16 Burst results for "Cy Fry"

"cy fry" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

08:25 min | Last week

"cy fry" Discussed on Science Friday

"Thank you for having me. It was a pleasure. We have to take a quick break but when we come back. It's an apostle verse is showdown as part of our charismatic creatures. Carnival stay with us. This is science friday. i'm marr- or fun. And it's time for charismatic. Creature carnival joining me today. Is cy fries. Charismatic creatures correspondent kathleen davis. Hi kathleen hey you mayor. I'm glad to have you along for the carnival will. I'm really excited to be here so before we jump into this week's charismatic creatures. Remind us with this carnivals all about so are charismatic creatures. Carnival is a celebration of six creatures suggested by our listeners by charismatic we mean a creature. That's overlooked or unfairly maligned by the general public. That once you look a little bit closer you can tell. It has an undeniable charm. We've got three weeks of matchups and then we're going to crown a winner and here we have an update about last week's matchup. Yes so if you remember last week. We kicked off the carnival with a showdown between the mantis. Shrimp and the hell bender salamander. Our listeners went to science. Friday dot com slash carnival to choose their favourite creature out of the two and the votes are in. So i would like drum roll. Please slithering into the first semi finalist spot of this charismatic creature carnival. The people's choice. Is the mantis shrimp. Congratulations to all the to strip out there. So we still have two more semi-finalists to discover one of which is gonna come from. Today's match up all right. I'm ready so who are charismatic. Creatures today so our first creature joining us exclusively from your local woods or maybe even your backyard is the a possum. This creature was nominated by a couple of people including listener from boston. Who wrote us on twitter. She said i'd like to nominate the possum for the carnival because it's the only marsupial in the us and it's pretty cute even though a lot of people don't like them and representing the possum in our showdown. This week is dr lisa. Walsh postdoctoral researcher at the donald danforth plant science center. She is based in washington dc. Welcome lisa you're having me and facing off against the possum. In our showdown is the most suggested creature of our carnival. All the way from the forests of batta is the i. We got quite a few nominations for the i including this message on our sifi. Vox pop up from lawn. In sioux falls. South dakota. And i think that you should add the i as a care spanich creature. They are the largest nocturnal primate They have some very specialized hands on their keith. Never stopped growing like a rodent. And just they're cute and cuddly looks All in the eyes of beholder. Thanks and representing the i in our carnival is meghan. Mcgrath education programs manager at the duke. Lemur center in durham north carolina. Welcome and thanks for joining us. I'm excited to be here. We're excited to have you both here. Just to note that this segment was recorded in front of a live zoom audience. Learn how you can join a future. Radio recording at science friday dot com slash livestream. So i have to say. I am completely charmed that both of our nominators used the word. Cute to describe each of these creatures. But i would love a basic description from each of you just paint a picture for our audience of what your creature looks like. What are they all about. Lisa i think more people might be familiar with the opossums. So let's start with you. Sure virginia guessing what was nominated. So that's the marsupial that is in the. Us there are actually over a hundred opossums feces across the american continents. But just to be brief. I'm gonna focus on the virginia awesome. It's actually the largest of the american opossums about the size of a cat. Usually whitish grey. Hank knows big. Bluish black erase una tayo bat. Unless you're really up close and personal it looks hairless. There is actually here there but because they use it to grab onto bridges and stuff. They don't want it to be long rush just like our hands which things don't have a lot of hair our hands so it sometimes gets compared to iraq. I don't think that is fair to the possum or a lot of rats out there actually be. A possum is found from costa rica. All the way up into ontario north dakota maine. They typically are found in deciduous forests. They really like marshland. But they are really resilient animals. They'll be in disturbed environments including your backyard. I've seen pictures of them on college. Campuses dot are also found across agricultural fields. They really just don't wanna be in. Desert areas are really high up nouns that otherwise. They're they're gonna be found oliver lisa. I wanted to ask. I've heard the term. Oh possum and possum. And they're often used interchangeably. What's the difference. That's a really good question. So historians tend to credit the name with john smith. Factually kind of anglicizing and american indian are gone were housing for the animal which roughly translates to y. Animal this was actually the first marsupial that european colonizers discovered a that was kind of what they based all other marsupials off of and so when james cook arrived in australia and a similar looking marsupials that were also intrigued. They decided we should name it like that original marsupial that we quote discovered and i guess somewhere along the line. They decided just for clarity. We should call it. Pass him although nowadays. Even in america we really lazier. We just don't like the. Oh we also dropped. The owns major obama's hassem but passan's in australasia. Those are very distantly related to be possibly find here. They come from numerous families. The brush possum retail awesome honey passing But deserve those are distinct around really interesting charismatic animals. Now let's move onto the i. Megan what does this creature looked like. They look like a mash of a bunch of different. Animals got jumbled together. So we've heard comparisons to possums or opossums before they have big bushy tails that almost look like a wolf for something. They have giant years like a bat but overall they are about five pounds. Lots of bushy black can silver wiry hair all over and they have In my opinion extremely charismatic faces with very kind of light silvery hair around their faces giant is giant ears and little pink noses now megan. I just looked up a picture of an i and the thing that jumped out to me. Is that really long-finger. They have. What's the point of that. great question. so is are full of really unusual adaptations and not just for being there an animal but they don't match a lot of primate rules. Even though there are primate they don't match a lot of lemur rules even though there are lemur. So they're kind of like the rebels of lemur evolution and branched off super early to have all these interesting things and the finger is one of the most interesting so all of the is fingers are pretty long. that middle tapping finger is actually not their longest finger. It's an optical illusion because it's so thin and skinny and they hold it at a weird angle and that tapping finger is basically used for everything. We've seen drink water with it. They'll eat like slices of orange with it. We've even seen one particularly funny. I hear who eats his grapes that way. Although most of them aren't that fussy most popular in their mouth so that tapping finger is elongated very thin and some people say it's on a ball and socket joint but technically it is very very flexible joint that basically doesn't keep.

kathleen davis dr lisa donald danforth plant science Lemur center kathleen oliver lisa sioux falls virginia Walsh meghan Mcgrath South dakota durham lisa passan boston keith dc twitter north carolina
"cy fry" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

07:59 min | Last month

"cy fry" Discussed on Science Friday

"But i research looks at extending the capabilities of the human hand. Here's cy fries charles bergquist. Hi there charles. John do me a favor and take a look at your hand and fingers for me. Okay now imagine. It went thumb index middle ring little finger and then another thumb. Okay extra thumb I i don't know that could be pretty cool. But are we talking about another human thumb here or some kind of prosthetic or or robotic thumb. Well definitely not a fleshy thumb but not quite a robot either. The researchers at university college london or calling their creation. The third thumb. It's it's flexible. It has points where it bends and it's kind of a mirror image of your first thumb and size and location. Okay that's pretty cool. But how exactly would you move this thing. Well the researchers rigged it up so that pressing down on sensors with your big toes sends a signal to the servers and actuators that actually make the thumb move. I think i'm following you here. I'd be moving my extra thumb with my toes which sounds. I don't know kind of like a piece of interactive art so this did start as a project by design student but then she connected with a neuroscience lab that studies brain plasticity especially people with arm amputations to put some real science behind this work. I talked with. Danny closed the designer behind the third thumb and paulina kylie by an engineer on the project and started by asking paulina how easy it was to use. Surprisingly they were able to pick it up really quickly like on the first day when we just gave them time by asking them to complete some basic tasks just the basics of how to use it day they go to really quickly and the use it in their daily lives. A little bit. Outside of the training goes well for more refined motor skills being able to use the time alone for a little bit more dextrous tasks they did need a little bit of practice but the basics of how to use it how to bend this one direction or the other direction or pick up a basic object. A table they could that almost instantly. And how proficient did they get. Give me some of the examples of some of the tasks that they were able to complete using this third thumb so in the study paradigms during the daily training some of the things that we asked them to do included are picking up wine glasses flipping them upside down them neatly on the table. A lot of things would just picking up multiple objects the most dexterous task. We gave them this one. Not everyone was able to complete was plugging usb cables into a usb adapter that they had to hold in the air so this is tricky even if you just strictly for any wine cable very difficult and we do it in the air just with one hand holding a disease after lagging cables will. Some people managed to to do it quite quite fast. Some people struggled allowed a some people only managed to do it after five days of training goes perhaps the most difficult task they did another example perhaps would be staring content of a cap with just one hand. So you have to hold the cabin dear. Didn't tear the content with the fingers that are not doing anything else. It was really fun observing them learning how to do it. Obviously this is not the ultimate goal. I mean better. Drink stirring obviously but this is not the reason that you did this. Why yeah a missing christian design pacific Upland percents and and i really wanted to the core of that. I wanted to understand what it was like to to control something extra attached to my body in understanding the relationship that forms That was obviously you design. School wanting to kind of exploring is being amazing. Getting to collaborate with the partic- eleven and really kind of grounding this kind of weird thing that i made into serious research in using it as kind of cashless to understand how we can work with orientations technology in the future. I guess it didn't really kind of design it with with a specific goal in place but also as a framework to consider in different environments. I would love to stop working with different kinds of people in workplaces and creating a vision of the film that can help him in this specific careers or jobs and this was really refining is is really about is extending not only the reach of the hand. Kind of having multi task singlehandedly. Did either of you. Where the extra thumb and if so what was it like yeah. We moved into your mind all the time. Yeah yeah i mean. I specifically designed to be right into one from the stop because i'm lifted so i wanted to be out of kind of called it lost wearing at not so much recently but but differently. I've been wearing it Definitely grow an attachment to it. When you're wearing it. Do you have to consciously think about. I am now going to bend my bonus thumb in or do you just think i want to hold the coffee cup. Stir it and the mind takes care of that part. It's funny it's i. I don't think i consciously kinda felt that the shift but differently. I mean because the sheer amount of hours is now wearing mine it's definitely not something. I actively think out cooling Daho point with with participants stopped over thinking it. I i feel like it was like Day to even they would stop even thinking about pressing down their toes deferred Participant like every person was slightly different Some of them distel us at some point. They weren't thinking about pressing down. Bertos moving tom but they would just sort of start naturally embedded into what they were doing with their hands for me. Like i worried the lord's When we were designing study just to try to figure out what kind of tasks we can give people. What can we ask them to do if this time and it took me a while i was one of the people that actually for longer while had to think. Okay i when. I'm extra tampa now. Not so much. Press down to toews. But i wanna move that extra finger. I do think there's a difference in how the brain responds to a prosthetic. That's say replacing a missing body part versus one. That's adding this new body part that they didn't have before i mean we cannot say for sure because no one actually carried out such a detailed comparison but i would guess yes because when we're adding something like a prestigious that's supposed to replace a function that we lost our brain sort of has the lead safe freed up resources that before where responding to me moving my natural handed that i may no longer have but now can be used to control prosthetic arm or to control something that i'm adding replaced lost function but when we're talking with organizations that just first time or going to be gear furred arm or anything like that. We don't really have this part of our brain that has been freed up so we're adding on top owner of a fully occupied among Fully occupied cortex and the brain has to adapt to it in slightly different way. Paulina you mentioned. The possibility of ill effects that this technology could potentially have. What do you mean by that. Tell me more there right. So imagine named the future when having fared time referred and something relatively normal. Let's say at certain sort of work scenario so for example you work in a factory. You're assembling staff for the whole day in your employer gives you this. Let's say two extra arms today. Just allow you to you work. More efficiently perhaps similar economically. But the the end of the day. You need to leave this two extra arms at your work and you get back in the car you drive home you go home. You make coffee play with your kids. The question is whether.

charles bergquist paulina kylie Paulina university college charles Danny Bertos london John toews tampa tom
"cy fry" Discussed on SpyHards Podcast

SpyHards Podcast

04:03 min | Last month

"cy fry" Discussed on SpyHards Podcast

"I forget the movie there was a ballad onsite was well-known hollywood movie. At the time. I was in electric. They cost a ballet. Don cy young ballet dancer is the lead. I forget what the movie was. If i think of it i'll mention it but it's a great movie. Yes anyway career waffling on as you as you can see as you cannot see. Actually if he caught. See ma'am sorry. I did not my camera birds. Everyone listening constantly either. So it's really. But i'd love to see you anyway next time if we have a follow up one. I promise you won't face to face awesome before we get to diner. Dykes beginning right. Then you mentioned the bbc show you did. Was that first big break into acting or is there any shows that no. Actually it wasn't i at the time i was doing. I got cost as a character. Cold nina on cy fried on the scifi channel identity. You know that character. It was a show. On the sci fi channel sifi every friday night and i was the horror host. There it was more wasn't hosting it wasn't presenting such. She was more of a character. Choose acting and i hosted like a friday night. Double bill of horror movies. Now i don't do you know that show especially ring a bell Kim suheil vira kind of thing where you like your hosting. You're talking into the movie or the show was but i lived in this house my head like a sidekick character anyway this show at the time when i got booked on the job They want it used to be hosted. By what's the name of the actress indira varma and before. That was nina hauge. That's why the character was called meena. And so when i got cost them the show they want sure about me and so it was just a one off season and then the ratings doubled within a month if it was it was such a great feeling to see those ratings double and so they gave me a contract for two years. Which was fantastic Doing that when i got cost from us combat so that was like a great gig made that was a fantastic gig to do think we did about five seasons of it all in like crammed into years And it was every friday night it was obviously be prerecorded it. So that was great. And prior to that asks. I had like stints like role in emmerdale. That was my first tv costing on emmerdale and lots of commercials galaxy did a commercial links axe deodorant All sorts of things. I was ready very busy like doing all sorts of different things like videos Yeah that sort of thing. And i was having a blast. Yeah i remember just being so busy and working doing everything and anything and enjoying it and the masters of combat and just being open to all sorts of different roles they later i got cast on brainiac. Remember brainiac. i was gonna ask you about brian. Way yes yes. That was two thousand and four side. I might up off the dying british listeners. Out there so these all these. Yes so many different things anyway. Carry-on well that's actually a really good entry point for die another day. At what point did you know possibility of that job kind of volunteer lap or you know. Was there in audition process. How did that work. Yes there wasn't audition for die another day and every job i got was almost an audition always will addition. I did quite well with auditions Full the things. I was doing So but this particular will dish in for die. Another day honestly. Didn't think i would guess it..

Don cy young Cold nina Kim suheil indira varma nina hauge Dykes hollywood meena bbc brian
"cy fry" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:22 min | Last month

"cy fry" Discussed on Science Friday

"Here's something interesting is happening in charismatic creature corner land. Tell us about that. Yes so this fall. We are going to hold the first ever. Charismatic creature carnival. Whoa we need the help of our listeners. To pull this off okay. So what do our listeners need to do. So all you wonderful people listening at home need to send us your suggestions for charismatic creatures. You would like science friday to talk about so. Give us your weirdest funky most charismatic creatures. It doesn't matter if it lives on land in water if it's super big or microscopic. It can even be extinct but we need to know what charismatic creatures. You would like us to talk about so if you are listening. And you've got a great charismatic creatures up your sleeve you have been waiting for us to talk about. Let us know about it and you can do that. A few different ways so the first way you can send us a voice memo on our side fry. Vox pop up the second way. You can also tweet at us tag us at sei fry on twitter and tell us your suggestion and make sure to hashtag my charismatic creature. That is very important so we can find it hashtag. Mike charismatic creature. All one word. Okay great and what about good old fashioned email. Yeah you can also email us your suggestions. That address is cy fry at science. Friday dot com. And make sure in the subject line to put my charismatic creatures so we can pick it out easily so again. My charismatic creature is the hash tag on twitter and the subject line on email yet. And this fall. We will hold our first charismatic creature carnival. Where we're going to talk about a bunch of the listener suggested creatures and eventually we'll have our listeners. Vote for their favourite creature so at the end of all that we will have a very first true inductee of the charismatic creature coroner hall of fame. You know it. All sounds great kathleen. We are excited to kick off the carnival a little bit later this year. It'll be great siobhan producer. Kathleen davis thank you for joining us again. Thanks so much for having me and that's about all the time we have for this week. If you missed any part of the program or you'd like to hear it again. Yeah subscribe to our podcast. Rescuers speaker to play science friday. Have a great weekend. We'll see you. Next week i'm plato..

Mike charismatic twitter Kathleen davis kathleen siobhan
"cy fry" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

06:04 min | Last month

"cy fry" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

"Helman's dot com for more delicious recipes. And make the most out of the food in your fridge with helman's this year. Let's not say we're going back to school work and our social lives. Let's embrace the lessons of this past year and move forward instead. Calls has just what you need to do it. In style for kids there's active wear and backpacks from the top brands like nike adidas under armor. And more and grown-ups there are beauty. Must have since stylish accessories to help you move forward to your new normal so go ahead find it all at kohl's or kohls dot com today get ready to cheer on team. Usa sign up for xfinity internet and get a flex four k. streaming box free and peacock premium included. Can your internet do that. Restrictions apply not available in all areas peacock subscription required xfinity proud partner of team. Usa ladies and gentlemen it is upon us. It is the morning hour. It is a moment that we've been waiting for all night to be honest with you. I was hoping i would be here. What it arrived. I am here. Grateful motivated favorite and relentless in my pursuit of happiness even though the constitution is not talking to us in pursuit of my inalienable right to that pursuit of happiness. Damning these gentlemen shirley strategy. I like it steve. Good morning. good morning and call good morning. Happy friday never made legend. That is june whatever off everybody morning old and nearly defeated in very bitter about it. Survival g anthony. Mr hard dad at a whole nother lilt phd. If you cy cy fried t- wack is fried great and in you don't like fridays. Wine nephew is too close to munti. You sounded excited about. I get excited to sad to come. Call this logic right here right up on monday. God miss your question. So what what. What am i richer. Favorite day ever is too close. I i like thurs. Twas thirst 'cause we all most like the weekend starts for me on but sad. That's a whole but if you don't like mixed ache which is fried because it's too close to monday. That's trying to piece this together over here. You headaches stuff to you got kisses your nephew you got to worry about. This is vo days away working your brain. There's the days away from money either. Either way you go toward thank. Monday is just paid so thursday is four ways away either way you look at it well. Let's see what you really. Why you say thursday friday using monday. 'cause you keiser winced you say what. Say where whiz queens. That's not all right. Listen all right. We'll be back. With more of the steve harvey morning show right after this. You're listening to morning. Show get ready to cheer on team. Usa sign up for affinity internet and get a flex four k. streaming box free and peacock premium included. Can your internet do that. Restrictions apply not available in all areas peacock subscription required proud partner of team. Usa support. This does a podcast that looks into the story of a mysterious pilot who spoke to us using clandestine cell phone from inside the prison in north carolina and claims to have worked in international drug trade for some thirty years. I'm am is also a man obsessed with telling and selling his own story my name. Is john gabler this transport. These listen to transport these the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts or that you know everything about child because responding that they're not telling you i knew that this is going on i would have went out there and brought my child back. Africa hardy died in two thousand fourteen. It seemed completely random. But it wasn't. It was part of a pattern this his algorithm a podcast investigating a modern serial killer and how he could have been stopped within two algorithm. Now on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your favorite shows..

Helman helman nike adidas Usa ladies kohl Usa shirley anthony steve keiser steve harvey Mr headaches john gabler north carolina apple Africa
"cy fry" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:32 min | 4 months ago

"cy fry" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of Illinois, freelance consultant for Professional Baseball. One last thing for you, and you're really gonna have to open up your ears for this one. Last week, 90 artists took part in a marathon 27 hour performance of one of the simplest but most important works of experimental sound art. The 1969 piece I am sitting in a room. It was part of a celebration of the 90th birthday of the composer Alvin Lucy. A Lucy A says his music quote makes Thean audible audible and to do that he straddled the line between science experiment. And music. He's attached electrodes to his head, using brain waves to trigger percussion instruments. But Lucia's most famous pieces, an exploration of the sound of the human speaking voice. In a setting we can all relate to the room were sitting in the composer's own voice, once defined by a stutter has weakened due to Parkinson's disease. So we turned to one of his closest collaborators to find out more. I'm Trevor ST. I'm a percussionist, and I'm the assistant to album Lucy, eh? So and I'm sitting in a room. Alvin reads a text. I am sitting in a room. Different from the one you are in now, and this text describes what's going to be happening throughout the piece. I am recording the sound of my speaking voice. And I am going to play it back into the room. Again and again, and then that recording is then played back into the same space. I am, Hmm. Different from the one you are in now. All the different pitches and tones of human speech. You're going under the room piece ends once that is no longer recognizable. Every room is individually tuned based on its architecture's. So there are things called resonant frequencies, which are kind of the tunings of the room and as the text keeps recycling into the room keeps repeating itself. The resonant frequencies get amplified and become stronger over time. And then the weaker tones pitches sounds in the voice that are not in residence with the room diminish over time. Even though he is the source material. It became the room and that's what's most important to him is exploring the room. Think of Alban as an archaeologist rather than a creator, where he's just basically making the listeners aware of the world around them. That is there already, but we just can't hear it or our focus is not on it, but you need time. He's got to be in this space and let nature do its thing. And then if you're patient enough, you get to enjoy it. Just that approach to life in general is Yeah, It's beautiful. That's Trevor ST talking about composer Alvin Lucy. A. You can see performances of I am sitting in a room at science Friday dot com slash room. Our story was produced by Cy Fries, John Jankowski, and I'll.

Alvin Lucy John Jankowski Trevor ST. Trevor ST Cy Fries Alvin Lucia 27 hour Lucy 90 artists Last week 90th birthday Parkinson's disease Thean 1969 Alban one Illinois One last thing Lucy A
"cy fry" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:43 min | 5 months ago

"cy fry" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mark his administration's 1st 100 days in office and push for trillions more in spending Franco or Dona as NPR NEWS, PHILADELPHIA the nation's historically black universities and colleges. Which have often struggled to the historic under investment had an unprecedented fund raising year in 2020, Hbcu officials say, increasing awareness of racial injustice in America. Is credited for the surge. From North Carolina public radio list Slimmer reports North Carolina A and T State University has raised $80 million since the fiscal year began in July. In nine months, the university received six times what it typically brings in annually. Todd Simmons is a spokesman for the university. There is not been a year like that ever in our history. Nor has there been a year like that in the history of nearly any other Hbcu. The president of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund, which advocates for Hbcu funding, agrees. Officials say corporate donations flooded into HBC use after the murder of George Floyd and the protests that followed as companies sought ways to repair systemic racial inequities. For NPR News. I'm list Summer in Durham, North Carolina. The European Union says it may take retaliatory action against Moscow for barring top EU officials from traveling to Russia. Teri Schultz reports on the latest escalation of tensions between Brussels in Moscow the use top three leaders say it's unacceptable and entirely groundless that Russia will block travel by eight officials, including the president of the European Parliament and the European Commission vice president. The move comes a day after a highly critical nonbinding resolution was passed in the EU parliament. The EU statement says it may now take retaliatory measures. Teri Schultz reporting Stocks closed lower today. The Dow lost 185 points. The NASDAQ fell. 119. This is NPR news. Medical teams in Israel are working to identify 45 people crushed to death in a stampede at a religious festival today, tens of thousands of ultra Orthodox Jews had gathered At the tomb of a second century rabbi for all night commemorations. Israel's observing a day of mourning tomorrow, officials are promising a thorough investigation. To ensure it will not happen again. Brazil is appealing for international help in acquiring covert 19 vaccines. NPR's Philip Reeves reports. Some Brazilian cities suspended vaccinations this week because supplies ran out the number of registered covert deaths in Brazil just past 400,000. Get vaccines a still in short supply. Brazilian Health Minister Marcelo Kadaga says the pandemics reached a critical phase. Nations with extra doses should donate them to Brazil to stop new covert variants proliferating, he told the World Health Organization. So far fewer than 8% of Brazilians of fully vaccinated. Many accused President Chae Abortion Arrow of delaying the program last year by playing politics and canceling orders. His government says it will be possible to vaccinate everyone before the year's end. Medical specialists say that needs to happen now. Philip Reeves NPR NEWS REDDISH Nero a car bomb exploded in eastern Afghanistan today. Officials say at least 20 people were killed and dozens more were injured. No one has claimed responsibility. Violence has escalated in recent weeks since the U. S. Has announced to withdraw troops from Afghanistan. By September. 11th. I'm Nora Rahm NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include Want Lee committed to helping self employed workers and small businesses, Get their P P. P loans. Application determines eligibility. Maura W o M p l y dot com slash NPR. The National Weather Service says it'll become mostly cloudy tonight with lows in the low fifties. Saturday will be cloudy in the morning and sunny during the day. They area highs will be in the upper sixties on Saturday in the mid seventies on Sunday, the Greater Lake Tahoe region will be clear for the weekend with highs in the sixties. I Michelle Hannigan, This is KQED Public radio. It's 806. This is science Friday. I'm John Donne Caskey. Ira Flatow is on vacation. Later this hour that imported coffee you're drinking wasn't just grown in Brazil. It was pollinated there a conversation about global food systems and protecting pollinators around the world. Plus, we imagine some possible and not so possible futures. But first new archaeological research on the Vikings Cy Fries, Charles Burnquist is here to tell us more. Hi, Charles. Hey, John, When I say Viking, what do you think of and don't say? Hats with horns? Okay, no hats with horns. Maybe warships, battles pillaging right right that they're all common reactions, Which is why I was interested to read this article in the journal Archaeological and Anthropological Science is about the Vikings. Is really skilled metal workers. Oh, yeah. Metal workers. You mean making swords and armor and a horned helmets? All for that pillaging that they do, you know, they're talking about developing the blends and alloy is used in finer, molded cast metal work like Grass brooches and keys And how over the course of just a few generations. They've really advanced their metallurgical skills. Oh, really interesting. So how did they find this out? So these researchers analyzed samples of metal working tools and ingots and metal products, all from the coastal town of Reba. Today it calls itself the oldest town in Denmark had dates back to around the eighth century. And it eventually became an important site for the Vikings and urban location of maybe a few 1000 people with workshop areas and was a trading center. It's what archaeologists call an emporium. Oh, so like a big arts and crafts fair, you could see some of the state of the art in Viking material Science, Yeah, and sell them to places in your neighborhood. Doctor Vanna, or Fondue is an E. R C. Post doctoral research scientist in the School of Archaeology at University College Dublin. She's lead author on this paper. I asked her to give me a picture of what metal work was like in the rest of the world at the time. Dress because you know, in the other night. We have brass examples from the late bronze age, But all these are extended Malloy's they were made. Accidentally because of the minerals that they were chosen the first who mustered, let's say the technology off bras and were able to manufacture it in almost an industrial scale one of their own ones, so we see a big in rest production in their own crimes. But then Brush kind of like, fades out of the picture of European mythology in the post Roman period and then again in the meat, seventh century in the midsection period, we have a re imagines. Off zinc in corporal is and that's when rebate is this happens that well, so they're material in Reba coincide with this new ways. Some people have even called it the third things of grass, which in a way it continues up until today, because we used blasting everything in our home today, So this is what it comes to corporate base that was the picture off the other periods. In this study. You're looking specifically at non iron medals. Why is that? Why is there this distinction between The iron based materials and the not iron based materials. Excellent question. First of all, because in the whole of Scandinavia who don't really have computers, so when we find Cooper, we know that it was important. What does Idol it was more easily to be locally found and smelted and hammered into whether they're 94 sort. But there is a very interesting technological distinction, and we cannot assume That people who worked with Cooper also worked with irony because the sensor they're different technologies for the simple reason that the first time that people manage to melts to liquefy Iram that was in the 15th century. Not before so before the 15th century. All Adam production is kind of like solid state metal working. Where's Corporal? Yes, your mouth, Cooper. You can mix it without that Allah is you can be more creative. And that's also what we see in today that what we see Kobe's not with music open anti incorporation Zinkhan black in various ratios and combinations, But we also have a lot of with this. We'll have the technology of silver gold because against you can melt cerebellum gold. So beyond the breast that you were looking at? They were using precious metals in these workshops, too. Yes, Absolutely. We do see this. It mostly in the analysis off. The by products off the mythology, the ceramic crucibles and the Mole's. This is where we find traces of silver and gold. We don't have objects. Syllable of gold or seem silver gold always because as you can imagine, this would have been very high prized and they would not have.

Teri Schultz Charles Todd Simmons Philip Reeves Ira Flatow World Health Organization John Donne Caskey Charles Burnquist $80 million John 2020 Nora Rahm 185 points George Floyd Michelle Hannigan 15th century Saturday Thurgood Marshall College Fund Denmark September. 11th
"cy fry" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:41 min | 5 months ago

"cy fry" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Reading? While I rip her usual. Our website is the best first place to stop science Friday dot com slash book club. From there, you can join our online discussion community, sign up for our email newsletter and even read a full chapter of Lost Feast for free. If you haven't gotten your copy of lost feast now is the time. Our friends at Powell's books are offering discounted copies on month and we're partnering with libraries to offer unlimited e book loans as well. Plus, we'll be having events for the next month, and we're even doing a cooking class that you can enter to win a spot in who signed me up. You know how much I like to cook? Well for our ethics guidelines. I write, you cannot sign up for a free spot. You can join us online as soon as next Tuesday, April 20th when we're bringing Lenore back for an audience Q and a along with slow food farmer meaning Edelman will be talking about losing agricultural diversity, some of the things being done to reverse culinary extinction and we'll be taking as many listener questions as we can. Of course, information on how to join and more on our west like science Friday dot com slash book club. Terrific. Christy. I can't wait to chow down. Thanks for stopping by. And if you could just put my lunch back in the fridge on your way out. That would be great. You got it, Ira. I'd rather microwave that tuna anyway, thanks to SciFi producer Kristie Taylor. For that delicious preview of this spring's lost Feast Book Club, learn everything you need to know, including how to join author Lynne or Newman and a virtual chat on Zoom next week. You collect all of that on our website science friday dot com slash book Club. And as your read, lost face this spring will be listening for your voice memos on the side. Fry voxpops AP Tell us what you're thinking. Discovering feeling curious about That's on the site five box pop app Wherever you get your APS 01 last thing our Seif fry soundscape. We're taking you to Central America where Jaguar Poaching is a big issue. The sounds of bullets and barking dogs are telltale signs that poachers are around. Yeah. 2017 to come back this issue Wildcat Conservation group hand, Thera set up acoustic monitoring devices in Guatemala and Honduras. These recorders collect the sounds of the farce. Sounds are what you are hearing now scientists with the help of artificial intelligence, analyze that collected audio. They condense end wildlife patrols to places where the poachers have been most active. It turns out this is working evidence of poaching has gone way down around these recorders. And the forest sounds more as it should natural. That's about all the time we have. If you missed any part of this program, where you would like to hear it again, subscribe for podcasts. Or ask your smart speaker to play science Friday. Of course you can say hi to West on social Media, Facebook, Twitter, instagram or email us the old fashioned classic way. Cy Fry. It's science Friday dot com Ever great weekend we'll see you next week. I'm Ira Flatow. Science Friday is supported by can off publisher of how to avoid a climate.

"cy fry" Discussed on CRUSADE Channel Previews

CRUSADE Channel Previews

04:13 min | 8 months ago

"cy fry" Discussed on CRUSADE Channel Previews

"His work died very young of cancer so was not able to produce as much material. I think she very much wanted to. That was a very tragic loss for academia but she did leave behind some really excellent work. And i'm going to read a couple of robot salvos christmas poems when i'm reading them. Think persecution think catholics requisites as they were called huddled up in their safehouses hearing mass in secret living in constant fear facing ruin from fines and imprisonment and torture and possibly execution for their beliefs. Think of what. It must have been like to live like that and be thinking of that when you hear his poems because so much of his poetry about the nativity in about the child. Jesus draws attention to the fragility of the baby. The fact that god becomes man as a tiny vulnerable poor child. It's the poverty and the threats that surrounds the holy family. That really comes out in robot. Salvos poetry the pain the foreshadowing of calvary the agony in the garden and the passion. Soupy thinking about all of these things. While i'm reading the burning babe by robert southall as i in hoary winter's night stood shivering in the snow surprised i was with sudden heat which made my heart to glow and lifting up a fearful. I to view what fire was near a pretty babe. All burning bright did in the air up here who scored should with excessive heat. Such floods of tears did shed as though his floods should quench his flames. Which with his tears were fed. Alas quoth he but nearly born in fiery. Heat cy fry yet. None approach to warm their hearts or feel my fire. But i my foot klis breast. The furnace is the fuel wounding thorns. Love is the fire and size. The smoke the ashes. Shame and scorns. The fuel justice slayeth on and mercy blows the calls. The metal in this furnace ruled are men's defiled souls for which has now on fire. I am to work them to their good. So we'll i melt into a bath to wash them in my blood's with this. He vanished outs of sites and swiftly shrunk away and straight. I call it unto mind that it was christmas day. How about that. The first metaphysical poem in the english language. You heard it here. This poem entitled new heaven new war films. The basis of one of the songs from benjamin britten's ceremony of carols. If you've never heard britain's ceremony of carols please do look it up. I'm sure it's available on youtube or spotify or whatever. It's very very popular over here. And in fact benjamin britten used this poem and another poem as two of the reflections and it makes for a very very beautiful suite of carroll's but here we go again. Think contrasts think majesty in a manger and all the implications for an impoverished christian community. Come to your heaven you heavenly choirs. Earth has the heaven of your desires. Remove your dwelling to your god. A store is now. His best abode sieff mendez homage. Do.

benjamin britten youtube spotify robert southall Jesus two Earth english christmas one of the songs christian christmas day heaven new war first metaphysical Salvos sieff catholics britain
"cy fry" Discussed on Veterinary Podcast by the VetGurus

Veterinary Podcast by the VetGurus

12:22 min | 2 years ago

"cy fry" Discussed on Veterinary Podcast by the VetGurus

"And exotic ingredients <hes> Oh grind phrase by take a dodig grinding Frei <hes> size. She's Lumpen it into a broader category. They are in that the apparent link between BEGA DOTS and they might be due to ingredients us to replace grinds in Grind Frei diets such as lentils or cheek pays but also exotic mates and vegetables and fruit but I still don't know what the what the story is in how it all fits it net but <hes> that say I point them. I come and the second point is that mice dogs been diagnosed. They see him do not have lied taurine levels in the reason why I wanted to point this adult stresses Mike is because a lot of clouds are adding Torah into the to the high my dot so the big diets. I'm thinking that it would reduce the risk for heart disease but in the hospital studies <hes> I've found that more than ninety percent of their patience with dicey m <hes> the terrain levels of Bay measured and the majority of them a normal Max. I <hes> don't think that it's <hes> related to taurine levels because that's probably unlikely and <hes> point three was the Roy dots in the high my dots and this is one that I found of interest. I'm a not Saif alternatives <hes> and thou just trying to stress that a lot of these dots to unite because you're adding a little bit of this a little bit of that <hes> and it's usually put together by somebody who is not a nutritionist <hes> then the chances are are the over org under supplementing. His diets is greatly increased and that's what I always tend to stress to my clydes. Even the clots had light to fade some sort of <hes> home-cooked meals in that Marco has tried training carriage into a lace Feta's small a man avert one of the the better quality balance foods <hes> in there as well Cy. Yeah thought also quite an interest in a really good summary. Actually Mike Habet Tom Abet Day Sam dogs and the still. I don't know about it but TOM IN I. I'm you want some one of these stories. Get out there as we talk about with a couple of stories today <hes> the Internet's ago a crazy so that's my thing you'll first story was accentuated by the <hes> the AH F._D._A.. The drug authority in America who put out a little press release off to those <hes> <hes> tufts professes and that pump pumped it along quite a lot and dumb and they have put out a a <hes> <hes> a h. a. f._A._Q.. Which is which is also pretty useful? The the M the one of the tycoon messages for me was that there's any been I think two hundred and sixty dogs <hes> that have shown these Sohn's John's <hes> and <hes> and so I don't think people should immediately be alarmed but I think it does point to the problem with these <hes> <hes> <hes> well big boutique exotic and grain free diets writes <hes> the <hes> tapping into a bit of a fashion rather than hard science <hes> and <hes> and I think <hes> our I worry that <hes> that people pay a significant premium memphis food that might not necessarily be worthy of that premium brandon. Yes definitely Ed the other the idea that comment that I missed that the die summarized is was the primary dic- A._C._M.. Is Pray despised <unk> braid set that is unrelated to it and I wanted to stress set traditionally certain breeds such developments boxes in our sh- will fans in great danes prime to the disease as well and that the <unk> at an end handles hoods at the taurine deficiency is the Least Common Fall Nice say yeah it was interested in V._R.. Just found that if D I a little report they are yes. I'm sure that once sipe that out decide F._D._i.. Is Investigated. He added potential connection between DOT cases of heart disease <hes> Aena once once I put out something that or an authority like that a lot of people suddenly jump up and pay attention. What's your first story mark? You've got something <hes> as important as just boxes ran the story <hes> it has to do with some of your old stomping grounds hillsdale sanctuary <hes> Tawny Kevin which is always endowing <hes> always good topics to do you find those in a story and then you know it's GonNa be good. <hes> Kevin is the name given to a <hes>. One of the tiny desert. Jura does a euros a toll Dunnett who managed to hoping to vehicle that was traveling across the central straight down through the middle <hes> probably jumped in at Dolon <hes> and hung around in the car all the way down to call in the western district so Victoria a journey of <hes> three thousand six hundred eighty kilometers the smash repairs discovered given in the car with these big black eyes is lodge es and obviously <unk> shaped tile in one of the panels of the car <hes> and fortunately he was able to be safely captured <hes> unharmed and now he's <hes> he's living at Hillsdale sanctuary and it's an interesting story because animal hey chuck is in in cas or <hes> various other. <hes> transport are surprisingly common thing in many avow zoos and wildlife refuges have to do with a large number of of these <hes> animals that have gotten into vehicles one way or another and banana box frogs are probably the most typical one that people are aware of that <hes> that <hes> particularly <hes> fruit tropical fruit <hes> will be boxed up lovely and fresh sh <hes> and then occasionally in between the little <hes> particularly in bananas between the the fruits in the handle. The frogs will be sitting in thou get transferred from their natural habitat. aniko sits plays a potential <hes>. <hes> <hes> agent full spreading <hes> diseases like kindred fungus so how many days <hes> it's a very significant <hes> thing for us to be aware of so. It's very pleasing that Tom Kevin's reached a destination where he will be careful hateful and that he won't cause any problems <hes> wondering around the the wilds of Melbourne and potentially damaging ecosystems down there apparently he's got a female co Brittany to live with Britain in Kevin Holiday Guy yes they are. They are cute little cute little animals as Donald since I little you realize how small laser heavy saying these <hes> hovered about ridiculous pack a punch Brandon. Yes yes later they <hes> you don't want to get on the other end their health. That's a show and a minute just reminds me of a slightly had unrelated topic. Do you say many hopping mice as as pets in Victoria here. You're led to Kate them as I as a pit on the license I think and if I am the same essay newsouth while they one of the jets and jade aside deci Saifi is little legs is little in the thinner than match sticks out offset lay saying Arkansas same four or five of the my for the as way life and I can I can do vertical so the jumps virtually dab of of saying four or five of them with broken broken legs. I've these might we've had to just put a bit of and they did quite well with splints fan that whether you say at any <unk> dealt with any just put a little mice lack type splint on the m the <unk> to they are anti <hes> reasonably well a shame and we haven't got compromise to the speculation they Max camp that you cy fried. y'All somebody's little little <unk> appeals man so yeah that totally unrelated to to Kevin taken of Tyke in his thunder. They are a little bit more might might take my next news story MAC and you're you're rolling your eyes could tell <unk> Murph you fifteen hundred kilometers away from each other when I told you I was going to talk about this story this is a story about the mystery surrounding the horrific death of a father of three who according to the one of one of the <hes> one of the <hes> <hes> <hes> sentences in in the click bite they might who looked six months pregnant and pass to I ten dies after Bain dead to eight GEICO at a party and there's a lot of controversy about this story here and that this is the store in sad that this study five year old David Dale try track in Queensland Tragically Dodd ten days off to the Christmas party on December the first two thousand eighteen and it was it was diagnosed with Salmonella infection in which doctors initially thought was caused by a chicken <hes> as she mac it's poison <hes> but <hes> I di- discount that and that's a whole lot of Hey said Shea said <hes> comments from the partygoers by in that <hes> as thoughts that he was dead to swallow eight GEICO was for some reason at the party are presumed are outside <hes> beside the Logan River which is sway the party was which is where they often on our that's what they went to celebrate this sorry last Tuesday of what would have thirty five birthdays family gathers the bizarre delighted move away often went fishing into hold a vigil in his are on Asir Bet that <hes> so yes <hes> but I spent the GEICO would have just been fanned <hes> in the region of where the party was being held presume in it was held near his house they <hes> yeah but does the comments from some partygoers sign that he was dead weight the Gecko <hes> that the GEICO was there but now he didn't he was dead and he said now another city was dead and he said yes but Tom until a bit weird marcus that the actual it sure report of <hes> <hes> sketchy <hes> you know what happened in the hospital of this league bit of bloat going on the <hes> and went into multiple organ fired Si- <hes> and <hes> yet but <hes> I think state your comment was affair before the start was what didn't I didn't. I tie Pat if it was Salmonella what what spacey's of Salmonella and I think that <hes> you know that this is a classic case of the Internet's grabbing story and and <hes> turning it into a bit of a a conspiracy theory. Just repeating room is more or less on there was a <hes> a <hes> <hes> an article in one of the K. papers where I would talking about Spago Isis as as being a factor in the the <hes> in the story but I think this is what happens when <hes> when these a a <hes> a story that people start talking about and they really have no idea exactly what's happened and I think <hes> I think it is his prudent very prudent for us to choose to <hes> white until the you know the hospital does <hes> Mike some sense of it on you would think that if they did taught the salmonella they would <hes> have a much higher index of suspicion of the Soul <hes> saying I'm and it does and the the time stories died tate gekas tank Mac <hes> at least <hes> before at least <hes> Cook them properly before you just tone up tabs. Sorry perhaps up titrate to match before you decide on you want to tie Cup Day. If it's pretty good rule of thumb rickety someone says is if you hear the phrase day the thing that's GonNa come off to not a good thing to do especially if the.

Tom Kevin Mike Habet Tom Abet GEICO Salmonella BEGA DOTS Victoria Tawny Kevin Frei Aena cy fried Logan River Marco America sipe danes memphis Hillsdale sanctuary David Dale
"cy fry" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"cy fry" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And we're glad you're listening right now. Our question is why don't you? Call the station which needs your help to continue to bring you programs like science Friday. Here's the number to call eight eight eight three seven six nine six nine to it is a great time to call. This is the final day of our winter pledge drive here on WNYC. You can also give at WNYC dot org helps support science Friday, the news from NPR news from the WNYC news room. And the takeaway coming up next here on WNYC. I'm David I with us. Also WNYC's Nancy saw. Solomon. And we're looking to raise the funds necessary to pay for the show's on WNYC. I don't have my guitar with me in the studio. Shame but I do have a phone number to give out eight eight three seven six nine six nine to WNYC dot org. Some of us didn't really need science to know that John Lennon wrote that song. But so be it 'cause science, of course, is critically important and the show does talk about so many interesting things. So if you're a fan of science Friday, give us a call eight eight eight three seven six nine six nine two. You could avail yourself of the Cy fry said it I fry side framework by fry right on the front. They are cruel mug for an eight dollar a month pledge or if you can afford a little bit more at fifteen dollars a month. This is one of our most popular thank you gifts. We've got the New Yorker subscription will add twelve months to your subscription if you have one. Or give you twelve months to try it out eight eight three seven six nine six nine to whatever it takes. Now's the data call. And then we're able to bring you the programming that you've come to rely on listeners. Support is our largest source of funding for WNYC. And we're asking you to help us raise ten thousand dollars by the end of this hour.

WNYC Cy fry Nancy NPR John Lennon Solomon David I twelve months ten thousand dollars fifteen dollars eight dollar
"cy fry" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

08:16 min | 2 years ago

"cy fry" Discussed on KPCC

"You've heard this your whole life. It is the programming language of ourselves. And that the four base pairs known as a g c t makeup the code of DNA, but could our DNA be built on a different code may be more letters in the code. Researchers have built unnatural base pairs now. And they've added them to Gillette to the genetic alphabet doubling the number of base pairs to eight in some cases in some of the research. The results were recently published in the journal science. This is one way to retool DNA other. Scientists have been trying different types of base pairs trying to build genomes from scratch all kinds of new products are possible medicines fuels what could go wrong right haven't. We heard this before that's what we'll be talking about next the brave new world literally of synthetic genes. The good the bad, and the who knows let's open the door. Discussion about technology with my next guests both deeply involved, Dr Floyd Rome's Berg is professor of chemistry at the scripts research institute in LA brea, California, Dr Rome's Berg Hira Dr Jeff for Boko is is director of the institute of since systemic system. Judicial system genetic Senator professor in the department of biochemistry and molecular biology at New York University Langone health here. Welcome back. Good to see you again. Good to see you just defined terms. Well, how would you define synthetic genome to someone who has never heard of it before well, a synthetic genome that the way we look at it is a genome that's built starting from non living matter and can be designed on a computer and introduced into a living cell to essentially reprogram that sort of likes upgrading your operating system from the old to the new. Do you can add new features to the genome by changing DNA sequences in specific ways. But the recent research that you highlighted goes way beyond that in actually adding new letters to the alphabet that we have to play with is that something a lot of people are aiming to do. Well, I think it's a it's a small group of a small and very select group of people that are carrying out that type of research, and it has all kinds of interesting challenges. But it it is very exciting to see that expansion of the alphabet at least in a test to Floyd, you weren't part of this latest study. But you have created your own unnatural base pairs in your lab, right? Why? Yeah. That's right. Tell us why you do that. And why this latest study is such a big deal. Okay. Sure. So why someone would wanna do that? So the natural letters as you already mentioned. And there a. What sells used to make proteins proteins. Are. What sells used a do what they do. So everything that you do is largely carried out by the proteins that you're able to make. But it turns out that those naturals for letters in code for a generally only twenty amino acids sort of canonical natural mineral acids, and those amino acids don't actually do some things that we might want them to do. They're actually if you if you if you went to medicinal chemist and said, you know, is there anything interesting here, they'd be less than inspired compared to the sorts of molecules, they build the where they include different functionalities that may help make drugs, for example, b of the drugs they are. So what we're trying to do is what we tried to do what we set out to do twenty years ago was to create a new base pair incentives instead of four letters in two base pairs. We wanted to make six letters and three base pairs that would increase the information that you could store give you new information and a salad that the cell could retrieve and make new proteins with and maybe proteins designed to have a properties. Like, for example, being drugs to treat diseases that were formerly untreatable. So this latest work by Steve Benner? It's it's a little bit different. Steve's a good friend of mine. I have a lot of respect for him. Fact, he's been doing this longer than I have in his work was real inspiration to me when I was starting my own lab. But what Steve is done his double these letters. But it's only in a test tube. And what we tried to do something a little bit different. What what what what our goals are are to have these extra letters where they can be replicated by Danny Plummer races and not only in a test tube. But in a living cells where they can be used a pretty proteins. Where Steve is what Steve has recently done in this in this paper that you mentioned was create these four additional letters that he's been optimizing for quite a long time. And simply looked at their stability in terms of forming. Duplex DNA so their recognition single stranded DNA forms a duplex pairs together. And he showed that you can do make those same pairings with these four extra letters am IRA flavor. This is science Friday from WNYC studios talking with Dr Floyd Rome's, Bergen, Dr. A Jeff Buca. Have have they been functional to these extra DNA? You know, if you're using these six pairs did they can they reproduce and make themselves over again. So so it's it's six letters and three pairs. And so in our case in my lab, we've now have what we call semi synthetic organisms. They're just bacteria right now E coli, they live and they grow and they divide and they maintain those extra letters in their DNA. They can transcribe them into what we call 'em Marnie and t Arna those are sort of the intermediate functional versions of DNA that go out into the cell and make proteins and we've in fact me proteins with unnatural amino acids, and I started a biotech company called synthetics, and they're actually developed they're using the technology to develop some anti-cancer drugs. That is a really exciting to watch a Jeff do you think an entire organism could be built this way with unnatural base pair? But I think that we're really a long ways off from that for more than one reason the the current three. Base pair system that that Floyd talked about. It's it's amazing. What his group has been able to do. But it's as far as I understand. It's only possible to put one of those special base pairs in a row. Whereas the genetic the natural genetic code allows you to put any number of them in a row. So there there are limitations to the systems that exist right now that might make it hard to really program an entire organism even more daunting is the fact that we barely know how to program an organism from scratch with the four natural basis. So I I really think that that's still very far on the horizon. Not to mention the fact that the eight based system that was recently described is only working at a test tube level right now in not as Floyd said inside living cells, so. Call me the conservative in the group. The four base pairs of DNA are plenty wild and crazy for us to work with right now. But we're not even creating we're not creating truly new organisms for this. We're sort of endowing existing organisms with new functions. I number eight four four seven two four eight two five five wanna call us. You can also tweet us at the Cy fry. But even using an re can you rearrange things? The base pairs. Your eyebrows went up when I said that while yes, I we've we've sort of taken that to an extreme recently. So we we we have a a paper last year where we had a lot of fun with the yeast genome. Now, the the yeast, which is our favorite organism of choice has its genome packaging to sixteen units called chromosomes, and I'd like to just mention an analogy and thinking of for what we did. So if you. You think of I don't know how many people remember what encyclopedias are encyclopedia's a series of volumes that has a whole bunch of information in it. And it's a good analogy for genome at the volumes would be the chromosome. I'm going stop you there because we have to take a break and we'll stop at the encyclopedia. Think of your books them how they're lined up..

Dr Floyd Rome Steve Benner Gillette New York University Langone LA brea California Danny Plummer WNYC studios Jeff professor of chemistry Dr Jeff Senator Bergen Dr. A Jeff Buca Cy fry Marnie director
"cy fry" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

11:41 min | 2 years ago

"cy fry" Discussed on KPCC

"Maybe you can explain for our listeners a little bit more. What exactly we're listening to their? What what is it? You're you're hearing in that sound that is meaningful to you. Well, we're listening to explosions recorded with infra sound, but sped up into the audible domain. One thing you might have picked up is that the frequency content changed and at the same time, maybe a little bit more subtle the timber of these sounds changed. And so as this level lake is rising up within the crater. We're effectively short the tube of this acoustic Resonator, and that's creating these these higher frequency sounds our study from two thousand eighteen analyzed another aspect of the sound. However, and that is this thing called the quality factor. The amount of resonance that those sounds are exhibiting. In other words, in the early portion of the sequence this pipe was resonating very nicely almost like a musical instrument and towards the end of the sequences the lava lake rose to within fifty meters of the crater rim. The resonance was gone. And it was just these explosions that sounded like thanks sounded. Like you sounded like thugs because why? Well, volcanoes as musical instruments only works when the crater shape is of certain form. And so in the case of via Rico had this giant shaft one hundred fifty meters deep about sixty meters wide, and that was able to very effectively trap acoustic resonance that was awesome of air masses within the system. There was a large appearance contrast at the atmosphere crater interface as the lava lake rose, the sources that are occurring at the level lake surface are now being projected out into the atmosphere and they're not being bounced back or reflected at that. Crater opening it has everything to do with the geometry or shape of that flaring crater. We have another recording here. This is a signal from an Ecuadorian of volcano called Cotopaxi. Let's listen to that. So that actually sounds very much different. It almost sounds like a human breathing or maybe waves on on the ocean. And what are we listening to their? Well, there are a few tricks that were done to make that in for sound audible, but suffice to say that what we're listening to right. Then was a an infrared signal from this volcano called Cotopaxi that was played in near real time. And the crazy thing about Cotopaxi is the the beautiful signals that this this bulky, no musical instrument is able to create by beautiful. I mean, if you were to look at the way form, you would see a five second oscillation that endures for something like a minute and a half. So what's actually happening is your exciting? This crater. This giant musical instrument with some source at the bottom, and you are causing an oscillation to occur for more than one minute. And of course, these these oscillations are inaudible, but with our specialized microphones, some eight kilometers away from the vent were able to pick up on these signals and use them to determine the size and the. Dimensions of that volcano crater. So you're able to use this to determine size volume. No little bit more about what's happening inside. How can this help us predict eruptions or events that are happening that could obviously be problematic for humans living nearby. Well, the coda pox example was a case study where we recorded this beautiful signal that wasn't changing over time. So for six months in two thousand sixteen we recorded the same signal again. And again, and again that allows us to say something about the rather stationary behavior of that volcano in other words, whatever was happening down at the bottom of the crater. And we don't quite know what that was was was constant that process was occurring again. And again in the case of the Rica. We we were alerted to these changes in the nature of the infrastructure, which became suddenly much more interesting volcanoes when they maintain their background state are are well behaved volcanoes when that background state changes. And you see signals that evolve over time that's the time when you want to pay attention. Would it make sense to be able to listen to volcanoes to be able to monitor infra sound at volcanoes all around the world are some volcanoes better candidates for this sort of experimentation than others. Indeed, scientists are listening to volcano in for sounds all over the world. Now, it's become an established component of the volcano monitoring tool kit. And there are dozens of all is right now, we're in for sound data feeds are complementing, the seismic or the deformation or the gas remote sensing technologies in many volcanoes do produce very interesting. Infra sounds which are being tracked in in real time. One thing to mention though is that unless volcanoes actually doing something at surface, the infra sand is less interesting in that case, we look at the seismicity the earthquakes occurring beneath the volcano beneath the volcano surface to infer processes. I know that it's probably not only volcanoes that emit in for sound. So what else can you learn are there other things that we can study aside from volcanoes? By using sound. Yeah. Sure infrasonic remote-sensing is being used for a number of of geophysical source studies. And some of the most interesting studies, I think are happening right now. Our group up worc- state university is focused on this is using in for sound to track and detect snow avalanches snow avalanches produce a lot of energy. That is is audible, but most of its energy is beneath the threshold of human perception right around five hurts. So if we're listening to these processes with infra sound, we can detect when avalanches have occurred. Even when we can't see the slopes. Jeffrey Johnson is an associate professor of geosciences at Boise state university in Boise, Idaho. Thank you so much for talking volcanoes with us. I really appreciate it. Thanks very much. Now, speaking of craters our second season of science diction kicked off last week. This is where we dig really deep into the roots of science words and tell you all about it. And the first word we looked at. Yes. Crater which it turns out has nothing to do with volcanoes. At least originally here to explain why is Cy fried digital producer in master of science fiction. Johanna mayor welcome to science righty. Thanks so much for joining us, John. Thanks for having me. Okay. So where do creator come from if not volcanoes take a look at pretty much any depiction of an inch in Greek symposium. You'll see a ton of guys hanging around philosophizing wining dining and nearly always in the center. There's this earn position really prominently. That's called a crater starts with a K and the crater was super essential for symposiums. Because that's where they would mix wine and water hole. It they'd mix wine and water. I thought that they just wanted the wine without the water. I know that sounds very blasphemous does today, but actually wine in ancient Greece was aged in these claims. Okay. Or on leather containers that resulted in a really acidic taste and also a much higher alcohol percentage. We're talking about sixteen percent the stuff that we drink today is around twelve or thirteen percent. So the ancient Greeks actually considered it really bar Barrick to drink the undiluted wine. Okay. So it wasn't cool to drink a straight line. I get it. So how did we start using this word to talk about volcanoes them since about the sixteen? Hundreds people have been using the term to describe pretty much any bull shaped depression, like you would find in that ancient earn or in volcano crater today, and actually fun fact. It was Ralph WALDO Emerson who is the first person to apply the word to lunar craters real really. Yes. That's really interesting. Okay. So I just you as our science fiction wizard because you're rounding up the signs origins of tons of words, I'm assuming you've got a lot to work with that would be an understatement sciences. It's everywhere. It's baked into the words that we use. It's encoded in the language that we speak. There's no shortage. I need to remind you. I'm John, Dan Kaczynski. This is science Friday from WNYC studios. And we're talking about science fiction. I maybe you can tell us how people are going to learn more about science fiction. Yeah. Just go to science Friday dot com slash science fiction. We send out a newsletter every week that looks into the scientific origin story behind one specific word. So you can sign up there. Okay. We talked about crater already. What's on tap for this week this week? We're talking about Spanish flu, which is a total misnomer that has endured for a century. Okay. It's is it has nothing to do with Spain. Not really it has more to do with World War One. Oh, okay. So when we say the Spanish flu what we're actually talking about us in one thousand nine hundred and flu pandemic, which was devastating and wiped out. I'm sorry. A third of the world was infected fifty million people at least died. So by the time that this pandemic surfaces in nineteen eighteen France, Germany, and the US bunch of other countries were already embroiled in World War One one country. That was not was Spain. Oh, so because Spain remained neutral that meant that they had much greater freedom of the press. They weren't subject to wartime censorship rules like the UK. They weren't worried about keeping morale up amid reports of great casualties among troops in camps. So it was a newspaper out of Madrid. That was the first to publish a story about the flu outbreak they got slapped at the name Spanish flu. And it stuck ever since show. What you're telling me is because Spanish newspapers did such a good job. Breaking the story of the Spanish. It's now called Spanish flip pretty much. It's kind of unfair seems a little bit. What about the second part of that influenza? That's a really interesting word where does that come from? So before we had any understanding of epidemiology or veracity ancient people believed that the stars and the cosmos would flow into us an influence our lives and actually influenza means influence in Italian. So the idea was that sickness like any other unexplainable event was due to the influence of the stars. And they just went ahead and called one of the most common ailments influenza. So the influence of the stars is what gives us influenza, even though. So it's not that medical term at all. It's it's really it's it's a mystical term totally. Yeah. Actually, this is why I like science fiction. Thanks so much Johan. I really appreciate it. Thank you. John Johanna mayor is Cy fried digital producer and head of our science diction project, and you can learn more on our website. It's science Friday dot com slash science fiction. Okay. One last thing today. Ira talked about this last week he's on a trip traveling through southeast Asia. And as he's traveling. He's looking around he's trying to find cool stuff worse. So he sent an audio post card from his first stop and here, he is from the northern part of Vietnam. I'm hearing Halong bay is an extremely biodiverse site with many systems, including mangrove forest, sandy title, flats Carl Reeves Kazin lagoons. And these giant limestone karst that surround the area gorgeous to look at. I can almost imagine IRA being there he explored the caves inside those giant limestone carts, and he said, it was one of the most magnificent natch. Wonders that he's ever seen. I hope he's having a great time. Hopefully, you send some pictures along. I know he'll be back in a couple of weeks. He's going to be sending us so more of these little dispatches from south East Asia along the way, Charles Burke, west is our director, our senior producer is Christopher Intel Yata and our producers are Alexa, limb Christy Taylor and Katie feather. We are technical and engineering help from day today from rich Kim, Sara Fishman and Kevin wolf we're active all week on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, all the social medias. And if you've got a smart speaker it to play science Friday wherever you want every day now is science Friday. You can Email us the address is Cy fry at science Friday dot com..

influenza John Johanna mayor volcano crater Spain producer lava lake lava lake rose Ira Rico Ralph WALDO Emerson Halong bay Cy fry Greece geophysical source worc- state university southeast Asia Madrid
"cy fry" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:19 min | 2 years ago

"cy fry" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Here to explain more as Jeffrey Johnson, associate professor of geosciences at Boise state university in Idaho. Welcome to science Friday. Thanks for joining us. Thanks very much for having me. So I just played a sample of some volcano vibrations. What is it actually sound like to our ears though? And maybe you can explain what you're listening to. Right. Well, what we just heard was a recording from volcano in Chile called via Rica over the course of about five days, and you heard it in just a few tens of seconds. But what you might have been able to detect is change in the timber and both frequency of those sounds now what we actually recorded was infra sound low frequency sounds below the threshold of human perception. But when we speed those up, we can detect them and and perceive something with our brains. Okay. So little too hard to hear. But you're able to make it something that we can hear how is different from vibrations from seismic activity. Well, volcanoes will produce both seismic energy that propagates through the ground, and when activities occurring at the surface of the volcano such as for explosions, we also radiate sounds into the atmosphere volcanoes produced sounds that. Are both audible and sub audible, and it's these sub audible sounds that are so much more energetic. And that's the focus of many of our studies on the subject of volcano acoustics. We we focus on infra sound energy below twenty hurts the very low frequencies that we're talking about can travel quite a distance. Can't they be they can be sensed a very long way away. Right. So low frequency sounds had the capability of propagating long distances with low attenuation, which is why you have foghorns and not fog whistles when you want to listen to boats that are long ways away volcanoes just so happen to produce a lot of infra sound, many of them produce sounds about one hurts which is something like five octaves below the threshold of human perception, and these low frequency sounds can attenuate very slowly. And. Be recorded regionally or even globally in some cases, explained a little bit about what the volcano is doing to create. These sounds in the first place. What exactly are we hearing happening? Well, the sounds. We just listen to come from a volcano that has a giant crater that extends down from the crater rim down to a lovely about one hundred hundred fifty meters below the crater rim during those most regular times. And this lava lake is is bubbling away. It's exploding. We call these explosion Stromboli and explosions and every time there's a burst. There is a sound wave that's radiated up and through this crater and can be recorded many kilometers away from the summit. What we've noticed that this particular? Volcano is those those infra sounds from those explosions have changed over time. And we are relating those changes to the rise of the lava lake within the crater. Maybe we can listen to that that sound one more time again, this is from the volcano via Rica in Chile. Let's listen. Maybe you can explain for our listeners a little bit more. What exactly we're listening to their? I mean what what is it? You're you're hearing in that sound that is meaningful to you. Well, we're listening to explosions recorded with infra sample. Sped up into the audible domain. And one thing you might have picked up is that the frequency content changed and at the same time, maybe a little bit more subtle the timber of these sounds changed. And so as this lava lake is rising up within the crater, we're effectively shortening the tube of this acoustic Resonator, and that's creating these these higher frequency sounds our study from two thousand eighteen analyzed another aspect of the sound. However, and that is this thing called the quality factor. The amount of resonance that those sounds are exhibiting. In other words, in the early portion of the sequence this pipe was resonating very nicely almost like a musical instrument and towards the end of the sequences the lava lake rose to within fifty meters of the crater rim. The resonance was gone. And it was just these explosions that sounded like thanks sound. Like they sounded like Funk's because why? Well, volcanoes as musical instruments only works when the crater shape is of a certain form. And so in the case of via Rica, we had this giant shaft one hundred fifty meters deep about sixty meters wide, and that was able to very effectively trap acoustic resonance that was awesome of air masses within the system. There was a large impedance contrast at the atmosphere crater interface as the lava lake rose, the sources that are occurring at the level lake surface are now being projected out into the atmosphere and they're not being bounced back or reflected at that. Crater opening has everything to do with the geometry or shape of that flaring crater. We have another recording here. This is a signal from an Ecuadorean volcano called Cotopaxi. Let's listen to that. So that actually sounds very much different. It almost sounds like a human breathing or maybe waves on on the ocean. And what are we listening to their? Well, there are a few tricks that were done to make that in for sound audible, but suffice to say that what we are listening to right. Then was a an infrared signal from this volcano called Cotopaxi that was played in near real time. And the crazy thing about Cotopaxi is the the beautiful signals that this this volcano musical instrument is able to create by beautiful. I mean, if you were to look at the way form, you would see a five second oscillation that endures for something like a minute and a half. So what's actually happening is your exciting? This crater this giant musical instrument with some source at the bottom, and you are causing an oscillation to occur from more than one minute. And of course, these these oscillations are inaudible, but with our specialized microphones, some eight kilometers away from the event were able to pick up on these signals and use them to determine the size and the. Dimensions of that volcano crater. So you're able to use this to determine size volume Noah limited more about what's happening inside. How can this help us predicted eruptions or or events that are happening that could obviously be problematic for humans living nearby. Well, the Cotopaxi example was a case study where we recorded this beautiful signal that wasn't changing over time. So for six months in two thousand sixteen we recorded the same signal again. And again, and again that allows us to say something about the rather stationary behavior of that volcano in other words, whatever was happening down at the bottom of the crater. And we don't quite know what that was was was constant that process was occurring again. And again in the case of the Rica. We we were alerted to these changes in the nature of the infra sound, which became suddenly much more interesting volcanoes when they maintain their background state are are well behaved volcanoes when that background state changes. And you see signals that evolve over time that's the time when you want to pay attention. Would it make sense to be able to listen to volcanoes to be able to monitor infra sound volcanoes all around the world are some volcanoes better candidates for this sort of experimentation than others. Indeed, scientists are listening to volcano infra sounds all over the world. Now, it's become an established component of the volcano monitoring tool kit and their dozens of volcanoes right now, we're where infrasonic Santa feeds are are complementing, the seismic or the deformation or the gas remote sensing technologies in many volcanoes do produce very interesting. Infra sounds which are being tracked in in real time. One thing to mention though is that unless a volcanoes actually doing something at its surface. The infra sound is less interesting in that case we look at the seismicity earthquakes occurring beneath the volcano beneath the volcano surfaced in for processes. I know that it's probably not only volcanoes emit in for sound. So what else can you learn are there other things that we can study aside from volcanoes? Yeah. Sure infrasonic remote-sensing is being used for a number of geophysical source studies. And some of the most interesting studies that I think are happening right now. Our group that Boise state university is focused on this is using in for sound to track and detect snow avalanches snow avalanches produced a lot of energy. That is is audible, but most of its energy is beneath the threshold of human perception right around five hurts. So if we're listening to these processes with infra sound, we detect avalanches have occurred. Even when we can't see the slopes Jeffrey Johnson is an associate professor of geosciences at Boise state university in Boise, Idaho. Thank you so much. You're talking volcanoes with us. I really appreciate it. Thanks very much. Now, speaking of craters our second season of science diction kicked off last week. This is where we dig really deep into the roots of science words and tell you all about it. And the first word we looked at. Yes. Crater which it turns out has nothing to do with volcanoes. At least originally here to explain why is Cy fried digital producer in master of science fiction. The mayor you welcome to science Friday. Thanks so much for joining us, John thanks for having me. Okay. So where do creator come from if not volcanoes take a look at pretty much any depiction of an ancient, Greek symposium. You'll see a ton of guys hanging around philosophizing wining dining and nearly always in the center. There's this earn position really prominently. That's called a crater starts with a K and the crater was super essential for symposiums. Because that's where they would makes wine and water. Holy they'd mix. Wind and water. I thought that they just wanted the wind without the water. I know that sounds very blasphemous does today, but actually wine in ancient Greece was aged in these clay. A or an leather containers that resulted in a really acidic taste and also a much higher alcohol percentage. We're talking about sixteen percent the stuff that we drink today is around twelve or thirteen percent. So the ancient Greeks actually considered it really barbaric to drink the undiluted wine. Okay. So it wasn't cool to drink straight line. I get it. So so how did we start using this word to talk about volcanoes them since about the sixteen? Hundreds people have been using the term to describe pretty much any bull shaped depression like you would find in that ancient earn or in a volcano crater today. And actually, fun fact Ralph WALDO Emerson who was the first person to apply the word to lunar craters, real really? Yes. Crystal. I'm not too. That's really interesting. Okay. So inntroduced you as our science fiction wizard because you're rounding up the signs origins of tons of words, I'm assuming you've got a lot to work with and that would be an understatement sciences. It's everywhere. It's baked into the words that we use. It's encoded in the language that we speak. There's no shortage. I need to remind you. I'm John, Dan Kaczynski. This is science Friday from WNYC studios. And we're talking about science fiction. I maybe you can tell us how people are going to learn more about science fiction. Yeah. Just go to science Friday dot com slash science fiction. We send out a newsletter every week that looks into the scientific origin story behind one specific word. So you can sign up there. Okay. We talked about crater already. What's on tap for this week this week? We're talking about Spanish flu, which is a total misnomer that has endured for a century. Okay. It's it has nothing to do with Spain. Not really it has more to do with World War One. Oh, okay. So when we say the Spanish flu what we're actually talking about us in one thousand nine hundred and flu pandemic, which was devastating and wiped out. I'm sorry. A third of the world was infected fifty million people at least died. So by the time that this pandemic surfaces in one thousand nine hundred eighteen France, Germany, and the US bunch of other countries. We're already embroiled in World War One one country that was not with Spain. So because Spain remained neutral that they had much greater freedom of the press. They weren't subject to wartime censorship rules like the UK. They weren't worried about keeping morale up amid reports of great casualties among troops in camps. So it was a newspaper out of Madrid. That was the first to publish a story about the flu outbreak they got slapped at the name Spanish, flu, and it stuck ever since. So what you're telling me is because Spanish newspapers did such a good job. Breaking the story of the Spanish, it's now called Spanish flip premium heights. It's kind of unfair. It seems there. What about the second part of that influenza? That's a really interesting word where does that come from? So before we had any understanding, of empathy meteorology are Veraldi ancient people believed that the stars. And the cosmos would flow into us an influence our lives and actually influenza means influence in Italian. So the idea was that sickness like any other unexplainable event was due to the influence of the stars. And it just went ahead and called one of the most common ailments influenza. So the influence of the stars is what gives us influenza, even though. So it's not a medical term at all. It's it's really it's it's a mystical term totally. Yeah. This is why I like science fiction. Thanks so much Johan. I really appreciate it. Thank you. John Johanna mayor is Cy fried digital producer and head of our science diction project, and you can learn more on our website. It's science Friday dot com slash science.

Rica lava lake influenza Boise state university John Johanna mayor Chile Ecuadorean volcano Spain Idaho Jeffrey Johnson associate professor producer lava lake rose Ralph WALDO Emerson Greece geophysical source
"cy fry" Discussed on Risky Business

Risky Business

03:17 min | 3 years ago

"cy fry" Discussed on Risky Business

"That software is will kick up, and it will then say, okay, you're enrolling to this Bank. And on the screen that you started the transaction from it'll be shying. Pictographs ease. The organization's mathematical view of who they are. And on your screen on your mobile inside Soffer is vegan. You get the picture if the two pictures match, then vice of you think you've got the right person if they don't match something's gone wrong, and you don't accept it. So this means it's not automated actually user taking an intensive step to say, yes, I'm happy that this organization believes, it's just me signing. So I understand that Saif rises is a standalone mobile app. The people can put on the device what I'm curious about is whether or not you've been speaking to organizations that might want to bake you into their own apps, right? Because this is a function that can imagine. They would find quite useful. The the wine which is designed is the scifis becomes a single dipstick. So it's one wife providing high-level authentication authorization digital signatures and also notifications. And this allows any organization to come to an arrangement code. We will give them their own web service. So that they get and transactional and that allows him to push the brand back through to the USA and ever the using. Now, this is cool. Right. So we should actually explain what you mean by that. Because I've seen it in action is actually pretty cool. Tell us about that in a bit more detail. Okay. So once when I when I challenge point out too that was basically you'll long long roundabout way of saying no not really looking to bike into other people's apps. It's more about becoming a centralized place for people to vindicate with the companies. I deal with got that. But yes, let's talk about the branded interactions because that was that was pretty cool. Politics, forgoing the rand. Yes. So the whole idea of is the win win the when the user asked the organization to prove who they are if Denies action. successful in doing it allows the entire interaction authorized to to look enticed like the organization. So that way the us against consistent brand reinforcement if the dealing with with the Logan isolation. It's always in concessions brand sales. Yes. Dealing with acne Bank. You get like an acme Bank verification window, right? Correct. So so in the example of biking it into the right apps you can actually bike so fries into a my bullet with just a couple of calls. And when when you go to log on context, which is the Cy fries app in the organization's brand completes the actions back. And again, you don't even say is these are actually been bouncing out to the cipher is up dancing at can't Can't go go on it. to the the goal of that is the if you bake authorize into four different apps three different web portals and a couple of internal systems. You can upgrade the authorize service to give yourself security uplift..

"cy fry" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:38 min | 3 years ago

"cy fry" Discussed on Science Friday

"Techniques that are really kind of moving fast and being developed and being iterative a lot now are around imaging soft tissues and their relationship with bony parts and this is what's what is going on in my lab so we're trying to look at living animal muscles and how they attached to these fossilized able parts because in the fossil record i'm not going to ever find a complete i never say never but a complete vocal organ but what i might find are the support structures for the squishy bits that produces sewn and so what i wanna do understand how those relate so i can navy predict properties of the squishy bits that don't really fossilized well or and so that's the kind of key work that we're doing is looking at crocodile vocal organs bird vocal organs which are very very different and trying to see you know understand how these these vocal chords that produce owned relate to these fossils able parts okay okay we just we just have have a couple of minutes left and we've established a few things maybe the dinosaurs don't sound exactly right there's no feathers dinosaurs veloce raptors are probably a little too big for real velociraptor but i'll start with you juliette me what would you do if you were making a movie about dinosaurs coming back to life in waters and things you do differently with the movie you you tell well i think i would go you know i i love the kind of i love raya harry house in who i keep mentioning but is this this early innovator in bringing dinosaurs to life in but i wanna see us move past that i wanna see you know something that's that's in incorporating a lot more accuracy in terms of you know because the important thing about dinosaurs is that they were once alive they're real animals and so that's what's different from a dragon or anything you know cool that we can dream up in our imagination and that's part of their terror is that they were real and so i think a movie like the birds by contrast where it was just segel's in crows that went you know had this militia tent in started attacking people is actually just as scary of film i'm not trying to see him another movie about singles in crows but i would like to see more you know real animals that are truly scary so i think that'd be cool again if you just have a couple of seconds left what would you do different i agree dinosaurs were were real they dominated earth's ecosystem for the better part of one hundred sixty five million years and there's no reason to guilt that lily they're more diverse more on believable really then you know we could have ever imagined and so you know you make realistic dinosaur and you've you've made a really scary beasts that's gonna make a good movie star kind of luck of our is author of li dinosaurs matter dean of the school of earth environment director of the delman fossil park of rohan university thanks so much kind of welcome thanks julia clark professor of vertebrate paleontology at the university of texas at austin thank you so much julia thank you bj liederman composed our theme music if you missed any part of this program or would like to hear it again subscribed your podcast you can listen gift you watch the movie if you've got a smart speaker ask it to play science friday any day of the week just say science friday say head of some facebook twitter instagram or emails are dressed cy fry at science friday dot com and feedback and tell us what you'd like to cover as well iras back next week i'm john sqi in new york

one hundred sixty five million