19 Episode results for "Curiel"

NLP vs Psychoanalysis - "The Man Risked It All" Book Review

Limitless Mindset

50:16 min | 1 year ago

NLP vs Psychoanalysis - "The Man Risked It All" Book Review

"Okay this is Jonathan with Louis mindset dot com and this is my book review of of the man who risked it all with Lauren. Gerneele is that how you say him Laura Hon GonNa and the French the nuances of the French pronunciation of surnames. Oh my God eh La Hun Hun Hun. I'm going to let French. Is that how that about on that. That gurgling back of the throat. Sound that US Anglos are really not very good at and and that is my wife there and she is going to be joining me for this book review and not distracted playing on her phone the entire time y.`all narrow life. Yes yes his. Okay thank you thank you. I appreciate you chatting with the listeners as we are. Are doing this podcast so so. This book is an entertaining raining and well written novel about transformative personal development via neuro linguistic programming techniques. My wife sitting next to me here enthusiastically recommended that I read this book about a man's inspirational heroes journey from suicidal despair. Too personal and corporate victory often fiction is a better medium than nonfiction. Four impactfully teaching being philosophy and this book will go on my shortlist of must read fiction four personal development element pragmatists along with memoir from ant proof case and atlas shrugged. I think so all could hear from the book's back cover blurb looking down the the Eiffel Tower Alan Gren more stands on the edge determined to end it all as he prepares to jump. His thoughts are interrupted erupted by a cough to his. Right is a mysterious stranger in a dark suit. Smoking a cigar. This is eve. debroy Roy did I say his name right yes. Eve debris the person who will change. Allen's life debroy convinces Alan to reconsider his plans with one caveat. Instead of ending his life he will give his life over to Devroy in return. debroy promises to teach allen the secrets to happiness and success and so Alan embarks on on a wild ride of self discovery from a humiliating fiasco at a Parisian bakery to finding the strength to assert himself in his company's Bedroom. Alan learns to overcome his deepest fears and self doubts face. Life's unexpected twists and turns take crazy risks and fully accept himself in the process from the bestselling author. How do I say his name again? Babe long will now the man who wristed all explores the fragility fragility of life and the possibilities that are presented to us in the unlikeliest of circumstances so the book starts with this young man. Alan raised by a single mother and he is kind of a loser who goes through a series of personal development adventures. And what I like about it. Is that the book emphasis emphasizes sizes the primacy of action in one's personal growth. No action no transformation. That's kind of the the the the Golden Rule of personal development. If you will. Let's talk about mentorship. So the book centers around the relationship between Allen and Eve or eager as he's called later on in the book and this is his enigmatic wealthy and Mir Curiel Mentor Babe do you don't Mir Curiel means Muir acuity new curiel non lacking me okay. You're curiel almost nobody knows what this word means services this is Harbach cavalry item of the item of the day. Just like Utah Vocabulary item of the day in Bulgarian. So you're curiel curiel means someone who has kind of a personality that shifts quite a bit like a personality where they're going to be like really friendly one moment and then they're going to kind of change a whole lot most shit. Yes yeah. Yeah and so. That's what I found with the character debris I found that he would. He'd be kind of like he'd be like really nice and helpful Foale almost kind of compassionate in some scenes but then he'd be like really kind of mean and tough on Alan in preceding scenes. You know in a quote from the book the moment has come for the disciple to free himself from his master. You can easily easily understand Catherine that. There's a paradox in giving someone in guiding someone toward freedom by leading them by by the hand all the way strict control was necessary because it made him do what he would never have done otherwise but now how he must free himself from control to become really free reality and another passage reality reality sometimes takes the shape of terrifying dragon. That disappears when you dare to look at it head on spurred on by EBOR. I had bastard the dragons in my mind and it now seemed to be inhabited it by benevolent angels. In the Book Allen Receives Devoted mentorship from this older gentleman who who lives in a opulent mansion in Paris young men struggling in their career or love. Life often often have this fantasy that a wise mentor will come along. Take them under their wing and show them how to get. Just just what they want. While this may seem fanciful. It happens in real life when you start your when you start taking your personal development seriously. Would you start taking a lot of action towards what you really want in life. Even if sometimes it's kind of a foolhardy foolhardy action that you're taking in this Sarah World Y'all running to you'll encounter counter a mentor that you can that you can learn from so it's not this this whole idea of win. The student is ready. The master will appear. This is a theme that we see repeated over and over and over and fiction. It's not it's not totally fictional. This is one of these kind of things about the world that makes me say that. Perhaps our lives are dolls that are written by God or written by some alien author breath. That's out there. Because when you take action serendipity will often deliver to you what you really need in life But the the master mentor. That you need is often cloaked and often appears to be something else like in my case At the beginning of my entrepreneurial career when I was really young man I had those two who anti mentors you know. I had those two or more people that I wrote about their in the final chapter of my book. DOC and the he they hired me they gave me an opportunity. They paid me very very handsomely for for my time time So there was opportunity certainly opportunity involved there but they were anti men mentors. They showed me they showed me he. Just how addiction mental illness hedonism Hubris and lies could ruin and even the most well funded of endeavors they. They were mentors but they were not exactly the mentors that anyone would ask for but but they came into my life when I started becoming open to opportunity. Let's talk about mindset. The book has a couple of passages on mindset. That will quote you. No one can see life as a series of pitfalls to be avoided or as a vast playground around that offers enriching experiments at every street corner. When you meditate on revenge you feel an energy that is admittedly very stimulating but it is a negative destructive energy? One that pulls you down. There are limits to what we're capable of doing says Allen and then his mentor responds. The only limits. The ones we give our selves. The person who obeys rules. Avoid thinking if you think outside the box the only solutions you'll find are those that everyone else has already thought of. You have to think outside the box. The book also describes the process of J. You of daily journaling to recalibrate your reticulation. Activating System to find evidence of new mindsets sets and here. It is every evening. You must take two minutes to think of the day that has just passed and write down three things that you have achieved and are proud of and so in the book the character utilizes a classical mindset transformation tool which is that you uncover a more empowering mindset and while you may be able to believe that mindset in a in a intellectual actual sense you need to start to recalibrate your mind to detect that particular mindset a whole lot more into search for evidence in the world that you perceive of a new mindset for it to be ingrained further in the way that you live and journaling daily journaling ruling is a really consistent effective way to do it. I think everybody should experiment with that. Let's talk about body language mirroring Body language is one of the first things that many people learn about in their personal growth journey quote when you are synchronizing with the other postures hours you must respect a certain lapse of time following his movements so he doesn't feel mimicked and a lot of people have experienced. This you learn you start reading a little bit about body language. Maybe watch some youtube videos about body language and they say what you want to do. Is You want to go on beer. Whatever the person that you're interacting with is doing with their hands with their eyes with their posture sure and you're going to create a bit more you're GonNa create a bit more commonality? You'RE GONNA create a bit more affinity with that person and so you you go out there and you do it but if you exactly beer their body language if you do the exact same body language thing with them if you're like copying them the move for move it comes across as disingenuous it comes across as kind of weird so debris describes to him you want to career body language but do it with a do it with a lapse. So it's not quite obvious that way what you're doing is you end up communicating kind of subconscious subconscious level with the other person and Alan Greg Moore reports who says I had managed to create a bond with a stranger and force force him to open himself to me. I marveled at the power of gesture over the unconscious. The superiority of the body Over the word the book also has a public speaking training in it. Do you remember this Public Speaking Ping Training Okay. One of the higher leverage personal growth skills does is public speaking and taking public speaking classes really is a commonality among people who do cruel things and live life life on their own terms in the book. Public speaking skills are key to the protagonists accelerated personal and and professional success talking about public speaking classes. They're not lessons. Each member trains by diving into do the deep end with a talk of ten or so minutes on a topic of his choice after that the others right feedback back on bits of paper which are then given to the speaker feedback. Yes information about his performance comments about his little defects his tex his imperfections. Everything in short that can be improved whether it's his voice his posture or the structure of his talk. And this this is something I hope being you can do. One day is go to public. Speaking toastmasters classes toastmasters. Maybe one day we can do. Yeah Yeah it's kind of interesting a okay. I'll do a short. You do some speeches. I believe everybody has the chance to speak publicly and every class and the classes are relatively small. So you're not going to be extremely nervous about speaking to two hundred people and you do a bit of extemporaneous speaking where you are just banking making stuff up essentially or you just have maybe five minutes of preparation before doing the speech and then there's also people every class session. There's at least one person that comes in. Who has prepared talk and they talk a little bit longer? I I think they do like something like fifteen or maybe a twenty minute talk so something. Maybe a little bit more similar to a Ted talk but you only have one of those per a class because it takes a bit more preparation and seems to be the classes law last. Maybe like ninety minutes. People often asked me if I have public speaking training and I attended a couple of these classes in key of Ukraine in of all places but other than that. I don't have much formal training. You'll meet people out there that have done toastmasters for like five ten years I I. I don't have nearly that much training in it. What is really honed? My public speaking skills has been video. Blogging video blogging is. It's pretty amazing for your communication skills if you don't have the time or the inclination to do public speaking training classes or do like Social Dynamics bootcamp the highest leverage way that people can level up their communication skills. Public speaking skills is just to get in front of a Webcam or down or the or even their smartphone camera and just do video blogs with some frequency frequency. And they'll they'll get a lot better at communicating speaking about communicating. The book also discusses. What's called frame control? And so roy is giving him some advice for negotiating with his with his boss and so he says faced with unfounded criticism torture him by asking him questions. What do you mean exactly exactly Allen Response Debris clarifies rather than just define yourself? Ask Him questions to make him justify himself and don't let it go. It's for him to provide proof of his criticisms. Not for you you to prove they're unfounded so what they're kind of saying. Is that when people are giving you. Criticisms resumes way you could do is. It's called a reduce it to the absurd. Is I think what people call it is you asked people for just more and more details like if someone all like. Let's let's say what's what's an example of okay. The other day someone was on minds dot com and they stay. Give me a rude comment right. And they said Uh uh like I need psychological help or something like that. was that their comment. Yeah the cycle of Powell me to go see shrank or or something. Okay okay so so what I could do if I was dealing with that sort of criticism in like like a professional setting or or if I if I actually needed to address that sort of criticism and I was GonNA use the frame control technique. What I would do? WHO's I would ask the guy but I would respond back? I'd say something like well. I'm very concerned with my psychological health. So can you you clarify what. What is my psychological issue? I I need some examples from you of where you see me. Psychologically you know a big unhealthy and then the guy would be like By the I don't know about but I don't know and then someone actually someone ask him questions right underneath his on his goeman the need psychological help that he he has a ha- okay so so that particular somebody they have. Unwittingly unwittingly used the life hack described right here in the book. If frame control interests you. You'll want to check out lie article which is twenty four practical examples of frame control and I do link that in the article that is going to be linked below this podcast wherever you're listening to. Let's talk about theory. Theory Verse Practice Now Allen and his mentor in the book. Don't spend much time delving into Alan's Dysfunctional psychology. His mentor is not his shrink. His Mentor is a pragmatic practitioner of. NLP He suggest to Allen New and empowering mindsets and then he sends Allen on missions to experience and enshrined enshrine them in his personality. For example. Alan has this annoying labor deeper and old lady that kind of bullies him up about the totally baby will have to respond to those comments An Old lady that bullies him about the totally reasonable amount of noise that he makes in his Paris flat. His his mentor teaches him that he must establish frame control with his neighbor by doing something shocking and a bold so hilariously one day when his neighbor nags him he opens his door. Totally naked and says Madam Blanchard. How lovely to see you remember that section? The book in a subtle subtle way is about the showdown between two diametrically opposed schools of philosophy philosophy of psychology and personal change. Do you remember with the schools with the two schools are that are having a showdown in the book that are in competition with each other that are described one will be the Russian school it's not exactly debris ended up being Russian okay. The two schools schools of thought. You know what I mean by that competing heating ideologies more or less they are neuro linguistic programming or NLP a neuro linguistic linguistic. Programming is also often referred to as cognitive behavioral Therapy School of thought and then the Freudian Psychoanalysis School of thought and so this book should make a anybody who reads curious about NLP he and according to wikipedia NLP is at its neuro linguistic programming and according to wikipedia media. It is a pseudoscientific approach to communication personal development and psychotherapy psychotherapy created by. Hi Richard Bandler and John Grinder in California United States in the nineteen seventies so when Wikipedia Kapiti calls something pseudoscientific. It's probably something that you should be curious about. I've never undergone formal formal. NLP instruction myself. But I think I own a lot of my personal growth to fields that utilize is a lot of NLP techniques. I started my career at a young age in one hundred percent commission sales. It's it's something that really prepares you for life of entrepreneurship and sales people use a lot of NLP techniques when I was just doing my Sales training different jobs that I had as a young man. I recall them teaching us about empathy about empathetic steadman's mids Recall them teaching us about doing pace lead techniques all of this stuff that kind of comes out of NLP and and then. I was a pickup artist. Four about five years and pick up artists us all sorts of NLP techniques. And and. I probably would not be married to a really great woman nor have remained happily married if it wasn't for using some of the NLP style techniques from time to time so I am pretty positive positive about NLP. I think it's pretty worthwhile. I'm sure that there's something to the criticisms of LP you can browse the wikipedia page if you'd like that that breaks down wikipedia and does says that wicked that. NLP is awful. I'm I'm sure that there's something to these criticisms because you know when you typically when you get like a like a school of personal development some of with these schools of personal developments kind of become to a hierarchical and they end up with a people kind of you've building these these kind of Colt followings. It seems like just kind of a natural thing. When you got like personal personal growth gurus that are helping a lot aww people? There's this natural trend towards them like starting a Colt. You know 'cause you have people that are that are growing personally. Finally that are overcoming. Their past that are experiencing new successes. And then they WANNA share share. What they're doing and invite New People to become a part of their tribe? Bob and there's there's just kind of a natural like coal tisch hierarchical nature to the way human beings like to organize things and so. Oh I'm sure there's there's something to these accusations that are made about NLP. But I think overall it's a pretty positive thing if I had to summarize arise and I'll pay it would mean that if you want to be something you do that thing if you want change and transformation then you be the change that you want to see in the world you're biased towards action in your your personal growth. You're about ready. Fire aim as opposed to ready. Aim Fire your about faking it until you make it. And in comparison to this the Book Mentions Shock Laekan who is a prominent figure in psychoanalysis and a quote from the book here. Laekan was the key figure in psychoanalysis in France psychoanalysis being what it is people thought it was natural for a patient to spend fifteen years on a couch talking about his problems and it also says but this is France. The less people understand about what you're talking about. What the more you're taken for a genius about the book's author? What's his name again? Longbow now and he is a personal development specialist who trained in humanities at the university -versity of California Santa Cruz which is one of those places that is just constantly surrounded by a cloud of marijuana. Smoke I can imagine. In addition to lecturing at the university clam won't feather homes. He's a consultant and leads international seminars. His three books based on the principles of neuro linguistic programming have sold over over three hundred thousand copies worldwide. And so this book hints. At what I believe which is that. NLP YOU and cognitive behavioral therapy are effective tools for transformation for living a better life and that psychoanalysis is the pseudoscientific time-wasting fraud. Do you remember what I told you about. Psychoanalysis I think you said it was a waste of time what did I tell you about Freud he i I just know that you don't respect him. A bunch yeah I think Freud was a total scamming bullshit artist Villain of history so Freud Freud's thing was first of all his whole idea that the basis of a lot of his theory was that was that babies are horny. Oh Yeah I think he told me about this right. This guy who did a bunch of cocaine. He came to the conclusion that babies are really horny. But that are are hoarding. It travels around our body it Were babies we are horny. Our mouths for some reason and and then our haughtiness travels to our anus and then eventually travels to our genitals. where it motivates us to procreate with another other adult and perpetuate life and really this whole bullshit theory? He came up with because in the eighteenth century there in Vienna. They had like incredible. Apparently they had a lot of problems with a pedophilia than a lot of problems. With like a a sexual abuse of young girls apparently this was a big problem amongst the Viennese aristocracy and so instead of Sigmund Freud saying and so he was a psychotherapist. He was a therapist Like women would come and talk to him and so as opposed to him saying like. WHOA this is super wrong? We need to call the police. We need to have some better laws like we need to have have some pedophile thrown in jail instead of him like trying to stop the abuse of children and particularly I think girls his whole thing was was let me come up with a psychological theory that explains why young girls and babies would our Hoodie. It's just it's so demented. But he was he was a drug addict he was a he was a total. He was a total psycho and he came up with this. He came up with this whole theory. Vat of psychoanalysis that I think really just existed to a DOC paralyzed people in their growth Paralyzed people in their trauma so that the psychoanalyst could make money so that the psychoanalyst psycho analyst could just have you know people coming back to them every single week that needed more and more therapy. And that's what you see. There was a this podcast that I I've I've enjoyed it. And it's called a psychology in Seattle. And it's this podcast. That's it's it's kind of witty. It's kind of funny and it's by. It's his podcast hosted by these two ideas liberal guys these two left us this guys and they are talking in this in this podcast. They detail just all these cases of a aw therapists and psychologists abusing their customers just endless endless examples of therapists and psychologists abusing their customers. And so it's it's so common that you got to say you know it's really appropriate that the therapist I is written out it's the rapist right at write it down therapist it literally is the rapist so so maybe be there some value in therapy but I generally think psychoanalysis is a big scam in the NLP CBT. School will for example. Let's say there's a guy and he's a lonely guy. He's kind of loser. He's failing with women. He doesn't have a girlfriend who doesn't in Hawaii he can't. He can't get a date if this guy came across a NLP instructor the NLP instructor would say say okay. I'm going to teach you a seduction technique. I want you to go to a bar and then try to talk to an attractive woman at a bar or doesn't have to be a bar could also be a cafe. It could be a library or it could even be a it gives me like a shop like in the in the book right. Remember where he goes to to be the jewelry store and then he speaks to a very attractive woman in the initial restore and so what an NLP instructor would say is she would say go and interact with a very attractive woman. If you're having problems in your love life and then disagree with every single thing she says like arbitrarily just just disagree with her on everything like if she says Oh. It's a nice day outside billick. This the weather is is awful terrible weather you know just disagree arbitrarily on everything and so then a NLP student. They they would go out and they would have a totally novel experience with women if they do that if you can imagine the kind of guy. That's like not very confident. If if he goes out and then he makes it a point to just like argue with every with attractive women and disagree with them about everything is going to be like a totally novel whole experience for him because he's going to be used to like just disagreeing. He's going to be used to agreeing with women on everything right. So it's something that like get them way. Outside of their comfort zone and immediately become more confident immediately have like a mile my a of a mindset shift that they will that they'll never forget and so the psycho an analyst psycho analysis. School is a totally different different story than this in psychoanalysis you would take this lonely guy. Having problems with women and the therapy. The therapist will have the lonely man sit on a couch with them and talk endlessly about his past his traumas. His failures and his disappointments and the therapist will try their damnedest to Dug Up some dysfunctional connection between the lonely man's present failures and his relationship with his mother. That's what psychoanalysis is all about. So I really do think it is a whole lot of horse shit which is really an insult to horse ship because it can make for greater fertilizer. You know Where psychoanalysis psychoanalysis is good for just about out nothing? Moving on this book contains in my view. A non hysterical critique of capitalism so capitalism gets critiqued and criticized endlessly in mainstream movies television and culture even even though capitalism is clearly the best way for society to function but really an all explain. Why here really the problem with capitalism is the state? It's the government whenever you see. These really egregious examples of corporations harming people or the environment. It's almost always do to some entanglement with big government. The worst corporate behavior is often motivated did buy the stock market in these numerous cases of corporate malfeasance. It's the stock market performance that motivates corporate quote unquote citizens to behave so psychopathic. And I linked in this article too that really great documentary that was done that was called the corporation and the hypothesis of the documentary. I think it was like a three hour documentary. Really interesting. was that if corporations are citizens of corporations are people too than they are psychopaths. Did you ever watch that documentary now. No I don't think so. It was so interesting it would put you right to sleep. I bet so. The book actually portrays this really well. A lot of the book is about the corporate intrigue of the French. Recruitment firm wear the protagonist works. The firm has recently gone public on the Stock Exchange which motivates the firm's management to make a bunch of shortsighted unethical unethical bad decisions bad decisions to inflate the stock price. And there's a couple of illustrative passages that I will quote from returning to my office. I passed cubicles full of employees stressed out by the ever-more humanizing zing management cycle harassed by the demands of stock market profitability and no longer motivated by an exciting business business plan. What a waste to see all these people unhappy on the job when every one of them could be fulfilled could even bloom in in their work? Next quote this requirement for share price growth brings with it enormous pressure on everyone from the CEO to the most recent hire it prevents people from working properly calmly. It encourages short term management. Yeah that's good for neither the business nor the employees nor the company suppliers who squeezed hard will reflect that pressure back on on their own employees and suppliers. We end up with companies in good health laying people off just to maintain their maintain. Hey Dr improve their profitability. Since the Stock Market Exchange has become a casino. We have forgotten its prime function and especially we've forgotten that behind the names of the companies. We gamble on like we're playing roulette. They are people living flesh and blood people who work in these companies and devote much of their lives to the company's Development and in the book the CEO of the firm drops a red pill. Here's what he says. You mustn't look for meaning where there isn't any. He she said dismissively. You think that life has a meaning the strongest and the cleverest win. That's all they get the power her and the money and win you get the power and the money you can have anything you want in life. It's no more complicated than that. Gren more you're the rest is intellectual masturbation and then the CEO of the firm has also saying when the stock market price race is crashing. A bunch of sheep all of them a crummy journalists sticks his sticks his nose in where it doesn't belong long and all the morons incapable of thinking for themselves follow his damn fool advice and so as a result the share price goes down a a bit and the others Russian without thinking with out thinking. I've long thought that the stock market that is awful. Businesses incorporations would naturally be pretty benign actors because if if they because they only profit in the long term if they sell a decent product that people want and are not terrible places uses for people to work but the stock market creates this million or billion dollar incentive for Corporate Management Schmidt to think only about short term performance to worry about how the stock is doing in three months or six months or maybe in two years they are no longer thinking ten years out they stop worrying about building something thing to last. They stopped worrying about if the company is contributing in a meaningful sense to society. They worry more more about the fickle stock market investors than they do their employees and even their customers one of the more recent examples of corporate. Idiocy that I protested was the sixty six billion dollar bear Monsanto merger which I did a whole article on it that is linked to which bear has been harshly punished for in in court. They've already had to pay out billions for lawsuits. One by the victims of Monsanto's Monsanto's cancer causing products at I. Guess sometimes there actually is justice in this world at the time of the merger. I think it was like maybe maybe two years ago maybe three years ago I watched several interviews with the bear executives and their sentiment. Was We know that this merger is very unpopular. People Hate Monsanto. It's like the most hated company in the world and we're paying a ton of money for it but but it will deliver value fast to our shareholders. So Oh we're GONNA do it and they did it. If they weren't myopically focused on short-term stock market gains would would they have decided to merge with this vile company that does so much harm to so many people farmers and the ecosystem. And I don't think so and so. This brings me back to my point that I made. Who Do we have to thank for the perpetuation of the stock market market? Well that would be the state the government employees floors and floors of board bureaucrats. What's apathetic apparatchiks and arrogant attorneys to quote unquote regulate the stock market consistently these regulating lady agencies are captured by corporate influence and they allow and encourage the worst corporate behavior? The government also writes endless Byzantine and confusing futures trading laws without which there would be no reason. He's in for corporations to play and cheat in the global casino without the damned government businesses big and small would be a whole lot more conservative risk averse and honestly interested in serving their customers a good product. That's my rant on That's my rant on capitalism or crony capitalism and stadium as people describe it and and I want to get to the very end of the book and to the last chapter that I found just a bit silly. The only part of the book I scoffed at was the last chapter where he is reunited with a beautiful and very cavalier. Really you're young woman. Who broke his heart and actually drove him to suicide? In the first chapter quote it was a great each joy to be reunited closing the painful parenthesis of separation. I was delighted to find she. She still loved me. I felt quite happy overcome with emotion to be able once more to see her touch her smell. Well her kiss her at. We swore to never be separated again. Whatever happened what are you have to say it? I say that you should not spoil oil the end our listeners. No no I'm not because we have at least one listener. Who would like to read it? Okay and yet no spoilers angry the book has a good twist in it and not gonNA share what it is so I found the last chapter totally unrealistic If you know anything about women especially young beautiful women you know that they move on fast they fall in and out of love fast and I would have rather seen the protagonist you know. Use his new like social skills to end up with a new more virtuous woman at the end of the book as a result of his growth so in conclusion I gave the book five stars. It's a fun easy read. That actually makes me want to visit Paris. Chris and the book has some some Red Pill truths about life women and the business world like I said it has a great twist I at the end I enthusiastically recommend the man who wristed all to anyone passionate about taking action in their personal oh development. Do you have any comments on the book Babe. Well we'RE GONNA mention how beautiful the legislators PTAs. Oh Yeah Yeah. It was very well what it was very well written. It wasn't quite as is clever as some books. I've read some books are just laughing at them like every other every every other moment but the it was written in French originally essence French. So guys if you speak the language and if you can read in it without a problem I just recommend you read it in French but if not the English translation is equally beautiful. It's great I already to Bulgarian actually and I liked it like maybe four or five years ago and recommended it to my husband here who read it like maybe tweaks. Yeah probably knocked it out about two weeks. Yes yeah something like that while. I was reading three other books. How Ya he's promiscuous in his reading is I am what is it panda like? Is it the pandas no. No pandas aren't promiscuous. It's the other one. It's the Koalas that are that are such sluts. What's those skank walls? I am a Marsupial Marsupial. Admire reading yeah so it may be now someone will want to call him. Well we can do that. But for the normal podcast I will just say I'm I'm Jonathan with limitless mindset and I'm his wife and we look forward to a continued conversation with you.

Allen Alan Paris Sigmund Freud US Roy Jonathan cough Eiffel Tower La Hun Hun Hun Harbach instructor analyst Utah Vocabulary Alan Greg Moore Mir Curiel atlas Alan Gren Gerneele
Getting Putins attention

Post Reports

25:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Getting Putins attention

"Did you know there's a long line of middlemen who are collecting a significant portion of what you pay for medicine ensures p. b. m.'s. And others got nearly fifty percent. What americans spend on brand medicines in two thousand eighteen and their share is increasing every year. Let's fix the system the right way and ensure the savings in the system go to you not middlemen. Learn more at p. h. r. a. dot org slash cost. Because you don't know the half of it paid for by pharma from the newsroom on the washington post washington washington ellen nakashima with washington. This is post reports. i'm martine powers. It's thursday april fifteenth. Today why the. Us placing new sanctions on russia and the former trump officials still looking for jobs. The biden administration just announced a set of pretty significant sanctions against the russian government principally for its interference in the twenty twenty elections and some other associated malign activities as they're described to shane harris covers national security for the post. This had been expected to be coming for some time. Given particularly that we have a new democratic president and the previous administration was mostly inclined to slap russia on the wrist for a lot of its mind activities but this is an effort i think by the biden administration both to punish the russians and make life difficult for them. And i think it's fair to say also signal that could be more perhaps even more severe or equally significant steps coming in the future if russia continues to as we see step out of line in threaten. Us interests and just for context when we're talking about the russian hacking or election interference in two thousand twenty. What exactly is the us. Alleging that russia did russia. The intelligence community said publicly. They didn't exactly mount a repeat of twenty sixteen where we saw them spreading of propaganda and importantly stealing democratic party in campaign emails and leaking those publicly. This was more of a propaganda effort to try and get disinformation misinformation principally about joe biden into the media bloodstream to circulate it in congress. So that's one piece of this. There's also an and this is separate from the election piece of another kind of very significant hacking operation that has been attributed to russia the so-called solar winds hacking attack so solar winds is the name that is given to a really expensive hacking operation that ultimately let the russians. We think get into many many us corporations as well as government agencies these sanctions really blame directly on both the s are the russian foreign intelligence agency as well as the kremlin. This is a very direct shot by the biden administration to say this major hacking operation. That has occurred this year. We're blaming russia for that. So what exactly will these sanctions do. Well there's three things that jump out to me is the most important one is that it will sanction individually a number of entities and individuals. Nobis four time at financial sanctions here for the most part. Basically trying to restrict their movements restrict their ability to access money that were responsible for carrying out these various operations it will expel. Some russian diplomats who have been mostly identified as intelligence offer is operatives. We could say diplomats kind of wink. Wink or air quotes there from the embassy in russia. That's pretty standard in a situation like this to expel people from the embassy but also it's trying to take this broader action to limit the russian government's ability to access the debt markets to raise money to get access to foreign capital. And i think this is also significant because it shows a couple of things one trying to put a kind of a greater squeeze on the russian economy rather than just trying to hurt individuals but also a signal that we are trying to internationalize this response and trying to get our allies board and making more of a broader sanctions. Thinking hundred states is trying to say look. This is russian aggression of behavior. That isn't just significant to us. In the united states it's also meaningful to other countries that they might take these operations against as well because of course. This isn't the first time that the. Us has placed sanctions against russia. But in the past especially in the recent past. i think they've been viewed by some people as something of a slap on the wrist and so these new sanctions basically represent something that is more aggressive and theoretically might result in more actual financial impact on russia and russians. That's right the biden administration. I think safe to say here is trying to go beyond the more risk slapping measures or very targeted measures of the past. And do something. That's more expansive and there's just tougher overall to make the bite deeper to make this hurt more for russia. And that's important because when you're talking about sanctions you know. There's only so many tools in the kit as it were and so you got to be careful as you use those that you don't use them all at once. Then you have nowhere else. Left to ratchet up. And what has russia president putin said about this. I don't think we've heard putin yet. But the russian government through their spokespersons have said essentially. This is uncalled for. There will be retaliation for this. This is unjust. That's pretty garden-variety response from the russians. It raises questions on. What could they actually do. I mean russia is not a very large economy. They don't have the kind of throwaway that we do. What they could do is launch more line activity and it's important to remember that this is also happening at a time when we are seeing a very significant build up of russian troops and military forces along the border with ukraine and. I think that we have to consider the possibility that some retaliation the russians might take wanted us to think they're taking could be some kind of military activity in that part of the world so these sanctions. There's a world where they don't actually dissuade russia from doing the bad actions that we are trying to dissuade them from doing. It could actually ratchet things at more and make them want to be more aggressive and taking actions against the us. I think that's possible for definitely. Part of the calculus will say that intelligence officials have been on the hill testifying the past two days about a range of different global threats and have been asked about this in so far. The posture of those officials seems to be look. We're watching this buildup we're concerned we're not highly worried. They have also said that. They don't think that the russian government wants in military confrontation with the united states. If they were to do something like push further into ukraine could be what happens certainly if they were to take action against the nato member state. There's a possibility we could be a war with russia and maybe the russians don't want that so russia's options are somewhat constrained here as well but there's always a risk of when you take these kinds of retaliatory actions that you start to get into a tit for tat. What will the russians tried to do next. Will they tried to one up us. Will they try to as they see it kind of reset a status quo. Which you know might be the best outcome that you'd hope for but you need these to be seen. They're designed to be public actions that the world understands we're ratcheting things up with respect to russia and they'll be consequences for their actions and what about american allies right now. How do they view this. And are they on the us side in trying to take more action against russia. I think generally speaking the answer is b. s. Our allies are with us. We've had some reporting today as well that we'll be looking to bring them on. The administration will be inviting britain france denmark and estonia actually to join an annual pentagon cyber exercise. That's coming up. Which i think is meant to also be a signal of some kind of international alliance here in some unity around this you know. There's really no one. Among america's allies who approves of this russian behavior there are just some allies. You might feel that they have more to lose and so the united states also has to persuade our allies. That you know this is worth coming along that they'll be a unified front and we'll have their backs if russia decides to take it out on them. I'm also curious to understand a little bit more. About how previous sanctions have worked. Because as we said obama trump they've also taken some actions against russia. What did those actions look like. And did they have any effect. Does that inform our expectations of whether the result from this will be a dissuasive effect. Or a ratcheting up. I think it's safe to say that the sanctions in the past. If most experts feel pretty underwhelmed they certainly haven't deterred russian aggression at least in any kind of comprehensive way right. I mean russia's still interfered in our elections and twenty twenty. They're still building up forces along the border. With ukraine they still are behind the massive solar winds attack so in that sense if trying to draw a link between do sanctions stop those kinds of activities arguably they don't and they're fairly directed in terms of limited ways companies and individuals. I think what's different here. Is that the biden. Administration is trying to more. Broadly restrict the russian government's ability to access capital to raise money to issue. Bonds and in. That sense is kind of saying. Look if we if we're not gonna go at individuals and tryin deter. Russia may view that way. Could we try and basically throw a blanket to some degree over the russian economy and really try and suffocated in a way that causes real harm to russian leadership. And you know a lot of this. While it's not explicit said is aimed at trying to undermine the regime of latimer putin. I mean when we talk about russia. We're talking about one man right i. This is not a normally organized country. It's kind of criminal. Petro state run by a former intelligence officer. It's more like an organized. Crime organization in some ways a lot of our our policies in the past. It seems to me targeted at traditional ways of going after individuals and trying to deter behavior. And it's not working because it's not deterring vladimir putin and if you really want to change russia's behavior that you've got to get putin's attention and maybe one way of doing that is if you weaken the russian economy maybe you strengthen the you know pretty considerable political opposition that does exist in the country right now to putin. That might be one goal. It's a much riskier goal from the standpoint of the us but it might be one that gets more results. Clearly what's happening right now. Represents the fact that their relationship between the us and russia and especially between the biden administration and russia is not good right now. But i also wonder what this says about how the us is approaching quote unquote hostile states. More generally it's fair to say that our biggest strategic challenge on the world stage right now comes from china. It doesn't come from russia. China is militarily in some ways. Well maybe not as much as rush in terms of the nuclear arsenal. But it's it's building a military to compete with ours. It has huge. They're truly ambitions and importantly china as a huge economy. The world's second largest in some things that might become the largest and eclipse us in the near future. I think that the biden administration has been trying to on the one hand kind of reset expectations. About how the united states government is going to behave which is to say. We're going to have a more consistent approach than the kind of more mir curiel approach the trump administration and one that was basically built around donald trump's personal relationship with world leaders including authoritarians dictators. And so there's a resetting of that making it very clear to let putin you're not our friend but we'll deal with you making it clear to kim jong un like you're not getting any love letters from his president like heated from the last. I trying to be realistic about that. And understand that the world is incredibly complicated and fraught dangerous right now but the biden administration has also. It's not looking to ratchet up hostilities. Intention right the president just announced were were pulling forces out of afghanistan after twenty years. I don't think joe biden is looking to get into any foreign wars and that's even lead to some questions about like well. What is the strength of american resolve. How would we react if the chinese decided to make an incursion into taiwan. It's long understood that if that happened. That could be a cause of military conflict between the us and china. Will it be just trying to think that joe biden doesn't really want to go that far up the ladder and so maybe this is the time because there is such a demonstrated incentive or interest for the biden administration to kind of pull us out from military involvement with the rest of the world that it's open question. Would we actually get involved. If push comes up. Yeah and i think there's been an open question. Maybe even for many many years on the chinese leadership whether or not the united states is really willing to risk facile even going to war with china over taiwan. And there you see it. Kind of creeping almost a feeling sometimes feels like inevitable expansion projection of chinese power and territorial claims to the point. Where maybe they're calculating that it's just not worth it to the united states to fight back against all of them. I mean that's kind of a bit. You know far afield from where we are with russia parts to your question it goes to the sort of thinking of. How does the united states approach these relationships and these adversarial relationship clearly with the administration seems to be wagering. Here is that it is worth it for us. In the case of russia to take these much more aggressive stances and to try to undermine potentially even their economy that these sanctions that are being announced. Today probably tell you something. About where. Joe biden and his administration plan to take our approach to russia. And it's one in which obviously he's open to dialogue but he wants to make very clear that he's going to be tougher than the previous president and arguably tougher than the president. He worked for barack obama. Shane harris covers national security for the post. The story was produced by ariel plotnik. Did you know there's a long line of middlemen who are collecting a significant portion of what you pay for medicine. Insurers and others got nearly fifty percent of what american spent on brand medicines in two thousand eighteen and their share is increasing every year. Let's fix the system the right way and ensure the savings in the system to you not middlemen learn more at p. h. r. a. dot org slash cost. Because you don't know the half of it paid for by pharma and now one more thing so we're a few months into biden's presidency now. Can you tell me what happened to all the officials from trump's administration like where are they now. A lot of them are really trying to get settled. Still touring you. Meyer covers the intersection of wall. Street and washington for the post. He spoke to our producer. Mattel off about the fate of former trump officials. A number of people from the trump administration had long careers in the corporate world before they joined the administration. Some of those people are struggling to get footholds back in that world now because they seem to be wearing something of a scarlet t public facing companies. Don't wanna bring those people back on board because they're afraid of reputational risk but beyond just the feet of these trump people. I think the struggles that they're facing reentering. Corporate america speaks to this bigger dynamic that we're seeing right now that is potentially really consequential for the future of the republican party. It used to be not very long ago that you could take it for granted that what was good for. Republicans was good for corporate america vice versa they saw their fates very clearly intertwined and the fact that trump people are now seen as toxic by big public facing companies. I think speaks to this. Bigger uncertainty there were seeing play out in a bunch of different dimensions and debates right now. Where it's not clear that ceos and other corporate leaders think that this version this sort of trump a fide or post trump republican party necessarily has their best interest in mind and the corporate world is kind of torn between its traditional allegiance to the republican party and competing set of demands from their customers in their workers to embrace a whole set of progressive values. That don't necessarily have a bearing on their bottom line but speak to the world that this next generation wants to live in whether it's a diverse workforce whether it's taking climate change seriously and doing something about it equitable pay. I mean all these. This whole other suite of concerns and the corporate. America's really caught in the middle Normally head hunters work with high profile members of an outgoing administration to get top jobs at big companies or on corporate boards. That's how it would go for people like elaine chao. Trump's transportation secretary who also served in the bush administration so one of the people that we took a particular interest in was elaine chao because she's really a staple of the republican power circuit in washington cher career in washington dates back four decades so she has pre existed the trump phenomenon and certainly the trump administration by a lot and she is a regular at conservative. Think tanks. she's married to mitch. Mcconnell the republican leader in the senate. She served on more than a dozen big public company boards. So she's someone who has a really outside profile and came in to the administration with that and now that she's out she's looking to get back onto public company boards and i talked to head hunters who have been talking to elaine chow. And they say they're trying to place her and they have found very little appetite among the companies that maybe just you know. Four or five. Short years ago would have been very proud to have her on their boards. And like i guess to me. That doesn't seem that unusual. Like i think anytime. There's any president former members of like their administration might sort of be seen as outsiders for better or to struggle to get a new job. As there's this power change but it sounds like you're saying this is actually pretty unusual. One of the things that we looked at to try to test that proposition was how did alums of george w bush administration do when he was leaving office at the end of two thousand eight and you know he was certainly a guy who was polarizing in his time he had very low public approval ratings. was enmeshed in a bunch of different controversies and unpopular initiatives from the war to the financial collapse and yet we looked at his cabinet members and saw within the first quarter just the first three months after he left office. Three of them landed high profile seats on For very big public companies. So it's not a huge sample size but neither is a cabinet and just the fact that there was a market for these guys coming out of the administration that doesn't exist for the trump people. I think tells you something. There are One hundred board seats right now. That are being filled by companies in the s. and p. Five hundred we looked at them not a single member of the trump administration who served into his last months in office Have secured any of those seats. Do you think we might see. Former trump administration officials seeking out more non traditional roles. Maybe they're gonna go outside of washington or outside if the kind of top corporate world that they would have preferred so we've seen ben carson the Kind of unlikely presidential candidate in two thousand sixteen became the hud secretary for trump. He is forming what he is calling a do tank. As opposed to a think tank one of the things. I learned at hud as you can facilitate corporation with town halls roundtables. You get local. Press to come in and you get people from different sides to actually discuss things. Put things on the table. That makes a big difference which looks like it could be a launching pad for Another bid for public office. We've seen mike. Pompeo joined the hudson institute and then another group. That is sort of an anti. Aclu that fights for evangelical christian writes it. Looks like he is trying his own presidential bid in two thousand twenty four. Let's say there's a scenario. Donald trump makes a decision. He's not going to run in twenty twenty four. Would you consider getting in that race john. I'm always up for a good fight. I care deeply about america. I've been part of the conservative movement for an awfully long time. Now i aim to keep at it Mike pence is making similar moves. So i think a lot of these people are going to be jockeying for the maga- mantle and none of those people are going the traditional route. They're all sort of trying to stay in a in a pretty tight orbit around trump. So is there any way in which this might be seen as a good thing right that it's not quite so easy to just go straight from politics to the corporate world and then back again. Yeah absolutely. I mean i think boards in general are a kind of preserve of clubbiness that the trump administration was promising dismantle. So i mean. I don't think this is what they had in mind. But this idea that there's a real kind of Established elite in this country and they go from running companies to running the government tobacco running companies with the expectation Sort of built in that when they're in government they're going to do what's best for the companies that there are inevitably going to return to that doesn't necessarily produce great outcomes for or people whose who might see their best interest as different or opposed to the interests of corporate leadership. So yeah i think. I mean if they're to the extent that this might herald a breakdown of that old revolving door. I think there are a lot of people who would be cheered by that. The tory new. Meyer covers the intersection of wall street and washington for the post. The story was produced by mattel cough. That's proposed reports. Thanks for listening. Today show was mixed by rina florez. Ted muldoon we also want you. Correct a story from tuesday's show in our segment about the shooting. Dante rates are reporter misstated. A brooklyn center police department policy about guns and teasers. She said that tasers are kept on the dominant hip and guns on the non dominant. Tip the police chief. At the time. Tim gannon actually said in a press conference that it is the other way around. You're right handed. Fire right side around the level martine powers. We'll be back tomorrow with more stories from the washington post. Did you know there's a long line of middlemen who are collecting a significant portion of what you pay for medicine. Insurers pm's and others got nearly fifty percent of what americans spent on brand medicines in two thousand eighteen and their share is increasing every year. Let's fix the system the right way and ensure the savings in the system go to you not middlemen. Learn more at p. h. r. a. dot org slash cost. Because you don't know the half of it paid for by pharma.

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Agree to Disagree: Are Election Lawsuits Good For Democracy?

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

51:10 min | 6 months ago

Agree to Disagree: Are Election Lawsuits Good For Democracy?

"There are a lot of people out there who are saying and normal who voted for trump for various different reasons. I think those people will be paying attention to what happens in these courts. The president is not limiting. His contest of the election to the courts is flooding the zone in order to amplify what he is doing on twitter in the media which is spreading massive disinformation. Everybody i'm john. Donvan and this is intelligence squared. Us and elections like the one. We've just been through elections in some ways are like the debates we do at intelligence squared. They have winners and they have losers and they have rules but elections also let the presumed loser challenged the outcome. that's why we have recounts after some elections and lawsuits challenging election. Outcomes is not anything new but the campaign of litigation by a still unconcealed. President trump is something that he's really going forward calling the election flawed in pennsylvania and michigan and nevada and on and on and on it really kind of sets a new standard for challenging a national election. This way it's much bigger than what happened in florida in two thousand now. Of course all of this is donald trump's right but is what he's doing good for democracy this week. I'm online with two legal experts. Who aren't going to argue it out over this question. We're not going to be talking about the merits of the cases themselves and is an entirely different debate. But we're just going to be talking about the fact that these cases he's bringing to court actually exists that they're happening and asking. Is that a win for democracy. So i want to introduce people to the conversation. I i want to welcome. Rebecca rifi rebecca. Welcome to intelligence squared. You're a former manhattan prosecutor. Now you're a law professor focusing on lawyers ethics and the history of the legal profession. So welcome to. I q two thank you so much for having me and i want to introduce the other end of the conversation we might say your opponent depends on how this flows but when it welcome in bassin a former attorney in the obama white house and the co founder of protect democracy welcoming. And it's great to have you with us and intelligence squared. It's great to be here with you. And with rebecca. So i'll start with you. Rebecca on the question are donald. Trump's lawsuits challenging the election. Good for democracy are you. Yes or no on that. I'm yes that's my short answer. I can certainly elaborate. I one of the things that i think is important to distinguish is rhetoric from and i think the danger here. I think that ian and i would probably agree on this that the danger here comes from trump's rhetoric and my view is it's much better to have this out in courtrooms where we're governed by rules of evidence. Ethics rules testimony is taken under the penalty of perjury. Then have it out on twitter. And so i think the lawsuits themselves are good for democracy. So that's my patch or right great. That's your elevator pitch. And i want to bring him to ian you. Obviously because you agree to do it in the conversation to take the other side of that question. But i will go through the formality of asking you on the question. Do you stake a position of yes or no whether donald trump's lawsuits challenging the election are good for democracy. No i don't think they're good for democracy and there's three primary reasons for that I i wish it were true. Rebecca saying that there are these cases. They're going to be litigated in court. And that's a proper place to have out legal disputes That's true as an empirical matter but that's not what's going on here. These cases are not being brought in good faith. I think you use an institution of our democracy like the courts in bad faith to bring frivolous cases. That don't really have support. That undermines the proper use of the courts. Not usually a coach in the proper way. Okay man jump in and ask you to hold off on your second third reasons because you'll have plenty of opportunity to to bring those forward. Is that okay with you absolutely absolutely. Okay thank you for that. So i wanna get the conversation then launched so rebecca. You gave us your elevator pitch. I think if i were to to repeat back to you to what you're saying is that you think that the president is employing legal. Means that the instruments are there. He's employing them and to some degree. You trust those instruments to reveal a legal truth and perhaps other kinds of truths as well and that you're saying the rest of us should trust the system to process his challenges in a meaningful and correct. Why do i have that right absolutely. That's right so where does that trust. Come from just take a. We're off the elevator now and we have plenty of time to stroll so keep going with your argument. Okay so you know. I want to address something. That ian said initially. Which is you know that these lawsuits are frivolous. I don't think there's any sign yet. Maybe some of them are borderline frivolous I would agree. I'm an ethics professor on if any lawyer is bringing into court of clearly frivolous claim than that is absolutely not allowed. But that's a lot that's very different from saying it's wrong to bring a claim that you know will lose because lawyers do not all the time and people bring grievances to court all the time that are definite loser than they do it for motivations that are bad but our system is to absorb that and i think the important thing also is that you don't as as somebody who cares about democracy on somebody who's been looking at these institutions and looking at the attack on these institutions. You don't wanna be in a position of saying don't go to courts don't you know. Don't go don't test this out because that's playing into the hands the other side being you know what you have to hide and the thing is i. Don't you know as long as you're going through establish mechanisms. I've got nothing to hide. And i don't think the democrats have anything to hide and they don't have anything to worry about. And i think joe biden's attitude of kind of rolling his law is i'm laughing about this and letting trump his tantrum in court is actually long. Run the most helpful thing and it's partially because you know when you look at the Trump supporters. I think people on the left sometimes make this mistake. Which is they conflate. All trump supporters into his base into the people who will be convinced by cunanan and basically anything that trump says but that is not the seventy million people who voted for trump. There are a lot of people out there who are saying normal who voted for trump for various different reasons. And i think those people will be paying attention to what happens in these courts and they may be suspicious of government institutions they may think government institutions mess up all the time but they also have some degree of faith in the court. So if this is litigated in the courts and there's no sign of any fraud or any substantial fraud anywhere that could overturn these results than in the end we have an erection whose legitimacy has been confirmed her. Let me swing it back to you. I asked you to hold off on your other two points so i want to give the opportunity to take this in the direction you want. You can continue with those points or respond to What rebecca just said or maybe fold all of that together but the floor is yours conveniently i think rebecca has teed up the other points that i wanted to make because i hear back to be saying A couple of things one is that it's a good thing that these disputes are going into the courts. Because if they were not going into the courts there are far worse places to be having out this argument. That could be more dangerous than good that it's happening in a forum that has some structures for it. The problem i have with that is that's not what's going on. The president is not limiting his contest of the election to the courts nor is he really using the courts to be the ultimate arbiter of the his contest to the election. What he is doing is he's using the courts in a cynical manipulative way to elevate is extrajudicial challenges to the election. So he's he's flooding zone as his former advisor. Steve bannon sad with a sort of excrement from farm animals in the courts in order to amplify what he is doing on twitter in the media which is spreading massive disinformation about rampant allegations of election fraud or earlier today before we recorded this that. There's some sort of de facto in the computer systems In the the purpose of these court cases is to create delay to create more time for confusing the public while undermining discrediting news outlets who are designed to help the public separate truth from fiction while at the same time stocking the government with loyalists and pressuring state officials to change their adjudication of election results. So if it were just let's let the courts settle this and then will accept the result. I think rebecca and i would be largely in agreement. The problem is. I don't think that's the that's what the president is doing with his court cases so just to clarify ian you think that there is no element whatsoever of good faith in what the gop and the president are. Doing this instance. That's that's correct. With respect to how they are using the courts just one example in the state of pennsylvania alone by my count there are now nineteen cases filed in the state of pennsylvania either by the trump campaign or allies of the trump campaign. If there were a legitimate dispute about something going on in pennsylvania it would be appropriate have a court case there are two different court cases you want to resolve the matter and then say hey let the court speak. But the fact that there's nineteen the fact that today. A challenge to ballots in michigan was accidentally filed by the trump team in the federal court of claims in dc. Which is the wrong court for it. That's where you contest Disputes over contracts with federal government suggests. This is not actually a good faith legal strategy. This is a tactic disruption. Let me let me bring it back then to rebel rebecca. You're hearing ian. Say that he's making the presumption that none of these challenges are made in good faith. What is your response to that assertion. I'm willing to accept that assertion and still stick to my point. I i it yes i can see that i mean i. Maybe there's one case or two cases or a few where there's some facts that are real but certainly not enough to over to change the election and any single one of these states. That's as far as i understand. I would imagine the and has been following these more closely than than i have so can you. Can you dig a little deeper on on the argument that he just made that If if none of them are made in good faith than they don't They don't deserve the attention of the court. The energy of the court the the cost of the court that that's harmful in itself and cynicism inducing. Yeah i mean. I just you know. I don't think that's the way our courts work. Thank our courts are often used in these sorts of ways. I think the idea that anybody that we would impose this kind of barrier or a gateway to enter a court where you truly believe that you know your grievances justified and we would have a lot fewer cases than we have right now. I mean but but but my point is i think to the extent that in is correct and i think i think he is largely about what what the president is trying to do with these court cases. I think that it will backfire. I think that's strategy of confused. Delay and undermine is working in terms of rhetoric and it will fail in. The courts is failing in the courts so to the extent that what ends up happening as i said in the beginning is we push this into the dark corner of the conspiracy theorists who we would never reach before but the you know. These outcomes can actually convince people. I think there are people who are already were looking at them who are conservatives trump supporters who are seeing this and changing their minds and again you know. I think there's this problem. Which is that people on the left tend to caricature everybody who votes for trump or would prefer him for president. Then biden this ridiculous individual. Who's not smart enough to be able to process information. And not just not true and i think we're never going to hit his bay. He's gonna do this no matter what whether he had the courts are not and his base would follow him to the end of the earth and the you know that that's a whole different story. How do you leave that to the work of his organization. How do you educate the public so that there are fewer people like that. That's a totally different question. But in terms of these court cases. I think we do end up picking off people who are who are who are not those people and convincing them of the legitimacy of this election and that's a valid thing to do regardless of what the motivation is of the litigant here so ian. You hear you hear becca saying. She trusts both the system and some significant portion of trump's supporters to to validate the election. Not just on the facts that would be presented in court or turned away from court but also in the minds of those supporters who might have doubts now but could be persuaded by failed effort to stop the election through the court system. Yeah so. Rebecca offered an olive branch to some of the things that i was saying and offered some agreement to them so i want to return the favor. An offer an agreement. Something that rebecca side. Which was that. We can't treat all trump voters as a monolith right that there is a you know. Seventy million people right happens to be five to seven million people fewer than voted for his opponent. But it's still seventy million people. A are many diverse perspectives. I think it's important to keep that in mind to rebecca's point that there are some people you'll never convince it anything but there are plenty of reasonable people who will be convinced by things will be convinced ultimately to accept the results of the election. Move on the question for me. I think the question of the debate is is using the courts to get there. In a way that i think rebecca i agree is somewhat cynical disingenuous good for our democracy and i think the reason it's not as because it poses a real danger to trust in the courts because i think rebecca's argument rests in part on this expectation that the courts will ultimately adjudicate these if they are indeed frivolous store them out and that's going to lend legitimacy to some people. Here's the problem i have with that. The president has proven time and again that he is not going to honor The decisions of courts that rule against him in fact he is already on the front end. i think done damage to the courts by saying supreme court will rule for me and overturned the results of the election. The court trigger to step in and they're gonna save the day three on the front anything that's dangerous because it suggests the people that courts are not independent arbiters already captured by one side of course on the back end if he loses. We can fully expect that he's going to attack the courts judges themselves who issued those decisions as corrupt. Why do we know that. Because he's done that repeatedly when judge curiel ruled against him in the trump university case. He attacked the judges ancestry. when a federal district judge in hawaii ruled against him on the muslim ban case he called him a quote unquote so called judge. The president got into a sparring match with chief justice. John roberts over whether there were obama judges and trump judges in suggested that judges are not independent. He attacked the judge. In the roger stone case he attacked judges on the ninth. Circuit is making the country unsafe. The fact that we can guarantee that he is going to attack court decisions. That don't go his way up. I think poses a real danger for the many millions of people who are then going to lose faith in the courts and so to rebecca's point of but how do we get the reasonable people to accept the results. I would argue that. There are better ways of doing such as frankly. We are the republican senators and house members who know a lot better telling people. The election has been resolved. It's time to move on that. To me is a much healthier way to move the country forward than throwing the courts into a dangerous politicisation dynamic where the president is going to sell a lot of doubt and distrust in an institution that it's really important for the american people to respect going forward rebecca point But i i still disagree on it and for the following reason. It's something that i said earlier. Which is i think. The one has to separate out president. Trump's rhetoric and the power of president trump's rhetoric and his actions. And i actually i. You know. I've i've been writing and have been for for the past. I don't know four years about the destructive power of his rhetoric not to minimize it but there are also ways in which he acts to corrupt democratic institutions. And these two things are different. And there's a limit to the power of his rhetoric. I know it seems like it's almost limitless but it isn't and i think that's the important thing where how does one limit the scope and power of his rhetoric and i don't think one does that by resisting What looks like his effort to test things in court. I think instead you act like the adult in the room and you like okay you know go to the courts and you know all one after another of these cases are getting thrown out and i don't think you know certain point rational people and again i believe there are some people who are irrational. Not gonna say every single court you know. Would i think ian mentioned how many cases of there. I don't know exactly how many there are. But that starts to look like a vast conspiracy and if you're gonna say the courts or corrupt in they're all against me. He probably will say that but there are that comes increasingly hard to believe for rational nights. And so. that's why. I think this in the end is really useful because it it it. It does start. You know there's a point at which not everybody but some it looks ridiculous loss and at that point they you know they leave him and you know not leave him not leaves trumpism necessarily or not leave but but but leaves this fight. Yeah except the outcome. Accept the outcome and move on and you know and maybe move on a little bit from him. I mean he. He's left in the dust looking silly. you know. i know it's like you would think like why. Why hasn't he been left in the dust looking silly but You know. I think that this could for some people. Make him look like a sore loser. Who's crying and fussing about leaving his job and not accepting this law. And i think that could pick off some people and i think that's valuable. Rebecca i want to. I want to talk about if this if the shoe were on the other foot here. A little bit and and we have a couple of examples where we have the two thousand election where. The supreme court only made a decision about vote-counting in florida the through the election to george bush and not to the democrat al gore and i think you know that there are democrats who to this day. Don't accept the legitimacy of george w bush's presidency because they feel that the election was stolen from him and then in two thousand eighteen in georgia. The governor's race Stacey abrams to the state truly refuses to concede she feels that the election was stolen from her. And there's a sort of A deep a deep well of suspicion and a sense of having been cheated in in those places and i'm wondering whether those two examples challenge or notion that people can accept and get over it in time and that as you're saying the court process would be part of that but what strikes me is that things are so polarized that there really aren't gonna be many people switching sides on this issue of whether the election was stolen from bellowed. I find that Comparison mitch mcconnell also compared donald trump's lawsuits to Bush v gore. And i. i see these things as entirely different. And i think again would agree with me on this. I mean that was. It's the five hundred and some odd votes that were at issue in one state when one st could flip the election. And i think that's a situation in which contesting it hub. Screaming publicly that this is not you know it's like well. I don't know one case the wrong way. And you know you have a supreme court that's divided ideologically and i think that really does create Some kind of question about what was the accurate result. And what is this is. Do we have to live with this as legitimate. You know. I just think this is different because it's lake you know they're they're they're not. You're not one case. It would have to be widespread massive conspiracy like fraud. And that's why he can't prove that if if he could prove it. I would want to go to the courts i'm with you. I don't think he can. But i you know. I think there's a difference between saying you know it came down to five votes and we're not really sure who those votes were four or you know the hanging chads or something like that. Unfeeling you know at the end of it. Some kind of sense that you know at the end we didn't win is still being somebody who believes in institutions. I think it's unseemly. I mean i think even after bush stacey abrams Election that one should concede and move on. But i still think this comparison is a little bit off because they're so different jump in. Yeah we both agree that this is very different than bush v gore. I think we may disagree a little bit about what the shot of that is what it means for the question of the debate because i think again another thing. We'd probably agree on is. We don't want elections to be resolved by courts as a general practice. In general matter of our courts already are being asked to resolve the most controversial questions of the day in a way that is unhealthy and unsustainable long-term for courts. We want the most controversial questions the day to be resolved more representative bodies like a congress primarily and as a result of course taking on these incredibly controversial questions. They are getting hyper politicized in ways that i think are at a healthy. The most political question of all is who won an election. And so i would. I would assume that record agree with me that we don't want courts to be the ultimate arbiters of elections. We only want that to happen. When for some reason it's absolutely necessary. And i think in the case of bush gore There was a legitimate dispute fair. That whatever we think of the ultimate outcome. I think we both would agree. That was a case that sort of it made sense parts of it. Got litigated if we can avoid election disputes going to courts. That's better for democracy and i think what's dangerous about with the president is doing here is. Where do we go in the future right. If future electoral contests do have valid legal claims in their brought to court. I think there's a reasonable basis that people roll their eyes a little bit about it. Given how donald trump has sort of salted the earth on the idea of using courts to resolve legal cases on the flip side. If there's a future election where there is not any real genuine dispute as is the case here. Isn't the loser. Feel some degree of pressure from their voters and others to do what trump did and contested in court. Isn't that the new norm. I think that's a bad direction for us to go in by putting courts in that position where they become the default sort of final arbiter of elections as the demand for telemedicine grows. So does the need for connectivity. Five g. meets that need qualcomm remains focused on giving doctors and patients superior security rich five g connectivity. Learn more at qualcomm dot com slash convention age. Rebecca where's the point of donald trump and the gop continue to do this. Where is the point that they run out of game for this You know if there's nothing in the system that prevents them from trying again and again or am i wrong about that but again and again and again and again and again. Well i think. There's there are deadlines and i i. I would think in would probably be in a better position to answer that question that i am but there's the december eighth deadline and then the december fourteenth deadline. I'm as i understand for the electoral college i mean. I don't think they have the capacity through through lawsuits to push that off. I mean there's been lots of discussion. Could they flip Electors they make lead. State legislatures change their mind. You know choose. Choose a different way for selecting Electors and so for them in. You can go through this sort of narrow Way in which this could actually change the result. But i think almost everybody would agree that. That's really highly unlikely so to me. It's like looked looney and interest right. Sure sure and i mean shoe just to addressed I just i guess. Here's the thing is that i. It might come down. The difference between the two us might come down to my thinking that these institutions are more resilient than he does and maybe that's an optimism that's misplaced Think it's so easy to do what he's suggesting is possible and to me. It's like at the end of this. What does it look like. It does not look like it does not look dignified. It does not look like the new normal. It looks like this was a match sentiment. I agree in the best of all possible worlds. You would have senate republicans behaving differently. You would have trump himself behaving differently. But we've had this administration and the republicans who have supported it just plow through certain norms. And we can't just sit there and say by the norms arms. It's not like we were so far past that and so given that that's not gonna happen then. I'm for this which is fine. Then try to see if you can get any support for this rhetoric. Back in our institutions. Because you can't end that to me is the best way given our reality. I mean we can wish for a different one but given our reality. That's the best way to address this problem. And i do think it it. Rather than buttressing. The claim it undermines the claim of of fraud and persistently. And you can you could say maybe people will be confused or maybe he can undermined the courts but it just seems that he gets that gets harder and there are fewer people who believe that that's important sense like you agree with rebecca that the scenarios such as Faithless electors switching switching their votes or save the legislature of pennsylvania which is controlled by republicans deciding to ignore the popular vote in that state in their own slate of electors to the electoral college. You think that those are those are not. Those aren't even remotely likely to happen. I mean they're awful. They're cranky crazy and they're dangerous. I mean they. Are you know they would constitute direct assaulted attempt to overturn the will of the american voters. I think thankfully. That's why the leadership of the pennsylvania legislature has. That's crazy and we're not. We're not going anywhere near that. I think the difference. Perhaps rebecca eluded to being an optimist about institutions. I'm an optimist generally about life. But i think i probably do have a bit more a wariness about the ability of institutions to protect themselves in part because of What i perceived to be happening right now around the world and in the united states with respect to democracy and democratic institutions. And you know frankly. This is why we founded an organization called project democracy because we are living in an era right now. The the early twentieth century we're democracy is in retreat around the world and more authoritarian forms of government are on the rise. If you look at data replace like freedom house. Democracy had been spreading into more countries in improving in the country's than it was in in a pretty much upward trajectory so the latter quarter of the twentieth century. And then sometime in the early audits it begins to reverse. And you see that. From venezuela to poland from hungary to turkey from brazil to india these more autocratic leaders rising and pulling the threads out of democratic institutions. And of course here in the united states as we have seen over the last four years we're not immune to that and so i am a little bit more concerned about the stability the long term stability of institutions in the face of this kind of global assault undemocratic institutions in. I think the fact that the united states elected in autocratic president and but for the pandemic i think it looks like he might have actually gotten reelected should scare the bejesus out of us about. Just how vulnerable this country is to whether something like that could happen here and so that makes me much more nervous when a trump like figure Begins to do the playing with institutions courts that he's doing here for all the reasons that i've alluded to as as the danger that can pretend there seems to have you go ahead rebecca. Sorry i was just gonna say you know. I take your point on that but what does about that is a very complicated question and to me. I don't think that you're going to be a part of it is You know what does a strategic matter in part is how do you sell that. And i think the idea selling Don't go into chords is a very hard sal. I it's much easier. Much simpler to say fine test this out. We have these institutions. That are there to arbitrate. And they have all these mechanisms that are that are there to do that and you can watch it in action and i mean you know we one good thing is. We do have a electric. That's much more excited than paying much more attention. So for better and worse so you you know. I don't think the answer to this question. I don't think the way to make court stronger is to say don't go to courts. Don't go into course with these kinds of with these kinds of grievances. At this point. I think the answer is fine Go ahead i mean of course again. I think it'd be better if you weren't if you didn't have these complaints than he just were to accept the result of the election but given that he's not this is really a good way to protect the course. I think it shows that they are even handed because if it were one court for sure like bush gore did it huge amount of damage to the legitimacy of the supreme court. But i think it really is hard to say. Well you know after at the end of this. When we've you know brought courts in like a ton of state courts and federal courts than we brought things up to the supreme court and in the end they all are rejecting our claim to then say yon not just because courts or corrupt. I mean i'm not. It's impossible to get there but it just seems that's that would that does require a great deal of ignorance on the part of the people who are watching but we have seen a successful discrediting of all kinds of institutions law enforcement the media et cetera and Why why would the court system immune from that sort of Corrosive impact on its reputation if donald trump continues to so take the muller investigation that there was a i mean. Trump's rack surrounding the muller station from day one was you know destabilizing harmful harmful to the legitimacy of law enforcement to the independence of law enforcement. I one hundred percent agree with that but muller investigation in one criticize it for all sorts of reasons but it came out with a set of facts and basically you know whatever there is the whole thing in bar rolling it out but in the end do people really disagree about the facts that were presented is the is was the legitimacy of that investigation undermined in that particular way actually came out intact and came out intact by the through this mechanism which is career officials keeping their heads down and doing their work in the way that they've always done our work before and so again. I'm not saying that you know. This is a perfect system that we won't have damage to the institutions or even to the courts. But how do you deal with it. You scream and say. Don't do this when you know it's like you can tell him to stop his rhetoric. It's not gonna work. So what do you do when he does it. My answer is you you you do what you would do. When there's a bully. Which is you just keep your head down kind of laugh it off and you keep doing what you were doing before which is like i you know these courts they decide cases and may have rules to decide cases they testimony and they keep doing their job with their heads down. That is the best way to address to counter that narrative and to try to tell him. Don't do this on a by by the norms. It's like shouting into outer space. Which is not gonna happen. So my view is this is the best given given a bad hand. This is the best week. So if you're a judge in one of these cases this storm comes to your courtroom. Wha what do you think. That's like for these judges these days. I can't imagine they want and this. Actually it's interesting. Because one of the things that i was gonna talk about is how part of the problem with an not. Just the trump campaign but it's the lawyers that are representing the campaign part. The problem what they're doing is i think they know that the normal mechanisms and tools that courts use to deal with abusing. The court system are unlikely to come into play here so for example. There's a rule in the federal courts called rule eleven Which is basically a rule that says if you come into court and you know you abuse the court process by bringing frivolous cases. That don't have any business coming to the court. You can be sanctioned for doing that. It's a rare step for a court to take to sanction somebody into rebecca's point for good reason because you really do want the court doors to be generally open for people to bring in grievances. I think that the lawyers are realized that judges are very cautious actors. The notion that a judge would sanction lawyers for the president of the united states in the election contest bringing a frivolous claim just as a matter of totality of circumstances is impossible to conceive happening and i think the lawyers probably bringing these cases full. Well know that which means there's something going on here that isn't operating in the normal space. That i hear back to be relying on for her argument which has courts have tools and rules. That sort of are able to police. What goes on in them. I think the problem with the actor here being the sitting president challenging presidential election is that just as a matter of realpolitik which goes on in courts to those tools are disarmed because judges are just not gonna do that In you know that may be a bad thing but that means operating a little bit of a different space with the courts than the normal ones that i. I generally agree with her back this courts or a good place to resolve disputes. And i think the president's team in his lawyers are cynically taking advantage of that. And i also want to say that i hear back in part and i'm sympathetic to this to be taking somewhat of a fatalist view which is because this president is so corrupt in so many ways as do so many bad things like if we have to pick one i guess. Let's pick the courts in there some truth to that In some ways. But i think it. Let's too many other actors off the hook You know i mentioned and then we sort of breezed over but republican officeholders have a have to be doing better than this. They shouldn't be let off the hook lawyers. Who are officers of the court should be doing better than this and they show. What's not letting them off the hook. Just calling them out will correct roman right here so for example we've got some major major international law firms that are representing the republican national committee in some cases. They they they are taking some Public pressure the new york times ran a story about jones day representing Some of the actors in these cases the other day But what i mean here is rather than say well. The republican senators aren't acting. And i guess these lawyers gonna take the pain client and do do the deed. Let's let's not just gloss over that and say so therefore i guess the court has Resolve let's let's say to those republican senators. Hey there's long term damage being done right now to the foundations of our democracy allowing this frivolous contest to play out over time while the president so is horrible. Horrible disinformation in jinja voters to think the election stolen. Don't you care about the country. Do you realize the long term damages are doing. When are you going to act. Let's let's put the onus on them. So i completely disagree about the lawyers and you know there's there is that There's not article in. There's also the lincoln project that's now which is done all sorts of great work but that's now posted the names of these lawyers and their telephone numbers in in vag- vaguely threatening kinds of ways. And i think that's completely inappropriate. And not because i'm kind of Ethics scholar who thinks well you know every unpopular caused deserves. A lawyer which i do think. But that's not what's at issue here. I would hardly call you. Know trump unpopular with seventy million votes. But i think that That that you know. In way. Because i don't think the lawsuits are bad. I don't think the warriors or anything bad. I think that in fact by taking these by by by taking this avenue. They're exposing them. You're putting the lied his rhetoric. And that's what's been happening so far. And i think that that's okay on so i really don't think that this targeting these these lawyers for doing this. I mean again if these if the suits are frivolous scher but i. I don't know as you said it's very rare that is used their states have equivalent Rules all of them. And there's an ethical rule that prevents you from bringing a frivolous case but it is a very high bar and it's a high bar in regular cases. You're probably right that the courts would be even more reluctant in a case like this but You know that. That's not the main mechanism at courts. Use in order to make sure that they Remain arbiters of truth and so. I'm not so worried about those. And i also think that these attacks on the it also plays right into Trump's hand when he is you know this sort of anti elitist thing like if no lawyer will represent him. It's like that's just that just gives his base like just raw meat. You know it. Of course he's entitled to have a good lawyer here and you may not want to hire that layer. It's a business decision on the part of the lure. You don't have any any like of course not go to a different firm but the idea that these layers should be ashamed to me is such a huge mistake. Let i i want to be very clear. I agree that the naming of individual lawyers posting phone numbers and going after lawyers who represent unpopular causes Injuries direction for the legal profession. And i'm not endorsing a vat. And and i think it's really important that we protect the right of unpopular lit against have representation. Why i am objecting to though is i wanna of zoom back out to the hundred thousand foot level. Which is there is a frontal assault going on right now on the very foundations of american democracy in our constitutional form of government a frontal assault in autocratic assault on our country. And it is other piece with what we're seeing happen. All over the world These autocrats from venezuela hungary to poland. We we surveyed a panel of this sort of leading scholars who study kind of autocratic takeover of democracies Several years ago and they said to us that all of these countries The autocrats basically do six things first. They politicized independent institutions and john. You're earlier the fbi law enforcement of military second. They spread this information. Third the aggrandize executive power and try to undercut checking institutions like courts and legislatures fourth quash dissent fifth they de-legitimize vulnerable populations and six. They corrupt elections in the last four years. Donald trump has done all six of those things here and he's done faster here than i did them in turkey or poodle did them in russia in so where i where i depart from from rebecca is. I'm not treating donald trump as a regular normal litigate. I'm not treating donald. Trump is a regular normal president. I am treating him as a black swan abnormal attacker of our democracy. And i think that as a. I'm a member of the bar. Like as a member of the bar. We have certain obligations as members of the bar. And if you read the new york state bar rules for example not to do anything that would harm the administration of justice helping the naval donald trump assault. Our democracy harms the administration of justice in harm's of understood our country that is different than a lawyer representing a client. Yeah i mean. I just disagree with you. Know they are not representing him in his whole endeavor. They representing him in these lawsuits. The lawsuits to me. As i said do not in my mind undermine Faith in democracy. They in fact do the opposite they. They are putting the lie to his rhetoric. That's dangerous to institutions in making making that argument for the side and you just stated at the lawsuits are good for democracy. And you're saying because they would give the lie to the system in that. I think you're saying that that biden supporters should therefore also be okay with the process and trust the process but implicit in that. I'm wondering is an assumption. Perhaps on your part and also ian that the process will reveal that. There's nothing there that that that there was no cheating that nothing went wrong in. This is in a serious enough way to count short. there might be individuals here and there but but are you both assuming that and especially you. Rebecca because you're saying the process will vindicate the the the the the declared Result are you assuming that there is not going to be anything there and if there were something there would you still be making our if there was this more suspicion that there was something there. Would you continue to make the argument that this is good for democracy over that. Actually enhance your argument. That this is good for democracy that if there's something there it should come out absolutely there was something there. It should come out. I mean but i suppose that rests on something i mean. The thing is that in all elections. You know there there. Are you know you're gonna find some tiny percentage of error you know. People are grandmothers ballot. But it's just that study after study shows that is such a minor piece and if there were some massive change here where they're suddenly something that hasn't existed before then. I really think we'd know it by now. We wouldn't have to wait for the courts. And you know i. I agree with the end. Ideally until you that there's something that these election officials have done wrong. Why would somebody else. In government whose obligation is to look out for democracy fiduciary duty to the country and response ability to the constitution. Why would that person question the validity of these elections. And you know. i think that's true. It's just that we have the president we have and he has a lot of people who listened to him and believe him and i think that the best way to say no. You know what that's just not true as soon as your chosen venue. The courts has proven that you're wrong and yash he'll go around and say no they're all democrats But sometimes it's hard for him to do that. He doesn't always win with that. And i and i just think that's. That's it's the. It's not the best choice but given the hand rehab. It's the best choice we have pick your battles so it's like you know you have to be careful and you have to be careful that if you're just you know you're just get hysterical about this and you choose every way to push back. Some of those ways are gonna that backfire. I think right now saying we should. He shouldn't be allowed to use the courts. And i know that's not exactly what he is saying. But it's beginning to sound like that from some people who are making this argument that does not sound democratic. That's illiberal and i understand the distinction and it's subtle. And i got it but i think far better position to take is one of confidence here and just say go ahead because our institutions are strong in. You're not seeing that. But i'm wondering are you somewhat heartened by. The results have come so far from virtually everyone of these cases that has come to conclusion being dismissed thrown out turned down. I am and so just. I think this. Actually i'll help serve rebecca's argument here by just quoted in a couple of lines from these cases to make sort of. Let's hope rebecca's right and this helps persuade people right. So judge tim. Kenny in denying requested delay. The certification of michigan election results that this court finds while there assertions made by the plaintiffs. There is no evidence in support of those assertions judge cynthia stevens wrote quote on this factual record. I have no basis to find that. There's a substantial likelihood of success on the merits as relates. To this case. So you know. I think that it's we are getting those decisions but but a really important underscore or record that you have one hundred and fifty people vote. You're gonna have Irregularities errors here that's just the nature of the size of it but the issue is you won't have anything that's that's nearly on a material scale To tip the outcome of the election right. This was not at the end of the day a close election but the purpose of these cases is to try to find one little threat one little scintilla of evidence here there and then through propaganda and disinformation stirred up into a fake controversy. That sows doubt in our electoral system. That's what the case are being used for. And i think we have to be very careful to guard against that all of us as as consumers of the media flowing. That's take hold. What do you think what sort of president is being set by what we're going through right now and or or or what what. Habits are being Being developed in our politicians in other words. Are we going to see this happen election after election after election. Do you think or is this one time. Only that's my fear right that You know it's interesting. Rebecca said the very beginning that lots of people bring sometimes frivolous cases. But we wanna keep the court doors wide open And i i definitely agree. Wanna keep the doors wide open. But we're talking about lots of people here we're talking about the head of state and one of the things that one of the things that heads of state do In in countries is they sat norms in the established patterns of behavior. I mean and. I think that you know the new york times editorial on the way that a prison. Trump's rhetoric has changed norms of behavior has led to more bullying in school. Yards is just a sign of how dangerous it can be when the president sets bad norms of behavior and so in the head of state signals to the public. That courts are places where you don't have to have a legitimate dispute to resolve but you can deploy them as tools in cynical ways to fight election results. You don't want my fear is that becomes. Enormous thing gets deployed in election after election in ways that are harmful for elections article for our democracy. What do you think on the question. Rebecca is are we seeing a new normal here. I mean you know i. I can't look into the future. But i don't think so. I think that the you know like many leaders. He's unique in certain ways unique in what he can get away with. There's a kind of swagger that he has that works for him and he's able through his own sort of i think it's actually his own conviction in his always being right that he's able to convince other people that he's right but i don't you know i i just don't think this is general liable. Do i am worried about the question. About norms and hound arms get eroded. And i think that's significant. But i don't think that the actually filing lawsuits is really one of those things that i'm most worried about. I mean i think it's the norm being broken not conceding and not sitting down with the successor. I mean those things other man there. Concerning but i don't think those are necessarily starting a precedent and i don't think there's any reason to think that the lawsuits would be. That would be something that would pick up as as being popular all the rhetoric. When will the next few weeks are going to tell us a lot and if things were perhaps we can have the two of you back to continue this conversation. I wanna say this that. I've really enjoyed the degree to which You were able to disagree in a respectful way. And i say that recognizing that the two of you do share the same basic set of facts in the same idea of what is reality sometimes more so than some of our other debates that made it more Made it easier to have this conversation. But it's clear that you have a very very distinctive disagreement on this question of whether the the courts The reputation of the courts are being permanently corroded by this or at least temporarily quoted by this or not and whether this is good for democracy but i appreciate the your your respect for one another and that came across and you shed a lot of light taught us a lot of things so rebecca and i wanna thank you. Very much for joining us on intelligence squared. Thank you for having us. Thank you so much. I also learned a lot from ian and on this has been a great conversation. So thank you for having me. And i want to thank all of you for tuning into this. Episode of intelligence. squared intelligence. Squared is a nonprofit generously. Funded by listeners. Like you and by the rosencrantz foundation clare. Connor is our ceo. David ariosto is head of editorial. Amy craft as chief of staff and leads production. Damon whitmore is our radio producer. Robert rosencrantz our chairman. And i'm your host john donvan. Thanks so much for joining us. We'll see you next time.

rebecca donald trump Rebecca trump ian pennsylvania supreme court Donvan Rebecca rifi rebecca cunanan twitter Steve bannon judge curiel trump university roger stone bush rebecca point gore michigan Stacey abrams
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Maureen From Quarantine

41:32 min | 2 months ago

Honor

"Well hello world. This is maureen from quarantine and today. I am guided to speak on honor an honors dignity reputation. Excellence and the truth is we. Don't hear that word often enough and honor and integrity They are the two or at least two of the most important attributes for one's soul. So this is all about the solution in the world and soul food and all that great chee great life force in this quantum field around the world and so This is a huge Attribute so to many people who are filled with their fear and their anger and the they want to put that anger in that fear upon the optimist. And so we have none of it. And i love the words of nelson mandela. May your choices. Reflect your hopes not your fears and this is not to take away the pain and suffering and sorrow in stark terror. That is going on indeed Due to the pandemic and so much the trouble and violence in the world and and just the overall essence of evil that does at times permeate certain individuals and and it does exist. So we don't deny this reality we carry on with this honor with this food for the soul if you will and remind one another of that that integrity and ended say one day at a time. Cleansing we tap into to maintain Are that sense of who we are. Down to. Very soul and so You know one main deed have all of the material things but without integrity and this honor they mean absolutely nothing now the zip and so again. It's got to be grounded from this place of substance and from this place of quite simply love and it's the real deal it's energy that again is a science to this. Your very dna changes. Structurally when we are tapped into this. Love this life for us. This great energy in the quantum field. And so you can again right. Get out of south. These self obsession self absorbed. Absorption and move beyond one's ego which is not to say you know the ego does not exist and and But we can get out of our own way in order to tap into this integrity. This honor this character which is of the utmost importance and so strong moral principles are indeed something that we hopefully we raise the kids with and they they watch us. The kids are watching us. This they they learn by what we're doing and how we're acting in what we've walked through even indeed how others have treated us or things that they have said they make the note and how we React or don't react. Or pullback or disengage and teach them That delicate balance and indeed. There is a balance and you know bottom line. Nobody is perfect and somebody who claims to be a question that and so it's exceedingly important to you. Know to not only be true to this honor but to note when others are not true and to ensure the kids that indeed there is not honor when there nine and they grow up knowing this person might be in this position of power but indeed there's no power at all especially if the person has no dignity no honor on no sense of The kindness The the the the truth the Being grounded with a thing called love and that energy is the strongest most powerful energy in the world. and it's it's excellence. Did something that one can stand in and empower oneself with that. Very ole force in. So we've all known or we do know men or women of honor and integrity and while they often times they appear to be few and far between they do exist. These people do exist. They are around us and they have throughout the ages existed. And and it's a good idea to tap into that here in quarantine and always to remind ourselves in the midst of struggles and The turmoil going on in the angst in suffering in the world and again i know a lot of depression. Anxiety pain and Things going on in the world in with evil taking place in so a good thing to do is to. Maybe if you can't get out here in quarantine then perhaps go out and look on the internet for Those that have Truly been of service throughout the ages or that continue to be there today they do exist and i know they do seem few and far between but we can remind one another to about this Most powerful powerful attribute. This thing called honor and i'll also put some great Biographies in great information. Be it history. And otherwise in present day Whereas in which to tap into this beautiful life force is cheese this energy of love and it's universal it doesn't go down one lane it's worldwide and so we indeed have the wherewithal to breathe it in right now. I invite you to breathe in this power. This love this thing called integrity and to one very core to raise the kids with this honor and to breathe that in and remember that it is real and it might seem curiel intangible but the essence of it we tap into a certain individuals be through the creative field. The arts the music the written word and or paintings. Whatever it is it's always creative rather than destructive and abusive and You know there's plenty of areas out there living on lower Scale if you will always gonna even say some people call them animalistic but animals are beautiful. So it's something other than that and so even looking at animals to is a great way to tap into this life for us and this sense of truth in reality and so i recently I heard someone say that. It's no longer survival of the fittest. It is survival of the kindest now. Isn't that cool. Chewier words indeed would never spoken and You know there's those of us into the solution and again. This podcast is all about the answer. The solution in life and living in the creative realm of love versus The the opposite of that which is the evil and the place of destruction which we don't go to and again we don't deny that but to to maintain one's honor in the solution this creative life force and again. There are those Others who choose to carry on in the destructive zone as if it's some kind of a game and they're they're the timewasters and we have none of that none of that nonsense and it said it's all about choice. What choose you what you and it is high time to again embraced this especially known quarantine and on a global scale embraced this honor embrace this integrity. Push away the Penny ante nonsense and all of the Abusive verbiage out there. And it's out there And they do attempt to bring down those who are rising up kerryon kerryon carry on with honor with love with dignity we keep it simple and You know again. There is more and more mental illness in the world. And and so We're not referring to that mental illness. The vulnerable kind sweet ones. We often sadly sometimes see People who are suffering from let's say addiction and alcoholism and all kinds of paint in the world. so i don't refer to that that's Something that is again The there is a vulnerability to that and when they're kind and sweet but it's the were evil and and you know putting out nothing but evil from that place is the one i refer to when i say to move away from that and so indeed i do send out love to all those vulnerable ones and gulnara ones and the kids And the and the animals and those who have been abused and who have been Other evildoers have tried to squelch them. And bring them down others. Who nothing of honor and integrity. And you know that ouden out evil fury a we will never ever understand that but indeed there is a difference and dial is stressed that there's a difference between share evil and those who are vulnerable those who are innocent and pure and decent in kind and again perhaps in need of help Out there and so. It's important to differentiate that and so You know kindness truly can begin to heal the world and people of honor always have that at their core that kindness factor and you know the evil ones always reveal themselves eventually and so we can. We can sense that that energy And so more and more during the pandemic we're witnessing The mental health issues. We see out there and more and more anxiety and depression and and this terrible terrible fear and people who are truly truly lost and hurting and so Again we can breathe in the love right now and send that out universally around the world and to my listeners to i know Some of you are out there in remote places and so sending out again. It's the good news is right here and right now our feet are breath is breathing the love. It's real and much more powerful than any of the hostility the negativity in the evil and so again to go away from that terror that fear And that sense of being lost and hurting. I know you know it's important to know That to be present in this moment and today the solution is in this place of love being grounded in the very present moment because it's it's sometimes terrifying to look too much to the future that provokes a lot of fear and then when we go too far in the past That's at times exceedingly sad and depressing so ninety easy to to remove that fear but it's important to surround ourselves with like minded individuals. You know back in the day The people who were filled with who had anxiety and depression and alcoholism they were put in straitjackets and sell. It's a very very Serious and it has been ongoing Like alcoholism throughout the ages and so We don't deny this and we do address these issues and send out on this in this quantum field. This beautiful life force to be a part of that creative energy that solution in the world and the good news is it's not whoo it's real this love and it is empowering and you know so now is the time to step it up with the kindness. Step it up. Let's step it up with the kindness and to shut those up. Who are consistently raining on the parades of the kind and optimistic. Beautiful souls in this world on this planet in this universe and so we step it up and the honor breathing in the honor will indeed see s through and even now I know again so much pain in the world. Perhaps one can find Within a little smile and because it gets so intense and we want to release all of the negativity and all of the the The yuckiness and win the kids Have that essence to or somebody. Who's been bullying them or threatening them or they're going through a tough time remind the kids know indeed. It's not them at all. There are people that have not quite involved to that place. And it's not a holier than thou place it's simply a place of kindness and others cannot or perhaps they choose not to hit that note But it's important to raise the kids to know that it's not them when others are bullying and that we must not must not engage. We must carry on into the solution into the love and the life force into that creative energy that changes things. These are the game changers. This is the The stuff that is again that can grow. Just keep us grounded in this place of honor we stay in this place of honor honoris a huge huge one breath that in to your very soul right now and it's right now again. It's a cleansing again. Daily cleansing to own that and it becomes muscle once worked often enough. It's there at the ready For you and so we look at the love and so it's not about economics it is about love and money again. is important. We're not saying that it's not but it's also important to have a the The again there's a sense of of morals and values because there is that sort of a moral rot and corruption and horrifying behavior out there by both men and women in the world and to deny this. Truth is to deny reality so We must speak up and have none of their insane and inane lunacy and it is lunacy and so We just fear and other spheres will indeed forest in two attacked the kind and loving souls and again. It's not up to us to try to understand that but it is important for us to remove ourselves from that toxicology and so we must steer clear of those fearmongers and those game player is. It's sadly it's a game for them. Maybe i'm not sure if it's it's it's always the sociopath or those without a conscience but it's those who somehow don't have perhaps compassion or are there. I don't know and and again. I'm not a doctor But i do know that this does exist and the ante games that go on that. We don't deny that we let the kids no no It's not them. And we know all about all the other things that go on and the gas lighting and the the The different kinds of different ways of attacking people waste their time. And we have none of it so we choose to live in. It's that simple and the kindness. Vat simple that simple and so we become this love. That's the good news. And so we're we're love walking and it's not an old look at me celebration of south in this place of narcissistic self self-indulgence it is a place of empowerment. When we walk in love and again there is. It's a constant sense of putting out breathing in the love and putting that out there and there are ways in different tools and resources we. Can you know tap into in different tools. We can use to get to this place. And so again i have different episodes of various episodes on giving us different resources and different go to's to maintain this and a lot of it has to do with simplicity keeping it simple in fact i have a podcast on in keeping it simple and even something as simple as what seems like breath work which i've called breath play in one of my episodes because we make fun thing to be here now in fact we can take a moment now and breathe in the love and the universe. And it's real and if you'd like if you see it at your score in a sacred little place while you listen to these podcasts. Lift your arms and you can almost like you're waving it in bring in the good cheer the life force and i bring it in now so it goes out from here to the universe to all those beautiful gentle souls gentle animals gentle kids and all over the world and again breath tap into that take account a little smile from within and remember those words there empowering the words the thing called integrity honor dignity all these things to raise the kids with and they go out from here to make a big difference and you can make a difference. Even if you're not going out at kevin even be as something as simple as preparing a meal with kindness versus hostility Even if it's for yourself so it's very very important and to become this walking. I like to say is kind of cool to give to yourself. I am love walking so that it's a verb. It's lettuce verb. it's an action and it's always there and so there such a thing as moral principles. Strong moral Just a sense of principles inherent in our makeup. And it's when we worked this over a period of time and again not to stand on that holier than that platform but to Know that one is not crazy when they witness such a lack of integrity and kindness on or around them at what seems to be at times. every corner and so it's This is another pink elephant that must be addressed and so we're not necessarily discussing the lunatic the sociopathic otherwise. But all of this knowledge must come into play when others attempt to attack those of us with genuine honor and integrity because we You know we. We do anger those angry. Who when they're guilty you know we angered under with. We watched and get very angry when they're witnessing kindness and Those you know who haven't played fair. They're very filled with guilt and anger when witnessing a smile or happiness or sunshine we see it. We hear it all the time and those who simply they'll never ever ever get it and They'll never know the joy of being human being who is kind and decent and full of integrity and honor and it's it's glorious place to be and so they'll actually Mock good people. And that's all they have and we witnessed him snickering. And it's it's almost like a concierge. Darkness cloud over them and when they're snickering from that mocking place and it's never ever genuine laughter. It's just very very sad to the whole because they're They're not even lost their just again Filled with it's a lower lower place and and It's i don't even want to call it frequency energy. Because it's it's it's something that's it seems almost unreal to be when we witness that we want to say. Are you seriously playing that unfairly. And are you seriously and they. Yes they are those who again They'll never know that what we what we know as human beings to the joy of being kind and being human being and a who is decent and again full of this Integrity so you know we move forward with this love and again i. I'm not sure if those who are These abusers. And they usually do they like a conscience and and so it's easy for them to be vicious you know they seem almost like robots as if no one's home if you will and so i call them robots again. They're just missing an element of humanity or that kindness factor. And there's just such a lack of warmth There's a coldness. They're even in their eyes. And so it's still important again For those of us aligned with this force for good in the world and our children in the life force the great Chee to call it like it is set the children straight and let them know. Okay you are right on. When you sense weirdness over there or creeping is and don't let anybody in that boundary of yourself or your children and they will try to overstep their boundaries and they have no respect for their own so they don't really they will not respect yours and so we know that there is again a lot of lunacy out there and and eve also when one does have genuine honor one is whole and complete and unable to be divided so others may try everything in the buck everything in their power to bring people down and again the the mocking and the patronizing and You know they're they don't lie. They'll cheat they'll attack and You know they're they're easy To target most of the time as their again very cold cold or cold lot and You know even if at times they can act. They act charming And they're not artists they're actors. There's the difference in so do not be fooled The there's a genuine lunatic Lies beneath there that that act and so we must trust our instincts. And as i told my daughter. I will always believe you so we who are of honor. We must remind one another to stand strong when others try insane tactics through finances. And whatever means that they have That they are the bullies who know nothing of honor and this is. It's a great you know deal of Narcissistic abuse in the world. And hopefully you know if we all become aware of these lunatics. We can shine the light so bright that indeed. They'll scurry away. They will scurry away into their little corner is in no stop the abuse in the bullying. They know there's You know Domestic violence going on in quarantine and You know again. i'm. I'm not a doctor but i do know the stats exist. And it's so important for the victims to know that it's not them and they are in a toxic scenario and this instant i'm sending out The healing energy all over the world for those of us who are kind and with honor and decency and aubrey that levin again now and if you can lecture arms to bring in the light which is the most powerful thing in the world and here's the stability. The strength breath added in. And so while we can be kind and loving. it's important for us to always You know if you can have a witness. Such as recordings and lawyers and others around as the abusers are always trying to get you alone. And they're very sick and so That's how they like to attack and again it angers them when you're now aligned with many many others who know exactly what's going on and again while it is a sick Game to the sociopath the narcissist in those who are out evil we must not engage and we have our lawyers at the ready and hopefully these abusers will stop the lunacy. and they'll they'll never behave again You know is decent folk so we must carry on with our honor get ourselves always back to the solution. And that's why. I discussed this not to dwell in any negativity or to engage in whatever lunacy is out there but to allow the good decent kind people with honor to know that no The gas lighters are not going to win at making one thing that it's them when indeed The gas lighter is whoever they are. Whatever is going on out there. They're putting that or attempting to put that on on you and so You know they will never just going in knowing and let the kids know they will never behavior stephen decent folk if you will and so we must carry on and get ourselves always back to this place this solution and it's the answer is in the answer and that's right here and right now abusers would like to take away your smile. Dont let them win. As the song goes they've been writing songs about this for years. Let the the the main ones win. Don't let them take away. Your smile keep smiling keep shining keep smiling you know. Don't engage as a friend of mine said recently you know certain relationships to It's when you're consistently giving them the benefit of the doubt. It's like putting money in a broken machine and it's broken so go away from that quote machine that coldness that nonworking whatever that is. There's a lot of apocryphal out. There as well and While all of this may sound again negative. It's important to discuss this. And especially when we are filled with love and optimism The lights shining even brighter. So we can be even more filled up because we know the reality of dishonor that does exist and unfortunately These people who olack on her. They don't seem to care about the reputation and they only care about making a profit. I don't know power game. That's not my business and and it is my business to again stay Keep shining the light and so With honor you know there's the soundness of mine in it's a sense of unity and humanity in the world and it's it's it's of the utmost importance to maintain this honor this integrity and others will indeed try to make those of us who are strong with this lifeforce week have none of it put up the boundaries push their fear their stark terror their anger their rage away and so you know With honor there is a lack of corruption and this upsets those who are corrupt to their very core. They even have one whatever it is. They're robotic self because they must look at themselves and they realize wow okay and they or maybe they don't. It's not again our business so let this be the reminder to hold fast to our honor and if indeed you're a man or woman of honor i commend you and i thank you on behalf of the universe and the forest for all that is good in this world and we are unified in this quantum field and the lunatics will attempt to bring one down with patronizing dialogue and especially when one is thriving and there are red flags meter flags and they're usually passive aggressive. If you will such as perhaps a sappy line to hook one in and then patronizing zinger. In the games they play and Has nothing to do with anything at all. But their on agenda and so step back. Pullback don't engage carry on into the solution especially now in quarantine we stay in that that zone of being a part of the solution in the world and so i've discovered You know there are some red flag. warnings You knew that are included. You know when others You know are are just filled with their irrational fears. And they're trying to put that upon you and their toxicity and they attempt to cross again those boundaries with your personal privacy and space and those of your children so we must maintain those boundaries and have none of their toxicity and so again. They'll feign that they air and that they're concerned but beware as they say you don't let them in. Don't let them Mess with you. You know if they have it. Don't let it happen again. And you know the drill so when you are owning your own personal integrity honor and power. They are exceedingly jealous. And you'll sense great hostility from those. Who would like you to stop shining your light. So keep shining and again Do there there are sources you can call upon to get back to this place when you're squelched and i'm a big meditators and good solution. You'll sense good energy. That's the good news. We find one another and so Push aside the naysayers and keep going and so there does exist You know again this. It's lunacy really in hatred and jealousy and it's out now people only looking for drama and so We maintain our honor and this drama by the way is always Red flag drama looking for an they always create chaos and Just it's mass confusion where they live and we have nine of it. So i love the word honor and the reverence reverence of abou- of a courtroom in the manners. Your honor when we think of that the sense of humanity or when it is the real thing and sadly people abused at obviously in the courtroom as well and the corruption there in not in denial of all of that. But when it's the real deal something so cool about that and so Here's the good news. One cannot fake. This one cannot take this honour. Thus it's so important to incorporate this sense of honor as we read the children up with this and we go out from here and it becomes something. It's it's it's a matter of fact rather than what is that kind of thing You know and i've had people that would be step back a bit going. Wait a minute you really care. Are you really. What and in in a world where they say. No no no. It's a dog. Eat dog world and you know you that responded of course and no. It's not and i'm a vegan so let's maintain who we are in other words sadly and it is sad. I have you know had these people who are just in shock when you're genuinely Being kind and so you know. I i am a. I'm a i'm the one who is stupefied to and they're saying you shouldn't be so kind. You shouldn't be so nice. And a why not. I liken this to einstein's words and this is a science to Is this a friendly. You university isn't it. And so i choose love. It's empowering it's the real deal it stands the course so stay the course my friends. I don't understand what the other is. and this. This does make us even more capable of knowing we know even more so when eagles in our midst and we have none of it and we don't allow our children into Be involved in that either. We raise them up. Pull them back. From any of this toxicity. So and we raised them to know again that it exists but We can indeed. We have honor and because we have honor we have zero zero allowance. Zero tolerance for evil. And especially when you're happy and thriving and your kids are as well and you're doing your own thing with honor and integrity They'll they'll come after you Every way they can to try to stop you including the gas lighting as we mentioned and more so beware You know there are many clowns out there and while we are nice and kind and full of love we cannot engage and we must alert the kids to this as it's neither acceptable nor is not gonna be around so their goal is always to to commit you You know put you on the defense in one way or another because they're just so guilty and so you know i'd say it's sad but it's it's not sad it's it's it's evil and so just simply go back back to shine in the light Say it again. Breathe in the light. The law keep shining your light. Keep coming from love. And so let's honor our cells our kids and our Our past selves to the brought us here today again. Nothing nobody's been perfect But here's to maintaining our honor and though at times it might seem even dangerous. I thank you for listening. This is maureen from quarantine the light.

curiel depression kerryon kerryon nelson mandela maureen stephen decent kevin aubrey levin confusion einstein
#311 Get inside the .git folder

Talk Python To Me

1:12:15 hr | Last month

#311 Get inside the .git folder

"These days get is synonymous with source control itself. Rare are the current debates whether to use get versus. Spn person fossil like source safe versus. You name it but do you. Now get works. What about its internals. I'm sure you've seen a dot gif older in your projects route but to most folks. That's a black box in this episode. You'll meet rob richardson. He's gonna pop the lid on that black box as we dive into get her in the dot get folder among other things about source control. This is talk by enemy episode. Three hundred eleven recorded april first. Two thousand twenty one. Welcome to type on a weekly podcast on python language. The libraries the ecosystem in the personalities. This is your host michael kennedy. Follow me on twitter. Where i'm at 'em kennedy and keep up with show and listen to past episodes at talk python and follow the show on twitter via at docked by von congratulations to mike manning. He's the final winner of our con- ticket giveaway. Thank you to everyone who injured. And if he didn't win i hope you're able to get a ticket and support the python community and be part of that awesome conference. See you in may rob welcome to talk to me so glad to be here. I'm really excited. That i get to join you great to meet your audience. Yeah it's great to have you here. You got to meet intersection. You gave a talk at the python webconference recently. That also spoke at and your talk was really interesting and certainly relevant to the by von folks. So i thought it'd be cool to have you over here and you know. I should give credit to paul everett for connecting us. He's like oh that was a great talk. You should go. Talk to rob so thanks. Paul as well is not long ago on the show. Yeah i've been chatting with all about thoughts around the talk as well. He's a really brilliant guy. He is he definitely. He's been doing a lot of cool stuff for a long time. So now he's he's a great guy now before we get into get an all those types of things which you know. It's really surprising to me how much it's taken over. The world's right used to be there was always a question. What source control. do you use like. that's not a question. I hear all often these days not at least as much as they used to be. But before we dive into the details of that. Let's start with the story. How'd you get into programming. This is actually a really fun story. I was ten. I was in the library because they had the computer. And we'd play video games. And the methodology of how you do this is you. Go up to the counter and you flip through the book and you go find the video game and show them that page and they give you the disk and you save icon. You take the khan and put it in the computer. You play the game. So i finished playing my game and i went back to the desk to go pick Another one flipping through the plastic sheets. And i found a drawing program. Was that the. I'd like to play this game. They gave me an eight and a half by eleven sheet of paper. The top two thirds was graph paper. You know grass and the bottom third was how to write the program to draw that onscreen. Oh cool okay and it was so much fun. I got to start to build content. That was in my mind in real life in this artistic medium with the very technical implementation so that was so much fun. I didn't return that game. And so that kind of brought me into the world of software development. I always thought it was just a fun thing that people did. I didn't realize it was a career so it wasn't until really late in my college experience. When i realized that i could do this for a career and so after i graduated i got into programming professionally and i've had a really fun time coating now for professionally for twenty years now. I think programming is special. Because it's one of those things you kind of hinted that where you you think of something you dream something you imagine something and then with a little bit more thinking that thing can become real whereas you know so much of what humans do. It's one or the other. I could tell an amazing story and write the book or i could go build an awesome house but normally those things don't actually coexist where you think a lot about something and they they come into existence but i do think that's a magical part of what we get to do and i think it captures a lot of people's imagination and what's really cool. Is that in this digital world. There are a lot less boundaries a lot less constraints. There's nothing telling me that this pixel needs to be in a certain way. I can draw whatever. I want on these pixels on the screen. Yeah yeah and modern day we have cloud computing. We have incredible computers. Like the sky's the limit is really really awesome. Also money you don't have to buy tons of hardware for many things that we do the really wrote now. How about today. What you of to these days. I'm doing a lot with software. Development cloud based development a lot of websites. A lot of web properties is dot net and note on the back end. React in view on the front end taking that into interesting modalities. I've started to play raspberry pies them as fun and getting to dig into all the things. I've gotten really good at develops art of my passion is being able to share this knowledge with others so i do a lot teaching both at user groups and conferences and elsewhere mentoring and so it's really fun to be able to not only learn these new skills but also pass it on the next generation of developers to i love to say that It's not that i'm really good at it. It's just that. I've been collecting things for a while. So let me add to your collection to well. I think one of the things. That's really interesting about becoming an expert in programming people who are beginners. Or maybe don't do programming. You're all they see that person as incredibly talented incredibly smart and they may be they often are but i feel like the real big differences. I've spent ten years gathering up these little tips. Like oh i try this. That doesn't work very well. That crashes you try to talk the database that way that's battle by the way also built up a couple of examples of what databases are and i've seen you just have this almost more experience than i don't know like innate skill right so it's really cool that you just kind of lay on these skills over your career and the reason i think that's powerful as it's the very easy to communicate back to other people right if you know the way new did philosophy or the way oiler did math like you can't or bach did music like you can't easily communicate that to someone i. It's crazy innate skill you can sort of communicate but is not the same but with programming. I think it's very easy to transmit it on and pass it on and ways to help people like level up. It's super fun and it's really easy to get started. Programming languages have become much more approachable of late end. So if you're new to programming and just starting to dabble in it you don't need to buy a big expensive thing. You know the laptop that you're using to browse the web is probably sufficient for building simple programs and so diving used free tools and and just start building. Stuff is really approachable and really fun absolutely as one of the things that just never ceases to blow my mind is i can be in a coffee shop working on a relatively cheap laptop. Do my coding get push speaking of get. Something happens on one part of the cloud. It triggers a web hooks somewhere else that then grabs the code and could run that on a tremendously powerful data center and computer suite of computers. A cluster of computers. And yet i get the experience of basically building the super powerful thing on my very wimpy little laptop it. It's just cool. That you can create things like facebook or google or you name the these these really large amazing apps but you can kinda just do it on like a laptop. Something that existed in my mind. Yesterday exists in the cloud and scaled to any user. That wants it tomorrow. That is really fun. It's super super fun Before we move on you also mentioned that you've been playing around with raspberry pies something. I covered recently on python bites my other podcasts. Is somebody built. A water cooled. Raspberry pi cluster computer so eight raspberry pies in one thing. All of them over clocked a water. Cooled have you seen people doing this stuff. It's crazy it's really cool and as you start to get into clustering. Programming clustered programming multi machine type of experiences. A raspberry pi is a really cheap barrier to entry for forty dollars or so you can get a raspberry pi get three or four or five of them. Cluster them together. And now you get the sense of what does it take to build peril machinery and it is really really fun so you know to get an eight or ten or a hundred or a thousand node. Raspberry pi is pretty sweet added awesome. I mean you could do something similar with docker right firepower bunch of docker containers but it's not the same feelings actually eight of them over there and they're actually talking to each other running together. I think it's a very different feeling super bowl contenders. Do help us start to approximate. That there is some lying to ourselves to believe that all of these containers running in context on my one laptop or really a distributed system absolutely. It's not the same but it does let you sort of play around there. But all right so i wanna talk about get primarily. That's what your presentation of the python web conference was about. And that's what we're gonna center conversation on. But you know you and i both been around the industry for a while get is not that old. It's the new source control on the block. I guess maybe let's talk a little bit about the history of source control. You know i think of source control as a spectrum from what source control all the way to to get a distributed source control. Maybe you know. There's i've talked to people. I've seen inaction source control is. I've got a file code file. And i've called version one version. Two version two edited version three version. Three final final to you know just like or maybe it's a lot of files you zip the folder and you name it like that right like. That's the beginning of source control. Misdoing a wrong but it's getting getting there right well. It's doing it in exactly the way that you needed at that. Time copy folder version is definitely a thing dot edu dot date. Copy that content off to make sure that you have it and that's really what we're after with version control is when we think of version control. We're really talking about two things. One is archiving the history of my journey. So that i can get back to a known good state if things go bad but also communicating with my team to be able to convey the progress of this system and copy folder version. Does the first one real well. It doesn't do the second one real well. Their systems that. I've worked on where you know to upgrade the system is to. I copy all the things into the dot backup folder and then upgrade the primary thing and if it doesn't work correctly then you put it back put back. Yeah they point. The web server asked backup folder and so now the system has been running out of the backup folder for you know six or eight months or a year and and now we go to upgrade step one is to take. Oh wait we just took down the site now. We have no known. Good backup thing. Yeah without some sort of source. Control the real thing. I think that falls apart. Maybe you're doing the file version. Anything which is still not ideal but the thing that really falls apart. is collaboration. Rut right soon as two people want to work on something and it's not okay to say. Well here's my zip version. Can you merge that back together and probably don't have merged either. So what does that even mean right. So i quickly gets us in to wear. I think people probably should be in some sort of version control but back in the day that was different stuff for example he no. Maybe that was sa- version actually. If you're on some version you are in a good place main. Really good place yes. Aversion was really cool subversion was an upgraded to cvs where would version each file or each folder separately and so nested folders just happened to kind of be together in this clump. And what's aversion gave us was. We're version in the entire project together in one piece before that we might have had sore safe or other pieces team foundation server kind of fits into this realm as well and so. It's that mechanism of version. All of the pieces together and then being able to publish that to a central place. What makes all of these systems of unique specific. Is they're all really client. Server pieces version was really good at being a client server piece. I'm gonna go out on a limb and say it was the best client server verse cottrill system that i'm aware of. Yeah i think so. These systems though kinda fundamental flaw because we wanna use version control for those two pieces. We wanna use it to be able to back up the works that i can get back to a known good state and to communicate with our team and the hard part with these client. Server version control systems is were doing lows every time we commit. So when i commit a change to subversion. I'm immediately publishing it to all of you so the analogy that i like is when i'm rock climbing. I want to be able to put a care. Beaner in the wall as frequently as possible if i climb a foot and i fall. I'm only gonna fall foot if i climb six or eight or twelve feet and i fall. I'm gonna fall twelve feet. Well actually the nature of the rope is that it's going to swing all the way down. So i i fall twenty four and that's a long way to go. I wanna stick pieces in the wall frequently as i can. You don't wanna see me spamming. The thing every time i get there so i get to the point where it's like okay. I finished a thought. I'm good. I want to mark the safe point but i'm not ready to publish it to all of you really. The thing you should be working with. Most of the time is if i publish it to the rest of the team it should be. It should at least run. Yeah the test pass. Maybe you can fix that. You're going to work with somebody but it shouldn't just mean nobody can build or even start the software at all because you've got the save point in the middle of their work that is inconsistent or halfway there whatever and so i've reached the stopping point but i'm not done it doesn't work and so i have this moral dilemma. Do i marcus point and inflict on all of you or do i not. And that's when i fall back to a secondary berle system where i started doing copy folder version again. Now where it's like. I just wanna take all my stuff and stick it in the spots that i have this known good state and that's where we pivot to distributed version control systems of which is one of them where we have a separation between the commit stage and the published stage and that isn't the official terms terms that. Get in him the rest of the muse. But there's a process of marking though safe points and then there's a process of collecting all of the safe points in publishing to others. That takes a bit of a mind shift to get used to it as well when you're working on it because if you come from one of these other systems i committed so it saves right but commit in a distributed source control system means. It's it's a local safe point and until you get push or whatever other imperials equivalent of a get pushes right and each bush and so it's exactly that it's marking save points however frequently want and then combining those safe points together into a cohesive story to publish your colleagues and that's what makes distributed version control so powerful is separating those two concept's curiel get her force. There are other distributed. Version control systems and as the world was moving from subversion. Ntfs into this distributed world. We experimented with each of them. You know arguably it wasn't the best we might have done. A vhs and betamax type of thing but clearly get has become the defacto standard version control system it is distributed and now we can separate the safe points from the published points. Talk by enemy is partially supported by our training courses at talked by phone. We'd run a bunch of web apps and web. Api's these power the training courses as well as the mobile apps on android. If i had to build these from scratch again today. There's no doubt which framework i would use its fast. Api to me fast. If he is the embodiment of modern python and modern. Is you have beautiful usage of type annotations model binding and validation with pedantic and you have first class a sink in a way support if you're building or rebuilding a web app you owe it to yourself to check out our course modern. Api's with fast api over at top by on training. It'll take you from curious to production with fast. Api to learn more and get started today. Just visit hawked by john dot. Fm slash fast api or email us at sales and talk by on dot fm. I think another really important thing to highlight for people who haven't been there now right the get homepage. They highlight subversion which we. Cvs which we've been talking about but per hours. We were case sore safe. T.f. s a lot of these things. There's two things one they would lock files like if you wanted to make a change to a follow. You would claim it like i'm editing. Main dot. pi when no one else can interact with that file is literally made. Read only on your computer until you know until that person has done and they had better not forget going vacation while they got some files checked out. That's the one thing the other is. You need permission to participate in a project. You have these gatekeepers and you need to sort of prove yourself to the gatekeeper. So if i wanted to commit. I wanted to work on flask. If it was under subversion. I have to go can i- permission to go read. It read only access to flask. I wanna make a change. I literally have to say. I need permission to commit back. The flask with the distributor. Ones you clone. You do your proof of work your proposed idea and if you want you can contribute a back or you could just go in a different way. There's this very interesting separation of i can kinda work on it and then see if i want to contribute back rather than the other way around. I have to get permission to contribute. And i think that's a super critical thing in the open source space where there's a very loose coupling of people and projects like if somebody comes to me and says i want to work on a suppose. I'm working on flash. Because they come to me. I'm in charge of last. They come to me. And i want to work flash because like well maybe. What else have you done. This is a huge project is we. Do not want to mess up basque. But we had a little bit of that with our you know you could clone the repository in subversion and just work on it locally. But you weren't able to participate the moment that you wanted to help. It was a really friction full process. Where okay so. I have this diff- now i don't have write permissions. So am i going to bake dip into an email and hope somebody reads it. Do i just use it locally. Do i four. The project only have our corporate version of it. It was very difficult to participate. And that's not a a feature of gig per se but rather the get hub shared hosted mechanism around. Get that has grown up as well. I mean with you can clone a thing and then work on it on the road access but yeah the additional mechanisms the git flow around certainly something created by get hub with like pr's and folks and your merging up streams and all that origin of stream. Stuff one thing. I did ask you before we get to the details. Why do you think get one. You did talk about this betamax. Just sort of thing. And there are other options out there for distributed source control. Have a theory. But what are your thoughts. And i have a theory too. I don't have the answer. Maybe our listeners will help us discover what the correct answer is or. Maybe there isn't one in my mind a lot of the time we were looking at ways to compete with things you know we had things that would compete with cfs or psa version because we wanted a little bit more. We want to make money on the process ours control and what's really interesting about. Is that it be. It has become so pervasive. And so we're not building competitors to get were building integrations into get billion on top of get. Yeah now arguably get hub helped with that to get her has a really really powerful community mechanism for that and get really only did get but i would argue. That get is really cool because it's free and open source and because it's free and open source and has that community mechanism around it. We don't need to compete with it. We don't need to try to make money on this instead. We can build collaborations with it and mechanisms working with it and build up the community together. I thought as well was get up. It's the thing that brought not. Just the server infrastructure to privately have code. It brought the community and at brought the flow that allowed people to collaborate in ways that could let them collaborate once. They've proven they have something to collaborate. Right here's my. Pr have already shown you the thing. That's amazing that i want to offer up to you. Oh that does look amazing. Thank you who are you. Let's let's talk about this right. It's a different conversation than i have. Never seen you. Why should i give you write access to flask on. Cbs as and it's exactly that gap has these magic levels to it. We're at the very first level. It is just an online source code repository system and so how is that different from source forge or t.f. S before it. It isn't at this level. And so if that's what you're using get hub for than that's perfect. Backup your local projects up to get. Get your content off of your machine in case there's a disaster that is definitely the first level next level starts to build workflows around it where we can say. I want to create issues. I wanna create project management things. I wanna create milestones. I wanna create goals. And so that's kind of the next level. Leveling up again we can start to create a social community around that where we can start to have conversations around the content where i can create a and we can all talk about it and we can collaborate on it and once. It's good enough now. we can pull it in. Add to that then the mechanism around whole requests and things like that it has content concept of push and pull Publish and receive. I guess might be the terminology that matches your and about a pull request. I don't have write access to your repository. But i want to contribute so instead of pushing my content to you. I'm going to request that you polit from me and so no longer do i need to create this email and write out all the content in hope you read the email i create this code up in my space and i request that you included in your space and that made collaborating with projects really really easy so with that comes the next level of where we have these communities that can socialize and develop and hang out in this coding space. And that's really. What made get hub. So magical is that. We have this community around coding. Where previously with source forge or other environments. Yeah we had the online source control system but we didn't have those levels of interaction so third or merger quests or whatever you're going to call it is that mechanism the being able to collaborate with low trust type of environments. I want to offer up my solution to the community and see if that's gonna fit into this ecosystem. Yeah i get one as well and Verita rose out. There says the best way to learn and improve technically collaborate people. You don't know yeah and i. I think it's that the people that you don't know it makes it special because it allows you to create these connections with people all around the world who you would otherwise not meet and get a chance to work with them. Even if you live in rural canada and you wanted us software development. Maybe no one around you is really good at whatever. You're trying to do but go to find a project you can collaborate the best people in the world that we can create these communities around our passions for technology or the problems that we want to solve not necessarily based on the geographic boundaries. That we find ourselves de absolutely all right so that's the history of it a little bit. I talked a little bit. On a wide distributes. Control is really powerful. And i think it is really unlocked. Open source in a special way on a much larger scale than it has and it is interesting to note that. Get and get hub are different. It hub uses get under the covers to be able to build it social experiences but get is a thing that is separate and distinct. There is no pull request concept and get for example and with get on your local machine in a cave. You can version and create a safe points when you're ready to socialize to publish your content to communicate with your team you can use get together with lots of services get hub or bit bucket or get lab or there's lots of private services while that allow you to create that online community now get hub as published their magic sauce to the world in lots of us have cloned it so give is still the place where recode for the most part but if you prefer coating in another community than that's totally fine you can still use get and all of the tools to be able to version. Create your safe points and publish that content to others. You could just publish it to a different servers. Will get and get hubbard different. It's easy to see them as the same thing but yeah there absolutely not right. We've got all these different locations mixed emotions mixed feelings about if you have another project and you put it somewhere else. I'm not gonna name any particular service but let's just say somewhere. That's not get hub. it's totally good. But at the same time. So much of the open source flow is around. Get hub and the stuff that's happening there. It's i don't know it's just really interesting to think if y you might be at one place and not the other place and so on and a lot of people were worried when get hub was bought by microsoft. Is this going to be the end of the humanity. Collaboration and i think microsoft has been a really good steward of the get hub community and really making sure that get hub is still available to all of us and bacillus the success of that ecosystem. Yeah there was a lot of hesitancy and concern within certain communities. And i feel like they've done a great job i would. I didn't realize was that get really needed. Some help from somebody i financially. They were not doing as well. I i looked at this place must be incredibly successful but it you know what came out after win some of the reports and stuff that was you know it. It was kind of avoided that someone came along. And if that's the case then i was head over heels. Microsoft bought the my lasting on one is us go and i think they've done a good job of just letting them be right yoga master. It's working really well. So i think it's it's been a good good deal. It worked out there. See also docker for an example of a community that is amazing and contributing but doesn't have a financial business model to be able to survive. Yeah yeah hopefully things go well for dr. But it's it is tricky. They they tried to enterprise thing. And then other yeah. They're switching to other things yeah. I loved their pivot back to on developers in the community which is wonderful but i still feel like they haven't found their spot that allows them to be business successful and hard part. Is you can only do that for so long. And then you need to pivot to something that can start of facilitate the business. Absolutely all right. Are you ready to go into the get folder and find where the hidden magic lives. Yes if you go into a project that you've get cloned you've get a knitted and you create some files and you mess around there. You don't see anything different. Looks just like any other folder. That might have a project in it right. But in there actually contained the almost the entire backup the entire contents of all the versions of those files at least every branch that you've checked out hidden in the dot get file so dot g. It on then. it's not almost it is. That is the entire history of the project so the way to back up. A database miss using that term is to grab that dot get folder and copy inside that got dot get folder is lots of files that describe the history of the project since its inception down to the current version. And so you know kind of the only way that you can break hit is to open up that docket fuller and changed by default. This folder is hidden on most systems. So you may have to show hidden files and folders to be able to see the dot get folder. But it's there and it's really powerful. Yeah so on windows. Go the explorer. There's like was a ribbon. Things that drops down check box for show hidden folders and files on mac os. I learned you can hit shift command dot and that will show and files i that i did not know. I was very delightful and some user delighted when users told me about that on lennox. I don't know mean you go and do an l. l. and there on the terminal but there's probably somebody to show it in the explorer equivalent as well you can navigate into it from your terminal or wherever and once you're inside of it. Yeah all of the files right there. Yeah so we go here. We find things like head. Fig description hooks index info logs objects hacked refs and arrests. You wanna maybe give us a rundown of what each one of these are and then will. We can dive deeper with one of the tools that you've built into maybe some things like rafts and so on but yeah the hooks but yeah wherever everyone was cool in this database is it is the entire history of your project and it's z. Lib compressed so for example the twenty year history of pearl the dot get folder is ever so slightly larger than the checkout folder and that includes the entire history including all the changes and all of the authors. All of that is really nicely. Compressed into this volvo it breaks down into a couple of groups of things we have the content. We have branches and tags references to the content. We configuration details around this repository. We have index files. We have temp files. Then we have automation tools and so these are kind of the groups of things that will find in this folder. A lot of them happen to be in their own folder. Which was really nice. So for example hooks is the place to go for automation rashes. The place where all of the content is that now is the place for branches objects is the place for the content and so a lot of the things that will see will have their own folder but some of them spill out a configuration is in the conflict file. But there's also some stuff in the info folder for indexes we've got the index file right there on the root directory but we also end up with index files inside a pack folders. And you know it gets a little bit interesting. The first one to dive into is probably the objects folder because this is the stash of all of the content repository. Now as you commit something in to get you'll i added to the staging area and then you'll commit it with a message and as you do so you'll end up with content inside the objects folder. Now it's interesting to note here is if you look at a get log you'll see hexa decimal thing might be seven character. Sugar might be much longer than that. And as you do that log you can take a look at that inside. The objects folder are folders with two digits. Those are the first two digits of the commitment inside that folder is all of the commits that happened to start with that two digit number or letter. So that means that not. All of the files will be in one directory. They'll kind of be arranged a little bit that gets around too many files in one directory hers but it's that that objects folder that then stores all of the content there. Now it's interesting. I think of it if i commit one. And that's where the talk was really cool. When i commit one thing and i go look looking objects folder. I will have three different files now. They are compressed. Yeah you can't just open them up and look at them right. They're kind of scrambled up. But it's not magic. Built a tool. That will unsealed compress one which is pretty cool but once we identify a thing that we want to do we can also use get hat file. It can't file allows us to look at both the type and the content in particular nude noses a directional a cyclical graph nodes diagnosed that specify relationships between these things. But let's cool as we. Here's here's a file that's in that branch something like that. They're not branches but they are fuller's. Here's a file within a folder. Here's the content so we have three different types of these notes. one is a commit and then the commit. We have the author's name and the date that it was committed. The message that we gave an also in that commit is a reference to the tree. Nodes that are part of that. Commit each tree node can specify files or folders so a tree node can reference another tree node inside the the tree note. We have references to those files. So i might have a tree node. That references file one dot. The third type is a blob and so as we look at logs then that's the actual content in the thing so go back to a click on. I don't think i have a one to get back to the blob. But the cool part about this app hit refresh and you'll get to that big blob of stuff. Here's all of the commits in this repository. Head so we had something visually to look at here in. It's about to pull up. Its rendering yes not super performance. That's all right. You built this called get dash explorer which is a little web amp that runs that you pointed out a git repository in that. Lets you look at these things that you're describing visually and then click around on them. Right right so click on show type and we see the three different colors emerge. There are commits treason. Blobs and it's like okay. I have a whole bunch of files in my objects fuller. And i can click on each one and i'll use that. Get cat file thing. Figure out what it is. But it's like you know. I really wish. I had more stuff about it. So that's where i click alphabetical and that will put them all in order. Click on tags and now you can see the name of that thing. And i'm only showing the first seven digits of the commit here but now you can kind of get a sense for here. All the objects and click on each one and opened up right and these names are often go by shaw's in parlance which is just the type of hash. Sha whatever it is. and. I don't know how many people know this. But you can use sub pieces of the shot. Refer to it in get so you don't have to say the full on. It was at thirty two characters or whatever to describe a name long as it's enough to be unique. It'll go like you can issue commands against these things this abbreviated form right right exactly. So oftentimes only two. Digits is necessary sometimes three or four. And that's why often when you're looking at history will only show you the first seven shirley enough. Yeah always start to do as we're clicking through this as we get a feel for all of these green nodes that's the content in the files. The blue nodes of the tree nodes. And as i click on one of those blue tree nodes than it references other files. I can see their shaw's there get hashes there in that list and as i look at the red ones the commits. That's my commit message. That includes the parent node. That was the commit right before this. It also references the tree node. That has the files for this and so wouldn't it be nice if we could. I dunno arranged them in a way. So let's instead of going from alphabetical. Let's click on parent child and start to see the relationships willing to turn on lines. Now we probably want to also turn on tags and now we can take a look at those commits and see how each one references nephew have a very large repository. Shoot-off then i haven't built scrolling yet. Sorry but you can see that the red commit notes all reference each other and reference the previous ones and then they go into the tree nodes that may reference other tree nodes and eventually those reference. The file nets as part of my demo. Highlight that if we create the same file content and committed in two different directories. It's actually only one blob on desk. There's only one green blob note but the whole park here is we were able to explore each of these objects in our repository and we get a feel for how they work. So if i change one line and a very big file what gets committed. Well entire file. That's suspect that's probably why large binary files are not ideal to be committed here even though technically can put them there so the first group of things is these objects and that's the top level objects folder in the docket folder. Yeah yes exactly now. There is a pack folder inside there. If you run various commands than get will say well do i have too many commits to many of these objects that i need to pack together to make this repository smaller on this and it so than it'll automatically do a jc a garbage collect where it starts to pack those into files. Now it's kind of a zip compressed group of zealand. Compressed files gets very meta there. But that's what the pack folder is inside the objects colored death. Okay so next up. Let's talk about the refs folder. Now when we look at rafts. We look at branches and tags and remotes. These are files that reference commits so one example is the head folder in the root of the docket directory and inside that head folder. It will specify what head points to. So if you do get long and you see that head has an arrow pointing to. I dunno name or trunk or develop or whatever than if you open up that head file. You'll see the text in that file. Is that file is basically the shaarei that what it is. It is the shot if your head is pointing at a shop but typically your head won't be pointing at a shot will be playing at a ref slapped. Mind right now to refs slash heads slash maine. Which is the branch for this project. So that's awesome main being the branch ahead says it goes to rafts. Heads means so we can go into the rest of older. We can go into the heads folder and we can open up main. And what's in maine is the shah of the commit. That main points to okay. What's cool here. Is that each of these rafts of head. And all of these branches is just pointers to the commits in the objects progressive. He's are like the main file is just a text file that just literally has only the shaw that is where that branch currently is exactly okay. So technically to create branch. I just create a file that happens to be in Heads a name. It something and i give it a shop and now i have a branch that coins at that thing branches and get are not these durable fragile things like in our in subversion branches in get our just name tags. They're players. they're references to the commits in this tree of objects. So the cool thing is we can move the morale by the basically a path of these named commits through the history of the overall history of their the labels that we give it so that we can understand it because communicating in thirty two digit. Shah's is not as much fun. No definitely not definitely not whether the talks that i like to do is i do get log and i show that thirty two digit hashim. I i read it out. And then i walk up to somebody in the audience and pretend they're the project manager and i go. Can i ship it. And they're like a thus we have these labels the heads. Folder is all of the branches in a tags. Folder is all of the tags and they're also just files pointing it commits My report was emptied out. Having people might tag a release or aversion or a beta version. Or something like that so you can refer to it by name by table instead of maine with a shower or something weird like that right right and then we would have a remotes folder. Which references where. I last saw another copy of this git repositories branches neptune. This case you have one. That says refs remotes origin main. And that's perfect. That's where i last saw this server the servers. Head Main branch now. This case i chose to call my mate my remote server origin now. This could be a server that we've designated as the server. It could be one of my coworkers. It could be a network share in a git isn't really opinionated about what constitutes a remote repository other than that. It is in this one. Yeah okay how does it know which what origins as i create a remote. I'm going to name it okay. So as i clone. I'm gonna say get clone this repository in will build one and it'll by default 'cause origin but i could also say get remote add origin. I just gave it a name. And then give it a url. I could say get remote. Add upstream i could say. Get remote. Add michael now. It's a reference for. Meyer buzzer raiders. And so it's just in this case in the remotes folder. It's just a folder. Referencing the branches. That i saw your machine. Is there somewhere where it stores like. The url it does and that is the next section that we may want to look at which is figuration. Let's open up the configure file in the root of the dot. Get folder all right now. This configuration file is really cool. It includes all kinds of configuration details associated with our repository. Now in this case we have remote origin where we've named this one in the urals that we go to their in this case it's get hub dot com slash talk python. We have other configuration details associated with this repository. This dot get configured file is actually one of three on my machine and we'll start out with our configure file in that's installed when we installed get so probably in program files or it's in user local been or somewhere often the ether of how installment we probably don't want to touch that one but that's the base configuration of all the options that we chose when we installed get viral command. If i were to say something like get email global something like that you know his ass g command. Maybe it's modifying that one. The one that we just talked about was the system one. The second one is the global one which is user specific. I find that any look using your but my specific dot get configured in my user directory so you know see users rob or user or the till they slash directory mac and lennox that dot get configured overrides any settings in my system configuration and so oftentimes. When you first get you'll say get configured dash global user dot e mail user dot name and so if you open up that dot get configured in your user home directory. You'll see those settings you'll see your username your name your e mail and all of the details that you've configured there and then the third one is they can fig file here in your repository. That will override any of those things so it doesn't make sense for us to have origin in our system in our user specific configuration file because well each repository will have a different origin but it probably does make sense to put our name and email in our system in our users specific directory because that would apply to all the repositories on our machine data. Absolutely almost all of them. You might be doing home-based open source work and you might be doing or pret button of work and your formal corporate place might not love your corporate email on the open source project exactly. Yeah so when. I have that scenario where i need to set. My email. Address may be my name differently in different repositories. I can set it in my dot configuring user home directory and then i can override it in each repository. Just copy those couple of lines. Set them in your configure file here. And now you've set this repository to track your email differently. Is there get command to change it. So i i don't actually go into the dot get older and i get email. But not global or get configured yeah even leave off. The desktops global. Yeah okay urban. Then you don't even have to know how he does not do Get email my meals is right now. There are other configuration files. Here in the dot get folder but the configure file is really the big one that we like to talk about. Okay you'll see a description file here. That's a configuration file. Get insta web is a web server. Baked didn't get that allows you to kinda browse through your repository. Now get instant web works pretty well on lenox and not so great on windows. I bet you've never used insta web in most scenarios we use. I'd never heard of it until you brought it up the other day. Yeah but this configuration file is the name of the website when you launch into web. So gift ships with a web server. That can be the host of that get repository. Yeah now why. Would i ever do that. Why wouldn't they just get hub. Exactly which is why you've never heard of get instant web. Yeah i mean you might say we want a private get server are public server or something like that that might be but yeah usually. I've never heard of it. So very addressing i. What else is in this this list here. Yeah so we've talked about the content in objects folder. We've talked about the branches and tags in the rest folder. We've talked about configuration. Let's go poke in the hooks folder. Yeah hoax is interesting. Yeah it is really cool. The hooks folder is where we do automation. Yeah so people probably heard of recommit hooks right. I probably the most popular example and the island spaces to run the black four matter so it automatically formats your code. Before it checks it in to indentation white space mike between comma in an argument. Or something. The always consistency. You don't get these like back and forth editor driven you know merge issues but there's no real change but format editor you format it in yours and back forth. It goes between spaces with the common no space with a common space with a comma. And so you could set up a pre commit hook to canonical. Is it before it goes in. But there's more than pre commit right. Yeah i could set up a pre commit hook to make sure all my unit test pass before i commit. I could set up and so what we see here in. This directory is all different kinds of automation things so pre-committed hook a pre merge hook a pre push hook a pre re-based base book and each of these are shell scripts while with one exception. It's a perl script. But you see at the very top it says slash bin slash s h one on a windows box. Is this shell script still gonna work. Oh yeah get ships with enough lindsay unix bash stuff to be able to kick off the shell scripts and run them as it would on any lennox system okay interesting. So there's basically like a little mini bash. That comes with it. I remember people using that bash from get be more unix like on windows exactly so here in this shell script. I could do all kinds of things. Maybe i'm calling a power shell script. Maybe i'm calling python script. Maybe i'm calling a node for matter. I can just call in to whatever tasks i want to accomplish and that will then accomplish that task whenever this event happens so what i love to do in my demo is removal dot sample pieces so that their actual scripts and then just merely the presence of that file will be able to kick off the automation. All right so there's a bunch of files that are samples shell scripts named things like pre dash commit dot sample or Emerged commit sambo. If i just called it pre dash commit but not the dot sample. Now it's going to be active. Exactly okay nice. Now the cool part about these is that i have all my automation setup. I'm running the four matters. I've got my unit test passing in. It's great but this file is inside. My dot gets older. So i can't commit these. It's not one of the files that is available for me to add in the staging area. Right you covered. It would be inception if you tried to commit stuff in the folder. Right so often will create. Shell scripts dot get folder and commit them and then have something here inside the dot get fuller that calls into that other shell script and you mentioned some kind of node based tool that you can use right. That will manage that stuff right. There's lots of packages. The one that i show is get hooks. That is an npr package and once you install get hooks it will actually create all those. Aliases from the folder. Where you actually build the scripts you can commit into this hooks directory so that then run just installing this package installs those books into place so basically if you just install the package want it will find those other external scripts and make those be the ones that get sees with the advantage you can commit them into get up and if somebody makes a change that change will propagates everyone else. Yes you can commit them into get pushed them up to get hub and they will run. Okay yeah tastic. Yep yeah very neat very okay. What else have we got here. What else are we think maybe index. Maybe that's an interesting one. Yeah index is really interesting as we look through index. If we just pop it up in in a editor is just a bunch of gobbledygook. And we're like what is this. It's a file right. Yeah yeah this isn't the only index but this is one of the really cool indexes where get keeps track of interesting stuff. that's nice. Yeah check out this blown up. If i tried to look at it. It's like a binary blob exploded and died on my terminal but there are file names in there somewhere so it must be something to do with that. Yeah i think it's get ls nashville's raking. Go look through this index. And if we passan flags to that then it'll be able to show the status of those files but this is looking through that index and the cool part about looking through that index. Is that get if it wants to do. A quick thing like which files of change needs to know the blog that is checked out in my working directory you know which blog did i start with as we look through those objects. We saw big tree of things and and so opening up each commit node. Finding all the tree nodes opening up each tree node. Finding all blob nodes that takes a while and so. This is a cash an index of all the files that check out my working directory. This allows get to move really fast as it looks through my folder and identifies any files that have changed or new files or things like that. So that's what this index miles were. Yeah and my get incantations or not pulling it up here but i think you can get it to show the shaw of each file as well right In which case then instead of traversing the whole history and actually looking at the file on the hard drive and saying or what is this hash do have an update for this. And i could just look in this binary file and get that answer right. Exactly nice yeah the next section of files that we want to look at our logs and the cool thing about gets logs is they keep track of where all of our branches have been definitely cat dot net slash log slash head. Then we get a thing. That looks really weird. We've got really long lines in this and in our first line at says whole bunch zeros space and then we've got the get shot of the commit that went to a little bit about that commit. This is a log of where our branches have been and so we'll have a file for each of our branches in this case we're looking at the head file so we see that head started out nowhere and ended up at e d one three. Fc that has my username my email and then some other stuff yet really interesting thing is this law can be really useful. If for example. I switch branches and forgot where i was or i commit something and then i commit it. That's the thing. And i want to get back to it or i delete branch before i merged it in or you know those types of things. If i do that quickly enough nor remember gets gonna do that. Garbage collect and go prune nodes. That aren't used anymore. If i get there quickly enough i can use this law to go back through my rafts and go find document. The objects are still there. I just don't have any refs pointing to them anymore. And so the command that we can use on the command line has called git ref log and we can pass get red flag a particular branch we wanna look at but by default if we just say get ref log a one word that it will show the history of head now in this case. We didn't move at very far but we can see there. Oh and here's the branch that i just deleted. And here's the shaw for this one. And so at that point then we can get check out that emit and get back to the content that we had created an lost the reference to right okay nicer. There's a little bit of a recovery kind of an elite. If you had to in there yeah. Nice the funny thing about this. The commanders ref log. But i've also heard it pronounced reflagged this of nine tails in a bike day. Get reflagged to get but once you understand how. The refs folder works than get rough log makes a whole lot of sense. Were looking at what those rough files have said in the past. Here's what it was before we changed it. Here's what it became after. Changed it a little bit more context around where you're currently working as where the head is pointing often that some branch and this is like where's the history of that been throughout the branch that it's on yes agricole very cool so we're getting sort of short on time here. What else should we be talking about. Like what else should we close. This out with in terms of content of our dog file other section in here is temp files. So if we've committed stuff we might see a commit underscore msg file or maybe it's called commit that underscore message. We might see other temp files. We have a temp folder. Sometimes baked into things. and so. that's the last group of files here in the docket folder is temp files them. Finals configuration objects ralph's hooks. He's all the pieces that come together to make this gate database now once again. You really can't break get you know it's like why did this incantation in it's broken. Now you can use ref log to get back to a particular commit or you can use various commands checkout to get back to where you need to. Maybe he'll use reset to kind of get your working directory back in shape but that structure of get the double entry bookkeeping inside. This repository is really good at keeping track of things and so you really can't break it. Yeah and back this up you back it up right you back up this folder you back. Yes basically everything right now might be easier to back up not by just backing up this folder but by publishing your changes to another repository. And that's where we have. Great workflows like i will push all of these changes to another server. Mail call that server. Origin death absolutely in in that is automatic. If you check out from somewhere like clinton from somewhere like rugged so there's just a couple of other things may wanna touch on really quickly while we have moment when you talked about breaking get. There's an interesting resign thing old. Dang it get or even better. I'll maybe i'll link to the better version the not safe version where you're frustrated and it's like oh no i just did something wrong. Please tell me how to do it. Re flog is right at the top of of these things. I committed immediately realized that need to make a change or i need to change my commit message. Yeah anyway that's a pretty interesting one. Another thing we've talked a lot about it hub and what we haven't really talked about is get ignore right as much as you want to track stuff. You don't want to automatically track a bunch of things that are working files build stuff from c. plus plus or maybe under note underscore modules or hide harm. Working files are all sorts of things should not go into your project right. You're vn directory. Yep absolutely so yeah. There's get ignored any content that you download any content the compile any of that content shouldn't be in your budgetary because it changes too infrequently and it's usually easier to either rebuild it or redoubt it all goes. Things should be ignored yet. It's a huge merged nightmares. Well even if you could keep it right. Suppose i check in my v of directory and you go on windows while you can't have the same contents as mine because mine is the mac os version. So you change it but your windows version in there. And i get it back out. Breaks my mac versions. I got those stuff you should ignore absolutely and when you create a new project on get hub it very handily says hey. What kind of projects is this. We can get you far down the road. You're getting more. Is this a python project. Is it a node project. Or whatever. Right what i wanted to point out. Is that drop down less. There's actually a get hub project called. Get ignore that has the ignore for all of these different languages. So if you wanna make a change to pythons get ignore. You can go there and pull it up and see it and you could technically do a pr against it to say. There's this new thing that's common in the community now lease fix it as pretty cool and these things aren't perfect in most of them will exclude everything that starts with or ends with or contains log. But your i longer or your log handler. Yep might get excluded by that as well so you may need to adjust this to get it the way you want. Yeah but it is nice to know that. At least it'll give you a bit of a star and that it's it's a thing that you can contribute back to not just magic inside get but it's its own get hub open source repository right by the quite neat. Let's see what else should we cover really quick. I think maybe just one other thing i think. That's maybe were throwing out there. That was interesting. But it's it's pretty specific. You've mentioned windows. A couple times Maybe two things. Actually one is on the show that you saw my screen. Just a minute ago. When i was inside of a git repository it would actually but what branch it was on and the get state and so on and i have that because i have only shell installed which is a really nice shell for mac lennox that gives you things like branch awareness and number of changes and so on. Assault your talk. You had something like that for our shell. The new microsoft terminal. What for that. It's called oh my gosh. And scott hanson has a really cool video about posh where he walks us through how to get it installed there are various themes into. Oh my gosh. But the thing that i really enjoyed actually puts the cursor on the next line one of the things that i frequently do in command. Prompt now have all of the path to get to this folder. And so the command that i'm trying to teach ends up getting wrapped to the next line. And so oh my gosh or own is age gives you that additional context of. How's your get repository. Doing you could also show your remote. It's basically just running a shell script behind the scenes so you can modify that shell script. Scott hanson is diabetic and so needs to check his blood sugar a lot and so he actually has built into his own my script his blood sugar number because it's really easy to miss and it's one of those things it's really important not to miss so it's in his terminal all the time probably even keller code it right if it's out of out a range make red if it's not not arranged you make a green something like that. Yes wow how interesting. Yeah this looks fantastic. I've never played with this before but now it looks. Looks really nice recommend it. Yeah i do vocal all right. Well i guess the one other thing that i was going to throw out there is i heard of this thing called. Vs f. forget. We talked about large files. And this this. It's very much a windows only thing but it's a neat idea. This virtual file system. Forget that if you have a really large repository it's kind of like the smart sync for dropbox or something that only pulls the files interacts with the files that you actually touch but it does that behind the scenes without you knowing it. Have you seen this. And we actually said the f. Forget but it's actually the f. Forget virtual system. Yeah great when you're repository is just massively huge and ninety eight percent of our repositories or not but when you have the code base of windows then you need something like this because you can't get cloned the entire thing. Get hope not get hub. Google is famous for having their corporate motto repo. And i suspect that's bigger than than you could get clone onto each machine as well and so the cool part is one of the benefits of subversion that we lost as we moved to get was i could clone only part of a repository and via fast kind of gives us that ability back. Most of the time. We don't need it but if you've been re really bad and you've committed a whole bunch of binary files to your repository. It's interesting. It might be worth kicking the tires. It isn't necessarily windows. Only it is plug in to get itself but the laws you to put that checkout directory somewhere else so for example on a shared file of shared network drive. Now i have all of those objects all of those blobs in one place. And i don't need to copy each of those to my machine. Yeah interesting the windows people that were switching to get said. It was really a nightmare. So for example the source code for lennox reports of the like six hundred megs point. Six gigs windows is like two hundred seventy gigs. So it's really jain ormuz. And they said to do. A clone took twelve hours to check out took three hours to get status. Took eight minutes and to do an ad in commit took thirty minutes before they made this change so they were suffering some hard pains to Go down that path for sure. I guess it probably is worth it for them. All right well. I guess we probably should put about one at were more or less out of time there but yeah all ask you the two questions. I always ask into the show If you're gonna write some code editor do use. It depends on the code. That i'm trying to write in most cases all reach for vs code but also reach for visual studio right. If you're going to be doing dot net stuff like you said. Sometimes i'm also known to reach for If you're doing like a dot net or something you were talking about like that or something. I maybe something like. Wpi the tools are built in. You have to basically not have almost as them. But sometimes i also reach for sublime text or text senate bill and then often for a python package library recommendation. Maybe we could make it your get scripts. The one that runs the p- recommit stuff on that moves that outside the get flooded what was called again. It's called get hooks and let me grab a link to it. It's actually a note package but exactly. Yeah you just install it wherever and it's good to go right yes and so if you have maybe a flask server and you want to as part of your server may be have a reactor review app or you need to pull down. Jacor is part of your client side dependencies. Then you may have enough nude stuff to be able to leverage this as well. Yeah yeah that makes more sense if you're already using mpm because you're doing front end stuff then you might as well right. Yes cold other things that we didn't talk about and it's really cool. How this happen. Get workflows what you the whole about get is really on opinionated about how you do your workflow. Are you going to do get flow. Are you gonna do get hub flow. Are you going to do something else. It can work for all of those scenarios because it is just a mechanism of committing and sharing files. It doesn't impose a specific branching or naming convention. You can choose to put those on top but gets workflow is really open to whatever you needed to do now. Well when i was first quitting familiar with this whole. Pr's and merging those kinds of things. I felt like oh. That's a good thing as a good thing. It has nothing to do with get right. It just get facilities that on top of it so you can choose however you wanna work right right by cool all right well. I don't really close out this show with a joke. But robinson had a good one here in the livestream. I'm gonna put this up here for us as our parting thought than oscar for one. More as well maybe yeah. So he said There's a programmer. Once told him couldn't use get he was afraid to commit. Oh good commitment all those awesome. Thank you for that. Thanks for bringing us laugh. All right action. People want to go a little bit deeper than get. Maybe they just do the three commands get clone. Get add commit push like that's four commands like that. How do you get more into this world. What's really interesting is as we're coming off of those other systems. We want to kind of build up that tribal knowledge that we had. And so we're gonna go grab those three or five commands and we're sticking to the posted under our keyboard. Take the next step to go figure out you know. What is the next command that i want to do. Or how does this command were what we did today was we explored through. That gets older so that we can take that next level to see how it works get isn't a black box. It's not magic. It just works a little bit differently than the source control system. You might have been from irish so definitely get familiar with it. Google the terms that you're looking for and really start to embrace that mechanism and get really powerful if get. I'm confident that you can get past just those few commands and you can make it just an inherent process in your workflow and use it to be really really powerful specifically separating the safe pints from the published points. That's the thing you couldn't do before that you can now do with Well said definitely agree with all of that. I think getting really good with source. Control and source control. These days really means get almost. It allows me to be fearless with your code right so often people like. I would like to try this. But what if. I break it. What if it doesn't go right. Well if you know how to you know create your branches work locally do all sorts of stuff rollback. You can just go crazy and just explore things and if it doesn't work you know throw it away. No harm no foul. It's lovely than if you get really stuck. Hit me up on twitter at rob underscore rich and show me the code where you got stuck. And let's get unstuck. Because i would love to continue this conversation and really help you be successful all right. Well thank you for taking the time and being here. It's been great to chat with you. Most definitely thanks for having me on c. Later this has been another episode of talk python to me. Our guest on this episode was rob richardson. It's been brought to you by our courses over at talk by on training on level up your python. We have one of the largest catalogs of python video courses over at talk by thought our content ranges from beginners to deeply advanced topics like memory and acing and best of all. there's not a subscription site. Check it out for yourself at training dot by dot. Fm be sure to subscribe to the show. Open your favorite podcast app and search for python. We should be right at the top. You can also find the Tunesfeed slash itunes google play feet at slash play and the direct rss feed at slash ours. S on talk python dot fm. We're live streaming most of our recordings these days. If you wanna be part of the show and have your comments featured on the air. Be sure to subscribe to our youtube channel at talk python dot. Fm youtube this is your host. Michael kennedy thanks so much for listening. I really appreciate it out. Get out there and rights and python code.

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Featured Interview with Steve Anthony

Breakfast Leadership

41:15 min | 2 months ago

Featured Interview with Steve Anthony

"Welcome to the breakfast. Leadership show where we interview global thought leaders on business leadership in life. Here's your host keynote speaker. Bestselling author and chief burnout officer of the breakfast leadership network. I go eleven as michael. Normally don't record introductions for my show but this episode. I thought i would based on who i interviewed since nineteen seventy nine. The name steve. Anthony has been recognized in media markets around the world for his accomplishments in his high standards in canada. Steve anthony is an award winning radio and television broadcaster and host. Sure you know ms founding. Vj of much music. He also co-founder Co host of breakfast television canada's number one morning show also several years. Cb twenty four. Which is where. I got to know him And just amazing. Amazing work that he has done in the media space And even you know from history He took over the morning slot at ninety seven. Seven com in montreal the replaced howard stern on that market. So needless to say if you're kicking howard stern out of a time slot you must be doing something right. Since he's left sleepy twenty four. He's been doing all kinds of different things and he's devoted his time to some new business ventures as you're going to hear about in today's conversation He is really passionate about helping small businesses. Take on the amazons of the world and and he's gonna talk about direct ops and amazing work that they do in the small business space to level the playing field so small businesses can not only survive but thrive. And he's also going to talk about trellis. Cana his Medical marijuana endeavor Heart warming and again you'll learn from this conversation with steve. You know his passions have purpose and he's got a method to the way that he does things in mary very methodical. And i think that you're going to enjoy this interview as much as i did. Enjoy the show. Welcome steve great to have you on the show. Michael thank you so much. It's a pleasure. And it's an honor. And i mean ethanol artem bottom there. He go a big fan of your work you know. I came to canada. Originally from the states immigration canada. Two thousand four. So i missed unfortunately the much music days but definitely was well aware of the cpi twenty four days and all the stuff that went on in amazing work in it speaks to your character and how you were able to segment from similar but different industries enrolls in do the things which of course leads into the work. You're doing today so Definitely missing you on the mornings But i'm glad we're seeing in the afternoon as we record this so thank you realize what. You're just give me a little fast. History would be twenty four. There was a a understanding between myself and my wife. I would do it for five years because we were going to move out of the city and I extended that state for another four and a half years so a wife said go It was time to go meet. We'd succeeded in being very successful on sleepy. Twelve foot breakfast so i didn't have much more proved in essence so he was trying to go so we. We packed her bags. Packed up my by notoriety. Or whatever that you know whatever cashier at and we moved into the country and so that was kind of woodward clock. Weibo now the one thing that i walked away with all years music and see between breakfast. I've got some credibility. And i got to the point where people would take a phone call. If i wanted to get hold of seventy in the prime minister's office i could pick up the phone right an email and i get through to them so that was kind of cachet so all those things during the last ten years that started interest me go those industries kind of ended up coming to me saying you know now truly even tv. How working with us and it. It and i pick them deliberately. Especially i guess i want to talk about is is. This direct co ops. Which is trying out small and medium-sized businesses. Because as you introduced it really is a tough time right now for small and medium size business. I don't know how a major portion of them we're gonna come on site. Yeah it's alarming to me and you know for myself You know being in toronto. Whenever order food from a restaurant. I am aiming for independent. You know single owned or maybe they own a couple locations types of restaurants the products and services. Doing as much local. As i possibly can. Because i know it's been with this pandemic the plainfield has not been even and not to get into political things and all of that stuff. But there's definitely been an imbalance. And i'm with you. You know even walking downtown. I have an office downtown and walking by all of the closed restaurants and all of that. I'm thinking what is this town going to look like. Once this pandemic is done and people can return What's it gonna look like you know how who's going to be around and it's it's devastating. What's happened to small business. The i just thought the unallocated and drawings us At you know it got all nineteen we know from reliable sources and when people were tested positive you know what the positivity rate is and how would you die in dry But we don't see it like we see the numbers but we don't see people in the morning we don't see people who died we don here number a lot of people become completely not to it. It's another thing another number that it really touch the people other people dead people sit where lasting missions reverend number and it's the same thing with marbles and people are not being tesla now and walk down the street yet against what is going on in small business live to see the door shut. They're going to see you know the the paper of the windows waiting for an antenna because that that's small couldn't survive it really is it it. Could we seen this coming you getting together. A business plan with the case may be unlocked. Everybody watching listening to do that. But you put in a risk part. Say what are you rhys. Anybody who wants to be getting along with vessel of the risks. Put down. We're not going to be in business for eighteen months or two years because there's going to be a global pandemic down who you know we know now. In retrospect that well and then coming it's inevitable young will actually have now won mocking preparedness in the goal of the actually improve. highly things. we're going to be sprayed with this. Was they'd gone and skill is scary. Aiming on boxing among a lighter the end of the tunnel legislative burger and further away because these barriers that are going to be happy whether whether or not the vaccines they have now work. And if they don't we're still going stuck i colon Four lines so the light is like shining shining kinder's on his bicycle. He's going gory. The holiest gets longer and longer is kind of like that. Like what are we going to get to that life so anyway To to reasonably passionate. Were having a often for this guy's Co-ops part cheers as they trying to help Snuggles and small ause small and medium businesses for years by this whole thing. Where were by as you're mentioning and truly more events field or anybody wants to buy local in the told the by local mr saga model logging story. I didn't know case hours. Okay so We've always been urged by You know it's always been wagon is long and then in the back in my. I woke with almost no has become far more for now or because you realize that not buying could be between a business survived. The nazi in used as in modern times teammates crohn's but the reason people didn't always do that before was because unfortunately the local businesses cannot compete on price or convenience with the yams are nothing against company was and all that and you know. Yes basil's now making a race to the moon. If musk is it got some money in. Oh okay that's farm Well because he kerzner's sabih new buying power that they have. There's no way will compete so that i work with. They say okay what we gave us the up figure how to compete with amazon dies. So this whole idea platform together multi-layered where it's by design cooperative but Crowns hardware store. If he's going to get supplies is gonna stop. Your shelves impossible wholesale price the as way more than amazon Bronx so what are we have on and bill and george v your hundred other of these. Barbara's spills and we all get together. All of a sudden we can. Why the bolster damian. At last they were amazon is getting at as long ago. She as bill and then they can start taking their place the same and we get more websites. You can do that. All certain amazon becomes something on a level playing field with local. So that was a concept. And that's what's been executed in venus. It's it's amazing that It came up with us And you know. I've been part of buying groups before obviously smaller scale. Usually it was around. Hr or pr or payroll types of services and things like that. But for hardware stores and other small businesses that are trying to establish a footprint in their community and and work from selves. And do all these great things to be able to have that available to them where they can buy things you said. Cheaper than what amazon is paying And offer it at a price that is almost identical or maybe a little bit less depending on the situation than what amazon charges people are going to go. Pick up tom's hardware. And i can pick it up right now or i can order something from amazon and depending if they got prime or not. They might dare to but will trucker. We're actually working because there's another level to it is created a driver platform dry ice so yes as we roll it out Going can compete with in left and yes billion agencies and all there isn't there's little driver anyway because both headless pots on his phone though exclusive can be local drive. We have training for smaller towns. That just don't have been burton. Lets you know around here. Bell rules the example. They don't have it or bracelets they won't have that so we can start there to get the name of the rose. Drivers are also delivery service. They become a local driver. Needs local delivery the so you know if you want something delivered instead of that armor store having to having to go out so you can actually get it. Delivered at a minimum minimal cost though amazon spree. We get that but still most people wanna buy. Local just can't visit price. Point doesn't matter or they will try and match the coin and whatever the convenience of delivery where we can do that too. Is we service that will deliver to your door. So it's multi layered and sometimes you a little little Intimidated by heavy levels of what it is that requires as prime deal. A great successes it's And we are members worldwide and we are like the masculine recognized buying food for like the the biggest agriculture Co-op united states miracle. So we negotiate costume feed is calorie kennel ration Horse speed or what your pig shower. There we go. Yeah we can get your in a out cheaper than anyone else. Dan about what they mean. That's what they as part of the popcorn and and again they they people. It's a because cooperative because they'll spiteful. All of our restores components themselves in backwell platform is their interaction. So it's not just palms are restored out there on an island Communication with all the other states in the palm of say he guys nor transcends regardless those a warm blast picking grass coated screws. Anybody in under and so then we would go and negotiate a price of screws to that they all go So there's voting platforms. That's amazing and ingoing becker. Quick to delivery side of things. Not only from you know when you're in. Let's say toronto. You know a lot of people don't use cars. They use transit so if they have to go order something that's large that wouldn't necessarily fit comfortably. On t t c. Well then they're renting a vehicle to go get it and all the costs with that so you have delivered. You don't have to worry about that in from farming standpoint. You know. Think about that okay. You're getting everything delivered to you that allows you know the farmhands and the people working on the farm to continue working on the farm and not have say well. I gotta drive into town to go pick up this and this pay the extra whatever it is have delivered dropped off. its they. Are the time savings alone with that. A lot of people don't necessarily look at that but believe me. The time savings means a ton a business owner means. You're not allocating a staff member to go pick up things and bring it back. it's there. They unloaded it's done back into this and they make such a big difference. And i loved the analogy about the collaboration that you don't get that i can't call up other people that are shopping amazon. Saying you know what i want. Some brass screws replace the. You know the screws knobs in my condo or something. Oh okay. I'm not going to have that conversation but as a business owner you have a network of people say okay. This is a trend. That i'm seeing all of a sudden all your network of people that are working in that industry are getting in early on a trend which means they can capitalize it and make more money and save money at the same time and offer something that the consumer watts and some. It's always amazing when you go under storm you want something in. It's there and know precisely down. If the if the young people are asking for is not available they mentioned it to us negotiate it and we will be able to shows and and again they don't even have to allow stuff they don't have to have the stock both also figure that out. We're gonna have warehousing as well so it's not as if You have to go to tom to get a grasp of ood. Schools longs on stock is not just as storage of course jealous but his elsewhere so it can be delivered from the same way. That amazon has a filming center. We're going to be being the same thing in mobile so We had that one yet is no logistically will merrick well so to get back to reiterate what is going on now is as everyone seals are made people feel that they shouldn't be buying local for all right reasons but conventionally that idea gets the wall because i just can't wait. What resent more when. I can get online. Some was our best buy. I would love to support your bob. I don't have to wait. Certain more can bring all do it now because eventually that's going to run out so we only kind of Platform the only design that we can see workings than one work and again is guadalupe. So the store owners as members are far only of the company so the co op model is which has been around forever. I mean of molotov ember successful in the world are cooperative. People somehow think that that's corny someday. But you know as a normal cooperative and the people who are the members only volunteers is less. Ira not and then you know presidents and boards and all that stuff leading. This is a cooperative. Everybody is everybody is a say to democracy one vote one member one vote blah blah blah so a world increasingly distant making people feel distance Mrs are offered to try to Maybe a little more human so you know a power on the back for that. It's just it's our is realistic. That seems to be the only way that that small businesses to initially this a friend of mine actually former friend any one of those name. If you wanna share it that's my i. Won't he said that amazon is not the biggest not amazon. Doesn't wanna be the biggest retailer on the planet. the one of be only retail implant. And i that saying you know what eventually is going to happen and we all do something about this. I'm going to buying groceries at the company. Grocery store to take in the comedy card to know inside company company and not a wenski. This grocery store walking like coronal. It's everything will be company. They'll be one retail balmasera. Babbitt these others and yeah. That's certainly his intent. I don't know if you saw this new justice. So agrees myers and Wayne's world maguire's givers aims. They attack our dana. So also now this. Yesterday there is an ad wayne's world and this leads people for it but the polish in meets realizes in vs. No horrible reminds people are paying too much for delivery wa wa in so for the next seven days or whatever it's they're offering when juiced weights or they've been case may be. It's because everyone knows. The rest of us are getting killed because google meats and board of all people. Sop almost all of your profits buckets their own restaurant from doing this because they have to stay in business. They have to keep having astro not because they're making lots of money. Stolen watching it is going to really. I mean the mayor of toronto in of curiel puzzled me said. Hey you delivery services you've got cut your rates because small businesses that are going out of business because again four wrong meaning money. We'll have like a politician going online to say something like that. Which section of age You got a problem well when we were here for our rates delivery drivers at ninety percent ninety percent of what they make and the The the restaurants only get five percent but basically we have to stay in business breath. Charge something but we're looking at it. Point of view is a greedy and volume as they care about Whereas i know basil's in and And even facebook basically basically one of the things corners ever was last last i own is there was four billion dollars which is at mark But it microbe do gresh people from london being other stuff but a lot of expensive the little guy so we're trying to stand up to them give them give them all wait to not only survive. None i applaud you and everybody involved with it for doing it and even you know going back real quick on one of the things should mentioned about you know inventory and having distribution center and things like that that is also a huge cost savings for organizations because if they have to keep certain levels of stock that means they need to have a bigger warehouse. Which means it's a bigger footprint. They're paying more utilities more land taxes all of those things if it's in a place where they can get it in a reasonable timeframe that saves that small business a ton of money. That means they don't have to build this big warehouse to store all the stuff they can grow but still say they're stay the same size as far as the storefront is concerned. Or maybe you know they wanna go something bigger if they want to. That's great but it. I would definitely comes out in the conversation. So far is very methodical about the thinking around this and the planning and coming up with ideas and in knowing okay. We're not there yet. But we know what the steps are for us to get to that point. We know who the players are. And i agree. That co op farming credit unions apartment. Buildings co ops have been around for a long long time and a lot of people. Don't even recognize it necessarily but the model has is amazing and it's more or less self self-governed in a way it's like okay. We're we're all making these decisions and you don't have the red tape of boards of directors and their agendas and all of that kind of stuff so it's a. It's definitely an i agree with you. I think in looking at the big picture of everything can't see another way unless there's a dramatic shift of how people buy things to take on an amazon appropriately named In this type of world without you know leveling the playing field some point and doing it in a way where people can say. Okay i want to support you. Know the small businesses and an insult to support a because it's not often more all things being equal as all things being equal. Why wouldn't buy local. It's back with their non so if we can make them equal then the choices on this is new by this big man and every in two days a boy whitest can will buy it from joe. Blow's penn store in your area. Get it in two days or you buy it from amazon. Today's jackson price. We're going to do of course not being visits convenient. It's convenient that dan. Bob's wanted amazon. If you're thinking in terms of. I walk a little toronto. By the way pompous have been bar most people know this Small medium sized businesses are actually not small. They go no exact numbers. Small business would be defined as up. To don't know number. Two thousand boys would be meetings. I think five dollars but ninety seven hundred ninety seven percent of the point people is in small businesses and we re percent are in big businesses like it was the case maybe walnuts. Ninety seven percents small and medium-sized businesses. And those are the ones that are going down the toilet and we'll three three percents are just surviving in bigger and bigger and bigger because of sheer volume. You don't have a choice if we care about these businesses staying in business and have on the choice. Then we'll squatting law was the only and again with will with rose you know those is an absolute is an act for was a beetroot business. Where businesses department of each other menus the consumer app as well like you and i with the amazon echo on a phone have the direct coop applicants all go look convert flashes your more in kensington market has latched rates. La we deliver locally driver and it's the way to go and you know with ninety seven percent of americans being employed by small business if we don't protect dot and create a level playing field than the the big guys. They are going to do. And we've been. We see the stories all the time of how amazon and walmart and all the big bucks a employers Alley treat their employees and some of the stories earn alarming loan that we need go leading stopping again. Who's gonna get waltz industry not People work with any Walmart will come in repeal firm and walmart walmart's winning on coral when you call a satisfaction winter recall Sound so wrong results in robert watts area and it's own way of people. I yeah as five thousand people over the small and medium markets because there there is amazon as material is and people go in the corner. So yeah sure there's about employers and then your net models with thousand foot and then you look and go okay where those four some people going to work and as we see with you know the economy as we see with evolution of jobs and all kinds of different things you know not all. Those jobs are going to be replaceable. And going okay. Now what are these people going to work. And it's yeah. That's why. I'm a strong strong believer in in the work that you're doing on this. It's amazing so you've got another adventure. I mean you've got a ton of adventures. I know you But you you got another adventure. That's in in the cannabis face. Let's chat about it on. We the person's name mentioned I was I invested a lot of. I shouldn't say we need to withdraw long a lot of money. Cisco's there's never any along. The water was guaranteed rate of which as the number of the people to to be guaranteed return on investment on certain percentage being and happy with this interesting Those who know about great service stories be five so if you pick your money at one pm in the The first year he would take five percent. Whatever you give extra four percents three to to five years. Absorb the strikes. I salute recruiting interest in all these other. Well long way. The cannabis industry became interest to this person and they saw was an opportunity and they were advocate. Savage as many people were much. Because i was side of because it's mean literally canvas cancian's world. I'm not gonna get on some weird pro cannabis. Yes of course. Are the one of the people change modes. People out plates have chemo. Your cousin is is people like So he decided that he would start going around with world Establishing himself In this industry And i was the ride. Because i had so much writing on it Until eventually wall was get were When we have to separate split your personal opinion long way was on people liked me. Didn't like them and so they asked me. I will pick up. I would get involved so from a disk ins a newly and all of a sudden gusting you want to trust you with wonderfully smart the business or so. I will send a partnership partnership with on on the grower in jamaica. Canadian guys by the huge farm. That your castle in jamaica. Polish hyogo cheerios. He's astounded consult with the jamaican people visit employee's hundreds of locals. He's worked with the government for nine years. Now is wonderful relationship and so myself and these other people that i trust decided that we would burn with so my company fella signal is retail wing of company called castle block ads and so we all retail stores genego on. Lloyd did notice and people will get mad. Any horrible can happen. Can expect with cannabis companies and reality was trying to be another commodity. And and a lot of this these people with money to going again caralis and the stocks with pomp dobbin pumped up on dot and kicking and all always people lost so much money and so will the taste that was left in people's mouth was cannibals industry not to be trusted stocks. And though we're not were were opening owning canvas stores and Were going to seven all. Then we're going to rolled out to the caribbean and then we'll go to global distribution of the product Not medical around the world. Because you can't really or recreational a wild for that happens but many times. These walked the medical side of an you already very legally allowed to the so. That's really the kinda early but I will but and raising raising capital for the spectral scandal. Now and i will plug a jealous candid. Trello scanner dot com. So i'm raising capital now so we can do all this stuff eventually. It'll be international global But i i didn't see myself in this business of an advocate of people yucel candidates to expand. It's those things thongs. Talk trying to become a leader in it and not quietly in the background doing being like the right way -partment jamaica so That's it that's my that's my myspace. Were not eventually. We will get into canada eventually but canada canada. The canadian spaces so does not true about it. You know it's just bar is too because they slapping people's now is that gonna get ripoffs. Inhale somehow so. I don't trust in the regulations and everything that they did made it really problematic for a lot of a lot of players throw out. There is in canada. We didn't embrace will black monkey or is this leftover guys. The guys who've been doing it illegally for decades and decades know how we do it and you know sustain the industry and all that. Yeah yeah true. Some of the ones that veil although since they weren't even worse than kennedy legal which was a will that in jamaica jamaica government knowing many farmers hundreds and funds hunting funds only the farmers that middle living growing cannabis and selling it They embrace them. They said as long as we can make legal as long. you can. Why the standards that we mean we will Bring you will. We will be part of it so this company possibly happen. He'll is working something called It's called the alternative developing for so the guy was a farm. We go to them with our clones because they registered the tracking trace. They're you know they're tracking and tracing six may begin the clones They grow them and we and we harvest them under strict rules strict regulations all we bring them back down so we process the ruling. But when you take out the growl we give them new clubs serving constantly doing with in place to several stop which just last week process it. From the oiling of the world and all of saturday the grain black market farmers are part of the legal system great tax basis. We can make its floor. Make him guaranteed money selling because we're buying it and citizen by grabbing a bag where we share with your guys running on the beach with bags sticks walmart. Some pot was wrong there. There there will because lebron's you can carry two ounces of pot of anybody wants so you know there's speculation. Now and canada was the star. But you don't you don't have to go to sensini race new. You are expected to have like I hate to plug them. But it's starbucks. Will you go into the clock. I mean something something where you know. You're getting a quality as a standard glory that slot. So that's what we're doing in jamaica. That's nuts amazing. Where again you know. I i. I think back to a couple quick stories before we wrap things up one My neighbor growing up Jim kennedy Little feisty irish guy Worked for the electric company and came down with cancer. And the doctor said well. You got if you're lucky. Eighteen months to live but he prescribed a medical marijuana and this is in the early eighties so long time ago. Jim live twelve years. And i mean there's studies and and the the thing of it is now that it's being legal is you know there's more studies going into it. There's no shortage of benefits from from asthma. Stress management aches and pains the opioid crisis. If people would have been on that stuff you know Mckinsey and company would've had half a scratch a check for almost a billion dollars to show for their part in the pimping of opioid drugs. So all of the endless line of the benefits of it. You know it's From inflammation go on and on and on. So i'm a strong believer in the product and it's a and again much like what you're doing with the co op. You being methodical. And you're like here's this and this and this you're not. You're not doing what target did when they came to canada and just way too many stores quick and and no one wanna shop there. Prices weren't american prices. They were canadian prices. And they didn't have any inventory like there should be business books on how not to launch a product and targets endeavouring candidate should have been listed there so And then the other story to. I don't know why this came to mind what My grandma my uncle and my cousin Used to smoke pot not for medical purposes and my grandmother had found a couple of joints that my uncle thought he hid really well and she got mad at him so she did it. She took the marijuana out. I'm assuming she smoked it but she's gone. I can't confirm that but she replaced it with oregano. And i can't imagine the reaction after the first couple of puffs what that must've been like every time. I think that that idea comes from time to time. It's rare but i just some reason. It popped dan so thought i'd share it with the world so that one lasting we obviously raw followed side. We have What's that group. And when we see share the one. The other day about opioids and and and i share and response immediately independent or bass. Why would do that you know it was like he was so strong. See this is another reason why we're with because they have organs. Nine cents gets tough. So steve loved our conversation today. I love the work. You do big ben a big fan for a long time and i'm thrilled that you're Doing things now. You know to make this world better in a variety of different ways. So thank you again for being on the show. Thank you very much again. Just customer geneval. Massa's wire up for real time there. You go okay sir thank you. Thanks for listening to the breakfast leadership. Show part of the breakfast leadership. Netware visit breakfast. Leadership dot com for tips on empowering your business and your life.

amazon canada Steve anthony steve toronto kerzner Crowns hardware store howard Weibo basil Cana curiel walmart jamaica woodward rhys tom
OMG! Apple vs. Qualcomm: Settlement & Fallout

Vector Podcast

12:23 min | 2 years ago

OMG! Apple vs. Qualcomm: Settlement & Fallout

"Sponsored by curiosity stream. Okay. Picture this opening arguments for apple versus Qualcomm are underway in the southern district of San Diego. US district court judge Gonzalo p Curiel first disallows then reverses allows live tweeting. So we all get to read along allegations are made of double dipping of coq wanting to aid for Pepsi of KFC and secret recipe of chicken and potatoes. No seriously. It got weird and fast. Then right there out of nowhere. The inconceivable happens hit subscribe smacks little building because you're not gonna wanna miss any of the fallout and any of the future videos. Irony Ritchie, and this is Victor, San Diego and Cupertino, California. Qualcomm and apple today announced an agreement to dismiss all litigation between the two companies worldwide. The settlement includes payment from apple to Qualcomm. The companies also have reached six year license agreement effective. As of April one twenty nineteen including a two year option to extend and a multi-year chipset supply agreement direct license between apple and Qualcomm six years with two year option to extend effective as of April. One twenty nineteen apple will pay royalties to Qualcomm settlement includes a one time payment from out bowl to Qualcomm multi-year chipset supply agreement all worldwide litigation will be dismissed and withdrawn including claims involving apples contract manufacturers contributions to increase ability for licensing business, reflects value. Strength of Qualcomm, intellectual property, then just as everyone and their analyst is busy trying to figure out what the fractious happened. The aftershock hits Santa Clara, California, April sixteen twenty nineteen Intel Corporation today announced its intention to exit the five G smartphone modem business. The company will continue to meet current customer commitments for its existing four g smartphone modem product line. But does. Not expect to launch five G modem products in this mart phone space, including those originally planned for launches in twenty twenty. We are very excited about the opportunity in five G and the classification of the network, but in the smartphone modem business, it has become apparent that. There is no clear path to profitability and positive returns said Intel CEO Bob swan, so what happened at some point in the span of a few hours or days or maybe as in weeks. Something changed apple and Qualcomm had been content to let their case go to court opening arguments had started an apple an Intel had been content to keep working on modems for future iphones, including next generation five g modems for next generation iphones a year or two from now. Then a judicial blink of an eye. The case is settled all other litigation is dropped an Intel is out of the phone modem business. Immediately theory stated as facts began popping up on Twitter apple realized Intel wasn't getting anywhere with five G. So settled killing Intel's phone business. No, no, Qualcomm didn't wanna risk arming the antitrust case against it. So agreed to more favorable terms with apple no way, Intel decided photo modems were no longer a business. They wanted any part of any more forcing apple to settle. It was like watching Roach Amman in real time. The truth is in those moments were likely only a handful of people in each of those companies who really had any idea of the full dimensions of what had happened. And why an absolutely none of them were on Twitter. But there were several smart analysts saying several smart things that we can draw on to get a sense of the possibilities, especially because it's likely there really aren't that many possibilities? The first is that Intel decided to get out of the phone modem business and that left apple with only one functional option at least if they wanted to keep connecting phones to cellular at least in the US. Settle with Qualcomm Intel bought Infineon's modem business in twenty eleven well Infineon had supplied the original iphone modems apple had transitioned away to Qualcomm chipsets too. Support things like in the US and to offer world's internationally when relationship with Qualcomm soured, and they wanted to start dual sourcing the non CD may modems I and almost eventually about the only place they could go was backed Infineon now Intel, but Intel's modems weren't as mature as Qualcomm 's which led to a performance gap and Qualcomm had somehow managed to position themselves as both essential to wireless standards, both out wanting to or having to respect the usual free reasonable and nondiscriminatory licensing that goes along with being part of a standard and that made it exponentially harder for Intel to keep up on LT. Much less catch up on five G with apple being their only effective client, albeit an enormous client. But one that demanded both low prices and high priority Intel's new management may simply have decided none of it was worth the effort anymore. The second possibility is that apple decided to drop Intel modem supplier, and that left Intel with absolutely no reason to stay in the phone modem business L. T was hard for Intel. They never reached Qualcomm level of compatibility or performance and the levels. They did reach reportedly required significant investments in time and resources from apple and existed under constant threat of action from Qualcomm five G was reportedly even harder with rumors flying that Intel wouldn't have any modems ready never mind for this year. The maybe not for the next either apple has never been an early adopter of radio technologies. The first I phone didn't have three G and apple didn't go to LT until the iphone five more than a year and a half. After the first LT phone, the HTC thunderbolt hit Verizon Samson has just begun the rollout of the galaxy S ten with five G in the US, which means even if apple does their usual thing and wait for wider network, deployment and more efficient modem generations. The same time line was still land on iphone twelve in twenty twenty now somewhat argue that given the maturity of the smartphone market and the flattening if not declining of growth, it's risky, the weight, even that long others. That five G is significantly less than a reality right now. And that even as deployment continues. No one has come up with any compelling use cases for it yet. So all of that is pretty much just a wash apple all about the roadmap though. And if there was no clear path forward for Intel's, five G modems, never mind minded first but going forward, then there was no clear target for iphones, which are always being developed a few years out and have to come together as a tightly integrated whole at launch. So come to Jesus reality check, whatever apple may have simply decided settling with Qualcomm may not have been what they wanted going forward. But the only way forward and with apple gone so to Intel's phone modem business also just to cover all the bases. There may also be a reality where Qualcomm solve pressing apple at trial on all of this may have won the battle over iphone modems, but lost them the antitrust war in the US and elsewhere and decided to offer apple rates low enough just to bring them back to the settlement table given. How Qualcomm at least in my? Opinion has been putting short term gains over long term viability for years now, and how hard it is for companies to come to those kinds of realizations. I consider this the least likely of the possibilities, especially because of the language used in Qualcomm PR and affectively removing Intel from the competition space doesn't make Qualcomm, look any less anti-competitive. So who won we're human? We want winners and losers. We want victors and vanquished people celebrating cheers high fives. Well, looking down at the distraught. Desolation of those they've beaten in any case though, it seems like everybody game. Something and loses. Something though, the degrees. Timelines vary greatly upfront. This looks like a big win for Qualcomm apple has ditched Intel and gone all in on Qualcomm for at least the next six to eight years. What's more all the money apple in their manufacturing partners were withholding will once again like the spice start to flow on the surface. This shows what Qualcomm has long contended that it is incredibly hard. If not. Downright impossible to make a functional let alone good modem without their technology. It affirms the value of their IP if not their business model, I say if not their business model only because there's been some talk that absent apple pushing this case what many in the industry would describe as Qualcomm abusive anti-competitive practices will go unchallenged. I'm not so sure though, the biggest risk to call comes business model was never apple. It was in the US Korean Chinese and other governments. And if anything the arguments Qualcomm made versus apple could end up hurting them far worse in the regulatory courts Microsoft invested in apple an Intel licensed AMD for a reason a smarter more forward thinking, Qualcomm might have done everything possible to insulate itself from antitrust where we competition is so much better than no competition. Apple probably and I say probably because again, no one really knows yet secured better rates from Qualcomm, which is what they've been after this entire time. Apple. Can be a remarkably personal company and often felt like it wasn't just what welcome was charging them. But the way in which Qualcomm was charging them defended apple based on the whole device rather than just a component and was licensing fees. Even when their own components weren't being used apples. Also, getting better more reliable. More dependable modems and modem roadmaps for the next few years. And yeah, they failed to break while comes business model, but that again is not really Apple's business. There regulators for that some are worried that this will also hit pause on Apple's own modem efforts which have been reported on for a while. Now, my guess is not count me as one of the people who believes the modem will become integrated into the system on chip. And just like what happened with arm affable transition from buying Qualcomm chips to licensing Qualcomm IP for their own custom integrated modems and that would be a big win for apple over time. And as much as I love all the history that ends up being unearthed a trial all the stories about how chips in phones were developed. Both Qualcomm and apple come out of this without executives having to take the stand and without secrets having to be made public humanity absolutely loses out on the cultural and technological anthropology. Apple and Qualcomm, though to keep their pants on at least until the inevitable documentary gets made. And yeah becomes available on curiosity stream. It's the world's first streaming service to address our collective lifelong quest. To learn explore and understand with over twenty four hundred titles available worldwide on pretty much every device, and including original content, featuring Stephen hawking Sigourney Weaver Michio Kaku. David Attenborough, Sylvia, Earle, Jane Goodall and more right now. I'm all about the first pictures of a black hole for the first time. Scientists have captured a photograph of black hole from the blurb the image verifies, one of the most important theories in physics, and we'll help unlock the greatest mysteries of the cosmos and curiosity stream, of course, has a covered. Just go to curosity stream dot com slash vector and enter the promo code. Actor to kick start your membership completely free for the first thirty days. Thank you Ossets dream, and thanks to all of you for supporting the show so Intel at the end of the day and tempted to say that they're still struggling so much with their core. Business getting out in anything approaching a timely fashion that while they lose some apple modem bucks up front. They also lose a drain and distraction that comes with them Intel's destiny as always seems entirely Intel's to win or lose for customers. Like us long-term. We'll have to see how the lack of competition to Qualcomm at least outside Asia plays out. And what if anything we eventually have to gain from Apple's in-house modem team short-term, though, it's a big win modems aren't as in your face as cameras, but if you can't connect, you know, it, and you hate it for the next long while iphones will once again have the absolute best modems in the business. And if anything compelling comes to five G, it'll come to the iphone along with it, at least, that's what I think. Now, I'd love to know what you think was this good deal for Qualcomm that for the industry. Great for foam customers terrible for Intel. And how would all affect apple going forward? It light. It's it really helps out the channel. And then hit the comments and let me know. And thank you so much for watching.

Qualcomm apple Intel Corporation US California San Diego Gonzalo p Curiel Irony Ritchie Santa Clara Pepsi Roach Amman US Korean Chinese Infineon Cupertino Twitter KFC HTC
It's Our COVID Anniversary

Mojo In The Morning

09:23 min | 2 months ago

It's Our COVID Anniversary

"So spike us sent out. tell us and said hey. Send me your last picture before. The world basically came to a stop and we had to do the covid pause thing and I went back to go look at pictures and escrow and through. I went too far. And i was realizing life was really good before this whole thing happened. I mean there was so much. We had our twentieth anniversary party celebration. pajama party. A lot of fun. Things happened in the months leading up to it was so much fun and the The last voters you can go see him on our instagram and on facebook so chelsea gets a phone call on friday from the cleaners that we go to the cameo cleaners and they said hi. We're calling because They call they call me. Mr chelsea lady calls me yet because it's chelsea's name so they think my last name is chelsea. Okay hello mr chelsea of appropriate. So they go. Mr chelsea dropped off his clothes in left him here and hasn't picked him up and chelsea goes. Oh i'm sorry. When was that. She goes march the tenth of twenty twenty. I ended up believing my clothes there for a year. They were there literally for a year in it turned out. I thought they were dress shirts. Because honestly i don't know yours for no need for them but they actually turn. This was one of them. I know i saw your video. This is actually loved shared. Yes so nice. Little house like sweater telling you bought it all over a guy. I felt like something was like somebody needs to. Yeah put it in a bow or something like that and then there was another sweater. That was there that i really liked and then there was a sweater that i don't fit into any more. No you made me realize. I have like three or four shirts on my floor that have been there for year and i just never took him into dry cleaning because i never had the desire to wear them again. So you guys have like a a place you put. Yeah 'cause i don't go. Until i have like a half a dozen things and do them all at once and i realized oh my gosh i have no need for nice clothes and i haven't worn things with buttons all year so now i gotta take it all in. I'd love to know from listeners. And maybe we can do like a bunch of random surveys and you guys can do anyone listening who has not worn a pair of jeans and a year like anywhere and i'm not talking about the people that never wear jeans talking about used to wear jeans all the time in now. You've never worn jeans. Now are a solid not for solid week. But i've maybe wore jeans In the last year maybe a half a month total like two or three weeks. Total if i if i added them up is there. Anyone listening who is not put makeup on in a year. Because there's no need to go out. Maybe you're working from home. Are you wearing masks. Are there any ladies who have not put on a legit bra in a year. Ooh we talked about the yesterday lake. Maybe you've been wearing a sports bra. But have you not plan on an actual bra. I think in passing you mentioned yesterday. And i saw like a couple of people that text into uh and said that they haven't done that. What are other ones. Oh anyone listening. Who has not driven their car in a year. Like his not literally gone into a car and i know that there are those that are really you know careful with covid but to not drive your car or is still on the same tank of gas. I can't believe that like where i've talked to people. And i'm like 'cause i fill up gas with coming into the station now and be inherit back at work. I fill up gas once a week probably now. I used to fill it up a few times a week. Because i was doing so much stuff going out to you know going out to vance or going out to klang calls but once a week is kind of like my thing before that though like when i was home you know for a good period of time. I think i lasted for a few weeks. What's amazing because a lot of people started working from home and then at the beginning obviously a lot of people are having everything delivered to their house they ride going out and then you realize the convenience of having your groceries delivered and some people just aren't going back to the old ways cell one of my girlfriends is very very cova conservative and she went to the grocery store for the first time actually went to target for the first time in a year about three weeks ago was she excited to see what it looked like. She was terrified ahead anxiety. Yeah claire hi hi. It's been a year claire. And what have you not done. I haven't wore jeans and a year. The last time i wore jeans was march. Fourteenth flash. Own my gosh. Have you tried to put on just to see how they fit now. I have like they still fit but My husband actually had an aneurysm in his brain After kobe hit last year. And since then if it's all about being lazy actually it's not about being lazy about by taking care of yourself like yes that is well. Yeah he has your husband okay. yeah he's doing. he's doing really good. Considering it was about ready to bleed and guys rate went rate when kovin hitting everything got shut down. Nobody was allowed in the hospital. My god yeah. that's off. Well enjoy looking at those jeans instead of wearing those jeans. I love the people by the way that that don't wear the jeans and then put him on for the first time and go now taking them. I'm going right back to my my. Comfy yoga pancer sweatpants. What's up lexi. Hi good morning. I you have now put on jeans. No absolutely not and and like an what are we. What are you wear said I we're looking pretty much every day to work Dress pants now are like curiel but jeans are just like they don't make enough gene to like the woman right like they're so bad. Yeah my legs are just like. I don't even know i. It's not even a covert. I just hate you honestly. Have we looked at jean sales. Like bluejeans sales. I wonder what bluejeans sales are Because i bet you believe over there like don't even fit you rights. Thanks to repair genes. That looks like i don't even say them floating them. We were talking about. You know the sweatpants. How sweatpants sales were like huge last year. I wonder if companies are suffering. What's up crystal. Hey good morning how are you good crystal. You kinda fit almost all of the questions that i just brought up. Yeah unfortunately I'd have to admit. I am a single mother in the healthcare field and things have been quite hectic somebody here today. I have not put on a pair of jeans not one. I wear pajamas. work running. Admit their clean. I knew change out of in morning when they start one to go to work. I put on my scrubs. I have not were makeup in over a year. What's the point wearing masks and say shielding goals. Is your skin better. Because of that there are. There are times where i look like. This is so great but then have that infamous mass me goes. I'm taking the good with the bad. I learned as i call it and i will make jokes about myself. I bought that girl. Scrubs and i wear my girl scout. Don't think anytime soon. Do you feel that the thing that you're most happy that you're you haven't had to do in. The last year is not wear a bra. My best friends now Ross are the best that confidence that chelsea and i talked about that. She says she loves being comfortable more. You know nowadays. So i admit like you said there's no coming home and popping it off now. I'm coming home and i'm having a massive data sports. Yeah good doing well all right check out our you can check out our pictures and if you wanna share some of your stuff that you had Last pictures you can do that. Especially on our facebook. It's mojo in the morning on facebook. You know what. I did a sharon with you guys in the studio. I went to the gym for the first time in a full year. And i what. I had the guy look up. I said you know i'm here as it. Look up in the computer last time in his one day shy of a full year since i got the planet fitness cash. They do a really kuttab. Hey i of. I felt like i. They they open privately just for me because there's not a lot of people that are very safe and the whole time i'm they're they're going around and cleaning every machine around me and as soon as i get off machines before i could even turn around to clean it myself. They're cleaning it like they do an amazing job. And the social distancing is fine. I wasn't near anybody on. The machines are all spaced out and sanitizer. Yup but i also way overdid it. Because i was so excited back in that huge gorgeous jim. I worked out for almost two hours. And i couldn't move our couldn't move monday and yesterday because i was like paralyzed every muscle hurt like a loser because i share it was two hours and twenty minutes and it felt like it was two hours but i was also wandering around like it was disneyworld. The core look at this. Wow this new machine like it was you know i mean i just went crazy overboard and again yesterday asked me in a week or two. How i'm doing going.

Mr chelsea mr chelsea bluejeans pajama party chelsea kovin curiel facebook vance aneurysm kobe lexi kuttab Ross jim
GraphQL at Github with Marc-Andre Giroux

Software Engineering Daily

50:12 min | 6 months ago

GraphQL at Github with Marc-Andre Giroux

"Get hub manages a large. Api surface for both internal and external developers this api surface has been migrated from purely restful requests to graph q. L. graph is a newer request language for data fetching and fewer round trips mark. Andre guru works at gab and is the author of production ready graph kunal. He joins the show to talk about graph Across the industry and specifically had get hub code fresh is a devops automation platform designed for kuban eddies and other cloud native technologies could fresh is launching the first component of what. They're calling get ops two point. Oh this not. Only automates the software delivery and deployment process but gives you critical insight into what's happening in your production test environments which ultimately allows you to constantly deploy software faster. This new get ops. Two point oh. Dashboard is addressing the visibility and observability problems that prevented teams from scaling. their cloud. native deployments. Now you can get an overview of gaps deployments in the context of features instead of just get hashes in addition you can roll back to a specific feature or pull request in addition to get hash. You can try it for free today at code fresh dot com slash save daily. That's code fresh i. Io slush se daily detri- code. Fresh new get ops. Two point oh platform markham show. Thank you so much for having me big fan of the show. Great here everybody. Listening probably has an idea of what get hub is but people may not know the surface area of gitta. People can build external apps on top of the api. Give me idea of the surface area right so the api you can think of it as just another way to excess gibbs domain so anything people usually deal with with the u. is creating issues poor requests. That's usually you can usually do that with as well. The difference is kind of like the who's interested in using it so multiple companies there your whole development workflow works around get hub and the primary way to access that domain in just at a programmatic way so give me a few examples of those api points. Yep so you've got an points from anything to getting an issue getting mad at every issue we've got. Api straight to get itself so creating get trees get objects and we have things that are a bit more high level like our new actions workflows which are controllable through the as well and give me some sense of the scale of these different api endpoints. Yes oh gebze. Api scale is is actually quite something we've got so many companies depending on that api for up and workflows. So we've got actually over. At billion requests data api serves we've got into the hundreds of thousands of integration so different apps or just clients or even tokens accessing. The api so. It's a huge kale. It's a ton of different use cases to support and tons of different clients that have kind of various use cases in mine to support. So it's quite a challenge and maybe you could take me through the life cycle of one particular end point just to give an example right so let's take for just creating a pull request given a branch so there's multiple ways to do that but cabs. Api right now. You can do that with our rest. Api by emitting post requests to a poor request and point. And you can do that with api now by doing mutation against poor quest mutation. So is that kind of what you had in mind as a workflow. Yes pick one of those and walk through the life cycle. How did you mean kind of the client. Life cycle here or world service. I'd life cycle. So like i make a request and then what happens on the server side right so in. Api request always goes through our little balancer. Which is called gop internally that little balancer will basically hit our rails monoliths get this huge rails model that that's kind of Famous for one of biggest rails apps really and that rails app serves everything related to the right. now i'm so if it step recipe our api. This is ruby monolith. That's handling the request. We've got these controllers that the thing about is is that the api has kind of like a separate little code base within that model it that served these requests so in terms of rest. We've got a nice way for our developers to define and points that has everything that will define w. p. should have so permissions are set at as dsl description where to documentation your l. is so developer. Really what our goal is. Api team is for a team to only defined their business logic so whatever domain is creating pull request for example. And we've got the tooling around it. What is executed during a workflow like this so rate limits middle wears authorization authentication all taken care of. Tell me a little bit more about what happens at the load balancing layer. Yep so it's pretty. It's actually dila balance level doesn't do much moment. It has a little bit of rate limits when it comes to animus requests but a lot of logic is found in our monolith running ruby so that little balancer is quite helpful to protect our ruby processes but anything that goes on with the. Api itself is usually right in the model. What are the canonical problems. That come from maintaining api service of the scale. So there's two problems there's the user scale so how many requests were getting serving requests that our performant and then the others problem is this internals kale our scale so the developers kale is actually sometimes even more challenging than the amount of users consuming. So we've got hundreds of developers working on different features. They all want to ship dirt dirt domain not only ui but in api so building api that can serve that many users but also serving that many developers is quite a challenge. That's why we focus a lot on making the experience as simple as possible building an experience consistent across points when you have dozens of different teams building them. This is where we invest more so in terms of users kale. It's also something we we focus on. Obviously but the devil upper scale internally is something very taunting as well. There's a rest. Api and graph q. L. api could you differentiate between those two api's and how the the interaction pattern differs between those two right so that's also a challenge. We have in terms of scale because we want we. Trade are piano rest. Api as basically just two different client experiences to same business. Domin so in theory anything you could do. I would want to be accessible through our rest. Interface and graphical interface in rest. That's what most people are used to. You consume our demands are set of resources and manipulate them through. Adp methods with gradual. You consume our demane with graph. You'll query so it is a lot more flexible. Clients can kind of create their own use case from are exposed graphical schema but it might not be as optimized or coarse grain as rest. Both patterns can be useful and we tried to support both. But it's definitely a challenge. Share some clients. Who really need that. Flexibility will opt for gradual others who want to get started quickly and can do what our correspondent resources will offer rest. Were you involved in building out. The graph curiel. Api yes so right before so get garfield. Api launched in two thousand sixteen. I believe and i joined around in two thousand seventeen to help. Build out polygraph. Api before that. I was a chopper. Fai and we were also building one of the first public. Aps up there so there's not a lot of public api's out there for graphic eulogised yet. It's very popular. Api style for internally is but it's it's super interesting and quite challenging to go for that pattern for public. Api like get shopping. Fis key telling them more about the experience of launching a large scale. Api yeah so gradual. The main challenge here is that it is a new technology. And you can't expect every new client to know very well about it with rest are. Hp has been around for enough time. A lot of people know how to consumer rest. Api with graft y'all there's a lot of benefits but you can't assume that everybody knows how to consume it so the big difference here is when launching a graph julie. Pi not only. Do you have to describe what your api can do. What kind of workflows you can achieve. But there's also a bunch of education about graphical itself which is a challenge so we tried to focus a lot on documentation about in general. Helping people getting started with building. Your first graphical query and we've tried to focus a lot on graph trans so the type schema and using that to bill documentation where people can discover our use cases as easily as possible and to more about. How the difference between shop by you because you worked on the graph the shop fai how did that. Experience differ from working on a get hub. So ironically they're pretty similar shop. If i also is a a large rails shop at a big rails model there so a lot of the same technology where used the main is very different. Chop fi things are oriented around a specific shop while getup zone is a lot more interconnected. So you might have an issue that has an event that points to an issue in a completely other organization or repository so the data access patterns are very very different. And making that work with graph. You'll can be a challenge where everything is cope to to a single shop which can be started in its own database. For example the data access patterns are manageable would get hub. We have so many different connections between our our types or resources that data fetching gradual world is quite challenging so we've invested in data lot. How big is the team. That work on the graph. Api we're pretty small team where four people team the way we think about it though. Is that our team build. Every graphical type or every rest endpoint. So we're we're here to make sure. I p is consistent that are developers engineers have the best possible to build. Graphically is so. That's what we focus on. So i like to think about it in a sense that we are the experts. We can talk about how to design a good late. But we're not the issue experts or get experts or any other like domain experts. So i believe a great api ipo. It's really well. Designed is kind of a a mixed between knowing the platform walls or in our case craft you'll arrest and knowing your domain really well to expose your use cases in the best way possible. So that's why we try to focus on. We focus on our strength building a great platform for our engineers to build on. So you have a surface area of both internal and external. Api's how does the difference between the internal api in the public management differ in theory. We'd like them to be quite similar. We'd like people think about internally is just as if they were public. api's really cause a well-designed pie is a well. Designed api in practice dated for a bit for example in service to serve as communication internally. You often know your use case very very well and you have a small set of known customers so in our case different teams that allows us to build a that are much more optimized but maybe less. Flexible darn pollock. Api and that's a big challenge. Graphical aims to solve that bridge because we know consumers can kind of query for their executives case. But the flexibility of graph. You'll comes at a performance. Cost at for an internal where you can know exactly what you want and you can optimize it very well. For a set of known consumers we choose maybe something else or where different or even a different design maybe more proper. What are some common design decisions you see. People are designed mistakes. You see people. Making in their creation of of a graph by the biggest mistake i see is trying to convert an existing source of data into a graph pi. I'm so that might be taking database tables and trying to convert them into a graph schema or even taking an existing rest. Api and trying to convert it into a graph juliette pi. That's all things that are possible and quite frankly they're cool projects to work on but the end result is rarely what your consumer will want to consume. Every platform has different design. Concerns a rest. Api will be designed with something else in mind than api so if you try to convert kind of dumb wages. One to one graph. Your database to graph. You'll you'll get often results that match. Your data don't match what your clients actually want to achieve from an api. So that's definitely the number one mistake. We try to avoid. And i suggest anyone building an api to to start from decline. I start from the use case. First and then think about the data later about maintenance of graph you'll api what are the difficulties with maintaining something. Maintaining api is challenging again. Kind of in terms of data fetching. Because there's so many ways to interact with graph so many paths to getting the same field optimizing all. These pets is very hard and that's often shown through the most famous problems. Graph up is an end. Plus one problem where fetching certain queries causes and plus one praise database or data source. And the way we try to avoid that is by building data. Obstructions that are kinda agnostic to how to corey through geographical. Api there's this pattern called the data load pattern. That originates from from facebook. Actually would graft you all that kind of has an interface on your data. Fetching layer. that's all synchronous or lazy if you can if you want to say so. Every time a field and wants to accessory source it goes through a data. Loader that accumulates things to be loaded and resolves them is synchronised lee as a batch any other longer term maintenance issues you've seen with large Api's the other issue. I see a lot. Is the just the evolution issue. So if you go on graph your website today you'll see graphical says you don't need to version graph. Api and there's some truth to that because clients only select what they need. So adding fields or adding use cases doesn't impose overhead to existing clients. The downside though is that you still need sometimes to remove or modify existing fields. And there's just like any other decisions that is not always easy so the way to avoid that as much as possible as first of all design things in a way that is future proof and the other thing is having a good process for making changes to api so it is a huge challenge for for any api star but graf fueled especially because often people don't up for versions up for continuously dilution approach. Making sure you understand how you're used and making sure you design things in a future ford way often by first of all exposing things that are relevant to your domain not the data not the underlying data is of great agility. So i would say data fetching and evolving. Your graph are two of the biggest challenges. You've actually written a book on production. Ready graph q. l. What did you learn when you were writing the book. So i learned a ton and this book is basically about everything. I've learnt that both shot a fine up. And i think while writing this book one thing to adapt to some people that it's very clear draft. Your is here to stay. But it's very graphical is not for all use cases so the book actually doesn't say everybody must be jumping on graph. Kill right away. It actually talks quite honestly about graph trade-offs and that's the thing. I thought the most about writing and the things. I discovered the moses that they are very clear offs where graph y'all's complexity and flexibility might not be needed but it's also very neat in some case in a trade off. You might be able to accept. So i would say that's the thing i've learned most is how to think about graph killing kind of a pragmatic way in a new way. This episode of software engineering daily is sponsored by data. Dog data. Dog is a cloud monitoring platform built by engineers for engineers enabling full stack observability for modern applications. Data dog integrates seamlessly together. Metrics and events for more than four hundred technologies including cloud providers databases and web servers easily identify slow running queries error rates bottlenecks and more fast with built in dashboards algorithm alerts and into and request tracing log management from data. Dog data. dog helps engineering teams troubleshoot and collaborate together in one place to enhance performance and prevent downtime. You can start a free trial of data dog today and doubted will send you a free. t shirt. Visit software engineering daily dot com slash data dog to get started. That's software engineering. Daily dot com slash data. Did you spend a lot of time. Talking to other practitioners who have built autograph. You'll stuff absolutely so that the book actually includes a few interviews. I've gone with other practitioners and part of writing. A book was also just my experience talking with so many people in the community. A great part of graph is community around it the tooling around it and we're all kind of in the same boat so everybody is new to that technology especially when it comes to exposing public. I've talked with a lot of people in that boat. So definitely they're craig companies. Doing great things with graph. You'll these days airbnb comes to mind. Uber comes to mind. Not ask a naive question. But what is advantageous about using graph q. Oliver rest from your perspective. So i liked to answer the question in two ways. The things that are inherently useful about kraft. You'll can start with graph. You'll makes it really easy to support very very large amount of different clients that have different use cases. The classic problems large internal. Api's have is that every client wants. Its own kind of optimize version of an endpoint or resource or any ap atas provided overtime that leads to the server team trying to kind of adapt to all these cases and either creating different end points for everyone or creating extremely large resources that are tailored to everyone but not optimized for any single client. So there's very solutions to that the back in front and pattern is one netflix's it's similar things. Two thousand twelve. I think with server adapters to different clients. Experiences gradual is kind of like facebook's approach to this problem where you can in fact define your schema as a way to expose all server possibilities but then clients are free to choose pick and choose and create their own use case. I i like to almost sometimes think about graph in terms of clients creating server side resources a bit if the client was creating their endpoint on the back in so that's kind of the inherently could part about graph any large internally is then the other part is the more almost magical part of where it just happened so that the community around it tooling around it and the fact that it comes with so many things bundled in like a type schema like the fact you can select smaller payloads so like executive feels you want. These are all things you could do with utter. Api's as well but there are less well defined and the specific asian defines. All of these could api practices into one. And i think that helped a lot of people just jump on graft y'all because you get all of this for free and you don't need to think about it. I'm so these are not things that only graph you'll does but it brings a good package altogether. Tell me about your perspective on schema design and how that's applied to get skimmer designs thing. I think a lot about. And it's it's something really important would graph. Api often people kind of assume. Hey i've got a schema. I've got a graphical ski. My has going to be really easy to use. Compared to my maybe at hawk hd pinpoints that have defined the past but the fact is aggressively is not magically well-designed and thinking about api design is just as important as anything else. So like i was saying a bit earlier is thinking in terms of what your clients actually want to do. Is such an important part and i do think raphael helps us that way because it's so query focused and so client focused so it could way to do that is think about not what you scheme. I should look like but what you queries with. Look like in design the back end server with that in mind and we do that by basically just asking. What is the client really wanting to do at this point. Does it really want to create a pull request record database or does he want something more friendly like merging pull request or checking the status of a pull request or basically thinking in terms of workflows and use cases not tables not services. Not anything internal. What's the state of the art of tooling around graph. So that's evolving. And that's something. We invest a lot in a lot of our tooling is kind of internal tooling so far. But there's a lot of things i think any graph. Api should have place the first one is a schema so a tool that helps you have a consistent api in any respects your api rules internally and make sure that's done on every change so that's something we do by checking in the draft schema in get on every change and having these checks ran on every change so we have this tool called graph. You'll dr which analyzes graphical schema and emits recommendations or warnings depending on what the changes for example we can detect if someone is removing field. That's used heavily integrators. We can then warn them that this change is dangerous and we can even tell them how many times this field was used. So this team itself leads itself to great tooling because it's the interface to use cases so any tooling that helps you. Maintain a consistent and maintain security. And making sure your changes are safe is great. The other part of tooling. I think is really important is tooling that. Come really naturally with graph. Julie's understanding how your scheme is used so if you think about arrest. Api the server determines the shape of the response. And when it's sent to the client you don't actually know which parts of that resource are being used with graft all we know down to every single field argument in value. We know what the client has requested. And we can assume it's using it dislikes us collect amazing data on how data is used and this data in our gradual dr tool for example which knows what every single change what the impact is possibly is we know new features already being used already being liked so this is the real power that's often forgotten about graph yours. You can know exactly how is used down to single leafs of the response. What about maintaining secure. Api surface area. Any suggestions on security graphical. Yup so one of the first thing i'll say is that graph field does appear less secure to an external i but it's not necessarily two facts so i think security and api security shouldn't only be about the api layer itself. Authorizations should be a big part of your domain logic of your business logic and no matter how you assess it. It should be secure. There are still things you gotta be careful of. Though with graph. You'll the main part is clients can actually send you the queries. They want so. That's a benefit for them but it can be dangerous for graphical server especially at public one the way we address this again is by using this schema to analyze inquiries. We use an iser that looks at income inquiries and computes it cost for each query instead of rate limiting for example the rest. Api where you would count an amount of requests per minute. We instead compute the complexity of queries and use that to block queries that we deem too expensive and we use that cost to rate limit clients as well the main thing we have to be careful about graphic. Api's yes giving the flexibility declines to design their own use but do that within secure bounds. And that's actually possible to do static way by analyzing to query against schema and there are folks ibm research. Actually that are working research projects and actual scientific papers on how do analyze a cost for query in the best way possible. That's a that's a big challenge. What are you focused on. Get up today today. Our main focus is trying to make sure all our use cases inequality of api's across rest across across our ui is consistent and easily accessible by everyone. So what we're working on is trying to make the rest. Api gradual to first class citizens just two different experiences for a client but expose the same functionalities of gab. At its core so recently we've released an open. Api description for sap kind of bringing sap on par with graph in terms of schema on the side. We still have work to do to bring some of these use cases that were possible. Arrests and not necessarily and graph. You'll yet so we're working on basically making that on equal ground and really treating both of these. Api as first class citizens and allowing clients the big experience they need. Do you have any advice for people who are doing large scale migrations from a purely rest. Api surface area to graph q. L. i do. I think my first advice would be tried to avoid tools. That will try to automate this conversion for you as much as possible so migrating from fuel is often in excellent fortunate. T- to rethink a design. You didn't like what your rest. Api and exit important. Teaches design. Things in a graph. I kind of way and not that weird conversion flow. We talked about earlier so that would be my main advice. Try to take that as a new beginning and think of your design again. In a graphical way my other advice would be to extract any logic. That's within your. Api layer address layer extract that elsewhere from the layers so that both the arrest and graph api call in in the same coat. Best a very very common mistake is having very important. Business logic stuck that. Api layer commonly. That's found in kind of rest. Api controllers and it's tempting for people migrating from arrest graft you'll call in into the rest api but that's not always great and what we found is that not only is your code base better if you do that. If you extract your business logic into reusable logic by both wrestling graph but you also don't get stuck with craft types at all the resemble your existing resources because you kind of leak that internal implementation detail that your graph julie. Pi calls in your api so that would be. My main advice is let your business logic away from any layer and try to avoid any kind of like automated conversion tools or at least verify. What the result of these tools are and make sure to fit your your design. Well you shouldn't build your own authentication when you offload your identity to octa you free up your team of developers to do the jobs that they were meant to do now. They have time to build a seamless digital experience or consolidate identity touch points for your customers or build trust with application users with octa. Your team can build a first class online experience and when the only option is to connect your customers virtually a first class. Online experience is not just important but critical. Companies like hp spunk carmax. Get lab and send gauge. Put their trust in octa. You don't turn your own butter. You don't knit your own clothing. You certainly wouldn't run a write. Your own payment service. So why are your developers building their own authentication service consider saving them time and stress and leave authentication to octaves. Customer identity solution go to okay ta dot com slash identity. That's octa dot com slash identity today. A great digital experience starts with identity and the full potential of that. Experience can't be reached if your team is overwhelmed with too much on their plate. Let octa handle the off so your team and your business can thrive good dot com slash identity. That's okay. ta dot com slash identity to learn more. Is it worth it to make that kind of migration. How do you judge the cost and benefits of making migration agrofuel. It can be worth it. But that's definitely something to think about. I think if you're if you have a single time and a single server and you've got a recipe added works. Well i don't believe it's necessary to move graph you all. You will likely not notice very many benefits especially if you already use something like open. Api jason schema and you've got a typed resources already if you do feel the pains though where you've got multiple client asking for maybe an endpoint to have an extra field or an endpoint as growing too large because it tries to do too much for too many clients. That's a point where it might be worth exploring craft or just other strategies that allow pollution of an api server with multiple clients in one to one scenario where you've got one client that's already optimized with your api. It might be a bit less worth it to move to grab the other interesting. I'm noticing though if you have public. Api is that client side. Developers and mobile apps in front ends using react are starting to love integrating with gradual more and more. So something funny. I've been noticing that even if draft you'll might not be needed on a server side. We're getting to a point where the technology itself is so appreciated by clients that it may become a requirement for third party. Api is to implement. So i would say think. About a trade offs graph. You'll definitely comes with complexity if you don't need the complexity these problems doc. Move but it's interesting to think about the future where maybe clients will will want require graduate. Pi because he loved the experience so much. are there any other anti patterns. You see of people working with graph q. l. I think the biggest anti pattern i see is using it. When in strange context where maybe the power of graph kills don't apply. I think the main one is public and static data so if you have an api that exposes a list of countries for example. Do you really need the flexibility that craft jewel at gradual server engine and is overhead and query language. Or would you rather just use. Hdp for what. It's good for and enabled the power of hp caching and proxy caches for data. That doesn't change often and is not authenticated so it can use caching at its full potential. It's possible to do caching with graft you'll common misconception. But that's definitely not the sweet spot so the biggest mistake i think is just jumping on graph because it sounds like it's something you need to use learn and not thinking if you actually need it. The public sadiq. Data's one example. I see often and the one that's debatable is when you have a single giant and a single server and you're just getting started the overhead of building graft. You might be a little a little too much for some people so get when you're standing up a new. Api what's the process for making an externally available. Do you have to get arrest. Api in place get greg. You'll api in place have tests for everything. Was that process like so. There's multiple stages. We liked to anchorage teams to start by literally opening an issue and think about whether it be i will want to do. And what kind of design they have in mind. The next step is moving to dan. Plantation stage where durst we provide kind of a lot of knobs to release an ep. Maybe behind a feature flagged. We had this thing called previews which are kind of like beta features where people can inboard but a special header. So we've kind of had a progression from this. Point is not available at all or this type available behind his feature flag. it's available behind it public beta until his full g. a. And we have that through our internal tools and dsl's where people standing up and new api can choose how to do so about wrestling gradual. We kind of have these internal persona about what kind of api might be useful to one or both. Ideally we one we would want any use case to be accessible through oliver interfaces. That's not exactly the case today. And it's something we're working on right now and trying to make trying to make it way easier for teams to expose functionality everywhere. Are there any major differences between how shop manage things. And how get hub manages. Things in terms of graph. You'll it's actually quite similar. Process is actually quite similar. Except i think the main difference here is that chef is kind of split into two. Api they have the admin version of kind of the back office and a storefront api. We don't really have that. So we haven't we do have an internal in a public. Api build it as as one and annotate parts of the schema using tooling again. In our our dsl's we provide our engineers to annotate. Is this field available publicly or is this part of an internal schema at runtime. Were able to mask certain parts of the schema depending if you're using an internal way or public way we actually do the same for anything. That's preview feature feature flag. These are all designed as once chemo internally which simplifies kind of cognitive overload for our engineers at runtime are gradual surveys able to modify the schema a client might see depending on the permission. So you have the feature flag are you. An internal consumer of this chemo. Do you have a preview. Enable all these kinds of things so the approach here is that we don't actually although the look like different. Api's they're built using the same foundations and we annotate things to generate multiple api's from one basically what's the process for deploying and rolling out updates to a graph kjell server get hub so the deployment workflow is the same. Whether you're deploying a i change and graph Api change are deploying for his is actually is actually quite fun. It's based a lot on chat up so to deploy graphic you'll change you. Open a pull request. Your changes are automation. Runs schema to make sure you're designing things in a correct way at. You're not making breaking change and when it's your turn to the ploy you deploy using slack. So we've got this deploy command where you pass in your pr. We employ so much that we actually have a deployed q. Trains you hop on one of these trains and your pr gets deployed automatically so an engineer. Actually it doesn't need to be involved into the details of a deploy we basically interact through those very useful chat ups when you're building out your external graph q. L. api for get hub. Did you roll out everything all at once. Did you have to have everything ready before a big bang released for extra. Did you gradually roll out the api surface area so right before joint get released a small. Beta graphical api which contained quite a lot of things to be honest but quite a small set of the holgate functionality. So that was kind of a a small bank of small initial data. but since then we've been evolving. it's slowly by adding things and the way we do. Things is by exposing functionality. First internally though often are you. I or mobile app will be using features before it's in the public. Api so that. Let's kind of test and see if we did a good job with the design of the api then we might roll it to partners and private way through feature flags we had these preview features where we could expose it to anyone who wants to try it. But knowing it's a feature and then we release it fully so when somebody makes a graphic change maybe adding field or even arrest change actually adding a new resource. It might not immediately be available in public. Api hit goes kind of Pipeline of confidence starting from internal only two available to everyone. What do you see in the near future for the graph q. l. ecosystem as a whole where are improvements coming in where the most broad changes coming. I think what i'm most excited about is graphic. you'll being more avai mature into the landscape. So i'm excited for the time. Where there's less blogs about. Here's the difference between rasim craft wise. Graft you'll better or wright express better and focus more on. here's when you would use rest or when you use afc kill. And what are the trade offs and get an to a place where everyone is in a place where technology is mature enough where it has nothing to prove anymore. There's no more of that. Api fight between different styles and we can focus on his strengths of all the is for graft itself. One thing i'm very excited about is just different. Performance improvements the the overhead of graph server where it has to execute everything declined requested. Add asked for is not something to take for granted so it. It does have an overhead for flexibility. And i'm excited for anything new. That would change howard. Prafula query would be executed right now. Most graphical servers execute graphical quarries in a fairly naive way and there are exciting things coming like pre compiled queries and persisted queries. That i think can could change that game a lot. The other part of it is observable t of a graph. You'll server be kind of a black box where you send a query something happens and you get exactly the response you want. But how that query is computed. How that graphical engine compute is quite important for performance reason and something you want to detect kind of slow nest in and it's not always easy out of the box right now. So that's something we also spend a lot of time internally on where making sure we understand how certain fields execute but also the relationship of different query shapes giving different performance results. That's a big. That's a big challenge. Trying to optimize for all these use cases looking at if i look at our grafter leap and if i come back to what i was saying earlier where every graph you'll query is kind of a client constructed server endpoint. Well we serve so many different shapes of graphical queries that you can almost kind of think of it as if we were supporting millions of end points. So it's definitely a challenge to make sure that all these use cases execute in a performance way and consistent way let's have gone my graph q. l. schema built and i want to evolve that schema overtime. What are the best practices for evolving. Agrofuel schema so the state of the art is using a continuous aleutian approach. Meaning you've always got one version of your api running in production and you use depredations to kind of warren clients about upcoming changes so the great thing about graph kill is it includes deprecation first class citizen. So there's a deprecated directive you can apply to certain fields values for example to make sure clients are aware than it upcoming. Change is coming. So we use that heavily when wanting to make changes we deprecate field and start communicating that. It's going to go away. The key here though is to focus on changing things into in additive. Way always so if i'm deprecating field it's because there's something else a client should use instead. If you deprecate. Something without an alternative clients are not going to move away so continues. Devotion is great because kinds. Don't need to hop from version to version and kind of grasp all the changes that are contained within versions but it also comes great responsibility where you have to communicate changes and offer alternatives that are great for clients. One way we do. That is using technique. We call brownouts so communicating. Changes are great. But you'll always have a long tail of clients that either don't care didn't see your communications about field going away to way we try to reach. Those people is by using brownouts and brownouts are basically periods where we'll disable that field as if we've removed it just for a minute or two hoping that the client systems using our api maybe errors or anything were they would be able to realize something's going on and then notice our communcations so in order. Think first thing you want to do is deprecate. Your schema members are going away. Start communicating these changes. And as i was saying earlier with graph. You'll we've got the potential to know exactly who and how are the using our api so you can track. Which would be affected by a certain deprecation. An email them directly hide these feels from your dachshund known. New clients are getting on board and finally if that doesn't work using brownouts to kind of wake up people who haven't seen the communications is a great way to do it. I must say that version. And graphical is possible. Even though it's not a common approach the folks that chopper fi us kind of filtering approach like we do get up for international public to create these versions. These calendar versions between graph. You'll versions and that's been working for them. So i think the the actually got a blog post about that comment approach is volition as long as you can with. Great communication but version is possible even though that's not the most commonly used approach mark. Is there anything else you want to add about. Get hub or graph or just your thoughts on engineering general. I think the only the only thing i would want add here is that there is a lot of talk about graft versus gop c. or whatever ap style. There and. i think the important thing here to remember is that we're building a is for users to build to build things to use features and for the api not always the most important thing it's often to think we'd like to think about as engineers building api but the reality here is that we have to pick the one that enables our clients to access the use cases in the way they want. And i think no matter what. The technology designing a great api's similar with cody. Api a twirler prp craft rest thinking about the client is key and finally i think there's nuance and everything and carefully examining the trade-offs case we've picked to support both is really important. Okay mark well thanks for calling a pleasure talking to you. Thank you so much.

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Elliot Loney on impersonating tennis stars

The Tennis.com Podcast

42:36 min | 10 months ago

Elliot Loney on impersonating tennis stars

"Okay, everyone welcome to the tennis dot Com podcasts. I'm really excited about this episode. I'm your host Nina. Pantic joined by our. NFL Coney as always. Hey, guys, how's it going and our special? Our special guest is Elliott Loney Eliot Welcome. Thanks so much, have you on the show? They wanted to come on here for a long time, so the fact that I'm fondly here and very solid and I'm to get stuck into it. Oh, I'm flattered. This is a great way to start. Exactly what I expected. I'm very excited. Raised water is unbelievable, sir, Crispin. She sparking to the microphone just now. We absolutely love hearing that because there's been a lot of people that actually would disagree with you, so I'm happy. You're saying that. Sounds unbelievable so. Around the, why author we're offering. People that might not know your name which I don't believe you are I former. tennis-player turned into an impersonator of tennis, players and celebrities, a Comedienne and you have a youtube channel, and you just launched a podcast, so I want to start off by asking you. How has the grind band during quarantine? it's very Guess I'm just looking for things to do. the podcast Qantas out data the whole oscillation being so. I guess the made. It was just a height decided of inciting twenty four seven, but this is such an unprecedented, Tom. It's a really tabooed fries would, but it is now the white Describe it, so I guess. Looking for things to do, and I thought about doing point concert contact comedy show is a live shows i. don't buy tennis too much anymore, but obviously still love the game, so I can have a kid. I tried to get out in. The open has been good. I I would have. AGO which absolutely. but yeah, there's been. So busy so been doing some strange things also show as we all have. Strange things. What do you mean by that? Will as you Nahra gets sometimes mild goes come out as pretty strange conversations. Almost settle in if the door's closed or just a job if there is another person in the opposite room, they probably think most wind schizophrenia can. Whenever call the feds homemade. Food. Run it takes confident confidence though to do what you do, but you've also spent quarantine at least from what it looks like from the outside with some of your closest friends like Novak. and Curios because you've been making this video tennis players in isolation is one of the most recent ones. How do you get in character for this kind of thing? this like. It's it's a tough question to answer because like I've carnival wise vein like that Even when I was a little kiddos, impersonating ages and stuff like that so it's always. A really known anything different. If that makes sense, so some characters are Louisiana to I guess most myself in like Rafa, for example because I have bait along I guess some other ones. They might take a little bit motorist designing, but usually a feel been doing it for long enough now that snapping to A. On the. Favorite, to impersonate them. Probably in terms of the tennis players Yes I guess because it's the one that I'm most knowing full, maybe about incidents of like old. MONTPE- stations probably no, but definitely the tennis. Yeah, you've been around the Tennessee. That I've seen you at tournaments. Have you met Rafa? Has He given you any feedback? And if not, are you nervous about it? Of Corn of made him a couple of times, like obviously I've got so much respect for him and. He seems like such an Oscar. and the only interaction I had with Rafael was I was in Montreal twenty seven. The Rogers cop was doing some content for them. And I was playing a guy ankle hits. applied the. Heads up with immature bouncing. Dot Curiel. If you plants coming through coming through one by one, and anyway wrath strolls up and saw much. They cannot. Cool also. Get Wrath my Fights game here and and you know he was. He was looking at me like unite very serious and then. Also. Are I might say to dot and then stride why the film for from ultra ran across the like? Hey, hey, we got the with Rafa. We have you don't have it can. Can we and refugees look dominicus? I'm sorry, Little Guy, but I cannot to do it, but. I gotta say Buddy Soup, and on the best of luck, my hand and we'll suffer himself. Jedi can sign off and all his devastated because I was hoping that I had maybe a couple more minutes just to be like. Hey, by the way. You know if you say. Yo! lost. A. Feels so good to make people laugh though I think that's such an incredible skill, not just for like dating APP line in general and just like in life so good. Trying I never thought I would actually be crying on a podcast. It's almost good that you have it like it's so. It's so good that you're able to just whip that out, you know. It's like a performance takes such confidence because I'm Serbian and I can't even do a stripping accent. They, ask me. It's funny. You bring up the southern accent thing because when I deny back to college they will. Literally, cannot. This reminds me that Roger Federer. Lobby Comparing me to Roger Federer. I appreciate that. Unbelievable Betty. Yourself is incredible I've seen you last. Time I WANNA hit a couple of decades with him no problem. Pull it together? Have you ever thought about doing roger or like other players. Like summer, women would be hard, but I feel like some of the guys. There's room there. Absolutely all I'll answer that question just a second, but I'm sorry. I realized wouldn't track was talking about the yeah. Diana's here that I sorry I lost it to. Arena lawsuit yeah. Larry. I just try not to do roth for for the remainder if Not Cry Laughter. Appreciate it. But with with Novak Djokovic show like a lot of people like how do activities do it? said the accident, but I was trying to sit in a racist or conflict. It is well, it's like. With Novak. He's kind of got sunny. Little intricacies voice, because obviously tennis global these Tom Traveling find omens, feel accent is in the Soviet accent. It's more like Novak Djokovic. Jackson, so there are some woods that he says of the Serbian accent, but in other words he says the back inside in that particular. Why are? he's a tough one to impose tonight. Probably one of the hottest wants to visit. Of studying had to go into that because I agree with you one hundred percent, it's not just the plain surgeon accent. There's so much in there so much flavor. So much flavor, but to answer your second question I have trod to impose nights applies of recently added Dominic teams. It's the least I think at the moment is Dominic Tame? Novak, Djokovic Andy. Murray Nick Curiel spinout told me. Tim Curry. In Korea we'll have. he's been on the podcast I just I. Just never I think takes balls impersonate. Some of these got all these guys. Yeah absolutely will Is Very very focused and professional man. I don't think he had much Tom from on known since I made him one time at the strike often and we just done abroad cost I always imprisoning Andy Murray Law for across the channel, said in an assortment in the cafe at at a strain on. A hijab I don't know if you know about God during the impression like it was dislodged with you on channel seven like twenty minutes ago and literally he was like. High on. I just tweet lake. T set back right about now like I. I got like or some food right about now. I'm not trying to be rude. I'm just trying to like get into my inner processes. Right about now for this next match up, so if you could just like maybe like. We'll talk later, but not right now. Okay, not right. Drums. Brutal so with that like experience like that from that. Is that where you get the impersonations from that one experience? will yet this differently possibilities impersonation that I buy some experience because like? US still locked Jim. I have a Lotta respect for Jim I think he was a fantastic. Pliny contributes to spoil, but my personal experience with not die I got the impression. It was like well I know he's probably not lock that. Maybe having a bad day. Maybe you know whatever, but also but I'm going to use that and I'm Gonna I'm GonNa drum that up a hundred tons That's. What I have and that's the way the alertness in the arrogance comes from when I'm visiting. Because I know, he's not like that, but because of that experience I was like well. You know we'll. Skirt? That's going to be him. That's. Not, you you have perfectly source material I don't that's the. That's the best defense, so you just you just launched a podcast. I guess a quarantine podcast, but probably going you continue, and you had nick. Carry US on I. Know You had the Nasi see? On Earth but nick, curious episode blew up I. Know that we at tennis dot com covered it. Probably much to Nick's to green, but that's my life. How'd your friendship with Nick Combat? And why are you going aside to hot when you impersonate him? Because he was spot on, he was spot on. Why are you wearing a sideways hat? Israel Israel. I guess with Olympus. Nation similar to what saying. Jim Full I think like a lot of the comedies in the absurdities and over and think like it's not just funny to do it impersonation. It's Kinda like with Rafeh when I do the. Like he doesn't do that of never-say-die that, but it's funny to add that in because it, it's almost like my little signature to the national to give Donald Siege, if every single person I this night, only Elliott lining up. So. That's something that I. Try to draw doing impressions, but with Nick I guess we met couldn't tell you how long. we probably started speaking more canoe about twenty fifteen, but I've known him for longtime into because I've been such a tennis fan for so long. I knew that he was really promising. Junior in mutual friends told about said he was on the way up talented walls, and all this kind of stuff. Then I guess we just got along really well. obviously an ASEAN really close in. Probably started spending multibeam, because if the Nasi And yeah, he was just always really consummate and really a really good to me, and I guess some. Yeah I just sort different sought sneak. tried in those early days especially. I really enjoy his company in. We still get along house finance. Everyone, yeah of time for. I especially liked the part where he talked about obviously drinking and then playing tennis, and all that like all that stuff that happens behind the scenes that people don't know about I mean these are normal human beings who have like five years old. He has friends on towards a one type of good time that is relatable content and the part where he was. Yeah it it just it just kind of seems natural, but like you also played tennis. Have you ever hit with any of these pros? With people the Nasi. Data you can hang pretty much. Wilsey God's sorry. You can hang because I think you're. I mean from what I understand like. You were legitimately chasing a pro career at one point or thinking about it. Yeah absolutely like I played a status free. Light Michael was eleven when I picked this racket light for tennis player. saw light as well so A. Representative Tennessee saw applied presenting tour when about seventeen? Win on it applying challenges futures, just trying to get a point that I never got a ninety eight point, but by Golly the challenges. That kind of stuff, but I never met him. I enjoy I never got point. So I kind of guided away, but I would say young still love apply, but Yeah, just didn't have what it takes to make it the Patients Tennis Riyadh's. Hey Guys Irena here today. We have comedian. Elliott. Loney and you gotTA. Keep listening because he legitimately made me cry of laughter. We love to ask transition questions as in like literal life transitions. How do you go from chasing a ATP point to becoming a comedian? Is that because you're always funny in high school I mean I get you were the class clown? Maybe but then like. How do you turn that into? What is now pretty much a career? It's IT WAS INTERESTING Ray out! So, yeah, I, played. oversee played tennis in a thinking about making a comeback in Ozama White. House body on the skype would with a whole group of Knights. Thinking also pretty cool and I think it had to Beer Mehanna. The Tom Knows Megawati down this. He'll come. One of my nights was like veering this corner and he's like this coming coming. Up and I like beat these. GotTa dislike Niger Strip, but as I came off, fell the pavement and. Failed to Paul and I was like what was that, and then like a searing pain that lex shot all the way down and unused something was wrong in somehow appeal must showed off in like there was like ten of my of me and I also looking at me I'm like what's happening orange My arm was dangling like. Like it popped out of the socket backwards. so most shoulder dislocations they pop out folds backwards. I was crazy man of pioneers. Hospitals twenty minutes away, so when might ran back to his car will skype back to his. when drive me to do not wooden i. it must shoulder was abandoned Allen. who was probably one of the most excruciating? Experiences are after that. My mom was never the sign in terms with my tennis like I. I started getting good bowl. I was doing a little practice at the time. With a goal, I was around seven hundred. I take a a mountain bacher in single. He was compliant trying to move pretty. Level into practice said so I thought maybe I can get on and maybe get that point because I'm starting to play a guy, but after that. That was it for me. I'm sure that that was also really tough on you. Mentally 'cause I mean you probably felt like you were right there to get that. You're so close to that point and then to be that close, and then have it pretty much taken away from you. I mean how was how was it dealing with that? I mean. I know that a lot of players when they get some sort of like injury like that, they can go into deep depression mode. I mean not. It can really mess you up. Yet will yeah I. Guess for for a while. Absolutely always really really. Excited because I guess. People didn't really put the future into consideration like I never really had a plan. Bao's unintended flat. But then I guess when you get older, you start to realize you. You become a lot more realistic with your expectations. I think you become a lot more levelheaded. Think I was just. Almost too optimistic. About stuff, and then that really was a reality check. Like lying in bed. Literally screaming into my pillow because I was like handle like this is all have known like like. What am I going to? And Food for a long time. heights like for about a month to six weeks. I was like doing nothing. Bailey with the house like it was in a sling, I could move on from idiot if you know I'd wakes like I was in really bad lies mentally, and then a sort of did a lot of Rahab supposed to get a shoulder reconstruction, but opted to go the more natural route and get a load of. Rahab, great stuff, go my shoulder back to a point where I could have full range of motion supply social tennis in so go to the gym It's like ninety five percent is the one hundred seven game, but it's not only fall. They Yet look. Votes myself to try something different and I started doing prank calls on facebook. Just for my my mutual friends light, putting it on youtube or anything, but I was just like pulling Morgan Freeman. Dr Phil in Bay Grills. Dislike screwing around and. That getting a lot of traction just within my immediate circles in one of my nights was doing video production stuff, and he said hi, man, like you wanted to film. One of these things are production. Help you. We can do it together. So, he shot at first video. Which I think was bagels and camping stole. Prankul where I was in a rice tent city, which is like a ten. Ten Year in Australia and cold, the stole manager wall, so as in the stole as bake rules. Like. Alan on beg grooms, rummaging around pots and pans, and then way on. He was in the stories. We are might where I own behind the. Show. Pretty Fun. side we did that and that sort of subtly blew up. Eighty thousand views which was crazy for me at that time I couldn't believe it and then. Shortly after that a drop, the Video Co. man try, which was also a big parody in the city, a twenty thirteen and that went soup of Aro like that was a think it's almost got. Thousand years now. At the time it was the most viewed video in the world for that particular diet, so he'd like front. Read it, and just went A. So that blew up in as a result of that I was of lock. Well, I'm going to stop doing wolf goes. So did that. Falling and then the natural progression from stand up comedy so here I am. Simple a simple story from from terrible accident to prank calls I mean. I remember doing pranks and colleges. Isn't people prank me and they're not famous. COMEDIANS are impersonators or have blow up to channel, but maybe had they kept going because how do you? Don't WanNa Youtube blows up like you said like. The girl is one of your first one. Where you really put in some thought there. What? How does that turn into? I guess money and fame, and like people have so many youtube channels now with so many hits, but yours are are unique, of course, but how how does that turn into like? Career because you get bookings. That question of? I was very fortunate to do it into bidding, which was like. Youtube was WISCON- of in its infancy back then like. Obviously! It was still a massive platform, but there weren't as many cree itis trying to offer paypal attention so I think it was interesting. You count on one hand, the people that were doing what I was doing and strategy at that time, so that helped me in the early stages up in cold, more audience and build a bit of a path life. Myself I think it would be a lot more difficult today to do that. But having said that Maybe the restore award ratio is probably hard tonight as well. Like if you take a big risk and it goes crazy tonight. It Goes Wolf Laurel today than it ever could back in tweet Thursday. So I guess there's pros and cons for H. saw of the coin about A condo happened for me because I. had that really good start with Memphis Metro and then I was able to take that honest that and use the audience that I initially got from that. Build it into something much bigger, so that's what I try to do. Do I was really consistent with my content is making a lot of videos and I wasn't really caring about the equality through much onto onto the quality quantity, whereas now and more about, but think back, and it was all about throwing dots and attend dots, and all non of a missing and wanted to the Bulls I'm GonNa. Do it again. That the way that I would. Say. Out of out of curiosity I mean I really don't know. Like what it would be like schedule, wise for a comedian so. Tell us like in the next couple of months in the next year I. Mean how how long before you get bookings and. Can you just show up? Is it like a three day thing? Is it a event? I mean? As a tennis player. You've been playing tennis for so long I mean it's a little different because you have to plan so far ahead and sometimes it's like out. We're going to this country that next. You know. I'm just curious what your schedule looks like as a comedian. Yeah will. It's it's Kinda funny. 'cause his comedies in a way like tennis a menu by itself. you You thinking through things? Uram if you have a great Gig, you feel amazing. If you have a terrible, it's like taking a hot loss. You feel terrible and sometimes you might have a mental of his coach that you can bounce ideas often like gameplay I guess so there's. There's be correlation I. Think between the third, so it's almost ironic that I am doing comedy to answer the question. I guess it's Kinda like. for May I'll do a lot gigs because I'm. In. A lot rare to come by than there's a lot of Canadians but not many impersonators and especially ones that well. Yeah being able to to navigate the corporate market pretty well. And Spain beneficial to me because it's like it's a lot I. think it's easier than doing clubs in bars and pubs which you have to do as well. Known as frequently if you're doing covert, Sane and base money in the overseeing. unless you're selling out shows sometimes it can be odd to make a good profit doing. Stand up unless you have a beat owing out shows. visit growing aspect to it as well because. Hitting the practical and you have to go to bars and clubs and to open mcnaughton, which is what they? Typically comedians through maybe three to five minutes in front of a really small crowd on you know I've done gigs to three people in the back alley of advisement on meal cry. To. Full at full arenas with five thousand paper, watching like. Biz of Donald Solta GEEKS are. I guess yet. Joel is is a hot wants a navigate especially now because. I don't know what modules gonNA. Look clock, but I guess I go to destroy news time productively in rotten new jokes and trusting you impersonations out, and I guess when all the dust settles. Don't get back out there and jaundice and material and ticket. So other than obviously people losing it and crying on a podcast I mean. What would you say like your favorite part of being a comedian? Being out there? In front of five thousand people are in a back alley on a milk crate. guess it's like a character deathly character-building like a I honestly think is. Is is ridiculous. It's my say on a tiny bit. Of like. I was probably more more judge. Mitchell, before I started doing. Stand up comedy, but I think once you once you get that the humbling experience of having a first bomb. Is is nothing mole. character-building than like. If you tank in front of thousands of people and you'll standing on stage for ten minutes. No loss jarque. that builds character like you wouldn't believe and you can't. You can't get that from a textbook sir. I think that's something that always be from foreign comedy the like. Made me more empathetic towards other performers and. you know nowadays I. Think when I say someone WHO's starting up? To a bad gig on will be the first person to get around him when they come off stage and dominate the hit off. You know what I mean because I know what that feels like Mattress stuffing kit. That's probably the things I've I've learned? From Everyone listening to the tennis dot Com podcast with special guest comedian Elliott Loney, stick around because Novak Djokovic shows up to sign off this episode. I can't really imagine you completely flopping. I guess I could see how maybe things could go wrong. The beginning you know when you only have three or four or five minutes and a lot of it seems like you have to memorize all this stuff, which to me seem not the hardest, but one of the many hard thing I really cannot imagine you flopping, but I guess it is like tennis. Do get you to take the losses, and some of them can be in front of so many people. I guess it also depends on the on the the situation I mean. Tenants you could come up against someone on the on the head to head. You think Oh this guy's going absolutely chop. This is other dude, and then I get cold and that they won't be carrying a couple of niggling injuries, Ovalles B in a battling some days off the court and then they lose the match matching you like what happened that there's something going on saints either know about so I mean look. I've done a Lotta Great Geeks as well we have. been fortunate to have like a couple of standing ovations. It's kind of like. You know you say stuff like that and you. This is the best thing in the world, but then obviously the lawsuits I did want meticulous game where? It likes. It like fundamentally change me as a person like almost like I felt like I was ray wall off that. I did a GIG ON. Eight Ministro, which is like A. Big It's a big rain. It's like a it's like a stadium with able reply feels fools matches their and stuff. It's cool novel stadium now tonight, But there and it was like think like three thousand. Thousand April for the IC to Congress, which is like a political gig. And the form prominent service trolley. was there like it was a big deal? And I was impersonating another former prime. minister. Tony Abbott Strategy I don't know if you're familiar with Tony Abbott. You guys have it. Is Nas I'm sorry. Johnny Abbott whatever raisin in the tenure airy thought to be a good idea to have. It s Lebron's so usually in culprit sense like these are. GIG like. These Abel's in lots of Abel's thanks on on the Ron. Shake their like all this time. We have a comedian who's going to be doing this? Special Guest Are. we had the Melbourne. Symphony Orchestra, which is like a huge string quartet like playing bar leans and everything like that in. The band struck up all the instruments and. I walked out on stage and almost dresses Tony Abbott and just went off the jug. OP, the judge to the clattering of cutlery. Times thousand. Like. Could. He is like the is of the crowd and to make matters worse. There was this huge like movie camera that was zooming in on my face, because some some of the views of the people in the room with obstructed by the storm, killers semi Feis, was offered on the huge predicted that will strewn all throughout the auditorium, and as I was tanking the camera, zooming in on my face, and I started to sweat profusely so I had watched sweat bathing debt on. As his tanking, going Dad's lives. Distribution by ten minutes. When was probably just about to finish and I was like? Bond Nine. Tiny abish and there was the saw that started on one side of the room that just ended on the other side of the room, and I realized that none of the judge had context because they didn't nor. Investigating and they must have just thought. I was some drunken either. Literally just like mighties while to the stage after a few drinks, because moments before I made. Up on the stage, the Prime Minister of Australia might these unbelievable. Each bicycle standing advice should add in August. A sitting backstage walking back and forth the felt like Scharnagl after he dropped precious a sitting meg I'll learn learn. daugavpils were. Walking back and forth this stereotype buy shoes, and I feel this hand stripes across my showery will up, and it was the busboy and he had dirty. Is like. Doria late when he might. Also be funny. Some consolation, Wow! That sounds really our fault I mean. It wasn't really your fault like the at that's bad though. I think it was a little bit, too. Might maybe a little bit more woman a little bit? There's obviously now that that was quite a few years ago. Now was like six or seven. Years ago now, but. Now whenever I do a Gig, I'm like. I want you to introduce me as the Canadian, it has to be in the ranch than on the Canadian people to be. Comedy Nature Pitch and what's comedy? Otherwise they'll like what is this? you learn so much more from your losses. They always say that right like in tennis in any sport like anything anything. It's so true. True words never have been spoken wowed. To tennis as well like you would learn a lot from your losses, fish oil more so than than you yeah, talk about your loss. Trust me there are some days where I'll still be rocking in my bed. Just you know shaking from loss or you know having points or yeah, so we've all been there. feels. Feel that it's almost an alert tennis as well not. You're only as good as your last mash that you always have that pressure to have to make lick. You just had this amazing. You know nick carriers, podcasts and they was. Thousands of hits right to feel the same pressure with comedy in your skits in your persons. The next video has to be better than next. You know show has to talk that show and it's just a constant tennis has the amateur that maybe comedy does to or at least the videos? Yeah I think definitely when I started out or head like crazy expectations on myself really stressed out like I'd be wise thinking to myself man. Go to be better than loss, Swan like. but nowadays not so not so much I think on wall destroying it for me like a trauma confident. That makes me happy I'M NOT SU- concerned about its in viewers and stuff like that on If I'm doing what I'm passionate about. It's GONNA come for in in the kitchen. Come so I'm not really concerned about locks always and stuff like that with. With my video is, but I just WanNa make the best content that I can, and that resonates with Gripe doesn't you know, make video lighted that will serve as long as I'm staying consistent doing videos similar to tennis you playing a little matches and you've had a lot of losses. If you try and kate grinding, you'll get a massive win in you end. Wall says the same thing comedy. It's amazing how you can correlate tennis. Into comedy and you know speaking of Tennyson being comedian. In Tennessee you have goals, you set yourself you know tournament to win a certain match to certain ranking. What's what's the? What's the goal for you? For me, my goals a little bit different, because obviously, I enjoy doing standup I. Love Tennis Law I think I'd like to say my podcast grow I'd love to I've always wanted to do something. We tennis passionate about the sport and marrying up my comedy with Montana's I. Think I, get the best outta myself when I'm doing that. 'cause I'm so passionate about things, but of written animated series goal, the prestigious non is. which is. Basically, it's about a Bryson hospitals votes. College recruits professional athletes from different cards to life. He's junior. League football team. and obviously the school turns blonde ought to it because I all I care about the athletic prowess of the school and stuff like that is kind of like family, the simpsons, but like completely sports related so I've been working on that for years. put a little more money into it and stuff Bain through a lot of It's with that It's animation is so expensive. of applaud for government grant here in astrology to get the show made So. That's my biggest. Goal in terms of moving forward I'd love to see that show him because I think it's a little potential. minority like commitment from a lot of profile. Athletes GonNa Lynn thereon voices in their avatars to the. If! It gets out so. Yet and I think I'd love to get that made in the US, so my goal is to start with that shirt here in Strasbourg. Just just stated around I fell in Mike another series. It's about. Cricket Era USTRALIA maybe another series. It's about tennis. They move onto NFL by. It's in out on integrating Elvis Bowl. So that's that's what I'd love to do. That's my. That's my example, but aside from that. is going to continue doing. Eggs. I definitely wish you the best of luck with that. That sounds I mean it's unexpected. Maybe because people might only know you as like the guy who does the impersonate at least in the tennis world specifically speaking I thought you're going to stay like and have my own Netflix's special. Everyone wants out I. Guess for me like I mean that'd be also like a savage show Netflix. But If. I was going to choose between Marlins. Special on Netflix Mine, emotional chief Mina, mashing everyday so. And all about passion I. Have you out this another like this is a bit of off topic, but have you ever met bear grylls? Because that was never. Never met big rules. I have made the people aren't tonight. Would you want to be like? Another strange question. Do you ever feel like if you met him? Do you ever panic like if I met someone and you WanNa impersonate them. Do you ever feel you're gonNA, choke that panic of like what if I don't? or Big Show I, don't know tennis tokenism thing where you're just like. And they're like that's not very good. Has that ever happened I? Don't think it's ever happened to you, but. On the definitely has definitely has the funniest thing is one of my good night's. First Time I did a reformation I thought it was pretty good I was like. Hey, that's pretty damn good. I'm GONNA do this. And he said that sounds nothing. Why Ground? As the worst references national of ever, that's what he said to me. Look at you. Kill an irate I. Kill. Saw On, said Gee I'm pretty sure it does. It does sound a bit like rafter. I'M GONNA give it a goods, so you're always going to have haters, no matter what you do in life. You? All of your ears stand up comedy in your skits and impersonations that the. Yeah I obviously tell funny stories and stuff as well as the things that I've experienced in the law, but I always try to wave line sand up yet, but. I'd love to show doing impersonations the whole time, but for me I. Think it's a really white. Relate to an audience. Get would laughs because I guess it's like a unique skill that I. have that a lot of comedians done? Sir I think I've got a utilize it. You know what I mean like this I guess he's like. I've got to use it to the best of mobility because I guess the Canadians that would love to be able to pence nations. And there's a lot of Comedians Auspey to I'd love to be able to do some of the things that I that concert so. I guess you focus on strings fighting full hand as I say. It does feel like a that. You can't really like make like. You can't force it almost like. A in a way like nick curious is ability to hit cleaners and these crazy trick shots. That's talent. That's something that he wasn't taught and I. Guess impersonations you. Can't I mean we'd be could learn it, but you. You haven't had to it something that you have. That's really cool. Yeah, it is really cool, and a fake. Outage towards. It is like yeah, regard I don't have to do this stuff like I. don't have to make videos like To destroy brought now like I could go and get a job, but like I. Feel like I've as I said got the skill, and I almost feel like it's like a judy of drawn brought. Payton's dies when I can because I I can get messages on my facebook page instagram from someone who's like a man with a real ducks onto the minded like is happened to my family will accept. someone I care about non feeling very good. At the moment. You'll videos change that like made me. Small may be happy when the chips again like messages like that. I'm like well. If all neighborhood effect, someone like that, I don't even know and have a positive impact in life. A butterfly fake that hopefully make same it back on the railroad tracks, and that's what but continued doing because I'm. Trying to make people happy and that's why is made something that I. Feel makes me the happiest. Give also turned around Irena Day I think making her laugh. That hard has changed. I really didn't think I. would cry today. I didn't think I would cry of laughter, but. My Life Elliot. Thank you. I was I. was going through a hard time. So thank you for that. It has been an absolute pleasure. Worries walking with you and just keep making the world smile because you're great at it, so keep it all. Mohawks molding. Appreciate that and dumb. Not thanks so much for having me on. It's been awesome in dumb. GonNa cost coming out, really soon, with Alex. statement now. Your listeners are interested. It's going to be there the only on Youtube channel all right well. Thank you again like it's been eiser innocent. It's been so much fun and such an honor. Glad to got some of your time. Nor worries no worries and if you want me to wrap it up. Any any other. Tennis players enough can rent it out whatever you law Dealer. You can choose whatever okay well I. I mean I. Think want new back. Yet show. All Describe High Novak. You low in the very happy to be here on the. Case with. The. Rule most grouping as so you know. Very, very fantasy. Glad these in the I know are in has been unbelievable. At I've seen early breakfast for. In incredible show since. This is my fourth line. So you know you are good, but your not degrade and the. Offense and we met I would like to say congratulations or a great show, and all the very best, but not to. This Gu there's been. A Great Day. From tennis channel PODCAST network. This has been the tennis dot Com podcast you start, subscribe to stay caught up available on apple podcasts, spotify and every major listening APP as well as tennis dot com slash podcast. You can also see the video of our episodes on tennis channel's Youtube Page and tennis dot Com facebook page. We're your hosts. Nina, panic and Irena Falconi would like to thank our team editor, an audio designer and video editor Christina Cassava Producers Alexa March and Sean o'malley. Producers Shelby Coleman highline horn an anti chill.

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250: Yolo Snarf (Repeat)

Embedded

1:24:32 hr | Last month

250: Yolo Snarf (Repeat)

"Welcome to embedded. I am ''alicia white here. With christopher white and chris smack this is one of those loved and hated. Basics episodes. A better loved and hated topic. Version control loves it. Why i love version control joel talking about. I know not so much when it saves you when it france. You wanna save you. Love it before we start digging in to version control and we have an announcement. T shirts t. Shirts are going to go on sale pretty much. When this episode goes up they will only be on sale for like three weeks. So if you don't have them if you haven't ordered them by mid july you may not be getting them and just go and do it immediately if it's long after that now then i'm sorry you you can send me a nice email such as what stephanie sent because of eric's shirt and maybe we will start another T shirt sale. I can elaborate on that. I'm not sure she authorized you to elaborate on any of that i. I didn't elaborate on any of it. He said her name. True practically doctor and our significant others name. So i mean there's right there. Yeah okay so version control. Maybe we should revert this and go back to it earlier. Version too bad. We didn't have any idea this idea where we're going to talk about version control. But we're not gonna talk about version. Control like what is get. What did you say. bisect bison buffalo. I dunno where. I'm going to talk about specific things. We're gonna talk about how you convince people to use version control and we're going to talk about what the importance is and we have of course can have to touch on what some of these things are like. What is a branch and some of the more advanced topics in version control. But i don't want to pretend they're we are each going to start up ex individually not together together. We'd take over and at startup ex. They have a sma- hardware-software would you but they have no version control when we walk in the door there's a doubly who's been for as long as we've been alive and he he doesn't see the need for version control. There is a college intern in software. Or something who doesn't know what version control is and hasn't been as long alive for as long as we've been working and we have a manager who doesn't care doesn't care about anything but getting things done you have to ship it right now. Oh my god finish finish. You've met this manufacturer and maybe there's another software engineer. Just 'cause you need somebody to talk to clutch i quit. Can't quit. Started beck says the bestest thing they make the super finest widgets alright. Is the explanation for why we need. Version control the same. For all of these people. it should be because otherwise. You don't have a consistent story right. no are you saying w. should do pay using version control. This is kind of where i wanna go. Okay all right. Is the explanation. For why all these individual people's abusing control in their particular areas. So are we. Are we talking to all of them at once. Kind of thing becoming in saying look. You just hired me. You're paying money one of the things. I knows. that version controls a good thing. How do we sort of evangelize this to get them on board with using it. Yeah except the words we use for the very experienced engineers who are not using it for a reason are gonna be very different from the words. We use for the college intern chur. Who just doesn't isn't aware of it. And the the reasons. We give argon be in terms of time for the intern and the debris. But it's going to be in terms of money for the manager. So i mean i didn't think i will have this group of people because their needs are different and version. Control can help each one. I don't think the managers gonna be checking in and his power points. Although i have done that but the manager needs to be aware version control needs to give us the time to implement it. Okay okay so now let us begin. The world's most boring de session role furnish got tony. Could you get to go first. How would you explain version control. Which one would you choose to go after. Talk to the intern. I compression -able nicely the rest to you guys and i would say you have code and you've got a file but you have this magic. Dial that you can turn and it will take you back in time through everything you've done to that file so let's say you made a mistake on wednesday but you didn't notice it until friday but you're not sure what the mistake was. You could look and see everything. You've done between wednesday and friday and find the mistake. Wouldn't that be great. Isn't that what time machine doesn't on your laptop. It's just back from his a fair enough. I mean yes and you could say you could say oh well why should choose time machine but time machine doesn't tell you intentive anything right. It's just a list of historical stuff. You don't hear of any notes about what you were doing. You don't have really a time stamp for when things happened and you didn't do anything a manually. So you don't have any control over what's going on. It just does it. Whenever and if you don't control what's going on it might miss something or it might have two pieces of code that you worked on. That really. didn't have anything to do with each other as a change. And so it's difficult to separate those out for example but if you have something that gives you a complete history of everything you've done intentionally. That's a huge win right. That is also. You might make a mistake. You might have your code and you type type type eighty and then you hit control k. Control x. somebody next thing. i'm probably butchering. And he blow away much stuff and then save it. And it's gone you can just revert to With your version control system your magic magic thing so brings back your code. The way it was just before you you nuked magic backup that will have documentation about what changed over the last period of time and forever. It's an immediate going back to the last known. Good at least at the very least description of what it does okay. I think i won the college turnover. You want roll for me to see if that worked roll for damage plus five plus five persuasion. It's the voice man it's winning. It's in that boys case vancouver. You want to take on the manager that's easy tyre. No okay the manager andras tough menderes. Kind of mean okay. I mean the the the e. He's been working longer. Than i'm alive is probably tougher than the manager. We'll take that one together. We'll just take him out maybe So the manager. The manager's thing with vision control is that look. Your people are gonna make mistakes and revision. Control helps them rollback and fixed those mistakes when they happen and it also if a if a developer leaves if something one of your people leaves which i know will never happen but it will happen then you will have the documentation of what people have changed over time and you can sort of see what they were thinking see. What approaches were tried in the past. Perhaps and you'll lose less of the context lest the institutional knowledge that person has when they left if some of that is in version control additionally when you are shipping soft free shipping suffer for your products. You know maybe you just have one product today because you're a start up and you just have a small hardware software widget at some point. You're going to have either more than one product or more than one released. You're going to have an alpha release and a beta release and then you're gonna have your one point. Oh release and then you're gonna have whatever else Whatever other releases you do as you go along version control allows you to sort of make make branches are typically called. Make a note that this is this offer released for alpha. This is the software released for beta and we made these changes. Were released this for one point and then we made this bug fixing called at one point one and so you can go all the way. Through all of your products you can kind of keep them separate and see which code shipping on which device on which day and with the documentation to say what changed end and what What didn't change The other thing is you have a copy of the code. Which at least has just told me to say. But i don't know what she means by that. I'm sorry this is why we don't usually at the get guest the outlined what you put my name in right because i was thinking a okay so one of the things you said sort of. But i thought you might've glossed over too much. Is somebody leaves. And you mentioned about knowing the history. There have been companies. I've been out where people leave and the killer notebook because they're angry and no one else has a copy of the current code or the current schematics so when we talk about version control systems that centralized repository where we share things and we're nobody has the final copy of the code. Everybody has some version of the code and the server or the central positively is contains. The stuff but. I don't think i think when you talk to the manager should also say look if if doubly leaves. Do you have any idea where that code exists or where he schematics. Yeah that that's that's great. That's the pain the managers are gonna feel and you can point to today. tesla right. Tesla had some rogue engineer who apparently reportedly went off sabotage their code and maybe left the company. If they had under version control they can go and see what. This manufacturing software changes were when it was made maybe even who was made by and at the very least they can roll back to the the stuff that was before it was. It was sabotaged signed. I guess that means. I get to go after the w now. I'm the dm you guys have to double yourselves since the gm x. My my little world. It's her show her show i. We can attempt to go. After the i can make an attempt but what about the what about the other software engineer at the more senior software engineer. After him i okay. Why don't use version control you. Moron colors engineer doing this. What does this file i. Squared c. driver underscores e final final final version. Three version aid dot c. And they'll say well that's that's the one that came after the final final and you'll say look. This is senior way to this just put in version control. You gotta learn a little bit more to learn how to check your files ended. Now you've got to ride a little bit is you. Check it in and out but haven't been burned by not having a backup. Haven't you wanted to be able to roll back the code. You checked in last line at midnight when you were. Your brain was so adult. You know that the stuff you did doesn't work having you wanted to be able to go back and figure out exactly. What did we ship to that customer. I don't want everybody seeing changes. I don't. I don't want them to see ed. Maybe they'll see something like get hell insecurity thing. Yeah or my code doesn't compile right now so i can't commit it it hasn't ever compiled per force that to or tried to put in. Svn and nobody else would use it. And then i had some error. And i could never figure it out so i just gave up. The is coming for me. The interesting things software engineering is. I found that in many companies that engineers don't want to be dictators and even managers don't want to be dictators and sometimes i think you just need a dictator at a company to say. Listen we're using version control right now. You will use version control. We will use per force or svn or git mercurial or whatever you want and if you don't like it i'm sorry at will employment gopher but maybe maybe not in your jurisdiction but we're just gonna. We're not gonna have this conversation more. We're going to do this. But this is not the way to convince the software engineers perhaps a way to get him to quit. So maybe we don't want to do that but he's been working here this long without version. Control yeah chris. Original rant was good. Because i expect better. If you're if you're doing professional software development. I expect you to sit down with a book and do version control and it will hurt for the first three weeks and then it will start to save you a lot of time and pain and suffering like a surgeon who says i don't like wearing gloves. Yeah it's it's yeah another another way you could sell it is they. Look as the company gets bigger. Coordination is necessarily going to have to increase because we're adding people and therefore at communication pass and you're gonna have to talk to more and more people and version control is one way to coordinate. The who has done what when especially as we have more and more software more and more people working more software. We need to keep track of things better and version. Control is a way to do that so that we make fewer mistakes. We step by judge toes less often and things go smoother that ticket when you i mean the company is growing. We need to start having a little bit. Better communication and version control as a way to communicate now the things that none of us mentioned about version control his ability to aid in having several people work on the same code at once. If you just have random files everywhere you can't have two people very easily making changes at the same time. Most version control systems are pretty good at at least helping you figure out if simultaneous changes are made to file how to resolve differences. But if it's just a text file on the server you're pretty much doomed. It depends on the version. Control system. Mean you'd think about svn and word documents you're locking them to make sure that they're protected or even when you think about the older version control systems cvs you could lock files in merging was harder than but at least they would tell you. Hey you know. At least he is working on this file right now so you might want to hold off your changes or yeah whereas now. Svn and get these other ones are actually quite good at merging in changes. That might even be conflicting and they ask for help when there's emerged that can't be handled easily than they get back to the human and say. Hey it has emerged commit are. There's there's emerged conflict. So you change something and chris change something and at least a change something and you change the same things so i don't know what to do so you figured out human about this really. I don't know it depends on what we think. The travel trouble with ws is me one of these. Wbz wbz here. You've got these guys. These w let me tell you about these. W now they have so software engineers work on textiles right and what we were just talking about. Merging and showing differences in. Things is reasonably simple problem for to write software for right to to compare differences in textiles. And show you. This one changed here in some changed here or note that two lines were simultaneously changed and do the thing that chris was mentioning and call out a conflict. Tend to work on. Graphical things right the schematics gerber files all that stuff. Binary sometimes binary. Although the newer packages i think are tend to be. Xml descriptors for the whole thing. Have it how do you merge that when you've been looking at well if if the software was nice and didn't randomly rearrange things because with the problem with auto generated things. Xml is the code. Generates it is that it can do whatever. It wants rearrange things so if he used a traditional version control system. You might have a change. That's trivial to you. But it's actually a change changing every line in the file and that's the value and suddenly all of your filed lines or change so there's a lot of problems because the version control systems. We software engineer us are not super well. Suited to the kinds of files ws use binary files Auto generated files. So it can be done but you kind of have to understand the limitations and if you do it was something like like get or svn and you put binary files in pretty soon since it can't do with binary files anytime you put in a new revision it just puts the whole thing in as a new blob and so you're positive. The server the big file to holds everything all the old files and all the changes that tends to really really big. So i don't know what what do you suggest. I have some suggestions. But i'm not ready for that I wanted to go down a slightly different path With the same people and ask you. What kinds of version control do you think they already use. Same people like the e w. Wwe almost certainly has a folder. Maybe on dropbox which is nice for backing up. If if they're aware it keeps versions and probably has a file has one folder labeled version one point zero and another folder version labeled version. One point one if they're doing a good job if they're doing a good job in their labeling it with nice clean version and they're they're copying the whole folder and making changes and and that is a form of version control. When we talk about that there are there are versions. If there was a read file you get almost all of the benefits of having things tagged and labeled you still can't compare anything though and that's because electrical engineering fouls are different. And that's that should be acknowledged like when you go into say. We need version control. I still think there's a place for it in electrical engineering schematics but before we convince everyone that we need it. We do kind of have to identify what they're already doing. Because shifting everybody's role too fast is kind of bad. I mean you don't have a choice it's either or you can't have these no but you could leave the w. alone right if he's already got something that is that shows the releases that shows good naming that is centrally located so that should he win the lottery. Go to tahiti. Everybody's still has access to the raw files as well as the published. Gonna take back what i said. You could go have these. You could let me do that. And then periodically check in when he says okay. I'm done with this folder. Check that in and then you check in the next one. So you'd have somebody help him or you tell him how to do a simple check in. But you could manage systems in parallel. So he wasn't having to to deal with all the time so i've actually worked places that do exactly that for maybe not for electrical engineers. But the the version control system used for some subset of control documents was a byzantine piece of software from nineteen. Seventy three i think. And there's a few people know how to use it in their fulltime job is doing that and so when i finish a document that needs to go into the system. I write in the document List in the document is okay. I made version one point nine. And here's right change. Christopher change it on june twentieth whatever. And then i email it to the person and they say hello. Can you please check this in. And they put it into this byzantine system. Because only they have write access and blah blah blah and then at least it is there and backed up it is horribly inefficient and painful but it is it is a halfway solution well and that brings up the point that there is a thing called document control. That is often different from version control. What is document control document. Control like at leapfrog for example where we made a consumer toys and we made a lot of them. So when i want released from where similar to you i would mail it to someone with release notes and then usually i'd have to run around and get signatures and So that everybody said the qa person said yes. We tested this version. My boss said yes. We approved this The co- the content development said yes. We want this. And then that goes into the system with the sign offs and with my code and that goes to the factory where it gets put on the line in my i can release my code into version control ninety seven thousand times but until it gets deducted control which like yours was pretty byzantine in very controlled by only a few people. It doesn't get from my computer to the factory without these levels and that makes sense for software also makes sense for electrical changes Mechanical changes all of the engineering change. Orders go through the same process of. Oh you're done now okay now that you're finally done and that everybody agrees that you were done. I will finally get around telling somebody who can actually build it for you. Yeah and if you work on medical that's going to encounter the head with all the time right. Yes because you are document control process than also includes your certification officer who will say. Oh yes. I checked to make sure that this is this. Change is traceable through all of our documents and is documented everywhere. It needs to be and it's in the testing file as well. So yeah whether you're in medical or not. I think a lot of this comes back to some of the first arguments were making with you. Want version controversial is a great way to you. Think you've done something you check it in us label it in some way that says this is the thing for one point. Oh and then later you can come back and see everything about it and make sure it is. Remember what you did for one boy. Now because it's in version control whether that's for for auditing purposes or for your sanity purposes are making changes later. The revision controls their. Save you back to. How does version control work for some of these other people. I wanted to talk about the. W when it put that question. But i also wanted to talk about the other software engineer who lately who may be doing a similar thing where they've got some backup system and persian 97.3. Ninety seven point three final But a lotta times. I see the software engineers commenting code out huge flocks coat. Because they're so afraid they're going to lose. It might need it later but that happens even with people with version control. I think that once you get over the mental hurdle of version control you start trusting it to be able to find that code again. I think the problem. I mean i find myself doing the same thing where i'll comment some cut out because i think maybe i'll forget that this existed. Maybe someone else will need this. And it's right here and if they're if they're editing this code. They might need this little bit of debug coat that i don't want to have an actual like checked in product but might help someone later. They're not gonna know to go look for it because there's no. There's no bread there that says six months ago kris van decoder. That would really help you right now. They're not gonna look to log files for that. So i i understand the the motivation and the fear of like well. What's the harm. If i just kind of leave it in here. Yeah and the version in the code you know this works for hardware version one. That only went to one customer of this works for hardware version three that went to a thousand customers. This this one works here and keep commenting them out. Because you're only shipping the latest hardware things like that build up croft in the code and that craft leads to bugs and confusion leads to huge confusion for the new people. Well it's even worse if duff's because two two comments tough out because then it's sometimes not clear if you can nest them in all kinds of things that comments are bad but blocking off stuff with i find even more bad a lot of time better with some of the editors starting to show but and yeah so let's just agree. Clean code is good and you should remove old stuff because at least two crofton. Bugs smith and confusion if you want to save it Make a note. Somewhere else okay. So so we've talked everyone but the doubly into using version control and maybe were occasionally secretly checking in the ws things when things are released some little modification said. He didn't know question. I think i would ask like especially sort of day. One is show me the canonical thing that you were shipping right now. Yes right the artifacts all the artifacts and win they come up with like a three and a half inch floppy disk. You know some like zip drive and laptops and then. They don't have the fourth laptop because the intern forgot it at home. Then you can say this seems like we put this in one place. Is it a little better. I mean it goes back to my my note to you that you a copy of the code. It's a copy of the complete system and back to document control system that was always with that was supposed to be for fda and big manufacturing projects that it is a a check point in time of everything that would allow you to rebuild it. Aw okay so once again. We have the checking in sometimes and and we've all decided on a version control version control simply we decide on. I'm inventing my own. It's always better. Oh i actually hope to avoid a particular one for for this because then we're gonna get hate mail from people while you're gonna. I'm not gonna be any hate meal. I'm going to get us. Let's just using an imaginary one. We'll call it yolo and it allows you to check files in it allows you to make branches. It allows you to see who check things in it provides authentication fantastic raising yellow. I love it. He only said that because my shirt says you obviously live outs. It's my favorite version control system. Okay yeah and so. We'll just talk about it in abstract and we don't even have to get into implementation details we should know where things go really off the rails for some of the popular words. But i don't think we're gonna talk much about mercury. No curiel there. You go merc rome. Espn svn and get or the two more popular. Winds and get i think is much more proper. Svn was the new hotness back in two thousand to five something like that. It was hot till get became a thing and now get is kind of the sort of the standard you know. Get hub is a frequent interface to it. So i feel like most shops probably use svn or get. And i've used perforce as well. They're all they're all basically the same same. They do very similar things. They work very similar ways. There are tons of details you will burn yourself on each version. Sarin each different system. You will hate some part of you. Love some of it and that is that's basically any piece of technology isn't it. Yeah and that's a good introduction to it so okay we're gonna go with our own created system although we would not recommend anybody actually do this choose. Svn or get get and get is not version control system. Get hub get labs bit bucket. Those are all places that you can have your git repository hosted so if we get her by accident and we mean get. Please forgive us but it just starts to brun together together or apart so You go to. The intern and the intern is willing to use your version. Control system. okay. Who has so. There's no version control this company right. Somebody has a directory that they can build out of so we need to find that person. A software engineer has has one. You can do that first. Thing we need to do is take that directory in its current state and put it into the version control system. That checking it in now because you don't have a repository yet. You don't have database portions setup so somebody sets up the yellow database okay and this could be set up in get hub or we set up our own local Svn repository or retirement news in your or using yellow magical jolo space in it right and her and then do yolo. Add building software directory recur sidley okay and so yellow looks at all those files and through whatever mechanism. The back end works for whether it's over the network or just copying to an database file on the server you're choosing to use a it creates a snapshot of all those files as they are now as the first revision. Okay do i have to type anything in to have a message. It's just the first one so we don't care if there's a message it might ask you for a commit message for the initial commit but you would say initial import of widget thing okay. So the intern comes back from lunch and now on their computer. Okay so you can have to provide a way for people to get a copy of the the source tree in the repository. Okay in this may be a link to the site where the repository exists. Okay so yellow but say clone. Let's say club yellow clone. Some random string of letters probably starts with https sure or rss age age and we. We neglected to make the intern and account. But of course somebody in yolo power adleman has to make an account. We didn't really talk about that aspect this actually a good one. We should go back and think about how he explained to the manager security permissions and accessing the The data the code the christie. That's why you're pointed at yourself and pointing actually to the west. So that's not the right direction. Which way are you well. I'm the west very very far east. Closer i'm over here so the manager probably doesn't care about permissions right now because he had nothing before this which means whoever's laptop the code is on he had no idea so i actually say this is a we start off with everyone has full permissions for everything and we worry but clamping down later. I'd slightly disagree. I guess you'd have permissions but everyone should still have an account with with credentials. Oh sure yes yes. Yes everyone should account. That's one way you figure out what the intern did versus wa- versus what he will month ago impersonating somebody else doing a checking the internet. The intern did they deleted all the coast. Change this whole thing to bitcoin minor. We're not making a bitcoin minor. I'm pretty sure that way that i ended up on this episode is actually because someone was impersonating me a couple of weeks ago so good so good. Oh by the way in case in case you ever need it. My voice is my passport. Verify me for now for you okay. So we made the interning account and they have a password and they have full permissions although it could be the next. Summer's intern doesn't get to look at the algorithm only partial permission or they don't have a one thing to do is to make it so that they can't like nuke the repository remove delete that permissions or whatever or add other users right but they have full access to all the files. Checkout whatever create. Okay so they've cloned it. I guess so they've cloned it so they've snarf snarf deal. So that means the entire repository comes down to their local laptop hard drive and you know that's a good thing to talk to the double e. about if we want to go back to them having version control or the other software engineer. You don't have to carry your computer back and forth in can get remote access you can sink your work computer and your home computer whenever you need them to be sick And that's a powerful thing for some people not that they necessarily work from home on the time but to know that they have access to whatever their latest data is is kind of a nice thing. So yeah we've just we've just snarf our data to the interns laptop but that matches. What the software engineer had and if the internet's a new laptop if this laptop goes up in a fiery ball is they pour soda and then try to solder on top of it. That's fine as far as the code is concerned. It's the code was not destroyed in any way they have. They can make a whole new copy. So i'm gonna break break character for a second. We're gonna talk about details of kittens fan but there's a fundamental difference between some of these respect to getting a copy of the lick repository with svn. Check out a copy of the tree. You get the files at that point the check it out whether it's the tip of the blaze version or specify a version. Those are the files that you get on your computer because svn is centralized so all of the provisions stuff is on the server. And that's where it stays with get You've made it. So i can't say cure xio get in mercurial. That's how they work their distributed which means even though the central server that has a copy of their Anytime you check out the repository. Cloning you get entire copy of the entire history of the world. That's great because you can do all kinds of things without having to connect to the network again complicated things. We'll probably talk about but it's also great because you've got a backup copy on everybody's development machine of the entire thing so you're saying it doesn't matter if the computer lights on fire somebody else has it with get it really really have everything. You have the history going back to day one now. There's some outsized that because talking about the w league very large bloating with binary that whole process says a fundamental difference in. And i just wanna make sure people are aware of that when they're choosing something that that's an aspect i think especially if you're not familiar with getting with it without these the that type of system works typically there is one sort of central repository because you wanna have won. The company wants to have one. This is the truth. This is where the final shipping code comes from. This is the one. That's hooked up to our jenkins server that runs tests. This is this is the one good copy And so you know. Frequently get hub. Is the place where that my org or get lab or bit bucket. Those will host the one central copy. That is the gospel truth. Copy and then because The way it works or mercurial works you can then check out the full the full database the vote repository onto your local machine to. That's great but you still got to put back up on the central one in order for everyone when when you're done with your little piece of work so that everyone else can see it. Okay that sounds like a good segue to they in turn his changed this file and has made something that needs i. We gotta coach view that puppy. How are you going to get a copy of it to everybody. Well over eating brand should be skip branching for a second. I think he should print the co down to get together in a darker. I think i'm gonna take a miniature lunch. I'm going to go back to nineteen ninety five and what you do is you take a diff- and you attach it to the bug. That's what we used to do not a bad way to do it. But let's say there's some method that they they look at it and everybody says it's okay you can check this in and that that's we're going to read we're gonna gilo. It's like putting a folder and a drawer check in and in addition to checking in at this point you should always write a message. Even if the message is should be required that you rider message this no longer compiles. I just want to cry. But i need to save it in case there is something here i doubt it. Please don't look at this monstrosity. That's a fine message. well is it a great mentor. Terrible message because the next person to get the to check out the the code is going to get it broken file. Well i mean that's sort of a a team thing in a process that we should touch on. But there have been times where i wanted to revert to a previous version in order to puzzle back but i needed that commit or or branch or whatever but it needed to commit at least a temporary commit. That had what had now. Because i have wrote the driver i needed and now everything was broken now now. Unfortunately we get into the implementation details like this is an easier thing to do to make your still leave yourself local breadcrumbs senior. Your local commit. It is midnight. I am crying and tired and this is broken but i'm going home and i'm so i'm checking in in a tool like get no one else has and if things you will have it in the morning on a centralized system like svn if you want to actually put back into the espn ribaud than everyone else has to see that unless us branch. And then we get into branching and in the weeds go there. I think we're going to get into the weeds there but basically should always always commit with a message and the message doesn't have to be written for the intern. Message doesn't have to be written the manage. The message is written for you and the other software engineers who are in the position. You are in and the goal is to remind them why and how you did this. What was the intent of this code modification. And if there's a bug it's related to you should absolutely refer to the buck. But if it's just. I added a spy driver and it mostly works but not when you're in high speed mode you know in a week when i tried to remember what i did. That's going to help me and you can standardize these things. I mean we have one idea one where it's you have to enter the bug. Id and you have a issues addressed section. You have to fill that out Changes made fill that out so issues addressed might be. It doesn't work right because of this and that changes made well. I looked at the loop. And i modified this and then how you tested it and whether you did regression testing and you can get pretty former with that and it gets annoying but it's nice to have like this is what we expect in a message for most people. It is an what you lose. You know what was wrong what you did to fix it how you tested it. That's a pretty good commit message sect you in anything. No i'm not going along over here. This is yeah. I mean i'm thinking in terms of a small shop that has never done this before. Keep the process to a minimum. So i wouldn't necessarily create a template for them for us for the my my new startup except for maybe say. Hey let's start with the bug. Id or the story. I d colon description of it and then let's all kind of do what what changed. What was wrong. what you face. What may not work and then as people get comfortable with it maybe add add process over time that may backfire because then people get used to slacking off and then you hit them with the process hammer. They might not like it. I don't know we have three of us. We should try experiments we can do. Ab testing and see which company does better since i usually work for startup. Axes i think in you to work for much larger companies. I think i'm the only one doing the experiment here. Are you should totally do this across your class. Sure they'll like that. So the intern has checked things in and then the turn goes over to the software engineer. And says i. I want you to look at it and this was not related to code reviews and software engineer. Says i don't see there's another step we need to do in order to everybody up not using. We haven't decided if you low centralized or decentralized centralized or decentralized at some point everybody else has to lose to stuff savaged if it's or pulled there's a minimum of one step perhaps two steps that are regarded as always your distributor. Let's go distributed right. it's popular so low is like get in. It is distributed or so. The intern has when we say they checked it in. They checked in the committed. Which means it's committed on their local drive and they're going to push it to the server in in a central repository. Those steps are the same. Commit an push in a distributed system commit and push our separate can be confusing when you go between the two But commit says. Hey i want you to know her. Hey i want you to know about this change and push says hey. I want everybody to be able to see the change. Yeah commit it. Takes that only works in that local copy of the repository. We talked about that. Has everything but it only makes the change there on your local disk and the push or as it is in yellow takes it and throws it over the network and says. Here's this thing from this other copied repository. I want you to put it in the master origin repository and that usually takes a lot of authentication because they're going over the network okay so when our intern went over to our software engineer and says i want you to look at my file. This after engineer might not be able to access it because they haven't actually pushed. The intern hasn't pushed it but the software engineer my also not have it because they haven't yanked it yet they haven't ganked or polled or fetched need some operation that goes to the remote repository and say hey. Do you have anything new. That i don't have in this local hoppy on my desk and it says yeah i've got fifteen changes and then it plays those back over yours to bring those encyc- played plays plays it back. What does that mean it takes each commit as they come over and the applies the changes. It synchronizes them. It makes them the same. Chris is telling you it plays them back because get actually takes each thing. Yeah applies them one after another and so it really is playing them back but mentally. It's hey to think this is copy. Hits hits just copied but it's just synchronizing them making them. This or not is fine. I mean it's it's hard to tell your software engineers done that and he's oh look at that and he can open the file and see it. He can run a command to maybe see the history of that file and see a list of all commit messages. And there's the in terms of the top that that thing. What is that called the log. Yeah provision history. The revision history. Here that's that is one of those things that if you don't use version control you don't know how much having the reversion the revision history is just some sort of magical device And it's really hard to explain because you get a list of kind of crappy commit messages and dates and people who checked them in. How is that useful. But i'm telling you it is so useful and it's not just because you know. Oh my god. The intern didn't follow style. Guide again. i'm going to look at this. It's going to be horrible. I'm going to spend my morning writing an email. It's just something about the logs. Well here's a feels like progress. Sometimes well okay. But there's a very practical reason Let's say somebody comes to you and says hey iran version one point eight last night and three of the icees lit on fire but it didn't happen with version. One point six which released in april. Okay i'm gonna go look at the log for the driver file and look at all the things that were done since april now you have a list right in front of you of everything you could possibly have caught the bug and i have done binary searched. You know you go halfway. Does it cause a problem halfway. Does it cause the problem until you narrow in on wearing the problem started. I think it's important to actually a step back like talk about the very pedantic and say like the tube sort of miracles that have just occurred with with having this history. The first thing is that you were able to go back in time and say what did we release was at one point six the older one and then one point eight was the newer one bisky pre-fire and post fire and you you're able to see the text version the log of each file a change. What changed you can do a so. You can see in code what changed and you hopefully have Loving colleagues who have written notes to themselves and notes to you from the past to the future that say i changed this then. I changed this. This didn't work. Oh it turns out that on friday at noon if you run this code it catches on fire and so sometimes you might get something that is like the smoking gun the smoking chip in this case. If you don't get that so that's kind of the first miracle of version control. The version control gives you sort of the history of everything but has just happened both in human written. Here's what i change form. And in code difficult form the second miracle Is that you can then go back and say all right. Let me get the thing that we built for version. One six the pre fire version. Let me check it out as if it was rano go back and let me get thank was one point six. Check it out. Recreate it and then run on the device and see okay no fire and then let me check out version. One point seven and see if there was fire or no fire. Okay no fire. That means the problem must have happened. Between one point seven and one point eight and then you can say okay. I know that was four weeks ago. So go to the code for two weeks ago. Check for fire and at least you said you know you can go and do binary search basically on this issue and then chris was starting to say there's a but we weren't as a get command. Does this for you up the get command blah blah blah. You let me tell you about the wording. There were a couple word of get. It happened here. you went back to the original version. The one point six. That wasn't supposed to cause a fire and rebuilt it and you checked to see if it cost a fire. You know the brilliant part of that we work with hardware. That isn't perfect. Sometimes you realize then that it was never the code because it likes on version they say works. Of course if you re building it tools. But there's another miracle to this to this revision. Lock and that happens on mondays for me when i type up my status reports to hook. You have everything you've done. It happens once a year with a review. When i can go through and look at all of the changes that i have made and if i wrote good enough notes i that list that my boss wants. That says the. I've had over the year so i think there. There are three miracles there and i mean tracking your own progress on things. It was kind of nice. The flip side of that fire is that there's some managers who really like. Oh and some version control systems you can go in and you can say hey. I wonder how. Chris has been doing last week three months. Wow he's really been committing with a lower frequency than usual. that's that's somewhat concerned and look at look bob. He commits a hundred times a day. Bob must be doing a really great job. We'll promote him or or addition lines and subtraction. Lines chris only ever deletes code and bryce like thousand lines for every hundred. Check ins chris. Salary over lines of code written is is not a number how these metrics are not. They have been made fun. They have been mocked extensively for good reason. There are there are companies. There are companies who sell sell packages that extract these metrics and tell managers that way to keep your employees. Doing better is to find people who are stuck by looking at that repository stats and then you can know when to offer them help because they are stuck. That sounds reasonable well but it. It sounds reasonable but then like you read channel lines and it's like well. Maybe the stock employees need coaching or extra ext. Anyway just fire him or just you know. Get them yeah we should. We set ourselves in the foot with making the version control case. By the way the metric systems are sometime. System has been a mistake. It's a tool of code. It was good joke. You talked over what was said. The metric system has been a big mistake since the invention of the centimeter. Yeah well as somebody who takes great delight and lead as much code as i can get my hands on and still make the system work systems making crazy cat. If you work at a company where people management is is or i will call it abusing metrics. You can probably find the job. Because that's i don't i'd never been a part of a system that works that way Maybe a more fortunate than than others but Yeah another hiring market for software. Engineers is seems to be pretty good right now depending where you're at so hopefully hopefully that's happening. You can find somewhere else to go. Because it's it's not it's not everywhere for certain. This is a good segue before we get into branches. I hear hiring where you're at is happening. It's hiring is happening Interviewing is happening at the very least we work for i robot. We are based in boston just outside of boston and we also have a office in pasadena california and we are hiring tons and tons of people. Actually i think we have at least twenty different software engineering rex We're trying to hire for basically trying to build more robots more different types of robots nba. We are hiring because of that. So we're hiring like an software engineer too because we have android and ios apps that we develop hiring people with extensive computer vision and robotics background. We are also hiring software engineers who may have dabbled in robotics. Maybe just think robots are cool but aren't like a phd in robotics. We're hiring the phd in robotics and the non phd in robotics or the non phd at all. So basically all types of software engineers think working on robots as cool. If you think living in boston or pasadena. California is cool then please go checkout. I robot dot com somewhere on their careers link and feel free to email me on. My email is c. s. v. c. at i robot dot com that's seasick at i robot dot com and. I would be happy to talk to you even if you think you're not a potential match at all. I'm just always happy to talk to people who are interested in what we do and Of the show and i love talking about what What we do. So it's a it's a good time. And if you don't recall his email you are welcome to hit the contact link on embedded that fm or email us show at embedded data fm. Just ask for referral. And i will pick you up. Been spec will talk to you and it will be great. Okay if you don't remember if you don't remember their email address you can email me. And i robot dot com and i will tell you the show at embedded at fm email address for We've gone through almost all the version control benefits. I like somebody said that Version control as i controls the for the software And knowing how often. I typed controls z. In order to undo what. I meant whatever. I just did i. I like the idea that less on doing. And than than you'd think but there's so much merger with others and and how to figure out who did what know what you did. These are all important. One of the benefits we haven't talked about is that You can gain and important feeling and that is lack of shame which is to say to everyone who keeps apologizing about lack of version control system. I'm not in charge of judging you unless you pay me. Judge which. I'm quite happy to do. But then you will definitely get a version control system but overall for all of the angst that goes into our. Don't have a version control system is just too hard to do it. It's not that hard. And it makes you a better engineer. And it makes your team more functional. Okay sorry show. We've branched off. Okay like a tree. I hope that's not midshow by the way eat. Some i heard. I heard the editor is pretty terrible for this shows. I'm not sure. I'm not sure that's going to get caught man. Nothing gets cut only only sized things you didn't say. Get at it. The yolo tree command well. Branching in the abstract actually wanted to draw a line in the in the show. So i like up until now. What we've talked about is i i. I think it'd be like the controls. Espn sort of the undo and the history aspect of version control and the documentation aspect of version control. So you can see what you did. You can go back and recover things you did before you can see what was changed by. Who when and that's i feel like from version control system to version control system like for you know even back into our or cvs which are pretty old version control systems through spn and get mercurial perforce force and even visual source safe. Yeah visits if you're using visual source safe at work you need to change but anyway somebody mingle with that one. That's probably true. It's probably true. You need all the systems basically work the same or do pretty much the same thing as far as logging history rolling. Back that kind of thing. So there's not many differences between any any of the systems as far as how they approach the basic That that basic part of version control system where they differ a lot is. I think we're about to talk about which is branching in. I would say the stuff we've talked about up to now for a small shop. One or two people is really almost everything you need checking in checking out commend messages going through history. But it's the minimum but yeah it's the minimum branches is gonna make you happy so branches nominate. Not me to talk about this okay. Since i'm probably the weakest on actually using branches a lot i will go first Let's say we're going to go back to the intern. Commit something and we all want to review it before the intern can put it into the main the main repository or onto the server where it's gonna function onto the production code and so we want to review it and one what you know. There's this chicken and egg problem as soon as they committed. It is committed and we wanna review it before it's committed so instead. The intern should commit to a branch and the branch is going to be located in the same repository. Ideally it's going to have a very descriptive name There lots of processes about how you do the name. Sometimes it's initials and date as well as what it was based on Sometimes it's shorter than that with the idea that the branches are deleted in dilated after the merged into the main one. But the idea is you're not committing for everyone you're committing a special set. That people will get to look at that is not the production code. It's not the main code. That's not the master code. It's a branch. And i can have a branch in. Chris can have a branch inspect can have a branch and then at some point before we release we'll have to merge back into the main branch and that process is really non trivial. And i think you have to have a drawing for it. But that's me because i get very lost with like where things are you branch off and then you merge back in those. Those are the terms. Were agreeing on right. Yeah so. I have trouble with this. Sometimes if i branch off of one point and then i need that that means stuff i needed to come up to my branch and then i need to merge stuff but it doesn't quite work and so there's the if backup a little bit sepcially. Branching is job try. I'll try to describe it so we talked before how you have this revision history right and each point in the revision. History is you can think of it as a snapshot of the coat at a point in time the way we've talked about it up to now is that's just a line. A branch is a foregone. That line where now you have to revision histories coming off one point and they are completely separate so once you branch. It's like a virtual copy of the code tree within the repository. That's different from the other. That the main from the line that we were talking about before and changes can go into that but they don't affect the other the other branch the other the main term and you can do this. Multiple times branches can have branches. It can get crazy that allows you to make changes. Check things back in store them in the repository without affecting other people and repository stuff where other people can see it. You get backed up. You can go to a different location now like you were saying at some point you want to get that back to the main line more anger. Let's see i want to emerge. I think you want a couple said well. No i think. I think you're good so i think let's. Let's do the intern example. Now so we'd say we tell the intern the way that we develop software. We decided that the way we develop software. Is that any time you make a change. You don't put that change into the main the master branch until people have had a chance to review it but because we want the code in their vision control system. So that if you you know. They've the the building catches on fire. If you decide to quit we still have your your code next day. And because the code needs to be in the revision control system in order for others to review it easily. So what we tell the interns. We say all right intern. You create a new branch using yellow branch name and so you so so the the The internist created their own branch. And they name it in. Turn dash Bug fixed wanted four because they fixed a bug. That was bug one. Two three four in the inner bug database. And it's got the name at the front of it so that everyone knows this is this belongs to them. So then there is now a master branch in our repository and there is a there is a a another branch which is has all the same history as the master branch for now at the point when the internet has created his intern dash bug fixed. One two three four branch then. The intern commits their bug. Fix onto this branch. The intern bug fix before branch. So the code is in the repository on their machine but is not on the main branches on the master branches only on their intern branch. Have i gone too far enough artists for i think okay i. I'm good with this. The internet has changed of on their branch. Okay now so there. Because yellow is distributed version control system that branch only exists currently on the interns machine does not live on the central server that this that our company x. has so then. The intern does yolo shove. Was that the word. You're getting their yellow shove their branch to the main rebel to the central server and so now the central server which we as a company agreed is the main revision control system server now has the master branch and the interns branch so then. The intern walks over to offer engineering. Says all right. I've made the change. Can you please look the change. Before effect anyone other than my branch with it then. Suffer engineers has okay in order to get your chains. I have to be safe snarf. I remember the term be fetch Who else pull the fetch. Poll should be just poll just to do yolo poll the Yellow poll and then that means the software engineers yolo software looks on the main repository and says is there anything new here that does not exist on these software engineers machine. Oh yes there's a new branch got created and then it posed the branch down onto the software engineers machine software engineer then sees this branch has a change on it where the bug fix happened Change and files and the software engineer can build the code can run the code can look at the disks of the code can talk about it and come and stop there. Okay that after your has we. We've okayed the coat. The interns code. That is on intern. Branch by one. Two three four is is ready to go. We wanted to go back into the main branch. And like i said i find branching very easy and intuitive. It's merging pana. Why because if anything's happened in between you can get conflicts. And because how do. I know. I never really feel like i'm doing mergers right and this is from somebody. I do a lot of nurses. I am kind of making. It sound like i'm completely. I think we should get too deep into this. This couple of ways of dealing with this stuff get for. Example is very branch dependent. If you read the how you're supposed to use get her always supposed to be developing in a branch and you merge it back. Everybody's got a branch for their current work branches all over the place because very quick to make branches and get conceptually. That's that's how they designed to work Unfortunately they provide many ways of kind of solving the problem. You have about how to emerge back in and the chief problem is the thing you said. We're or something the main thing that you're merging into the main trunk has drifted past you because because in our example. The intern has made some changes. The software engineers made some changes. We have made some changes in and trying to put it back. But you're trying to put back and you're actually out of date in some way. Yes you've got nujaine old stuff too. Yeah so get provides you a bunch of ways to do this. You can merge the main trunk into your branch and that will bring you up to date you contests locally in your branch. You still haven't done anything bad to the main back to the main branch and then once you've done that you can merge back in now the time gap there where somebody might have moved past you a little bit. Sometimes it matters. Sometimes it doesn't there's another thing you can do and get called rebasing which is where it says. Oh well take the master trunk and take my changes only my changes and put them on top as if i had committed them at the top And that's nice. Because you get up to date in your revision. History looks nice. That's another way to force. There's a of ways to do it with these things. And that's where people get tripped up and each shop tends to have their own preferred way of doing things as complain about c. Plus plus how. They're ninety seven ways to do everything and so everything feels very artisanal get is sometimes that way that you use it the way your team agrees to use it and teams can agree for with drastically different use models and so you. It's easy to feel like you don't know what you're doing if you don't know what your team. This team's methodology is there isn't a standardized agreed upon methodology for everyone in the books. Tell you different things. I mean if you get five different get books arguing. There's even named there's even deemed jesus git flow. Which does this do your branches. This way so i don't think we should get too far into the that's fair. I mean really kind of getting down into get. And i think that's one of those things where you should get a book you really. You should get a book. This is important for your career. I think the meta point we can make here is that you got to choose a way of dealing with branches. And so if you don't have if you don't have any reason to choose any of them around and get flow or any of the more popular ones are well documented. You can find reasonable examples. Reasonable explanations on the web and so just like when someone asks what's depots plus coding standards should i use. I say. go use google's not because google has magical because it is is canonical enough because it's google and it's published and it's defensible and it's something and if you don't have a reason to not do that than just start with that so pick pick a flow. Pick away the us get branches the seems to make sense for you and stick with it and then within a few months or few product ravs or whatever you'll figure out what are the warts. What's the stuff that's really easy with it. What's the stuff that's confusing. And what's the stuff. That's really hard to do overtime. Time you are going to your use of game and branches or svn branches or mercurial andbranch will probably evolve. I don't think any company i've been at is any version. Control system has sort of stayed using the same model for more than a year. Maybe a couple of years. So it is an evolving thing just like just like your product evolves just like the way that you write your software probably evolves your get usage or your svn usage will probably evolve and change as well as you learn more as you hate yourself for having me decisions in the past and as you figure out what the words were just again like with any other technology choice. Okay i have a few more questions and then we should probably wrap it up. Do you have a time when you used version control. Maybe outside work or on something that wasn't code and it was good. I'm certain i did. But i'm drawn a blank. You don't use version control for music at all. Well the mid. The logic has a little bit of thing to help you with. But i would not sincere. No that wouldn't work very well that you so i wrote book chapter and visit about free toss and that was a pretty significant chunk of work and i the publisher Happened to us have a was nets fan. Repository was the way that we delivered work. They the authors delivered work to them. And so i had use svn or give it to them and i end up using spn to mark brown changes and that was that was great too because actually there when it would be edited editor copy editor. They could make changes. And it was there in the revision control. And then i could go back through and make changes either agree or disagree with their changes and then go back and forth and i would delete paragraphs safely knowing that if i thought there was something good later i could go back to it because i had the magic of version control. So i've done that with that I don't know if accounts. But i've been version in my bash. Artsy file since nineteen ninety-five using our cs. And so i have it now. Lives in our directory in dropbox but I've carried that around with me. Sits ninety five. I think so. That's an just use a straight up our actually as revision control system it stands for i think and it is old and it is super basic and it. It works it still functional. It was the first one i ever used you. Yeah me too. I also used it for my book and as said it was great. Because i could delete things and i could trace things and i could see you at other. People were the editor and copy editors for doing and i didn't. I didn't expect that to work as well as it did. But it really was quite nice And last question. I have is are there times. You don't use version control and realized later yearly should've and for me when i take classes at utah city or any of the classes have been taken online version. Control my score. Yeah but then. I don't know why god have private get. It's not like i'm worried about showing off my answers to everybody. If you just have it on your disk don't have to put their here to do a server true most of the make it pretty easy and it would be so much better if i if i version control my schoolwork would be and yet i same. Same thing for me i i. It seems like too much effort. But i'm sitting here telling you all of the listeners and everybody it's not nearly as much effort as you think it is totally regretted especially with something like that for something like that. You're totally doing the stuff we talked about in first fifteen minutes to half an hour right here. Just check this out and check it in. Don't neutral branches little other people. It's poll this is a good place for me to stop today. Yeah okay inspect to have any times. The ill admit that he should have anytime. I added a word document. Or excel excel spreadsheet right. I mean they may. No word has track changes. Which is i hate track changes. It does not do what i wanted to do in. There is no good revision control diff Beyond compare which is my favorite diff tool in the world actually doesn't okay job of dipping one word document to another but we're has in inap- define now that's not terrible anymore. Yeah i use a mac mostly. And i think it's it doesn't exist on the mac or didn't exist on the mac so i wish at the very least many times that i had just stuck the whole stupid binary file by a whole doc x. File inter version control. So i can at least go and do a basic text On what was in there instead. I trust their their bob. Remember history stuff within the app itself and that that doesn't end. Well i really wished. I had it in the eighties when i was writing basic programs on apple. Two last one really i promise. This is The intern comes back and says okay. It made sense when you wanted to see my file that i should commit. But what if. I'm doing a lot of stuff. How do you only commit when you're done when it compiles. This is the place where ranches are nice. Because then you don't you can commit as often as you like and you don't harm anybody else. How often as you like. How long is that. I i give the same advice that i give to about voting vote early. Vote off and commit early. Come on. c'mon often. That was a joke. That was a terrible joke but seriously commit committed early committed often from chicago. I'd say i mean as frequently as anytime you make a functional change. The do think is a unit of work on our slack. Ten on the embedded fm Patriots log channel. I suggested if you haven't committed issue commit every night before you go to bed doria different Because when you wake up in the morning you never know what that last hour of work was. And it's a good habit to get into mean we say commit often. But i i admit for hours go by before commit. I don't usually manage a whole day but early in my career. It was good to get into the habit of not waiting too long. You're not hurting anybody by adding commits free. It really is free on the beauty of it is. It is free and you can check in code. That is broken and that is not working. And you say i am just too tired to deal with this compiler but i want to save where i'm at all right. Let's see you are still hiring. I robot which we already talked about. And i guess that brings us to the last last last question. Do you have any thoughts. You'd like to leave us with chris beck. I guess the win you come against anything like version control which seems like this giant giant piece of work this giant messy thing sort of take a step back and think what am i trying to do. The beginning of this Beginning this conversation we we said. How do we convince the manager. This software engineer. They'll let you too near the any of this is worthwhile and the reasons worthwhile because you get history. You can recreate stuff. You break them something or lose something. And then you get this kind of release management you know sort of branching for for different projects branching different efforts so as long as you remember sort of the high level while you're doing it i think that will help you endure the pain when you do shoot yourself in the phone when you do have to figure out the right branching strategy for you when you do realize oh. I wish we would have done differently. Like you want the history. You want the being able to go back in time. You want to be able to recreate stuff and you wanna be able to sort of seeing these separate Different different codes doing different things using branches. So it's totally worth it at the high level even though it's frustrating databases. Sometimes the other thing. I'll say is that the new spend ninety five percent of your time with any revision control system just doing check in checkout kind of stuff so the merging is not usually painful on a daily basis that the stuff that sounds hard is not usually done on a daily basis. One of the retard is because it's not done often So the the office stuff is easy and quite frankly it feels pretty good when you get this sort of checking off habit. So that's quite the less thought i left it with. Its more more more than nine tenth that but there you go now. It was good. It was a nice summary. Thank you for being with us. Thank you very much. Guitar guest has been. Chris vac senior principal software engineer at i robot you can read his embedded software engineer one. Oh one articles at embedded dot. Fm and he's going to post a new one very soon. It's going to be about see we're getting out of the world of semblance microcontrollers so you should look forward to it. And i want to say. Thank you to our patriots. Subscribers for chris vex microphone on so thank you to my christopher focusing an producing and of course thank you for listening of a final thought to leave you with always remember that. It's much easier to apologize than to get permission. Grace hopper said this. She went on to say in this world of computers. The best thing to do is to do it. Emitted is an independently produced. Radio show that focuses on the many aspects of engineering it is a production of logical elegance and embedded software consulting company in california. If there are advertisements in the show we did not put them there and do not receive money from them at this time. Our sponsors are logical element and listeners like you.

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Cloudburst: Stateful Functions-as-a-Service with Vikram Sreekanti

Software Engineering Daily

59:35 min | 1 year ago

Cloudburst: Stateful Functions-as-a-Service with Vikram Sreekanti

"Server less computing is a way of designing applications that do not directly address or deploy application code to servers service applications are composed of stateless functions as a service and stateful data storage systems. Such as retinas or Dynamo. Db Server applications allow for the scale up or scaled down architecture because each component is naturally scalable and this pattern can be used to create a wide variety of applications. The functions as a service can handle the compute logic and the data storage systems can handle the storage but these applications do not give the developer as much flexibility as an ideal service system. Might the developer still needs to use cloud specific state management systems victim. Sri Conti is the creator of cloudburst a system for stateful functions as a service the reason that stateful functions as a service don't really exist today his because we don't know a whole lot about how functions service are being spun up on cloud providers. We know that we send our code to the cloud and it gets scheduled onto a server and then that code runs at some point on some server but we don't know a whole lot about the durability of that server and how stable it is if it's GonNa fall over if the code is going to need to be rescheduled and that's part of why we don't think of these things as stateful. Reliable cloudburst is this project from Vikram Sri County and its architect it as a set of VM's that can execute functions as a service that are scheduled onto those vm's each vm. Can utilize a local cash as well as an auto scaling key. Value Store called Anna which is accessible to the cloudburst runtime components victim joins the show to talk about service computing in general and his efforts to build stateful service functionality. His work that comes out of the rise lab which we have done a few shows on before. It's a computer science lab in Berkeley. When I'm building a new product g two is the company that I call on to help me find a developer who can build the first version of my product G two. I is a hiring platform. Run by engineers that matches you with react. React native graph and mobile engineers who you can trust whether you are a new company building. Your first product like me or an established company wants additional engineering. Help G two. I has the talent that you need to accomplish your goals go to software engineering daily DOT COM SLASH G to I to learn more about g to has to offer. We've also done several shows with the people who run G to I gave Greenberg and the rest of his team. These are engineers who know about the react ecosystem about the mobile ecosystem about graph. Curiel react native. They know their stuff. And they run a great organization in my personal experience g two I has linked me up with experienced engineers that can fit my budget and the GUI staff are friendly and easy to work with. They know how product-development works they can help you find the perfect engineer for your stack. And you can go to software engineering daily DOT COM SLASH G to I to learn more about G to I. Thank you to G two. I for being a great supporter of offer engineering daily both as listeners and also as people who have contributed code that have helped me out in my projects. So if you want to get some additional help for your engineering projects go to software engineering. Daily Dot Com slash. Gtri Vikram welcome to the show. We've done many episodes about functions as a service. We've talked about the basic engineering concept. Give a brief overview for how functions as service are used today. Yes the core idea behind. Functions as a service is that the application developer shouldn't have to worry about thinking about servers. How they're configured where they're running and all that kind of stuff and so the idea that the application developer can rights and code. Whatever their business logic is uploaded to a service like aws lambda or Google cloud functions and configuration trigger events. Let's put it behind an API gateway or maybe configure it to run whenever an object is uploaded to three something like that and then the cloud provider is responsible for taking care of when the function runs where runs making sure that security is taken care of an all of that and then the developer is only build for the amount of time that the code is actually running down to the millisecond and so today what commercial functions as a service systems are really good at is taking care of things like event processing. That doesn't require a lot of state or things that aren't really latency sensitive and some of the folks that we've talked to in our research have focused on human loop interactions where there's a relatively large late and see that they can be dealing with so that they can take advantage of the flexibility that the service offers while also providing reasonable guarantees to their end users. What are the shortcomings of function as a service systems today? Yes so the things that they really haven't focused on thus far are things have non trivial ounce state and things that require relatively tight latency budgets. The reasons for those are obviously you know only known to the folks who are working at some of these major cloud providers but I think in some sense the one of the reasons because these are non trivial problems. It's not clear what the right way to think about. State in a civilised world is and how while providing strong isolation security and so on you can provide low latency access to stay and make it really easy for programmers to deal with those things and so even doing really simple things things that might not even sound stateful. Doing function composition for example is pretty prohibitively. Slow on a lot of fast systems today in some initial benchmark found that just running to music functions like squaring an Integer and implementing it. You take as much as forty to fifty milliseconds per invocation if you put those in two different functions. You've already paid. One hundred milliseconds and the rule of thumb for interactivity on websites is a couple of a couple of hundred milliseconds so if doing no computation takes one hundred milliseconds. You've used up a lot of your latency budget already. And those types of things are already difficult and then you start thinking about how you can do more complicated. Things like modifying shared across multiple parallel requests and the state of the art for several lists infrastructure today to basically through a bunch of data in storage system like dynamo or S. Three and rely on the application developer to resolve inconsistencies. Because as we all know using these systems Monas Three. You don't get very strong. Consistency guarantees out of them. So you sort of are in the wild west. It's up to you as application belt or to make sure that your updates don't accidentally carburetor reading separate pieces of data that they were written in some format whatever that means for your application and so on. They're they're very few guardrails in the space. What do we know about the implementation of aws? Lambda Lambda is the most widely used the most mature function as a service platform. Do we know anything about how it's actually implemented under the hood? We know a little bit and recently ends on his started to be more and more open about what they're with their core infrastructure is composed of `Bout a year ago. Or maybe a little more than that. They open source. This platform called firecracker which is a micro vm. Hyper visor that basically Dave built from the ground up. Basically wrote a hyper visor. Rust to reduce spin up times for what's called the cold start problem for fastest and Gold Star. Problem is basically an request comes in there. No resources allocated for that particular piece of code to run and so they have to figure out where those resources be allocated they have to go set up an environment they obviously have environment for many different languages and common runtimes download the code. Set it up in the right. All of that stuff and traditionally that cold start time in the initial releases of lambda could be multiple seconds long and so what firecracker has has done. That's really awesome is to bring a lot of that down. Obviously there are still some some speed of light constraints here. If you're uploading one hundred megabytes of code or something that's going to take a little bit of time to download. But as far as the core infrastructure goes they have the spin up times for the individual. Vm's that user code is running down to about one hundred milliseconds. I believe so. We know a little bit about sort of core infrastructure but in terms of what the actual sequence of aws or otherwise components that the requests are going through as far as more. You mentioned this idea of function compositions and this might be a use case where I would want to have. One lambda function spin up. Call another lambda function which calls another limited function. I mean in programming. We have nested function calls all the time I make some high level method. That high level method calls a lower level method that might call to lower level methods. We want to have this nesting system of function calls. And I think more abstractly we might WanNa have these complicated long-lived workflows where you have twenty different lambda as talking to each other and orchestrating. Some long lived session like You know you could imagine maybe if I WANNA make If want to build a real time strategy game or An Imam oh on top of lambda. That's pretty hard to do today. I don't really have the the durability of my processing system that I think I need for For like an m. m. o. Why is that why? What are the issues with having this long? Lived compositional compute with Lambda Two. Really good question. I think a lot of it has to do with the core conception of the system in some sense. If you're talking about long lived compute that has probably some state tied up with it. You know you can imagine that if you're building a game the environment and the characters and the objects whatever. The object of the game are probably have some state associated with them that they're responsible for managing a Lotta that starts to sound very little like a function and more like something like an actor and so if you talk about a functions the service system it become a little difficult to envision at least at first cut how you might manage stateful nece how you might manage the D. updates to that state where that they did actually living how you what tolerance if one of these machines with your function fails then who's responsible for spinning back-up repairing the state doing whatever is required for that all of those things are not readily obvious when functions are the core programming paradigm. And so one of the things that we've been thinking a little bit about is how you can sort of start with functions as the sort of entry point because lambda has become relatively popular in the last few years and people. Are you know getting more interested in the paradigm but how we can also push that programming model forward with introducing state primitives with introducing? Maybe even different programming paradigm like or like you know more stateful stateful operators that allow you to think about who's responsible for the state and where that's living. Who's updating in all those kinds of questions that are really addressed by the primitives in a traditional functions and service system it. We're talking about adding state management to a lambda based system. And we'll get into your approach to that stateful approach that stateful computing adding state to lambda. The naive approach might be. I just WANNA use some in memory cache. I WANNA use an object cash like lettuce I could use a database like Dynamo. Db and this could manage my entire state. Why isn't that good enough? Why can't I just manage the state of my computer with these? These object storage systems. Yes so for some applications definitely is good enough. I think I mentioned a few minutes ago. That some of the production applications that we've seen that are running on them today or focused on you know really simple state models. They're using systems like Dynamo or as theoretical whatever it may be too dourson intermediary state into maybe communicate between Functions were necessary. But there's some core constraints that you run into pretty quickly for a lot of common applications and these are things like data shipping. You know. Linda doesn't really give you a facility to make sure that if you're accessing certain kinds of data really frequently you don't have to ship it over the network every time you know you can write certain objects or file slash temp on Linda. And if you happen to hit the same lend executed repeatedly with the request. You can check to see if there's something slash temp but that's a pretty hockey in a pretty unreliable way of trying to implement caching and then on top of that. It's not just data shipping but there's concerns around consistency if I'm using Dynamo. Db and I have multiple requests running in peril. That maybe touching the same state for some reason. Dynamo has very loose consistency guarantee. You might think that a system like lettuce which provides the ability at least on a single shard would be better but at least in the in the cloud. Native isn't auto scaling right. So you have a lambda assistant like landon. The auto scaling up. More executor's come up seamlessly but then with register has to be someone sitting there. Adding machines removing machines every time you do that on reticent cluster mode. There is a pretty high overhead because it reshuffles all of the data so all of these operations become really expensive and cumbersome they sort of run against the grain of the simplicity and the ease of use. That land is really great at offering. And so you start to wonder why you're using all these complicated Techniques that you know the the community gotten good at in the context of of non service or server full programming but if the core goal of service is to use some of the more easy to use auto scaling paper You cetera attraction then it starts to become pretty difficult to reconcile that with all these complicated scaling procedures and thinking about the way in which you're supposed to allocate resources to all the auxiliary components in addition to the compute worth taking a step back here and asking. What is the goal? What are we trying to achieve here if I want long-lived compute and I want to have scale ability. I could just use the traditional aws stack. I can use EC. Two instances. I can use far gate that can use auto scaling groups. I can set up a scalable system. Why do I want any of this? What are we actually trying to achieve here for talking about building a stateful functions? A service platform is there's some developer experience ideal that we have in mind that we're trying to get to. Yeah that's a really great question and I think a lot of it goes back to thinking about that who the end users or developers are so for a lot of folks who've been living in the cloud for the last ten fifteen years a lot of this stuff like you're saying may sound a little silly. Why are we jumping through all these hoops and trying to reinvent the wheel when we already know how to use communities and Horizontal Potter Scaling? All these tools that are that are pretty good at what they do. What's the goal here and I think from our perspective? One of the really interesting questions is thinking not about who the developers are. Maybe today or two years ago but they will be in five years at Berkeley. Where I'm a Grad student. For example we have recently introduced a whole major around data science and a lot of these folks who are studying data signs weren't coming from traditional computer science software engineering backgrounds. But there folks were interested in a variety of other fields who are studying data science as were of an applied major to go learn about dinner and techniques and then apply them to whatever they're interested in and so thinking about those kinds of folks in the next five ten fifteen years. We're going to be an increasingly common and increasingly large share of the programmer developer community. It's going to be really difficult for them to have to worry about setting up Kuban Eddie's every time they want to do analysis that doesn't fit on a single machine and to worry about how those things skill up and down and to worry about when you know they should be allocating resources them or how to configure a pot auto scaler. All those kinds of things are maybe not in the wheelhouse of people who aren't were traditional software developers and in general even for people who are familiar with with more traditional server management techniques and auto scaling I think there's an attractiveness to surplus which comes from this idea. That only pay for what you you you don't have to worry about these traditional techniques of provisioning peak load and worrying about you know how you're going to reallocate resources during the not peak load times and whether you shouldn't be running back jobs on them in the background that can be preempted just in case load spikes and all these kinds of things that that some of the large web companies have gotten really good at doing but maybe aren't what the average developer should be worrying about and so if we can do a really good job with bringing state management to service if we can sort of help developers rethink the way that they are configuring. Their servers building their application fitting. All these pieces together actually make everyone more productive they wanted to worry about mucking around with Coburn attis policies and building there docker containers and doing all these things that maybe aren't core to the business that are necessary to be running applications today but the question is is that necessary in the future and the goal of the hoop of services that we can turn simplified these attractions and make people more productive by removing some of these obstacles as a company grows the software infrastructure becomes a large complex distributed system without standardized applications or security policies. It can become difficult. To oversee all the vulnerabilities that might exist across all of your physical machines. Virtual machines containers and cloud services extra hop is a cloud native security company that detects threats across your hybrid infrastructure. 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We're saying there is not that if we manage to build stateful functions as a service this is going to solve the problem of the entry-level data scientists who wants to do look processing across eighty terabytes of data without thinking about how to configure spark cluster. What we're thinking about is if we can make stateful functions as a service. This is going to be a very interesting infrastructure. Primitive that will allow platform developers to build the necessary platforms for allowing an entry level data scientists to due process across eighty terabytes of data. Yeah that's a really good clarification. I think the goal here at least from our perspective is not solve every problem that that you could imagine by building stateful to ask system but the idea is that you know especially in the last fifteen years. We've seen that open source whether it systems like spark or pandas more recently have gained a lot of popularity because their new paradigm or maybe improvements of existing paradigms that allow people to process data to do things that they weren't able to do before really easily and quickly and so the goal here isn't to say that you know we're going to build a system and every scientists is gonNA use exactly that system but like you're saying that infrastructure that we're building. We hope will provide a blueprint for nibbling people who come along in the future to say. Hey I have this really interesting way to think about processing data in a civilised action can I layer on top of a stateful fast system so now my end users can come along and just write code against this. Api and I'll take care of distributing and charting it and making sure that there are the right guarantees and the right scaling properties and all that kind of things really good example of that is actually another project in the lab that I work in called Modin which is a API sits in between Pandora's API and distributed processing frameworks and with the folks on the Modem projects have done is basically to decouple dependence. Api which you know. Scientists and data analysts are super familiar with from the underlying infrastructure where bronze and they really thought hard about how to structure data frames under the hood and what the data layout should be an all that kind of thing that the average data scientists doesn't come out and now what they're trying to do is to layer that on top of a bunch of distributed data processing framework that data scientists using can write code against Pandora's API that they know and then under the hood. Maybe you know switch a conflict or something and then have it automatically running distributed fashion. So they don't have to worry about memory constraints and shuffles charting and all that kind of stuff but still get all the nice properties of scale ability and distributed compute for your goal with cloudburst cloudbursts by the way. I should say this paper that you published is it's about a stateful service platform it which is what we've been talking about in the abstract. Tell me about why you first started working on the problem of building stateful server less computing. Yes so we and my research group sort of has a database background. We all have studied databases and traditional database techniques and we got sort of excited about cloud infrastructure four or five years ago just trying to think about the level at which you can think about scale and being nice properties that you can rent machines and not have to worry about resources all kinds of things and do things that relatively with relatively high ease of use and to serve as sort of just accelerated that excitement when we started thinking about all the different ways in which we can make programming easier. Like we've been talking about for the last few minutes. And so what we realized was when he took a sort of deeper look at several is from an infrastructure perspective. Was THAT. There's all these things that pretty good out like event processing for applications or you know handling orchestration across a bunch of existing services. You know th that's actually a really common use case if you look at the. Us limiting use cases they use lambda functions basically trigger events into other services to write data warehouses. And so on. But what we realized was that if you really wanted to push that forward and to think about how we could restructure the way that developers are going to be writing code building platforms against cloud infrastructure. Sort of like. We've been talking about using data sciences. An example service didn't really fit the bill. There were really abstraction. There weren't really ways to structure the infrastructure to take advantage of all nice properties of serveral without having to jump through all this complicated hoops around you know like we've already said consistency and data shipping. And so on. And so the reason that we started tackling stateful function. The service was it felt like a concrete way to make programming easier with all the benefits of server lists but while also improving guarantees around consistency and performance data locality with the sort of Nice Api. Is that already come with services and as we talk about the structure that you built with cloudburst the architecture I want to talk about the design goals you set out with some design goals for the problems and the features the problems you wanted to alleviate and the features that you wanted out of cloudbursts one key design goal was logical disaggregation with physical colocation. What does that mean logical desegregation with physical colocation? Yes something that we haven't touched on from the perspective of existing Functions Service Systems. This idea of disaggregation which I think becoming increasingly popular in a lot of cloud architectures and the idea is that cloud providers can gain a lot of efficiency by logically disintegrating compute storage. Which means that. There's a compute service. That's running on these machines over here. There's the storage service that's running on those machines over there and so you can imagine a simple example might be s. three and lambda when you spin up a lambda function and you run it. You don't know who else is running on the physical machine. That you're running land functional. All you know is that you had this core for the next few hundred milliseconds and you're gonNA do your computer and it's on. Aws To make sure that there's no security vulnerabilities or data leakage. That happened to the Cross and similarly when you put an object into S. three on the same physical hard drives one hundred other users who have objects living there and the Nice thing about that from the club. Provider's perspective is that they can use fewer resources really aggressively pack users into this multi tenant environment and if they can do that then they can also turn around and provide lower cost to users because they're using fewer resources to service this number of so that's this idea of disaggregation and we thought that disaggregation was a really nice feature. We don't want to remove disaggregation because for all the reasons that I just talked about. And so the idea was that having this logical disaggregation and saying that we're going to have some resources where compute runs restorage running. You have to worry about who else is living on. The same physical resources will take care of that for you. That shouldn't preclude having physical colocation which has always been sort of a core tenant and data systems is that we don't want to be shipping data all over the place over the network especially repeatedly and so if we can achieve physical locality for data access. That will improve performance. But we also want to make sure that we have disaggregation because it provides these nice properties for both the cloud provider end for the program and it almost sounds like I mean when lambda. I came out the way that I thought about. It was okay. These are just functions that people are using as glue code. They're getting scheduled onto this questionable servile server infrastructure. The server might fail at any time. Maybe these are old servers. Maybe this is just spare capacity on a dusty old the Amazon service dedicated EC. Two instances about to fall over. And you don't get really strong guarantees about whether you're lambda function is GonNa Finish Win. It's going to spin up. It's this this flaky function and so you know as Amazon you think Amazon is just scheduling these functions onto random servers throughout their infrastructure. Of course we don't know but here you're saying if we can have a dedicated dedicated blocks of infrastructure that were scheduling functions onto at least the stateful kinds of functions. Where we're going to want to scale it up too. Many many instances of functions and perhaps a large amounts of data we actually want larger dedicated quantities of infrastructure for the service function. So it almost sounds like a move towards entirely different conception of how the infrastructure should be managing the service functions. Yeah that's that's a really good point. I think we've already seen more. And more of a move to this. And and with hosted infrastructure services things that are sometimes referred to as back end as a service systems. You know if you look at Aws. A good example might be a system like a pheno where you can run. Arbitrary Sequel queries over structured or semi structured data. That's stored in S. three. And so what that's done is it's built. A disaggregated system is running on some machines over here. A few knows running over there and you API is just a sequel query and it is service. In the sense that you upload your seaquarium you basically pay for a believed the number of gigabytes of data that's processed and they'd be how long the quarry takes something like that and you don't have to worry about you? Know how data is maybe Amazon under the hood is being really smart and his pushing some of those compute cycles down onto the same machines that are running. Maybe they're not we don't know but then do they. We don't have to care about it. But the Nice thing about this disaggregated architecture is that you pay for the data that stored in S. three. And that's one service that you worry about and then if you WANNA run sequel queries over that you pay for the that's processed in fina and that's a separate service you worry about you have to think about. I'm going to write some data to us three and then I'm gonNA stand up in. Ec Two instance. Over here. I have to worry about the get requests from S. three and how much they cost and how long that's going up. Might easy to bill. All that stuff is sort of abstracted away from you because we can aggregate the services. That are doing storage and compute and allow you to manage one of those separately. It run through some of the other concepts the design goals of cloudbursts before we get into the architecture. You wanted distributed session consistency. You wanted users to be able to compose functions together. You wanted the ability for functions to communicate with each other and in order to get these features you needed some state management and you needed storage semantics out of your function as a service run time. Tell me about the requirements for state management the requirements for storage. And what you did to implement that yes so I think you mentioned distributed session consistency and I think it's a really important idea in this whole in the broader picture here because if you start doing simple function compositions and think about how you might do it. In lambda let's just running to functions each of which is going to read some data from a storage system. Let's say you're using Dynamo. Db because that seems to be a common component in in architectures use land of. Let's say that you're I function my read some data from Dynamo. Juicing processing trigger the second function the second function happens to read the same piece of data with Dynamo. Db's default consistency guaranteed. You're not guaranteed that the same logic will request which happened to have two functions are going to read the same piece of data. I met re key ex twice in version one the first time inversion to the second time and that's makes it really difficult for programmers to reason about what's happening in the world. Did the data change or did function f happen to read the still version. How do you even know what the versions are? Dino doesn't really provide an API for you to understand what what's newer and what's older. It's on the application to maybe write that into the payload for example. All of these things become really thorny questions really quickly. And you're sort of forced into hacks like you know having a version aversion scheme on top of Dynamo or maybe explicitly shipping data that you require consistency for between functions. Whatever it is that you need to do as the application developer to make sure that they're sort of a sane view of the world from the perspective of your code and so having distributed session consistency. You right is a sort of storage ask primitive. But it's really important for sanity of the program or to be able to say I have a function over here. It's going to execute. And then as a part of the same request another function is going to execute and I WANNA make sure that there's some consistency guarantee across the two functions that execute and so from a database perspective that guarantee that I just mentioned is often called repeatable. Read a really key once I read it later on in the same request I should see the same version of it and so in terms of what the requirements are from a storage system. You know you can imagine schemes. That would that would build. Maybe some version of these guarantees across multiple storage engines. We actually built on top of an existing key value store that we had developed as a part of our research on which is a really low latency auto scaling key value store that avoid all coordination techniques and the way that it does this is by using these data structures called lattices or CR. Dt's that provide semantics for automatically merging conflicting updates without any user intervention. So a simple example would be a set if I have to replicas of a set they can accept updates in peril and acing currently they can tell each other what values are the set and because of the semantic that once an object is put into the set we can just say that it should be inserted into other replica of the set as well and we can eat. Synchronicity resolve and combine those conflicting. And so there's a bunch of data structures in the research literature that have taken advantage of this property that sometimes summarized as associated item as long as you're conflict resolution satisfies those properties. We can ace secretively resolve conflicting updates without any US earn entries and so the reason that we decided to use as the underlying store substrate to help provide these semantics is because it sort of fits with the standard mold of some of these auto scaling cloud systems like Dynamo S. Three and that doesn't have strong consistency. It doesn't use sort of really restrictive coordination techniques but it provides meaner semantics that helped build some of these distributed session guarantees on top of it without requiring us to build version scheme on top of a system like Dynamo or really think about where data lives. And how we should be managing conflicting updates and all those kinds of things and so using sort of the storage substrate nice way to sort of delegate some of the the conflict resolution and consistency mechanisms that it already took care of and then we were able to layer protocols on top of it and the cupboards layer to provide this notion of distributed session consistent over the last few months. I've started hearing about retool. Every business needs internal tools. But if we're being honest I don't know of many engineers who really enjoy building internal tools. It can be hard to get engineering resources to build back office applications and it's definitely hard to get engineers excited about maintaining those back office. Applications COMPANIES LIKE DOOR DASH and BREX AN AMAZON. Use Retool to build custom internal tools. Faster the idea is that internal tools. Mostly look the same. They're made out of tables and drop downs. Buttons and text inputs. Retool gives you a drag and drop interface so engineers can build. These internal EU is in hours not days and they can spend more time building features that customers will see retool connects to any database and API for example. If you WANNA pull in data from post grass you just read a sequel. Query you drag a table onto the canvas. If you WANNA try out retool you can go to retool dot com slash. Save daily that's R. E. T. O. L. DOT com slash S. e. daily. And you can even host retool on premise. If you WANNA keep it ultra secure. I've heard a lot of good things about retool from engineers who I respect so check it out at retool dot com slash se daily. I WANNA REVISIT ANNA. This auto scaling key value store a little bit later. Let's talk about the architecture for cloudbursts at this point so a cloudburst cluster has multiple. Vm's and functions get scheduled onto those vm's each of those VM's can run some number of functions and these functions can can use local cash. And there's also this auto scaling key value store that can be used by the entire cloudbursts runtime so this first of all the VM's so cloudburst cluster has a bunch of vm's on it and functions that get issued to the entire cloud cluster get scheduled onto those vm's what happens when a function get scheduled onto a vm. What does the Vm do yes so what the VM? Basically does is it reads in the code from the storage engine. The our initial implementation of the whole system is in python so it reads in a pickle python function destabilize. It it checks to see if any of the arguments to that function are of a special reference type and if any of the arguments are references it basically treats those ads Katya keys. So whatever keys are stored in those references? It automatically sucks them out of storage. And if they're stored locally in the cash from the cash don't have to go over the network and then we'll execute the function passing in those arguments in the references are automatically resolve and then once the code finishes executing it either will trigger a downstream function. If there is a downstream function or all right the result to storage or optionally it can also just send the user synchronised result back to the requesting client each of these. Vm's has a set of executor's. Can you explain what an execute is? And what role and executed place in the function scheduling. Yes so an educator is basically a single thread that does the process that I just walked through. So thread has a separate. Id The scheduler will basically look at all of the threads in this system. See how much work. It's assigned to each of them. Recently it uses jurisdiction based on data locality based on load management. Those kinds of things it picks an execute thread to assign the function requests to and wants to execute a receives that requested does the factors and execution the returning to the user. That whole process is done by the executing thread so each of these. Vm's also has a cash. What kinds of data is being stored on the local cache of of the VM? That these again these vm's are accepting the functions that are getting scheduled onto them And then they're executing those functions. What does the local cash in the VM? Do the cash is responsible for enemy in a room getting between all of the requests between the functions themselves and the storage engine so the functions of the part of their code can do arbitrary writes and reads from the storage engine so whenever a reader right is issued the cash sort of sits in between and says if I have this data stored locally than I'm just going to return it automatically from the cash and if not that I'm going to second in from the storage engine I'm GonNa cash it locally and then return it to the client and so as we start doing more and more requests especially if data access is skewed in some way or there's some hot set keys it's likely that data is going to be stored in cash and so whenever a function requests that data. We're just GONNA read from cash and avoid that expensive network round trip that we were talking about early on in the conversation okay. That's a clever design. Basically the idea is you've got these different functions and the functions might need to do some data sharing they might need to reference did variables that have been created or operated on by another function. And if you need to to read one of those variables you don't have access to it in your VM's local cash you can reach out to this auto scaling key Value Store. Anna that is accessible from all of the different. Vm's that functions are getting scheduled onto and that's the that's kind of the disc of the overall cloudburst computer that you've got the I understand correctly. That's exactly right now. Does this lead to any cache. Coherence issues the fact that you have these different functions as a service they've all they've got local caches that they're accessing and then you've got this auto scaling key value store that they might need to reach out to can lead to cache coherence issues. Yes so in general. We have not thought about managing cash consistency as a problem that that should require strong coordination just because it sort of introduces all these performance barriers. That are really difficult to reason about. So what we've done is to take advantage of the coordination freeness of Enna into leverage that to keep the caches roughly up to date as as we can expect the storage engine to be so what we do is under the hood and a sort of has a distributed multi cast mechanism that allows us to keep all of the replicas of each key in sync with each other using those sort of associative commutative item potent burge functions. That I talked about earlier so way that works is that if there's three replicas of a key and all of them can update themselves in parallel without any coordination and then periodically bill also send each other any updates that they'd received for each key in the storage engine and use that merged function to make sure that they all deterministic end up at the same value. So what we did was. We actually used the scene. Crt or destructors that uses and the cash layer basically treated as an extra KBS replica. So whenever updates are received at the K B s layer the can actually subscribe to certain keys indicate he s and when the KBS performs it's sort of distributed multi protocol in looks to see if any caches are subscribed to the keys that it's currently multi casting and it basically sends an extra message in addition to the storage replicas to the cash to say. Hey here's a new version of the key that you might want to know about and if the cash still has that data catch then it'll merge it and using that same merge logic and if it doesn't then it will just drop the message and treat it as just you know an empty message so the implementation of cloudburst we're talking abstractly about VM's and cashes on those Vm's you had to actually implement this. Did you implement it on a cloud provider? Yes everything runs on. Wabc to the underlying infrastructure uses Kuban Eddie's and chaos to interface with EC two and we basically have our docker containers that we run. We have our own sort of auto scaling infrastructure looks at load metrics and you know machine failures and all those kinds of things and use a sort of Chiapas as API to scale the whole service up and down in response to load changes and sort of standard to fix around load management. What were the implementation difficulties in actually building this out so I think the core sort of challenges that we ran into was wearing the infrastructure in a way that allowed us to be as seamless as possible akin to the way that existing functions as a service systems are while also sort of dealing with the constraints of existing server full cloud infrastructure. So sort of making sure that every time that we want to auto scale for example we. Maybe don't want to wait the three minutes that might take for instance to come up and then the extra two minutes that coronet east takes to download all of the infrastructure containers that it runs download our containers and all those kinds of things so finding the right ways to manage the infrastructure. Make sure that we're sufficiently nimble but aren't wildly over allocating resources. We are working on a research budget after all so we can't just leave. You know tons of machines lying idle all the time if we're not doing anything with them trying to find a balance around sort of managing the full infrastructure and how we can translate that into service infrastructure keeping in mind. Of course that we're not running sort of a large scale. Multi tended to production system that tons of people using every day but sort of doing this in their research context. They're trying to navigate all those kinds of things. There's been a really interesting challenge. Another one that sort of comes to mind is dealing with you. Know moving data across the network across multiple languages. Anna's into my in C. Plus plus the cashing layer is as well just because we wanted to take advantage of the same data structures but the programming interfaces in python and anyone who sort of worked on distributed python. We'll know pretty intimately that paying for serialisation and decentralisation python is really expensive really really slow so trying to think about how we can mitigate some of those overheads maybe I'd cashing in addition to ensure on a per vm basis. Also per executed. So that we can start realized. Versions reducing the overheads in DC realising functions on every request. All those kinds of things where things that we sort of had to work through at a fine grain sort of with a fine tooth. Comb to make sure that we were reducing the overhead as much as possible because it's started to add up pretty fast when we didn't consider these things. The prospect of production is this. It seems realistic. You could imagine offering what you've built with cloudburst as a function as a service company. You could imagine if it works as you intended selling. Compute time on a cloudburst cluster. Is that a realistic possibility. Yeah I mean we're we're still trying to finish Grad school so we haven't really thought super hard about what a commercial offering of this would look like but we have been starting to play around with a bunch of applications that run on top of it to get a feel for what the sharp edges are here. And where the applications that run on top and really derive benefit from some of the attractions. That we've been providing and so wanting temple is an application that I already mentioned which is distributed pandas infrastructure that. We've been working with with folks and our research lab to implement on top of cloud worse and we've also been thinking about how to make data science easier in general by building several doc in for Jupiter notebooks to basically enable folks were writing code against Jupiter to not worry about where the state is living and maybe even scale up their workloads seamlessly without having to worry about. You know where'd Uber? Hub is running in. What the resource constraints on all of that infrastructure is but to sort of get more services field and say hey for this particular cell I wanNA scale it up really fast and in the rest of the time. I just want to use one thread to run my code or something like that. So sort of as a compromise cancer question we've been thinking about some of the more concrete applications that we can layer on top of this and derive really interesting benefits from model that we've implemented with cloudbursts but we haven't really thought yet about what some of the more commercial applications of it might be. Have you talked to anybody at? Aws about cloudburst. Yeah the Nice thing about our research. Lab Is that we're actually sponsored by all of the major cloud providers. So we get we get to chat with them. You know a couple of times a year and get their feedback on what we've been working on. I think they are definitely interested in the idea. Is that these ideas as I think. Interesting future directions for some of their services but at the end of the day you know they are running a multi-million dollar production service said they can't go running around planting sort of newfangled research ideas and I think a lot of the work from my understanding. That's gone into some of these. Systems in in recent years has been really focused on hardening the system making sure that it provides reasonable guarantees for example around called start. Latency is like I mentioned earlier. And to really sort of tighten tighten the nuts and bolts around the core offering. But I'm sure they're they're thinking about what the what the future directions of these services are and have definitely shown interest in learning more about what we built in how we think you know the idea might be more applicable in their setting. You're part of the rise lab and I've done a few shows with people from the rise lab. Why are the rise lab people so interested in in service and I'd love to know just what your experience like has been your experience has been like at the rise lab? Yeah to maybe answer this question backwards. The the rise lab is is super unique From my perspective because it has a really strong research background obviously but also has a ton of contact and interaction with industry that allows a lot of the researchers in the lab to choose problems that I think are really applied and are really focused on moving the needle for problems that folks in industry are running into and so I think that sort of perspective that close interaction that we get just by virtue of being in Berkeley and being really close to the Silicon Valley in San Francisco having those interactions on a somewhat regular basis. Sort of temperatures and motivates a lot of the research that we do and I think one of the reasons that folks have gotten really interested in server list's not to being super repetitive. Here but is really starting to think about how we can bring some of the simplicity of civilised to a broader variety of applications. Because we are starting to see more and more people who don't maybe have traditional computer science background writing code wanting to deploy code but not knowing what the right abstractions and the right infrastructure to layer on top of is and provides a really neat way to simplify the lives of those people. And so that's why I think a lot of the conversations that we've had had moved in the direction of surplus and have pushed us to think about simpler obstructions for cod programming. That don't require the complexity of servers. Cougar Netease and all these kinds of things that people are dealing with today. And what would be your research. Focus what would you be working on? If you're not working on service right now. What kinds of problems are you thinking about? Yeah that's really interesting question. I think I got interested in cloud infrastructure before I got interested in service and and so I think if I wasn't working on service I would still sort of being the general space of thinking about meet ways to take advantage of the scale and the sort of resource availability of the cloud wasn't really possible before the advent of systems like EC two and S. three that operated this scale that people were really dealing with before and so I think finding ways to take advantage of that and bring developer guarantees whether it's around consistency or fall tolerance making those things. More seamless which I know is starting to sound like several but I I would say that the reason that we came to this was because it felt like vehicle for making those things easier rather than we looked at several lists and then decided that we should make those things easier. If that makes sense he does Vikram. Thank you for coming on the show. It's been real pleasure talking to you. Thanks for having me. This has been awesome. Apache Cassandra is an open source. Distributed database that was first created to meet the scale ability and availability needs a facebook. Amazon and Google. In previous episodes of software engineering daily we have covered CASSANDRA's architecture and its benefits. And we're happy to have data stacks the largest contributor to the CASSANDRA project since day. One has a sponsor of software engineering daily data. Stacks provides data stack enterprise. A powerful distribution of Cassandra created by the team that has contributed the most to Cassandra. Data stacks enterprise enables teams to develop faster scale further achieve operational simplicity ensure enterprise security and run mixed workloads. That work with the latest graph search and analytics technology all running across hybrid and multi cloud infrastructure more than four hundred companies including Cisco Capital One and Ebay run data stacks to modernize their database infrastructure improve scale ability and security and deliver on projects such as customer analytics. Iot And e commerce to learn more about Apache Cassandra and data stacks enterprise goto data stacks dot com slash. Save daily. That's data stacks with an X. D. At A. S. T. A. X. At Davis tax DOT COM slash daily. Thank you to data stacks for being a sponsor of software engineering daily. It's a great honor to have data stacks sponsor and you can go to data stacks DOT COM slash. S. daily to learn more

Vm developer Dynamo aws Berkeley Google Anna Gtri Vikram Sri Conti Vikram Sri County Curiel Greenberg engineer
Episode Forty-Nine // Meemaw, They're Storming the Capitol!!

Bitter Brown Femmes

1:01:45 hr | 3 months ago

Episode Forty-Nine // Meemaw, They're Storming the Capitol!!

"Before we begin. I would like to give a shoutout to all of our patrons over on patriot dot com slash bitter brown families without your support. This podcast really wouldn't be possible. So thank y'all immensely. If you want to become a patron in exchange for some awesome rewards like extended episodes as always livestreams and even some horoscope readings feel free to follow the link in the description of this episode or visit patron dot com slash bitter brown fem. We would specifically like to think our bb f bff level patriots on our age ni. Caitlyn m d'elia elizabeth. Oh miranda e. Cynthia p loop f. and christiaan g as well as eveline. Y'all are so bad ass. Thank y'all so much all right. let's start the show. Why three hello. Hello hello and welcome back to an episode of bitter brown fans is rueben coming to you from los angeles. And this is cassandra. Coming to you from el paso us. This is our first official episode of the year. The last one was recorded like the day before christmas so even though like the things that we talked about on that episode were still relevant because ten minutes an illusion and nothing changed right like folks like the democrats were going back and forth with like whether or not to give us two thousand dollars of our tax money or six hundred dollars our on tax money and of course. They chose the six hundred the hobby. I don't know just bummed about not having a job which is a weird thing to say. I think 'cause we're gonna fucking pandemic but i think even though the pandemic is happening a lot of people still wish they could work and not in like a fucking trump republican way wordsley. Xlii opened a blue state or whatever but in a lake. I'm fucking broke. His shifts. And i wish i could work So yeah you're struggling with that. Like how much more do we have to go. You know and then even afterwards like what. How hard is it going to be to find a fucking show blake who is going to be hiring. All these businesses are going to be closed just thinking of all But i mean other than that. I'm trying to be like optimistic. That it's a new year even though we're still in a pandemic and nothing has changed. It's almost going to be. It's almost going to be a whole year of like being quarantined. Like hit me on march and they won't these bitches have only given us thousand two hundred and some people got six hundred. I had still haven't gotten mine but not even two thousand dollars in a whole year for most people they just give you a hundred dollars. A month essentially. Yeah that is wild and can't like boy already talked about the fucking stimulus to talk about. United stimulate stimulates chai chat anymore. No but Get those stimulus out for our merge no but for real we do we did drop our merge patriots this weekend so you already came through. A lot of y'all unita calmed down. Because it's just me picture myself like as a cartoon gift like packing stuff by myself all fast trying to so so please. Y'all get your shit soon but if you're one of our patrons and you haven't checked it out you can hit on over patriot on and if you're not a patriots on Merch will drop leader this week for you all so we'll see what people have left for you because promises merch will drop eventually merged when a drums but if you're a patriot you can go get it right now. This very second. You can just be like nope not listening right now. I am instead going to get march. You can do that. But i've been good things for asking Literally did this twice. And both times. Sandra move on and he's been as is you'll great. Curiel chair thinks you know. I've been fantastic stressed. My eating habits are over the place my sleeping habit all over the place but yeah in grad school. Let me not fabulous life. It's a mess. I don't know how they expect us to learn anything in these situations. And so i can't imagine like what what like golic takes for like professors to be like to the grad students. Like you only to turn thirty pages of this and that assignment and it's just like grammar a pandemic like i had a class a day of like the white could premises like capital ri- and they acknowledged it for more than five minutes and not even sure they did. I was late to that class. Because i was still like in shock and i was like should i even show up to. This class is weird. Anyway i'm dropping close because the topic a lot. I can't even imagine going to school right now. And shutouts to everyone who's been working during the pandemic who's been going to school during the pandemic who's been at home with their kids who are like shuttled to all of us. you know. we're doing what we are best. Let's put it there. We're doing our fucking best. Having clean your house in a minute like You know et cetera et cetera. Judge yeah joining doing your best out here. But i hope yeah that in leaving twenty twenty behind that we wanted to do like these two last episodes for the year twenty twenty but should happens okay so we did our best. Bitter run films did their best and put out a lot of episodes more than any other year. So shut out to us and this year will be more but we did wanna make like an episode. That i had wanted to do was kind of like a round up of like what happened in twenty twenty Unfortunately we didn't get to do it. And now i feel like a new year new year but i did one of the things though. I want to talk about real quick as like if you took anything away from twenty twenty is like our government doesn't shit about us and just how fucked like capitalism is and how it like kind of set the stage for like everything like as far as like work and like healthcare and like labor like poverty and everything that has happened so like. We're not gonna have this whole episode like we intended about like twenty twenty and what we learned. Maybe we'll do that this year. That'll be called. but i sure for sure for sure. I hope we're all on the same page that our government does not give a shit about us in that capitalism is killing everybody and the planet. Yeah i think one thing you were getting out is particularly how this last year should have made a lot of us. Think about like labor like our jobs and our the environment. We end the pace. We expected to work out but also like the protections that we had or didn't have is a product of the unions being stripped for like ages. You know consider how you're gonna take those lessons into consideration going forward in the different ways that you work but also i think about immediately about like even not only like work that you get paid for but also think about domestic work. There's so many folks who are now spending more time at home and seeing that maybe their labor was that there was so much invisible labor that was being done in their homes right because they had a woman or someone who's feminist like do that labor right like. I think something that you were talking about earlier. Cassandra is about how so. Many people lost their jobs in their last year but most of them were women who were fired. Particularly black women and latinos. Yes so there is like An article that came out of this week that said us employers cut one hundred forty thousand hundred jobs in december and women accounted for all the losses but particularly just block woman and latinos that loss one hundred and fifty six thousand jobs while men gained sixteen thousand jobs. Black women latinos are out here. Losing lost all these jobs and twenty twenty like men actually gained jobs during a fucking pandemic. Obviously not all men. But y'all know what y'all know what the fuck we're talking about but that's just one example you know you brought up like domestic labor and it's just it's not it's like everywhere like women lost their jobs and the reasons that women that some women lost their jobs because of childcare was because of children you know i always talk about like a lot of differences between fatherhood and motherhood and one of them is mothers and like how they're seen by employers very unreliable if they have children like a lot of times they won't even want to hire us because if they know that we have children because they're like older if the kid is sick. You're gonna call uptick. Have you have to go pick them up. There's like it's like a downfall. It's like a flaw. You know if you say that you have children but with men who say that they have children in interviews more than likely to get that job because it seen as a positive for them and so women are often fired because of absences and a lot of these absences are due to childcare. Due to like. I don't have some wanna stay home with my child. If they're sick. I need to take my child to the doctor etc so. I definitely believe that. But i definitely believe that. Could that is one of the factors. Because i had been wanting to share a similar article awhile ago and the article that i was referring to a few months ago is how covid sent women's workforce progress backward In a pretty much said the same thing and one of the quotes and that was One experiment found the job applicants with relevant experience. Who were out of work more than six months less likely to be called back in does with no relevant experience who had been unemployed for less time. this is potentially compounded by hiring discrimination that mothers and specifically mothers of colors experience. So this isn't like anything new. it's like childcare. it's like being a parent and in the third and then when we go into like the homes right so now like for example. I had to quit my job. Because i didn't have childcare and i'm at my house and i live with my parents so it's a little different but if for example you're in a relationship and your with your husband right like even though you're at home you're still expected to do that. Work to right and it's like so now you're at home and you're still doing work. You're still taking care of your children. You're doing virtual learning you're cooking. You're doing the things so it's like just like this is just just austing but when other article that i had been wanting to share to which ties into a domestic labor was the survey. I it was in new york times that they were doing and the question was who has spent more time. Homeschooling your children or helping them with distance learning. And what's funny is that men said me. Forty forty five percent of men said to me and eighty percent of women said so we all know men are lying here for no reason for no fucking reason. Nobody's gonna find out. Still lying. unprovoked does survey. Like i'm just like why are you lying. It's like an anonymous survey. So one of my favorite quote in that article about that was like although it's not possible to be certain which perceptions are correct years of past research using time. Diaries have consistently shown that men often overestimate the amount they do. And i'm just like obviously like in their little heads. They really do think they're doing like a lot you know they're like oh i i made this bed for you my love so it's just like even we're at home during a pandemic like not getting paid. Were still doing work where cray not being compensated for it. Because domestic labour is it is labor as well and capitalism runs off that as well so that's just like a whole thing that i wanted to shine light on If you're a mother even if you're not a mother you know like i. I'm sure like women who don't have children also just got let go of their jobs. Employers are misogynists shit. They're six shit. Of course they're going to pick men over women they're going to let women go. You know that shit still exist in the workplace so and that is just one one of the like inequalities quote unquote that that were seen you know but we can talk about like. I think one of the things that twenty twenty in regards to the pandemic and capitalism also shown for me was like able ism which i need to like. I want to be just more aware of myself like that. That's just one thing like for me like the pandemic and like just how ablest not just how people are in regards the pandemic right but just like how you know disabled rights and like able ism that tie into the pandemic and capitalism as far as like healthcare as far as like the pandemic itself in how people like a treat it and tree. You know people who are disabled us disposable or like they're not worthy of like being saved or like we don't care about their lives but also just like how these employers like you know you get to work from home and then it's like when disabled people ask for these things that was impossible but now it's possible because we're in this pandemic and just just a lot of things so the for me you know i just want to be more aware of of And disabled rights. I should say for me. That's kind of one. The things i took away from the pandemic absolutely the and with that. We're going to go on a short break and come back in the second. No one knows your body better than you. That's why it planned parenthood. You have your health care decisions. Do planned parenthood's telehealth appointments. You can get high quality affordable. Care your way by phone or video when you're ready just book original appointment at planned. Parenthood dot org slash bbs. That's planned parenthood dot org slash. Bbs all right all right and we are back. And today we wanted to devote a chunk of our episode to the white supremacists attack on the capital. Which like oh okay. There's a couple of things that like immediately in that statement certain leftists were just like stop defending the capital like any attack on. It is good and just like shut up like this was. I didn't even see that. I'm like leftists are going white leftist. Let's keep it. Keep a rail out of their way to be like you know. Be careful what you come damn in this thing because it's in a comeback to hire her leftist. I'm just like girl. Whatever they were gonna do. They were going to do already to us. Like they don't need our approval or disapproval when it comes to talking about these premises because the state itself is white department. The state it didn't need our permission are being people of color and didn't need our permission to enact violence against us so the simple act of these white supremacist. Doing this bullshit is already going to affect us negatively like so please like some folks were were up in arms because trump got to spend it from twitter as a result of the white supremacist on the capital and they were like if they suspend donald trump. They're gonna suspend all of us. And i'm like bitch there already. Suspending all of us the regularly suspend left is that so many of them have like alternative accounts sect like sex workers are consistently getting suspended off all platforms. Like some your leftist. Don't see that because you don't see sex workers as like people who need protection. So let's talk about that bitch. Like is so frustrating. When you know. I was posting about like you know what was going on with the we know. Trump's especially twitter and people are like essentially bringing up the fact that we're gonna suspend everybody and i'm just like where does where does this power of like you know Corporations and and. I'm like we live in capitalism corporations. Have all the power. Did you just wake up to that fact today. Please think for a minute and consider the fact that some of us have been talking about these issues for ages like my first youtube video was about Sesto foster which you know was rolled out like three years ago and which deep platform a lot of sex workers in in it. I mentioned the fact that they were gonna come from the rest of us but who was talking about it. Not very many leftists like particularly Marxists right because a lot of them do not like sex To talk about or endorse sex work but still watch porn but whatever And so it was just a sex workers in allies. Were talking about this issue. So i need a lot of y'all to wake up or her like sit the fuck down anyway back to just remembered that that really was pissing me off reading that everywhere. Who's defending the capital like. Who's a fuck as like. Please don't touch the capital. Please don't destroy the but all guys like who the fuck got. I didn't see those tapes. But let's rewind let's rewind. It's not like us being like. Oh protect the stage like this is not what this conversation is no. I'm just like god. Okay let's rewind though so this happened last wednesday for those. Let's let's get. Let's get everybody out last wednesday wednesday little raise margot's day. Yes the fucking disrespect. These people have towards like latino as being. Yeah being nexus v necks of bitch so much first of all. How fucking dare you okay. What did you say they already disrespected us enough. Be enough throughout this fucking presidency and unto do this on on that day now respect but anyway let's continue so these mother fuckers. I'm sorry that that That picture of that little old me mama grandma inside the capitol waving the flag just came to my mind and i'm just like okay. So we got the grandma's and the capital. We got the vikings. We got the. I don't know the people falling off the the walls there. It was a hot mess. I mean let me. Just start off by saying when i woke up that day and i saw what was happening actually was scared and then i was actually very angry and bothered and i don't even know father too strong enough word. I was just very. I didn't want to see it. I don't want to see made me very mad that it was happening and i didn't explain it. It wasn't like just scared and it wasn't just angry. Was just this weird feeling that i had where i was just like. I don't wanna see the show like it pisses me off like it. Upsets me that they're being allowed to fuck and do this. Even though it's not surprising at all it's still very like. I don't even know if shocking the were to right because nothing that white supremacist or white supremacy does. This is like shocking. Because they've done it all before. But i just don't want to see it because pissed me off and it wasn't until like a few hours later i was like okay. I need to get on and see what's going on. Then you know eventually. Throughout the day the videos came the memes and that made me feel better but initially it just really bothered me The level that we were seeing like white supremacy at such a it was just so like oh this casual like normalized like no big deal kind of thing like it was a big delay people reacting to it but the people there like the security. You're like the cops or whoever the fuck was there. Obviously they weren't doing shit you know. And so these people just got to roam free at the capitol like it was nothing and that piss me off and on that note. I don't the first thing people did was start comparing what was going on to like black lives matter or to like you know black people who have died in police custody who had been killed not died in police custody who had been murdered by cops in police custody. It's like if black lives matter. did this. then this would happen or like you know those side by side. Comparisons of like this person got killed by a car because they were black yet. This you know those kind of comparisons and then it's like this is what white privilege is. Those are the only two things that were like coming out and that usually come out with shit like this happens but look one thing that i wanted to to touch on was like how we should make these comparisons at all because it kind of just validates. What a lot of like right we right wing people say about black lives matter and about like social movements or like different protests that are about something that are against oppression um and our four liberation which is very different from what was going on at the capitol in very different from like right wing fucking rights protests or whatever the fuck you want to call them you know so when we compare the two we are. We are saying that they're the same and the only thing we're saying is look they're the same but the outcome is different when they're not the same at all the outcomes not the same but the the situation is not the same at all so like those comparisons need to be just not made we when we're talking about like what happened at the capital and we're talking about white supremacy year like right wing Fuckers like that's what we need to talk about period. We don't need to compare them to block lives matter we need. We don't need to compare them to left just because they're not the same at all so that's just one thing and then the second thing is like when we say like this this is what white privilege is. And it's like yeah. I mean yeah. We can argue that that the reason why they got to do a lot of what they did right was because they have privilege under white supremacy but white privilege is such a cop out at times like replacing. Just kinda using it for everything like this is white privilege. This is white privilege and white. Supremacy does not white privilege like that's white supremacy and and needs to be called what it is and white privilege now just feels like this watered down we just label everything as an kind of just feels like it caught white people because even though they some of them still have white guilt i guess for having privileged like privilege is not something that you earned right so day. Just have it. They didn't do anything right like they just have it in. So they're in their minds. It's like oh it's not my fault you know it's my fault they have privilege and when we say like oh. This is white privilege than they get to remove themselves from that. Because they're like well. It's not my fault you know. So for example. For saying you know. These fuckers got to storm the capital because of white privilege. It's like oh well. That's not their fault. it's not their fault. they have white privilege. Right is not their fault that like the cops saw them and we're like oh they're white they have privilege like no like the reason. They stormed capitals because of white. Because they're fucking white supremacists because of white power because that's what they were doing. That was the whole point of that. And i've been. I have felt that way about term white privilege like i hardly use it because of this but seeing everyone label white dot that action like that situation at the capitol as white privilege was just like no. This is a not fucking white privilege. And that's how i feel also about. I know we've talked about this before. About like the whole karen thing right like calling these violent racists as white women karen's You know when. I had said like we need to start calling them what they are which is like violin races. White supremacism aggressors. You know at times like there's a difference between someone saying oh. Let me speak to the manager at mcdonalds. Like yeah okay. You can say. Oh this person's being a karen ha but when this white woman is like attacking a black child how is like how is it like a whole there being the karen like target karen like some fucking cute thing but anyway. I'm not getting into that. Because i talked about that. And i got dragged for that and now everyone's on board but whatever the point is we need to start calling things but they are not caught a white people and not like issues and then another thing. It's like hunter explained now. It's like i do think that pointing out white privilege has its place. I think that it's a good way to get people who aren't maybe they're not all like they really don't understand why privilege or they don't understand how it manifests right in white supremacy like pointing those things out. I think our do reach some people right. Because i've reached people that way like pointing to different things out but if feels like everyone's just stuck there. I like okay now. Let's just call everything white privilege okay. A white person acknowledges that they have privilege in like what like what is. What does that mean they just get to say that they just got to go online and say i'm white and i have privilege but like what does that do that doesn't do anything so like the point is not like i don't give a shit of a white person acknowledges that they have privileges because that doesn't do anything and needs to be a lot more than that like. What is your role and white supremacy. How do you perpetuate white supremacy. How do you benefit from it. Aside from like having these little privileges like a lot of the time you having little privilege. It's like a lot of the times not swipe people engaging in white supremacy and like violence. It's not just like oh. I have the privilege to do this. And it's like no you're fucking racist so those were just like two big things that i got from like. I don't even know what we're calling it. 'cause the white supremacist attacked on the capital You know there's so many things but one thing i've been told not to call it as a terrorist attack because invalidates apparatus either way as you were saying like we start counting like the premises and other thing. That does that. It shows you that you know i feel like white privilege. Does this thing of making like racism. Seemed like an individual thing like you know like they're acting the right privilege as opposed to like illustrating it as part of a greater system ray and white supremacy the term itself. I think that is more effective right like when a white woman calling the cops on you know black child because she thinks he stole her phone like has happened recently ray like her. Doing that is not her. You know enacting. Her white privilege because in It turned knowing that she lives in a white supremacist society. That is going to believe her as believe is not going to believe a black child when it comes to stealing ray. That's kind of the what's happening here. Yeah and another thing about white privilege. There's this Also article by la- shave from kinfolk collective that's called stop blaming white privilege and her angle which is something else. Y'all should read this article v schuylkill. It'll come out was when we're talking about an embassy. Maybe empathy is not the right word. But for example. We'll say stuff like oh you know you don't care about this issue because you have white privilege like there's this post that's always going around. That's like if something doesn't affect you like you don't care what privileges. And i could be wrong on that but i'm sure most of you have seen it like not carrying about something affect you is like privilege and i'm not gonna lie. I think like a few years ago. I might have probably posted that because they made sense to me or i thought he did at the time but after reading this article like it made me change my mind on a lot of things and one of them was like how we say. You know. you can't like you can't care about like for example like black issues or like what black people go like the state violence that black people go through. Because you're not black right because you don't because you're you don't experience this and you have privileged. But it's like when we think about you. Know of ruben. Were to say my mom passed away right. Like my mom's ever passed away. But i can imagine the pain that ruben would feel and not just like with his mom with like if he were to tell me you know that they got an car accident or that that something happened that like hurt them and i could relate to that and not necessarily relate like i never went through that but i could sympathize and empathize because i care and because i he i can connect with them and i can sympathize with them. But even though we've never. I've never experienced that. I can sympathize and it doesn't like it is a really makes sense to say like be able to understand what ruben is going through because i have privileged because i've never experienced outright because white people lack empathy. I'm sorry but not sorry they don't. It's not that it's like privilege that's holding them back from like you know when we're talking about another thing when thing that i always fight back as only trauma porn for example like sharing trauma porn and people are like we need to share it because white people like racist need to see this child dine at the border so that they understand why you know. Detention is wrong and it's like no they don't care they don't to see these pictures like they don't need to go to little tours at the detention center like if they had empathy if they had morals like say what fucking care but they don't so it's not this lack that's not this privilege. That's blinding them from like allowing them to feel compassion and empathy. It's just that they don't have cut ties into everything. like why. yeah like. Just stop blaming privilege for a lot of things not just for like calling it not calling it white supremacy but also like blaming you know using it to caught a white people and using a to like excuse them of not of like of everything. Because that's what like that term white privilege has come to. I feel especially with celebrities like media. Yeah and then on on back on that note. I think i already mentioned like when we share these these things of like comparisons and not only. Is it inaccurate. But it's white people. I'm pretty sure they know that. Like black people white people do not get treated the same like they're not living in some lake other reality they just do not care. So why are we wasting our time screaming. This is white privilege and making comparisons about black lives matter and calling them hypocrites like they already know that like. Let's move on and let's focus on like ourselves and not like individually blake as a community. I mean how can we show up for each other like what are we doing like what should we read right. Now that's going to like help us see like because again like what happened at the capitol in this day and age. Yes it's like the first quote unquote time. It happens in our lifetime that we see it like reliving through but it's not the first time that white supremacy looks like this or that. Does this so like what you know. What are we sharing with other people. That's actually educating people. That's uplifting people that's like providing people with something other than what we already know. We already know we really don't do. All of these basic things. People are saying like we already know that. So like what's the point of sharing that over and over and over and over again. But i think you're getting at something that i wanted to talk about. Which was the fact that like in a lot of people are like. Oh you know there must be repercussions for these white supremacism and things like that. And while i mean yeah another part of me is like the already achieved what they wanted to achieve like they already essentially made it known that like white supremacy doesn't end with donald trump right and that they are ready for whatever the next us deletion is ray and it was a mess like that and i think that's part of what the intent here was because as some articles have mentioned like maybe like one or two of them like there was one particular Dude hussein's remind you know went in and there was shit. Pictures of him fully covered up head to toe and he was carrying like zepa ties like like police level grades zip ties and he was obviously trying to kidnap somebody Or take hostages but everybody else like all the other white supremacist just walked into the capitol building in like you know through their axe body spray and he literally put it on. The walls like literally. There's shit on the capitol building walls that wire but they're you know it's not like they had a plan like give if they went in there and stop the vo like they didn't have a plan of action after that right like a a cool usually entails there is like an overthrow power or or things like that but that is not necessarily what they were ready for what they were ready for though was to speak into circulation of white supremacists imagery right because now a lot of us. You know sure are like shaken by the trauma and all that of like watching these white to premises you know going into the capital and were shaken because like the imagery of them doing so was so widely spread so now we have like images of like somebody walking in the capitol building with like a confederate flag. We have you know images of some dude in a buffalo cab like body pain. Like i on the houser senate floor you know. We have all these like while images in her head that you know. They went in there with the full of tension of of simply make them felt either to martyrs. Or you know they were imprisoned or killed or you know four the by two premises group that the are part of on the internet right because this all began on like i either ready or parlor or something like that or the blog post reich. Unm being that conspiracy theory website that thinks that donald trump was like god sent to save america Which is like surprisingly. I mean i don't even know if surprisingly popular but it's like mega popular at the moment that website. They they've sure they made a mockery of themselves. These white supremacist but the also like creed of the imagery. That's going to live on and be historic size. So i think folks have to pay attention to what the age of social media what it means to incite terror right and to incite violence. Because all this is going to do with it is going to inspire a lot of copycat to want that type of glorification bright or that kind or that like martyrdom from like white supremacists articles. I completely agree I think that white people suck up protesting on. I wouldn't call that a protest. Obviously but just in general they never know what the fuck are duly like. You can tell. They've never protest in their life. I just so. It's not surprising. They didn't have a plan like in it's laughable but at the same time like i one hundred percent agree with you that regardless like. They got what they wanted. Which which was that which was like. Hey look at us. We can do this. We want to and that's pretty much it and that's what happened right. There were smiling too. I mean how many people died like five people died who shot and everybody else like died of complications. Were not so one people. One guy taylor about that so One lady how to tread on me sluggish. She got tread on Stomped on to be exact and then there was one lady who got shot like actually got shot by like a cobber like a slot person. Let's three and then a cop. They killed a cop. Died by suicide like a couple of days veteran. Oh yeah i did. I did see something about that so just a hot mess in like both of those things are true right like they got a lot of them what they wanted they a lot of them like get they get off on like enacting violence even if it's just like imagery like ruben mentioned because they know like spotlights on them pictures are being taken and now people of color black people indigenous people like now. That's like what they want And then at the same time that they're all a lot of them were hot s mess and just went a lot of these trump supporters. Obviously like i don't like saying that right wing people republicans conservatives that are quote unquote like. They're not smart like there's like this thing where people are like. They're they're not a lot of them. Are fucking smart right but then there's a lot of them that are just kind of going along with what you know. They just believe everything that they see on facebook on fox news on conspiracy theory exits other like the followers right. They're not like the leader or just like there and so a lot of those people like meemaw for example like i can tell like they just went like noah's date nomads about. I mean they're just like fuck y'all let's go like there's they didn't have a plan they've never been to lake. They just they just wanted to go so like both of those types of people were there and so the latter made me laugh because those people were just you know climbing walls and falling and tailoring themselves in the balls to death. Yes i was gonna get okay. I don't know. I was thinking about buying something and then my ex was like just. Don't hurt yourself in the balls like this dude. And yeah so now. I'm not sure if making certain purchases. Why have a teaser. And i'm not scared to use it. Not but i've i've never had to use it on anybody but i will. That's what happened in conclusion last wednesday in conclusion. What else has happened since then. Oh i mean yeah that you have touched on at the beginning like a lot of the what happened afterwards was like all of a set in trump is banned from twitter and spotify some from the like absolutely not commercials for you actually no commercials your just not band. You're just not on here. So he got ban and then and then people from his administration resigned. And it's like it's just like all of a sudden people like want to impeach him and all of a sudden people this energy like two weeks before the end of his presidency and i'm jay. Oh my god that's what business me. Let's talk about this impeachment shit like now. I'm past like pistre. These bitches are all hype about like. Yeah let's impeach him to set a precedent enough to let this doesn't happen again. Am like bitch was energy years ago when this all when his whole shit started now all of a sudden you're brave now that you're like eight nine days away from potentially taking the presidency and the house aca they already or congress like they are one like democrats already one everything. Another brave bitch. You know what you need to breban getting me my two thousand dollars a month. Retroactively like to geneva brave on passing like a job security measures. You know passing like a small business. Like security measures like financial measures taking money away from corporations and like big banks and shit like that and giving it to people like that need to be worried about and these are all things that i'm mentioning that is within the capacity of these liberals to make happen like i'm not even not even asking them to like you know destroy the storm or whatever the fuck they think leftist talk about like i'm i'm talking about like shit that they can do right now. They can you know what else they can do. Another can forgive all student loans. They can provide free health now. Biden said only two miles on guys. You know what they can do all that on day one instead of wasting their energy this fucking like a theatre like you know. It's the opposite of the theater. Of the oppressed is the is a theatre of the oppressor array here. That they're fucking doing like fucking girl will put up with motherfucker for another nine days. If y'all bitches give me my money if y'all bitches forgive my sooner loans if y'all give me some fucking healthcare for free because otherwise they're just like oh. We tried our best to get him impeach or even worse like if they do impeach him like a fucking week before he said to leave. Anyway they're gonna they're gonna ride that high for agency gonna pretend like they did something it'll be like the we've resisted to the very end and i'm like uber is doing something. You resisted your resistance getting your at the end and not even much 'cause like the only thing in politicians resist is a fucking doing their job because they don't resist taking money from you know big corporations and you know big. Pac's big super pacs. They love not resisting. does that cashflow So you know. What i i will resist on my own like i will. If you've y'all at trump be president for another nine days or whatever. I'll resist him as long as you pass all the other progressive measures that we have been begging your for ages which reminds me that. And y'all better do something because all the progressives that were like pro america for all pro like student loan forgiveness pretty much all the progressives like won their races. Were that were asked liberals that like you know our by the book like you know capital i but we like you know people have colored. Those type of liberals nancy pelosi type most of them lost their. So y'all need to step it up because people you know people are facing. Y'all oh yeah just about how everyone wants to act like. They're brave and now all of a sudden and it's just so it's like when it's like when you're your mom like you know puts your sibling in a timeout. When they were like hitting you in the face and you can defend yourself until all of us. But now that you're montpe- the kid in the corner like you're like taunting them like my dad took this is about like your so childish like i really hate it here so i just i just hate it i hate it. I do think it's funny that he got back onto hundred. Because i honestly i'm like what is he doing. All this free time especially always look at twitter like shut up so like it is kind of funny but it's a go. You think you're special bitch. I've been banned for saying men are shit like shut the fuck up but anyway. I guess that wraps it up. That was just the outcome that i wanted to talk about how everyone's all said and brave and regard salako trump. Oh and like the big thing is like all of a sudden. These people didn't care about black lives. They didn't care about all the other marginalized like people that live under this presidency. They didn't care about people in detention about trans people. Dying in detention children about These women that we learned that were being Sterilizing detention. They didn't care. You know about all the trans people that died these last like they don't care about absolutely anything but now that white property federal property was destroyed all of a sudden they're like oh this is where i draw the line like all those lives lost you no to violence to police to like this pandemic with no healthcare dead are like poverty. Now that don't have job like all of this has happened in the four years like none of shit matter to anybody but all of a sudden these bitches stormed the capital and they're like shook or they're like this is. This is where. I draw the line at this white property. How dare you Which is not surprising. But it's just like okay and all of a sudden yellow brave and one impeach and are denouncing him and you're fighting agencies fighting ted cruz on twitter and like everyone's fighting each other and it's like this whole thing and i'm just like get the fuck outta my face like i don't even give a shit like give us give us fucking money. That's all i care about because we know like nothing's going to happen to these people. And i think as an abolitionist. Do i want them to go to jail. You know maybe am. I gonna call the fbi On anthony ghetto from el paso texas. Yes i have videos of him sir. Officer fbi agent. Please call me fbi. It's like i have information leading to the arrest of whatever the name anthony again please. Email around films had no. But like it's like what is going gonna do. Let's sit down and think about that. Like these people go to prison or they get tried or they get charged and that's the same way like everyone that goes to prison like. What is the outcome of that white supremacy still exist the followers that these people had are still gonna be around if they get tried. It'll be probably even more because you know they hate when they their friends go to prison or they get tried. They get riled up and they bail them out and then they. It's like this whole thing that it's like really. What is that gonna do right like there needs to be. We need to take things by the route that's when radical means to take by the rue. This is sandra davis. Should we hear chatting. Thanks for the roof. Aquarius you think. Yeah i mean. I think it's funny to me to think like yeah. I'm going to report these people to be i and it's funny to think because these you know a lot of these people think they're untouchable and like their league. I love the law. Like they hate the law but they love the loan convenient. They're just like you know. Just how lake day love cops and they hate them and like they kill them but then they love them. They like a to that cop. We'd like they were killing them with the blue light lake by. So it's just like yeah. It's funny but at the end of the day. Blake no like what is prison going to like. What is charging these people really going to do. Like that's not going to solve the issue But yeah that's just like a thought Just some some thoughts at almost three in the morning over here. What else is there to talk about anyway. Like what wait. What's been up nothing. I guess where we talked about the things that made us less bitter this month. Yeah so we're starting a new little cute segment where we just you know when people are like let's talk about choi about healing meinen. Rubens is like what made us less bitter. not like. we're still bitter. But like what made us less less bitter you go. for ruben. When me this book by maggie nelson The red parts Which kind of explores the trial of the authors like aunt's murderer and how she was grappling with it as like as an abolitionist and like as like a radical In how she someone. Who's very investigate and america's obsession with violence and she was taken by stride and and talking about like you know what does justice mean for someone. In scenario where like her aunt murder had gone unsolved for like thirty years and so like her family was essentially like we'll putting him in prison like make us feel better and at one point like her grandpa like her aunts. Father was like you know. I don't even. He said something to the effect. Like i don't even know if i want him to run prison claiming that he didn't kill my daughter or if i'd rather just have him be free and be a changed person and does that mid to us that he destroyed our lives like all that time ago and so it was just doesn't sound like a happy book and it isn't. It was a lot a lot about grief to lot about the ugly things. But just the way that maggie nelson rights as so. I don't wanna see vulnerable. But because i sometimes i think that owner ability specifically in writing like one of the reasons i don't like poetry because sometimes vulnerability is really cheap in writing. It really is. Sometimes 'cause like that's why god i was about to say something but that that's why you have a lot of these like you know these lodhi net diaspora poets like all writing about the same share. Because it's so easy to hit certain like emotional marks in writing. But the way that maggie nelson a deal to the motion does very cerebral and very She makes like all. These basically makes the eerie at of her feelings. And i really really enjoy that Yeah so that's what made me less bitter this these last. Few weeks maggie. Nelson's the red parts sounds like coming on and you're like it. It's very it's free on audible if you have. Yeah it's very it's very true. Crime that sounds likes. The obvious thing when you were describing sounds like a book. I read in high school yet. Note for me I got to see my love for. I was gonna say my love. That's really corny And i hadn't seen him drop off merch today no like a week. Two weeks ago to weakens remember Because yeah like i. I don't even know how many times we saw each other. Like twenty twenty. It's so wild delay. We didn't. I didn't see him. Blake months or agency at all. Yeah it was so wild and think about it but just like being able to talk like not just spent time with someone i love obviously but just like with a fucking just getting out of my house and like having a fucking conversation with because again i'm like i am home with my child. And then when he's not with me. I'm just here alone. He i talked to like my friends online but or through message. But it's not the same as like you know having just having a human connection and that sounds really corny. Cove added commercial Because you know. They're saying i don't really watch it's beginning. I was thinking about how the beginning of the pandemic there was like. All are these like we can do it together. Like all these commercials and these ads and then like a week later like everyone's like open open up the fuck you like anyway also just been watching you know me. I've still been. I think i'm done with no nineties. Novellas that were keep long very staying for the last couple of weeks and Just like music. Like i was saying to just like. I don't know if it listening to a lot of music from like high school like today. I was listening to a lot of new found. Glory which. I haven't listened to a long time muslim until like the rapture rapture. That's like fever band. Yeah you've mentioned that like shut up about them. Just stop supporting no. There's a song bay in thailand for groped her about her because i don't know her i feel like her. Not carla morrison and manga farts like. They came out of nowhere with like cds like albums upon albums of material and everybody was immediately. Stan and i felt like where the fuck have been for so long that these women have not only a plethora of albums but like the solidified fan bases like. Yeah i do not know anything about the. I know that. I will eventually like them. But i don't know anything about these. White latinos all the power to them though no listening to like one of one of my favorite songs by her. That makes me cry. That doesn't sound very happy but it made me happy because like reminded me of my grandma and so anyway. I guess just to say like music. That's like my escape like sometimes my mom's like you put your headphones on sees like you don't have to because i don't wanna talk to him. Felt like okay. Hello no shame. Parents know like when you're with your child twenty four seven like sometimes. I go to the restroom and just to like get away because there's not because for me to be alone. It's still not the business. Oh my god and so. Sometimes i'll just put on my headphones. You know and i'll just listen to music and that's my way of like in even i'm not physically alone when i have my headphones on listening to music i am i am alone the very email inside. But you'll know what the fuck i'm talking about Sunday yeah alright. Y'all that's all. We're coming up on a hype. I'm like you know. Usually around. This time i start feeling my powers rise that is not. How feeling am hopeful. That's how i fell like in twenty twenty. Usually like when secretary season starts on like fuck ya but like in twenty twenty. I was like nothing. You know la la. Last time i went for my birthday last year. That's like the last time. I felt like when you're here. You're right while we just went to a barbed doesn't march. Yeah we went to a straight people bar. I don't wanna call going ow. We were increases. Okay we couldn't go to the gay district and el paso that was the best we could do l. pasa lesbian experience down. Gosh those only like what. Was that. Like a tuesday or a wednesday which takes had to work the next day. And i had to take my child's school so we couldn't go to hottest to get to get down. I know she goes. Oh i miss. What is yeah. Yeah anyway conclusion. Cassandra didn't take me out in conclusion. She was nfl. Where do we have water burger. I'm holding accountable. That when ever the pandemic ends in the next decade you take me to water burner like a fool. Warlike roll out the orange carpet all that. Yeah you're gonna call call them ahead of time now and be like roll up the orange carpet. yes side no shuttle to wanna burger during this pandemic. Because they've been holding those you sorry. I just saw tweet. I don't know where it was like people in lying. Like to get the vaccine to sign up for it or but it chaotic like the scene and someone was like waterberg job. But it's because like for some reason during the pandemic like everyone's going to water burger and so they have like they have their employees outside and they have like cones and they have all these stations of late just like very organized situation happening water burger throughout this whole pandemic so shutout to waterberg here for that anyway. Happy new year. Everybody and we'll see what twenty twenty one has in store for us. I mean your thought shit like a few days one hospital who had to like administer six hundred vaccines like randomly because their fridge gave out. This whole thing is just a mess. Oh my god. Oh yeah i just there was. This image is like video of like all these gaze at like a rave And there was like if the gays were in charge of vaccine distribution. They would have just put it in like rave fog and distributed that. I want to go and booty hole in peace without a mask on without watching with the mass. All right. that's all i want. That's okay take care of yourselves take care bye all right before we leave. We absolutely need to give a shout out to all of our. I know her level patrons over on patriot. Dot com slash. Bitter brown fathoms. That would be that day. Natasha be just mean. Our bengazi aims t. Amy leela g. M. lease beth k. Sarah m cutting ac- you lisa chrissy jay jacqueline aid coppee jonah. Our money soul l. miguel. Be nancy m ballantyne. A- are yes mean. You're selene the vanessa alana f erica a disdain joe m my s louder are crony l linda. M bianca kimberly. Gen a cassandra. G abigail d. And i'd anya herreid. Sending a ton of love take care.

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A second patient is free of HIV, offering new hope for a cure

Post Reports

20:12 min | 2 years ago

A second patient is free of HIV, offering new hope for a cure

"From the newsroom of the Washington Post. Question imposes, call from you. Hi, Stephanie permanent in the Washington Post. This is post reports I'm Curiel Kelly. It's Tuesday March fifth. Today. House. Democrats are starting their investigation into all things. Trump doctors say they've cured London man of HIV and mysterious visitor to our solar system. House. Democrats are opening an investigation into President Donald Trump. And it's an exhaustive one. You go from Jared Kushner to people like politics, and you're talking about the inaugural committee, and the NRA it is very very broad spectrum. And it goes from the big fish all the way down to the smaller little fish current immersion covers congress for the post I cover national security issues on Capitol Hill carn has been reporting on the more than eighty people in institutions that the House Judiciary committee is now demanding documents from. Looking into almost everything that you've heard about raised in conjunction with the probes of the president of the last year, which is everything ranging from questions of obstruction of Justice to questions of whether he had any sort of untored ties with foreign governments to questions about whether he tried to push certain people out of office and why he fired Jim Komi, and basically anything that has been raised as a line of increase that might tension. Even pertain to the Muller probe was covered in this request. This large to eighty one requests for documents. The judiciary sent out which is what they're supposedly saying there. First Seva that there's going to be more to come on top of all of this. So it's clearly a lot of information that they're looking for what are the actually hoping to accomplish? Well, I think what they're trying to do at this point is just start to shake the trees and get all of the documents that they think that shouldn't be that hard to find. Now kind of. Subjective definition, though of when you say you give me anything related to this topic. That's very very wide ask and usually get witnesses pushing back and saying hold on now with that. That's that's too broad. I'm not going to give you this this that and the other, and then you get into these legal fights and subpoenas or thrown around and maybe court battles. That's all what we had to look forward to. But with they're trying to do basically in the here and now is substantiate. What they can about the allegations that have been raised and figure out what doesn't stick. And what does I think a lot of these questions would potentially be more readily answerable if members of congress at this point had access to everything that Muller had done to all the investigative files. Not just the final report because we don't know how extensive long that's going to be even if we see the whole thing, but the investigative files the grand jury testimony, and that's all stuff that they want down the line. The problem is that on the hill. They don't know when they're actually going to get access to it. So they want to be able to do their own investigation to get their hands on his much as they possibly can. That's already out there. To inform the directions that they wanna go because as much as the information that Miller has could be very important and informative for the house probes. It's not going to be a direction signal because it has probes have a much more expensive mandate. They can look into any sort of abuse of power, which is a much broader assignment, basically, then Muller had which was to look for any sort of crime. What has been the response from Republicans to this investigation? It's been largely to jeer it. I mean, it was such a wide spread ask for documents Eighty-one letters and counting and Republicans are basically saying this is overreach. Pick your lane decide what it is. You wanted to you cannot do absolutely everything under the sun. And it seems like you're just trying to grab up every last little shred of dust that might exist that might be you know, unsavory about the president. And that's not a real investigation. That's what the GOP has been saying. There is an argument that if you're going to put out this many letters, and if you're going to build on top of that, how are you gonna choose what your priorities are? And I think that's a challenge. Just general. For the Democrats. They have six committees. That are looking at this pool of issues related to this general scoping investigation and beyond if they all sent out eighty one letters as opening salvo or more, you would find that they're gonna start to bump into each other. These committees have different spheres of expertise. They're talking to each other on a weekly basis to try to figure out who is where. But again, if they all pursued this sort of strategy, you might not just have the committee's been to each other. But you'll have witnesses get confused about who they're supposed to produce records for. So I think that this is certainly a splash of a move, and we're paying attention because we're still talking about it in the whole other day later, but the challenge Democrats moving forward is going to be okay. If you get the answer to all of your questions who's going to run with what because you wanna be able to do as much as you can as a fishing as you can because even if you don't have necessarily a tight deadline. I think Democrats are aware that everything right now is measured in terms of how many months away from twenty. Twenty and if you're still investigating with no sort of conclusions. Whether that's the impeachment word or or less than you've kind of miss that opportunity. So I think that that's the scope of time in which we're looking and and you've got to take into consideration that there's a lot here. It's going to have to be prioritized if not parcel out so that they can actually attack it, and they haven't said yet exactly how they're planning to do that. How the president responded to all this to object emphatically over Twitter, which his his normal style of doing things he called it a big fete fishing expedition presidential harassment the greatest overreach in the history of our country. We know that this president is prone to superlatives, but he has been accusing Democrats since they won the house of just trying to use their majority to harangue him to try to block everything that he's doing to try to confuse his presidency, basically by by pursuing all these oversight pros. Of course. Democrats say it is our legitimate and constitutional authority to conduct over set on the ministration. And there's a lot here that is suspect. But that is the back in. North you've got Republicans by enlarge. It's interesting actually that you know, when you talk about the molar probe. It's really only the president's closest allies that are saying, oh, that's a witch hunt. Everybody else's kind of defensive of his right to do his job on unimpeded. When you talk about the congressional investigations is pretty much you can draw a very hard line down the center of congress right now for publicans who think Democrats trying to play politics and just try to make the president look bad. However, they can without a real plan without real proof there and part of this is politics. Yes. The part of it is also substance that they're seeking out. So that's a situation that we're in right now. So what's the precedence of an investigation? Like this. It depends on what you wanna look at you look at the political side of it. You wanna look at the substance aside of it, politically, you could say anything from the Clinton Email probe investigations of whether the FBI. India Jay conducted this appropriately that's with GOP did for the last two years. That's a precedent. In terms of how much information the geo Jay actually ended up turning over to congress, which Democrats are saying that's our baseline. Now. We. Wanna go even further than that? You could look a little further back and say the Benghazi pro which was a huge leap political event. And it was a long running event that kind of lost the political moment in a way because as much as it was scrutinizing, Hillary Clinton and as much as some of those themes came back to bite her during the campaign had stretched out over so many years and had been so, hyper, hyper politicized that. It was more of a base satisfying issue than it was actually an issue that was gonna convince anybody yielded anything really people could use in the end. And then if you wanna go even further back than that, I think the one precedent that everybody needs to kind of study up on a little bit is the Nixon era because that's when you actually had not just the impeachment proceedings, which may or may not happen here. But you had the the special prosecutor in that case turn over his roadmap. Basically, the grand jury notes from and so that sets a precedent of how much the House Judiciary committee, and others may expect to see and may expect to be able to learn about what Muller did so they can choose whether to go down the same path or use that information celek. Actively for what they choose to do. So you mentioned that obviously Democrats would like to wrap this up before twenty twenty before the election. So where does that leave us for right now? I mean at the prospect of seeing win can we see documents? Well, I mean, I feel like it leaves all of us going, you know, like wait waiting with baited breath for what's going to happen next. I think that was the effect of sending out this large in this sleeping of a document requests. They put a deadline of March eighteenth on everything. But if I learned anything from covering the GOP led probes of the FBI India Jay over the last two years. It's the deadlines are meant to be extended and do get extended. We're in the asking stage right now for those documents, right? Usually what fellas that is negotiation stage. Okay. Well, when can we get them if there's like, a real circumstances making it impossible for you to meet that deadline, and then that's when we get to after that the enforcement stage, which is you know, the subpoenas and the potential court battles after that. But there is no proscribed rule for how quickly you can go from step one, whatever and step. It is that they wanna take. And the Democrats have said they want to work more with Republicans to try to issue these subpoenas, obviously, they have more people in all these panels. They can do it themselves. If they want to simple majority vote. But we'll see how much the actually stick by that. And how much they decide that. If people are not meeting deadlines are going to go straight to the subpoenas. That's going to set the tone for whether this is going to be more of a combative sort of a probe, or if it's going to be more conciliatory is the wrong word because that's not the mindset there in, but but if they're going to try to do this calmly, they're gonna try to this aggressively. And I think that probably the pendulum swings towards aggressively. Given the situation Democrats are in and giving the considerations of both the time element of do this investigation and figure out sooner rather than later, whether they're going to have to go down the impeachment road and just the calendar element. That's everything that they have to count on. Karn? Demerging covers congress for the post. I am zebra Brown. I'd been called the Berlin Dacian for years, but I prefer Hughes. I wrote him since I came up about book. Timothy Ray Brown, better known as the Berlin patient was the first person to be cured of HIV more than a decade ago. He was the only person. But now there's a patient in London too. I'm so happy job help somebody joined my family. It's a very small family. I've the only pertinent it. So far until the station bounce spoke to us from a conference in Seattle where the scientific achievement was announced Tuesday Asian who's decided to remain anonymous. So researchers are just calling him the London patient has been in a long term remission for more than a year and a half from HIV. I'm Caroline Johnson. And I cover science here at the post has been covering this story and she noticed right away that people were getting really excited about these headlines. It doesn't however mean that this is going to become a standard treatment the way that this patient was treated isn't something doctors. But try for just anyone in addition to having HIV he also had cancer making him a candidate for a bone marrow transplant. This one didn't patient is extremely exciting advance. And it's going to spur a lot more science to try and find ways to use what they learned here to create other cures. But this is a really intensive in rare procedure that this person underwent he was suffering from Hodgkin's lymphoma, and you wouldn't just give a bone marrow transplant to another way Heli person with HIV because it comes with a lot of other risks. Why did it take a dozen years to do this again, it has to do with the difficulty of doing these transplants? So a bone marrow transplant is not a trivial procedure the first Haitian received of O'Mara transplant that had to disabled copies of a gene called CR five. And this gene creates a protein that's on the outside of white blood cells in hell. The HIV virus invade the cells. And so if the genes not functioning, which had only isn't functioning a tiny person to people mostly in northern Europe than the virus can't get into the cells. So these people are affectively kind of resistant teach IV, but bone marrow matches are hard. You might have heard of how difficult it can be defined a match. So finding a genetic match for the bone marrow transplant is hard. And then there's the fact that these people also have cancer. So when they've tried it in some other patients HIV, researchers told me oftentimes these patients may die of their underlying malignancy of the cancer rather than being able to replicate the remarkable progress of this one patient, so there's a whole bunch of things like it's a numbers game. But it's hard to find appropriate transplant matches and people with the Ray genetic match to get. The kind of transplant that could provide this amend. There's also just the fact that these people are also very sick with cancer. And so that also further selects down have many people are eligible is there something else about the stem cell treatment that makes it not necessarily a panacea for curing HIV. Well, there aren't very many donors that have this basically malfunctioning, gene. So that's one thing. And then you just wouldn't do a stem cell transplant into in otherwise healthy person with HIV because it's not a lot of morbidity and mortality heated with at. It's not an easy procedure to undergo. So doctors actually have much better tools to treat HIV now than they do treat like leukemia in many cases, so they wouldn't subject person with HIV to a bone marrow transplant. If they didn't have cancer. So at least at this point the best help for people is actually managing the disease through drugs and drug treatment. Yeah, I think you know, one thing that's relate been stunning about HIV is how many drugs there are in. How successful they've been at transforming this into a manageable lifelong chronic disease with patients that have access to good medication being able to live nearly normal lives. So, you know, this is a really hopeful advance. And there's a lot of hope especially in more lower income countries that where access to medication may be different. Or there may be more drug-resistance reins of the virus that something like this could be helpful. But. You know, I think one thing this just shows. It's another step of progress. But there has been already so much progress nature IV that the disease is really changed. Thank you. Caroline. Thanks. Caroline Johnson covers science for the post. Timothy Ray Brown. The Berlin patient hopes that scientists working on HIV we'll keep going with their research. I want to encourage the brilliant. Scientists that have been working on finding HOV cures to keep going and come up with something that is more viable to everyone else. And now one more thing about a Mamura. It's the first interstellar object found in our solar system and Oslo is the Harvard professor who first popularized the idea that it might be an alien spacecraft. Is now on its way has Jupiter and the whole time that we've known about it his career arc has been trending from the studios academic into sort of a quasi celebrity obvious elk is a features reporter for the post and got the chance to sit down with Logan his office. Really looks like he's sort of in a different world himself as composed that kinda just mundane environment of the faculty building, but what really sets lobe apart from his colleagues is that he and another scientists wrote a paper about how space object defying physics could possibly come from alien technology. The big thing that nobody can really explain is when a memoria approached our son, and then did sort of a big you turn around it and started flying back out of our solar system. It was going much faster than conventional physics said it should have been. There seemed to be an extra force that these pushing it, and it's not clear what this push is from that's low on CBS this morning. Sunk says, the professor had documentary crews the Atlantic and the New Yorker after him all because of a paper he wrote with a colleague at the end of their paper and like a few paragraphs. They said the only thing that we can think of. Is that a Mamura is not actually a rock? It's potentially a light sale. Imagine like ship sail something very, very flat. Like, no more than a millimeter thick extremely long that sunlight is actually giving it. The little kick at needs after loaves paper, basically called moo moo at an alien spacecraft. The professors idea went viral got probably more attention than astronomy paper has gotten in in years and at the same time. There was a bit of a backlash among some of AVI. Lobes colleagues in the astronomy field. Who kind of ranged from just skeptical to being outright annoyed with him that he would publish something that was this sort of speculative? Nobody has any evidence to explain what it is. While lobes fella. Scientists made out his idea. They can't doubt his popularity. Avi Loeb has gone from this fairly revered, but publicly unknown astronomer within his community to this absolute celebrity. Obviously is a features reporter for the post. That's it. For today's show. I'm kim. Brielle. Kelli, we'll be back tomorrow with more stories from the Washington Post.

HIV congress president Muller Washington Post GOP House Judiciary committee Democrats Caroline Johnson London FBI Timothy Ray Brown Jared Kushner Mamura Donald Trump reporter Curiel Kelly
Israel Hour Radio: February 10, 2019

The Israel Hour Radio Archives

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Israel Hour Radio: February 10, 2019

"Yeah. And. Veto need mash. Go ahead. Janney. Russia. That. Leumi w dick share? No. Sam. Jay. Very be. They know. Mash. Journey. Some. Then. Jay. Vaga? Villi be issue guy. Mesh. Jan. Johnny on mood. Some. Welcome to the Israel. Our? Connect with us at Facebook dot com slash Israel. Our Email us at info at Israel. Our dot com. Seven three two nine three two eight hundred. Here's the host of the Israel. Our Josh rouse. That would be me. Let's do this. My friends. As I just my headphone. Welcome to Israel our radio. I'm so glad that you're tuned into our radio show this morning today. Thank you so much listening. We really do. Appreciate it. I think you like music I've gotten that oppression for my listeners over the years. And I think I have a hunch that those tuned in right now are fans of music. Well, you've come to the right place. We have some amazing an amazing array of Israeli music for you on today's show. We do every week, but I kind of liked this playlist as well. We have some of the biggest songs in Israel right now, including the biggest song in Israel right now. And it's by last year's Eurovision song. Contest winner net up bars. Eli her new song has made lots of noise in Israel and around the world. It is as weird as you would expect you'll hear it on today's show. We also have an unusual amount of English. Music on today's show. I don't love playing English music. I'd rather be playing mostly Heaver music. But you know, I gotta keep my finger on the pulse of what is going on in this Rayleigh music, and to do that sometimes I have to play glee so you'll few songs in English on today's show. In addition. Let's see we have brand new music by he Sharib. Oh, and Kobe flow Eddin Kosonen Nassreen Qadri, so many more. An and I have so much to talk to a big big week in his Rayleigh music. We'll tell you all about it on today's Israel our radio program and some great request to get to as well, if you have any please, let me know right now at Facebook dot com slash Israel. Our that is Facebook dot com slash Israel. Our let me know if there's anything you'd like to your on today's show, also if oh it Israel our dot com. The militarist thank you so much for tuning in to Israel our radio. On van Benicia ruler Mugabe, virtually pass typical work the name. On a me. Domas Ashikaga been ocean cleaner of Gomo veto Vamos named team. Share burtle? Bane event. Ten. Ever. Show here. Team. The mission had been a. When I spoke rush. Daily. Could be not as fall she have to. Should come on. Shoot. Vein about. No. Jay. He'd be like how the tally Louis long. She's a thousand. In coolum. These topic. Don. Dumb. On come. Bandy shy. Could. Saleh's lose. Him. You pull up the date by pools for. Bye bye. He may pick it back. Bunny? Public school by people like you'll be cool clue. Lemoyne dusty things find. Free cutting horse coach. She'll candidate. He candidate. Me. Come on. Due to foil album set. Takahide the food. Chemo dot cat. Sucky taco guy. Bye. Bye becca. Donkey go. Bye. Bye. Guba poobah ROY that you'll be Garoppolo amid. Time. The people of. Israel our radio. My name is Josh Rhone. Thank you so much tuning in. This song is by requested comes from our brand new Facebook proof, our group of Israel, our fans on Facebook will tell you all about it in just a minute. But first some great music from pet. Knicks Israel our radio. Mobile. Bye. Because. Four hundred dollars. Let kit. How phasing is that song? Thank you so much to David on Facebook for requesting and it's ethnics bit. Invest Harare, a black BMW before that brand new music by air tussey and run niche era song called rook kid that dancing. Kobe lalo. Brought us a brand new song from him. I have I shall Lee. My love and giddy goal. Brought us a cool jazz version of his song in which of course, sounds very muchly. Like the English song heaven my name is Josh Rhona. I'd like to thank you so much you're tuning into Israel, our radio on my Israeli music dot com. Thank you so much to all those who check our website regularly and find all the fantastic content. We have on there. And by the way, I am pleased to announce that to the best of my knowledge fingers crossed. It is spam free. We went did a thorough cleansing with the help of a company out there who made sure that all the Mao wear and all the garbage was off our website. And I hope and pray you will not see. You will not see it anymore. When you go to any page on my Israeli music dot com. You will go straight to that page and not to some other hijack paid. So my apologies for the disruption. We are ready to go and please visit my Israeli music dot com. David requested that song by ethnics beneficial row on our Facebook page on our excuse me on our brand new Facebook fan group, you know, up until now our Facebook presence has been me talking, and you listening I post something, and I give my two cents on whatever. And you'll either like it or share it or maybe give a comment, but that's not the way it should work. This is in school. This is in class. It is not my job to sit there and throw information that you this is a two way conversation. So now, we've created a brand new Facebook group called Israel, our radio fans, and that is a place for you to go on and to discuss his Rayleigh music with each other. If you have a song, that's on your mind. You've heard a great new song on the radio. If there is a song that you just can't get out of your head. If there's a question, you have about Isreaeli music that is the place to post it on our brand new Facebook group, we have thousands on our Facebook page and only about twenty on our Facebook group, we want that to change. So search on Facebook for Israel, our radio fans, that's Israel, our radio fans, if you are fan of this radio program, and I know you are so go on there right now. It's brand new, and it's a great place to share and discuss Isreaeli music, and anything that has to do with Israel anything that has to do with Israel our radio. We would love to see you there. Israel, our radio fans. Thank you so much you're tuning into Israel. Our radio continue with brand new music by repo. Kushner. My show. She fired them. Komo so firm. Miriam. Bendall? Shamia? Shovel please. That. Russia. Miss bendy. I guess. Michelle. Shame. Clannishness fits your share show show. Shimmy. Vandal? Be. Sure. Chevy. Should sherman? Then shades. Sharla show. Ms. Meshack chevy. Michelle. Shit, man. Israel our radio. I told you that we'd be playing a little bit of English music on today's show. And it's clear to me that Noah cure-all wants to make it out and religious country of Israel and into the big rule, the international music. This is her brand new entry. She would shut up. I could tell you. It's called drum is only every every. You free. But you. And how you say Larry, but you. The bad. One. Drum. On the dark side of the moon. Hides the person. Dylan. I honor. And that can get in the way. I'll be ready soon. But we. Junk. Trump. Strong. One. Yeah. I could be wrong. But I have a feeling that's Noah cure-alls way of saying. I want out of his role. I think I'm bigger than Israel. I think I can make it in the United States, and I want you to hear me you record producers out there. That's no cure-all singing drum Israel, our radio. That's my explanation. As to the only reason she'd be seeing him English, her accents, not bad. Maybe you'll see Noah Curiel on this side of the pond sometime soon, we'll see before that you shy. Oh with a brand new song of his call talev. Shelly my heart. You will see each Irebu on the side of the pond very soon because he's going to be in concert a joint concert with not go Shen. He'll be in New York, Miami and Los Angeles for all the information, you can go to my Israeli music dot com. That is our most popular page on the website, the upcoming Isreaeli, concerts, we keep it updated all the time at my Israeli music dot com. Just come go to our upcoming concerts page and you'll find all the information you. Need to see a fantastic Israeli concert in the United States and Canada at my Isreaeli music dot com. Thanks so much for tuning in. Let me say a load of David listening live in California. David I got a couple of requests on for you coming up a little later on also a low to max listening in Germany anyone else's to an Ellen is listening as well. Thank you so much anyone else tuned in right now say hi at Facebook dot com slash Israel. Our we love to ever you. The biggest Rayleigh music song of the week. The brand new entry by the winner of next of next year. The winner of last year's live radio, folks. The winner of last year's Eurovision song contest net bars Eli finally came out with her long awaited follow up to her hate. Toy has tens of millions of us maybe in hundreds of millions. I forget and now she's out with her brand new song, and it is quickly skyrocketed to the top of the Charleston Israel. And I think it's time for you to hear it if you haven't already this is brand new from Neta. Bars. Eli it's called bossa SABA. B's me what the by that back. Obama. The be. Happy. I'm gonna get you. How? I'm gonna chew. Bomba? Brand new from nigga bars. Eli bossa sub baba what do you think of that song? If you want you can check out the video at my Isreaeli, music dot com. It is even stranger than the song. But you gotta check it out of my Isreaeli music dot com. And that's a great place to comment, and let us know what you think of that song bossa SABA. It is the biggest song of the week on his Rayleigh radio all over the land of Israel and the world and best of luck to Neta bars. Eli as strange as it is. I guess we just can't stop listening. You're tuned to Israel our radio if you're a fan of dog mccosh now would be a good time to turn up your radio because David from California requested this great compilation. Doc Natasha along with tease mortem car with a mash up of three of their songs. Low my speak, low mid ter and no fryer may triple from dogma Fash going out to David California, Israel, our radio. Think. This. You. People say shit. Four. He was. Speaking. Little. Shoddy? Enough. Festival. Because I've asked you guys. Yeah. Published? On the. Speak thick York. Let me. Seven show. I got the. Chapman. Olympic locations. Boosts. Israel, our radio on your Amazon echo. Just asked me. Alexa, play the Israel lower on tune in. And I will play the latest episode. Thanks for listening to Israel our radio. Cobb is fatal. Sandy. Says. The Saudi code. Seamless still. The. Shave. Famously. Yes. Israel's national sensation the shove band live on. Okay. Hot by about era. Vi's Yonne taken right from television on the on the as Rayleigh Keshet TV website. That's why year some dialogue in the middle as the judges ponder and discuss their performance. But my gosh, what an amazing story from Shalva. These guys if you haven't heard if you like the one person on the planet who hasn't heard of these guys they are an Israeli band of amazing individuals with all kinds of disabilities. Some have down syndrome summer blind other disabilities as well. You can find all the information on our website at my Isreaeli music dot com. But there's so much tell you. I mean, these guys were in the running to represent Israel in the Eurovision song contest, they made it to the grand finale of hukou. Kava Bah, the reality show that Israel uses to decide who will represent Israel. And then they found out that whoever is. Has chosen to represent Israel in the Eurovision must perform in a an a rehearsal on Shibat and a number of members of the Shalva band are religiously observant, and they were not willing to perform on Chabad and very reluctantly after much deliberation. After letters were written on their behalf from higher ups in the Israeli government, including culture minister, mini, Mary Regev, they decided to withdraw from the competition. Very very sad, very disturbing. Now, they will perform and the Eurovision semi final which takes place in Israel and Tel-Aviv on Thursday night. But they will not compete in the Eurovision and that sets the stage with four acts appearing in the grand finale of Hakko hubba by this time next week. We will know who will be representing Israel in the Eurovision song. Contest 2019 taking place in Tel Aviv Israel. Thanks so much. You're tuned into it. Israel, our radio before that. We heard a song requested by David in California had dog noth- gosh, performing live, Loma speak, low move tear and low fryer him whether or not you like hip hop music. Dogma cash is made up of a number of very very talented musicians. And they write very creative lyrics. Great mash up by them had dogma massage Israel our radio. Have you downloaded the Sheree app? We talked about this on our website. My Israeli music dot com. Sheree is the name of the app released by the Israeli government, which is designed to get people listening to Isreaeli music. It is a free app unlike Spotify which charges for their premium subscription or Amazon or anything like that. This is a free app playing nothing, but his Rayleigh music once you download the app which is available both for apple and Android devices. You put in your favorite three artists three of your favorite Isreaeli artists. And they will match you with songs that they think you will like you then have. A chance to give a thumbs up or thumbs down to songs you like or dislike hopefully, the app will. Learn your preferences and start playing only music that you enjoy a number of people have tried this. And they love it. I do too. It's plays an amazing selection of Isreaeli music. You can find my review at my Isreaeli music dot com. But they'll be so much more to say about this app. The only thing the only downside. I can see is that it seems to skew older. They don't seem to have the latest releases on this app. And I'd like to hear more of that. I know it's a work in progress. I know there's only the first week that they're around, but I do hope to hear more brand new Israeli music check that out. It's called Sheree, and you have to type it in Hebrew. Everything has to be done in Hebrew shin. Raisch Xinyu would ratio would get into Hebrew keyboard on your device, and you can download it. And if you need help, let me know at Facebook dot com slash Israel. Our happy to help anyone who needs help downloading the app, speaking of Sherry, well, her doc. Commentary came out in Israel this week, which chronicled her journey from Tel Aviv to Broadway. We all know that Sheree my Mon start in Chicago this past fall. And there was a great documentary in Israel in Hebrew, of course, chronicling her journey, and they included the press conference that I attended where she answered questions from the press. So may have an I R on Isreaeli TV for about. I don't know eight or nine seconds will post the video at my music dot com. I eight or nine seconds of fame on Isreaeli television. Well, speaking of Sheree. This is Sheree my Mon along with film ski LA singing their cover of the amazing song by Miriam Masika. It's called sheer t- clash shearing. My Mon Shimon Busse Keila. Josh Rhone, Israel our radio. Essay. But shutt-. You'll Musset feet. To the shares me show him. The calm. Mm. Middle. Ooh. Sure. The patch? Key. No. Do. Schmaltz. Sure. Shosha? Sure. Sure. Sure. Shannon. Sure. What? Sure. In New York people. I guess you. Mommy, come. Liuqiu lee. Flay? Sorry homeboy Mets. The the volley. The girl. And the. Besa? Schnoodle? The hob. Schmo? Equal able Takeshita. Leila. With the shooter the bite calm. The Shema believe that's me. The hockey. Over the Hudson. Shoot the file. Insane. Share? Then his brand new music from Eddin Kosonen, it's called. Hey DJ before that Sheree Mamone and Shimon Busse Keila with sheer teak Vaa, Israel our radio. And by the way, I forgot to thank Andy for the great suggestion that we played before that the Shalva band along with Hurrell Scott with their live performance of bitten by on Hakko hovel by laravie Joan my name is Josh Rosen. The Israeli music, man. Thanks so much for tuning in. Really do. Appreciate it. Hello also to Rena who is listening live her remind you to please join our brand new Facebook group called Israel, our radio fans that is your way to discuss his Rayleigh music with one another. We really would appreciate it. If you like the podcast. You're listening to right now. Please go on I tunes and give us a review to let everybody know how much you like us. I tunes likes it when you do that. And it pushes us up higher on the list to make sure that more people. Discover the show. So if you do like this show, and you wanna spread the word a great way to do that would be to leave your review just once on I tunes and let every. We know how much you like us. I tunes will say her. These guys must be popular and the push us up higher on the list. So please do that. We would really appreciate it. And remember to subscribe to our podcast if you have not done so already. Oh my God. We are running out of time. I gotta play this last. I think it will be the less on for the day, which is by static and Ben Elta Volare. But unfortunately, it's an English. These guys are trying to make it in the world of international music here in the United States. They actually had a nice interview with tune in radio, which I haven't seen yet. But I know it exists, and we'll get it for you as soon as possible here in the United States. It's pretty cool, but what they've been doing. And I don't love it. But we'll see how they do is. They've been converting their Hebrew songs into English the latest one it's to do bump static Laurie with an English language version of to do bomb. Our radio. Let's check in you name the more getting to know, you, sweetie. Theranos girl. Are you? The color now, if we're gonna do this for real crimes cheers. If you want to maybe I will just wanna party Cutty. Two. Everything is. Just the minnow feeling this flow. I guess you baby. That's what for. This is. The love. I know you're not afraid of asking you got me multitasking being my bad thing to baby. Pain. Tonight. We have. Hey. Everything is. Jordy. Let's what's it up. You know what? Bevo has gotten. Down get sell you. Get me better. See if you've never heard that song before you might not hate it for us. Who know the Hebrew version? We're like seriously this is what they're doing. But if you're brand new to the song while it just might have a shot static and Benneton Laurie with their international English version of to do bomb, Israel, our radio, I would like to thank you so much you're tuning into the Israel. Our I need to thank max from Germany just sent me a donation on our website, our website, my Isreaeli music dot com to help us with the spam removal that was so so nice of you max, I really really do. Appreciate it. Thank you so much. I really so grateful to our wonderful listeners. You're always there for us. Thank you so much for all you do until next time. We're going to conclude with a song by subliminal going out to David and California. And we'll be back next time at Israel, our radio on my Isreaeli music dot com until next time. You're tuned to Israel, our radio mining is Josh Rhone. I'll have secret last year. Will come. Could be. Treat mom up. Backup. Com. Slipping? Garnishing. Find thinking. Go. Bella ball. Class. Impact? Jamie. The south.

Israel Facebook David Rayleigh California Charleston Israel Isreaeli Eli Josh Rhone Jay Josh rouse Russia Sheree New York United States Noah Curiel Germany Tel Aviv Liuqiu lee Janney
What do channeling & sacrifice have in common?

A Balanced Life For You

29:34 min | 3 months ago

What do channeling & sacrifice have in common?

"Hello everyone and welcome back to the show a balanced life for you. Were you design the life of your dreams. I'm your host. Rhonda's summarily credited transformational coach as well as an nlp practitioner. The purpose of this show is to provide you tools and resources as well as inspiring interviews from women all around the world here at a balanced life for you. We believe every woman deserves to love her life not just live her life on this week's episode. I am so excited to introduce to you a fabulous woman whom i've had an amazing conversation with if you or someone you know has had a difficult time. Maneuvering through twenty twenty and now twenty twenty one who has felt a little awkward upside down confused or anything in between. You're really gonna love this interview. With rebecca as she helps to bring clarity and move forward and much more positive and productive way. So here's our interview with rebecca dawson. Rebecca thank you so much for joining me today. I know that you are coming miles and miles away from me and what i love to do is have you introduce yourself with tell my listeners. We're joining me from so i. My name is rebecca joining In western australia. So right on the side of the world from from way you it's nighttime via. I love speaking with Fun guests from around the world. It just makes us an international show. So rebecca you are an author. Correct i am i am. I'm an ulcer amongst amongst other things ultimately more recently and you have written an incredible new book it is called the agreement and before we jump into the agreement in. What's in that book. I would love you to share with us us a little bit about you in what you're doing these days. Okay so i i. Normally this year's a little bit different for most of us i think. Twenty twenty s changed. How some of us doing things so normally. I'm a channel on matama speaker. Iran workshops and tours and i around the world and speak to people about what's happening with consciousness in how it's shifting for us on how her experience on the planet shifting and this year for me right now i'm at home. I'm playing from home. Getting with people from home. Which i think is an experienced many of us that having this year in twenty twenty and End just finding new interesting creative things to explore with consciousness. I love what you've said a couple of things that i think. My listeners may or may not be familiar with so it's okay. let's kind of dive into a few of these words that you said you said you are eight channeller. Tell us what that is. So i think Decision people have different ideas about what channeling is. Sometimes we say that it's bringing through something that's beyond us or higher consciousness than what we are in delivering it through our expressions into this. Well i sometimes say that they channel beautiful artwork will riders channel. Certain pieces of wisdom Beautiful price for me. I'm a voice channel so about twenty twenty five years. now i've being bringing from information about us and humanity and how reality works. And i do that through through elections and i write books and i run courses and workshops so as a voice journal. I never know what we're going to be exploring on talking about. I love answering. Pins questions and i always learned to expect the unexpected. But it's a real privilege and an honor to be able to do that. Because i'm always undestanding things in a deeper richer away in love that you now. It's it's interesting years ago in my previous career. I was a leader in a global company. And i had a team of about thirty forty women and i can remember. There were events that we would stand on stage and have questions presented. And i can remember answering these questions and at the end someone would say. Oh my gosh. Can you repeat that an i would say no. I can't because. I think this is what you might be talking about channeling. It's just something that comes through. You and i were just speak in answer. These questions and i had no idea what i would say i used to think. Could you please record this. So i know what it was that i said exactly. I can totally relate to that. And that's why i now record everything that i that i do and you know. I think it's great that exactly the just given because one of the real key focuses. I have in the way that i do is introducing people encouraging people to that channeling in that way bringing out the unite wisdom unite intelligence. That we all have is something that everyone can do in every human hats. We used to think back in the day that channeling was go. Certainly my view. When i began bringing something outside of you in but my understanding of so many years in its much natural movement and it's easier and less Less disruptive is we're actually bringing something out of us and it's such a beautiful thing for us to really claiming my think as as she meant to be hours saying we'll acting vegan. I can pull this out of myself and it's incredible. What what it is that we can access when we're in that place that zone. It's it's amazing. When we knew said you'd everyone has the ability to bring out this wisdom. How is this something that you teach people how to do well. It's something that i think is a natural within us as our capacity humans. But we've forgotten how to we certainly with certain encourage educated in to elicit information from within To absorb information from an exterior salsa assimilate into the minds and that access. It's remember assistance. So yes i mean. There are exercises as like exercising muscle to be able to access in. Go with me. It's actually can feel quite natural in the beginning because we're so used to looking beyond ourselves thanks but it is a very very naturally experience. Once you begin to play with it so yeah. We do run workshops that help people to to to know what that muscle feels like different parts of the mind and the brain to facilitate Unlike the example a muscle because what that makes me think of is when i started studying. Nlp this makes me think of the simple concept of communication. Now it's figuring out your intention of what it is that you want to say the words that you use to express your ideas or thoughts. Then it's only other person what they hear and then what. They think that you meant to say so. There's those four components and as i you know. I also do workshops and one of the things that i observed was the the idea that we are so stuck in our own head that we forget how to listen to what the other person is saying. We're so concerned about. What am i going to say next. That we don't allow ourselves to come from that. That inner mind of let me here and let me respond is that is that kind of what you're talking about absolutely and i think for me that that mechanism is shifting from what the brain thinks knows who mind thinks noise into being couple in sitting in the urban space the void and as soon as we allow our attention going into the void something emerges from that space that we didn't i was there that we had access to and i love the way you described. Actually it makes me think of going forward or leaning back end any day when i first started learning how to channel on demand. You know when you're busying you're on this you know so people would you've done in your in your working life. I almost how is driving a stick almost in the brain. So when you're in skiing painting you're looking for the next saying and then he moved into second gear when you move into observation and then sir gear when you're being ensured insured when you're trying to kind of project anticipate and then forced for maize really aiming back into the nine spy so i kinda like to dry different parts of the month and the other thing that makes me think of with muscle. We're talking about muscle memory and this is something that i work with my clients as well. It's creating those new sustainable habits and we have to exercise that muscle just like if you're getting your body in shape. They used to be a fitness instructor. And say you know the muscles have memory and when you stretch them out for example it's important to learn how to wait for that eighteen to twenty seconds stretch and allow it to feel it and completely release so that you can have a new length for your muscle. And i think that's a lot of how we have to exercise our conscious and subconscious in the mind exercises to keep practicing in. Allow them to make those those shifts. And i know i'm using hand language and it's an audio. It's stretch now. I understand. I understand completely and i think the queen exercise more that you do it the easy you shift for one to the other. It just becomes very much in al in out this. Yeah absolutely. I agree with that completely. And i think it's the same when people led led to meditate or learn to do anything creative as well as always feels like a process in the beginning it ends up being very natural modes it you slip into rather than having to go on a journey to get there in the process of steps to get there once you become very comfortable with yes process because it's new in its difference in it's uncomfortable and yes we just have to adjust and shift to so rebecca. Tell me how how did you know how did you. When did you recognize that. You were a voice chandler. Well that was quite by. Accident actually wasn't really part of the plan are always being to I've always been able to see and hear I guess most of can but we don't maybe because we're not paying attention or not looking for it. So i always had the visual. C energy fields Body and that sort of day from the time. I was quite a young child Put the voice channeling that happened quite spontaneously. When i was a chain and it just really took me by surprise and again it was different pot of mind that it felt like was being used was a very expensive state of being and it was like an hour i was sitting there on someone else telling them all about their genetic blueprint those sorts of things. It was someone who's in distress. You can kind of see me so it was quite unexpected. Really three me. Actually because when you sit in that space where you allow something else to come out to view or at that time i as i understood an experienced with someone else coming in. That's what it felt like. It really disarmed. Linear sinking in disarms. The way that my brain was working in a very sequential logical way kind of created a big hole in my thinking like a like a void space and so of course. What do we do is human. When we presented with a spice we go and chime. Fila is something. So i spent the next ten years food studying and trying to find teachers and looking through different philosophies in mysticism of things to try and fill that space so that i could make sense and i guess in some ways control. It may be off. Feel like i'd mosque and yet what i realized that every time i tried to fill that space especially become bigger feeding a black hole so thinking getting help me very much i had to learn how to go beyond so and really become very comfortable in the unknown and really are the anyone who's Ever experienced channeling noise really good china. It's it sitting in the spices. The unknown all the time As great challenge especially when we live in a world where knowledge is valued so much an attachments at all edge. Yes as you're describing this. I'm sitting here listening to you and watching you to thinking to myself about especially twenty twenty and so many of us are in that space of trying to figure it out because life is shifted Many people it's upside down. And i think some people have their own voids if you will trying to figure out what to do with maybe their personal life or their professional life or their health and fitness those different areas and to allow them to sit in that space and be present is. Is that something that would be if you were going to talk to somebody today about the year twenty twenty and processing and how to move through this share with us some of your your thoughts if you will while. It's a great question. Because i think as humans are told you we with saying a little bit earlier about sinking forward and being strategic being sequential. And how he moves route lifesaving in terms of how we think about our own journeys looking forward and i think this is an experience this year where all of a sudden is not past ford. And what you do in that moment stay still. Let's very difficult. But we do have an opportunity this year. Twenty twenty-nine i do believe that. This is all part about great shift in consciousness in the shade from what may be talking about from the oldest to the newer or a new experience speech humanity when that happens. We can't really just go from where we are into something. That's completely weird because if we can see the direction we're going in and we could see taga where aiming for it's not yet and so we're talking about you know to do things differently but if we see we know how to do them we probably doing what's already been done full all sold off so the whole idea of a new experience humanity new paradigm means. We have to go through an experience where we have absolutely no idea and that really brings us back almost to a race set. Where we can begin to think creatively again and we can begin to actually very natural space all knowing what it is that we want because even though we see we've been through life and we know what we want our minds. No think that it knows what we want but a lot of that is conditioning and programming. What we see we should have. We'll see should want if you actually ask people what it is a really want when i sat inspected not knowing for awhile usually not have an idea and so we need to be in that space long enough as as a species in as a consciousness to actually bring out water is that is really benefit humanity and what it is we really want for our planet and so twenty twenty really has a wonderful junichi to kinda on hawk from all of the expectations about what we should be going and get back into the sovereignty of who we are and rediscover how we actually want to live online so the lot of people who have experienced in quarantine in isolation this year have suddenly realized. Maybe on. don't want what i want to. Maybe i was just on a trajectory and not even know why i was on that trajectory. I couldn't agree with you. More and the expectations of what we should what we think we should be doing her moving towards. And it's a powerful thing to be able to sit in your space and identify what i what i term are really getting back to your core values. You know what is it. That's really important to to me. And quarantine has shifted so many people. And i know for finding for finances for example. I know people who have been on this pat of financial success to obtain these monetary positions. If you will. And now that maybe their businesses closed or they haven't been able to go to worker. They've lost their job for a while. It's an opportunity to sit back and evaluate for what purpose was striving for this monetary. Wohl and maybe that really wasn't the right goal for me because by working eighty hours a week i have had to sacrifice time with my wife for my children. Were pen to sacrifice other things my health even so i see twenty twenty is not to really get in touch with yourself on that type of level i agree completely and i love the way you bring up Sacrifice because i think sacrifices being such an inherited condition tied to what we think is choice when we think we're choosing our lives in choosing our pathways choosing our goals. It's really based on his promise of opportunity costs if i want is i have to sacrifice that it's a bait and that's not really natural. You know that's very jewel listed way of looking at life and end all be all the structures and systems that we play with that a setup in our experience a wired for that and then way way toward a young age to choose from iowa gay and this pressure involved with making decisions. And you know it's It's it's incredibly tuffy young people i think especially but you know we're we're going as as a as a collected is is away from choosing between i in bay now and now having more unlimited choice and how we need to try different things to sample life to taste this woman taste that and re experiment and play and be creative and i think that's what we got when we choose from sacrifice creative play in try however have you found out when people are presented with new opportunities in the opportunity to try something new it sometimes is so scary it can be paralyzing. Yes because oftentimes. I think will if i do that. What am i going to sacrifice back to the sacrifice Because there's always the opportunity cost. Isn't that what we're all wrong. So these things. And i go back. Will i made a mistake. Are these things that you cover when you do your workshops. Yes absolutely because. I mean some of the concepts speaking about now a fundamental principles about shift from an old paradigm to a new paradigm moving from three to five day murray mechanics of how we choose how we move Bodies function how we we look at how life is structured completely change. So these are some of the things that we look at We don't realize how conditions we ought to think about things in a certain way until somebody offers you an alternative. Gosh you know. I can look at it that way instead like going from the menu to the buffy when you got the continent you you get to choose once daughter and one on trade and one desert to sacrifice the others generally When you've got the buffet it just keep going back again and again and you get to try everything and no one's going to be upset if you don't finish meal plate dish you just keep sampling and there's always will our love that knowledge because i personally love the buffet. I like to take a little of this and a little bit but do we do that. When it comes to choices in our lives we really darn and and we tend to keep ordering the saint things because we know that we likes that wants so last time will order that one again. The menu doesn't always change unfccc. Butch millionaire familiar. What's familiar airy and it becomes to bitch full and then we sequence using but we're really not choosing. Why just on repeat wants autopilot right absolutely. What rebecca s. We kind of start wrapping up our time together. Because i know you've just got so much wisdom and knowledge and i just appreciate everything that we're talking about What i would like to ask you now is because this topic is a little bit more in depth than what we normally what normally talk about on my show if you could offer perhaps some simple suggestions on how to become more aware of that the consciousness you began talking about. Could you share with us. Some basic tips to start at that. Starting point this point a shaw i think that one of the most important things we can do right now to especially when you find yourself in a space where you don't have to clear poss- in front of you which is how many for a lot of people right now. It's very difficult to go forward. You will sites dunphy like he can go back to eighty four. So i liken it to being in a room and there's a door in front of unit do behind you the door in front of these look to the dole behind you. You don't really wanna cut back when you stop being spontaneous and could be the slightest smallest spontaneous action in your day. It's lack suddenly opening up a whole bunch of new always in that little room that you're in it shifts here into possibility and out of probability so as soon as you start if you feeling stock and you can't see what a god if you do something spontaneous in your day and it can be anything small. It doesn't have to be big spontaneous things. It could be little things the frustration the frequency of that will literally open up new opportunities and doors for experience that you could see reform and why there before and it immediately takes you out of that feeling locked and trapped experience and boom you get your movement again so it's a really important thing and it could be something so small light tying you'll love show instead of iraq shoot first or drinking your coffee with with an opposite hand or driving to the shops a different route than you normally would Those small small things take you out of habit and back into creative action again and it can really get that flow happening in your life. So that's running on the another really important key. I think right now. It's too even though there's so much information around about what's happening now. Well this time is to get into curiel curiosity. I wonder what's going to happen today. I wonder what's going to happen politically. I wonder what's going to happen with the weather and start asking. Those open ended questions instead of always trying to anticipate the answer will find the answer because that again also off the pathways impossibilities again. Because so many people are feeling stuck in bottlenecks right now so. Those are the two things that i think. Really simple and easy to introduce. Oh my gosh. I love that so much for sharing that with us and because i want people to be able to access you and your information tell us about your book the agreement so the agreement is is my my newest woken. Do believe it's it's some. It's really important book. Which is why. I'm thinking about it. I have written on the books. This one is really to me quite profound so this is a book. That's really a principal for lying. And it's the principal. Life that i think is how as humanity were designed to live and where designed to be. But we'd forgotten. And i a lot of that information about how we actually operate and function has been lost time. So there's a lot of information in there about how how bodies emotions and thoughts in how belief works. All of those things actually work. Because i think we take it for granted that we understand the reality that we live in and yet it's quite hand that we died because when things don't go according to plan we get very disruptive we get very distracted and and with must be a misunderstanding about how reality works if we can be so disrupted when things don't guard clan so there's similarly i think wonderful information in there it's not it's not an easy rate and it's not a quick great. It's something that you'll have to spend some time digesting some. I think it's a really important view of our world. That's called the agreement. that's the new one. And where can they find the agreement. So agreements is sold to amazon. It's also available through my website along with all of my other books and courses and that's just my name and got net and there's lots of free channeling of material so lots of resources for the looking more antastic. This will all be on the show notes. So if you missed rebecca's information. Rebecca dawson dot net correct. It will be in the show notes rebecca. If you have anything else that you'd like to share with us as we come to a close. I think you know i would just encourage everybody. This listing to know that that were k. Another that there's a lot of information around the one owner k and perhaps the planet's donor k. And perhaps where we're going is not okay but but we're really going through an incredible tunnel of transition right now and it's a time of not knowing but the not knowing is the bridge the knowing and we will get there again. Just be spontaneous and open for new possibilities being a place of city so many wonderful words of wisdom. I wanna thank you so much for being Mma credible guest on our show a balanced life for you where you design the light of your dreams. Thank you rebecca. Thank you very much for having made All i can say is wow. Wow what a great interview. I don't know if you took away as much information as i did in the comfort of knowing that not knowing is really okay. It's a sign of. I'm in the right place. So i'm going to encourage you be spontaneous. Share this episode with five of your friend and consider leaving us a five star review together. We can make the world amazing place to be. Thank you for listening. And i'll see you next week.

rebecca rebecca dawson Rhonda western australia Rebecca Iran Fila skiing chandler rebecca s Wohl ford china curiel dunphy iowa Butch murray dole shaw
Final Fantasy 8, Part 2: Machine Gun Dreams

Post Show Recaps

1:21:40 hr | 3 weeks ago

Final Fantasy 8, Part 2: Machine Gun Dreams

"I listen to dad. That's that's slaps statman with the machine gun that secret dream state battle music dreaming for playing as all these different characters. What's going on here. Final fantasy eight is popping off in a very weird way brooklyn said dreams. Division jeep stream. Dreams i'm running in here crotch first hundred bag and tiptoes just strutting right in my. Everyone is really crotch. I in this game Yeah yeah i love to run crashed. I in final fantasy. We watch every run currency As we are here f. a. r. as things are going in a very strange direction already both the podcast but certainly in terms of the game this the episode of the podcast dead in the portion of the game. Where like this story is getting much less confusing and go. Play is not getting much easier. Indeed it may be getting worse but but things are happening. People are introducing themselves. We are exploring all sorts of strange nooks and crannies. The game is opening up whether or not in a like a clarify in way is another question. But it's definitely popping off your as we are We're officially members seed in this chapter and we are officially saying goodbye at least for now to ballum guard in as we are going to go off on our first official members of the organization of seed so like what we for educated. We don't even get to walk. Was the valedictorian. And of course it was obviously was. Yeah there's just a weird like inauguration ceremony in the hallway you basically become see late in life. Isn't it like my private room. He's like hey you're in yeah well. He has an office. But i didn't even go there right away. It was like because of the walk. Through that i went back there for some reason but like literally. You're all standing around in the hallway outside of the classroom that you go to at the beginning of the game and they tell you the eu squall and zell both passed the test You will be joining seed. Officially was very excited. Sin tells al to try to control his emotions. Little relaxed dude relaxed. I so we're officially members. Not all of us will talk about that. Vote four are we. I mean things means. There's some interesting stuff going on. In seeds relationship the greater world or at least with a a a certain underground organization led by a certain person who may be not as absolutely the person in the logo squall so we are going to open up the story in a significant way Did you feel as you were playing deeper into final fantasy. Eight through this portion of of what we're talking about today for those who are playing along. We are playing through The entirety of timber section Did you feel like the game was like starting. Make sixty or still not quite. I think still not quite. because we add more factions. we add this whole dreamworld And there is just like even more stuff going on it vacillating. Yeah yeah understand. There's a lot of things that are happening here in this game And i guess it's our job to make sense of them or at least try to articulate. What's happening so that we have. You know something like Yeah some some semblance of sense here as we're marking everything okay. Can you hear my cat i can. He wants to get into the closet. That's not a place for him to go. That's okay all right. that's okay. Welcome spooky to podcast. Spooky is not even in great about the no. He's not he's like a back to france. Fancy stand bats moguls. Get out of this place Well maybe it'll be happier in the dream world as we go deeper into the game. So last me left off we were child warriors. We were students at war. And now we're graduates We've we've we've graduated from the seed exam. A wall has graduated. zell has graduated. Selfie has indeed graduated Which is just the best news ever Unfortunately for like the five thousand time for has bailed he never learned. His lesson doesn't do. Cypher has bailed. He doesn't make the cup because he disobeyed orders and he's just such a little punk about is like whatever maybe bikes in the garden. Yeah he's he's just like a super senior he will. He's like oh like a super duper. He loves it so he has has failed. And so since. Congratulations graduates like we. Don't get a ceremonies like well. You do get a dance party. You get a big fancy gala with mayor. She cherries and shrimp. Lang's as many as you can eat. So what are the things that we didn't talk about last time but we should talk about now is like there's storms yes at the garden and so going north into the garden and you go into like the dormitories is hugo into like squalls room and walkin like change his clothes times where has to change his clothes. You don't change into like battle uniform for the invasion of daulat and this time he is changing into like some sort of like his like warm will wear. Yeah storm aware for the for the inaugural ball. Yes he's got like. I mean all basically what the same just like his formal wear and his bow aware looked like worst versions is casual but they like these really are just like kind of like getting the character is not really like the super fancy what. He's sort of like A copper shoulder pads it is it if they do sort of put on you know All the boys are in what looked like Hogwarts uniform soon party all the all the women are in you know various diverse dresses but the boys are all these suits swift color accents. Yeah yes that's what. They're wearing As they go to the to the To the big the big ball the gala the fancy gala. Everyone's there in squad. I really have to be here A lot of like internal mutterings of get so anxious. I have to be. And i'm like. Wow i guess like i m squall though is the ball's going through here's like i really want to be here mike. Yeah man like. I know what that feels like for sure is just like the thing that we've gotten common band and has to be there and so he's hanging out there and ask these hanging out you know. Children the corner feast and unstrapped. There is a women across the way in the woman in the white dress. Lady wine who i was like yours like like fireworks about who she kinda just like look like points in like she's like all personality and she shows that all right we're dancing. Skulls aqa dancing. Do you know it. what. Yeah i wrote. In my notes this random woman comes up and tries to hypnotize squall. To get him to dance with her followed by several question marks. What did she say. You lag me literally just meeting right now for the buried for. It's very bizarre. She's hitting on rather aggressively kind of awesome. She just shows like listen. Like you're really sat in the corner. You seem like you could be potentially great Why are we dance. He's a but i'm like a jerk. Yeah i'm a jerk. And i don't care about people snow behind bolivia especially like drags him out on the dance floor in one of my favorite things about final fantasy up to this point and of course the list is not as fast as it would be for some of the other file indices. But this is something that i do. Legitimately love is poor that like super intense like cgi at them the budget into creating a movie where This woman who comes to know is named renault spoiler she. She guides squall through a very awkward dance where he's terrible at dancing. Yeah they basically do a wall. The waltz to the moon. I believe is what it's called. Yeah there's a long seen dancing very poorly but it has big like ten minutes ago from cinderella energy yes. It's amazing it's hysterical. She's just like a squall who up to this point is like is like this very deft fighter. He's got the gun blade. He's gone to war. He's fought things and then he gets out on the dance burns Total bunket our no to do i mean. He did get slashed in the face and again this is still the same day appeared to be the same exact day it would appear that since we started talking about a single day has elapsed cast same day. Luckily we are going to change The pace pretty soon but this is the end of a very long day but just like you know put a button on it like this would be squall any day he you know he doesn't want to be friends he doesn't feel comfortable making friends like whatever it is And this this woman comes. Launched like nah euro accor than you realize like you should probably just answer because i'm definitely really cool like all right. And so he does and he doesn't really know what to do and so he's like really terrible dancing and it's kind of. It's kind of like clumsy in cute in it's like this actual moment of humanity from this character so far. I like this part. This part of the game Always made me made me really happy. Never ceases to. I enjoyed this piece. Came quite a bit but she says excuse herself she's like all right. Well maybe that was a win fight. Or no i gotta go. What and she says that she's looking for someone that doesn't want anyone to now. Like come dance while i'm like looking around. Yes like this is sort of clinton destined thing for her. She's like i'm looking around and trying to figure out what's going on. And so she She's like kind of like qualify using squall but also. She seems like she's just like it's like zest for life type stuff so she does. That comes teacher chris. This teacher tree teacher teacher instructor former relationship chris. This shows obstacle squall Be you want to get out of here is sorry. What's fun secret area where students secretly go isn't all the secret area. Yeah yeah area where they go secretly meet after curfew to talk secretly as students teacher a stronger voices to the secret area. We need to have tough uncomfortable. Yeah and so. He's like all right. This seve's it appropriate. I mean i know how to say no. I guess i'll go and so she's like okay. Gogi changed again again and then come meet me at the training area so again really talking about the fact. That like baumgarten is best. Scott dorms cafeteria with hotdogs. Classrooms is There's like a motor pool. It's got the quad in. There's a library as well and there's a training area So you go and you changed back into your clothes and then you go and meet this at the training area kaz. The secret area with students meet for their secret activities against is in training areas that but usually only part of the campus that stays open past midnight or whatever me as a trainee area open twenty four seven which seems like a strange. I hope that the medical bay which is another wing place. It's all new open. Twenty four seven because training areas dangerous. That is sort of like this enclosed like jurassic park. Just gonna say not the least of which is because there's a toronto source refs training area. Did you fight serena source rats. I did it was okay. Yeah it's not the worst. It's gotten intense amount of points. It's very hard to kill. Specifically because it has wattage p t rex zoar calls in the but is literally it's raves or it's a dinosaur dinosaur in a jungle e environment this school that sends its kids off to war also has transfers wrecks the you can fight in the training area at least the one probably many. Yes like run around inches. All right I've also changed gladys boasts change Let's meet up in the secret area but let's fight through the training area. I the fight through the training area to get to the secret area in the secret areas like this like a kind of like classy balcony in in like the training area. It's like what is this doing here. And it's absolutely love slave. Yeah and it goes so this is where the kids go to meet up to. 'em oh this is like their mo owing is their mo miss the most by secret secret kissy kissy place And squalls teacher has decided to take him here for a conversation in this long shot this long cut scene. Where both of their baxter to you. 'cause you're like looking out at the same view that they're looking at and there's a lot of awkward pauses the go on for a very long time. You're like okay. Do i move and go talk to her. Now do i. Do i leave like should i be doing something. Not just keep waiting. 'cause they're gonna talk some more and questions like so I'm not a teacher anymore. last leadership qualities i put in parentheses and is hitting on her student. That may be. It may be it like. She's not a teacher anymore. Instructor treat trait is no longer instructor. Trefor traces just quits now. Been relieved of her The duty hauser of balance garden has been Has lost her license. And she's like kind of it. She's like you earlier in the game we It the but like what she leads. The medical bay and back to her class and stuff like she really is completing a sentences like she's clearly like really fascinated with squall borderline like is like into squall installation. She's like saying. I'm not a teacher anymore. Kind of relief the bad any anyway. What he thinks about all that and spas like not giving her much is smelly. Wow you're you're really called high and like there's a piece of this falls probably like okay. Well let's recap this high got hit in the face with a sword. I woke up in the hospital. You took me back to your last. Took me to a fire. Keep threw me alongside the rest of the faculty you guys threw me into. War went to war. I had to go to a gala and change to go to the galahad dance in front of my peers. And i'm a bad dancer and it makes very anxious. You may be changed and i bought a dinosaur. You take me to the lovers lane garden. You're telling me you're not my teacher anymore. And you're like this. A lot has happened on this day I just wanted to go to bed and go to your cold man Yeah that's the whole reason she wanted to meet with him is clearly like so. I'm not a teacher anymore. Like i don't know what you wanna like. Is there anything you'd like to talk about. In terms of bat awkward. In her kate mara on pretty hard squalls. Like no come on like your great. No yes he's not feeling it and so she's like all right well. I guess that's going to be that Maybe we should just go. Find the t rex's together so is very awkward moment. It's very awkward moment like this. This debate doing terror. Felt like hey i was your teacher. I'm not anymore one. M oh yeah and you're in the secret spot after we t rex is you're like no she's like all right that's it effectively it so they leave their leave the training area after the definitely do not emma and as they're on their way out remember he last time around like when when squall wakes up in the hospital. There's someone there waiting for him. And then she's like briefly there and she walks away while here she is again is woman in like sort of like a -til shirked -til blouse with this green dress and Surrounded by monsters now wall helped me squalls. Like i don't know who you are but this never ending day. This is like jack. Bauer is like exhausted. Here is a she cheese. And i thought i had it. S squall spurs day in. The game really is underrated off now. Like imagine like if he had gotten hit in the face that's like twelve o one and then he wakes up at. let's call it like six and then he goes to the fire tavern. He's done with that. Let's call it nine. And then he goes to a foreign country and invades it by giant spider. Robot returns state s five nine to five experience And then he comes back. He asked to wait in the hallway to find out if he's a member of seed now for let's call that an hour and a half six thirty go get changed and come to the gala cocktail hour. Seven o'clock your stuff. There insult ten ten. Pm you are now in the training area and the secret area where teachers trying to make out with you. Which is not your teacher anymore. So it's okay you fought fatah's random stores wrecks in now This girl is being attacked. You gotta savour in thankfully finally league. That's the last part of the day but that's a lot of events it's a lot of sense to a podcast in and changed. Talk about This first day yeah busy. I'm tired just thinking about it at learn how to use guardian force vehicle. Why does it just wanna be my gs in every sense. I just want to be alone. You fight these things like this is going to help you quit this. By the way she has she uses a whip. That's weapon Feels like they're going something for something here in her limit break is blue magic which basically enemies skill from f seven like she finds something she learns like the moves of the enemies and she uses. Them might does not make things were you. You had to for a big guard like mighty kerr. Yeah there are a few that are really valuable. But i didn't go out of my way to learn them or us. Then frankly for the most part yeah see same this person but then like people swoop in The the these people in white costumes you've never seen before. And when they clicked when they crossed their arms they look like they're in straitjackets. It's like more like weird creepy people creepy people in this game for sure Us is like this. Big dragon thing with the dragonfly wings and then. He has like three smaller lizard minions that he keeps throwing it. You know which was very funny. Yes we're So sweet band. They take away next fall by whilst. Who are you spas No idea what's going on. I am running on no sleep. That is even remotely close to sleep. Was the six hours. I spent conscious. Yeah this day is over thankfully. I guess this has been a lot. See you later man. Good luck on your missions. I hope it goes well for you so you go off. Go back to your dorm. Do finally get to go to sleep. La for how long right like another six hours maybe before you're called to the principal's office. Where headmaster saed it's like okay call. You've got admission now member of seed. Now you and self ian zell you have received your first seed mission. Which is your life now is your this. Is your job now to the point said that we covered this in our Prologue a little while ago. Do you remember how to get money in final fantasy eight. Yeah it just kinda happens in fact the first time it happened. I thought i had done something. 'cause it just like pops up on the screen and it says like steed rank whatever and you get like a paycheck just deposits. Yes so you make money in final fantasy eight based on your seed rank Which is Which correlates with like it correlates with your level in the game And you can increase your seed ranked by taking quizzes. Did you know laugh. I'm sure you mentioned it. And i don't know if i believe it came up at some. You take tests you take exam tests which you can take in the menu of the game you go to the menu you go to to'real you choose the test. And the tests are all yes or no and their yes or no questions about things in the game about Like the junctions system that items magic. Whatever about all these various things are all these things that you are. Yeah to do And let me tell you something. Roklin said yes. Let me just tell you about a thing that you can can. I cheat on the quiz. You can cheat on the quiz. You can cheat on the quizzes. The answers are the same as as always they have been You can look them up. Yes no yes yes yes no yes no. No that's how you pass the i want. Yes yes yes no yes yes no no no now you want to pass that test no no yes no yes yes yes no yes tests no yes yes yes no no yes yes no no and so on and so forth said if you want to just take as many tests as humanly possible. There are thirty. That's absurd that final test by the way is no yes. No no no no yes. No no no unreal final one and we fox texts right straight a limitations. To how many tests you can take at a time. I don't remember what those barriers are. But i do know that eventually you could take all the tests said just cheat your way through them in makes the max amount of money because you don't make money any other way you could sell stuff. I guess what you make your mind because you're a salaried employee of seed that's how you make money and you can increase your seen rank by taking these tests. So hey do that do that get yourself down get yourself that haber between now and the next time we do this that i hope that you're a gilliam. They're not a multi-billionaire in the world of as a cheap assistant treat yourself thing to do sure. Never played the game with actress obliterating earliest possible. You know why because then you can biased much ewing equipment as you want. You don't have to worry about expanding your magic which again just want wanna stock and tribute to your attributes so weird and so i e way clinton like your actions are like attack dry guardian force in item And so your items like if you need them in battles hypoc yourself or whatever the move okay now you know how to make mass amounts money rob seed wine. It's it's funny that you say that because when you meet said for this in the morning for your mission He tells you this mission is being done for very little money. Yes you're hoping resistance faction a lot of money but we're doing it anyway all right and we're sending you guys going to send you a little kids. It's sort of implied that like because this is very little money we're gonna send you guys in new recruits s. Yeah okay so he's going to send you off on his you to go to a town called great fish song And if you talk to stay he'll give you a match lamp. Yes hey cursed item but if one with power uses it it should be some help. Did you take the magic lamp. I took it yeah Did you have any idea of what to do with it Someone told me. I don't know if it was if it was you or if it was somebody in the discord or both that like it's a thing you use just like any other item when you're like out in the fields and then that is how you will get eventually still haven't accomplished this diablo's other guardian force. That's correct Diablo's a guardian force who is actively state always a good sign when you acquire an item and the description of the item is stave your game before using this. Yeah it's nice that they tell you that It's nice that they're like hey Definitely do that so the walk the walk through. I'm reading as for how to defeat. diablo's is to stock up on phoenix downs. In case the alba's hurts real bad And make sure that you've got both draw. An item available diablo's has three tasks rusting attack. Which is actively how everyone runs in this game It deals massive damage to a single target. It also has danny which deals half the targets current hit points and then garage Which deals fractional damage. Equal to three quarters of the whole parties current hit points so the strategy is to draw demi from diablo's Cast that against diablo's you'll know what is hip joints are based on the damage. That dairy does does it have his Share yeah so you keep using that until you get him into like the low hundreds and then you wanna use squalls limit rate. Which by the way is called renzo. Can we talked about renzo. Kook did not renzo kuchen. It's sort of like white omni slash from. Fff's basically just hit multiple times. Yeah there's like a little sliding thing that goes by on the bottom of the screen it says trigger and you have to time it right to get the go. Yeah you have to pay attention to the trigger warnings on evades limit break been triggering properly with five fantasy aids. I have no idea. Yeah what you know that you can do this though right. Yeah i have i have. I have triggered squalls limit breaks. Have i accomplished anything. I've done that unclear you you can do this in normal attacks as well though I don't remember what button it is but you like when you attack in squall slashes enemy you either wing. Hit square are two or one or something like that. I mean i guess it's different on the switch but like one of those shoulder buttons and It is like him pulling the trigger of the revolver as he sliced in jack that like. I don't know if it doubles the attack. But it's certainly a c. Increase it missing. I yeah support for this. Podcast comes from paypal. Small business owners. Turn your smartphone into a cash register pay pal. Qr codes or the safe and easy way to get paid in store and deliver the same security and trust. Pay pal is known for online in person. If you're a cash only business with pay pal. Qr codes. You can accept credit or debit with everyday low fees. There's no additional hardware or software needed generate your unique qr code from the pay pal app and display it on your device or print it to display in store customers. Scan your code with their pay pal app. You only need your smartphone. Learn more at paypal dot com slash. Us slash get qr code. Anyway you got a magic lamp. Use that you can get a guardian for us this way. i don't know how you've been trying to attack it. Maybe the strategies pretty good. I think demi is like a smart way of gauging where you're at the bell. Yeah well and the other part of that is if you stock it and then cast it when you cast it. A diablo's will cast kaga on you. fully fully healing you It's just the timing of getting it all to work and like drawing. Demi is very difficult and you'll get one at max's to if you succeed That's why you drive to cast it. I think you can do if you do that. It won't curiel but it is an option. Yeah yeah The yeah. I've tried it a couple of times. I haven't succeeded yet. But i have not put emeralds weapon level data covered into it. Yeah yeah it's awfully early in the trying to do something. Eight is if it is worth having as many guardian says yes bowl because like you you can quit multiples at a time Let you like regarding force can be equipped you know simultaneously like theoretically squawk could have all of them doesn't really make sense. But you want to distribute it like you want to figure out like the way that distributes the best. But this way like diablo's might be like i can't remember if diablo's is like a hit booster or booster. Those are some of his abilities that you can. You can level up stuff like it's interesting that thing like don't really want high levels because like your enemies actually level with you right so there's really nothing to be gained from level grinding but having a like you know juiced out there like abilities you're like big ability points like that's relatively important so i recommend that you return to the match blam soon Just because it will be good to have asked the albums can afford you like this giant demon in a magic lamp that you can fight it any time. Assuming you've got mashed but you've got it okay. So you're gonna go to timber and you go to timber via train you'll go you'll leave from ballum will take the train By the way Something we haven't talked about yet But we talked about last week. And just in anticipation of we're recording this before we've gotten feedback for our first podcast. I bet that there is at least a couple of people like but you haven't talked about the courts. Would you talked about the card. Game triple a. And then there are people who are like wait. What triple triad triple triad is a card game from file fancy eight triple triad which i believe a. I think it exists in final fantasy fourteen as well which is the second to online only numerical fantasies. The one that people actually really like. I have not played Is that if at any point. You and i wanna like. I don't know like galvanize. Crew of people form up a file fans fourteen party. This is something that we could potentially cool. Sounds like a vestment of money and time. Not psyched. I am to do it. But my arm could be twisted. His future problem positivity that is absolutely prob but triple triad is card game and there's people who expire by the card game and i know that there are like people who feel like there's actually a lot of inciting that there are people who feel like there's actually a lot of utility card game there is genuinely utility to the card game like they're important things that you can do like you can win cards and then you can turn the cards. The great legendary thunderbird kotal has an ability. I believe it's called card mad where you can modify cards into items and so if you win really big cards. And you don't like the dean you could turn the cards into like a hundred metalitz irs or You could turn it into component parts to upgrade your weapons since really how you get better weapons with component parts in magazines that you pick up a long way. of course. there's like king of fighters the name of this magazine that you can find throughout the world And it tells you about all these cool new weapons you can build. That's how you get the availability to build new way. I know i have an stones and some screws. Maria's random little pieces of things accumulated over my various battles s have no use for them yet. Yeah So you can read about it how it works with the card game. I don't think is mandatory. The half the playing the card game in this game. But i think that it does help does help to to get some stuff at bringing up because i'm reading this walk through right now just as sort of like a refresher on what's going on in the game and like you can challenge said cars you challenge anyone to triple triad as we just had to like go up to them press square or whatever omar's yeah i play then you play in triple triad and like usually lose your mate go played three total rounds of this came and i lost once in then i read the rules again and that i tied and then i played against it once lost and i was like all right. This game makes no sense to me. I don't understand what the numbers have to deal with each other. We're card turns over from one color to the other or just about anything about there's elements there's elements on the cards. That means something that sometimes they don't and it's in the right corner. There's like a element. Booster that you get. Bonus points is like pilot bullets from community or the wheels in whatever game that rdm atom made up intentions intriguing. His characters i find it very difficult to follow is a little hard i never really bothered with triple triad in final fantasy nine. You actually at one point do have to play cards in order to advance the game to a certain degree so i tried a little harder there But i don't think i ever really mastered either of them. It might be fun some day like go back and play eight with ferry express purpose of just like crushing the card games. But it hasn't happened for me yet. Anyway just bring it up because they know you can do it right now and then when you go to ballum before you go off to take the train timber. You can go to sells houses. That's where he lives and you could like play his mom in cards in and you can get celts cells card. I think you could always go back to it. Yeah i'm pretty sure. One of the wachter is is very explicitly. Like go play cards against it till you win. And i was like no go to sales house to play cards against his mom and i was like do i have to. I don't think so not gonna do that. And then you start to take the train There's a funny runner in the game when you go on trains that like selfie loves trains selfie as a character like we did a decent job describing zell. He's sort of like plucky punchy like he's the martial artists he's very upbeat sophie's also like super upbeat. Yeah she's very. My impression of her is very like cou. Why like vary If anybody out there watches kim's convenience the like from korea customer who comes to visit like. Oh my god so pretty very much that energy To the point where when they're planning they're like plotting. How did you this task that they have to do later. Southie is like teased love. Everybody get along basically. Well everybody's trying to figure out how to accomplish their mission. She's like she is another really happy. Go lucky type And there's gonna be a couple of moments in the game where like there's like some social committee type stuff that she's Your ass yes. Oh yes trying to plan at one point or something. Yeah squall you wanna help me. He's like no. I don't i think you have the option to say like to just like how like dot dot dot answer to say no. Yeah i paid a love. Squall got to be honest. I always like. I try to play as the character like rather than what i think i would do. I try to make the choice. That makes sense for the character in this game in dungeons and dragons in any that i'm play. I tried to make like the character informed choice so even though it was like meaner answer is said to sell feels like no plan at dance. He's not there yet you know. Maybe someday maybe he will. Maybe that's the vr that we're aiming for but right now he's will leave me alone more. I've linked become comfortable with my own anxiety like the more. i like. Recognize that this character as a guy. I don't feel comfortable around people. This is hard for me and everybody wants something from me in. It's tough and i don't know what to just leave. Be gotta love him. I kinda love squall sir. Taking the train. And they're on the train. Or i guess we're gonna go on all them falling asleep snoring. They follow over. They pass out on this expensive trained. By the way. At the time i only had seven thousand gill and it cost three dozen. Gil get on this train that you have to get on to go on this mission. And i was like. Who's footing the bill for this where we're not getting paid anything. Yeah this berry Yeah this low financed train this low finance mission and yet they want to put you in like the first cavalry prize at cabin did sal is very excited about like jumping up and down on the seat. Excited about is like all right. Well that's cool but like we have in the budget end. So yeah so you you fall asleep. Everyone like passes out. Spontaneous In weird ass shit goes now because it would appear that everybody has a share dream or hallucination or something to that because suddenly like you see like squall and zell and selfie like are all like having sort of like is like like almost like a telepathic communications with each other. Sort of like these like Not quite visible or trans. Lose sort semi translucent. Conversation pieces as re other characters are now under your control Yes you've already. Played like five different characters in the course of the first few hours of his game and now you're playing his three completely different unrelated as far as you can tell Other characters who are gal and soldiers. Yeah as of next week's podcast dead. You will have encountered all of the characters that you play essence. Wow yeah They do a. They knew a quick some. Sometimes they do that and then other other ones in the series like make you really work for it as a kind of frozen macha but yet you're in this like shared hallucination where you are members of the albanian army your soldiers send your in the uniform of those guys that you were killing over in. Yeah and so like your these three very specific people. There's the gigantic game. Gaylord zebedee this giant dude Who throws Wounds at people. That's his weapon. He literally has a harpoon. He and then he runs forward kip seattle and again like very crotch heavy run. I guess just like it's like it's like fun out. Run the run lake f f seven at. Yeah yeah so. The graphics are better so it's like even via ads. True god properly people shaped like weird little pointy round guide. Oh award throws harpoons at people and then he chases them down unplugged far pruning runs back in. There's curious not walk of siegel. Curious siegel is the name of this other guy who. I'm trying to remember the name of the character from seoul cowbridge. Jim soul caliber now Volvo name was volvo in seoul caliber. Who could sorta like this weird like acid nam type guy. We play ask all these blades on his hand on his hands and sort of like Kind of like fantasies. Steam punk edward scissorhands type That kind of his body like gesticulating. We're the as he comes up in late slices. Ashi that's what cure rose has said without the on. I think far as we know they. I'm not gonna ask He's another one who you play as he's cool in then there's laguna laguna warriors is name and laguna has machine. Got just like by just like. Hey i'm going to end it. There laguna has a machine gun. He is the man with machine data and the battle music that plays when you're playing laguna curonian. Ward is distinctly different from the babbel music. That is playing in the rest of the game. The music we played top of this podcast. It's one of my favorite battle signs in any games. There is that this remarkably epic orchestrated version of this track with a full string. Orchestra full orchestra. And it's it's just like so bad ass a in the song is called demand with obscene gun. And it's a real It's like a real crap favorite is just like it's such it's so funky and is so different from anything that you hear in battle music across final fantasy but certainly within this game. It's just so different from the standard bala music that i think really plugs you into this idea. Like something weird's going on. I'm not. I'm not where i was. We're not in kansas. We're in a dream world. What is happening here and to describe good. He's just got like long hair He apparently house like a bum knee or need like ten. Whenever he gets like awkward like his leg falls asleep or sleep or whatever when they announced final fantasy eight. I remember this They asked like f- abating f f nine. I feel like media now just estimate it may be the day announced death nine s ten in lebanon sort of like a similar breath but as a fate on its own but they One of the earliest things that you knew about the game. If you're paying attention to like kind of like the press and the hype machine was that final fantasy was going to have to sort of central characters one is swallow in one is laguna And you didn't really know what that meant like. I think we kind of figured that like all right. We'll maybe like the balance is like half and half but like how are they going to intersect like what's that all gonna look like an all. Leave you still in the dark as far as that balance. Although i'm sure that you're picking up more squalls game than lagunas lagunas really important character and like very clearly different energy than squawk but half doesn't care doesn't want to talk to people in laguna with a curious in ward these other albanian soldiers. And they're all just like massively type like the three best friends that anyone could have. Yeah they've all clearly been like fighting together for a long time and they're always working as a team yeah So that part of the albanian army. They're like at this point. I think it starts to become clear. That like a big albanian. army lake. day are A very this. This is a really powerful army. They're they're like you know the huge military power in the world and that they are kind kind of feared and so it's like why are these like cool people they're like why are these seemingly like nice people like working for him since the kind of like a mystery baked into into what's going on here so you fighting around in the forests fight through the forest like squall on. His friends are friends and deep quotes starting narrating. What is this. What is this share. Who's nation that's going on you end up with laguna in cairo's and ward in This in this city and like a piano bar and there's a pianist here named julia laguna has a big crush on all alone. Julia julia julia julia fan Curious war like why. Don't you go talk to her. I on so free. I'm so scared to do it. I want a in select like she's playing this song on the piano. Pretty catchy wonderful. You know ended up a pop ballad version of that song. Be game with full lyrics and everything And like it turns out that like lagoon is just like he's like always been like coming to this piano bar watching and like being really psyched about thing and their regular table place. I enjoy it was like hey you wanna come. Meet me specially themed room secret area because this piano bar is in tel puglia has room at the hotel yeah those like average of bbn secret areas the so tell aka my room i do think lagoon has the the character design. Lagoon laguna goodness great. But goodison my favorites. Like he's like walks around like like a like a box square like he just like sorta like with his like deeply like like stiff legged he's like gad g. of so nervous he goes to julia's ruminate. Just like it seems like they just have like a really nice pleasant long evening of targeting except she says 'cause. I wrote this whole romantic scene in a hotel. Room is bizarre. Does she says you have such beautiful is dot dot dot. Don't worry i'm not going to pluck them in eat them. I just want to talk gazing into those is upset it and he's like oh that wasn't necessarily what i thought was going to happen. I i didn't. I didn't think you were going to flick my eyes out and eat them. Now i'm a little concerned now concerned that maybe that's what you actually want to do. And if that is actually what you wanna do. I think i got to like get my knee back and fighting shape and like i don't know dive out the window sticks this leg. Cramp would have personnel whatever's going go. They have like a a aside from. That wasn't up. I guess it's a fairly big aside from that. Aside from the mayor made up. Look your eyes out at east s. Yeah otherwise it's okay So what how does this end because then the dream and everybody wakes up right. They wake on the train and southeast says. There's no way we can understand this. Let's just concentrate on our first so they all like they all week from the dream way so we just had a shared dream right an even score Yes we did an like everyone's like should we talk about it. No on a mission. We're not going to explain any of that to you player. We're just gonna move on like no. I think though that like probably that's very important piece of the game but it might be too. We like really dig into any kind of explanation. So let's just like offload that for later. I guess that makes sense but that's happening so now like you've been introduced to this I really think that it is to spoil anything for us to say that this will happen again and may happen a couple of times in so there is sort of light side parallel story. That's happening here and like this sort of like question of what does it mean. What's the point of it. How's it intersecting with the main story. is is is that we something the tracks simply something that we will track for the listener. It's just important to stress that late. There's everything that's going on with squall and seed and then there is sort of like this other alternate stream story. That's happening with this very plucky dude named laguna. Who just like seems like like sort of he stays like. I wanted to be a journalist. He didn't want to be a soldier. He wants to be a travel writer. This guy and like ward and curious are his best friends like none of them want this anymore. They don't wanna be fighting or anything so it is kind of interesting you're tracking two stories for like your main characters are like excitedly embarking on intimate physical militarized conflict in. You're playing as these season. By warriors these like soldiers who want to escape the conflict. Yeah i don't know i. I don't know how this is happening as a collective dream or what the game is ultimately going to be trying to say with these parallel stories. But it does kinda give you this like you know. On both sides of a conflict there are humans right. And if you're going into war there is a human toll to that in like. How is that gonna salt after how deeply go look. We'll talk it through i take. I think it's worse. That is certainly worth having Our our eyes on put our eyes on those is that we're gonna blocking All right so they're like okay. We just got to focus on the mission. Take the train. They arrive in timber against gray fish song in get to timber and they link up with zone in watts of the forest and its zone who has the ulcer or is it watts. Who has the the the ulster. I don't i think it's done. Yeah it's just a guy like chronic stomach hurt always like doubled over clutching his horrible. It's kind of an interesting character. Note this is not like a super important character. Spoiler alert did very specific and consistent. Yeah he's just like he's trying to tell you what's going on. And then he doubles over in pain. And i think if anything. It's like Darren such like a desperate situation here in timber under the thumb of the gal. Bady army That like you know. They need a lot of help in order to get their lives back on track. It's like get like the care that they need in their soy pushing through their crippling stomach disease to goes through cycles. This is brutal. Yeah it does. It feels very specific and like it should lead some way. Yeah it's really. I think it's maybe underlining some staff but like It's just a character trait that he has severe gastrointestinal distress effectively. yes so eventually we meet the issue leader of the resistance or a member of the resistance in. It's not necessarily that. We're meeting her so much as we are really meeting. Yeah renault learning the identity system when we already met wake the princess they she's asleep as princesses are want to be You go to wake her up and end angelo. The dog is here. You can rename angelo. Right yeah you can. Do you know. I'm sticking with all the default names mostly so for like two streamline smart there's enough confusion yes without also renaming great idea yes. So she's got angelo dog. Who have you got a chance to use renault's limit break yet Once or twice. I think so. We're like the dog charges in doesn't mazing things renault limit break is. Yes you just six hundred wiles. Yeah her she hits a limit break in the angelo rush in angelo. Just like bursts from offscreen and rex and there's a few different tricks he can learn. Yeah yeah yeah. So it's noah she's the one that spokeman cover your get this shot just do it It's so great The reason that she had gone to balance garden in the first place was to recruit seed four emission. They had a mission their resistance year. Or it's dowels in timber. She wanted as cypher. Along for the ride Cypher was the person that she was hoping would be here. That's not who gets. That's not who she got it all instead. She gets squall zell All right well. I guess this will be the crew to kidnap the president galbani. And everyone's like excuse me what we're gonna do now. I'm sorry excuse me what. And so yes The crew their whole thing is. Will you guys have to help me kidnapped. The president of pia we hired to do a train heist train heist and train. Heist was yes in elaborate train heist slash kidnapping slash another trade. Are you talking about rain highs so elaborate. You guys kidding me so yes you cannot do a train heights and i hate it. Thanks thanks i hate it. Nation of it shocked me not as time it takes to explain. 'cause they have a model of the train tracks and the end the president's train and your train All set up in their like headquarters car of the train And so they explain to you in great detail all of the tasks you're about to have to complete in there's timing involved because you're on a speeding train going along these train tracks and you're going to have five minutes to complete seven procedures involving q trains and six cars and you have to uncouple cars twice and then they will rejoin each other. The way that there's most bull on bullshit is terrible. It's so tough to. It's really difficult cut exceptionally difficult. So much as it's like it's very annoying. Very annoying gets a lot of timing stuff Then you gotta stop running when you guard in the window and then it's a red guard you wanna drop down at eight has a temperature sensor but it's a blue guard that you want to run whatever my job and that's one part mike. God yeah you gotta get to the thing where you gotta enter the code. V five coats to enter and they're a series of numbers. The numbers correspond to symbols. But we're only gonna show you the number for like two seconds and then you just have to remember it and do it and the numbers are not in the order buttons that i thought they would be nightmare but then watch out because the guards my comeback to climb back up on top of the train and then get back down like don't do more than two of the at ones in their five codes. Good luck you five minutes. No hugh all his various. Yeah hockey through it fairly well in the process of doing it like you don't actually have to. You don't have to remember every single detail that they explain to you Because it does at least like show you the number code to Like symbol ratio But it's a lot yeah. It's very chaotic massively. So i was just watching it like you know. Mouth agape like what's in the first like five hours of his game. Yeah so they're going to try and kidnap the president. they're going He's on a special train car so they're going to like detach his car from the train. And replace it with a dummy car. Meet presidents fatally mechanically. What is that just literally like stuff president. Cates use his us president body to save the planet. Yeah they they. You have to replace the dummy far with president's car and then you go to the president's car to like i don't know kidnap present turns out that the president was president. The whole time days anticipated. Your plan is a fake president. Boris dudes is agatha. All all along dellinger by the way is the name of gal baby. President were incredibly binsar dealing Not my insert Inches and in his dialogue he talks like an internet troll taxed as like a combination of capital and lower case letters. Which really cracks me early idiots. Yeah you dhabi's he's like some sort of like monster that you then have to fighting. Who very irritated. Because his security keeps coming in to check on him and he's like i'm fine. Go away like we just is our job to check and make sure that you're ok every ten minutes. Sorry checks get out yeah. So he's like he starts off as just like this thing and then like you have to a heat wave morphs into like this rear gross. Yes zombie skeleton. I wrote that he looks kind of like like the black pearl crew. Moonlight in parts of the caribbean sophisticated. Oeser skin hanging off like shambley. Gero gero is the name the boss And this is crazy if if you look at the stats of a boss in this game yet. It says level somewhere between one and twelve p summer between three hundred fifty. Three thousand six hundred fifty hit points because of 'cause it scales with your welcome like that's just so wild. I know huge rate of like one. It was going for something for some people. It really worked for others Anyway so like you have to kill this thing have fun do it. You get rid of it all right. Well now what shit. You guys paid us nothing to do this elaborate train heist in kidnapped. The president of shelby's release signed on for this came after president gal media for peanuts. This whole train highs was a total waste of time. Always time this is where like everybody's in a terrible mood in they're trying to regroup and figure out what to do in southeast like everybody love and peace and everybody literally wags their finger at her just like not now not a find out that the president is going to make an announcement at station. The real one. Not the dummy data and some. What are they gonna do here. They're still under renault his contracts or knows all right. Well let's take over the tv station. Maybe yeah and the seed people are like. Can we see that contracts. It's like. when are we done here. Yeah and the contract is very vague. Basically just like seed will work for the forest owls until the mission is done. Yeah yeah it turns out that the reason they gal bedia infiltrated dollar that town in that radio towers they could make the radio tower operational so they could broadcast this thing from the tv station here in timber so that everyone in the world could like watch this program. Basically i think is sort of what's going on. President has a very important announcement to make In the announcement is that We've got a new asset. Here in the galvin governments. A source risk said. Welcome to the party the sorceress. Idia how would you describe. Esteemed the media So we only see her Kind of briefly. But she's like very. I mean like she looks like a sorceress in like big robes and his very dark and like hiding off to the side ale yeah real. Bail a very. Were like somewhere between light helmet. Invite swimming cap Shower cap is scott like warns all sorts of sharp prickly objects as a seashells over the years She's got a skylight flow flowing like malefic since rogue she's terrifying. She's very very very intimidating. Yeah it's she's there and supplies Is here cypher. Who has failed his seat exam for the last time in decided way i'm going in any way That cipher has Has come in. He's gone row and his decided that he's just going to take matters into his own hands so he left balanced gardens just like rid timber and who is no longer teacher who was fired from being a teacher than just like all right but you can be seen by the game for a job with seed chase down. Ciphered like hey. Don't let him do anything crazy. Wolves little too late. 'cause cyber has stormed the the tv broadcasts Yeah and he has decided a. He takes the president hostage. Let us know not gloss over that part takes the president hostage but the but the president in the source arrests are like are working together because the president does this broadcast to announce an ambassador and the sorceress. Is this ambassador. Yeah but then safer takes. The president hostage in like has a conversation with the sorceress and decides to quote bid farewell to his childhood and join the sorceress. And let the president go. Yes that's essentially what goes down and yeah the sources like hey come on dutch wildlife play with the big leads. Please powerful yet. Let me a stupid little boy anymore. Interesting come on. Do you wanna hang out with me. And he's like. Oh yeah. I thought about it a little bit more. Maybe so edna able to like squirrel cyber away effectively just as light squall on everybody like watching the broadcast in trying to storm the tv station And so that doesn't quite work So like i guess like so. Cypher takes the president hostage is able to dismantle that I answered now. That he's like gone. renault's like all right. Well how about this. I'm your boss still and you will continue doing what i say in. What i say is take me to galbani a garden We're going to go visit another garden. But it's the garden of like the evil military nation and so what the hell like wide. We need to go there. What's going to happen there. Well so he went said. We'll find out next time. Find out nasty on another episode of the final fantasy. Eight podcast Do we really know exactly what's going on much more than last time. I would say we know more things. We know some things where things have occurred. Yep were fully on board as members of seed right. now there's a sorceress. Who has been announced as like a key figure in the gal etienne regime. This could be terrifying. She has like seemingly like hijack. Cypher and cypher seems to be like kind of cool with it And also quizzes back. I'm not teaching anymore. Small did you hear about that. Yeah you told me yeah. He didn't tell them. Any further thoughts continued thoughts about the fact that. I'm no longer your teacher know. Yeah this is the dialogue. This gave is so wild sometimes You get to timber and you can kinda run around and explore a bit before you get the tv station and there's like a house where you can hide out Where you can like go into the bedroom and like look down into the alley to see what's going on and it's also it turns out to be a safe house where you can rest up after you've battled and in the house. The daughter like the daughter in his house says Oh shoot where to quote go. It's wild She says. I can't wait to meet. A great guy can scream at and exchange blows with h- he's going on in this town people say things like this all the time and no one is like you're crazy like that's a problem. No everyone's cool. Yeah wild totally mild yes. We're also having like lucid shared dreams. Yeah and like squall and renault again in a fight at one point in renault's like we're serious so serious hurts. yeah yeah. There's a lot of drama a lot. A lot of young. You know teenage young italian. There's teen angst in this game because you're bunch of high school kids ridiculous you know. You're just a bunch of like you know you're in that that nebulous area between high school and college in which like you're a child soldier to hunt down a sorceress. Yeah you know. we've all been steph. We've all been there so it's still. The emotions are going to be very very high in this game. I don't know about you. But i'm having a blast reliving. It had base for really fun vibe casting so the so the next time we come back we'll finish the remainder of disc one So we'll we'll get through. What is still in front of you. In terms of like what is traditionally considered disc. One us you'll meet new character will have a lot to save at this new character We'll have a lot more to say about the sorceress and then make money. That's your homework money and get y'all blows and then there is a another guard force for you to get on a side quest that that you should do coming up now Coming up this. This should be something that we do for this next episode of the podcast the The the character the guardian force That you are that you are going to try and get trying to think of. What's a good tease. Tease is one guardian force slot but multiple guardian force characters lou And it is a sort of somewhere between like a mild to major pain in the ass to get great campaign. Yes that's good all right cool. That'll be the next one and actually being incredible. It'll it'll be softened it'll be something for sure. Okay that's next up on the final fantasy eight. I passed hidden us up about your final fantasy adventures. You can talk to us on twitter at hard rock around. Howard you can talk to the poster. Recaps adrian discord patriotic dot com slash bush. Recast is the way to sign up. We are available for your conversational purposes. We love talk and final fantasy. Hit us up there. John dot com slash show recaps among the many perks. That you'll get there the ability to play dungeons and dragons with zen. Yeah it does in dragons in the discord is like regime and more sprawling world. You have here in. Fifa possible full of characters full of crazy places to go and unexpected games to play. Yes all sorts of crazy things that you can do in dungeons and dragons play alongside me alongside said alongside many of your other favorite podcasters as well on the bush recaps network so it's just one of the many reasons to consider signing Is that any final thoughts before we close. I don't think so i'm hated. Keep running cross forward into the win off my goodness well with that said. Let's close out the way. We started man with machine session epoch saw and we'll be back next week with more final fantasy eight until then everybody take care bye-bye report.

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ML Feature Store at Intuit with Srivathsan Canchi - #438

The TWIML AI Podcast

41:58 min | 5 months ago

ML Feature Store at Intuit with Srivathsan Canchi - #438

"Welcome to the podcast. I'm your host. Sam charrington hard to believe that tuomo con. Ai platforms is just over a month. Away join us at twelve okon. To hear from industry luminaries like psalm asylum today. Netflix's feisal siddiqi. Mvp's fran bell on what leading organizations are doing to increase the efficiency of developing machine learning and deep learning models and getting them into production learn about the practices and platforms being put into place by companies like google spotify into it and more and engage with fellow data science machine learning engineering platform engineering and emma lops practitioners and leaders to share learn and connect on how to accelerate automate and scale machine learning and ai in the real world formation and to register visit tuomo con dot com. Before we jump into today's episode. I want to send a huge thanks to our friends at amazon web services for their support of the podcast and sponsorship of this year's reinvent series. Aws offers a vast array of machine learning services and supporting cloud infrastructure putting machine learning into the hands of every developer data scientist and expert practitioner. Its extensive set of mlb services at all. Three layers of the technology stack offers a broad array of capabilities including contact center intelligence devops tools industrial machine learning enterprise search health analytics and much more and amazon sage maker one of the fastest growing services in. Aws's history helps data scientists and developers to prepare build train and deploy high-quality machine learning models quickly by bringing together a broad set of capabilities purpose built for machine learning to learn more about aws l. services and how they're helping tens of thousands of customers accelerate their machine learning journeys visit aws dot amazon dot com slash machine dash learning and now. Enjoy the show. Already everyone i am here with County head of engineering for the machine learning platform at intuit throughout san. Welcome to the podcast. Thank you so much sam. It's a pleasure in an honor to be on this podcast. I am super pumped about this conversation. We are talking in the midst of reinvents where we're hearing about a bunch of cool new announcements that aws Doing new things that aws is doing in the machine. Learning space and one of those was their feature store and it turns out that into it is A big part of that story and we're going to dig into that in a bunch of detail but before we do. I love you to share a little bit about your background and how you came to work on m. l. platforms at into it absolutely glad to talk about that. So my background is in bowling flood platform so prior to I was at ebay. Where rebuilt the cloud platform as the service or a and b scaled from almost nothing running in an off brand setting the running on an on prem cloud with open stack and carbonates of be handling tens of billions of calls every day and the mijoni machine learning. There's a it's an interesting history that so there is this bayport goal that hidden depth on machine learning by the challenges of running and operating amil models Described many of these patients. Problems are not new. I'm they have been previously sold in web services ecosystem on the platform so my background in building. Such large scale cloud from systems was a good fit for failing an platform which saw similar problems in the emily as awesome. We could go into a whole set of conversations about open stack. Who are not gonna do that. I was a part of that community for many years in too many open stack. Summits are actually interesting conversations to have about you know the what we saw happen in that community and what we see happening in kuwaitis and you know are are there parallels and lessons that we need to learn from. But that's maybe you know something that we can do over beers on. We're hanging out. When do that again. But for now maybe we can start by just talking about some of the ways that into it. Uses machine learning i i can imagine about. Shore listeners can imagine a bonds but you know how do you think about the various ammo use cases at into it you know or what are the focus areas for the teams that you support with your platform absolutely so into this on a mission to power prosperty around the world and we want to do that by being in. Ai driven expert platform for some of the things that people faced with their financial lives managing your taxes managing accounts and books managing finances. So this being the mission of the company it a. n. is to mission and all the male models that run on the platform outing vader's aspects of those missions. You're quickbooks customer. You might have been exposed to a new capability that will predict the cash flow that you might can't for your business in the next three to six weeks out. This capability has been extremely important especially in the last six to eight months because of covid and all the uncertainty that's been around How small businesses operate and that is one use case where india's machine learning capabilities are really powering deep insights for customers and enabling them to make decisions that will our prosperity father. And what are the specific types of workloads that you tennessee does tend to be tabular types of data traditional Machine learning workloads. Are you doing a lot with deep learning. What's the spectrum of the portfolio that you need to support with the platform most of indians. Data's dabbler and doing collect as the traditional machine learning we get streams of data from our users were using a products and need to extract features out of that and predict videos things such as cash flow. Forecasting are What do you need with the tax and things like that. We had just embarking on a deep learning models but not not a lot of them at this point of time other than at a lot of natural language processing mortals and document understanding models for optical recognition. And so on so in you have your w. two and you're scanio w to use doctrine understanding models to extract those capable. Expect the vs out of those documents. So either the whole set of questions that i'd like to ask you about you. Know what your overall platform lurks. Looks like and you know what that journey looks like. But in fact you'll be speaking at our upcoming fomo con. Ai platforms conference in january and covering a bunch of that saw want to steal your thunder here on the podcast interview but it i would like to understand the genesis of the feature store as an element of your platform. What are the needs that you know that drove you to start building a feature store in the first place. So dude has multiple lines of businesses which intersect in various ways. So you have the tax business with taxi Quickbooks which just doing the counting on you have postal finance but now with credit card more coming in all of these streams of data actually dissecting because a lot of them are about the same customer like you high as bush tonight have might taxes to file and i also own a business and i might have to file business taxes on so so With a lot of these are as billing metal models for servicing. These different systems may discounting back. We have building similar features for because of the data sets are highly intersecting. We have lots of features that need to go across the systems and be shared between models across double tax quickbooks that meant so in order to be effective at shading such features. We'd needed needed a way to do that. So that was the genesis of bailing type feature stole so that we can then have features data described well described and so i can have inhabited distri of features that i find a new model but i can go to the feature students say hey what features exist in the features to let me take a look at these features. Are these features. Good enough for my momma satisfy needed. Change any one of those speeches. I can make Changes to the speeches. All are if the those pictures are not sufficient. I can go ahead. And add to the features store and add new features to the story so overall today have a thousand plus individual features that are stored in that features and b. c. about fifteen billion feature updates every day the features in the store from the various feature processors who are modifying those features so feature stores off for several different benefits to To folks that use You mentioned kinda feature discovery and eliminating rework and folks creating the same features over and over again. There's also you know. Issues around production. Analyze asian of the features and consistency. And for you and your users is any one of those are the others. The main driver is it. All of those is always all of those. How do you think of the why folks should invest in a feature store. And is it one-size-fits-all alike or does it vary a lot with the folks that you talk to your peers and industry it. Is betty important for models to be trained on the right features. So that is where the feature this feature shining come. The next step is also extremely important. Is to make sure that my model gets trained on of features and when i'm inferring i'm using exactly the same features so it becomes very important for models to be consistent across might training evaluation and in front spaces Observed is with the battle of data socialist available at the training phase and during infants face models tend to get trained on slightly different data. Said it's the same day coming from somewhere else. For example i might have a data in house which i can credit for my off-line training of business and then job that moves data from data warehouse into an online inference. Kind of immortal. The problem with this approach is that you are now creating drift in terms of the features and these speeches though they might start off almost similar. They quickly start diverging and it becomes increasingly difficult to converge. The so. that's the feature stowed. Being a single blazed which you'll get access the Both in an online fashion for online influence and in an offline fashion for training and batches access the same features same bay is extremely embarked model consistency for tracking things like Explain ability Outed my martyr product that i should get a From google books should not get credit from quickbooks. It becomes easy to track those back when you have a consistent way in which the market trained on the motto is used in france. So the answer to that question is both both of them are important. equally burdened. I would say it's interesting to me. you know. Maybe he can referencing back to the tomo conference. Last year a year ago features store you know some of the big and most advanced players in users of machine learning had feature stories as part of their platforms but in terms of commercial feature store offerings. They were very very few and now the spaces exploded like seemingly overnight like tech thanh is out with product now. They're our platinum sponsor of tomo at platforms. Aws just announced feature store google just announced a feature store you've got feast which is open source offspring. that is rolling under collaborating. With william from feast went to tectonics on there are other products in the space. There's a ton of activity. It's going to be something that we talk about a lot at the conference. Why do you think this is all happening now. So in large companies this has been happening for a long time. So when you talk to facebook and google they have the semblance of They have store. Sunday built for their internal use cases. So what benzene is when the number of use cases in the number of models accelerates Point you start feeling the need for something like a feature story and a different companies have their feet just those independently for their own internal use cases and now things are kind of gumming to a stage. The broader industry needs it and there is an expert insight if it is a market for such a thing as the store like Tectonics wrote of michelangelo's feature stole which which is used internally yuban and similarly the sage mcafee just into had Belton based on expedience. So i think now. The market opportunity and the opening is standard and there is a realization that in order to accelerate i at any company. Now you've at the moment across the tense of models going to the hundreds of modest face. You start feeling the need for something of just the absence of which leads to a lot of duplication within the company where you know you need to have groups of data scientists. Doing pretty similar things they know. In order to create these features in an online and offline and Not a lot of companies can actually invest that kind of work for doing the same thing more than one time. That's that's an interesting thread that i'd like to pull on some more. So the maybe reframing the question is like how do you know when you should be thinking about a feature store sounds like point one is when you're you're seeing a lot of diplomatic efforts under seeing folks building same features over and over again. Are there two three four and five on that list. I want to accelerate your number of use cases for and using machine learning models the earlier points when you have more than you know a ham fall dozen modules or so then is probably going to be thinking about art so tell us about your particular journey with your feature store. Maybe some context there that is worth talking about a little bit. You've been on the cloud for machine learning for a while now. Maybe tell us a little bit about that. And then the what were your first steps in building out the feature absolutely so The features in startled as the features. So it's titled stock that office feature management than featured engineering in the first place to create a simple way for people to use the streams of data that were coming in and introduce moving mostly to a stream based architecture where you have these streams of data that are coming in down. You need to make predictions on these streams of information. That's coming in. And so you needed to extract these beaches out so it's doctored elvis. How do feature engineering. So that are multiple aspects to the feature management space one speech at engineering. You need to extract these features then once the expected the features than the dot was. Hey we need this feature summer so then we went ahead and built luminaries to our i e so first customers where they fraud ecosystem will be needed to detect fraud for that was happening on the platform on in dude like throw double tax or quickbooks and so we built a store specifically for starting fraud-related features and then wants that became used by multiple models. It became interesting that the same features would be usable for other adjacent model use cases as well. So that's when we expanded on the feature stone made a do if you will which was typed and which had very solid semantics around powder create the feature. What is the features set. So we create a new terminologies that feature sets features. And though you could start widening your features sets to the life cycle of a feature set of all and so on. That's where we are in that journey right now where we can define feature set some type metal and it can say this feature is of the best speeches of this type. Efi just said can have multiple pages from multiple types and all of these integrated with the training and influence portions so from data scientists perspective. If i'm training on on the model i can. I can say here. This liffey just said that. I want to train on and the model trains on that said and then i can then push that monitor production it'll be infighting on exactly the same feature set for the same types and so on so there is a strong missed to the whole life cycle of model so that that is nothing lost in translation. What is the feature store. What did that first feature store for. Fraud look like it was a privately. A database with much of tables do and integrated with our training and inference when not infants would basically talked to the database. Fits those speeches. That was the only feature that they know how to fetch and put it would fetch those very rudimentary in terms of How the access made so essentially a database query to fetch the features which is not at all uncommon. I bought a lot of folks. That's where they started. You know either bolting something on top of a data warehouse or a data base or whatever a store that they have sounds like you did the same thing similar things so you had to the thing that we did from. The stock was divided the Offline store would be in a s three and access to high and so on and the online store was in a dynamo. db and the reason was online Stole you needed to have extremely quick access. Like ends of milliseconds are even less than ten millisecond type of feature access so that was the thing that we did and then be started adding layers on top of it and then some of the integration that gee it sounds like the the big maturity step beyond that is a couple of things i heard integration with other the broader part of kind of training an inference and then also i heard you mention types in a type system and thinking back to my conversation with the f. b. learner folks that was a big elemental of what they did and you see that in the aws feature stores while like you know. Tell me about why that part important types and then talk a little bit about the integration. You've done Across your workflow types are very important because you need to know whether featured as list on and not an integer because you need to feed that into the albert in some way that determination has to be made of. What does the thing that i'm awesome into. The al gold. That determination traditionally has been made inside the code which will write for. They are familiar rating in something. Then saying hate this Does is of this type like you could have That need to pass and You you kind of typecast in the code. The problem with died. That's that was really great when you are experimenting. When you're in your notebook you want to try different things and so on and so forth operationally becomes difficult because now you are spreading that logic across multiple locations so you have something in your notebook. You have something training. They have something not in front scored. And that is a overhead to keep that consistent and to make sure that the type checks that you're doing other type conversions that they're doing in one eighty eight equally in the other areas so strongly after system helps with that. Because you that you're when you're reading feature said and features said has features abmc a list of teachers and You know that's what you're going to get and in your code. You can depend on that and you can actually quickly for that type from the stolen in your you can make that night and this is also important for consistency across training and influence. And you might see that. That's a team that on which we have built the platform because it's extremely important that deal training and influence kind of go hand in hand and then our diverging at any state and having a type system is crucial for that in terms of hobby of integrated the features stone with the modern life cycle. We've created a system by which Obey road if you will in netflix terminology for a male models at the company and as part of this baby would be able to specify what features you warn for mine and that graph you'll essentially features to end it will return back a time set of features to you and the same graphical is applied doing training and A materialized view of the flights show as produced for the training to use and the same graph kills used to quit the features Service so they just service stakes in the graph curiel and then it goes to the back end database which dynamo db inquiries that gets back the assault so the modern models interface will exactly the same to the feature stories that consistency is extremely important because from a data scientists perspective. They have to write very few lines of query and picket the Consistency benthic independent. I'm starting to see and hear graph q all being used quite a bit. As part of these pipelines places that we might otherwise have used rests traditional rest verbs. Maybe take a second to talk a little bit about that why you selected it and what it does for you absolutely. So the graphical art actually originated as an creation for Various data stores that we had you'll have a doctrine of not just for the features Data stores as well as the feature. Still be thought that this is a great interface because it provides us a way too graphic in crafty semantics have a diversified schema. That can turn to. And i think that's very important in in a jason type of a structure. You cannot enforce the scheme you'll can say this Schema for my input on Right passers putting to destabilize the read bite Get the tools. They ecosystem is rich. A because the you can say this my schema and now you have. You can generate clients for that ski mind. Multiple languages and make saint nationwide easier on example are integration for training with biden. Meant for online insurance with jonah. But then it's the same graphical query that gets joost Docks to the service for that and so you started building. This feature story had a couple of it rations of it. When did aws come into the picture. I mean you're using. Aws as the underlying platform all on buds. How when and how did they come into the picture. so injured. The native lists as rich has failed. Gave the Great partners Powers all of in two hundred percent of intertwined. They've been amazing for us in all respects and been working with. Aws since the early days of sage minka when statement good was not call sage make than something else and leaving working with them very closely as built out their online friends. That was the first thing that the berkshire onstage. Mak- was online influenced by tougher than we operationalize the training buydell for it and and we've been working very closely with them on the stage. Make it operate. Their star on communities asks h making moves to communities operators. So we have an extremely close partnership by mickey them abreast in terms of what we are doing. What the problems that we are seeing. So that's where the collaboration started. Sp saw their tabling this because we have a need but we would love for it to be a managed service that database can provide and so can we collaborate. How can we contribute What be have doubtable. The learnings from what we have and so that started of cd's Conversations and design discussions with aws and. That's that's the journey has been. And how close is the thing that you have seen them announced to. You know something that you did to the thing that you built. What are the commonalities. Where did it diverged to support a broader set of use cases. How do you think about the relationship between the two from back. In respect they They're quite the similar one. Far design criteria was stack when be migrate from our internal features to manage beaches story. Took not be a big lift for us. So we've that's easy for you to say but we have to continue that kind of wood. Them ambassador said they're extremely great partners in I think i think we have. We pretty close to that objective in terms of Being able to migrate quite easily and we have a migration plan in the next few months to migratory from our Today the switches to the secret sauce that brings in his mind his taking this and offering that as a managed service for a wider set of use cases All the controls Run in any account than how do you create those interfaces that are common across all their customers. So that's the beauty of having a sage maker offered so as they can take that than generalized for a much richer set of customers images of use cases. But it sounds like this reading between the lines that hasn't diverged a whole lot from you know the thing that you build to solve. The wall is a set of these cases at into it yet. They did controls around. How do you cross account access something like that that guided the basic semantics the same. So the fundamental. Epa's that very similarly close to this And so for folks that don't have a feature store or you know have something rudimentary. What are the things that you need to think about to successfully adopt Something like what you build or something like the sage maker features store or something like a another one for that matter before the step before feature stories feature engineering biden featured engineering is huck. So that's one thing that you need to think about. What are my features. And how. I going to extract it from the data that i have and i think that ecosystem is still fragmented. Because of the data with data wrangler of this has announced that featured engineering is going to get much simpler as the again. You can apply standard transformations and so on. So how am i gonna do feature. Engineering is a question that you have to think about and Founded upon the second one is Stole the meta data about my features so that they are discoverable. Lend their in a shed of lacrosse. On what would that data the third thing is. How do we share features so peaches might not be universally applicable across the company. They might be sensitive features. That need some controls around it. So what are those controls. How do those controls. The fourth thing is that on complaints. What sort of complaints does my data set need to hear. Do for example you might need to info to or gdp on the data sets audio. Might depending on the business that you are in you might need to have indoor missed complaints on the daytime. So so those are the questions that you need to think about as any features You'll need to answer those questions. I think the platforms will provide the capability to info some of those policies but it is up each individual use case to decide what those policies are for themselves. You mentioned Some work that you're doing around coober nineties. Auburn operators also working with aws sells a little bit about the the background there. And what are some of the problems that you're trying to solve with those don't go I think in the clustered manager for cloud. Kind of domain govind has come out on tops. Ivan inaudible cabela's ecosystem since twenty fourteen twenty thirty two twenty fourteen and at that time mason Diesels really for data work. Of course our data workloads on david coming into their web workloads and web services debate as well since then i think has matured at such a fast clip on that community has evolved significantly that i think that it is now the de facto What communities offers as their two key dimensions China like the first provides clear and consistent available interfaces like you. Have you have the seattle. These that you're right do they. Were the same way. But they're they're running in your local. They're running on cloud. A cloud On ebay v implemented at an open stack. Google soviet would take the same workload. Run it across. Open second gogo. Simile entered weekend on the same workload. You know whether it's local on my laptop on on. Aws they second thing that go into these brings us the ability to run heterogeneous workloads on the same clustered give kendra near web service and you can run data processing workloads. They can share infrastructure. So your cost old all cost for bring actually gets because now you can utilize the infrastructure that you've got You already at paying for the maximum like for example if you're running a web service which has a seasonal pattern like in the mornings During the day that is the high traffic on then in the evening. Volume based on the same cluster can be used for running. Your data will close which can then pick up in the evening to their spot processing things like that. In the evening the third thing that covenant is offers is the operator concept right so with operated concept. You can now integrate with other systems. Which offer richard functionality. On top of the same cluster. So for example upload operators. I don't spot conflict which which we use at intuit for data processing on the same clusters that machine learning workloads body. I signed a now sage maker. We worked with sage makers saying hey we need to being the saco system injured as going to a Unity's ecosystem on top of aws. And so we need machine learning workloads to run go exist with the ecosystem. And that's that's how the sage make could operator partnership started happening. Maybe saying hey can you provide us a native communities way for interacting with sage. Make me not want to bed. A controlled plane back in tracks. Sage maker separately maybe using motor year. Run up those other. Aws estimates we wanted to be able to integrate natively with communities so that we can then use our native governor. These tools such as argo workflows. The nago cds to manage machine learning workloads and so is is. The idea is what we're talking about something you know that we see seen. Aws doing other places like a sage maker anywhere where you'd have this age maker operator and you could run it locally in your environments or is it you know the other way around. Is it you using it. Is it primarily focused on exposing api to applications and systems that you might have running in like e chaos or you know on native Aws infrastructure running grenades in the cloud so the first cut this for provide. Api's right so to integrate with sage makers you has h make could expose stay be is now they Exposing they say to make an operator can then take on the ammo Going behind the scenes. It's going to involve they sage make it. Api stood on the workloads. But what does opens up is tomato. You go to run sage. Make at any like you run. Sage makers on Run sage make on the edge flooding sample. You can like a micro globalization and you can actually run things anywhere and you're interfaces are not going to change like asa as a practitioner. I'm gonna write to a betty standardized. Nobody's faced interface which the sage mukasey ida defines and at that point. I did not really know where it is. Actually i can make those around. I can my practice around knowing that that is going to be my interface and wednesday maker evolves in know maybe he can run he says in my own namespace than i'm gonna leave those benefits without me having to actually do a lift and shift away. I'm doing things and the other thing that's eight Provides is also an easy access to new capabilities. As sage make good evolve by for example they recently introduced a single multi model and points. And hopefully. If i have to access points now i may need to burn. Something ain't decorations but boto three and all of that to actually starting working with the operator. The benefit has no. I have my sage makeover the final. Which was maybe hundred lines long now. I have a section. That's twenty eight hundred lines that are there and boom. I got multi model and points. So i'm a customer steinbach Customer sage make it makes it trivial for us to keep up with the release. That sage make it is doing and have a translate those benefits back to our customers who are data scientists within the company so you not only saved having the right does endpoints using bottled three or some other. Api but they're resilient and points also because kuban. Eddie's is making sure that you know they're the correct number of replicas and all that good stuff kuban. Eddie's provides out of the box absolutely. Yes absolutely very very vertical. So where do you see this whole kind of feature store landscape going. You know not necessarily even the landscape but in terms of the kind of capabilities that you need and expect on your users need and expect And that will become required in the industry. Where do you see. All the going. I think feature is an important extremely important by. It's like a foundation far the ecosystem right one would happen as to build tools around the Emily example could be the data wrangler. Were at this coming up with Give flu has a good integrations with feature stores like the feast features to so dying the whole ecosystem together. Like how do i go from data to features to train models to models that are producing great business outcomes dying that together would these components is i think important. I feel. that's where the industry is headed towards. So you'll see a lot of activity on give. For example a give pipelines which is trying to get this end to end orchestration going and mel flow has created dashboards where you can actually relies the your model is going through. Its life cycle. Having a combination of these is still lacking and that spare opportunities in future awesome. While it's we've often congrats on seeing what. I can only imagine as your you know your baby. You know out in the world now as awesome and looking forward to your presentation at tuomo con about more of what you're doing in the platforms operationalize ation production elucidation space and thanks so much for joining us to cherub about the feature store. Thank you so much. Sam has been really pleasure to talk to you about our journey really looking forward to presenting the knows updating Platform at the conference awesome awesome. Thank you thank you so much are everyone. That's our show for today to learn more about today's guest or the topics mentioned in this interview visit tuomo. Ai dot com. Of course if you like what you hear on the podcast please subscribe rate and review the show on your favorite podcast. Thanks so much for listening and catch you next time.

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Kate Somerville on The Importance of Peptides, Why She Takes Two Baths a Day, and Creating a Homegrown LA Brand

Gloss Angeles?

1:07:24 hr | 2 months ago

Kate Somerville on The Importance of Peptides, Why She Takes Two Baths a Day, and Creating a Homegrown LA Brand

"I look bad. That's really firm. Something a little softer than that rest. Easy with the sleep number three sixty smart bet you can both adjust your comfort with sleep number setting. It really helped me fall asleep faster. Yes by gently warming your feet. Okay but can it help keep us asleep. It senses your movements and automatically adjust to keep you effortlessly comfortable. Sleepnumber proven quality sleep is life changing. Sleep don't miss our president's day weekend special save fifty percent on the sleep number three sixty limited smart bet plus special financing and free premium delivery when you had a base ends monday special financing subject to credit approval minimum monthly payments required. See store for details. Lambda lena's you know how urban i really feel about ice creams. But that was pre pandemic now were battling with a new world of issues stress and no sleep have finally taken its toll. If you feel us we have a product that you might like from our faves over esther becton. Why do we love. Try becton because they're an award-winning science. Back skincare brand in every product of theirs is validated by independent. clinical testing and features nine one one. Four a patented form of nice in that strengthens the skin's barrier. They've got a new ice cream called intensive. I concentrate for wrinkles plus and it's clinically proven to reduce the look of crows feet those eleven's between the browse and under eye puffiness starting in just five days. I personally love how lightweight it is and how quickly it absorbs. I've been using it for a couple of weeks and it's really helped tired under area. Thanks babies zoe look more hydrated and bright. I know kirby feels the same learn more about intensify. Concentrate and see some before. And after his by heading over to strike back then dot com email subscribers get fifteen percent off their first quarter. And i swear. I've had ties and people. They always doted like the stronger thing. That kinda gives them a reaction and they feel it. Where peptides are more healing. They're like seeing the skin and feeding the college. Then i'm kirby. I'm sarah well to los angeles every week. We break down the most important beauty news launches interview your favorite beauty experts influencers and celebrity guests and review our favorite beauty products of the moment as your beauty editor. Bff's from the beautiful and great city of los angeles. Glam julia knows we. Will you stay awhile so a few weeks ago. We had an episode called unsung heroes. If you haven't listened to it yet please go back and listen to it. But in that episode kirby. I talked about brands and products. That we don't talk enough about on the podcast but love so much have been using for years and one of the brands that i talked about was kate. Somerville which kirby one hundred percent cosigned with we have been longtime fans stands of kate. Somerville every chance. We can get to go into the clinic. It's always such a tree and you know like x. Fourcade glow dermot quench everything. We love love love and then we also realize that. We hadn't had kate on the podcast yet across. I am crime and so without further ado. Today's guest is gates over a kate. I have to tell you. I love your brand so much but one thing i love about. It doesn't even have anything to do with the efficacious of the product. It's the names of your products. I think kate is just such a genius name. I wish my name was kate. So i could have come up with it. Well i have a really funny story. About how politic. He's to be. It's actually a really great story of please. By all means so it was one of our first launches. Hey but kate was called dayton. Dr so i was in obviously the treatment room so we have a clinic on melrose place. That is a medical clinic. So we were one of the first ever hate aesthetic like petition products and then marry them with lasers injectable so i come from more of a medical background than i do fath background and so we open kate somerville on melrose place two thousand four and at that time i was mixing products for my clients on site and i was also i had about seven hugh and exposure. Kate didn't exist but it existed separately. So i had really great scrub anytime a client with him in an laid down when they're in i would do a light explanation with the bead. That was really round and not harsh like i would just kinda lift the dead layers of skin while i was mean to just kind of unlock the glue of that layer of skin to kinda rough it up and then i would paint on the incredible math that had invited so it had up pineapple pumpkin in time with a little bit of lactic acid a little bit of like colic so that would then melt away the dead layers of skin and so that was our protocol like every single facial started that way because then we can work on. What's underneath right. And then lasers and sue everything that we were doing and so one of my clients. We were working on our good. She was going off to set for four months in a remote area. And he's like. Hey what can. I take with me to keep my skin looking like this. So because i was mixing so much on site. I took the bead and i poured them into that mask the in my mouth and i gave it to her and her people called two weeks later and they were like you have more of that incredible and then she ended up calling me and saying kate. It's like you're with me at the clinic and you should call it payton. Dr and i'm like oh that's cute and so we launched it. Qbc with my first launch of dark silicate and then it became very successful. It was huge buzz everywhere. Before i picked it up nordstrom. Stick it up. Newman picked it up. And then another brand got really upset because there was something in a jar similar and so they filed a cease assists. Me and i was devastated. I was like oh. My god doesn't and of my product. I just want that. We all had a contest in the clinic. And it's just the nurses we have a doctor on staff and then all of our institution and somebody came up with expulsion. Kate and so. I was so scared to change it. I thought it was the end of the world and then it became our biggest seller and so it ended up being even a better problem. So that's how it fully. Kate game i love it. I love that you shared that so initially when you were making it and you gave it to. This client was in a jar now. It's in a tube and you squeeze it out right. Yeah so it was in our pump jar. So if you google it. And you put in kate and dr. It's gonna look like this with and then you pumped it out and then what we noticed with that too. We had issues with getting all the way out because of the bead. Because i like things as much as possible. We ended up. Put it in a two. And that's where it lay now and it's still our number one product and the brand sarah. I remember that time. So vividly i was in high school. Like two thousand four. So was sarah. It was like britney linzie. Paris us weekly covering everything. Perez hilton the superficial. I mean this was like the high of 'paparazzi in the celebrity world. And i remember seeing kate somerville and all of the magazines that i was buying because i was in texas at the time so i so desperately wanted to move to la. I was consuming. Anything i could and i remember when i went to sephora for the first time i was like okay. What's my big girl. Purchase can be what makes me like a true connoisseur of beauty and kate. somerville Was in that purchase. So they're not have just been longtime stands where the word is here to sing your praises. We love you thank you. That means a lot to me and and that was a fun time by the way like being in the clinic with that kind of energy even though you know i don't have a lot of respect for brought the just because i've had so many run ins with them but it was fun you know with. It was a really fun time to be in beauty and to have a clinic that everybody was coming here. There was just a lot of fun energy and and we still have. That energy. Just change like the paparazzi. You're still there but not as aggressive but it was really fun fun time. I just wanna touch on the fact that was you said like two thousand and four two thousand five. It's twenty twenty one and x full. Kate is still such an incredible product. I recommend it to all of my girlfriends. 'cause there are still a few that who have not tried it. They always like texting back in there. Like holy crap. My skin looks amazing. Like why haven't i been using this this whole time. So just the longevity of your brand vaguely like it worked back then. It still works now. Like pervious edward. Just singing your praises. You are a skincare genius. So thank you. Well that's a testament. Tell all my ears in the clinic. This is how the industry changed right so from celebrity. Now you've gone to influence. Or and i think implement third great right but one thing that is different about an influence or an employee are usually as trying on themselves so they have one perspective and with the clinic. We get to see everything we get to see. Every skin type. Every skin concern every age every color. So when i'm formulating i get to really tough it on a lot of different people and different skin types and see how it works and see how they respond me not only their again but like oh i don't like the smell i don't like the touch. It's breaking me out. Irradiating needs so. We get to really perfect. Every formula in the clinic is our lab and not to me is so important and not why the longevity of the goop inside right. It's like the marketing outside. I always tell my marketing team. You buy the quarterback because inside that tube. It's been work every time because my girls and us or behind it and we got conform. You'll eat it with my formulator and so now it's your turn to like half the ball to the public and teach them we keep talking about the clinic on the press zoom that we did last week you talked about when you got this clinic and who used to own it before i think there is such fun. La his within this clinic. Can you talk a little bit about that all right now. I'm a small town borough. I grew up in a tiny town above fresno california. I mean heine and grew up in the mountains. I was a total homeboy. And i met my husband and his family was from hollywood. So we move to hollywood. I'm so lucky. Because his dad owned the piece of land in the middle of hollywood. We're looking at right right directly at the hollywood sign across from it but it was on a little rock. He used to have horses. We used to live in a barn. I grew up in a barn. My dad built this really cool barn for us the living and it's so crazy. I moved into a barn in hollywood hills. And so when i started doing kin care i was with a really prominent classic surgeon. Stephen hoffman. he did everyone in the world. Like we treated people from around the world the most famous people in the world and he kinda fell into some paparazzi issues. And some publicity issues of people didn't want to come to the office more not for him because he was a genius that more because of the situation and so it pushed me out to get my own clinic. And so when i was looking i found the street called melrose place and those of you that know. La it is the only street. I swear that reminds you of hollywood or europe it almost feels like it had cobblestones dirty really quiet and when i moved in it was not what it is today. It literally with sleepy. It had antique stores but it was really still high end and i rented it. I rented three rooms. My husband and i m out like literally. We came from nothing. We built this five hundred dollars in our pocket and we built these three rooms and the building which i didn't know at the time it was bill by the first woman to ever win an oscar. So her name was janet gainer and she was married to the man that did all the cops them back in like wizard of oz taste level with toll amazing and then the sweet that i'm in. It was sean connery home for a while. And then johnny. Depp had it while. I was downstairs and johnny depp was up there and it was as production opposite and then he moved out and i hooked up stairs. What is beautiful. And so there's there's hollywood royalty and you can feel it in the building. I honored that building so much. And i feel like stanford gainer has like taken me under her wing and made it successful because there were so many fun and kim clinics that have come and gone. I'm not three and we'd survived like crazy things like two thousand eight and now we're making it through cove it which is been so difficult but we're doing it and we're surviving and so i'm so grateful to that building if you have not been to case clinic if you're not from l. a. If in the hopefully near future you can come out and visit. You have to book yourself. A treatment like kate said it's so much i remember the first time i walked into it. It's almost like a little secret right like it's like the you know the doors a little bit hidden and then you walk in and there's a beautiful staircase and you're immediately transported to hollywood like you feel like hollywood of vip a very important celebrity or something like that. But i can't wait to get back curvy. Oh ben we open. You're open okay. In fact today. I think the announcement goes out. So if you are fan of somerville we need you right now. We need you to buck because this has been so tough on our girls. It's been tough on the company. We need you so book book We talked about this a lot. Kate on this podcast but the skin care community here in. La has been through it. I feel like more so than anybody else. And i feel like there's been very little direction from You know the government in terms of when you guys can open what you guys should be doing in the meantime so we are happy to support. Lemme tell you something. My clinic so above. We were the first to close. When this pit we will never put any of our clients danger that we were the first to close which was hard and our girls. A lot of our girl that are nurses are on the front line so they went into the hospitals and started being on the front line and that was so traumatic because we didn't have ppe for them. We were searching. The world on to god is protecting them personally. And then we started donating p. to all the hospital in los angeles and then what was happening again with just getting back from the math because they were in the math for like eighteen nineteen hours sixteen to eighteen hours and so the girls were like we need help with our skin and so we need it over sixty thousand products to you know help the barrier of their skin and then delegate came out our newest want and does successful because it came out at right at the right time because it's all about building the barrier and we donated a ton of delegate all the healthcare workers and then when we were able to reopen we really invested in keeping number one our staff saves so we had them fitted for in ninety five math. So that was really important. The other thing that we did with put in these electron eq where it has your temperature and now we have rapid testing if a client wants to come in we can rapid test them and all of our nurses most of our nurses now have had the vaccine and our support staff has their tied to a specialty medicine center. So we are really really safe so if you wanna come and book. It's a safe place to be as safe as we can be so we also have opened up the room. That only have windows we put in. Uv lighting that. When you come in we save room and every fifteen minutes it gets the ub where it kills. The virus so and are are cleaning crew has been trained to keep everything really clean and thorough. So it's now you know a sabre place to be and we've learned a lot through it so we're excited open and we're ready to go ready to start treating again. I'm personally of the opinion. I want everyone to be safe. I want them to do what they feel is safest but we also have to figure out how to move forward in this new normal right because people need to be able to make a living. They need to be able to keep their businesses. And i think what you're doing not only to help the medical community but to make sure that your staff is protected and make sure your clients are protected as really really remarkable. So hats off to you. Kate thank you. We're really proud of what we've been doing. And we also don't needed to the world food organization when we launched silicate fifteen percent of our proceeds. Went there so we were really trying to do our part to not only deliver a great skincare but also just on a social level. Because we're all going through it right right totally. I feel you. Alright beautiful kate. It's time for us to ask you a very very important question. Which is what's on. Your fish is okay so This morning i woke up. And i feel pretty good this morning so i always take a bath so those of you. That don't know my story. I had a mess my whole life like the exa where. I have any careful even what i wear. Has i get so irritated or all. Through my childhood. I had severe and then even as an adult so i have to take a bath every day. Those of you that have eczema you know. This is something i can help you with. And just deal me or up questions on our website and i get you how to get permission. 'cause i'm now and reminiscent but it hake along time going quick back. I think about every day. So i use epsom salt to really often my water and then immediately after i jumped out of the bath i apply something called. Terrell and curiel is a moisturizer that you just get at the drugstore and it really feel then the moisture and my skin to keep my skin hydrated throughout the day. I have to bathe twice. Because my skin is so sensitive and i have to keep that moisture barrier really high and then i feel it in with our dry skin favor which i created then the one we donated to all of our amazing healthcare workers and i created this crane could be like almost like cellophane over the skin but still breathing the wall right. It doesn't feel breeze. Be on the skin. And this really calm my skin and feel in that moisture and i love it for handcream too so if you look at everything in my house i have a theon cream next to it because i wash my hands. 'cause i had eggs emma so bad even see some of the scars. 'cause i messed petition. I was always in the water. I created this to kind of protect that barrier. Okay so that one. And then for my safe i immediately pat dry and then i do dermal quench so depending on the day so today i was super dry and so i use our clenching aware her love the and this is a spray heimer on acted not. It's i swear why. I don't have wrinkles and fifty you guys and i've been in the sun so much and there's two products that i use if this and then i follow and we're gonna talk about this with our total repair cream and then my makeup so i used to make a i love by terry. She has this brush foundation. That i use. If i'm going to be on air. And then i a chanel hotter foundation as well but i huge fan of hourglass. So i use there. I think it's called him an off the or something like that. And i don't know you can see how the light bounces off your skin and you know as you age. You want that reflection. Because i don't know if you can say about i'm starting to get you know a little sagging and that helps i you great lash for my lashes. I use charlotte hillary. I love her. I colors and then i'm a huge fan in this new. So there's a woman in santa barbara where i live. She is a eyebrow genia printing. Michelle kath and her place called michelle k. She is such as being announced that she has the product. Where hannah and it actually stain your eyebrow area and it lasts for a bow i would say like maybe like three weeks and not just helped me through my age. I'm starting to spend here. And then hair-wise i have really tough near and letting the gray so i use guinea by 'cause i have frizzy hair skinny by michael What is that michael anyways. I'm so bad. I'll send it to you but it's an old school brand so my hairdresser because i thought dry hair kinda like my skin is dry everything. I from trader. Joe's south fire oil. Because it really really fine and it's a lie. Y.'all and i just call it through dry hair that he told me you can't do it through wet because water and oil. Don't mix obviously and so. I've been doing that to try and repair my hair. Because i had to leach. It tried match my greg. So what on my face and my hair and my body man. I loved that. I felt like i was with you this morning. Like walking through your routine and also. I have a huge bottle of curiel next to my nightstand. So i feel validated knowing that you use that to. Yeah it's the only thing that put me in remission. I tried all of them. I went to bear a lot of specialists. When i was pregnant i went through the worst breakout of my life. It with head to toe. I was the most miserable. I've ever been in my wife and i had the funny dermatologists you older. He's i think he's passed now. But he's my weenie to put you back in the womb and i was like okay Because i felt. I felt like i was dried up like raisin painful and he goes you need to get in the bath twenty minutes a day and he goes. You're gonna go through a crazy rich stage at ten minutes. And he was right and it would ask. The water was really so came into my skin. And now i have a theory about smoking. And its hub. So i think dehydration is probably one of the hot thing. That people are dehydrated honestly. We don't drink enough water. Or it's not absorbing because your skin also drinks it absorbs whatever you put on it and so for me like if i'm not feeling well or feel that in the bath for forty five minutes and this is gonna be like pm is pretty much information. But here's how i know i'm hydrated again and and my muscles and my joint feel different after i do this. I lay in the bathroom. Forty five minutes. I allow the water to get My body temperature. So i don't keep it too hot so i stay comfortable for forty five minutes and i know i'm hydrated when i feel the urge to have to go to the bathroom urinate and that's how i know i'm waterlogged and i want that. I want my skin and my body to get that hydrated. And then i'll drink water but i feel like inside and outside. Highgrading skin on that level is really cheeks. I've never said that to anybody says the first time. How but my dermatologist told me you've got to hydrate and not changed my skin. It's cut me and her mission. We're going to have to try that. Kirby long bath. Kate says we need. We need to take long babs. Sorry to the men in our lives. Kick them out of the bathroom in. I'm in let's let's do the damn thing. Well i have to say. I've been married twenty six years and we take long back together and we're still together take it with your man. That's romance right. There is romance and we're in love but like we are in love like people are like get a room and we're like it's been twenty five years we've had multiple rooms. I love it. i love it. Okay kate by the way your name says katie somerville. So do your close friends and family call you katie. Yeah i honestly like so. I was married. My first husband called me kate So some people call in k. But honestly i'm katie. I think katie. Since i was born my dad called me did like katie. The bug and he he even drop the katie's like did you know or my my really good friends. Call me did factor. I don't know where did factor so katie is really my name okay. Well we're going to call you. Katie i feel like we are on this level. Now we know the bath moment. Okay so it's katy all right so katy. You have been working as an esthetician for decades. Now how has the landscape changed. According to you like what do you think the future of aesthetics is and i'm personally curious. Like what is those com ca. Skin-care mistake you think people are making. Okay the let's go to the first question for how is that change and changed dramatically right so when i first started and this is before you guys were probably grade school and you know alibi drop these. Were the big thing like that was the newest. I was in a doctor's office when that became big called me astrada and they. They're the ones that found out by drowsy and then vitamin c got big with alexi and then selects the and getting suitable broke. Apart and now skin cynical has survived and then it became retinal retin-a and and now it a lot of different things. Now it's clean beauty but what is that right. That's a whole 'nother thing. And i believe in always putting good things on your body But i think some brand have tried to market clean and it like they don't even know what clean and not clean and so that has been a little confusing right. There are some ingredients. That aren't good right but the fda isn't going to allow that to happen so Anyhow so that has changed the landscape and then how products get to you so you know the bigger brands like sa water and clemmie and all these older brand that that were you know that we knew through our moms. You know. I don't i don't know if you remember. There's that for me. It was twenty three step right with that yellow cream and it used to be cl- a clan tone moisturised and now it's so technical like I feel like classic surgery. Injectable i mean look at what's happening to the younger generation. All of them want these big lips and tens. And i mean look at the kardashian. Their faces have changed a lot. And so it's gone there. Well because i've been in that career my whole life. Plastic surgery and in care has changed like lasers came on about three years in my career. And i was one of the first to be in the first laser sessions ever and watching that change and then allowing me to open my clinic where the laser treatment weren't so all like now we can do in things with lasers and really transform skin without a lot of downtime. So that's awesome. what's coming. Is you know science sciences coming. They're figuring out literally how you don't age like you're gonna be able to take something and you're gonna say youthful. They've proven it and map mice now like diet. It really matters. You can go now and get your tested and really customizing to you and skin terrorists changing too in that way. I think there always will be topical but when science figures out how to not allow us to age. I think that's gonna be coming and you're going to be able to take a pill or a shot or something and it's going to keep you young so dot what's coming can i be a part of the clinical trial for for the i'm in. Well they they are they are figuring it out so the good thing is is i got to partner about five years ago with unilever and so i get to the briefings of what coming and it's just really exciting. What science i mean. Look at what we did with the vaccine. I mean we did the so fast and science is so wonderful. I've been in science my whole career like every single product. Every ingredient that we put in our products are done through studies every ingredient. We look at the studies. We say. Okay this creative. this effect. How much of that ingredient. That goes in this to get that result. So that's the other thing why we're so different. I'm from medical research. We come from really studying each ingredient and then when we combine them than we studied the whole formula. and so. that's what's so exciting as ingredients are changing but by one. It's going to transform a lot of sickness it's going to. It's going to transform everything you talked a little bit about the kardashians and we read an interview with the cut that you credit them specifically kim her glam to our current skin-care boom. I would love to know why you think that is and maybe what other factors you think are responsible for this surge of interest in taking better care of our skin. I don't credit her for skin care. Even though she was a client of mine like when she was friends with paris does she came in with paris. She more change make up in my opinion And she also change an. I think this is amazing that she changed how we look at our bodies because she's a curvy girl. She really embraced her and she embraced. These women accepting who they are and that hervey by they just like Now that i see what she's done and influence in the realm. I'm so proud of her. But more i think she's changed a makeup like i think the makeup them with the kardashian and now unfortunately A lot of girls. Like i have the you know. Full girls coming in and they want a lot of injectable now like they wanted to change their faith and that part is a little hard for me because even though i think they all look so beautiful and what they've done is beautiful they look beautiful But also for me. I just i really like if you conduct summer. Though we aren't then change your face. I mean we are going to give you what you want but we are also going to try and make you look like you and i'll tell you i had some plastic surgery around my eyes and i've had injectable in my skin and both talks even though i am going to have talk than a year because of covid So i believe in albuquerque. I've seen it transform lives. However i have these girls that are close to perfect coming in and wanting to change everything and that kinda hurts me because unlike except you and then i. I'm born in that culture. But i do think it. And they've also shown that women 'cause i'm one of those women that can take a career and roll with it and become powerful and their own path right. They don't they don't need a man they even though we need men obviously but they can create their own career as women and i applaud that. So i'm a fan of their. Even though i don't always agree because i'm dealing with the after effects of these young girls going. I want huge lips than i want. This check jawbone. And i wanna chain. I'm inducting my behind i'm like You gotta sit on your behind. You know you're eighty so you know. I'm like okay. But there's a line when those clients fears come in and you say you know you will give them what they want but do you advise them to not do certain things like. How do you go about that because obviously you know you want them to be happy as a client but you also want them to look like them. But here's the good news. I within the clock back surgery industry in la. Now it's at its peak but really top time and i'm really close friends with a lot of surgeon and so if they want that i can steer them to the right person that will give them out. And i've had to turn away clients. I i've just said enough is enough. I cannot give you any more. Dr wall is not my brand like your face is not looking like new anymore. And i have the real conversation with them. I'm like you are so good at who you are like you. Can't they want more. They want more. And then i send them to people that will give them more but hopefully in a safe way you know and so i had to do that a lot in my career and like i'm a person that also like i don't get on the bandwagon so you know my derm. Abrasion became the biggest thing in the nineties. So big and i brought it into my clinic. I studied it on like this thing. Paris up your skin. That breaks capillaries patient. Gives you an go good explanation. But he can do that chemically without the damage because the suction breaks all the capillaries. So i was fixing people like most aestheticians were doing my raisin. I would have client call and go. Do you micro derm reason. I'd say no. And then hang up on the and i was like i don't care i'm not gonna do that again and they'll i'm just someone that's really like this is who i am. This is our brand like we inject some of the most beautiful places in the world that looked like themselves. They're really centered and who they are. You would never know that they had injection. You know through their age process. We've had them looking like then your them you know. And so that what we provide. Is that natural. Like if you owe somerville. They're going to give matrimonial gorgeous. But you're gonna look like you. We're not gonna give you the lips that that's all. They're just lips right or huge cheeks. We're not gonna make you look like that totally. I'm actually really glad that you touched on that. Katie because we think of people going in and saying i want to look a certain way whether or not you give it to them. They're going to find a way to get it. So i totally. I not like you need approval. But i would rather you as an experts say. I'm not giving this to you. You can go to this person. I know who they are. I know that they're licensed etc etc. They can give you that. Look if you prefer rather than just saying sorry. I'm not going to give this to you. And then them risking going to someone that's going completely botched their face in a different way because i've seen it happen and i've seen crazy things so when i first moved to la. One of the very first jobs. I had after being airbrushed hanner. I worked at frederick high on melrose place right across from y'all you did oh. I didn't know that. I worked at the front desk and i was there for a year and the the people and the faces i saw it. Was you know as texas girl coming and being in la for two years. I was like how does your face get to that point. I didn't understand it. And i and i'm somebody that was obsessed with beauty and aesthetics right so i remember talking to people You know my co workers there and they're like oh yeah she has gone nuts with the filler or yeah that girl has her plastic surgeon on speed. Dial man this was before the kardashian. Boom you know. And it's i think it's just really interesting that when you come to l. a. You can see on every street corner. There is a card ashen vacher. Looks like him vacher. Looks like kendall yeah. Vacher looks like kylie. They're everywhere hair and it's to their credit. I mean thir- incredibly influential at the same time. I totally see it from your perspective where you're like. Hey guess what your face is not even remotely close to being able to achieve this. Look at that they have. Why would i destroy what you have. It's hard yeah. Well the hard thing for me is the girl coming in. That are so perfect already. Like literally done ainley beautiful and i and they're like i want and i'm like oh you're going to draw it. Don't destroy it and that's the thing and he will get obsessed with it. We've studied it. It's actually a sickness you know and and it's sad you know on the good no you know i can lead them to at least people that are going to be inducting right thing. Because i've seen people go to not great people and have poor if it issues and so that would i. I'm proud of you know at least guiding them to the right people. I feel this conversation. We've been kind of pulling back the curtain on what happens in hollywood in l. a. And sarah if you don't mind. I was hoping to kind of pivot. This conversation just brought this up. Can you tell us about what celebrities are doing to their faces. That it's not injectables. It's not it's not any. I guess not any type of injectable because one thing that i'm obsessed with is going online and seeing before and after photos and they look just different enough but it's almost dramatic in that way as well. Do you have anything you can reveal to us like. oh yeah. people are getting brow. Lifts people are getting like water people. Doing a lot of people are doing these now. They're string basically and they go. We do it at the clinic. In fact two of our girls are specialists and like they do a lot of it and it's something that i've tried. It's not for me personally because it just feel weird to me but a lot of girls or women are going in and they do these strings they they underneath the skin tastes dermal and it lists the threads and the thread they left and you know i can't tell you but just look even if i did tiny bet right if you right. It's just because this. Gravity is pauline down and we're losing volume okay as we age and so it just doing a little bit of that right. The see how that makes me look like five years younger. I don't know i can't do it. It's just something. I have a you know an i'm someone that was literally at a plastic surgeon office. He would rearrange base like he made beautiful women even more beautiful but he also had a philosophy of like he measured what beauty was to him and I could rearrange my whole body and face. Thank god my husband and me. We're like yeah. I still wanna be knee. I dunno. I just want to be me. I'll tweak what i have but i'm not gonna change my face my nose completely though you're probably seen the threatening And the string that lift. You're probably paying injectable. And you're probably seeing lasers laser. They're amazing today what they do. Is they pull heat into the skin. And what happens is when a laser goes through the skin and bill heat remodel the skin to go injury. I'm going to create more collagen. I'm going to repair and repair at a rapid rate. And so you get tightening. You get contouring. You're probably seeing a lot of lasers that are kind of really heightening and lifting and then a lot injectable on the channel area. No i mean we do a ton of inductions to Under the is a little filler as we age in cheek area. So that's what you're so. The secret is finding someone who can do all those things and make it. Look like you're not really getting anything done that what we do at the clinic. We make you look good. But we're not gonna change your face. I mean we'll we'll maybe do a little like for me. I have a a chin that dot dot down like this best. Measurement is not but again we can inject a little here to make this more balance right or for me. When i i have done my upper lip for the last twenty years and i had no upper lip and now i have a little upper lip. Because i've done in jacksonville for twenty years and now i don't need them because i have enough. That stayed You know under my eyes. After i gave her. I don't know what happened. I think pay my son. Suck the life for three years and i- hollowed out here so badly and Giselle is one of our nurses at the clinic and she just did a little excellent and look like it looks great but i still look like nate so i'm proud of not. I'm not ashamed of that but again you can take it too far. That's all i'm saying. I just had a baby in september. And i tell my husband mount all the time and like zoe sucked the beauty out of via email. It's like my hair like my skit. But hopefully i'll be able to get it back. We'll wait till you hit. Menopause with sir talking about okay but can i just. Can i just say. Sarah is one of the most beautiful people i've ever seen in my life. Yes so i understand the horrors of becoming a new mother not intimately. Because i'm not one. But sarah at hand is one of the most stunning human being sweet. That's why we're together. I i know how you feel there are it. does it feels like the beauty of spec. But it hasn't motherhood makes you more beautiful than anything in the world. And you know this episode is brought to you by apostrophe we sing apostrophes praises on glossy angeles because we feel out of all the options for dermatologists prescribe. Skin-care online. they do the best job of catering to your specific skin. Care needs and instructing you on how to use it properly apostrophe offers topical and medicare patients prescribed by a board certified dermatologist for acne rosacea hybrid maintain and wrinkles. I recently completed a follow up visit. Because although i wasn't scheduled for one until october i felt like i wanted to up my tretinoin prescription. And look into other treatment. 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Silk is hypoallergenic and non absorbent which is great for normal or dry skin. The sarah if you will rayon from bambu is moisture working and great for oily. Acne prone skin aka the kirby. I have the gun metal shade which is beautiful. But let me tell you. Even my little diva doggy. Quinn loves sleeping on it. Hashtag rough life. It comes in three colors in two sizes both small queen and king and for a limited time. Glam jelena's can get twenty percent off the pillowcase. Using code gloss just visit discover night dot com and get ready for some beauty rest. We have you here for another reason. You just launched a new collection under the kate. Suitable is line so it consists of the total repair cream. That you're talking about a firming. Serum and a lifting eye cream and the focus is on peptides so if you could enlighten our listeners about the importance of peptides and then maybe you know what peptides do and then is the right person for this. Kate suit calls collection. Okay so i would say. Eighty five percent of my client comes to me for anti aging So this line is inspired by all those men and women that comes me and we transformed him every day and so our group of girls in the clinic. We were like okay. Let's bottle what we're doing. We're doing injections that we're lifting plumping dealing a little bit of both talk to relax muscles to really move. Will we're doing laser to stimulate collagen. And then what are we doing pop. That's the maintain all of these things and it's interesting when we were looking at all of our backfire culpable. The one consistent thing has always been peptide and this particular mentally of peptides that i've been using the clinic for the last twenty years obviously if modernized recently and so i wanted to put together what we're doing in the clinic the you can get that clinic result at home so each product was inspired by a treatment that we do in the clinic. Cynical line is launching at nordstrom's on the fifteenth of february and then march second before it gets it and you can also buy it at somerville dot com And also in our clinic. So i'll start. First with the firming serum so this iran is our coq favorite in the clinic but it's often the basis of our most successful incredible theorem in our line and if based on hyler onic acid of course it also has p extract in it and so we were looking at. What were we using to really. If someone comes in and they're aging they're dri- they have maybe some pigment issues like as you age. What happens is your melon. I in the skin starts to act like some die off and you get kind of white bought and then some go way over active and they get brown spot then it depends on sun and choir mountains and so what we found we were using the p. extracts to really even out in town and then it has this minister sheeham flower extract in it which also meets the skin okay and it brings brightness to the skin so we looked at this than we. We're like okay. We want to bring super hydration into the skin bath. So our our molecule size is really small but then we want to control what's going on with the pigment because as we age back what happening. That's why we get that grainy luck in the skin so i love love the theorem. It's houghton as far as getting anti aging ingredients. And then of cour- we put the pet ties in there and i'm fifty and i Obviously i do gin pair every day but the one thing that has never changed for me because i have eggs emma so i have to be careful vitamin c and retinol. Because i'm so sensitive but the one thing i've always done pets highs and i swear by peptides and people they always go to like the stronger thing that kinda gives them a reaction and they feel it where peptides are more healing. They're like phoenix. The skin feeding the collagen and so this has a try peptide in it too. So it's really comprehensive. Any skin type can use it because it doesn't have oils in it. So if you're oily you can use the i say in your late twenties. You're gonna wanna start in the times of ingredient To really fight. Aj especially if you're in the sun. Okay then i'll go to the moisturizer. This is my all time favorite moisturizer so Again this has a haxhi peptide. Meaning that has a medley of a lot of different peptides going to work that dots. What really fighting. Fine lines and wrinkles and it's at a level that really high but it's not gonna irritate your skin like retinol or vitamin c. It's just gonna feed the skin and keep that that heightened ask and that Firmness in the skin that volume and then with this moisturizer. Because i'm dry. That i don't like moisturizers that like suffocate my skin or feel heavy and so i put him natalie a different Oil than it. So one of my favorite oils is macadamia nut. Because again it has. Those pro teams is really moisturizing. Without feeling heavy it has a by and then something called baba well and feed really control melonides again. So this is literally my favorite moisturizer. I've used this formula even though we've tweaked it a little bit and the formula we also put wailing in the and wailing it repairs barrier. It's just it's so moisturizing. Those of you. That are really oily. I would stay away from this. 'cause you have enough oil but if you're dry like on the outer surface of the skin put it on there but i was in you. That are dry anyway or aging. This is my favorite. I do it morning and night and in not comprehend so if airless everything super fresh and get the right amount every time get the right amount every time and then the the lifting i Cream my favorite ice cream in the entire line business. Something when went to formulate this we wanted to kind of put everything in the kitchen. Cinq as far as clinical base proven scientific ingredients together to work then are just tickly on every level of aging. So for instance. The is when the i is aging. You're getting sending. You're getting dark circles. You're getting puppy. You're getting pro seat so this is going to actually hit all signs of aids every single product in here hitting all kinds of aging. C put really safe vitamin c. n. Control the darkening of the skin and then what we also did we remember. I was telling you about sapphire oil for the hair. So we did sapphire and sons flour oil. Who are the waster as asian. Because it's a white light oil and the molecule size is smaller so it's gonna penetrate deep but it's not gonna cause like milia under the skin a lot of my clients though you like lemaire or something really heavy and i start to see. The little tiny milia happened. Has their cree ways to too heavy for the under eye area. So this really addresses you dark circle puppy is like i do and then kroth e probably line and you want kind of youthful under eye area. That's good address. All of and then last but not li it had to end with one of our resurfacing peels. So the firming serum really was inspired by all the symbols we do like for western and plumpy the eye cream the same way but it also has a particular peptide that relaxes the muscles like a bow talks. Okay so it's also going to relax and that's why you're seeing and our before and after we'll be on our website their incredible usually before and after or taking six to eight weeks after these are taken after two weeks and you can see crazy. Change so fine. Lines and wrinkles will start to visit because you're getting that relaxing so this is really an fired by the toxins. Fillers are peel is inspired by. All the appeals that we do at the clinic and this is something we use in our back bar so we would like call appeal if somebody came and they just needed in rejuvenation. They need it. They had navy's them texture issues. You know some clogging. The poor fine lines and wrinkles. They just had dead layer of skin we would we would paint on a black hollick peel and then we would layer it with a retinal anna vitamin c. And what that would do is it would give you. Explanation would turnover skin doctor the next day and then i'd have them do full locate the next day and so we wanted to bring best resurfacing peel To our clients that couldn't see us at the clinic and it's called are resurfacing overnight peel. It is a mirror hall. Okay so any time. My clients use this overnight. People ask them what are you doing. Did you do to your skin. And so we wanted a bottle. That and So you use twice three times a week. You apply a night thin layer over this and you leave mid on go too late and it goes to work so it has like colic and retinal in. It also has the sarah my so you don't get the irritation that a lot of my clients when they come in for -til or they've seen somebody else in there just kind of a mess. We formulated this. So you get a result without dot laking and that craziness. And then what i recommend and this was for your viewers and you don't have the full a kate really recommend like this would be the first product that ever recommend you that and our delegate moisturizer because everybody has about game day you two to three times a week and then the next day you do call a cate. Your skin is like glass. it's so beautiful. What happens to the skin and again after we're going to show you two weeks and the ch change takes time with getting here like especially topical skincare. Where a treatment. You can see stuff right away but with product it takes a while because your skin cell is slowly going off right. It takes time right from one kinsel being born to the next. It's taking time so when you see these results in two weeks. It's a really exciting. This is our physical line is for anti-aging people in their late twenties concert this and then obviously up until Your path my age. You know. I think our oldest client ninety six so we see people from twelve to ninety six at the clinic. So that's gonna be s kirby yep ninety six years old at the clinic yet and she's gorgeous. Let me tell ya. We're going to end this. Lovely informative interview with a question and that we also ask all of our guests. And you've lived in hollywood so you can imagine this but let's say you're back in hollywood you've become a famous actress and it's just been announced that you have a new movie coming out and you're really excited about it. Who is your co star. Oh my gosh. that's hard while. I say someone that you guys might not know. But she's just the funniest human being. I know and every time i get to be around per she makes me laugh and her name's jennifer coolidge and she of course coolidge. Okay so it's how are you kidding. Me she's i gone ix. She is iconic so fun to be around and literally. She is her characters. You're crying laughing. She so raw. She's so who she is. And i would just know that that entire however long i got to be with her i would be laughing the entire time. I would watch that movie a exactly. I mean anything with her. The whole area. Did you see that. She recently made headlines for. She dated two guys at the same time. She had two boyfriends at the same time. It was incredible incredible. I love this woman. She live who she is and she does not apologize. And that's what. I love to offensively her. She'll be starring in the next legally blonde with jennifer coolidge. Katie takes over. Reese witherspoon spot. Yeah thank you so much for joining us today. Katie local you katie. I'm like oh we're friends now. We're really friends. Please tell everyone where they can find you and your products now. Hey summer dot com kate. Somerville dot com. And then of course we want to support our amazing retailer. Nordstrom sephora ulta online and across the pond. We are doing amazing thing. They're so super excited if this goes around the world we are at facing k. And we also just monster derm store but you gotta go to summer dot com because up supporting us and then please come to the clinic. We are open. We are faced. Wanna see you want to cut your skin and transformed kim's so mcs in person the clinic. Amazing thank you again so much for this wonderful conversation. We had the absolute best time. Everyone listening all of the products that katy somerville mentioned will be on the website so you can check them all out there and you know where to find us. We're on instagram. And twitter at los angeles pod find us in our facebook group look up glossy angeles claims. Elite knows y'all are thriving in that group. I've just stop commenting in there because y'all know what you're doing so it's taken a life of its own. Enjoy that group and we will talk to you next week. You know what. I really miss the spa a delicious body scrub a soothing massage. And don't even get me started on facials. Luckily i've been able to bring the spot experience home. Thanks to milk and honey's luxurious bath body and skincare products for those who don't know milk and honey is renowned spa in texas and fun fact. They're opening their first. La location in brentwood in march. What i love about milk and honey sponsored goodies or that. They're made with organic ingredients. In small batches in austin texas home to great kirby johnson. If i had to pick i'd recommend the gel cleanser lux face oil and hydrating rose missed if you are also missing the spa like me and could use a little self care at home. Be sure to stock up. On some of milk and honey products at milk and honey dot com. If you use our code gloss fifteen you'll get fifteen percent off your next order that's gloss fifteen at milk and honey dot com.

kate hollywood Kate kate somerville kirby katie curiel sarah somerville Lambda lena esther becton Somerville Glam julia Fourcade dermot quench los angeles britney linzie Stephen hoffman janet gainer