19 Burst results for "Cynthia Brazil"

"cynthia brazil" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

01:47 min | Last month

"cynthia brazil" Discussed on WBUR

"Safe. And to have the opinions that we have. And they were executed yesterday, and we will find out why. And find out more about this man that did this. Police described both victims as innocent bystanders. Rollins says the suspected gunman, 28 year old Nathan Allen, was married employed had a PhD and no criminal history. Allen was killed in a shootout with police. The union representing hundreds of striking nurses at ST Vincent Hospital in Worcester, is criticizing a new contract proposal from the hospitals. Parent company. Tenet Health says the new proposal includes limits on how many patients each nurse has and better salaries and benefits. The Massachusetts Nurses Association says the contract fails to address staffing concerns that led nurses to walk off the job more than three months ago. State health data show. 31 new coronavirus infections were reported yesterday, the lowest single day total since March of last year. There are now a little more than 1400 known active cases. The seven day positive test rate is just under 0.3%. That's the lowest rate ever reported in the pandemic. Close to 4.2 million people have been fully vaccinated in Massachusetts, Another state mass vaccination site closes this week. The vaccine site at the Doubletree Hotel in Denver's shuts down on Wednesday. The state is now using smaller vaccine clinics to focus on communities hardest hit by the pandemic. On Saturday. Vaccine van administer shots at a youth basketball tournament at Ramsey Park in the South end. Cynthia Brazil's high school age son was competing in the tournament and they welcome the opportunity to get him the shot. I don't know if it's because I'm fully.

Saturday Wednesday Ramsey Park Massachusetts Tenet Health Allen Nathan Allen ST Vincent Hospital yesterday Cynthia Brazil Worcester Denver seven day Rollins 31 new coronavirus infections this week Massachusetts Nurses Associati March of last year 28 year old each nurse
"cynthia brazil" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

01:50 min | Last month

"cynthia brazil" Discussed on WBUR

"Two people protected our rights. They fought for us to be safe. And to have the opinions that we have. And they were executed yesterday, and we will find out why. And find out more about this man that did this. Police described both victims is innocent bystanders. Rollins says the suspected gunman, 28 year old Nathan Allen, was married employed had a PhD and no criminal history. Allen was killed in a shootout with police. The union representing hundreds of striking nurses at ST Vincent's Hospital in Worcester, is criticizing a new contract proposal from the hospitals. Parent company. Tenet Health says the new proposal includes limits on how many patients each nurse nurse has and better salaries and benefits. The Massachusetts Nurses Association says the contract fails to address staffing concerns that led the nurses to walk off the job more than three months ago. State health data show. 31 new coronavirus infections were reported yesterday, the lowest single day total since March of last year. There are now a little more than 1400 known active cases in the state. The seven day positive test rate is just under 0.3%, and that's the lowest rate ever reported in the pandemic. Close to 4.2 million people have been fully vaccinated in Massachusetts, Another state mass vaccination site closes this week, the vaccine site at the Doubletree Hotel in Denver shutdown Wednesday. The state is now using smaller vaccine clinics to focus on communities hardest hit by the pandemic. On Saturday, a vaccine van administered shots at a youth basketball tournament at Ramsey Park in the South end. Cynthia, Brazil's high school age son was competing in the tournament and they welcomed the opportunity to get them the shot. I.

Saturday Nathan Allen Wednesday Ramsey Park Massachusetts ST Vincent's Hospital Allen Tenet Health Cynthia yesterday Two people seven day Denver Worcester Massachusetts Nurses Associati this week 28 year old 31 new coronavirus infections both victims March of last year
"cynthia brazil" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

06:29 min | 4 months ago

"cynthia brazil" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"You could bring that right down to even what's going on today with the impact on on jobs. So, yes, it's this huge, huge span off areas that AI covers and and possible outcomes that that means that you can't just attach a convenient label to it. You can't just say Ai bad or ai? Good on drinks now or you're you're done now. You now you get it. It's not that simple. I've got a friend who's glued to his radio tonight. Listening to you. He sent me today. Close to 15 text messages. Peter wanted me to ask you about the AI and smartphones because he's obsessed with a smartphone and you know, he does have a point. That the smart phone which is not like a handheld computer has changed our lives dramatically, hasn't it? Oh, yes, There's a A long standing principle in philosophy called Extended mind hypothesis goes back before smartphones by a long way by a gentleman named Clark and one named charmers. And they advanced the idea that We can think of anything. Outside about body that substitutes full or adds to part of our cognitive processes as being part of our mind. Just an extension of it Now, when they came up with us, they were talking about things like notebooks. Map. But smartphones are absolutely in that category. So according to their Desist. Smartphone and the things that are running on it. Is part of your mind. It's doing part of the work of for us figuring things out, which means that Apple, Google and Facebook actually own part of your mind, which is kind of mind blowing. Possibly disturbing. It's amazing. I've got got a present from Tom Dannheisser years ago. The person who called you and got you on here. He bought me a Elektronik map of garment. It's called And you know, whatever. I'm in Los Angeles. I just turn this thing on and I don't have to worry about directions. And, yes, Smartphones have this capability to But this thing's amazing it talks to you. And you don't have to look at a map. You don't have to do anything. You just simply put in where you going? Turn it on, of course, And then off you go and you know, let's say, you know, turn right at this street or go to this freeway for two miles and do this, And it's amazing technology. And then every once in a while you updated through your desktop. You plug it in and just do Ah Little update when there are new roads and new things like that, or even construction sites. It knows this stuff. I mean, that's amazing technology. That's where it really is really working, isn't it? Yeah, on. I rely on that myself, especially in Los Angeles, because there's so many different ways of getting from one place to another. And it will often change its mind as I'm going along, based on real time information about the traffic congestion and say We found a quicker route for you. Go this way. Technically, Peter, How did they create artificial intelligence? So I mean, it's probably way beyond my pay grade. But I mean, how did they do this is with the computer chips. What? What creates the intelligence Mm. Well, a lot of it goes back to principles that were laid down 50 years ago so well, they were talking about simulating the human brain. You cut someone open. Don't try this at home, but it look inside their head and use a microscope. Then you will see these things called Nero ones, and we have lots of them about 100 billion off them in your brain. But these cells that talk to each other through Ah 100 trillion connections. And they're firing signals to each other and in patterns that we Don't understand very well constant. This looks kind of simple enough. Let's try build an analog of this in a computer where we have the computer simulate. Simple cells that talk to each other. And in the human brain. The thing that makes the decision inside each near honors the weather. It's going to send a signal to its neighbors on our discordant activations potential. And then the Neural networks. They call that an activation function is a very simple in the the computer version of this, but that If you put enough of these things together now, things that matter these artificial neuron together. Millions off him. Then now you start getting behavior that you wouldn't have predicted. The whole is greater than the sum of the parts. Now you get this emergent behavior that starts to approach what we get in the human brain, where You can train it to recognize faces. Can we create artificial intelligence to show emotion? Yeah, that's being done right now. There is Two branches off that kind of artificial intelligence. One is recognizing emotion and people. It's called affective, computing or emotion. A I and it's Quite good at that It recognizes emotions on faces. And then there are robots and advertise that engineered to display emotion. An early example of that was called kismet. Robot out of the M I. T media lab by research is called Cynthia Brazil and she recently created in the commercial robot form of that very updated called key, but Gee, Bo And Have, although that wasn't a commercial success, but People engage with these robots on a very emotional level, and the only thing how engaging that can get. There's a Ted talk by research accord, Kate Darling. Andre and she talked about this at length and you'll know you've found the right one when you see a picture of a woman holding a toy dinosaur up by the tail. Hold on for a second. Peter, we're on a break. We'll come back and talk more. His Web site is linked up it coast to coast team dot com. He's got a podcast called Artificial Intelligence, and you will be back in a moment with Peter Scott and talk more about a.

Apple Peter Scott Google Tom Dannheisser Facebook Los Angeles Kate Darling Peter Andre two miles Clark tonight Cynthia Brazil 50 years ago Two branches today Ted about 100 billion Elektronik 100 trillion connections
"cynthia brazil" Discussed on The Future is Spoken

The Future is Spoken

04:19 min | 4 months ago

"cynthia brazil" Discussed on The Future is Spoken

"Roughly and worked in that area gibault being these social robot of the brainchild of cynthia brazil from mit media. Labs work there for a couple of years until things didn't go perfectly and needed to look for new work and lo and behold. There was a role at google. And here i am today. That's an incredible journey. And you are in this space and we do have something in common. So i used to work for voice. Box technologies which is now acquired by who Nuance we do have the nuance connection. Which is interesting. Yeah yeah. I think i think it seems like everything that has been speech. At some point i pulled into the mothership of of nuance. Yeah wow so. Jonathan used specialize in multi-modal design. And you have an incredible journey from ivar to designing robots And then also now designing assistance or smart speakers on smartphones and everything. What kind of similarities and differences do you see designing for one modality versus the other Well the different modalities. When usually when i'm talking about modalities it's these sort of voice input output versus the visual input output and i have mostly to be brutally honest. I mostly focused on the audio channel. How other audio modality. However you know with gebo and then with The google assistant more and more were integrating those west the the visual modality. I mean there's differences mostly are in the use cases you know in terms of our why people would use these things As i i don't know if your audiences background is in this field but for those who aren't you know a the used cases the number one use case from voice only is is is free. Hand is busy hands busy. You know so you know. Perfect example is you're driving in the car and someone needs to get something done and they want to be able to do it without having to look at anything. Ideally and that. That's that's where we've focused mostly on on voice only But then now we've got this whole world of multi modal where You know in the kitchen. For instance if you have a device in the kitchen and you know you wanna do some kitchen recipes. E wanted risk food recipes. You know then you have this opportunity to a you know a move in between them as needed. You know so. You're get covered with flour as you're as you're making a cake or something You know so you wanna be able to do something by voice but every now and then you just have to go look at the directions. Because you don't wanna hear your fault. I mean one of the challenges with voice is that it's ephemeral. Goes away immediately after you hear it and it cereal. You can only get one piece of information at a time. So the screen can be very valuable. If you've got a long step in the instructions of the recipe for instance So you know it's it's it's the use cases that really make the difference between which modalities Were using But dumb yet with gpo. It was interesting because it was a voice forward experience and by voice board. I mean that you know it's still multi-modal but the we're leaning more towards the audio channel but even if people were tapping screen there was so much visually that we were doing a to enhance the experience necessary to To give something that was required for the interaction like in terms of like getting the job done but in terms of adding a warmth You know the screen was able to do that. You know as he listened his. I was moving around in a certain way that communicated. I'm listening when he was thinking you know his. I've might look like he's thinking about this thing. Notice i'm saying he. S chiba was very compelling. So you know the screen could be used for a lot of us..

Jonathan google today one piece cynthia brazil google assistant one modality one of years challenges nuance
"cynthia brazil" Discussed on Spark My Muse

Spark My Muse

14:11 min | 1 year ago

"cynthia brazil" Discussed on Spark My Muse

"A lot of people have responded to that particular quote and I mean you know because you right you right and then you go back and you re I have. I come up with that. It's just to show. There's there's always something happening. You know creative level. That's deeper and bigger than we are now. Let's let's go back to the shy soul. That is I have to give props to Parker Palmer Really Palmer who who I kinda articulated that way of understanding a silences shy when he talks about the soul being shy. And I'm like well you know it's kind of like you know at the dance that the shy boy and the shy girl are looking at each other in which one's going to make the first minute obviously likely another and they're caught each other's eye so that there's kind of this intimacy. I think that we can have between the deepest part of ourselves and the the vast soundless nece in which we find the face of God and and of course the grace of it is. We don't have to make the first move you know. Silence is simply there and this is something that I learned after years and years and years of you know Centering prayer practice. You know meditative practice. Was this idea that you know. Silence is not something we achieve something we will see that. It's given to us that you find it in between every heartbeat and in between every thought it's always there and the reality is is that to be human is to be creatures of sound. I mean obviously as we speak but think about your tummy gurgling again. The percussion of your heartbeat the you know the the the drone of even your neurons firing and I wrote I. I don't I don't think it's in the book I wrote on My blog once that sometimes when I said and I really deeply entering the silence I will hear this home and I thought you know my neurons firing but then I finally figured out. I went to many grateful dead concerts when I was a kid. It's probably low level. Yeah I have two two and I. It's at times driven me absolutely crazy and I think there's a medication that makes it worse. But I've tried to think of it like that. I've tried to think of it as not so much like the sound of silence. The kind of like this is this is what being powered on as you know This is this is life you know. Think of as a positive sound instead of like this is the sound. That's going to put me in an asylum. Well and I think there are other reality is absolute silence like you know the silence in outer space. I can't remember. I can't remember which movie I think it was alien. The tag was in space. No one can hear you scream weaver with a bit gone. You're trouble but but the but this this you know so. Absolute silence is like absolute zero. You know we really. That's really not a pice of life So so it's good that you know when I teach center and career I tell people you know if you have a distracted mind that is simply evidence that you're alive really were to be gentle with that under the accepting of that and it's not about. Oh you know. And it's funny because critics of centering prayer. Say you know it's wrong to empty your mind? I always laugh because unlike as if we sackler what I said to someone recently. He said you're advocating to empty your mind said. Have you tried it like it's a lot harder than you think? What is what is fascinating. And Yeah Yeah now. But so. Yeah the critics of centering prayer Who usually come from either. Very ultra conservative Catholic or an ultra conservative evangelical place. They they always say you know. If you empty your mind you make yourself vulnerable to demonic attack. That's kind of the stick and that's that's bad theology because if you look back at the at particularly the early contempt of teachers vagus and cash in the desert mothers and fathers those kinds of people. What they always say is that temptation comes through our thoughts. It does not come through silence. It comes through our thoughts. We have thoughts that are average or thoughts that are lustful thoughts that are violent or angry or abusive or whatever the case may be and then it's acting on those thoughts that then move us into into into what traditionally we call sent. This is why in you know in the pair of confession. We we pray that we have sinned by thought by word by deed jealous. Silent silence is actually a very very safe place to be spiritually. Especially if you're God's child I mean it's it's like it's kind of like acting like The demonic forces are equal with God or something because God is the real real thing right. I think about James Talks about getting dragged away by your evil desires. You know in the book of James Doesn't say dragged away by your empty mind so so what silence is so so there's always a dynamic relationship between silence and center in the human body. That's the first thing I want us. The second thing is is that you know just us idea that you know and this crops up again and again in the tradition really beginning with the Hebrew scriptures but this idea that that silence is an icon of God. Silences is the way we touch the face of God. You know into songs you have this this wonderful verse that often gets mistranslated the first verse of Psalm. Sixty five Eugene. Peterson gets it right in the message. Translation Silences praise silences actually way of praising. God we praise God with our some how back oh go have. Akaka can never pronounce it. Right says you know let let the divine God is in the Holy Temple Year. Be Silent before him and I love to read out through through the New Testament loans with you know with love to all my Jewish brothers and sisters is a Christian. I read it through a New Testament. Lens and God is in his Holy Temple. That's the the Holy Spirit President. Our hearts goddess is present in our hearts and so we respond with science. So you have you had to biblical tradition and then again. The contempt of tradition the traditional. Evelyn underhill introduced me to it. Just shows up again and again and again Meister Eckhart Great German Dominican mystic and Theologian said you know if this were adjust world. He would be a doctoral church but unfortunately he fell about church politics in the Middle Ages but he said nothing resembles God more than sides. Nothing resembles God more than silence. So you know so so we we and then what Thomas Kidding to bring it to her own own age Thomas Keating only left us a few years ago who said God's first languages silence and everything is a poor translation and somebody recently. I can't remember who went to one of the readers on my blog. Somebody said you know he was quoting roomy there who was in his book. It's a transcript of a Q. And A. was having with students so it doesn't get cited so I can't give you the Rumi source but again the mystics have been stealing from one another gleefully here so so there's no you know there's this wonderful line in the. This is a digression but I never met a decoration. I don't like there's this one. There's this wonderful line in the cloud of mowing or the cloud of the author of the cloud of annoying whose anonymous we don't know the person's name probably Carthusian monk but he says he says there is this tendency among spiritual writers to show off how well educated they are my constantly telling you who they are quoted you said. I think that is a sign of pride so I will not do it. Give give that to your to Your Dissertation Advisor. And they're not gonNA appreciate excited. Jason Different understanding of comedy back the ethics of that tradition. But it but it won't be innocent of mystics have been saying over and over again. That silences God's first language that I think Romney Shapiro. He just updated his website but sh- but his previous website. If you go to Internet archives and look at his website from a year ago he had this wonderful quote on there where he said you know. Every religious tradition is like a language I wanna be multi lingual but when the end we have to remember that God's language or the language of the soul I think is how he put it the language of the soul of silence so is it was something that Krista Tippett said that it really kind of what you're saying. She said that the Christianity is my mother tongue. And even though you can learn other languages in a way your mother tongue will be the one that you do. Start with first or the one you might understand. Best can textually but you can be bilingual trilingual and really appreciate other languages and and even sort of other cultures or flavorings and I. I really appreciate that that way of thinking. It's not like no only speak one language. That's terrible if you speak other languages I liked the idea that Learn as many as you can and and ultimately God knows every language and no language. You know it's it's kind of a beautiful way to see. I think you know there's two sides to this because I totally agree with you and the and the Christians who are afraid of other religious traditions. That's their fear. Speaking and I think we should be compassionate towards people like that although they can be annoying sometimes I I. I recently did a did. This is the story with a happy ending. I recently did a parish at a Catholic Church of another diagnosis than my own. And somebody got to my website. Sour hide written about the Yoga Sutras and they wrote a letter to the Bishop. Thing that this person shouldn't come and speak I assist because he promotes yoga and and to bishops credit. Even though the Bishop had no idea who he was he talked to the pastor. Who had hired me. I guess he visited my website too and he got on the phone with this woman and he said I have no problem with this coming to my diocese had a happy happy ending. But but this this kind of thing goes on where we're Christians who out of their own fidelity and their own wet. What would feels right to them? I don't want to. I don't want to attack their conscience as an act of conscience they say my Christianity does need to be monolingual. I only want to approach God speaking the language of Christianity but then where it gets into trouble is when they wanna police everybody else because I think the reality is is that we live in an age. I mean again. Look at Merton look at beat. Griffiths look at Tilden Edwards. Tara grant a Cynthia Brazil. You know so many of our most creative spiritual teachers of our time. Are they speak the mother tongue of Christianity but they are multi lingual and they're drawing from other sources and and so that that's really really important but the other side of it and this is something that I had to learn because I studied Buddhism for a while you know and every day every day you know the bishops did something that made me angry which you know fairly frequently but done with the Catholic Church. I'm going to be a Buddhist but what I came to realize as much as I love the Dharma and I will always want to. I say Christian studying Buddhism today are like Christian studying aristotle. You know eight hundred years ago. It's it's it is such a rich gift that God has given us from outside of our tuition but But I realized I cannot be a Buddhist the way the Dalai Lama is a Buddhist. I cannot be a Buddhist on is a Buddhist you know and and that's not to take anything away from Western. Buddhists like petro drink for example. You know I admire them in there. They're being true to their path. And that's great but I realized that I will always be Buddhism as a second language even if I became fluent in it it will always be my second language and that for me made me realize that okay on. Christianity is in my DNA. It's kind of baked in and You know and so for better or for worse this is where I am to work out my relationship with God. My relationship with being you know a loving presence among other human beings and so you know so when I now when I get angry at the church it's kind of like having a fight with my wife. You know okay. We we've had we have this fight. We gotta work sometimes up to agree to disagree and might be painful for a while you know and and you know I will. I mean you know it's just but but I'm committed to the relationship. I'm in trouble. And so just like a healthy marriage is enhanced when both partners in the marriage have meaningful deep friendships outside the marriage. My relationship with Christianity is deepened. By My my study primarily of Buddhism. But I'M IN THE BOOK..

Parker Palmer Thomas Keating James Holy Temple Evelyn underhill Meister Eckhart Krista Tippett Catholic Church Eugene Cynthia Brazil Akaka Holy Spirit Peterson Romney Shapiro Advisor Jason Merton
"cynthia brazil" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"cynthia brazil" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"The world Janice Kaplan is with us on the phone welcome hi thank you first of all how do we define genius well I define genius very openly because I think historically as you suggested genius has been defined by men and about men's and so I wanted to find a new way to think about genius and somebody early on in my research said to me that she misses where extraordinary talent meets celebrity and I loved that concept this is a Cambridge professor who said that to me so he didn't mean celebrity of the Kardashian sort of when he met celebrity and getting your work noticed and too often throughout history women have had only one half of the equation they had the extraordinary talent the extraordinary ability but their work hasn't been noticed and so I think we need to rethink what genius is and look at some of the people we have forgotten and some of the people that we're forgetting right now so what are some of the traits that women geniuses share well I thinking this is almost by definition are unique and and an individual but the guy I spoke to so many women that I did find things that they that they had in common and one that seems to be that they didn't notice gender that from the time they were young they had boys who were friends they had parents who didn't put them in princess costumes or expect them to have to behave in a certain way and so as they grew up they had a core belief in themselves and in the sense that they could overcome obstacles and to so many of the women also had to just have blinders to bias to be able to go through a system like ours which is often structurally against women tend not to notice it to just keep plowing forward until they got to a position where they could do something and where they could bring about change for other women what women geniuses really aren't what what you expect of a lot of these women genius that you have in your book are are married with young children for example right when you and when you say genius you just automatically think Albert Einstein and yes one of the women I mentioned had to do little toddler girls and she herself was just this lovely attractive woman and she was a tenured professor of physics not what I had expected a woman who's a roboticist at the MIT media lab had been a tennis player in college and she still was very athletic and and and very cool woman and so I think we need to expand our sense of what we all can do and see people in in different lights and that whole question of what people look like can be very limiting the for women it's a problem that these women all had how am I supposed to look like a genius and still be who I am and I was there's also the proverbial tension between beauty and genius and I'm thinking right now Hedy lamarr this gorgeous actors in the forties who also was pretty much of a genius in what was a coating she came up with some voting thing eighty eight you know I I it yes but she you're absolutely right that the third is that endless problem that women have if they look too beautiful like heavy Lamar then people are only going to think of them that way and yet if they fall into the other stereotype they're going to be ignored and it's it's certainly not a problem that men have attractive men have which psychologists call the halo effect if they're good looking you know if you if you're the as the tractive man then we just assume that you're good at other things too and with women that that can often that can often backfire who are some of the amazing women who are now out there who are changing the world right now who you talked to well when you particularly inspired me was Dr Francis Arnold who won the Nobel Prize in chemistry a couple of years ago and she has is the wonderful positive attitude about life she created a new way of developing enzymes which she called directed evolution and when she started it everybody told her that she was crazy that this wasn't going to work and I asked her how did she have the courage to keep doing that and she said I did not doubt myself and while that line just gave me the chills you know how many women are able to say I did not doubt myself I heard a very similar story from Stacy lead who is one of the world's experts in artificial intelligence a a young woman at Stanford and she's a very quiet and quite demure and she came up with a new way to teach computers how to see and she said when she did that also people doubted her told her she was wrong and she in a much calmer waves and doctor Arnold just kind of looked at what their objections were confirmed no I think I'm correct and what's the worst that can happen if I'm not correct and I think again that core belief that positivity it's just so vitally important in in these women and allows them to achieve absolutely and it's so it's not just missed being smart obviously it's being confident and that a you know a lot of women just are raised to believe in themselves that way that is absolutely true the roboticist who I've mentioned before Cynthia Brazil at the MIT media lab came up with an idea for the first social robot and she was working at a time when everybody was thinking about robots in a very practical sense and she does like the idea of how about if robots can interact with us and once again this was a young woman she was in graduate school when she went to her adviser and said I'm going to try something different and I don't have the answer of what it is that allows some people to do that I do think in part it's how you grow up how you with if you have that one person who believes in you and encourages you from the very beginning it can make a huge difference parents take note that you could be raising a genius and and encourage your daughters right and I think so often we think we're encouraging them we're saying the right things but they're picking up all of the different messages that were sending I talk in the book about the popular Disney movie The Little Mermaid and how many little girls I see walking around in there Arial costumes and going to nursery school and up showing up at my door on Halloween and there are you know costumes well may I remind you the story that Arielle had to give up her voice she had to be mute in order to get the love of the true love of prince Eric so what are we telling little girls when when we let them B. R. A. L. other than that they should shut up and look beautiful and maybe it's not what you think you're telling your daughter but she hears the message she hears that that's what's important and boy I'd much prefer to see those little girls an astronaut costumes come Halloween the man said Janice Kaplan you have a website that is your name right Janice Kaplan dot com that's correct Kay and the book is called the genius of women from overlooked to changing the world by Janice Kaplan thank you so much thank you a pleasure to talk to you thanks for listening to Kentucky focus.

Janice Kaplan
"cynthia brazil" Discussed on The Voice Tech Podcast

The Voice Tech Podcast

12:32 min | 1 year ago

"cynthia brazil" Discussed on The Voice Tech Podcast

"So that we find people lights for stay the find helpful distance themselves talking at light by what people stay. Some of them noticed things that we had programmed into the robot the comments on the site with Don some fairly subtle things. The robot has a breathing function. That spilt in Macho you can can slacked off. The benefit of USA is basically throw pot just sort of sway slightly from side to side but we thought if somebody's taking quite a while taunts. What's the question? We don't want it to look like the robots discount sleep site if it looks a little bit animated thoughts the closest we can get to looking looking like in glowing is right and this is. I should describe early. Listen it's like a child sized robust more child till three years old glowing. Green is completely unthreatening is placed on a table in front of the person who was giving the onset so he sat down. SOFA says it's not huge robot and and ask. Yeah exactly is quite cool futuristic. And it's it's kind of swaying and moving said. There was some animation two times and we actually had it so it's pick Ryan Glowing eyes she said and you can change their color so we have the color when the robot was asking the question and then they changed inch to not the color when it was persons. Tend to answer and we have at least one person did not set set it kind of made them GEICO SACO Easter. They really enjoyed the interaction. All the papers didn't comment on it. So I think it was probably quite subtle cue conversational key. Allies Pink helps. It's filled more like an interaction. Suzanne taking yeah well. Let's say it because it's a robot has a face and is a very intimate kind of one to one conversation station. You are looking at it the whole time. It's not like Lisa. FERRIOL voice assistant compensation we might be doing other things like driving washing up or something you really were paying attention to this. Robot robot instead of the movement really active into the whole conversation dynamic and also the robots looking at years because his face tracking functions. Saying if if you turn away because you thinking deeply by something robot will turn with the eight and again I think people consciously not stop the helmed fade failing gauged with it. Said people don't consciously engage isn't notice that something's being done to then you kind of resist or you realize the magic goes away but it's really good conversation design when when there's a robot with some kind of Avatar involved you WanNa make. It seem seamlessly natural. The aim of things. Yeah and pay said things like I know. It wasn't really listening to me. But it felt like a compensation. I felt quite engaged with it. I wanted to ask you about is is the studies that have shown that to actually be the key has not been proven to be the case where it really doesn't matter whether the person knows the thing is listening on understanding understanding all that really matters is that it feels like it and the moment I taught anybody who's tested thought directly. I haven't heard anything yet. Generally understood kind of principle. I think of other places as well. It's kind of a pragmatic approach to these things. It doesn't really matter whether is not people react anyway anyway. That was one that I'm and I did a presentation while ago you need. It was around the Kismet robot bomb Cynthia Brazil and that was studying mimicking. And obviously obviously this robot if you see what it looks like it looks like Johnny Five Short Circuit. Some you know. It's it doesn't know what you're talking about. This is two thousand and two or something that that wasn't even even the algorithms today but they did find in that study that the robot looks sad than the user would kill sad and the robot will copy their side expression and that was kind of off marrying during the real dynamic that had an effect on both parties even though obviously there was no real intelligence involved and I thought that was really quite fascinating. You know that you could create that level of engagement and physical reaction on the part of the user just through that kind of mirroring yeah and I think he even without that people sort of OFA. Generalized that unit. They talk to animals as if they've got human levels of intelligence. I think we've all been shot as our computer wire to Made a mistake or whatever WanNa say one of the things that we find with Participants were say did to with robots quite a lot quite sensory. She can hear in the time with Tokens throw out but they made to particular comments. I think a very very interesting suggests it was different from a human interaction and one was. They really liked the facts thoughts. It wasn't judging them and people often commented on that they said they liked could just talk that being judged and they light fat robot into drop them a knows the assumption that human would have done. Dice ice thanks hume. Therapists would be trained not to be judgmental not to respond in a judgment Hawaii but if the client has going in thinking those things might happen then this anant wet my Ashby more reassuring Vote South something that surprised us. Yeah I can imagine that the in the case of certain things that require embarrassing for people I know the men in general have more trouble getting to the doctor than women simply because they don't want to have have to admit that there's something wrong with them physically. And so you'd think that if you have some kind of need physical mental therapy than that stigma there in your mind your perception of even greater and having some supposedly anonymous machine. Listen to your problems. Could be the solution for people yet. They are needs Diction conference to by robots. There you you have some interesting conversations with people by the robots were going to kind of type place of human therapists. Stephanie Vam uneasiness in resistance. I think would be the best way of wedding it to this was a conference with healthcare practitioners clinicians as that very well nine in research of addiction that never come across a sanctuary before and it was very much. The first question you'd constantly get asked was is scheduled to take my job. They say there was uneasiness about whether responsibility lies. I'm when a variable is being used as a therapist and can the right about the same as a human. Is there a potential that the boat could make somebody worse. And if that's the case who does the responsibility lie with. So there's a lot of uneasiness and I think that's just simply simply because people have high expectations of what robots can be. I think that we're taking them to places where they on actually capable of going yet. For instance say you're saying that the doctors had genuinely fearful that the robots would replace them because they are worried that the robot technology was sufficient to in order to replace them. All the vice versa. Nina wasn't sufficient and therefore they're going to be liability issues when screws up. I think it was kind of make sure if the two opinions actually there were some people that were more aware of the technology where it's currently are and how much it can do and thinking that it was being stretched to forty scene but that was a little sater's that genuinely thought that the robot was at that stage where it would be able to take jobs awesome. We genuinely just concerned in the ethics around that. And how the brain what could potentially alert human to somebody that's inevitable position for instance and why the confidentiality lies is if someone says something to a Bible and these big topics that obviously need to be addressed bet was still very much in the early days of this research and taking it into clinical alario is not is not the near future that technology is still very limited in what we can do with it. I know from having what e- health or remote healthcare startup Convincing doctors to change the way they do things is an uphill struggle and quite entrenched. There is a lot of liability issues like you say very complicated organizational structures as as well to battle through and still getting to grips with the things like mobile cloud and and all of these kinds of things as well but I think there are a number of very forward thinking. Doctors helped the younger ones who need to the game winning to try these new technologies and absolute social robots clearly have some kind of something I think actually actually a lot of it whereas none of them would actually face to face with the social worry about before. They never had an interaction with one before or they'd never had they'd obviously heard of the idea of robots. It's being used not seen it face to face and hadn't real understanding of what they're doing and what we're doing with them on the steps. Were taking to get them to the right place and the collaborations across disciplines that we need to have to be able to do this justice basically to make sure that the Breitbart can actually what we want it today and after having conversations with them and how demonstrations with the right but then resistance kind of seem to draw quite a law. They are actually starting to give me ideas of where the robot could be taken and talk about the barriers that they could see that perhaps as a psychologist or as a computer scientists. We wouldn't foresee because we're not on the ground wave patients every day so so we would. I wear doing lab based studies. We're not in a clinic with them. Patients that have potentially high risk behaviors and we went. Foresee those issues. So I think it's really important that we work alongside them to understand their opinions and their experiences so that we can incorporate this potentially social way butts come help our healthcare systems absolutely when you're meeting them in discussing the various benefits. What are the main advantages? The you're trying to convince them of in terms of why robot counselors are the future nine. What use cases they could be most effective and why the necessary? What kinds of points were you making very much say office? That non judgmental environment that allows them into freely. Talk talk about what they want to talk about with no interruptions and that they can just approach the right but when they feel comfortable to say and I think it was although the brave about may not always help someone directly change their behavior. It may help. Someone realized that they do need to talk to somebody. And a human is the best present for them to speak to take B we had conversations with therapists who actually perhaps rather than the therapists be the face of the intervention anymore. Perhaps a robot should be the face if the intervention on that actually therapist works behind the scenes was developed scenario. Say That some people perhaps not saying human face is what they need and having the variable interaction works for them. But the therapist still behind the therapy that receiving obviously than you'd get confidentiality got the tissues and something that would definitely needs to be looked in tape. They will save very much liked the idea of robots being able to be in community centers for instance for people that may not feel comfortable going into a doctor's surgery that just happy to get into the community and that there's a private room that they can go and discuss behavior change inch. I think that's really the big win is when you put these things out in the failed or even in the home when people are GonNa have a these robots. Many of the projects have vowed recently. But it's only a matter. Talk to one of them. Wins and yet to be able to talk to something in the comfort of your own home in the privacy long time is huge and I think it's really a way of getting psychology the because a lot of people try and try and increase fitness repeatedly. Then give off. Ponente are going to have another got it. It would feel a huge step to go to see a counselor because you weren't able to but I think actually if robots robots can sort of introduced these techniques like most facial in fear that would be very hard to do on yourself but they provide way of having that dialogue aloke can get that psychological support without having the stigma of admitting that there's something wrong with you because it's very normal struggle with changing changing behaviors. Really hard paint STU. You've got deeply ingrained habit to change thoughts. I'm really interested in what year lease it to imprint. Suits men not liking the doctor or people thinking maybe something is becoming a problem personal bad enough to seek help for yet. Maybe debate this less for barrier to speak into a robot then having gun talk to a human by appropriate people even say..

USA Don Green Cynthia Brazil Ryan Suzanne Johnny Five Lisa Stephanie Vam hume Breitbart Nina Hawaii Ashby
"cynthia brazil" Discussed on This Week in Machine Learning & AI

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

11:56 min | 2 years ago

"cynthia brazil" Discussed on This Week in Machine Learning & AI

"All right everyone. I am on the line with kate darling. Kate is a research specialist at the m._i._t. Media lab kate welcome to this week and machine learning at all for having me <hes>. I'm really looking afford to this conversation. We met not too long back at the a._w._s. Remorse conference amazon remorse conference <hes> where you did a great presentation tation on <hes> some of your research into human and robot interactions and i'm really looking forward to <hes> diving into that but let let's start with the kind of broad brush look at the field. You're a leading expert in robot ethics. What exactly is robot ethics nickson. Why is it important. That's a great question so robot ethics sounds very science fiction any <hes> very i robot blade runner esque ask but when i talk about robot ethics what i really mean is the ethical use of robotic technologies and part of that. Is you know how we integrate technology into the workforce. How we think about responsibility for harm in all sorts of contacts whether that's automated weapons systems sir automated vehicles or other types of automated technology but the main thing. I'm interested in in this sphere robot. Ethics is the social aspect act of integrating robots. That seemed very lifelike to people so i'm really interested in the ways that people treat robots like they're alive even though they know that they're just machines and what sort of ethical issues can arise from that and how did you get interested in this field. What's your your background and what that led you to this area focus so i <hes> i originally studied law and social sciences and i did <hes> <hes> lawn economics and intellectual property but i think that my interest is always been in house systems shape behaviour so you know if you look the laws the system or economic system or now i'm really focused on technology of the system <hes> and how shapes human behavior and i think what really got got me interested in robots in particular was this one moment where i was. I was in law school and i bought this baby. Dinosaur robot called cleo oh they don't make them anymore but it was this really cool toy that had discount lifelike behavior and one of the things that did was mimic pain very well so like if you held it up by the tail it had a tilt sensor in it knew that it was upside down so it would start to cry and squirm around it super br acute and and <hes> and it was really cool like for the the toy that it was at the time so i would show it off to people it'd be like lit up at the tail see what it does and and people would hold it up and after a while it started to bother me when they held it up too long and i would tell them to put it back down. They say that's enough now and that was really interesting to me because i knew exactly how the toy works but i still felt this empathy for it when it was crying crying and i was like that's weird and then i started looking into this more and i discovered the whole field of human robot interaction dat dat looks at how people interact with robotic technology and a lot of it is studies that you know border on psychology and look at people's tendency to <hes> treat these machines like living things and how to you know tweak that so i got very interested in that and i started coming at it though from the perspective perspective of okay clearly we do this but what does this mean in the broader context of a society where we're increasingly integrating robots into shared spaces aces. You have several of these clear robust to this day <hes> i think he showed some photos of of them. In your presentation we'll make short either include or linked to <hes> some of those photos and the and the show notes very cute so and and you kind you've mentioned the increasing role of robots in our day to day lives as you know were transitioning from memorial where they you know the primary experience that most folks had with robots was if they work with them like industrial types of robots and now we're starting to see these robots that are in stores guiding people around or your robot barista's things like that. How is the study of human robot. Interaction practically applied to this new world that we're <music> evolving into. We yeah so like you said you know we're. We're very familiar with industrial robots. We've had those for a long time. What's happening right now is that robots are coming into workplaces in households in public spaces stores and right now the technology soldiers still very crude. I know like my mom recently had an encounter with a robot in stop and shop that she was not happy with she was like this overlooked creepy. It's beeping and i don't like it <hes> but i think it's a matter of time before the design gets better and more compelling and people <hes> actually you know start to accept robots in their shared spaces. I think it's inevitable that this is going to happen. <hes> i also think it's inevitable that we're are going to be working more with robotic technology because i know the media likes to talk about how robots are taking all the jobs and that's true in some cases jobs that are very very easily automated but in most cases were what's aren't good replacements for humans and they have a very different type of skill set so what is actually happening is that we're gonna see more <hes> <hes> technology that people have to work with and <hes> human robot interaction helps to study how people interact with that technology and how to design it in a way that they might trust it or even enjoy working with it instead of just saying oh this you know this machine gene is threatening to me or it doesn't work it made a mistake and i don't like it <hes> human robot interaction. It's <hes> oftentimes about designing technology collagen way that is more palatable to people that people might even liked to work with and it's also about finding <hes> use is cases for the technology that <hes> we might not even have so it's not just about workplace integration but there are also some applications in health and education in that are really interesting where we're starting to see social robots being used as replacements for animal therapy for example <hes> in contexts where we can't use real animals or robots robots that are working with autistic children engaging them in ways that we haven't seen before so a lot of pretty pretty cool things happening and human robot interaction <hes> so i think it's very useful field study offer this day and age at one of the aspects of human robot interaction that you new study is <hes> or at least the result of it is kind of this exploration of human empathy in those kind of scenarios areas and you've done a number of experiments to explore that including. I think involving these plea robots. Can you talk a little bit about about some of the experiments that you've done yeah sure so the plea i haven't actually done any scientific experiments with the polio robots because they're very expensive it and the experiments i've done usually involve destroying the robot so but the what inspired the the experimental work was a workshop that i did with five of these baby dinosaur please with my friend hottest guzzled where we took the baby dinosaur robots. We remade five groups of people. He's all adults. They're at a conference <hes> we had like five teams of six people each and each team got a robot and they named it it and they had to interact with it and play with it for forty five minutes and then we unveiled a hammer and a hatchet and we told them to torturing kill the robots and <hes> <hes> it was really interesting like we. It seems like you're getting uncomfortable. Just the thought of torturing and killing these please well. It's <hes> and it was really really interesting to see that. People were more uncomfortable than i expected them to be like. We thought that some people would be you like yeah sure it's just a robot. I'll take this hatchet to it and some people would be like no. Don't do it and instead in this particular group. Everyone refused to even hit hit the robots so we actually had to improvise in the workshop and at some point we were like okay you can save your team's robot if you destroy another teams robot <music> patriot to do that and they couldn't do that either and finally we threatened to destroy all the robots unless someone took a hatchet to one of them and you know it was very like like half joking half serious discomfort that people felt when when the robot have got destroyed destroyed by this hatchet and it was actually moment of silence in the room to the fallen robot so it was just a very interesting very dramatic very not scientific anticipate experiment <hes> day that we had and that inspired later research that i did at m._i._t. With kalashnikovs dean cynthia brazil and for those experiments we weren't using cute baby dinosaur robots <hes> perks of the cost like i mentioned but in part because we wanted to choose something that people don't immediately we bond with and respond to so we chose heck's bugs which this toy it it's small moves around and really lakeway they like a bug and people come into the lab and smash them with mallets and <hes> we want to know two things we wanted to people hesitate more if we gave the heck's book a name and have a backstory so if we said this is frank and frank's favorite colors wed and he likes to play and the other thing we wanted to know was whether people's hesitation correlated in any way to their natural tendencies for empathy so we do the psychological empathy test with them and we found that people who scored low on the test for empathic concern they would hesitate much less than the other people they would just hit frank and the people who scored very high on the empathic concern concern test would hesitate much more or even refuse to hit heck's books so it was it was a little study but it was kind of interesting because it indicates if you know we might even be able to measure people's empathy using robots which is kind of like a a weird turn on the white contests from blade runner. I don't you know if you're familiar with that one. I don't remember the details of it so in blade runner you have robots that look just like humans and so did tell hell whether someone is a robot or human they do this empathy test where they they tell them these stories and see how they react to them and so our version of that is weakened. See how empathic yours a human by telling you stories about a robot and seeing how you react that so it was it's fun was your presentation and it showed a video of kids in a like a mall security robot and some of the dynamics that occurred ordered ordered. I see that <hes> separately. Do you know the video that i'm referring to..

kate darling frank polio cynthia brazil forty five minutes
"cynthia brazil" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"cynthia brazil" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Everybody in the chest happy fourth of july rashly off this week no chat show verge cast this week were celebrating our nation's independence but we did while at the feed go empty and i really wanna share this episode of wide you push that button with few ashley in caitlin investigated gibault just a robot died ashley he's been so excited about the story it's a robot people loved it jeevan wasn't a good robot joanna stern hated it dan seaver and hated it but some people loved it they brought it into their homes and made it part of the family in died well it's not dead yet they're gonna turn off the servers and it's gonna die in people are really emotional is such a wild episode of button i think you're really gonna like it check it hey gibault tell me about her latest update well it's not great news the servers out there that let me do what i do are going to be turned off dude once that happened in our interactions with each other are going to be limited i want to say i really enjoyed our time together thank you very very much for having me around maybe someday when robots are way more advanced and today in everyone has them in their home you could tell you what i said i said hello so march the makers of this robot about that you just heard gibault updated the robot in homes around you as to make it say that it's servers are going to be shutting down today on the second episode and are death online series were asking what happens when a robot friend dies wow i have never had a robot friend i mean either this is new for both of us but that's why i was so shocked to find the story there's a real robot find out there in its name this deebo can you please tell me about jeep from i don't have a personal relationship to vote yes yeah so the story of love lost human robot friendship an ethics gray cat way before we get into the full story i'm gonna give you a little context introducing reducing the world's first family robot deebo is a home robot that was introduced in twenty fourteen and indie gogo which is a crowd funding platform and it looks like what you would probably think of for a smart home speaker so it's stationary it sits it's on a desk or table wherever you wanna put it and it doesn't walk so doesn't have legs but his body moot that's devos whole thing it's a kind of gyrates dance and it has a big display with little eyeball sucking follow you around the room hey where'd you go there you its creator cynthia brazil works at mit and she studies human robot interaction so when she introduces product it's a big deal like this is her industry she's a big name technology actually treat you like a human being would have technology helps you to feel closer to the ones you love that's what he was about that's why created this company in gio was really ahead of its time when it debuted on and you go alexa google assistant they were around yet so at the time the people who loved robots or always wanted a smart assistant dot deebo might be their opportunity we need your help to build gebo to bring it to the world and to grow

"cynthia brazil" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:50 min | 2 years ago

"cynthia brazil" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Just being able to tell a device to do something with your voice? Caroline, nor. Right. Exactly. And I think when it comes to kids, you know, they really the novelty of being able to talk to a device that. Reacts as though it's really listening to you is really it's just it's like catnip for kids. So why then are sales of these taking off for parents Caroline north. Well, I actually really think that the reason why sales are taking office because they're super cheap. The all of these devices are lost leaders for the companies that produce them. It's the whole razor blade razor model. It's not the razor that makes the company money. It's the razor blades. So the companies put these devices in your home, so they can basically make money off of them. They are collecting your data, and they are monetize ING all of that information. And also there as Jacob mentioned they're trying to get you to make purchases off of them. So that's where the money comes from. And in terms of just the extreme amount of data. They can collect device like this just give us a sense. Oh well. They collect they're really collecting. They're collecting basically every interaction that you have with them. And then they aggregate that information, and then they use it to determine patterns of behavior and create a composite profile of the consumer, and what they might want now, and what they might want in the future. And that's where we really get into some problems because we don't know exactly how they're listening and how and exactly all of the data that they're that they're collecting and when you buy one of these and you consent to give them your data. You are actually opting into future uses of your data that have not even been invented yet. And can I do a really quick poll? Carolina, nor do you have a smart speaker. Yeah, we have I have three of them. And how about you? Jacob boring. Knob even one by the way, Siri is in essence as smart ES degree. Yes. And January dusky what about you? I don't have a smart speaker. We have Sonos speakers to just. Play music around the house, but hopefully, they're not listening. So we heard Caroline nor earlier say that these smart speakers are like catnip for kids. Can you talk a little bit about how kids how view these speakers how they relate to them. Well, there's a really interesting study done by Cynthia Brazil at MIT media lab or she had children from three to ten years of age interact with different agents such as Google home and the echo dot with Alexa, and she also had them with interact with Cosmo and a chat bot. And and was interesting a level of trust that children have in these, you know, humanoid voice enabled assistant, extremely high children when they interact with robots or anything that has a voice, they they imbue some animism in van computer. They don't think of them as computers, they think of them as having more lifelike features and intelligence, and they also indicate that they trust them. They and they don't want those especially with studies with robots they want them to be treated with human values. They don't want them to be locked in a closet. They worry about the experience of those computers. And I just an example of this like when I asked my. My eight year old who serious he said, she's a woman in California who answers questions whenever we need her. And I was like what I taught you the technology can do this that technology can can create a really lifelike voice. So we have to understand that young children conceptualize AI and machine learning and privacy and even just computers and technology very differently than adults conceptualize them, and that can put children being a little bit more vulnerable in terms of what they're willing to share with technologies or just what they're how they're willing to interact with technologies. What you're talking about really opens up a whole new host of questions beyond some of the more common concerns that we hear about these smart speakers. I mean Jacob board. You've been looking at the way this technology affects human behavior, and some of the questions that have come up have been basic things like we'll this make my kid. More rude because they're talking to this device in a in a kind of demanding way short sentences and expecting this this device to answer. Our questions have been concerns raised about the fact that Alexei is a female name, and whether or not they'll be some association with making demands on. I think could you just quickly run down some of the sort of, you know. Basic level concerns that you've heard right? So, you know, I'm writing a book about how technology in general in a in particular is considered reprogram human behavior. And the the the easiest way I've found to try and go at that question is to at least look at the incentives of the companies that make these products, and then what we know about the patterns in human behavior, and how those two things might interact. So we know and I get this all the time from the executives. I interview at the big companies that make these products that they are all about trying to learn your patterns, learn your not just a logistical patterns of your day. But also what mood you are in there? Trying to pick up all kinds of human, you know, programming that you, and I don't even know we are giving over to them when we interact with these devices, so that they can make themselves invaluable to your day, you know, make themselves really one of the principles of design that you hear these companies is the toothbrush principle. They don't make a product unless it's gonna obey the idea that you're going to use it at least twice. A day in a habitual way. The way you do a toothbrush, right? So if you think of companies like that throwing everything they have at trying to create the, you know, your toothbrush like habits, and then you combine that also with the tendencies that count as mentioned an out, so many others have mentioned about how human beings in general and children in particular are are great at anthropomorphized saying, right? The term for for attributing more sophistication to a non human thing than it has anthropomorphized these devices, and in the long term the way that these companies are trying to basically change your habits is going to sweep all of us up into new habits. We didn't even really know we were forming. So suddenly you, and I are checking you know, social media multiple times a day. You know, we're we're evaluating each other based on that like, the they're creating new habits out of it that that interact with unconscious behavior in humans that we, you know, we're just that science has just reveal so to me the challenge here, the scary part of it is just that kids could find themselves just by you know, spending an hour a day. Let's say interacting with something. Like, Alexa, get to a certain point ten years from now where they are so acclimated to using that technology on a on a daily basis that they've in some way, you know, they've they've they've been reprogrammed in a sense to interact with those devices, and what the upside or downside of that is we don't know yet and Carolina you're nodding you very that was great. Right. And actually what I think is. So interesting is that we call them. Sparks smart speakers. But they're not actually that smart. And what might mean by that is they fail all the time there, they the AI is pretty good. But it requires you to interact with them all the time and the issues that we get to with kids is. Yes, there might be that issue of like demanding something and I get the response. But the problem there is that it's not inducing critical thinking, so it gives you an answer and for small children, especially they're going to accept that as the as the God's honest truth. Right. So they're not like where did this answer? Come from. Is it correct? Can I cross reference even like you could on internet browser? They're accepting it, and we don't know exactly how all of the home assistance collect and decide that that's the answer that you need to know. And then and there's no further inducement to research where it came from. Why they believe that? That's true. And and get any context and perspective on that. Answer and Jenny Radetsky. In addition to just providing answers that may or may not be accurate. There inhibiting to some degree the learning process, or at least that's been a concern. That's been raised by some I played at the very beginning of this show. The audio from viral video of a little kid asking, Alexa. What is five minus three and Alexa, giving this kid? The answer. Are there concerns around that? In terms of how it affects the way children will learn absolutely mostly because March speakers, and a I are are great at offering facts and filtering through the tons of information on the internet and picking out the facts that might fit most with the question you asked her to behavior. Do you did the last ten times you use the speaker the thing I worry about that is that children? Don't learn just by facts, they actually need a a cohesive contextualized version of knowledge that is what attracted adults provide in her life through storytelling through helping them. Put together pieces of information from different experiences. They think in really magical and expansive ways, and they'd make come up with really crazy alternate solutions to or explanations for why things happen. Whereas, you know, like Caroline said a in comparison is pretty dumb. It really offers very constrained solutions or answers that are not the breath of information that kids really need to know. And I think I've read that AI designers know that there's this lack of common sense or cohesion or ability to, you know, look to another being and say is this what you think can we put this together and critically analyze it. It's really just kind of spitting out the same the same facts. And I think that I don't want parents either to feel like they're being displaced in terms of all this question asking because while it may seem easy to have your child who's asking a million questions to just, you know, just shoot them all at the smart speaker what you're missing then is the subtext of the child's questions like what is the meaning behind wider acting over and over about facts about fire extinguishers and fire alarms could they just be afraid because they heard about someone's house burning down. And and do you need to do something else to help them with that fear? That might be just talking about it or drawing a picture or give them a hug rather than feeding them more facts that actually might make them more anxious. It's very interesting. You're talking about, you know, really the connection building the relationship and really the understanding of who your child is. But I think when you said displaced it sounds like to some degree. You're also talking about them turning to you the parent is someone to help answer questions at all that they may prefer to go to the speaker rather than the parent taking the speaker has more the answer. Then they do they might. I mean, the speakers are thrilling, they're fun. I mean when my kids have had exposure to them, they just bark orders at them. And you know, the the things that take up us talking about with kind of reinforcing this type of patterns of behavior could concertedly happened, because voice assistance. There's one study showing that when they program the voice assistant to only respond to polite commands and to actually rebuke. That child when they didn't use polite commands, the children didn't like the voice assistant as much, and if you are, you know, a Google or an Amazon you want people to like and trust the virtual assistant hanging out in the home with them. So so it's they want to build really easy to interact with interfaces that might reinforce some really demanding an impulsive behavior on the parts of kids again, we're talking with Jenny Radetsky. She's an assistant professor of pediatrics developmental behavioral pediatrics at the university of Michigan and lead author of the American Academy of pediatrics a report media and young minds. We also have Jacob board with Esa technology correspondent for NBC news. And Caroline, nor senior parenting editor for common sense media. I want to ask our listeners to join the conversation about smart speakers. What questions do you have for guests that you're hearing the things that they say, do you have a smart speaker? How do your kids use it? Are you right on the edge of whether? Or not to get it. Or what if anything has given you pause about having one in your home?.

Caroline north Jacob Alexa AI Jenny Radetsky Google Carolina assistant professor of pediatr Cynthia Brazil American Academy of pediatrics Siri anthropomorphized NBC Alexei university of Michigan California virtual assistant Sparks technology correspondent
"cynthia brazil" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:05 min | 2 years ago

"cynthia brazil" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Just being able to tell a device to do something with your voice? Caroline, nor. Right. Exactly. And I think when it comes to kids. You know, they really the novelty of being able to talk to a device that. Sort of reacts as though it's really listening to you is really it's just it's like catnip for kids. So why then are sales of these taking off for parents. Caroline. Well, I actually really think that the reason why sales are taking office because they're super cheap. The all of these devices are lost leaders for the companies that produce them. It's the whole razor blade razor model. It's not the razor that makes the company money. It's the razor blades. So the companies put these devices in your home, so they can basically make money off of them. They are collecting your data, and they are monetize ING all of that information. And also there as Jacob mentioned they're trying to get you to make purchases off of them. So that's where the money comes from. And in terms of just the extreme amount of data. They can collect device like this just give us a sense. Oh well. They collect they're really collecting. They're collecting basically every interaction that you have with them. And then they aggregate that information, and then they use it to determine patterns of behavior and create a composite profile of the consumer and what they might want. Now in what they might want in the future. And that's where we really get into some problems because we don't know exactly how they're listening and how and exactly all of the data that they're that they're collecting and when you buy one of these and you consent to give them your data. You are actually opting into future uses of your data that have not even been invented yet. And can I do a really quick poll? Caroline, nor do you have a smart speaker. Yeah, we have I have three of them. How about you? Jacob Arnab, even one by the way, Siri is in essence as smart. Yes. Yes. And Jenny Radetsky. What about you? I don't have it smart speaker. We have Sonos speakers just. Play music around the house, but hopefully, they're not listening. So we heard Caroline nor earlier say that these smart speakers are like catnip for kids. Can you talk a little bit about how kids how view these speakers how they relate to them. Well, there's a really interesting study done by Cynthia Brazil at MIT media lab or she had children from three to ten years of age interact with different agents such as Google home and the echo dot with Alexa, and she also had them with interact with Cosmo and a chat bot. And and it was interesting the level of trust that children have in these, you know, humanoid voice enabled assistant, extremely high children when they interact with robots or anything that has a voice, they they imbue some animism in than computer. They don't think of him as computers, they think of them as having more lifelike features and intelligence, and they also indicate that they trust them. They don't want those especially with studies with robots they want them to be treated with human values. They don't want them to be locked in a closet. They worry about the experience of those computers. And I just didn't example of this like when I asked my. My eight year old who serious he said, she's a woman in California who answers questions whenever we need her. And I was like what I taught you. Technology can do this that technology can can create a really lifelike voice. So we have to understand that young children conceptualize AI and machine learning and privacy and even just computers technology, very differently than adults conceptualize them, and and that can put children being a little bit more vulnerable in terms of what they're willing to share with technologies or just what they're how they're willing to interact with technologies. What you're talking about really opens up a whole new host of questions beyond some of the more common concerns that we hear about these smart speakers. I mean Jacob board. You've been looking at the way, this technology affects human behavior, and some of the questions that have come up have been basic things like. Will this make my kid more rude because they're talking to this device in a in a kind of demanding way short sentences and expecting this this device to answer questions. There have been concerns raised about the fact that Alexa, as a female name, and whether or not they'll be some association with making demands on could you just quickly run down some of the sort of basic level concerns that you've heard right. So, you know, I'm writing a book about how technology in general in a in particular is considered reprogram human behavior. And the the the easiest way I've found to try and go at that question is to at least look at the incentives of the companies that make these products, and then what we know about the patterns in human behavior, and how those two things might interact. So we know and I get this all the time from the executives. I interview at the big companies that make these products that they are all about trying to learn your patterns, learn your. Not just a logistical patterns of your day. But also what mood you are in there? Trying to pick up all kinds of human, you know, programming that you, and I don't even know we are giving over to them when we interact with these devices, so that they can make themselves invaluable to your day, you know, make themselves really one of the principles of design that you hear these companies is the toothbrush principle. They don't make a product unless it's going to obey the idea that you're going to use it at least twice a day in a habitual way. The way you do a toothbrush, right? So if you think of companies like that throwing everything they have trying to create the your toothbrush like habits, and then you combine that also with the tendencies that count as mentioned, so many others have mentioned about how human beings in general and children in particular are are great at anthropomorphized saying, right? The term for for attributing more sophistication to a non human thing than it has anthropomorphized these devices and in the long term. The way that these companies are trying to basically change your habits is going to sweep all of us up into new habits. We didn't even really know we were forming. So suddenly you, and I are checking you know, social media multiple times a day. You know, we're we're evaluating each other based on that like, the they're creating new habits out of it that that interact with unconscious behavior in humans that we you know, we're just that science is just starting to reveal. So to me, the challenge here, the scary part of it is just that kids could find themselves just by you know, spending an hour a day. Let's say interacting with something. Like, Alexa, get to a certain point ten years from now where they are so acclimated to using that technology on on a daily basis that they've in some way, you know, they've they've they've been reprogrammed in a sense to interact with those devices, and what the upside or downside of that is we don't know yet and Carolina, you're nodding you very great. And actually what I think is so interesting is that we call them. Sparks smart speakers. But they're not actually that smart. And what might mean by that is they fail all the time there, they the AI is pretty good. But it requires you to interact with them all the time. And the issue that we get to with. Yes. There might be that issue of like, I'm demanding something and I get the response. But the problem there is that it's not inducing critical thinking, so it gives you an answer and for small children, especially they're going to accept that as the as the God's honest truth. Right. So they're not like where did this answer? Come from. Is it correct? Can I cross reference even like you could on internet browser? They're accepting it, and we don't know exactly how all of the home assistance collect and decide that that's the answer that you need to know. And then there's no further inducement to research where it came from. Why they believe that? That's true. And and get any context and perspective on that answer in January dusky in addition to just providing answers that may or may not be accurate. There inhibiting to some degree the learning process, or at least that's been a concern. That's been raised by some I've played at the very beginning of this show. The audio from a viral video of a little kid asking, Alexa. What is five minus three and Alexa, giving this kid? The answer. Are there concerns around that? In terms of how it affects the way children will learn absolutely mostly because. March speakers, and a I are are great at offering facts and filtering through the tons of information on the internet and picking out the facts that might fit most with the question you asked her the behavior. Do you did the last ten times you use the speaker the thing I worry about that is that children? Don't learn just by facts, they actually need a a cohesive contextualized version of knowledge that is what trusted adults provide in our life through storytelling through helping them. Put together pieces of information from different experiences. They think can really magical and expansive ways, and they may come up with really crazy alternate solutions to or explanations for why things happen. Whereas, you know, like Caroline said they I in comparison is pretty dumb. It really offers very constrained solutions or answers that are not the breath of information that kids really need to know. I think I've read that a designers know that there's this lack of common sense or cohesion or ability to, you know, look to another being and say is this what you think can we put this together and critically analyze it. It's really just kind of spitting out the same the same facts. And I think that I don't want parents either to feel like they're being displaced in terms of all this question asking because while it may seem easy to have your child who's asking a million questions to just you know, to shoot them all at the smart speaker what you're missing then is the subtext of the child's questions like what is the meaning behind wider acting over and over about facts about fire extinguishers and fire alarms could they just be afraid because they heard about someone's house burning down. And and do you need to do something else to help them with that fear that might be just talking about it or trying to picture or give them a hug rather than feeding them more facts that actually might make them more. Anxious. It's very interesting. You're talking about, you know, really the connection building the relationship and really the understanding of who your child is. But I think when you said displaced it sounds like to some degree. You're also talking about them turning to you the parent is someone to help answer questions at all that they may prefer to go to the speaker rather than the parent that he must speaker has more of the answer. And they do they might. I mean, the the speakers are thrilling, they're fun. I mean when my kids have had exposure to them, they just bark orders at them. And you know, the the things that take up was talking about with kind of reinforcing this type of patterns of behavior could can certainly happen because voice assistance. There's one study showing that when they program to voice assistant to only respond to polite commands and to actually rebuke the child when they didn't use polite commands, the CIA children didn't like the voice assistant as much, and if you are, you know. Google or Amazon you want people to like and trust the virtual assistant hanging out in the home with them. So so it's they want to build really easy to interact with interfaces that might reinforce some really demanding an impulsive behavior on the parts of kids again, we're talking with Jenny Radetsky. She's an assistant professor of pediatrics developmental behavioral pediatrics at the university of Michigan and lead author of the American Academy of pediatrics AP report media and young minds. We also have Jacob board with us technology correspondent for NBC news. And Caroline, nor senior parenting editor for commonsense media. I want to ask our listeners to join the conversation about smart speakers. What questions do you have for guests that you're hearing the things that they say, do you have a smart speaker? How do your kids use it? Are you right on the edge of whether or not to get it? Or what if anything has given you pause about having one in your home? You can call us at eight six six seven three three six seven eight six again eight. Six six seven three three six seven eight six you can post your comments on our website kqeDorg slash forum on Facebook. You can tweet us at K Cutie forum or Email us at forum at Kikuchi.

Caroline Alexa Jacob Arnab Jenny Radetsky Google AI CIA assistant professor of pediatr Facebook Cynthia Brazil American Academy of pediatrics NBC anthropomorphized California university of Michigan virtual assistant Siri Sparks technology correspondent
"cynthia brazil" Discussed on Talking Tech

Talking Tech

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"cynthia brazil" Discussed on Talking Tech

"Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com with wicks you can use artificial design intelligence to create a stunning website right from your phone in five minutes or less. Just go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your professional website today. Hi, Brett, console from boy spot that a I filling in for Jefferson Graham, who is on vacation. And you're listening to talking tech. Today's topic is consumer robots. It wasn't so long ago that they were destined to be the next big thing. But that optimism hasn't translated into consumer sales. The result Gebo has recently sold off for parts. You don't remember Gebo? Well, it was one of the first social robots the founder mitt robotic Cynthia Brazil was a favourite of tech media Gebo even made the cover of time magazine and twenty seventeen and was listed as one of the twenty five best inventions of the year, the nine hundred dollar robot was delayed many times and at one point had to refund the money of early crowdfunding backers, but it did come to market in late twenty seventeen the problem was it didn't sell well, or at least well enough this past summer, the company laid off staff shut down production and sold off its. But Jeeva wasn't the only robot headed to the SCR heap in two thousand eighteen another robot named curry made by division of Bosch when an invasion ward at the two thousand eighteen Consumer Electronics Show that was in January by summer the product was cancelled. So what happened however prognosticators so wrong about consumer robots or at least have been so wrong about them thus far. Well over the past four years we have seen the rise of headless robots. We know them a smart speakers like Amazon, echo and Google home, whereas g bone curry could play music answer some questions and set a timer for about eight or nine hundred dollars an Amazon echo dot or Google, many can do those same things and much more for under fifty dollars in fact on sale for under twenty five dollars. You don't really need a robot to follow you around the house if you can place a twenty five dollars smart speaker in every room. So the question for consumer robot makers is what is the rationale to own one. Animated facial expressions. Don't actually rise to the level of must have technology. So smart speakers address, many of these needs more efficiently than robots or smartphones. And some ways smart speakers can help facilitate robot adoption because the devices will help consumers become accustomed to speaking technology to get information and perform tasks that's a type of behavior change required for consumers to become comfortable with robots. However, smart speakers also perform many of the functions consumer robots hoped to provide so robots need to identify new use cases that they're uniquely designed to address and an example of this is robot vacuums you may be familiar with roomba and Neto bought vac. These are popular with consumers in part because they perform a useful function that other devices do not they also integrate with smart, speakers, invoice assistance, like Alexa, Google assistant to offer voice control. So the future of consumer robots may not be for general, purpose tasks or even. Social interaction instead single purpose. Robots are more likely to succeed in coordinate. Their activities with Alexis Siri and Google assistant each of which can inhabit any device. So you've been listening to talk and tack. I'm Brechin sell filling in for Jefferson Graham, who's on vacation this week. I invite listeners to check out voice bot that on the web where we cover the latest developments invoice assistant in AI devices in tune into my weekly podcasts voice by podcasts. Which like talking tech is available in every podcast Spotify, Stitcher, and even Amazon, Alexa. Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com. When you're ready to get your website up and running you want to be able to do it quickly and efficiently and wicks dot com has got you covered. They developed artificial design intelligence that creates a stunning website for you with wicks, you can create your own professional website right from your phone, which means you can open your own online store portfolio or blog wherever you are. How's that for efficient? Just go to wicks dot com. Decide what you need a website for pick your style at your own images link your social accounts and just like that your website is ready. You'll look amazing on every device desktop and mobile and it takes less than five minutes. Plus, you can do it with one hand. So it's time to get started. Go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your very own beautiful professional website today.

Google Gebo Jefferson Graham Amazon Alexa Brett time magazine Cynthia Brazil Jeeva Bosch Alexis Siri founder Brechin Spotify curry roomba AI
ICYMI: Consumer robots not hot

Talking Tech

04:39 min | 2 years ago

ICYMI: Consumer robots not hot

"Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com with wicks you can use artificial design intelligence to create a stunning website right from your phone in five minutes or less. Just go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your professional website today. Hi, Brett, console from boy spot that a I filling in for Jefferson Graham, who is on vacation. And you're listening to talking tech. Today's topic is consumer robots. It wasn't so long ago that they were destined to be the next big thing. But that optimism hasn't translated into consumer sales. The result Gebo has recently sold off for parts. You don't remember Gebo? Well, it was one of the first social robots the founder mitt robotic Cynthia Brazil was a favourite of tech media Gebo even made the cover of time magazine and twenty seventeen and was listed as one of the twenty five best inventions of the year, the nine hundred dollar robot was delayed many times and at one point had to refund the money of early crowdfunding backers, but it did come to market in late twenty seventeen the problem was it didn't sell well, or at least well enough this past summer, the company laid off staff shut down production and sold off its. But Jeeva wasn't the only robot headed to the SCR heap in two thousand eighteen another robot named curry made by division of Bosch when an invasion ward at the two thousand eighteen Consumer Electronics Show that was in January by summer the product was cancelled. So what happened however prognosticators so wrong about consumer robots or at least have been so wrong about them thus far. Well over the past four years we have seen the rise of headless robots. We know them a smart speakers like Amazon, echo and Google home, whereas g bone curry could play music answer some questions and set a timer for about eight or nine hundred dollars an Amazon echo dot or Google, many can do those same things and much more for under fifty dollars in fact on sale for under twenty five dollars. You don't really need a robot to follow you around the house if you can place a twenty five dollars smart speaker in every room. So the question for consumer robot makers is what is the rationale to own one. Animated facial expressions. Don't actually rise to the level of must have technology. So smart speakers address, many of these needs more efficiently than robots or smartphones. And some ways smart speakers can help facilitate robot adoption because the devices will help consumers become accustomed to speaking technology to get information and perform tasks that's a type of behavior change required for consumers to become comfortable with robots. However, smart speakers also perform many of the functions consumer robots hoped to provide so robots need to identify new use cases that they're uniquely designed to address and an example of this is robot vacuums you may be familiar with roomba and Neto bought vac. These are popular with consumers in part because they perform a useful function that other devices do not they also integrate with smart, speakers, invoice assistance, like Alexa, Google assistant to offer voice control. So the future of consumer robots may not be for general, purpose tasks or even. Social interaction instead single purpose. Robots are more likely to succeed in coordinate. Their activities with Alexis Siri and Google assistant each of which can inhabit any device. So you've been listening to talk and tack. I'm Brechin sell filling in for Jefferson Graham, who's on vacation this week. I invite listeners to check out voice bot that on the web where we cover the latest developments invoice assistant in AI devices in tune into my weekly podcasts voice by podcasts. Which like talking tech is available in every podcast Spotify, Stitcher, and even Amazon, Alexa. Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com. When you're ready to get your website up and running you want to be able to do it quickly and efficiently and wicks dot com has got you covered. They developed artificial design intelligence that creates a stunning website for you with wicks, you can create your own professional website right from your phone, which means you can open your own online store portfolio or blog wherever you are. How's that for efficient? Just go to wicks dot com. Decide what you need a website for pick your style at your own images link your social accounts and just like that your website is ready. You'll look amazing on every device desktop and mobile and it takes less than five minutes. Plus, you can do it with one hand. So it's time to get started. Go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your very own beautiful professional website today.

Google Gebo Jefferson Graham Amazon Alexa Brett Time Magazine Cynthia Brazil Jeeva Bosch Alexis Siri Founder Brechin Spotify Curry Roomba AI
"cynthia brazil" Discussed on Talking Tech

Talking Tech

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"cynthia brazil" Discussed on Talking Tech

"Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com with wicks you can use artificial design intelligence to create a stunning website right from your phone in five minutes or less. Just go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your professional website today. Hi, Brett consult from boy spot that a I filling in for Jefferson Graham, who is on vacation. And you're listening to talking tech. Today's topic is consumer robots. It wasn't so long ago that they were destined to be the next big thing. But that optimism hasn't translated into consumer sales. The result Gebo has recently sold off for parts. You don't remember Gebo? Well, it was one of the first social robots the founder mitt robotics, Cynthia Brazil was a favourite of the tech media Gebo even made the cover of time magazine and twenty seventeen and was listed as one of the twenty five best inventions of the year, the nine hundred dollar robot was delayed many times and at one point had to refund the money of early crowdfunding backers, but it did come to market in late twenty seventeen the problem was it didn't sell well, or at least well enough this past summer, the company laid off staff shut down production and sold off its IP. But Jeeva wasn't the only robot headed to the SCR scrapheap. In two thousand eighteen another robot named curry made by division of Bosch when an invasion award at the two thousand eighteen Consumer Electronics Show that was in January by summer the product was cancelled. So what happened however prognosticators so wrong about consumer robots or at least have been so wrong about them thus far. Well over the past four years we have seen the rise of headless robots. We know them a smart speakers like, Amazon, echo and Google home. Whereas g Bowen curry could play music answer some questions and set a timer for about eight or nine hundred dollars an Amazon echo dot or Google home mini can do those same things and much more for under fifty dollars in fact on sale for under twenty five dollars. You don't really need a robot to follow you around the house if you can place a twenty five dollars smart speaker every room. So the question for consumer robot makers is what is the rationale to own one. Animated facial expressions. Don't actually rise to level of must have technology. So smart speakers address, many of these needs more efficiently than robots or smartphones. And some way smart speakers can help facilitate robot adoption because the devices will help consumers become accustomed to speaking technology to get information and perform tasks that's a type of behavior change required for consumers to become comfortable with robots. However, smart speakers also perform many of the functions consumer robots hoped to provide so robots need to identify new use cases that they're uniquely designed to address and an example of this is robot vacuums you may be familiar with roomba and nito bought vac. These are popular with consumers in part because they perform a useful function that other devices do not they also integrate with smart, speakers, invoice assistance, like Alexa, Google assistant to offer voice control. So the future of consumer robots may not be for general, purpose tasks remain social interaction instead single purpose. Robots are more likely to. Seed in coordinate their activities with Alexis Siri and Google assistant each of which can inhabit any device. So you've been listening to talk and tack. I'm Brechin sell filling in for Jefferson Graham, who's on vacation this week. I invite listeners to check out voice bot that on the web where we cover the latest developments and voice assistant in AI devices in tune into my weekly podcasts voice by podcast, which like talking tech is available on every podcast Spotify, Stitcher, and even Amazon, Alexa. Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com. When you're ready to get your website up and running you wanna be able to do it quickly and efficiently and wicks dot com. Got you covered they developed artificial design intelligence that creates a stunning website for you with wicks, you can create your own professional website right from your phone, which means you can open your own online store portfolio or blog wherever you are. How's that for efficient? Just go to wicks dot com. Decide what you need a website for pick your style at your own images link your social accounts and just like that your website is ready. You'll look amazing on every device desktop and mobile and it takes less than five minutes. Plus, you can do it with one hand. So it's time to get started. Go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your very own beautiful professional website today.

Google Gebo Jefferson Graham g Bowen curry Amazon Alexa Brett Jeeva time magazine Cynthia Brazil Bosch Alexis Siri founder Brechin roomba Spotify AI
Consumer robots are dead; long live Alexa

Talking Tech

04:39 min | 2 years ago

Consumer robots are dead; long live Alexa

"Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com with wicks you can use artificial design intelligence to create a stunning website right from your phone in five minutes or less. Just go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your professional website today. Hi, Brett consult from boy spot that a I filling in for Jefferson Graham, who is on vacation. And you're listening to talking tech. Today's topic is consumer robots. It wasn't so long ago that they were destined to be the next big thing. But that optimism hasn't translated into consumer sales. The result Gebo has recently sold off for parts. You don't remember Gebo? Well, it was one of the first social robots the founder mitt robotics, Cynthia Brazil was a favourite of the tech media Gebo even made the cover of time magazine and twenty seventeen and was listed as one of the twenty five best inventions of the year, the nine hundred dollar robot was delayed many times and at one point had to refund the money of early crowdfunding backers, but it did come to market in late twenty seventeen the problem was it didn't sell well, or at least well enough this past summer, the company laid off staff shut down production and sold off its IP. But Jeeva wasn't the only robot headed to the SCR scrapheap. In two thousand eighteen another robot named curry made by division of Bosch when an invasion award at the two thousand eighteen Consumer Electronics Show that was in January by summer the product was cancelled. So what happened however prognosticators so wrong about consumer robots or at least have been so wrong about them thus far. Well over the past four years we have seen the rise of headless robots. We know them a smart speakers like, Amazon, echo and Google home. Whereas g Bowen curry could play music answer some questions and set a timer for about eight or nine hundred dollars an Amazon echo dot or Google home mini can do those same things and much more for under fifty dollars in fact on sale for under twenty five dollars. You don't really need a robot to follow you around the house if you can place a twenty five dollars smart speaker every room. So the question for consumer robot makers is what is the rationale to own one. Animated facial expressions. Don't actually rise to level of must have technology. So smart speakers address, many of these needs more efficiently than robots or smartphones. And some way smart speakers can help facilitate robot adoption because the devices will help consumers become accustomed to speaking technology to get information and perform tasks that's a type of behavior change required for consumers to become comfortable with robots. However, smart speakers also perform many of the functions consumer robots hoped to provide so robots need to identify new use cases that they're uniquely designed to address and an example of this is robot vacuums you may be familiar with roomba and nito bought vac. These are popular with consumers in part because they perform a useful function that other devices do not they also integrate with smart, speakers, invoice assistance, like Alexa, Google assistant to offer voice control. So the future of consumer robots may not be for general, purpose tasks remain social interaction instead single purpose. Robots are more likely to. Seed in coordinate their activities with Alexis Siri and Google assistant each of which can inhabit any device. So you've been listening to talk and tack. I'm Brechin sell filling in for Jefferson Graham, who's on vacation this week. I invite listeners to check out voice bot that on the web where we cover the latest developments and voice assistant in AI devices in tune into my weekly podcasts voice by podcast, which like talking tech is available on every podcast Spotify, Stitcher, and even Amazon, Alexa. Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com. When you're ready to get your website up and running you wanna be able to do it quickly and efficiently and wicks dot com. Got you covered they developed artificial design intelligence that creates a stunning website for you with wicks, you can create your own professional website right from your phone, which means you can open your own online store portfolio or blog wherever you are. How's that for efficient? Just go to wicks dot com. Decide what you need a website for pick your style at your own images link your social accounts and just like that your website is ready. You'll look amazing on every device desktop and mobile and it takes less than five minutes. Plus, you can do it with one hand. So it's time to get started. Go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your very own beautiful professional website today.

Google Gebo Jefferson Graham G Bowen Curry Amazon Alexa Brett Jeeva Time Magazine Cynthia Brazil Bosch Alexis Siri Founder Brechin Roomba Spotify AI
"cynthia brazil" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

03:40 min | 3 years ago

"cynthia brazil" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Robots. And this turned out to be a little more dramatic than we expected it to be because none of the participants would even so much strike these baby dinosaur robots. So we had to improvise a little and at some point we said, okay, you can save your team's robot. If you destroy another teams robot. And even that didn't work, they couldn't do it. So finally, we said, we're going to destroy all of the robots unless someone takes a hatchet to one of them. And this guy stood up and he took the hatchet and the whole room winced as he brought the hatchet down on the robot's neck, and there was this half joking half serious moment of silence in the room for this fall and robot. So that was really interesting experience. Now. It wasn't a controlled study obviously, but it did lead to some later research that I did at MIT with polish Nandi and Cynthia Brazil where we had people come into the lab and smash these heck's bugs that move around a really lifelike way like insects. So instead of choosing something cute that people are drawn to, we chose something more basic. And what we found was that high empathy people would hesitate more to hit the heck's books. Now, this is just a little study, but it's part of a larger body of research that is starting to indicate that there may be a connection between people's tendencies for empathy and their behavior around robots. But my question for the coming ehre of human robot interaction is not do. We improvise with robots, it's can robots change people's empathy. Is there reason to, for example, prevent your child from kicking a robotic dog, not just out of respect for property, but because the child might be more likely to kick a real dog. And again, it's not just kids. This is the violent video games question, but it's on a completely new level because of this visceral physicality that we respond more intensely to than to images on a screen. When we behave violently towards robots, specifically robots that are designed to mimic life. Is that a healthy outlet for violent behavior, or is that training or cruelty muscles. We don't know. But the answer this question has the potential to impact human behavior. It has the potential to impact social norms. It has the potential to inspire rules around what we can and can't do with certain robots similar to our animal cruelty laws. Because even if robots can't feel our behavior towards them might matter for us. And regardless of whether we end up changing our rules, robots might be able to help us come to new understanding of ourselves. Most of what I've learned over the past ten years has not been about technology at all. It's been about human psychology, an empathy and how we relate to others. Because when a child is kind to roomba. When a soldier tries to save a robot on the battlefield or when a group of people refuses to harm robotic baby dinosaur. Those robots aren't just Motors and gears and algorithms their reflections of our own humanity. Thank you. For more TED talks to Ted dot com.

Ted dot MIT Cynthia Brazil Nandi ten years
"cynthia brazil" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"cynthia brazil" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

"Case only earl guotai was really the reflection of his dream for it but nevertheless he because of one laptop or child asked me to come with cynthia brazil one day to mit and talk about what we could do with technology to help children learn to read since that was part of the failure in many places the kids didn't know how to read so having a tablet or computer or laptop in this case was was really just a waste and ended up in the garage and then the place so she wanted to know whether i thought that was possible and i didn't know and so it began a great initiative that's still ongoing it's called curious learning nncholas gave us the original funding and then moved onto other projects so he's not involved anymore but it's a project in which we try to help remote regions of the world world especially places where there are no schools or schools with their you know a hundred or sixty to one hundred kids to teachers whether tablets can help children learn how to read and we have modest success in some places much better than that but in large part what we're able to do is help children learn precursors for literacy and in our original deployment in eighth ethiopia some of the kids in fact have learned how to read on their own i looked at that as an ongoing initiative and in tales of literacy for the twenty first century i describe how for us would it represents is a hoped for role of technology to help us in literacy in very particular ways in this case in remote regions where there no schools are inadequate schools or schools where there's so many needs and and not enough teachers.

earl guotai ethiopia cynthia brazil mit one day
"cynthia brazil" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"cynthia brazil" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

"Worrier chapter in there about technology and its changes of but you start your end with the positive note and that's right but i don't want it and on negativity and so would i gave and it was really kind of its own separate book almost it's a chapter but it was its own separate tail if you will and that's the future the hoped for future of how technology can be a great tool and i chronicle an experimental project that i've been involved in with people at mit and toss and georgia state in particular stephanie got volved my assistant who helped write a chapter three on that book she's a child linguist and so she was very involved in the writing of chapter three there she works with tinsley galleon a former person that mit on a project called curious learning and curious learning was begun by cynthia brazil at mit and myself and in the very beginning with nncholas negroponte who some people might recognize his name from two very important initiatives one is the mit media lab which he began and has become this extraordinary place for all manner of scholars to come and work on all manner of technological innovation and the arts and generic it cetera et cetera but he also was involved in one laptop per child and though that did not become what he hoped it would be which is he hoped that technology in it's just by giving technology and exposing children to check well and she they would be able to gain all kinds of knowledge and really have almost an auto digoxin formation of learning through it that didn't turn out to be the.

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"cynthia brazil" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"cynthia brazil" Discussed on This Week In Google

"Cool if i can be replaced by robot or jeff can be replaced by robot though liz ever do it you can't you can't you can't but i am curious this the gebo the thing that got me to send the money completely on spec is it cynthia brazil who is a very good were bodices that of mit and so um i thought that was a pretty good too ancestry we'll see we'll find out it's been so long though because each she announced it before theme of sun and go came out and times have changed at least you're tanzanian it i mean i know all the things ready the aca does it's very disappointing near who have a jeep oh i don't but one of my friends does an arrow you try not to let us let me let let me down easy okay i'm sorry twenty nine dollars leaders ethical hand mayo it's very key these it has a long tradition of shooting could just hoping on everything let me that the title of the show but stacy's pooping on everything last that area as time when i bought it was it a nest iq camps secure doofus but she was right because she's you wanted me to buy this thing aback here the white house and she was right because you're a sponsor now they weren't at the time our show they brought to you by capterra you need software solutions for your business the last thing you want to do is google uh you know uh had a dog groomer business software that's really bad idea or yogurt studio software or well i can go on and on you wanna go to capterra of free directory of over five hundred categories of business software it i love going down the list of capterra businesses because who knew who knew they were businesses i mean ab testing cell for accounting suffer advocacy software a antispam suffer apparel management software applicant tracking software are.

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