19 Burst results for "Curable Disease"

Ambassadors of Science

Sounds of Science

02:17 min | 2 months ago

Ambassadors of Science

"Welcome elaine and alan. Hi thanks for having much fiving us. Thank you for being here so first off. Can you both give rundown of how you came to choose science as a career alan. You want to start first ago. Fist so basically. I was fortunate enough to grow up in zimbabwe and the uk and during the time of kinda witnessed the spectrum of life on the side so in zimbabwe children dying from israeli curable. Diseases over here in the free healthcare so from that point on which i was always fascinated with science and knowing how culas in medicines work in order to kinda help people help alleviate some of those those problems faced and are now found myself here doing exactly that. When did you go to the uk was yes or me and my family migrated here in two thousand and five When i was nine years old. So yes oh. Half of my life was spent in zimbabwe in tough with my life has been spent here in the uk. Elaine how 'bout you. How'd you get started in stem. So i had a different background in. Just the i was always really interested in doing fun science things. So you know the star of your cook at putting main to suites into bottles of coca cola and getting the rockets and things like that and just generally really curious about things that i was really fortunate to have parents and family and teachers who encouraged release support that so i guess through school i was like. What do you want to be when you grew up. My answer was always something science. But i didn't really know within there and i guess for maybe similar to allen's story is that i was also really driven to to help people by did work experience at a hospital an absolutely hated it. I remember. i watched a patient get bone marrow. Taken and high nearly fainted in the patient was asking me. If i was okay and i think that was the end by medical career

Zimbabwe Alan UK Elaine Coca Cola Allen
"curable disease" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"curable disease" Discussed on KOMO

"Were searching for him we're trying to contact them to let them know what occurred we had been able to get in contact with them yeah salon workers are gotten worried about Julie when she failed to show up at a regular appointment when the Calder those salon workers got a voice mail her phone had her husband's voice on it saying they were sick with the flu and she couldn't talk the two detectives Julie I had spoken about a strained relationship with her husband of the and he will have to confirm this identity of the man who killed himself here today in maple valley Carly Johnson come on news the mother of two missing Idaho children has been arrested in Hawaii her seventeen year old daughter and seven year old son haven't been seen since September Laurie ballot failed to meet court ordered deadline bring the kids to authorities in Idaho she's now being held on five million dollars bail and facing extradition from Hawaii to Idaho supporters of a bill that would reduce the legal penalties for transmitting the HIV virus welcome the change to or chance rather to lower the stigma surrounding the virus that causes aids more from como score one heck the bill now before the state Senate changes language in place since the height of the aids epidemic when contracting HIV was a literal death sentence under the older measure it was a felony to knowingly transmit the virus now though drugs can suppress aids and Dale breeze supports the bill that would make knowing transmission a gross misdemeanor only I am not a potential criminal just because I am HIV positive with merry steel Klein who says her husband died of aids points out this is curable disease she's not ready to reduce the culpability of anyone who transmits the virus the higher penalty would remain in place if the victim is a child or vulnerable adult the bill has already passed the.

flu Carly Johnson Hawaii Idaho Dale breeze HIV Klein curable disease Calder Julie I como Senate
Inside Iran's Underground Fashion Industry

The Business of Fashion Podcast

08:59 min | 1 year ago

Inside Iran's Underground Fashion Industry

"Global News headlines have been dominated by news out of Iran where a recent US air strike killed. Iran's most senior military leader General Qassem Awesome Sulejmani resulting in growing tensions in the Middle East back at voices. Two thousand nine. We shed some light on. Iran's underground fashioned seen team Iran is a country that we in the West know very little about but over the past few years. I've been receiving messages on instagram from young fashioned creatives. Who have written to me saying that that behind closed doors there is actually a vibrant fashion culture in Iran and they are longing to connect with all of us? It seemed like the perfect topic explore voices. Twenty nine to shed some light on Iran's underground fashion scene. We were honored to introduce four Iranian fashion creatives to share their experiences of their vibrant culture. Holzer with us and also to demystify some of our misconceptions about their country based in Chicago Hoda Khattab is the voice behind the political fashion platform. Juju Jewish and hotel opened our voices session with a powerful talk which explained how Iran's fashion economy has been impacted both by an extreme regime in Iran but also sanctions from the US UK and other Western countries. Hoda was joined by Sharon and chief of Car to self taught fashion designers and co-founders Iranian fashion label car. Who came all the way from Tehran to join us and the brilliant Iran born London based sued goal Sarky founder and editorial director of Tank magazine who interviewed Hoda Sharon and Sheva together? These four challenged our assumptions about aww country that is largely closed off from the West on this week's B. O. F. podcast go inside. Iran's fashion industry and I had this really cute flowery speech. I was excited to give but given what's happening in Iran right now. I think it's only fair to sort of take a setback and talk about the situation and kind of conceptualize that so right now. It's been almost a week in which the Iranian government has actually shut down the Internet and shooting Shiva and I couldn't even be in touch until they landed in the UK. I haven't been able to have been in touch with my family for the past near week. Either and this this sort of constant and current sort of uprising protests are really in part due to economic insecurities as sort of economic degradation of society see that has been caused by government corruption mismanagement of funds but also US and UK sanctions that have literally crippled society. Every single Iranian every single day is affected by sanctions by this country and by the United States. Things like medicine is unaffordable. Everyday curable. Diseases people are dying from because they don't have access to medical care or medicine because of the high prices food commodities everyday little things are so inaccessible accessible to every Iranian right now because of the situation so so important that yes what's happening in Iran is horrible but I think we also have to understand that the United states and the UK and many of our countries are also complicit. And what's happening right now. The reason and the difficulties that she didn't she will be talking about more both domestically but also from the sanctions that these countries are having creates a larger more complicated situation that we really need to be. unpacking and fashion is inherently political intertwined and all of this and yes obviously in Iran. There's a mandatory dress code and fashion. Maybe a little bit more political explicitly there but throughout the entire world. There is no such thing as apolitical fashion. It does not exist if anybody says fashion is apolitical. Please Punch them. This Muslim is condoning violence. I'm pleased on called prevent on me but it's true because fashion ultimately at its core is the motive communication. We're communicating something able to convey really powerful messages. Tell people about a culture about society or we're not an recyling. It and silence is complacency at a time where we truly cannot afford to. The world is fucking on. I can say fucking the world is fucking on fire right now. Aw How can we ever think that what we're creating and putting out in the world should not be engaging with us and all of us were closed and are in the business of fashion. I don't even immune that fund and yet are we actually truly grappling with the complexities of how fashion is truly political on so many levels beyond just just a slogan which could mean or not mean something based on where you're producing it Fashion is even more inherently political. If we think about production and consumption what does that mean. The majority of our clothes are produced in Southeast Asia by people who look like me and you had the majority of consumed here. In the West our whole industry relies upon and continues continues to profit from histories of imperialism genocide sanctions that have plagued the entire world and yet we still profit from it. We're living in an active empire. The British Empire still exists people are still profiting off of the fact that there is no economic growth. happening in countries countries like Indonesia because we profit from it and we value this and our entire industry is built upon it. So what does that mean and also the fact that fashion literally frames our bodies like literally every time we step outside. We're deciding how we want our body to be actually presented in the world there's nothing else that's more intimately connected to our identities or the manifestation of that in public space than fashion literally. Wraps it touches our skin. So what does it mean mean for something that's made in a product of violence to be rubbing off on our skin every single day were so so concerned about what we eat where it goes in our bodies but how about what touches our skin constantly every single day most nights some nights but also but it conveys a Maybe religion the fact that I'm visibly Muslim. My experiences growing up in the United States as someone visibly Muslim has been marked with physical assault being uncalled terrorists every single day. This is a reality that every day I step out of my house and choose to present myself in a way that I know that I'm GonNa be added to another government surveillance. Watch list her. And if you don't have to think about every day when you step outside of your house who is going to profile you or what police is going to stop and search you. That's privilege which doesn't make that decision any less political so we have to think about that and right now especially the fact that the Muslim identity is trending trending in the fashion industry. My identity is sexy. Every single person wants a Muslim. Who looks like me? Walking down the runway and their latest campaign. But how can we have the fact that right. Now we're at a time of heightened anti Muslim racism on a global level partnered with the time that we see Muslim faces taking up space across fashion magazines. What does that immune for our industry? Is that a trend. Or are we actually substantially dealing with and grappling with the manifestations of what it means to support Muslims. Would it means the support people people of Color. How can Nike? For example create. A pro hit job that was created with the raw materials by Muslim wiegert Muslims and concentration camps in western China passed down to Muslims in Indonesia working in sweatshops to produce Nike Apparel and then sold here and then be a product and praise as for being so pro Muslim. Why are we allowing brands and the whole entire fashion industry to simplify and reduce our identities into just a hit job? Hit Job is not synonymous as being Muslim but we allow fashion right now to reduce simplify and completely annihilate the movements Minson identities in which we've been working on for decades actually call this revolution washing greenwashing which I think most of us are familiar with. But it's at the revolution every brand. Dan Wants to be sexy. And part of the Revolution Right now. But what are you actually doing. Are you actually simplifying. And reducing and taking away the significance of what it means to be Muslim. The complex experiences of what it feels like to wear every single day and that the government simultaneously is gonNA use that against me or use that to invade on a son and and so. I'm really excited. Really excited to also be able to be the sheet and Sheva on this panel to understand that the world is fucking complicated like there's a lot She does happening every day everywhere but rather than just being afraid of taking a step back and be like okay. We're GONNA make the simple like I don't want to be controversial. We have to engage with at that. Fashion should not be in the business of simplifying things but embracing the complexity and really being able to grapple and imagine a better world and then actively work work toward building that

Iran United States West Indonesia UK Sheva Iranian Government Middle East Global News General Qassem Tehran Southeast Asia Nike Hoda Khattab Chicago Holzer Hoda Hoda Sharon Tank Magazine London
"curable disease" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"curable disease" Discussed on AP News

"To deliver stable sales numbers a preliminary probe into a viral pneumonia illness sickening dozens of people in and around China may be caused by a new type of corona virus according to a report from state broadcaster CCTV corona viruses are spread through coughing or sneezing or by touching an infected person some because the common cold and others can lead to more severe respiratory diseases such as sars and murders such viruses are common in people but more exotic versions from bats camels and other animals have caused severe illness CCTV says the novel coronavirus is different from those that have previously been identified Chinese health authorities of already ruled out sars and murders as possible causes and didn't immediately confirm the CCTV report pop star Justin Bieber says he's been battling Lyme disease in an Instagram post use of it's been a rough couple of years but he's getting the right treatment that'll help treat this so far in curable disease he says he'll be back and better than ever they'll be recalled in curable the vast majority of Lyme disease cases are successfully treated with antibiotics the infection which is transmitted by deer ticks can cause fluid conditions neurological problems joint pain and other symptoms he says he also had a serious case of chronic mono which affected his skin brain function energy and overall health the Grammy winning singer sizzle discusses battle with Lyme disease and the upcoming U. two docu series Justin Bieber's seasons which debuts January twenty seventh wire in his first election year rally president trump takes credit for the drone attack that killed a top Iranian general last week the United States once again took the.

China CCTV Justin Bieber curable disease Grammy trump United States pneumonia Instagram president
"curable disease" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"curable disease" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Hey, Dr Liederman or back. We are back, and they were talking about a man is sixty one years old. This is a man as a fancy hairdresser one of those fancy places on the upper east side and a year ago. It went to hospitals having difficulty walking just send them home. They said he was dehydrated, and blah, blah, blah and didn't do any tests. Well, this is a pretty rely. Liable straightforward man who said he couldn't walk and they saw them in the emergency room at one of the super pooper big hospitals and send him out and he thought well, they must be right. And so I didn't go back for a few more months by then it could barely walk even worse. And at that time, he was almost paralysed went into one of the super pooper big hospitals, and they try to via and they said, well, the can't find any cancer. And so they sent him to a nursing home. And he went to a nursing home for months, and we often talk about this going to a nursing home or rehab when you have cancer in my view, generally just gives the cancer a chance to grow. And that's what happened. You got worse and worse and worse and worse. And then he came here at about our work radio listener like you told them. Hey, you may want to go see Dr Liederman, and he came in. And I saw him orange the biopsy, and we found that he had a limb fomer eating away at his spinal cord and by time that he saw me was paralyzed a wheelchair. And we started treatment on him to a man who has paralysis and lymphoma, which is a potentially curable disease, and we started treatment and sin. He's been on treatment. He's starting to move as legs. And there's lots of things to learn. If you have something wrong with you, and the doctors tell you, hey, it's not this. Well, it's probably time to get a fresh second opinion. Like, he did unfortunately, took months and months and months and months to come here to thirty four Broadway. But he did it. He went to a hospital. I and they went to nursing home and rehab, and none of that helped until he came here. You got a biopsy. And now for the first time he can move his legs. This is the work. We do all noninvasive. No, cutting no bleeding, no chemo. This is the work that we do every day at thirteen four Broadway. Broadway and thirtieth street in the heart of New York City. This is what we do every day. And what would a man who came to me seventy three years old? He's married. He has to kiss as a rapidly rising PSA he came his piss say went from three point nine two seven. Point three so doubled. And in just one year and his biopsy showed a Gleason, eight cancer with multiple cores positive, and he came to us because he knows with surgery..

Dr Liederman cancer difficulty walking Gleason lymphoma New York City chemo seventy three years sixty one years one year
"curable disease" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"curable disease" Discussed on WSB-AM

"And curable disease people at average risk for the disease should start getting screened at age fifty and get colonoscopies every ten years and every day. There are things you can do to lower your risk for colon. Pinson, minimizing not read and processed meats for example, eating a diet with fresh vegetables and fruits high fiber hand in hand with diet. Also goes issue exercise embrace a healthy lifestyle and get screened to find out more visit inside mop at dot com or call one eight eight eight six six three three four eight eight. It's a home fix-it tip from Dave Baker. Brought to you by the home fix-it page dot com. There are five things every homeowner should know number one. How do you shut off the water? There's a water shut off at your house. And there's one at the street find the both know how to use a number two. How do you shut off your heating and air system? The switch is generally found you the furnace and it usually resembles a light switch number three on shut down your electrical system. No. Where the main breaker is it could be the circuit box. Or could be disconnect outside older boxes may require turning off. Each breaker. Individually know, how yours works and worse. Located number four. Where's the fire have working smoke detectors locate in every sleeping room plus in hallways gathering rooms? And number five Honda. Why get out every resident in the house needs to know the best and second best ways to get out of the house, the home fix it pays dot com. Your site for how to do it what not to try and who to hire valuable information on the web at the home fix-it bay? Dot com. You trust WSB's traffic. Reporters accurate experience coverage of Atlanta traffic, then we put them in the WSB sky-copter, and you trust them even more WSB. Smilin' Mark McKay and Doug Turnbull fly over Atlanta's highways. News ninety five AM seven fifteen. We're we're lying on.

WSB Atlanta Pinson Dave Baker Doug Turnbull Mark McKay Honda ten years
"curable disease" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

13:00 min | 2 years ago

"curable disease" Discussed on KGO 810

"Hundred two two two five two two two ju drew with. And you can get it. Right. Man. This midday live leeann tweeden, Dr juror number eight hundred two two two five two two two. And we're about to enter into a medical topic here with Dr Joseph Lee, he is chairman of board of directors chaired, the board of directors of the enter consumer research foundation, and you may not have heard of neuro consumers, but they are not that uncommon. And they're rather devastating and they have affected people in the public without much conversation, which I found rather lacking. So this is our chance to talk about it. Dr Lee, welcome to the program. Thank you. Dr am I right that Steve Jobs had a pancreatic Neuromancer consumer? Yeah. That's my understanding that, unfortunately, Mr. jobs, so died of that disease. And again, if people had even a passing understanding of this disease. They would understand that there was very effective treatment. And the weird. I understand why his anybody allowed him to die because it didn't have to happen. Correct. Wow. I don't know that the specifics of Mr. jobs treatment because I wasn't involved in. But certainly, you know, I think that. I don't know that I would describe that we have affective treatments. There are a number of patients, unfortunately worldwide who are dying this disease. But in part of what we're trying to do at the foundation is to bring awareness. So we have earlier diagnosis and with early diagnosis. We can treat patients with surgery and removes a tumor. That's the point. I want to make is that he refused. Surgery. Pancreatic cancer is devastation. No carcinoma of the pancreas. But neuro endocrine tumor of the pancreas a small one without any evidence of metastatic disease. You are doing a dance when you get that. And you're going, and you take it out, and he refused that and that was the tragedy my opinion. Now as we both have said, neither is it took care of him. He may have had some metastatic disease that wasn't evident or who knows. But my understanding is he had curable disease. And that's insane. That they didn't go after it. So I'm looking at the paper here that was put in framing. It says a lot of times this diseases, commonly overlooked or misdiagnosed. Go ahead. What we know is that based on studies we find that patients oftentimes takes over four to five years before patients are finally diagnosed with this disease and a big reasons because the symptoms are very common. So for example, and somebody who has loose stools. Communist thing that you might have some food poisoning or you might have irritable bowel syndrome, but that is really one that earlier symptoms, of example, a small bowel cancer. But let's let's be clear you're not because somebody comes to your office like myself primary care doctor and says, I'm having diarrhea. You don't go straight to test you for cancer. No because diarrheas, right? And it's also presentation of lymphoma and leukemia and thousand other things infectious diseases of all types, and there's a million different things at present like that and neuro endocrine disease. Does not have a simple screening tests. That's the hard part. Would you agree with that? I absolutely agree. And as a as a general generalist like like yourself? I take care of patients daily who come in with very common symptoms like loose stool, and you're absolutely correct. More common things happen commonly. But however that being said patients continue to persist in having symptoms. It's reasonable to point to work down the list of differential diagnoses. And well, one of the things that we want people think about is a possibility that near Anderson Cancer is on that list. I completely agree with your your sighing. Because you're you're pointing at a weakness in our profession, generally as doctors don't have time and do not generally take the initiative to think they have to think about Dr Lee is advocating, hey, guys, think hard about what this is every time. You see diarrhea don't blow it up think it through and down the list. The listener in our head trust me about lakes. I mean, what is it? Are you backed up because insurance might difficult. And and I'm not sure. Well, my goodness. I'm gonna show my bias here. I'm not sure we're training doctors think is critically as we used to be. There's all kinds of distracting is. But let's get back to the consumers. The it's a it's a family of disorders. Let's talk about that a little bit. Yeah. It is a family disorders. You know? I think that part of the confusion is that when we think about Mr. jobs, and and people like Rica Franklin, we think that they died a paint Graddick cancer and say did die of pancreatic cancer. But not the traditional type of ad no carcinoma that most commonly patients with pancreatic cancer say they unfortunately passed away with pancreatic, Noor under cancers, we have new intercom cells throughout the body can happen. We have new cells in the lungs. We have neuron cells in the pancreas. We have in the small Dow, and depending on where to cancers arise they can have different symptoms. So for example, in patients who develop near endocrine cancers of the lung they may develop shortness of breath. Or are we seeing or as a tumors grow? And obstructive the Broncos they may develop pneumonia. So these are all we know again thinking about leasing that's more likely reactive airway disease or asthma near Anderson cancers. When we think about patients with appendicitis, you know, more commonly, it's not due to a tumor like a neuro endocrine cancer obstructing appendix. But we do see with some regularity that this does happen patients get up in the scientists, and when they get their appendix removed lo and behold, there's a new independent tumor, they're causing the problems. So I think that one of the things I think about is that for patients is that if you develop symptoms, and you're not getting the answers, please keep going back to your provider. No matter what you think the symptoms are always get symptoms are not a diagnose diagnosis treatment. So until you have at least a provisional diagnosis don't sit back through doctor. And if you're not satisfied, you go and get a second opinion. If you're all out, but let's go back to the Carson. I'd actually again, we're talking about the Noor enter consumer research foundation. That's the entry. We're talk to Dr Joseph Lee and with the increase use of antibiotics to treat acute appendicitis. Are you seeing an increase in miss Carson? I tumors of the pancreas. Yeah. But I don't know that we have enough data to understand the diagnosis of appendicitis. As it relates to near endocrine cancers in this era, where we are using more antibiotics than ever what we do know is that. Are you miss? My question. There is a there is a body of literature that's recommending particularly elderly patients. We don't operate on appendix. We're doing treating it with antibiotics and thereby we're going to leave a couple of Carson always behind because the you know the. Calmed down. It will come back. I guess recurring appendicitis has carcenoid until proven otherwise. But I'm just wondering if that has any data to show what the effect of that has been yet. Yeah. I don't know. I'm not aware of any data as such but one would expect that you have a tumor large enough. That's obstructing the appendix that it's absolutely what you said it's going to come back, and am I guess more likely than not recurrent appendicitis is going to be less likely treated medically surgically at some point. But I I think we're gonna have to see some data's whether or not getting there late later has any real effect on the course of these cars, and I I gotta tell you. I've I've seen. I've seen a lot of bizarre carcenoid where they're just in the tail of the appendix, and they may not have been the causative factor directly to the appendicitis. And this is all kinds of ways the carcenoid fits into the story. So it's it's a it's a complex complex story and one of the points. I wanna make the nomenclature has changed over time. Yeah. Exactly. What you're referring to in terms of carcenoid? There are some providers out there that have a belief that carcenoid is not cancer cancer like, and and that's part of the reason why the nomenclature we've really moved to the nomenclature of using neuro endocrine cancers throughout the body personal and more often refers to near Anderson cancers of the small bow. And, but I I think that there is a level of confusion out there that has persisted over time with with what the nomenclature can I ask if you get neuro endocrine tumor that's cancerous in you discovery. It early. What are the chances that you will survive this? You know, I know. Like real early. Yeah. Like with breast cancer. You know now the chances of survival are better. Even a tiny pain created. No Carson of the pancreas pretty much curtains. You have a small near Entercom tumor pancreas, and you discover a guy said we should be joyous. We can go after that. So I'll let you assets. Actually, it's my position. I don't disagree. Dr drew. I think that right now the standard of care for treatment of urinary cancers, if it's isolated is to respect it because that's the only hope for cure. You know, the the reason why I'm involved in foundation because I have a family member who's close to me who has this disease, and and there are many people with this disease. In fact, right now, the United States, we believe that over one hundred and seventy thousand Americans currently, I have this have been diagnosed with this disease. What we don't know how many more have not yet been diagnosed, and you know, this is really a six and a half fold increase over the past forty years. So we're seeing a lot more this disease, and we did back in the seventy s going back. So I think. The real focus of this disease. Like mini cancers is really focusing on trying to make sure that to diagnose it as soon as possible. And if it's isolated reception surgical reception is the best hope for a cure. I have a patient with an adrenal tumor that I thought was a what's feels Chroma Saitama feels are not in Iran corner or they Narendra Anderson. Feels they are part of the neuron into the absolutely all right. So I want wanna ask you this. It's not a fear turned out. But I'm still worried because this is a lot of bizarre things are happening. And I can't identify what it is. I can't get the insurance to pay for an endocrinologist. And I'm sitting here going, how am I going to work? This damn thing up. What are your recommendations for something like that where it's Lear you thinking neuro endocrine, but you can't quite nail it down. You know, I I would refer the patient again. Thank you. I can't get them to do. It is driving me. Crazy. I worry about this every day. So any any advice? Yeah. No. I think that's a real challenge because we really talking about a sub special field where their specific scanning that is. Study either. I know what you're talking about. I can't get there. First of all I have to send them to a tertiary center. And Secondly this insurance company that this patient endocrinologist? I mean, it's unbelievable. It's unbelievable. The world we practice. This is why doctors are unhappy all the time. I save Dr L let you finish. I'm sorry to see you push one of my buttons. No, no. I I understand your frustration. And you know in general. The insurance companies do with your good job. What's he dare? You. Yeah. There are situations. Like this I've encountered, and I try to speak with the folks on the phone, and and really also solicit and try to engage the patient in helping them advocate for themselves as well. This is a primitive patient with lots of difficulty cognitively and a family that is not Fisk enough to do this. And that's it. So it's me doing it every day for months. That's how our system works everybody. That's it. But again, this is why common but somewhat opaque conditions like ner endocrine tumors can get missed number one. And number two. I don't understand how people can live in a world where somebody like Steve Jobs dies of this. When he had potentially curable thing. I just I we were we were all robbed of this guy. He was robbed of his life to allow him to believe he could treat this with diet was the most I just looked at it when it when he started. And I thought this is a disaster and the low, and behold, it was so let's not let that happen to any more of us adeptly is there their website or any place subject send people? Absolutely. Hey you. I would encourage people who are interested in learning. More to come to the neuro enter consumer research foundation website. And you can find that online at WWW dot e r s dot ORG..

Steve Jobs appendicitis Dr Joseph Lee Anderson Cancer Pancreatic cancer Carson diarrhea metastatic disease Noor leeann tweeden curable disease breast cancer chairman Broncos bowel syndrome United States Fisk
"curable disease" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"curable disease" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Setups. I don't have a lot of credibility in that before. You said the GOP's been dropping hints that if they keep congress they'll dismantle this mental health care, the majority of Senate majority leader saying if they keep congress will dismantle healthcare seventy their strong suit. Yeah. No. If you read between the line, you can really figure out what these people want. Yeah. I mean, it really is that I gotta say it's pretty dumb politically for Mitch McConnell. Whatever else you think of him, but you know, to kind of say like who ran up this trillion dollar deficit? We gotta come for your Medicare and social security now, I mean, just yum. No, it's staggering. But one thing that I I always hated about Mitch McConnell was he was he was evil. But he was smart. Just a really dumb move. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. You you always go to the heart of the issue on Twitter, as we know you tweeted when you're dying of a curable disease because your healthcare will definitely be taken away take comfort in the fact that at least terrified Brown children who walked across Mexico will be taken to tent camps before they're sent back to Central America to be murdered. Yeah. That'll warm your heart as you. Yeah. No, he's he's he's promising to rip children away again. He's repeated a lie that through one of his super fans to shoot up a temple. Have. It's actually dangerous. They he's made the people led to like live under the under the refrigerator, the cockroaches. They will come out. And now, they're they're mainstream. Right. Part is mainstream. Yeah. No. I mean, we have a lunatic far-right Frings conspiracy theorists in the Oval Office. There is no there's no difference now between the mainstream Republican party White House and Breitbart, you're right. It was such big absurd. Hunger for conspiracies..

Mitch McConnell congress GOP Senate Twitter Oval Office Breitbart White House Central America Mexico Brown trillion dollar
"curable disease" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"curable disease" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"Dollars or pumped into. Prevention and treatment experts warned on Sunday on the eve of a major world, conference An alarming. Rate of new infections coupled, with, an, exploding population of young people, in hard hit countries the world will be steering for crisis of epidemic proportions says Mark debut an American aids researcher and diplomat And a. Couple of things struck me I you know what I think about. Aids aids is the most curable disease. Ever known demand we know exactly how you get it we know exactly how, you cannot get it there is no need to spend one dime on prevention or cure we know exactly how to stop aids but the other thing is, this the aids epidemic aids is, not an epidemic and I'll I'll demonstrate to you how aids is. Not an epidemic because and this isn't show prep. To win, found the ten deadliest diseases in the world These are the top ten killers in the world you ready form some of these you may have heard of number one heart attack heart disease coronary disease Number two Stroke Number three Lower. Respiratory infections you know that that is the third leading killer in, the world not, just, mirror lower. Respiratory infections the third leading killer in. The world you hear anybody talking about lower. Respiratory infection Epidemic no Number four chronic obstructive pulmonary. Disease Number five.

researcher Mark
"curable disease" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:06 min | 3 years ago

"curable disease" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Following argument because of their pistons khris disease victory piss differs disease victory well they have made tropical forest very very difficult for humans to inhabit to colonize over the last ten thousand years because every time that we would try and go into those forests booed get sworn by mosquitoes in we'd run away and therefore they have played an important role in bringing those forests forward relatively intact into the twentieth twentyfirst centuries if there were no difficulties diseases threats to the people living in those forests then those forests would have been turned into settlements cities farmlands much more extensively in much earlier than they have been and are now being i call them nature's viet cong because they are they are the resistance fighters on behalf of the rainforest why don't we make it harder for you why don't we make you imagine that it's springtime or early summer in alaska that there's melting everywhere that they are hordes and hordes and clouds of mosquitoes and they're forming a permanent sort of cloud around than any mills comes up and offer you the opportunity to eliminate them completely from the planet and he makes this offer as they are stabbing you in the risk faced cheek you do what say i would do these two things i i would unzip the mosquito net of the tent and i would say andy for god's sake let's have this conversation in the tent jump in the tent dip that thing okay now i'd say okay now andy we can think about this clearly and one of the things i'd say well look if we're up here just to humans in the middle of this alaskan tundra and there are these millions and millions of squitoes swarming around us to get our blood obviously we're a small factor on this landscape and they're a big factor in some way so if we were to press a button and a radically them instantly it's very difficult to know there loadbearing significance in the ecosystem because they're playing lots of different roles as parasites as competitors as prey but one of the things that sonia sean told me is that they actually don't play a big role in the ecosystem i mean i really tried hard when i was writing this book to get a mosquito biologists to explain to me that mosquitoes were useful that they had some sort of ecological role to play that was important and no one would admit that they had any role at all is there not a useful nutrition for bats or fisher any of the other like predators of mosquitoes 'cause they're biomass assess small that those those creatures would be fine without mosquitoes like everyone would be fine without mosquitoes she might be right about that but that's not the only ecological dimension we're talking about that does mentioned might there be as just as a as a for example competition they might be competing with other insects and if you eliminate the mosquitoes then suddenly flare flies become much more abundant oh i mean when you talk about trying to foresee the consequences of completely eradicating any one species we just don't know the real deep thought here is if you're going to destroy the only obligation you owe yourself to know what you're killing absolutely by that i mean yes to no absolutely the dimensions the implications of what you're doing and what i'm weighing on here i have been to some of these sub saharan parts of africa and i was floored that we have a curable disease and how many like twelve thirteen fourteen year old kids were held up.

twelve thirteen fourteen year ten thousand years
"curable disease" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:16 min | 3 years ago

"curable disease" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That sonia sean told me is that the actually don't play a big role in the ecosystem i mean i really tried hard when i was writing this book to get a mosquito biologists to explain to me that mosquitoes were useful that they had some sort of ecological role to play that was important and no one would admit that the head any role at all is there not a useful nutrition for bats fisher near the other like predators of mosquitoes 'cause they're biomass is so small that those those creatures would be fine without mosquitoes like everyone would be fine without mosquitoes she might be right about that but that's not the only ecological dimension we're talking about that mentioned might there be as just as a as a for example competition they might be competing with other insects and if you eliminate the mosquitoes then suddenly flare area flies become much more abundant oh i mean when you talk about trying to foresee the consequences of completely eradicating any one species we just don't know the real deep but here is if you're going to destroy the only obligation you owe yourself to know what you're killing absolutely by that i mean yes to no absolutely the dimensions the implications of what you're doing and what i'm weighing on here i have been to some of these sub saharan parts of africa and i just was lord that we have a curable disease in how many like twelve thirteen fourteen year old kids or holed up in this world you know like i agree with you that that's urgently compelling an important and i feel the same way that something needs to be done and it's true to some extent in the end after all the debate i've ended up at this kind of middle ground well i think what you're what we're aiming to do actually aiden perry but it to me like this we don't have to kill the mall everywhere in fact maybe we shouldn't but we can kill them where we live limit major urban cities and towns that they no longer pose a threat we can draw a line and say you know what you stay on the words will stay here because the diseases that they're spreading they will go away if the mosquito goes away for long enough because if we get better like in like in america we don't get malaria hardly ever because there's no one with malaria mosquito bite and then give that malaria to someone else we have a ton of anopheles mosquitoes and we have less than a thousand cases of malaria a year almost all those cases are somebody like myself who gets sick and africa comes back here and why is that because we hit zero zero in our cities and towns once people stopped having malaria here mosquitoes stopped getting it and giving it to other people we just have to kind of police the boundary a little bit better the mosquitos could still do their thing we can do our thing so you don't hate them anymore is what you're saying i think there's a way to live harmoniously with mosquitoes mainly do it in this country right i mean we have mosquitoes lee control their populations in many ways but we also get it.

sonia sean twelve thirteen fourteen year
"curable disease" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"curable disease" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Implications of what you're doing and what i'm weighing on here i too have been to some of these sub saharan parts of africa and i was floored that we have a curable disease and how many like twelve thirteen fourteen year old kids were held up in this world you know like i agree with you that that's urgently compelling an important and i feel the same way that something needs to be done and some extent in the end after all the debate i've ended up at this kind of middle ground well i think what you're what we're aiming to do actually aiden perry but it's me like this we don't have to kill them all everywhere in fact maybe we shouldn't but we can kill them where we live limiting them major urban cities and towns that they no longer pose a threat we can draw line and say you know what you stay on the woods we'll stay here because the diseases that they're spreading they will go away if the mosquito goes away for long enough because if we get better like in like in america we don't get malaria hardly ever because there's no one with malaria mosquito bite and then give that malaria to someone else we have a ton of anopheles mosquitoes and we have less than a thousand cases of malaria a year almost all those cases are somebody like myself who gets sick and africa comes back here and why is that because we hit zero close to zero in our cities and towns once people stopped having malaria here mosquitoes stopped getting it and giving it to other people we just have to kind of place the boundary a little bit better than a skaters could still do their thing we can do our thing so you don't hate them anymore is what you're saying i think there's a way to live harmoniously with mosquitoes i mainly do it in this country right i mean we have mosquitoes and we control their populations in many ways but we also get bit.

america malaria africa aiden perry twelve thirteen fourteen year
"curable disease" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:25 min | 3 years ago

"curable disease" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In the ecosystem because they're playing lots of different roles as parasites as competitors as prey but one of the things that sonia sean told me is that they actually don't play a big role in the ecosystem i mean i really tried hard when i was writing this book to get a mosquito biologists to explain to me that mosquitoes were useful that they had some sort of ecological role to play that was important and no one would admit that they had any role at all they're not a useful nutrition for bats or fisher any of the other like predators of mosquitoes 'cause they're biomass is so small that those those creatures would be fine without mosquitoes like everyone would be fine without mosquitoes she might be right about that but that's not the only ecological dimension we're talking about that might there be as just as a as a for example competition they might be competing with other insects and if you eliminate the mosquitoes then suddenly flairy flies become much more abundant oh i mean when you talk about trying to foresee the consequences of completely eradicating anyone species we just don't know the real deep thought here is if you're going to destroy the only obligation you owe yourself to know what you're killing absolutely by that i mean yes to no absolutely the dimensions the implications of what you're doing and what i'm weighing on here is that i have been to some of these sub saharan parts of africa and i just was lord that we have a curable disease and how many like twelve thirteen fourteen year old kids were holed up in this world you know like i agree with you that that's urgently compelling an important and i feel the same way that something needs to be done and true to some extent in the end after all the debate i've ended up at this kind of middle ground well i think what you're what we're aiming to do actually hidden perry but it to me like this we don't have to kill the mall everywhere in fact maybe we shouldn't but we can kill them where we live limiting them in a major urban cities and towns but they no longer pose a threat can draw a line and say you know what you stay out in the woods we'll stay here because the diseases that they're spreading they will go away if the mosquito goes away for long enough because if we get better like in like in america we don't get malaria hardly ever because there's no one with malaria that a mosquito bite and then give that malaria to someone else we have a ton of anopheles mosquitoes and we have less than a thousand cases of malaria a year almost all those cases are somebody like myself who gets sick and africa comes back here and why is that because we hit zero close to zero in our cities and towns once people stopped having malaria here mosquitoes stopped getting it and giving it to other people we just have to kind of police the boundary a little bit better the mosquitos could still do their thing we can do our thing so you don't hate them anymore what you're saying i think there's a way to live harmoniously with mosquitoes i mean we do it in this country right i mean we have mosquitoes lee control their populations in many ways but we also get.

sonia sean twelve thirteen fourteen year
"curable disease" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"curable disease" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"Gone to different doctors for different things for different drugs get off of other drugs and it's like we talk about school shootings we talk about all these things that we can throw money to fix were we we we can't talk it's like a shameful to talk about i mean everybody knows their cousin or nephew or somebody who's right and they just throwing them to the win you know like heck kid you know he's just he's gone he's out and you know you can cancel your family gathers around you know you get you get that disease and then if the cancer comes back oh god cancers back when you relapse people you're further away you know i i don't know where i'm going with this is that it needs to be talked about ninety writings me to writing thank you for your call and thank you for your words a kindness and congratulations on your recovery too because it is a tough it's a tough deal it's a tough deal to get through into tough deal to it's it's something we have to deal with as addicts the rest of her life it's not a curable disease it's treatable disease but he's right it is the number one public health issue in my mind facing this country and you know you see people you know like the woman who had her own eyeballs you know they're obviously can poke match pulled them uphold the them out of her head but but it but it's you know and we're gonna roll over to the jews because i know you've got a whole lot more the best part of the show so we're we're gonna go that but it but but the thing about drugs now call is is he touched on something so key there and where i think this country is really failing especially in the healthcare system and he mentioned cancer and he mentioned hard very didn't mention heart disease but heart disease or diabetes or whatever other disease there is out there if i have health insurance and i have a heart problem like the you know the people you add in earlier on the mini weekly check where i could go in there and this ban you you have a heart problem you're you're nine nine percent blocked you have to do this this this.

cancer heart disease diabetes nine nine percent
"curable disease" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"curable disease" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The more visible in the hope of preventing fools we spoke to had other forests that decorating seo what kind of things she light if she said she love pay as you pointed out view of the butterflies flowers and so he kind of went for a garden theme and my guest today is family doctor graham easton and we're gonna start graham with two very different infectious diseases first of all malaria now the has been huge success in controlling it but today the who 's world malaria report shows that progress is stalling so graham wants the situation if they're very worried that progress farting this century curable disease malaria has stalled so in the years two thousand fifteen to two thousand sixteen malaria infection cases have increased by about five million from two hundred eleven million two hundred and sixty million deaths have remained roughly the same but research is really are concerned even where data resent that accurate in countries where the don't keep packard to the research is really feel that there is evidence that things are slowing down and it seems surprising but as before that the has been really good progress asthma really impressive since two thousand when malaria was chosen as one of the focuses for the un's millennium development goals billions of dollars were plowed into malaria control programmes deaths from the disease re have reduced about sixty two percent since two thousand to two thousand fifteen so it's really going well but over the last couple of years old so could if this report things really have stalled particularly around those basic interventions that we know work things like artemisinin combination therapies which is the gold standard treatment which was made more affordable and more accessible by the funding that seems to have slowed down rapid diagnostic tests which was hugely important in helping delay development resistance testing children before treating them that seems to have slowed down as well and things basic things like insecticidetreated bednets so why is allies at just down to funding will that's what the who feel that the has been a plateau and funding in a sort of complacency this come in over the years from funders and from governments and they feel that there is evidence that since two thousand fourteen globally investment seminary have decreased in many of those countries where the burden is highest and the.

malaria packard un graham easton sixty two percent
"curable disease" Discussed on News Talk 1490

News Talk 1490

02:22 min | 4 years ago

"curable disease" Discussed on News Talk 1490

"A higher statues felony felonious assault for somebody know only infected with the hiv virus have to have sex with some without advising them that he has the the he or she has the virus and he attacked it on the on first amendment and equal protection and the majority said dad actually was content and new wasn't congress cod darkness and not as a speech whose into speech was incidental and therefore what they call rational basis tests and a fat cells rational basis because of spreading aids and the the sand written by justice dewine said basically had no it is it deals would speech but there's we have called strict scrutiny when you have to show them pelley governmental interests and he said there was a compelling governmental mattress and i'm actually more in line based upon how by law professor uh back when i but i took constitutional law i really i thought nailed the analysis of the court seem to make this the station and they've done it for many many years that between speech which is protected by the first amendment and conduct which is not and frankly i think that distinction this is the point that a lot of times conduct is what we call xpress the speech you are in some ways by your conduct communicating to people what your feelings are without having to use your mouth uh but the question then becomes all right if it is if it's all considered speech whether it's words spoken our actions taken it goes down to the question of whether the state has a compelling interest in regulating or requiring the speech to occur and and now in that sense i do agree with with the the opinion written by justice to wine which is yeah i can't think of anything more compelling that perfecting preventing the spread of any curable disease okay and making sure that if you're going to have sex with somebody that the person who is going to be the recipients knows that you are you know you have that it curable disease at all by the way you by get it if you're not careful eye that that seems to make a lot of sense to me uh effective it's one of those ties one the of the.

assault hiv virus first amendment justice dewine professor constitutional law
"curable disease" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"curable disease" Discussed on KGO 810

"Easily curable diseases now probably be keep you pretty grounded sense of purpose it's right and then you've got mark zuckerberg slip in up to number four at seventy one billion dollars scana evil and beware of him evil can't afford a thai seventy one billiondollar can't even afford a her and he's he's a easily the younger this guy on the top five holes zuckerberg he still was thirty right there yeah i'm pretty sure i'm old and he is when we make me sad where is he going to end up where is he going to end up gene how because of ms evil is 33 years old thirty three seek an end up being the the richest person that's ever lived adjusted for inflation i don't know just insanely or does facebook just disappear he's a joke and i don't know about that i mean 'cause who invented my space where they rich for wa no clue then you get your your alphabet your gugel they're trying as hard as they can to come up with their into everything at this point they're investing in everything that seems to be the future we got a new phone out today that's getting good reviews at least a new a say today there new phone the pixel to to real contender they say answered numerous leading and never that super three in a phone smartphones we were talking earlier this week about how the smartphones a social media are ruining a generation giving massive mental illness to america's young thanks a million to allen for sending this along she says in your discussion about being forced not to use your former i got wondering if there were apps that cut you off after a certain amount of time sure enough one search proved the summit already beat me.

wa social media america mark zuckerberg facebook allen seventy one billion dollars seventy one billiondollar 33 years
"curable disease" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:31 min | 4 years ago

"curable disease" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The coast and part of the bay partly to mostly sunny the rest of today highs cooler from the lower 70s to the low to mid '80s far inland eighty five degrees today and sacramento from kqed public radio in san francisco welcome to forum i nina kim california is struggling to get a handle on rising rates have sexually transmitted infections in 2016 for the second year in a row cases of committeea syphilis and gonorrhea have significantly increased with young people african americans and men who have sex with men having the highest rates san francisco recorded some of the biggest increases in infection rate statewide we look at what's behind the rise of these curable diseases and their health impacts in this opening hour form in joining me is jeffrey class mary is professor of medicine and public health the david gas in school of medicine at ucla he's also former director of std prevention and control services at to san francisco department of public health good morning jeffrey klausner by morning thanks for joining us and also heidi bauer is with us she is chief of the std control brandt at the california department of public health good morning hide power could mining heidi bauer i'll start with you give us a sense of the numbers how many cases of stds were reported in california last year and how does it compared with previous years right so how we had almost two hundred seventy five thousand kayhan a comedy agron 'area and reported in two thousand sixteen that's represent forty percent increase compared with five years ago and what is most turning i is that over two hundred cases on genital thought that were reported live here we saw fifteen percent increase in fourth and women of reproductive age and that leading to a large number of congenital for cases and twelve dope art yes talk about the health impacts of congenital syphilis on absolutely so we had the lowest rate in california and two thousand twelve and since then we've and significant increase jer um just in one year loan from two thousand to two thousand sixteen noted jump on 44 percent increase and were primarily hang these cases in the central valley of the gate where we're seeing much more heterosexual transmission of the floor.

sacramento san francisco syphilis gonorrhea jeffrey class mary david gas ucla jeffrey klausner heidi bauer california kqed kim california african americans professor of medicine public health california department of publi eighty five degrees fifteen percent forty percent 44 percent five years one year
"curable disease" Discussed on Podcast – The Pan-African Alliance

Podcast – The Pan-African Alliance

01:37 min | 5 years ago

"curable disease" Discussed on Podcast – The Pan-African Alliance

"Haiti had to agree to planned parenthood haiti had to agree to birth control measures that otherwise they would not have agreed to before the west with give them aid these are people who are suffering from an earthquake they're suffering from one of the worst natural disasters to hit the western hemisphere in modern history on top of being infected with diseases like hiv aids entice would it all kinds of curable diseases right quaranteed on their part of the island separated from the dominican republic and left there to die see quarantine as part of the weapon of white supremacy called infection i which is exposure to disease they'll keep a group of people in a certain area where diseases prevalent and let that disease barnum out but again s novel we're talking about is so many levels and layers to the weapons of white supremacy and namely hillary clinton and her ilk and we could spend a whole episode on net banamba labor in the point so planned parenthood and her support of planned parenthood will continue the programs of eugenics that have destroyed the black community if your haven't seen a documentary coma off the twenty one you can check it out on youtube i'll also include a link to it in the show notes but that documentary revealed the truth and the extent bonn programs of eugenics specifically targeted towards black men and women globally i so not only they tried to kill you after you leave the wall they're trying to kill you before you even come out of the womb.

Haiti earthquake hillary clinton birth control