say that. That was where they got everybody into line. And they fired all the professors who didn't agree and they closed all the newspapers that wouldn't go along. And they went after the leadership of the various union movements and churches, and they showed them you play ball or you go to dock out. So many priests were sent to dock out was called the priests camp. Well,

Robert Malone Department Of Facebook Youtube Twitter Yahoo Eastern Europe Czechoslovakia
"czechoslovakia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"czechoslovakia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To a place called the race instead. Where are we going? Where were we going? Where are we going? Where were we going? I don't I don't know about that. Mom. I don't know. Where are we going? Where we're going. We really, really really be going. Hard. You can't even know where that is, instead was different now we're Czechoslovakia was Where are we going? Where you going? Where are we going? We're becoming Where are we going? Where we're going. Where are we going? Where? Where we go. Two.

Czechoslovakia Two
"czechoslovakia" Discussed on The Worst Day of Your Life

The Worst Day of Your Life

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"czechoslovakia" Discussed on The Worst Day of Your Life

"Alcoholic was born in bratislava in what was in czechoslovakia in nineteen twenty six at the age of thirteen. She faced the full horror of world war two as nazi germany dominated europe and began the systematic murder of millions of jewish people. There are now very few survivors of the holocaust. Vulgar is now ninety four. This is part to the extraordinary story from auschwitz. You went to this much. This much was winter. Was it was.

bratislava czechoslovakia germany europe
"czechoslovakia" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

07:38 min | 1 year ago

"czechoslovakia" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Czechoslovakia, or what was then Czechoslovakia. But his bosses were not convinced that this was worthwhile research. So they told him to knock it off and get to work on other stuff. So rather than abandon this idea completely, he moved his work to his home. And he used a Jerry rigged system to start making these contact lenses. That system consisted of a gramophone. In other words, the predecessor to a record player. He used that to create a spinning motion and an erector set mechanical kit for kids to work with and together. He used these to make a spin casting. Machine. Now spin Casting is a technique that has been used for lots of different stuff, not just contact lenses. In this particular case, it was making a soft, breathable contact lens. But spin casting can be used for lots of different things. So what exactly is it? Well. Let's stick with contact lenses for the explanation. Since that's the subject at hand. The conventional way to make contact lives is up to that point was to use a cast molding process and oppress So you would create a mold of the shape that you want your contact lens to be. And you would put some plastic in that And then you would use a press to press down into the mold and formed the plastic into the correct shape. But this method had disadvantages. When the press would withdraw. Sometimes it would leave scars and aberrations upon the lends itself And this is the inside of the lens. The part that would go against your eye so it could potentially Create damages that could in turn hurt your eyes. The edges of these contact lenses were also prone to defects and unevenness so it could make the contact lens less accurate and more uncomfortable to wear. The spin cast method works differently. You put a small amount of liquefied plastic and you drip that into the mold, and the mold then is spun in a circle. This creates the force necessary to draw out that plastic to spread it evenly over the mold. There's no press that makes physical contact with the lens, so there's nothing to leave behind those marks or scars or to create uneven edges. Now he secured a patent for his contact lens production method, and then Bausch and Lomb swooped in to purchase the patent to put it into use in 1972. They're soft contact lenses were ready for the market. In between his first experiments and balls and loans. Introduction of those contact lenses, the U. S Food and Drug Administration decided to classify soft contact lenses as a drug. Now. That might sound strange to you because these are contact lenses you wear on your eyes. They're not something you ingest. They're not something. You injecting yourself. You don't absorb them. But you have to remember there was a lot of development in the field at the time, tons of companies and inventors were all rushing to experiment with different materials to create better contact lenses. The F D. A wanted to create protections to put in place to make sure those materials passed numerous tests before they were ever marketed to consumers to make sure they were safe to use because you wouldn't want to find out Your brand new contact lenses were actually toxic after they hit store shelves, thus the necessary necessity to classify them as a drug so they could pass all these numerous check marks before they could hit stores. Now, more improvements have come along mostly in the materials that we've used to create contact lenses in 1982, Dr Michael Bay. He's as far as I know, not related to the Hollywood director who makes things blow up. Created a disposable contact lens. So until 1982 When you got a pair of contact lenses, you're meant to use those indefinitely. You would only replace them if you had lost one or damaged one or if your eyesight had changed and a new prescription was needed. But that also presented a hygienic issue. Contact lenses can develop what is called protein build up. And if you've ever seen a contact lens that has white or cloudy marks on it, that's likely protein build up. And if you were to put those lenses in your eyes, you might feel some discomfort. Your vision might not be all that great. Worse If your contact lenses get damaged. They could in turn scratcher corneas, which not only can hurt but can make you sensitive to light or even lead to a Corneille US ulcer, which can potentially damage your vision permanently. And Lindsay's can also carry bacteria and germs, which can lead to infections like conjunctivitis and keratitis. So disposable contacts reduce those risks Because you're not using the same pair of lenses indefinitely. There are fewer opportunities to shove gunk in your eyes. In other words, Also, if you ever have contact lenses that have protein build up. It's the one time where you're actually supposed to kind of scrub them with your solutions that you can clean them off because just washing them in solution is not going to remove that protein build up. In general, You're not supposed to scrub contact lenses at all. They're very easily damaged, but that's one case where you are supposed to do it. Although I would argue at this stage just go out and buy new context because you don't want to mess with that stuff. The first disposable contact lenses were meant to be worn for a couple of weeks before you replace them. Dr Bay named them M I A lens is MIA. Not missing in action. That M I A was the actual those were the first initials of his name, his wife's name and his daughter's name. So it's Michael Inga and a net in case you ever have. Pub trivia and you're asked. What do the initials M I A stand for as far as contact lenses Michael, Inga and net. His design was purchased by a company called Johnson and Johnson famous company. They tweaked and rebranded the technology to create their own disposable contacts, and they launched that brand in 1987 under the name Acuvue. 1988 Ciba. I assume that's how we pronounce the name of the company. C I b. A created contact lenses using silicone hydrogel. Now the big advantage of the hydrogel material was that was particularly permeable to oxygen. So it could allow oxygen to pass through the contact lens and allow the cornea to get that sweet, sweet oxygen it craves so dearly. The first daily disposable lenses with debut in 1995 Ron Hamilton, who was an inventor in Scotland, gets credit for creating the first example, which he called the Premier Award lens. Bausch and Lomb would purchase Hamilton's company and rebranded the lens, the soft lens one or the soft lens. One day Hamilton would go on to launch a different company called Pro vice. Now there have been numerous improvements in materials and processes to contact lenses over the years, But the basic principles remain the same contact lenses bend light so that ISA can focus. Which is a little reductive because there are contact lenses that are meant to protect eyes that have been damaged through injury or illness. There are some that are meant to treat diseases, not just a problem with vision but actual diseases of the eye. There's also cosmetic contact lenses that don't have any corrective nature to them as well. But I'm going to focus. Piland ended UN corrective contact lenses, since that's such a common use for them, and that brings us to a couple of questions like How does an optometrist determined what prescription you need? When you go to get glasses or contacts? And where did that whole thing come from, anyway? Well, in the next segment, I'll tell you but first Let's take another quick break to thank our sponsor..

1972 1987 1982 Scotland U. S Food and Drug Administrat 1995 Michael Bay Ron Hamilton Johnson and Johnson Czechoslovakia Hollywood 1988 first one case Acuvue M I A Jerry Michael Inga first example Hamilton
The Problem With Track & Field World Records

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:45 min | 1 year ago

The Problem With Track & Field World Records

"What goes into a world record. Obviously it has to be an incredible performance. Everything has to come together just right. They don't happen very often. When bob beamon broke the world's record in the long jump in nineteen sixty eight. See my previous episode about that. The conditions were perfect. He had the maximum allowable. Tailwind it was at a high altitude in mexico city. He had perfect form and he put together his best jump ever at just the right time since the advent of competitive athletics nine thousand nine hundred twelve. The international association of athletic federation's has been keeping world records in every event. There's been a progression of world records. As people of incrementally bested previous performances. Most world records are only broken by less than one percent. The greatest single increase in a world record was the aforementioned bob beamon jump which beat the previous world record by six point five percent so that is sort of the world record of world records. Each event has a very different progression in how frequent and how recent world records get set. And this gets into the real heart of what i wanna talk about. You should expect to see world records being broken at a slower and slower rate over time as humans. Approach the limit of human performance should become harder and harder to break records. Records will require more luck and more people who have the perfect physique in the very peak of their careers. But this isn't quite what happened in some events there hasn't been a new world record set in over thirty years. You're shulte set the world record in the men's discus in one thousand nine hundred eighty six at seventy four point zero eight meters to put that into perspective. The gold medalist in the two thousand nineteen world championships had a distance of sixty seven point. Five nine meters a full six point five meters or twenty one feet short of the world record the men's hammer throw was also said in nineteen eighty-six yuri set up of the soviet union through the hammer. Eighty six point seven meters. The two thousand nineteen world champion through it. Only eighty point five meters that six point two meters less than the world record. The oldest existing world record in track and field is the women's eight hundred meters. Your meal acrostic viola of czechoslovakia set a world's record finishing the eight hundred in one minute. Fifty three point two eight seconds. That's almost five seconds. Faster than the two thousand nineteen world champion. You might have noticed something that all these really old records have in common. They're all held by athletes from former communist countries. If you're thinking that these records might be tainted by performance enhancing drugs. You aren't alone.

Bob Beamon International Association Of A Mexico City Athletics Yuri Soviet Union Czechoslovakia
The Prague School of Rehabilitation and Principles of Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS)

The Peter Attia Drive

03:58 min | 1 year ago

The Prague School of Rehabilitation and Principles of Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS)

"I think for the purpose of this discussion. Let's assume a person has never heard of. Dns has never heard of the prague school or any of these things can you in a somewhat succinct. But not terribly brief manner. Explain to people how all of this school of rehabilitation coalesced around this idea of what we call. Dns going back to the founding fathers of the prague school and what these various insights were that each of them had and how that sort of came together dns dynamic neuro muscular stabilization. Kind of built on some pioneers of functional rehabilitation. There's many that have been part of the prague school rehabilitation. But i think talking about the influence on the development of dynamic muscular stabilization by professor powell whole lodge who runs the rehabilitation department at prague school. At this time. I think we need to go back. Post world war two cold war era. Nine thousand nine hundred fifties his wear prague school rehabilitation was was really founded and it was founded as part of the medical faculty of charles university in prague czech republic or formerly czechoslovakia now czech republic and being post world war two cold war era so they were in eastern europe behind the wall. That may have been a factor for. They're not reliance but tendency towards the use of of observation in both diagnostic diagnosis but observation and palpitation for diagnosis and treatment. All three of these pioneers neurologist. And who are the three. Lot of miranda kerr levitt and ballclub woida professor janda. He had a keen sense of observation and he formulated concepts and principles that tied into pasta habituation specifically the tendency for specific musculature tend towards tightness and other musculature to tend towards weakness. And he he termed this upper cross and lower cross syndrome. So for example with an upper-crust syndrome meaning the neck and shoulder region with demands of life and tendency towards paschel habituation such as with sustained seated postures There is a tendency towards the muscles in the back of the neck the exceptional muscles the external cloud asteroid muscle which is the muscle that also attached to the skull in down to their sterner curricular joint the pec muscles the upper traps that musculature with ten towards a tight meaner over activation other musculature in the upper extremity the radius which attaches to the ribs in the back of the scapula the deep neck flex irs the middle and lower traps would have a tendency to tend towards the weakness and with that tendency towards over utilization or hyper tenacity and underutilization in addition weakness. That would also he also recognized that that would affect the quality of movement throughout the kinetic chain and subsequently would lead to overload in specific areas throughout that kinetic chain so that was a big contribution on his

Prague School Prague Professor Powell Medical Faculty Of Charles Uni Czech Miranda Kerr Levitt Ballclub Woida Janda Czech Republic Republic Europe
"czechoslovakia" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"czechoslovakia" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Flatten the curve. Put this diaper on your face for two weeks now. Flattened curve. Yeah, No. Now it's Ah, Put the diaper on your face and put another one on Don't you dare leave that house unless you're some type of a ness n Shal employee. And if you go to a restaurant on Lee 25% of you can eat there. It's disgusting. What's happening right now? We've been devastated. How about this one? You gotta stand. What is it? 6 ft. Apart with a diaper on your face, and then you get on the airplane, and now you're sitting next to each other. Yeah, If you're eating, you're just right through. I mean, you're just shoulder to shoulder Got it. Is it starting to dawn on you that were being played. We're not just being played, and some benign kind of all we've been played with were being played in a fascist, hideous, painful way. And what? What about kids? No being told that possibly have decided yet that possibly you get to go back to school for what is AH, day a week. One day a week is the day weaker damn month. It's something like that is just crazy. Now. None. Nobody'll stand again. Stand up and do anything about this. It seems, Are you hearing any of your elected officials even talk about this. I want to get more into that the second, especially with bare to travel restrictions. But, you know, I'm almost remember back in the day when we would kind of make fun over Marvel at that. In Russia, you can't travel from one city to another without a passport. Anybody. Remember that Bind Iron Curtain? You couldn't drive? Some say I don't know a city in Czechoslovakia to another city inspectors. The vacuum. You certainly couldn't cross the border. No, no way. No way. Uh, now you can do that. They're here. They're starting to set it up such that You're not gonna be able to travel around flora or other states as well. Now run to sentence in Florida. By the way, God bless him, the nation's premiere governor, he and Christy No, he's saying that is a punishment from the bite administration. We'll get to that in a minute, but I want to read something to you. Ah! Posted this on Facebook. Thank you, Becky X for sharing this with me. This is Carl Sagan. It's attributed him in 1995. I don't know what it's out off. But somebody said this references future shock. I remember reading future shock in the seventies and being shocked. Yeah. Alvin Toffler. This is Carl Sagan. And he writes here I have a foreboding of in America and my Children's their grandchildren's time. And this This is 1995 1995 before boarding of an American, My Children's Grilled grandchildren's time. When the United States is a service and information economy when nearly all the key manufacturing industries have slipped. Away to other countries when awesome technological powers are in the hands of a very few, and no one representing the public interest can't even grasp the issues. When the people have lost the ability to set their own agendas are knowledgeably question those in authority? When clutching our crystals and nervously consulting our horoscopes are critical faculties in decline, unable to distinguish between what feels good and what's true, we slide almost without noticing back into superstition and darkness. We'll come back to that in a minute. The dumbing down of America is most evident in the slow decay of substantive content in the enormously Influential media. The 32nd sound bites now down to 10 seconds or less lowest common denominator nominator programming credulous presentations of pseudo science and superstition. What's his name? Neil? What's the black guy's name? Neil? The grassy Oh, yeah, that that would be him, but especially a kind of celebration of ignorance. Yeah. It's all right right now. Did you hear what Carl Sagan said in 1995? There It is right there. Now back to the, uh Superstition and darkness slipping into that the dumbing down of America most evident the slow decay of substance of content, enormously influential media. We're there. Were there and that that's what you would attribute, I guess to the club, the climate change hoax And if you if you call the climate change hoax and you're the public school system, you're gonna be burned at the stake. You will be ostracized will be what do you call it? Their canceled Canceled. You won't be able to go on and maintain your academic career because you haven't accepted the reality of climate change and put a couple people on hold. We'll get back within a second. Ah, it's scary stuff that it really is. I mean, it's almost cliche to say that and a lot of people are gonna say not inoculated, uh, against this. They're just dumb down, not paying attention. I'm astounded when I talked to certain people that know nothing about what's really going on. That's that's um, arrogant boasts. I'm really smart and I know what's going on. No, no, no, It's just that if you just do a modicum Of homework honor on Well, I'd say substance of websites where there's actual reporting going on where it's this happened here is where it happened. Here's how it happened is supposed to. They think it happened. If you do that, you're awake up to just a nightmarish America. Ah, straight up. Nightmares. America. That's where we're at right now. Now this has been going around. Facebook for a couple days Now, I think it's I think it's a couple days back. There's a woman that thinks he's formally female martial artist and pretty damn good at it. Her name is Gena Khurana. And Right now she has been stripped of the ability to make a living, stripped of the ability to do anything to get a job. Probably stripped of the ability to go into a restaurant without being harassed because he's out there in California. If you know her story. But The hashtag canceled. Disney plus canceled Disney Plus became a tap trend late Wednesday on Twitter after Lucas film star actress Gena Khurana from the cast of the popular Disney Plus Star Wars spinoff. Sir is called the man DeLorean. Her firing came after Khurana. Sharing a social media post..

Alvin Toffler Gena Khurana 1995 Czechoslovakia Russia California Florida Neil Becky X 25% 6 ft Khurana two weeks America 10 seconds Carl Sagan Facebook Christy Twitter Disney Plus Star Wars
"czechoslovakia" Discussed on The Patriot 1280 AM

The Patriot 1280 AM

06:08 min | 1 year ago

"czechoslovakia" Discussed on The Patriot 1280 AM

"Show on this program. I get to talk to interesting people. Usually today is one of those days. I am really thrilled to have as my guest. Irving Roth, who is in a film called Never Again, Irving. Welcome the program. Thank you Happy to be here. Listen, I don't know where to begin with you. You, sir, are not just the Holocaust survivor, which is a big enough deal. But you're old enough to remember vividly what it was to be there You were 15 years old. Ah, when you went on this evil journey into that place, and you are featured in this film, Never again. My friend Dennis Prager is also featured in the film. But we we want to hear your story, Irving, tell us your story. Where did you grow up? And And how did you find your way into one of the darkest places of the 20th century? I was born in a country called Czechoslovakia, which the doesn't exist, is now made up of three countries actually. The area and I grew up in. This actually called now Slovakia and was part of Czechoslovakia, which is fundamentally Democratic state when I was born in 1929, but unfortunately, by the time 1939 came along, it no longer existed. Because that happened is Germany first occupied Sudetenland, which is the western part. And what I lived in 1939 became an independent country and independent fascist country. And it's a result of that They followed the same Ideas as Nazi Germany, which meant immediate clear. H 10 hit I'm living in this city, which is about 6500 people. One third of the population is Jewish. More than half his Catholic and sort of Russia, north locks and gypsies and all that living and working together and perfectly integrated society. I start school at age six first grade. Perfectly happy in the school. I like going to school because we have a soccer team and I play on it. Some beautiful girls in my class. Everything is working Fine. That's 1935 by 1939 all these changes. And suddenly I'm being persecuted, and I don't know that because one morning in 1939 around late spring early summer, I Do what I normally good in the summertime. I don't want the school. I mean, my friends in the park. But that morning. I cannot longer going to the park because I'm a Jew. There's a huge sign says Jews and dogs are forbidden to enter. And suddenly what Jews and what Jews and dogs are forbidden to enter. Now, This is amazing thing just to be clear on the history. So you're 91 years old now, correct. OK, So you're 10 years old and you see the sign? Did you have any sense of what was going on that that something is going on before you saw the sign? It was the sign the first time you had an inkling that things are changing. I knew something is going on because going back A few months around November off 1938. I get up on morning and I look at my father's face and it's totally ashen. They just finished listening to the radio and something was happening in Germany. Which is right next door. Germany has taken part of Czechoslovakia already, the question is, Are they going to take the rest of it not be going to suffer the same fate. Our will. Our synagogues be burned. We are well my father and other people being taken to concentration camps. And now you're talking about Kristallnacht. Crystal. Not exactly. So your father heard about this on the radio, and you could see it in his face? Yes. And so it really began then. So I knew things were not going doing well and of course, when, in the spring of 1939 so back, it becomes this new fascist country. With a fascist government in the Nazi government. And now I'm being I'm being identified as a Jew and a limited what I can do. I can't go into the park in the afternoon. I want to go to the beach. I can't go in because I'm a Jew. Slowly step by step. I'm being identified. There's a Jew by wearing having two very yellow star. And I'm being limited to where I can be and went like forest. There's no Jews allowed to be outside on the street when it gets dark. And this is you talking 1939. It's so not begins the process of saying to me you don't really belong again. Be the one true This is before the war started. Correct just just about right before the war, And this is because of Chamberlain and my right. Yes. Okay, lets it is. As you pointed out, Chamberlain decided that the thing to do with Germany is to give them what they want. And they'll be okay that sign an agreement. And everybody's gonna be happy Euphoria, everyone except you. And and and all the Jews and Czechoslovakia. Exactly. I guess he forget about you eventually pulling away and eventually, of course, of course. Okay, so Now the war starts what happens to you? You're 10 years old. But one thing that happens. I know the war has started and the way I know it is because where I live, is on the border of Poland on the eastern part of Slovakia. It right north. Actually, Poland is about 30 40 Miles north off my city and through my city goes the German army. Day and night. The getting 1939 September.

Czechoslovakia Germany Irving Roth Russia Chamberlain Slovakia Dennis Prager Irving soccer Sudetenland German army
Security operations centers: a first principle idea.

The CyberWire

05:01 min | 1 year ago

Security operations centers: a first principle idea.

"The idea of operations centers has been around seemingly forever friedrich limb in his a history of western technology suggests that the concept goes back as far as five thousand bc amazing anytime an organization grows big enough either in terms of function or one. Small team can't do everything. Leaders have built these centers to men's the workflow and status of the various groups into coordinate. If you fast forward to the early days of the technological revolution we started seeing organizations. That began looking like a modern day sark. But we're quite there yet. The classic example is how nasa managed space missions starting way back in nineteen fifty eight now for those. Who don't know me. I'ma space geek specifically. I love everything about the space race between the russians and the americans during the nineteen sixties in fact as a side note the washington post lillian cunningham produced a thirteen episode podcasts. About that very thing last year it is called moon rise and i highly recommended. But did you know that when neil armstrong and buzz aldrin landed on the moon in nineteen sixty nine that the russians had a remote controlled spacecraft up there at the same time. I didn't know that. Until i listen to the moon rise podcasts. The russians crashed into a moon mountain as armstrong and aldrin. We're flying back to the lunar module so maybe that is why the russians don't advertise that much. But i digress. One of my favorite space movies is paolo. Thirteen directed by ron howard. And one of the things. I love about that. Movie is how it depicts the energy and sense of purpose of an operation center. Here's the actor. Ed harris in a virtuoso performance playing gene kranz the real life nasa flight director delegating tasks his crew of operational teams on what they need to do to get apollo thirteen at home. And the meantime whenever frozen command module to power it up another but the re entry batteries. We've been tried before we've never even stimulated it before gene. We're going to have to figure it out. i want people in our simulators working reentry scenarios. I want you guys to find. Every engineer designed ever switch every circuit transistor and every lightbulb. It's up there then. I want you to talk to the guy. Knee assembly line actually built the thing. Find out how to squeeze every aunt at both of these goddamn machines. I want this mark all the way back to earth with time to spare never lost an american in space where surest not gonna lose one on my watch. Failure is not an option. If that doesn't bring chills down your spine you might be dead. I'm just saying when telephone network started appearing in the early nineteen twenty s phone companies like eighteen bill traffic control bureaus to handle long distance traffic issues by the early nineteen sixties. At and t. Handled most telephone switching through mechanical devices and build a network control center or noc to manage it. At and t. Historians consider this to be the first knock ever built by nineteen seventy seven bell systems had built the first national knock in bedminster new jersey which looked a lot like modern knocks. Today there wasn't much security yet but if there was any knock operators were doing it in the us intelligence community the nineteen sixties were fraud with international incidents like the cuban missile crisis of nineteen sixty to the arab israeli six day war in nineteen sixty seven the us pueblo capture and nineteen sixty eight the prague spring crisis and czechoslovakia also nineteen sixty eight in the one. Twenty-one shootdown crisis in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine the. nsa decided that. They needed an operation center to manage their efforts. Across a wide swatch of international activity. Based on the freedom of information request. The nsa released a document in two thousand seven that described the formation of the first national cigarette operations center or insomniac in one thousand nine hundred seventy three and according to charles berlin. I hit him on lincoln and the answer me. He's a former in sock director. The innocent kept adding more responsibility to over time. He said that it's secret. Sauce was when the nsa decided to pair offense or cigarette defense or comsec in the same place. Eventually they replaced the word singing in the title with security. In other words it became the national security operations center. Berlin said that when cyber came along years later the toll of michigan came too big to keep in the in sock in the. Nsa created the national cyber threat operations center or the in talk to deal with it. But with the addition of the concept mission these operations centers started to lean toward defensive security on the government side and in the aftermath of the morris worm which was the first destructive internet worm

Lillian Cunningham Gene Kranz Nasa Buzz Aldrin Neil Armstrong Aldrin Ed Harris Ron Howard Bell Systems Washington Post Paolo Armstrong NSA Bedminster NOC National Cigarette Operations Charles Berlin Czechoslovakia New Jersey Prague
Live not by Lies and the Danger of Soft Totalitarianism

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:10 min | 1 year ago

Live not by Lies and the Danger of Soft Totalitarianism

"Four describes. How after throwing. Peter jon jail for teaching and proclaiming. Jesus the resurrection of the dead. The san hadrian demanded they not speak or teach at all in the name. Of jesus peter bluntly replied we cannot help but speak about what we have seen in hurt throughout history. Of course. Christians have faced demands to be silent throughout history. They've refused the word martyr. In fact is derived from the greek word that means witness and live not by lies a manual for christian dissident blogger and author. Rod dreher thinks that christians in the west are now entering a season. Not only have to decide whether or not we'll be silent. We have to decide whether or not we will allow ourselves to be forced to go along. With what is not true with lies like those who endured the hardest days of communist eastern europe western christians face a totalitarian future though he admits the totalitarianism talibanism of today is different. In a number of ways dreyer thinks it is still the correct word to describe the all encompassing ideologies of our day that seek to control not just our actions but our thoughts. Of course we don't face sort of state sponsored violence persecution or physical coercion. That many many others have throughout history. One doesn't end up in a gulag for criticizing the new sexual orthodoxy or for refusing to use the demanded pronouns but some have lost jobs. Some have lost future. Some have lost their degree programs. Others like cake artist jack phillips or floors bear. No stutzman have all but lost their livelihood in our current context. What dreyer calls soft atallah. -tarian ism is mostly administered. Not by the state but by corporations and other institutions that are run by managerial elites are social media profiles our smartphones and our smart speakers provide these managerial elites in corporations with an unprecedented ability to monitor what we say in what we do. China which is also an expert of course in hard to tolerate. -tarian ism is an example of how soft -tarian could proceed especially their social credit system which determines who's allowed to buy to sell to travel based on their social behavior here even as more instruments of technological surveillance or put into place an additional layer of enforcement comes from corporate america and our recent conversation for the breakpoint podcast rod dreher pointed to the corporate reaction to indiana's religious freedom restoration. Act that dates back to two thousand and fifteen. He sees it as a key moment of cultural transition. I do too though. Indiana's legislation was essentially identical to its federal counterpart corporations responded by threatening economic sanctions. Some corporations closed down offices in the state. The ncaa which is based in indianapolis threatened to move the final four basketball tournament and then when the christian owners memories pizza expressed support for the measure they were bombarded with negative online reviews and even had to close down temporarily because of all the threats of violence during the controversy a man whose mother had grown up under the hard to teheran ism of communism wrote to roger and told him that his mom saw parallels to what had happened in eastern europe since then many others from across europe told their own observations. Many of these moving stories are included in the book. In fact the interviews with christians who remain faithful under communist tyranny. That rod includes in. This book are worth reading. Even if you aren't convinced by his comparisons between their day hours above all these dissidents such as father thomas loft colaco vic a jesuit priest. Who was responsible for an underground church network and czechoslovakia. Have a great deal to teach us about what it means to live. Not by lies. We have much to learn from the bender family from prague about how to categorize our own children when everything it seems as pointing them away from the truth and we have much to learn from people like russian christian dissident alexander. Oh garage knockoff. And of course sultanate's in an hovel and so many others will go down in the annals of church history many as

Peter Jon San Hadrian Jesus Peter Rod Dreher Dreyer Jack Phillips Stutzman Eastern Europe Atallah China Indiana Ncaa Indianapolis Thomas Loft Colaco Vic America Basketball Roger ROD Europe
Politician, Eleanor Rathbone

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:59 min | 1 year ago

Politician, Eleanor Rathbone

"Today we're talking about one of the first female members of the British Parliament who used her position to push for gender equal legislation. Please welcome Eleanor Rathbone Eleanor was born in London on May. Twelfth Eighteen, seventy two. From a young age, she grew up in the world of politics. Her Father William was a liberal member of parliament. And often entertained other politicians and intellectuals. In eighteen ninety, three at the age of twenty one. Eleanor. Left home to study at Somerville College Oxford. There, she studied classics and was allegedly nicknamed the philosopher by her peers. When Eleanor realized that her college refused to give degrees to female students, she took matters into her own hands. He joined a group of women called the steamboat ladies who sailed to Dublin. To get honorary degrees from Trinity College. After graduating eleanor worked alongside her father investigating the working conditions of Industrial Liverpool. After his death eleanor continued her work in the city she volunteered for the Liverpool central relief, society where she dedicated her time to helping families in poverty, improve and change their living conditions in the eighteen nineties. Eleanor became a supporter of the women's rights movement, which she saw as integral to widespread social reform. Eighteen ninety five, she was appointed secretary at the Liverpool Women's suffrage society as well as the women's Industrial Council. Eleanor didn't agree with radical tactics to promote women's suffrage and instead pushed a more moderate approach in nineteen. Oh six, the Liverpool City Council Open. It's elective positions. Two women in nineteen o nine eleanor ran and was elected as an independent candidate a position she held until nineteen, thirty five. In nineteen thirteen, she co founded the Liverpool Women Citizens Organization to promote the involvement of women in politics. When World War One broke out eleanor organized association to help wives and other dependents. She continued that work when soldiers returned home, she saw mothers were struggling to provide for families and advocated for the installment of a family wage system. This method would pay family allowances directly to mothers, helping them to support their children and simultaneously fighting against the notion that men had to be the breadwinners. In nineteen eighteen at the end of World War, one British women over the age of thirty. Got The right to vote that same year eleanor established the nineteen eighteen club the following year eleanor became president of the National Union of Women's suffrage societies. And renamed it the National Union of Societies for equal citizenship in Nineteen, twenty, two eleanor ran for British parliament. She lost that year but was elected in nineteen twenty nine as an independent member for the combined English universities. She was one of the first women to hold a position in parliament. There Eleanor continued her lifelong activism in her first speech. She criticized British colonial ISM, and it's anti-feminism. She specifically called out the inhumane practice of female genital mutilation in Kenya. As. The Great Depression loomed she campaigned for the People's rights to cheaper milk and better benefits for dependents of the unemployed. Eleanor was also one of the first politicians to warn of the danger of fascist uprisings across Europe. She spoke candidly about her disappointment in British neutrality concerning politics in Germany Spain Italy and Czechoslovakia. She joined a nonsectarian anti-nazi council to support human rights and set up a parliamentary committee that took up individual refugee cases throughout the war at one point eleanor allegedly tried to charter a ship to cross the blockade of Spain Rescue Republicans from the country. Later, in the early nineteen forties, eleanor devoted resources to get an Jewish people out of Poland. In nineteen forty-five eleanor finally saw her fight for family allowances put into law by the Labor Party with the Family Allowance Act. However it was initially passed on the stipulation the allowance be paid to fathers rather than the mother she fought for. Eleanor's rage was short-lived. The bill was contested by many women in parliament and was amended within the year to be paid to mothers. Eleanor died suddenly of a heart attack on January second nineteen forty-six. Forty years later, a blue plaque is dedicated to her by the Greater London Council at her former residents. It calls her the pioneer of family allowances. She was also honored along with fifty eight other women's suffrage supporters on the plinth of the statue commemorating fellow suffragettes leader millicent falls it in London twenty? Eighteen.

Eleanor Rathbone Eleanor Liverpool Women British Parliament Liverpool Women Citizens Organ Liverpool City Council Open Liverpool National Union Of Women London Somerville College Oxford Trinity College Greater London Council National Union Of Societies William Europe Kenya Dublin Poland Millicent Spain
"czechoslovakia" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"czechoslovakia" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"I appreciate your and I'm going to be I'm going to be on Arizona probably mean you baby now see Czechoslovakia busted now we could be cell mates right right now let's make this happen brother your phone tap a rainy right here man it's about that time for you make you think he makes the JV one opinion yeah Big Boy my bro let's go like this we don't do that future Drake life is good then I got that new one ma'am blueberry Faygo by Lil Mosey both coming up in this Mickey Vicky mix is going to make it happen right here big boy's neighborhood with the mob harm to our law said you want me to do a good job third is the name impala did did saying total for a watch press the plain Jane with the what is the name for the it didn't what to watch press the plain Jane the song for some deeply believe me he did not put me in the in working on a weekend like usual sales in in demand like usual when they passed the state doing too much I haven't done my taxes on time.

Arizona Czechoslovakia Lil Mosey Jane Drake Mickey Vicky
"czechoslovakia" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"czechoslovakia" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"A man who's eighty four years old is born in Czechoslovakia's inventor and scientist says two children as is true of colon cancer it was seen by his doctor had an elevated PSA is because it was four point nine I used told by his urologist that insurance would not pay for his biopsies eighty four years old is a surprise amenities activities in inventor he's creative is fully functional and hit a high PSA urologist totem insurance would not pay for the biopsy which was not true not true at all so we came here for a for a second opinion I saw him as PSA was five he wakes up twice a night to urinate he was offered medicines to get better is what is under fifty four pounds of stable is five foot ten I examined him he has a large prostate well as a large prostate plus a high PSA and I spoke to him do you want to know if you have cancer or not you're eighty four years old you want to know if you have kids uses yes I want to know because I don't wanna die of cancer of cancer I want to be treated I want to be cured I want the chance to live as long as possible there's a functional man knows all the options and chose to be treated with radiosurgery pinpoint treatment to the Preston that's what's happened to him he's taller to treatment while he's finished his treatment.

Czechoslovakia cancer scientist
"czechoslovakia" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"czechoslovakia" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Here we are four you don't have an eighty four year old medicine inventors from Czechoslovakia is two children and you came with a high PSA is eighty four is doctor from all forget about it the urologist said the insurance company would not pay for a biopsy what I call the insurance company and they said it wasn't true as PSA was elevated his urination twice a night he was offered medication for your nation and want that you want to know if he has cancer and so he had a biopsy and in fact the biopsy showed an aggressive cancer he came to us a year ago he's been treated now he's doing well he's happy city forty one celeb I see so many people who are there seventies or eighties or even more who want to be treated they don't say just because you made it to seventy she dropped out they don't believe that the doctor refused to do a biopsy then told him something that wasn't true that insurance company won't pay for a biopsy because of his age that's not true why did the surgeon Tom insurance company wouldn't pay for a biopsy wasn't true he came here we evaluate everyone no matter what the age or the race or the creator of the call or rich or poor we take care of the issue this man had a high PSA he was biopsied cancer he was treated and he's happy so he's been successfully treated in remission doing well tolerated treatment all our patients we have a unique program I often tell men and their loved ones here for prostate cancer issues one two three four what's one two three four for prostate cancer one is to get the best results and to is to avoid radical robotic surgery whatever possible three try to maintain sexual function for urinary function so off with radical robotic surgery man lose sexual function urinary function I see so many men actually data shows ninety seven percent of men have damage to their sex life after radical robotic surgery eighty percent of damage to the urinary life who wants that another reason why so many men with prostate cancer come here for treatment and evaluation we have a book that DVD.

Czechoslovakia cancer Tom insurance company
Tear Down This Wall: The resistance

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:53 min | 2 years ago

Tear Down This Wall: The resistance

"The I on curtain was not the creation of a mindset or a system which had any time for dissent. The curtain was at its height. Seven thousand in Columbus of wires watchtowers walls fences minefields and sentry posts stretching from the Arctic Tundra Finland to the Black Sea coast of Greece. This old dedicated to preventing captive people's from fleeing somewhere they might speak think and vote freely. Nevertheless there was resistance courageous inventive and surprisingly rarely violent it took foams as different as the imprison nations of Eastern Europe would different in this third episode of the foreign discs series reflecting on the thirtieth anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. We look at Poland where the regime Asia was confronted by a trade union and joined by Pope the country then known as Czechoslovakia where revolution was led by poets playwrights and rockstars and Romania the only one of eastern Europe's liberation struggles of nineteen thousand nine to descend into bloodshed. This is the foreign desk. My impression of the strike in the Lenin shipyard was that this was going to happen as they were going to get way because there was nothing credible calm about the way people are going about the strike. There there was no panic. There was no drinking no rushing around people were just waiting for the government to give in and the government did get enough to series of public negotiation. I mean we knew something something was going on but we still wear not sat in that be able to live to see the end all the system. We knew Tom Unsustainable in the long run but most of our perspective close sustainable for longer than our lives about the thing about people on television television or a heads of the secret believes in the army and they were giving contradictory instructions to people in the field but there was fighting on on the streets. Nobody knew who was on whose side and the sea turns out of course neither there or no sides there was a single side and the churches were along and they had no loyal troops in August. One thousand nine hundred eighty a group of workers at the Lenin shipyards in Gdansk went Own Strike they called their fledgling trade union solidarity and hoisted a Groovy flag based on Poland's national banner with the Solidarity Name emblazoned in red on the White Stripe in cheerful friendly font within a year of its foundation solidarity had ten million members within within a decade. It had the country a few weeks after the Berlin Wall fell solidarity leader Falesa an electrician by trade was elected. President President of Poland Kristof Bobbin. Ski Is the President of Union and Polska a pro European think tank in Wausau. He's also the former Warsaw correspondent Brandin of the Financial Times. He picks up the story in Gdansk. In the summer of nineteen eighteen to strike in the shipyard had two phases one was a phase which which went from about this Thursday to the Saturday afternoon when the shipyard authorities the management gave into the demands and tell people go home that he said we've we've got the money or go home and at that point it was. The younger workers also led by young dissidents. I suppose who went round the ship out saying don't go home. The strike is not over people out there in the restive discuss still on strike. They were driving around in this small electric electric trucks telling the people not to go home and a lot of people go home but enough state from the Saturday afternoon and I arrived on the Saturday Saturday afternoon and I saw young people saving shy making it continue into the Sunday. On the Sunday people started coming back on the Monday morning people came back and strike got underway big strike on underway. So actually I had the impression that it was actually a young people's movement at that moment it was saved by the young people by the shipyard workers wasn't quite solidarity then because it was formed as it were off the strikes extended but my impression of the strike in the Lenin shipyard was that this was gonna happen this they were going to get their way because it was incredible calmness about the way people we're going about the strike. That was no panic. There was no drinking. There was no rushing around people. Were just waiting for the government to give it and the government did give enough to series the public negotiations and is the reason for those public negotiations were a certain number of Social demands pay demands but also the the main demand with for this supplements of independent unions

Lenin Shipyard President Trump Berlin Wall Gdansk Poland Eastern Europe Black Sea Columbus Finland Poland Kristof Bobbin Czechoslovakia Warsaw Greece Tom Unsustainable Romania Financial Times Union SKI Army Falesa
"czechoslovakia" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

07:23 min | 2 years ago

"czechoslovakia" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"See they sat on the stairs daily the cabinet there and I'm unaware of we do these men we didn't still so the kids simple and she's the only main but you gotta keep yeah but you gotta keep yeah it comes up again three Mario Lopez during down studio actress musician singer AJ my shock welcome to the show how are you I'm well thank you what what is the ethnicity behind the truck gets Czechoslovakia all checks the lan okay my dad yeah very cool name thank you did you ever get any pressure or consider changing it yes when my sister my first first I should say get it got into the business we definitely got encouraged to like change last night I either go by a first name middle name as your last like what I'm not gonna go by mandatory like that's a great name but I love my last name can stray away from that good for you by the way I really I really stand by and I always tell people it's it's easy once you get used to it shop yeah my shock at the age is like an S. H. yellow sign what what came first the music again I wanna see simultaneously in the sense that they both kind of popped off at the same time but I would say music probably probably came first in the sense that I knew that I was going to be enough my sister start and that's when we started writing songs and that's the first time right this is something I want to rest my life you know where is the acting I came I.

Mario Lopez AJ Czechoslovakia
"czechoslovakia" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"czechoslovakia" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"To the eighth of July feed on. Who, who accompanied to, to the Alden region Luxembourg, and even the countryside? Czechoslovakia his brothers. Who says Jews Stanley Friday when you wounded twice in the region then in the all done? He was on the strength to head into calm, about them to post, the Rhine river, took liberation of the concentration comes on the faces the survivors and the faces of the executioners alike. Maybe then. Moment truth that moment to you understood what you were fighting for. Brothers and on. Of you to Terrence you. What does the radio operator? I mean you what he decided to go to France to military operations in Normandy. And then in the Rhine region Vincent fine. Sometimes they approve tells Stanley Friday. How old Terrance all? Recognition of your unwavering Athens's, France to regain its freedom. I will in just a few minutes. The older of the knights of the legion. Donna. Thanks legion. On the highest distinction awarded by the for public commend you extrordinary action.

Stanley Alden region Luxembourg Rhine river Terrence France Czechoslovakia Vincent fine Terrance Donna Normandy Athens
"czechoslovakia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"czechoslovakia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Was terrifying. Dream and I had it many times over the next twenty years. Okay. So there's plenty in here this summer. I went to visit my mother and look through the box of things. I'd saved from the nascent house all the years I'd spent away from home. She'd kept the box, carefully labeled and stored through four moves. Yeah. I remember. Yes, they wouldn't she wouldn't Boston. I remember I think it has things it should. The box was as I'd left it a little makeup, case with powder, still inside the eyeglasses some children's records and the coins photographs of the family letters. And there were newspapers right on top was the one in found that very first day. Boston sunday. The marching after marching into the rest of Czechoslovakia, March Hittin Chamberlain exchange speech is not to stay there and Chamberlain said he must do it again. Yeah. April sixteen thirty nine. And my, my grandparents were already the fiction of Czechoslovakia. When my great grandparents fled their home in Czechoslovakia, they'd left, furniture paintings, letters, all very suddenly and never returned. My mother tells me that all those things probably still exists somewhere with that in mind. She couldn't bear to see the nascent things rotting away like they had. Spoon. It's all very melancholy, this remnants wise. Melancholy. The abandonment you'd Benjamin is no. Way. It's worse than throwing away, much worse. I can understand one, fabulous being obliged to flee overrun band. But nobody else cared that it was so overwhelmingly abandoned by everybody that nobody cared to solve something to resolve something that was very offensive to me. That was.

Czechoslovakia Chamberlain Boston Benjamin twenty years
"czechoslovakia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"czechoslovakia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It was a terrifying dream and I had it many times over the next twenty years. Okay. So there's plenty in here this summer. I went to visit my mother and look through the box of things. I'd saved from the nascent house all the years I'd spent away from home. She'd kept the box, carefully labeled and stored through four moves there. Uh-huh. Yeah. I remember. Yes, they wouldn't see wouldn't box. I remember I think it has things should. The box was as I'd left it a little makeup, case with powder, still inside the eyeglasses some children's records and the coins photographs of the family letters. And there were newspapers right on top was the one in found that very first day this, this. Boston Sunday globe. The marching after marching into the rest of Czechoslovakia much Hittin Chamberlain exchange speech is not to stay there and Chamberlain said he must do it again. April sixteen thirty nine. And my, my grandparents were already exempt because of this picture of Czechoslovakia. When my great grandparents fled their home in Czechoslovakia, they'd left, furniture paintings, letters, all very suddenly never returned. My mother tells me that all those things probably still exists somewhere with that in mind. She couldn't bear to see the nascent things rotting away like they had. Here's spoon..

Czechoslovakia Chamberlain Boston twenty years
"czechoslovakia" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"czechoslovakia" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"It talks about how you have to have democracy to get there. Now, listen in order that the reformist democratic way to socialism be complete there had to be of course. A denial of the basic condition of the possibility of victory for socialism of the dictatorship. Our state has decided for socialization in the democratic manner that is to say at the ballot and not through revolution or dictatorship. Thus solving. The problems of transition from capitalism to socialism, breaking the desperate resistance of the blue joie Z of ex- ex- pro expropriating, the desperate resistance resistance of the capitalist private capitalist production into socialist production on a lawn skate on a large scale should be possible without the direction of policy by the workers class without a dictatorship. Just by phrases about some sort of pure democracy. In other words, revision in denial of the basic, maxim of Marxist, Marxist, Leninist theory of classes and class struggle. So they're saying. Look, we if we want to do this without revolution. What we have to do is convince the average person that you need pure democracy. Because people will vote for free stuff. So we can get pure democracy. We can do it without a strong arm of revolution or a dictatorship. Then once we have it as it goes on. Then the vice comes down, then we have it. And we hold them. This is how they flipped other countries the blueprint that we're going to show you tomorrow was one that was smuggled in from behind the iron curtain into the United States in the nineteen sixties. And then it was just lost. And people forgot it. And I'm not saying anybody is using this as their blueprint. I'm just saying we're getting to exactly the same place. They're doing exactly the same thing as this blueprint written in nineteen fifty and used on Czechoslovakia, they're using the same tactics. So whether they know it or not it doesn't matter. They flipped Czechoslovakia. They're flipping us. And you need to see it you need to watch it with a with an open mind. That's tomorrow at eight pm eastern. The kind of stuff that nobody in the mainstream media is going to actually do their homework. It's not conspiracy theories. It is the truth. And I make that case tomorrow at eight pm. Don't miss it. Socialism a warning from the dead. So let me do a really terrible.

Czechoslovakia United States
"czechoslovakia" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

03:34 min | 3 years ago

"czechoslovakia" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Fast things are changing now? Hey, it's not just you things are changing rapidly. And there's a reason for that. And on next Wednesday. We are going to show you the reason because we're gonna show you the plan. This is one of the most amazing discoveries. We have made, and you know that. I have made a lot of what people would call predictions crazy predictions. They're not predictions. I just read a lot. I study history. I look for patterns connect dots its analysis. It's not prediction. And if you take people at their word. When people tell you something crazy. I'm going to do this. They usually do it. I'm going to kill you. Well, I take that one seriously. I'm gonna start a caliphate. I take you seriously. And then I look at the the dots and the connections and the patterns of history and see does this person have a chance to to cobble together caliphate. Yeah. Yeah. They do the conditions are right. So then I go on the air and say they're going to try to start a caliphate, and they do. We found a document in our research on socialism where writing a book right now on on socialism. And we're also preparing all of these shows for for fall this coming fall on socialism. And as we're doing our research Jason our head researcher. He comes in and he's just white. And he's like have you ever heard of this? And I'm like, no, he's like, this is the craziest thing I've ever read Glenn. He said it is the plan of what's happening today. And I start reading it. I'm like, oh my gosh. This is this is where did you get this? He said it was written in nineteen fifty or fifty one by the communist historian in Czechoslovakia. And it's really an evil book of how we did. It is you have to remember the Soviets were kept by treaty that we signed at the end of World War Two. They couldn't just March into Czechoslovakia and Poland and all those saying, they just couldn't do it. They weren't allowed to take it over. So the communists wanted to spread communism throughout the world. How do we get these countries to fall? Well, their first attempt was Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia was this amazing country amazing country the highest wealth per capita. I think next to the United States. It was top five. I think it was number two. The production was incredible. Even though it was destroyed under the. Nazi's it quickly came back because it was a free market democratic society. The guy who started is the father of their country if you will studied over here until you modeled, everything on us. And it was just thriving nineteen forty five it's dropped from the Nazis by nineteen forty seven. They are the bread basket of Europe. There feeding everybody it is roaring by nineteen forty eight forty nine.

Czechoslovakia Glenn Europe Jason United States researcher Poland
March Madness: Britain Leaving The EU

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:14 min | 3 years ago

March Madness: Britain Leaving The EU

"And that means that March twenty ninth Britain's deadline to leave. The European Union is only a few short weeks away, Brexit Brexit. In fact, there is another vote tomorrow on Theresa May's plans leave the EU and with a deadline, so close the idea of a hard Brexit is becoming much more of a reality a hard Brexit for those who don't know what that is. That is the scenario where Britain leaves the EU with no deal in place. No clear. Transition plan. No new rules to govern trading relationships. They just leave. And of course, are trying to make predictions about what would happen in the scenario, which is hard because it's difficult to predict what's going to happen on doomsday. Exactly, no one has any idea. What's going to go on? And that's the thing. The reason they're having trouble with it is that there's no precedent. No one knows. It's going to happen with Brexit because nothing like Brexit has ever happened before or has it that assumption that this hasn't happened before may not be entirely true. I'm Patty Hirsch. And I'm even Brooks today on the show. We're going back in time and halfway around the world will explore Brexit precedent in the most unlikely places and see what we can learn from it. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from zome when you can't be there in person zoom zoom is used by millions to connect face to face one easy platform for all your communication needs. Visit zoom online to sit up your free account today. Meet happy with zoom. Support. Also comes from NPR sponsor Rossi's ralphie's is the everyday flat for life on the go. Each style is machine washable and made from recycled plastic water bottles. Go to Rossi's dot com and enter code indicator to get your flats and free shipping. The last time we talked to Brexit on the show was in December about a month after that Prime Minister Theresa may finally brought her plan to parliament, which you just heard for a vote the is to the right two hundred to the nose to the left full hundred and thirty two. Wow. That is the sound of defeat this rejection. And the fact that we're only weeks weeks away from a deadline makes a hard Brexit. Look, more and more likely the British government is very aware of the scary possibility, and they published a few economic reports in the subject, but the thing is the reports focus almost exclusively on the long term, which is kinda strange because the threat of a major economic problems in the short term is very real very real. Because as part of the EU the UK is bind to the rest of Europe through this intricate network of business and trading relationships that are developed over more than half a century. Those relationships are based on rules. And if you throw the rules out overnight you jeopardize the relationships. So I wanted to figure out why communists aren't taking a closer look at that short term effect. So I spoke to Peter Morell. He's a professor of economics at the university of Maryland economics. I think is a wonderful science, but it has its limitations. Means economics is really attuned to studying situations way. People are not in dissect quit Librium not reacting to circumstances. They had not into separated, you know, a communist never deal with this cutting o of of rules and cutting off of the possibility of trading on their existing relationships costs. It doesn't happen very often. You have to look for analogous situations. And that's the whole point of the checkers of accurate example that there are very few analogous situations. And that is one of them, and it was very dramatic. The Czechoslovakia example, you see Peter spent years of his career studying eastern European economies. So when Brexit started to pick up steam Peterson parallels with Czechoslovakia, it was a country that most people regarded was one of the bet of run social. A-list eastern European countries in many ways, they will God as the country that was most prepared to accomplish this mammoth task that mammoth task started in nineteen eighty nine with the fall of the Soviet Union Czechoslovakia has a peaceful revolution. And as a first order of business needs to instate some serious economic reforms. They need to dismantle the rules that govern their plan to Konami and replace them with market capitalist rules scrap one set of existing trading relationships and replace them with another. They were preparing really by destroying figuring out higher. They were going to destroy the existing institutions here. We can draw first parallel with Brexit Czecholsovakia had to remove it self from complex economic system and Britain has to do the same thing. Brexit is about destroying set of rules that had been relevant to the British economy for a long time. Time. But while it's been almost three years since the Brexit decision Czechoslovakia only had about one year. And at first things are actually looking pretty good. The economy was extremely buoyant in nineteen ninety industrial production increased over the year by a considerable amount. Retail sales were extremely buoyant rising by as much as thirty percent over the year. So after a very good economic year finally came the big day January first nineteen ninety one the day Czecholsovakia switched to a market capitalist economy, literally overnight changing this system, so Czechoslovakia walk side of the Soviet Union. No plan, no deals just an account resist this checks, it what happens a huge collapse in economic output. So we have an economy that entered a era of precipitous. Collapsed even in a country that was extremely well prepared and extremely well run. And of course, Czechoslovakia's woes did not end their the economic problems brought about a revival of tensions within the country and two years later, they separated into the Czech Republic, and Slovakia, and they're it's sort of interesting to think of England and Scotland right because in the Brexit referendum. Scotland voted very very strongly to remain in the EU sixty two percent allied margin voted to remain. So the thinking is if a hard Brexit causes economic problems in the UK Scotland might hold another referendum on independence. Then vote to rejoin the EU which is possible, I suppose, but I'll have to say I feel like we're getting head of ourselves here is it really appropriate to compare Brexit with checks it. I'm just gonna keep going the UK, right? As a modern international. I would looking at Konami tech as lavar Kia was essentially planned walled off Soviet economy there too. Very different

Czechoslovakia Brexit European Union Brexit Brexit Brexit Czecholsovakia Britain Theresa May UK Konami Soviet Union Czechoslovakia Peter Morell Scotland Rossi Patty Hirsch Soviet Union Zome Brooks
"czechoslovakia" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"czechoslovakia" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Come in? Hope you don't mind something can tell you. The port is going to talk to us again tonight. Need we go through it all the game managed by myself? Then you'll be at the theater we do three plays week. I do not appear game Thursday. Bad day. There's always bad about this time are used to stop buying six. I have been frightened before being along without friends with our money. But I have never known anything like this, please tell me about him. When did you see him last? What did you do? Didn't make much sense. We drank too much what they tried to steal my girl. Let me she was many years ago. Valley. It's very difficult. You knew Harry, we didn't do anything very amusing. Just made everything seemed like I don't know like a lot of fun was he clever when he was a boy, I suppose they could fix anything. How do you fix my bakers for me? He heard the Russians were repatriating people like me who come from Czechoslovakia in Uber right personal right away watching when he was fourteen me three card tricks. That's growing up never grew up around him. Hello. No, no, no, you're up again. Like. If we have to see the porch. Go moment ago. You didn't want to see the we are both. Hi, holly. Ali martin. Remember? I am sorry. All right. At least get my name, right? You ought to find yourself a girl. That's what I keep telling myself..

Harry Ali martin Czechoslovakia
Prostate Cancer, PSA and Dr Charles Snyder discussed on Reimagine America

Reimagine America

01:06 min | 4 years ago

Prostate Cancer, PSA and Dr Charles Snyder discussed on Reimagine America

"Using the PSA blood tests to screen for prostate cancers become a controversial proposition. Dr Charles Snyder and tells us about a new recommendation, PSA or prostate specific antigen is high almost all men with prostate cancer. PSA could also be hired other prostate diseases, particularly benign prostatic, enlargement common an older, man. A British expert tail allies five major clinical trials of PSA screening. They conclude PSA screening

Prostate Cancer PSA Dr Charles Snyder Prague City Hall George Manzoni Donald Trump Czechoslovakia Beijing United States China President Trump Thirty One Billion Dollars Two Years
"Cuckoo's Nest," "Amadeus" director Milos Forman dies at 86

02:10 min | 4 years ago

"Cuckoo's Nest," "Amadeus" director Milos Forman dies at 86

"Push back against efforts to pass stricter gun control laws as indiana public broadcasting's lauren chapman reports they fear their right to bear arms is threatened at the indiana statehouse progun protesters weren't allowed onto statehouse property begun friendly legislature is a gun free zone protesters instead crowded on a wide sidewalk in front of the steps listening to lawmakers and advocates one speaker was gary oh he's the president of the indiana chapter of three percent a pro gun network he says in order to protect gun rights it's these smaller conservative groups have to come together if we can't unify with the second amendment then we'll never be able to unify with anything these simultaneous protests were organized by a new grassroots group called the national constitutional coalition of patriotic americans for npr news i'm more in chapman in indianapolis you're listening to npr news in washington filmmaker milosz foreman has died at the age of eighty six and bears bob mondello reports the director of one flew over the cuckoo's nest and amadeus emigrated from eastern europe at the height of the cold war and he brought with them a distinctive sensibility having grown up in what was then communist czechoslovakia milosz foreman hated tyrants and in one flew over the cuckoo's nest he created one for audiences to hate softspoken but monstrous nurse ratchet to mcmurphy doesn't want to take his medication orally i'm sure we can arrange the he can have it some other way but i don't think you'd like it mister mcmurphy give a cuckoo's nest one the big five oscars best picture director actor actress and screenplay forman's later films also tended to center on power struggles amadeus musical biography that won eight oscars also ragtime the people vs larry flint and the musical hair bob mondello npr news washington a storm system stretching from the gulf coast to the great lakes has buffeted the central us with heavy snow winds rain and hail up to eighteen inches of snow had parts of northern wisconsin with winds up to fifty five miles an hour.

Forman Larry Flint Foreman Czechoslovakia Amadeus Washington NPR Lauren Chapman Indiana Wisconsin President Trump Europe Director Bob Mondello Milosz Foreman Indianapolis Chapman Eighteen Inches
"Cuckoo's Nest," "Amadeus" director Milos Forman dies at 86

NPR News Now

02:04 min | 4 years ago

"Cuckoo's Nest," "Amadeus" director Milos Forman dies at 86

"And several other books on gun laws we used to have people go to school with guns we had rifle teams in high schools nobody killed their classmates this is relatively new or win says he believes the second amendment is under attack he says the problem lies not with the nra but with the state of mental health in the us for npr news i'm bridget dowd in phoenix the republican led kentucky state house of representatives today at opted a pair of resolutions condemning governor matt bevin for telling reporters friday the teacher the recent teacher strikes over pay and education funding left children vulnerable to using drugs or being sexually or physically abused because he says there was no one home to watch them today's resolution calls bevan's comments beyond the pale and no one state representative has called for his resignation the nba playoffs are underway today at last check the washington wizards down to the raptors the rafters lead one eleven to one zero four this is n pr the world health organization is launching a campaign to immunize nearly a billion people in twenty seven african countries against yellow fever the goal of the who unicef and other agencies is to eliminate outbreaks of the disease in a region considered at high risk the yellow fever virus is endemic in tropical parts of the continent and its regular circulated between mosquitoes and monkeys and outbreak two years ago in angola killed more than four hundred people and significantly depleted go global vaccine stock supplies filmmaker milosz form and has died at the age of eighty six and peers bob mondello reports the director of one flew over the cuckoo's nest and alma aldea's emigrated from eastern europe at the height of the cold war and he brought with him a distinctive sensibility having grown up in what was then communist czechoslovakia milosz foreman hated tyrants and in one flew over the cuckoo's nest he created one for audiences to hate softspoken but monstrous nurse ratchet.

Alma Aldea Foreman Czechoslovakia Washington NBA Kentucky Phoenix NPR Europe Director Bob Mondello Angola State Representative Bevan Matt Bevin Bridget Dowd United States NRA