35 Burst results for "Cumberland"

When AJ Gave up the Biggest Scoop of His Career for Jack Nicholson

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:26 min | 3 weeks ago

When AJ Gave up the Biggest Scoop of His Career for Jack Nicholson

"The next morning he was gonna shoot the cover for John Kennedy junior's magazine George and he didn't want to shoot it. He was out too late. He was with Ashley, then he met us at spy bar down in Soho. We had a ball. I mean, oh God, I'm getting on so many tangents. The point is, he never showed up for the shoot and John Kennedy junior couldn't do anything about it because it was the weekend he was in the island off Georgia about to get married to Carolyn bessette. And that's the night that Jack told me, I'm in town for the kids wedding. I said, oh, who's getting married? John John. And Jack just gave me everything. He told me to get married. They're on Cumberland island. He didn't know. He just gave me every fucking fact. And after that dinner I called my friend rosemary who represented John and I said, hey, I know the wedding is this weekend. I know where it's at. I know it's in tumbling island. Just tell John and Carolyn, I ain't gonna write about it, but just let them know I'm thinking about them. I want them to have a good time. AJ, I don't know what you're talking about. It's not true. Of course she knew it was true. And of course, John and Carolyn always loved me for not telling that story. However, I lost the biggest scoop in America. But I didn't care. Because I loved hanging out with Jack. I love making John Kennedy feel good. This was toward the end of my reign.

John Kennedy Carolyn Bessette Jack Soho John John Ashley Cumberland Island George John Georgia Carolyn Rosemary AJ America
"cumberland" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:45 min | 9 months ago

"cumberland" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"He is the cofounder and chairperson of Cumberland advisers Let's talk a little bit about Cumberland because you guys were a little bit of a head of the curve The company is founded in 73 so you're just about gee almost almost 50 years old but about a decade ago you relocated Cumberland from the tri state area to Florida Tell us a little bit about what the motivation of that relocation was It turned out that you were on the leading edge of a lot of financial firms looking to relocate to places where the cost structure is cheaper and the taxes are lower Well we were looking at the move in late 2000 6 7 and 8 and the financial crisis was unfolding at the time What we found is my colleagues and I were on airplanes for Florida all the time So that became a trigger At that point it was my company and now I have 17 shareholders and the majority of them are employees but I was the driver in 2008 2009 And I was the caregiver for my mother who died in 2008 So it was a restraining situation for me before I moved The move commenced seriously to Florida in 2009 we had examined it for a number of years And we started to transition the entire company and we still have a little office in New Jersey we still have a person and sometimes two people in the New Jersey office but everything is in Florida So because four years to move people it was literally during the financial crisis and aftermath so it was very difficult And there's a long story as to how we got to Sarasota and instead of the east coast and that's another story But the bottom line is we're now here We're about 46 people And we do most of the activities in Florida The motivation was not just taxes Everybody says oh yeah you went there to cut your taxes Well that was part of it And certainly in New Jersey after John corzine hike taxes he encouraged us to leave I jokingly say John corzine bought my condo for me That's what I was laughing about because I remember that exact line coming from you you know 8 years ago Well we moved into a very nice place that corzine paid for meaning what you're not paying in state taxes basically covers your the cost of your very nice housing on the intercoastal Yeah well here's the thing though We had our accounts at the time And I said look at the company and give me the picture if this were in farting So that's easy We just changed the income tax business to asset No no no no no Take all these people Have them live in the same value house Have them ensure their cars in Florida Give me a full picture The full picture was really compelling because the cost structure Totally besides just the direct taxes was an enormous amount So I said so if I move people and I can give them real incentives and those incentives give them an opportunity to really examine a full picture And that's what we created And we had a very strong incentive package of moving expenses We reimbursed bonuses if you make a move if you choose not to make the move you stay at your desk in New Jersey And all but two eventually made the move We had a deal with a whole lot of issues People on the cell houses and if I houses and then deal with families and I had the biggest crisis I had was somebody's daughter had a date for the prom and couldn't come and by the way she broke up and went to the prom with somebody else but I mean we went through it all But we got everybody here So that was way before the pandemic The question I'm leading you towards is so now with the pandemic the past two years you and I have talked about hiring people having never met them in person and having never had them step into your office but having them work remote it raises the question how has the pandemic and the work from home era change the entire calculus of where a firm like yours can elect to locate itself It's massive You've written about it in describing your own experiences Work from home I have two at work from home can be in Idaho Or in Florida it has it can be for many people where you want it to be And what you do and I would add it's made us much more productive Our capacity to do things and accomplish units of work if you will is so much improved depending on what you do So work from home why Florida if it's so attractive is not growing as fast as Idaho Why is this change taking place So you have to ask yourself are people rethinking location And lifestyle And I think that you look at places like Idaho and Montana you look at sections of the country and you say some things are going on here because they want to get out of the center of the big city So let's go into let's delve into that a little more deeply And I want to talk about wages and I want to talk about real estate if and let's not count the dozen partners and or people whose names are on the door at a firm like yours or mine we're talking about either new hires or administrative staff If you can locate them anywhere in the country do you pay the same wages in Idaho that you do in San Francisco or New York or is it a cost savings having a person remote in an area where the cost of living is so much lower I have a book in my library from 19 30.

Florida John corzine Cumberland advisers Let New Jersey Cumberland corzine Sarasota east coast Idaho Montana San Francisco New York
"cumberland" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:45 min | 9 months ago

"cumberland" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is the cofounder and chairperson of Cumberland advisers Let's talk a little bit about Cumberland because you guys were a little bit of ahead of the curve The company is founded in 73 so you're just about gee almost 50 years old but about a decade ago you relocated Cumberland from the tri state area to Florida Tell us a little bit about what the motivation of that relocation was It turned out that you were on the leading edge of a lot of financial firms looking to relocate to places where the cost structure is cheaper and taxes are lower Well we're looking at the move in late 2000 6 7 and 8 and the financial crisis was unfolding at the time What we found is my colleagues and I were on airplanes to Florida all the time So that became a trigger At that point it was my company and now I have 17 shareholders and the majority of them are employees but I was the driver in 2008 2009 And I was the caregiver for my mother who died in 2008 So it was a restraining situation for me before I moved The move commenced seriously to Florida in 2009 we had examined it for a number of years And we started to transition the entire company and we still have a little office in New Jersey we still have a person and sometimes two people in the New Jersey office flipped everything is in Florida It took us four years to move people It was literally during the financial crisis and aftermath so it was very difficult And there's a long story as to how we got to Sarasota and instead of the east coast and that's another story But the bottom line is we're now here We're about 46 people And we do most of the activities in Florida The motivation was not just taxes Everybody says oh yeah you went there to cut your taxes Well that was part of it And certainly in New Jersey after John corzine hike taxes he encouraged us to leave I jokingly say John corzine bought my condo for me That's what I was laughing about because I remember that exact line coming from you you know 8 years ago Well we moved into a very nice place that corzine paid for meaning what you're not paying in state taxes basically covers your the cost of your very nice housing on the intercoastal Yeah well here's the thing though We had our accountants at the time And I said look at the company and give me the picture if this were in farting So that's easy We just change the income tax and business to actually no no no no no Take all these people Have them live in the same value house Have them ensure their cars in Florida Give me a full picture The full picture was really compelling because the cost structure Tonally besides just the direct taxes was an enormous amount So I said so if I move people and I can give them real insane and those incentives give them an opportunity to really examine a full picture And that's what we created We had a very strong incentive package of moving expenses We reimbursed bonuses if you make the move if you choose not to make the move you stay at your desk in New Jersey And all the two eventually made the move We had a deal with a whole lot of issues People want to sell houses and if I houses and then deal with families and I had the biggest crisis I had was somebody's daughter had a date for the prom and couldn't come and by the way she broke up and went to the promise somebody else But I mean we went through it all But we got everybody here So that was way before the pandemic The question I'm leading you towards is so now with the pandemic the past two years you and I have talked about hiring people having never met them in person and having never had them step into your office but having them work remote raises the question how has the pandemic and the work from home era change the entire calculus of where a firm like yours can elect to locate itself Well it's massive You've written about it in describing your own experiences Work from home I have two at work from home can be an Idaho or in Florida It can be for many people where you want it to be And what you do and I would add it's made us much more productive Our capacity to do things and accomplish units of work if you will is so much improved depending on what you do So work from home why Florida if it's so attractive is not growing as fast as items Why is this change taking place So you have to ask yourself are people rethinking location And lifestyle And I think that you look at places like Idaho and Montana you look at sections of the country and you say something's going on here because they want to get out of the center the big city So let's go into let's delve into that a little more deeply and I want to talk about wages and I want to talk about real estate if and let's not count the dozen partners and or people whose names are on the door at a firm like yours or mine we're talking about either new hires or administrative staff If you can locate them anywhere in the country do you pave the same wages in Idaho that you do in San Francisco or New York or is it a cost savings having a person remote in an area where the cost of living is so much lower I have a book in my library from 19 30.

Florida John corzine Cumberland advisers Let New Jersey Cumberland corzine Sarasota east coast Idaho Montana San Francisco New York
"cumberland" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:47 min | 9 months ago

"cumberland" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Kotok He is the cofounder and chairperson of Cumberland advisers Let's talk a little bit about Cumberland because you guys were a little bit of ahead of the curve The company is founded in 73 so you're just about gee almost 50 years old but about a decade ago you relocated Cumberland from the tri state area to Florida Tell us a little bit about what the motivation of that relocation was It turned out that you were on the leading edge of a lot of financial firms looking to relocate to places where the cost structure is cheaper and taxes are lower Well we were looking at the move in late 2000 6 7 and 8 and the financial crisis was unfolding At the time what we found is my colleagues and I were on airplanes for Florida all the time So that became a trigger At that point it was my company and now I have 17 shareholders and the majority of them are employees but I was the driver in 2008 2009 And I was the caregiver for my mother who died in 2008 So it was a restraining situation for me before I moved The move commenced seriously to Florida in 2009 we had examined it for a number of years And we started to transition the entire company and we still have a little office in New Jersey we still have a person and sometimes two people in the New Jersey office but everything is in Florida So it goes four years to move people It was literally during the financial crisis and aftermath so it was very difficult And there's a long story as to how we got to Sarasota and instead of the east coast and that's another story But the bottom line is we're now here We're about 46 people And we do most of the activities in Florida The motivation was not just taxes Everybody says oh yeah you went there to cut your taxes Well that was part of it And certainly in New Jersey after John corzine hike taxes he encouraged us to leave Our jokingly say John corzine bought my condo for me That's what I was laughing about because I remember that exact line coming from you you know 8 years ago Well we moved into a very nice place that corzine paid for meaning what you're not paying in state taxes basically covers the cost of your very nice housing on the intercoastal Yeah well here's the thing though we had our accounts at the time And I said look at the company and give me the picture if this were in farting So that's easy We just changed the income tax and business to actually no no no Take all these people Have them live in the same value house Have them ensure their cars in Florida Give me a full picture The full picture was really compelling because the cost structure Totally besides just the direct taxes was an enormous amount So I said so if I move people and I can give them real incentives and those incentives give them an opportunity to really examine a full picture And that's what we created We had a very strong incentive package of moving expenses We reimbursed bonuses if you make the move if you choose not to make the move you stay at your desk in New Jersey And all but two eventually made the move We had a deal with a whole lot of issues people that sell houses and if I houses and then deal with families and I had the biggest crisis I had was somebody's daughter had a date for the prom and couldn't come and by the way she broke up and went to the promise somebody else But I mean we went through it all But we got everybody here So that was way before the pandemic The question I'm leading you towards is so now with the pandemic the past two years you and I have talked about hiring people having never met them in person and having never had them step into your office but having them work remote raises the question how has the pandemic and the work from home era change the entire calculus of where a firm like yours can elect to locate itself Well it's massive You've written about it in describing your own experiences Work from home I have two at work from home can be in Idaho or in Florida It can be for many people where you want it to be And what you do and I would add it's made us much more productive Our capacity to do things and accomplish units of work if you will is so much improved depending on what you do So work from home why Florida if it's so attractive is not growing as fast as items Why is this change taking place So you have to ask yourself are people rethinking location And lifestyle And I think that you look at places like Idaho and Montana you look at sections of the country and you say some things are going on here because they want to get out of the center of the big city So let's go into let's delve into that a little more deeply And I want to talk about wages and I want to talk about real estate if and let's not count the dozen partners and or people whose names are on the door at a firm like yours or mine we're talking about either new hires or administrative staff If you can locate them anywhere in the country do you pay the same wages in Idaho that you do in San Francisco or New York or is it a cost savings having a person remote in an area where the cost of living is so much lower I have a book in my library from 19 30 5.

Florida John corzine Kotok Cumberland advisers Let New Jersey Cumberland corzine Sarasota east coast Idaho Montana San Francisco New York
"cumberland" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:44 min | 9 months ago

"cumberland" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The cofounder and chairperson of Cumberland advisers Let's talk a little bit about Cumberland because you guys were a little bit of ahead of the curve The company is founded in 73 so you're just about gee almost 50 years old but about a decade ago you relocated Cumberland from the tri state area to Florida Tell us a little bit about what the motivation of that relocation was It turned out that you were on the leading edge of a lot of financial firms looking to relocate to places where the cost structure is cheaper and the taxes are lower Well we're looking at the move in late 2000 6 7 and 8 and the financial crisis was unfolding at the time What we found is my colleagues and I were on airplanes for Florida all the time So that became a trigger At that point it was my company and now I have 17 shareholders and the majority of them are employees but I was the driver in 2008 2009 And I was the caregiver for my mother who died in 2008 So it was a restraining situation for me before I moved The move commenced seriously to Florida in 2009 we had examined it for a number of years And we started to transition the entire company and we still have a little office in New Jersey we still have a person and sometimes two people in the New Jersey office but everything is in Florida So of course four years to move people It was literally during the financial crisis and aftermath so it was very difficult And there's a long story as to how we got to Sarasota and instead of the east coast and that's another story But the bottom line is we're now here We're about 46 people And we do most of the activities in Florida The motivation was not just taxes Everybody says oh yeah you went there to cut your taxes Well that was part of it And certainly in New Jersey after John corzine hike taxes he encouraged us to leave I jokingly say John corzine bought my condo for me That's what I was laughing about because I remember that exact line coming from you you know 8 years ago Well we moved into a very nice place that corzine paid for meaning what you're not paying in state taxes basically covers your the cost of your very nice housing on the intercoastal Yeah well here's the thing though We had our accountants at the time And I said look at the company and give me the picture if this were in farting So that's easy We just changed the income tax business to actually Take all these people Have them live in the same value house Have them ensure their cars in Florida Give me a full picture The full picture was really compelling because the cost structure Totally besides just the direct taxes was an enormous amount So I said so if I move people and I can give them real incentives and those incentives give them an opportunity to really examine a full picture and that's what we created We had a very strong incentive package of moving expenses We reimbursed bonuses if you make a move if you choose not to make the move you stay at your desk in New Jersey And all but two eventually made the move We had a deal with a whole lot of issues People want to sell houses and buy houses and then deal with families and I had the biggest crisis I had was somebody's daughter had a date for the prom and couldn't come and by the way she broke up and went to the promise somebody else But I mean we went through it all But we got everybody here So that was way before the pandemic The question I'm leading you towards is so now with the pandemic the past two years you and I have talked about hiring people having never met them in person and having never had them step into your office but having them work remote it raises the question how has the pandemic and the work from home era change the entire calculus of where a firm like yours can elect to locate itself Well it's massive You've written about it in describing your own experiences Work from home I have two I work from home can be in Idaho Or in Florida it has it can be for many people where you want it to be And what you do and I would add it's made us much more productive Our capacity to do things and accomplish units of work if you will is so much improved depending on what you do So work from home why Florida if it's so attractive is not growing as fast as item Why is this change taking place So you have to ask yourself are people rethinking location And lifestyle And I think that you look at places like Idaho and Montana you look at sections of the country and you say some things are going on here Because they want to get out of the center the big city So let's go into let's delve into that a little more deeply and I want to talk about wages and I want to talk about real estate if and let's not count the dozen partners and or people whose names are on the door at a firm like yours or mine we're talking about either new hires or administrative staff If you can locate them anywhere in the country do you pave the same wages in Idaho that you do in San Francisco or New York or is it a cost savings having a person remote in an area where the cost of living is so much lower I have a book in my library from 19 30.

Florida John corzine Cumberland advisers Let New Jersey Cumberland corzine Sarasota east coast Idaho Montana San Francisco New York
Football Booster Club Raffles Firearms, Concerning Some Parents

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:07 min | 1 year ago

Football Booster Club Raffles Firearms, Concerning Some Parents

"Us what the cedar cliff. Colts booster club. Did and how it was received. Well you know a lot of these district clubs are what support In particular football those are what support the team. It helps them get the new equipment. New jersey Things of that nature the things that keep them safe and and they're usually charged with you know making a raising x. amount of money and they're all volunteer booster clubs are all volunteer programs. Almost all just made up with the parents because the players and or the cheerleaders and this year has been particularly hard to raise money. Because you know restaurants aren't giving you know is is. They're reluctant to give away anything free. Which is what they traditionally do or give away free meals In support of the booster club. You know this kids will buy a certificate and then they go around and they try to sell her raffle well. It's become incredibly impossible for these young people to raise money so they came up with the idea of having a raffle. There's ten different items on the raffle of those ten five variety of different kinds of guns. Now in dolphin and and cumberland counties because this this school district covers both Owning a gun is as common is only a car or a chart country this is hatred on thing and target shooting and and so you know they decided to have a raffle and gowns for part of it now. If the if you wanna gun eat it went one it. You got two hundred dollars dead. But there was one parent who took exception to this role and took it to the school district and the school district in. Its great wisdom that i understand your feelings however we have no jurisdiction over this.

Cedar Cliff Colts Booster Club New Jersey Football Cumberland
"cumberland" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"cumberland" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Governor has called in the National Guard to assist I'm Mark remarried ABC News The amount needs to raise a 90 minute track Lake hook road into Kennedy outbound at 14 and Bond Kennedy busy between Cumberland and Harlem division to the current interchange in the express lane Augusta to Ogden it will be a half an hour in from the airport 15 from montrose flipside 12 to the junction at 30 minute trek all the way outdoor air slowing you between the other straight tunnel and north avenue central to Cumberland because of ongoing road ring as in our 33 minutes three 92 wait till the goal post office 22 informal busy between 25th and first dam into the burn interchange Stevenson on the brakes Cicero to pulaski Damon to the Dan line 25 minutes in veterans 19 in from the dry state Dan Ryan slowing you Stevenson to the burn interchange 16 minutes 95th burning interchange For free bay high 57 they short drive not banned the same along the toes out of Wheaton however reported an accident Roosevelt and Main Street Same in age of Travis and ram Jane Smith with an accepted in 30 minutes Securities offered through TJ stern's a registered representative of cryo capital security's LP member finra SIPC Content is intended to provide accurate information However is not intended as financial tax or legal advice Please consult a financial legal or tax professional for specific information regarding your individual situation Opinions expressed and provided are for general informational purposes only and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security Welcome to protect and grow with Chicagoland certified.

90 minute 30 minute 33 minutes Mark Ogden 25 minutes Cumberland 30 minutes Wheaton TJ stern Dan Ryan Roosevelt 16 minutes Harlem Main Street Kennedy Travis ram Jane Smith Bond Kennedy Augusta
"cumberland" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"cumberland" Discussed on Bear Grease

"Be <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Music> able to hunt <Speech_Male> to be able to own weapons <Speech_Male> to have this unlimited <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> continent <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> ahead <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and of course they did things <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> we don't approve <Speech_Music_Male> especially to the indians <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> they weren't gonna let indian <Speech_Music_Male> stand in the way of <Speech_Music_Male> this <Speech_Music_Male> new <Speech_Music_Male> world <Speech_Music_Male> trying to <Speech_Music_Male> be <Speech_Music_Male> so they were far <Speech_Music_Male> from perfect people <Speech_Music_Male> but <Speech_Music_Male> they also did <Speech_Music_Male> wonderful <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> created <Speech_Music_Male> a sense <Speech_Music_Male> of a new <Speech_Music_Male> country a new civilization. <Speech_Music_Male> Yeah <Speech_Music_Male> so <Speech_Music_Male> historical <Speech_Music_Male> relativism. <Speech_Music_Male> I think is something <Speech_Music_Male> we <SpeakerChange> shouldn't carry <Music> too far. <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Met a bit of <Speech_Music_Male> a loss while gathering <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> my thoughts <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on this episode. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We really didn't <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> cover much of boone's life <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> part <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> one. We made it from his <Speech_Music_Male> birth to his mid thirties. <Speech_Music_Male> But <Speech_Music_Male> we're still here <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in his mid thirties. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We dedicated <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this. Entire <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> time to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the cumberland gap <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> because of its <Speech_Music_Male> significance <Speech_Music_Male> on boone <Speech_Music_Male> indigenous <Speech_Music_Male> people <Speech_Music_Male> and america. <Speech_Music_Male> Man <Speech_Music_Male> i love <Speech_Music_Male> daniel <Speech_Music_Male> boone. And <Speech_Music_Male> ten to celebrate <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> him <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and most <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> parts of his life. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Boone's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> passing through the cumberland <Speech_Music_Male> gap was <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> truly physical <Speech_Music_Male> feet romanticized <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and cherished by <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> back. Woodsmen like <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> myself <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> but it was also <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> deeply metaphorical <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for america. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I like the tension <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> between man and nature <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> narrow mountain <Speech_Music_Male> pass and this <Speech_Music_Male> rugged dude <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> duke it out <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> but i only <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> love it because <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> boone taught <Speech_Music_Male> us to love it. <Speech_Music_Male> It's the story <Speech_Music_Male> we identify <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with the one <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> we were born <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that version <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> ridiculously <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> embodies western <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thought. Even <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in its telling <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> indigenous. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> People didn't <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> view their lives in <Speech_Music_Male> conflict with nature. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> They <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> were simply part <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of it. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm speculating <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> but perhaps <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the indigenous <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> view wouldn't <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> see humans passing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> through the gap <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as a fight <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> against nature <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> but rather <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> like the current <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of a flooding <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> river. That <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> couldn't be held back. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The one thing that we <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> know for certain <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as we look at human <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> history is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that civilizations <Speech_Music_Male> rise <Speech_Music_Male> and fall <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in very <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> seldom <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is it just. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> suspect these <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> are the treacherous <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> waters <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> will

"cumberland" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

18:17 min | 1 year ago

"cumberland" Discussed on Bear Grease

"Just the nature of the times where he was at and what he was doing. He ended up being in conflict with different times. That you have to analyze zim. I think you'd have to analyze that aspect of him in context of his peers and compared his peers. Yeah he had a very lenient. Compared to the long hunters compared to other millet other soldiers of the time seems to have had a very tolerant rather progressive view of of relations between the euro. Americans in the native americans bought at the same time. Did a tremendous amount in some respects one could say like unintentionally but knowingly did a tremendous amount to displace those people but understood the loss that he was inflicting. Dr taylor keen is a graduate of dartmouth college and has a couple of graduate degrees from harvard. He's currently a professor in the business. School of crichton university in omaha nebraska most relevant for this conversation. He's a member of the cherokee in omaha nation. He considered himself a citizen historian the cherokee nation. I wanted to ask him about the other side of the story of the cumberland gap meet professor king professor team. I want to Want to tell you and experience. That had while i was in kentucky i took my family to the cumberland gap. So the cumberland gap sits on the border of tennessee virginia and kentucky and the way that we came through. The gap was from. Virginia and tennessee side. So we came from east to west. And as i. I'd been thinking about this for so long. I was excited in you. Kinda drive on this highway. And you can see the cumberland gap. And as i'm there with my boys car wife. I'm talking to them about how you know. This is what daniel boone saw. This is exactly what he saw minus the buildings in civilization when he came through here. And we we went through the cumberland gap from from east to west. We stayed in middlesboro kentucky that night and that evening we decided we were going to drive back through the gap and when i was driving from west to east i just had the thought that most likely the first human to ever walk through that gap came from west east most likely no one really knows where the indigenous people of north america exactly came from but the best evidence right now i would say with. They came from the west and moved into the east and it was really kind of moving thought because as an as a american. I'm thinking about the european americans that came from east to west but the indigenous peoples they would have found that thousands of years before before americans did in the french did and white europeans and it was. And that's what got me on this train of thought of you know we celebrate this path. People passing through this gap but for the indigenous people of this country of this continent. It wasn't something necessarily to be celebrated. And that's why i wanted to talk to you. I just wanted to get your your perspective and just talk about ultimately the impact of of europeans. Coming in through the cumberland gap and then just settling the rest of north america. I think that's a fantastic intro. And that's the big question is not how long ago where the first humans to see that. And that's a mind. Mind boggling question for sure. The theory to which you are indicating is the baron straight theory. Correct there's a couple of them. I hear of. But that has an indelible. On americans. Perceptions of indigenous peoples are ancient cherokee stories Say that we come from an island in the east meaning the atlantic and that we were on a island that had volcanoes and Big turtles that's actually a very important part of cherokee cosmology. Those those Turtles but that makes it sound like it's somewhere around the galapagos or something like that and then our stories say that that that was where we had massive temples and and an earlier golden age that eventually water overcame the island and we had to flee. And that's where our stories of grandmother spider carried our one number from one great fire and that we've migrated into what would be south america and the turkey is the only tribe that utilize blow dart guns as hunting weapons as well as double walled basket tree. And so that's an imprint. Of our time in south america and then that we migrated up over the great old man which is the mississippi river and then eventually found ourselves up near the senecas because that's are most closely related tribal groups and eventually we were forced down south into what is more often than not viewed as you know turkey homelands but we were probably immigrants to that areas while you can look to the five civilized. Tribes the creeks in the choctaw chickasaw and and and the seminoles that was that was their homeland but turkey certainly occupied it. The question is for how long. So when we're talking about things. Like the cumberland gap it. Time as continuing makes it really really messy regardless of who discovered that of course. We'll we'll never know. Most americans would site that of daniel. Boone who valley signs. I think indigenous peoples had a bigger influence on on daniel boone and other frontiers men than what is more popularly recognized. Yes and little things like him. Basting the turkey with its own juices and something that you know we as americans just take for commonplace but I was probably thousands year old indigenous practice with you know with those those great birds that have been here for a very long time very important in tribal cultures. Talk to me about the the long term like high level overview of what happened what that started to the indigenous people when when white europeans came through that gap. Well it's There's one aspect of indigenous history in the americas that you can't get around. That's the issue of smallpox and disease primarily smallpox. However it got here many scholars would theorized it came from the spanish probably spanish conquistadors and whether or not came directly from human contact or dogs or horses of course in these days we all understand the basics of a pandemic doesn't doesn't matter how it got here. What does matter was the impact on indigenous peoples without exception across all of the americas. Whether that's what is now. Canada and the united states central america south america the indigenous peoples were decimated by smallpox most conservative estimates are around seventy percent but the bulk of the data that we do have is eighty five to ninety five percent decimation death rates from smallpox. And so we have these fascinating documented encounters with indigenous peoples from say the spanish conquistadors and massive numbers tribal peoples in the amazon mesoamerica. You can pick your conquistador and follow each story but the story is pretty much the same. They were outnumbered. In many cases pushed back repelled or defeated came back with larger armies a few years later and found everyone gone. And so it's that's that's the story that i think is so hard for people to get their minds wrapped around. Think of your one hundred closest friends and family and there's only five of you left. Wow so it at the least it Only have detrimentally impacted tribal peoples whether that's abrasive headman. In warriors which is crucial at such times or the the the knowledge of agricultural lifeways ninety five percent of the knowledge gone so in many cases we were kind of faced with almost a cultural amnesia. And so if you were a child that survived that no longer. Do you have ninety. Five percent of those teachers storytellers. You have five and they have five percent of what was left. So you have this huge gap and made it an easy story for your americans coming to america to view it as a vast wilderness when in reality you know it's been populated for over ten thousand years for sure and arguably twenty to thirty thousand years so there there was no wilderness. There was only land and the animals and whether one knew them or not. I'd look at things. Like the cumberland gap and i think. Easy ten thousand years maybe fifteen and if we go into the number of generations of people that is. It's just mind boggling. When we think of american history just at a surface level you think of wars with indigenous people that would have killed native americans. immuno musket balls and whatnot. But really that. That's not the culprit. That's not the main culprit. The main culprit was disease this hidden this hidden warfare that came in just from contact which is just really such a bizarre thing when you think about it because how how bad at i don't know i mean i'm sure there's science behind how these white europeans were coming from tightly grouped dwelling places of people so disease with spread around and these indigenous people were living. These healthy lives out in the wild so they didn't have disease. That's the biggest irony. Because nearly all of these pandemic says it were smallpox etcetera all came from domesticated animals So smallpox is a evasion of cowpox. And that's why there was a greater immunity towards it with european populations They were certainly not immune when you dig deep into american history. You see the impact on even on the founding fathers themselves you know just a personal question professor keen like i mean you can tell from me doing a podcast series on daniel boone. This is a man that like. I want to celebrate you. See inside the research. Boone was just a figurehead. He was just an archetype for for what americans did. He was just the one that we kind of picked to be our heroes. So we're not necessarily picking on boone but like how. How do you feel when we celebrate. Somebody like boone. I mean but you're in american as well now. I mean it's so long past but what are your personal thoughts on that. I've just always found it fascinating. I mean first of all i. I consider myself a patriot. And i love our country and i understand why all cultures need heroes. And so you talked a lot about branding and archetypes. And of course that's all stuff in our and our field a business. And i understand that. And so i acknowledge that he was an icon. He was an archetype of that frontier. Zeman but i also feel like there should be in history indigenous peoples that he worked with learned from spent time hunting with that should also be those types types of heroes and we don't know who those are but guaranteed they were there He did have a relationship with try. The cherokees he did have a relationship with the shawnise. I'm just glad that podcasts like yours. Today bring those aspects of history backup because it only adds to the rich tapestry of really. What would made those individuals able to survive. What an incredible perspective from professor came. I want to go back to mr morgan and hear what he has to say about historical revision. I figure he's got some insight in modern times people have they go back into history and they they find faults with people based on things that we now know were agreed things like slavery like people we now know worldwide that this was a terrible thing. This is a. This is a scar on humanity. That we've we've been a part of this but it but it just doesn't seem fair to go back and say that every human that ever was involved in that in any way was an evil person and at the same time. I'm i'm talking about boone and want to give him credit for all these things but we know there was this irony inside of his life for things that were done the native americans and you know we said that he owned a slave and not a whole lot is known about that. Can you speak to that. Discount like your personal thoughts on on how we can deal with that well. Historical revisionism is the fashion. Now and people won't to impose on the past the values and the judgments of the present and we should keep that in mind. You know our ideals and our ethics as we look at historical figures but we sit also be tolerant because we're all human beings and we all make mistakes and in the future. some historian may be looking at us. they inevitably will So do you also want to be more flexible and looking at these figures and not only see what they did wrong but to see what they did right and the case of boom to remember why he's important. I mean there's a reason he saw important in american culture and in fact in world culture. We shouldn't have it both ways. Yeah i think we should remember that. Daniel boone believe it or not raises a quaker actually had slaves at least one point and we should remember that we tend human beings to act the way other people are acting in a culture. That probably at that time. It's seen okay. 'cause everybody was doing it to realize that to remember that thomas jefferson owned slaves but the also hard slavery. The strange paradox. To remember that Boone did other things. It wasn't just owning a slave pride. So it's possible in what i'm hearing you say is that it's very possible for someone to in this same so contrary to what we hear happening in society today but it is possible for someone to have parts of their life that are very honorable and noble and then maybe have one section. That wasn't great and that one section doesn't cancel out the honorable and noble. I don't think we should look at people's lives just over one issue. I mean you've got to look at take the thing all around and away and Try to get some understanding of them as a human being with many facets At the same time you keep in mind the values of the president of course that a historian is looking at things through the lens of the present always and their own biases and values. But you can't be much of a historian or biographer. Unless you're able to also see things through the lens of that time otherwise you will be so limited and your approach you have to have this sympathetic imagination empathetic imagination so you can try to find out how those people saw things. How did the world look to rebecca boone to michael in a stone er- to simon kenton. What were they after. They trying to do of course. You can't do that perfectly. But the point of historical writing is to try to imagine what this was like what it had been like to have kentucky. They're in a week and say oh they destroyed the game. They bought slavery into kentucky. What was michael stoner. What was boom thinking of at that time and they were probably think of this great paradise the thing available distinct. There can go there i can. I can become a part of it. We cannot judge in our own time. What land meant to these scotch-irish emigrants who'd never had a foot of land. They could keep what that mid to here to.

cumberland smallpox daniel boone kentucky Dr taylor keen School of crichton university middlesboro south america omaha tennessee north america Virginia west east united states central america Boone dartmouth college americas
"cumberland" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

07:51 min | 1 year ago

"cumberland" Discussed on Bear Grease

"Native americans. I want to continue to look boone's relationship with them and restate. That boone was boom because of native americans with no native americans. There's no daniel boone national archetype that we know they seem to have more influence on him than white culture. Here's stephen Discussing this very thing. He had a really unique relationship with indians. In that he was at one point in life he was adopted by the shawny as the son of blackfish and he always had this site seemingly deep respect for native americans but just the nature of the times where he was at and what he was doing. He ended up being in conflict with different times. That you have to analyze zim. I think you'd have to analyze that aspect of him in context of his peers and compared his peers. Yeah he had a very lenient. Compared to the long hunters compared to other millet other soldiers of the time seems to have had a very tolerant rather progressive view of of relations between the euro. Americans in the native americans bought at the same time. Did a tremendous amount in some respects one could say like unintentionally but knowingly did a tremendous amount to displace those people but understood the loss that he was inflicting. Dr taylor keen is a graduate of dartmouth college and has a couple of graduate degrees from harvard. He's currently a professor in the business. School of crichton university in omaha nebraska most relevant for this conversation. He's a member of the cherokee in omaha nation. He considered himself a citizen historian the cherokee nation. I wanted to ask him about the other side of the story of the cumberland gap meet professor king professor team. I want to Want to tell you and experience. That had while i was in kentucky i took my family to the cumberland gap. So the cumberland gap sits on the border of tennessee virginia and kentucky and the way that we came through. The gap was from. Virginia and tennessee side. So we came from east to west. And as i. I'd been thinking about this for so long. I was excited in you. Kinda drive on this highway. And you can see the cumberland gap. And as i'm there with my boys car wife. I'm talking to them about how you know. This is what daniel boone saw. This is exactly what he saw minus the buildings in civilization when he came through here. And we we went through the cumberland gap from from east to west. We stayed in middlesboro kentucky that night and that evening we decided we were going to drive back through the gap and when i was driving from west to east i just had the thought that most likely the first human to ever walk through that gap came from west east most likely no one really knows where the indigenous people of north america exactly came from but the best evidence right now i would say with. They came from the west and moved into the east and it was really kind of moving thought because as an as a american. I'm thinking about the european americans that came from east to west but the indigenous peoples they would have found that thousands of years before before americans did in the french did and white europeans and it was. And that's what got me on this train of thought of you know we celebrate this path. People passing through this gap but for the indigenous people of this country of this continent. It wasn't something necessarily to be celebrated. And that's why i wanted to talk to you. I just wanted to get your your perspective and just talk about ultimately the impact of of europeans. Coming in through the cumberland gap and then just settling the rest of north america. I think that's a fantastic intro. And that's the big question is not how long ago where the first humans to see that. And that's a mind. Mind boggling question for sure. The theory to which you are indicating is the baron straight theory. Correct there's a couple of them. I hear of. But that has an indelible. On americans. Perceptions of indigenous peoples are ancient cherokee stories Say that we come from an island in the east meaning the atlantic and that we were on a island that had volcanoes and Big turtles that's actually a very important part of cherokee cosmology. Those those Turtles but that makes it sound like it's somewhere around the galapagos or something like that and then our stories say that that that was where we had massive temples and and an earlier golden age that eventually water overcame the island and we had to flee. And that's where our stories of grandmother spider carried our one number from one great fire and that we've migrated into what would be south america and the turkey is the only tribe that utilize blow dart guns as hunting weapons as well as double walled basket tree. And so that's an imprint. Of our time in south america and then that we migrated up over the great old man which is the mississippi river and then eventually found ourselves up near the senecas because that's are most closely related tribal groups and eventually we were forced down south into what is more often than not viewed as you know turkey homelands but we were probably immigrants to that areas while you can look to the five civilized. Tribes the creeks in the choctaw chickasaw and and and the seminoles that was that was their homeland but turkey certainly occupied it. The question is for how long. So when we're talking about things. Like the cumberland gap it. Time as continuing makes it really really messy regardless of who discovered that of course. We'll we'll never know. Most americans would site that of daniel. Boone who valley signs. I think indigenous peoples had a bigger influence on on daniel boone and other frontiers men than what is more popularly recognized. Yes and little things like him. Basting the turkey with its own juices and something that you know we as americans just take for commonplace but I was probably thousands year old indigenous practice with you know with those those great birds that have been here for a very long time very important in tribal cultures. Talk to me about the the long term like high level overview of what happened what that started to the indigenous people when when.

cumberland daniel boone boone Dr taylor keen School of crichton university kentucky omaha middlesboro tennessee virginia dartmouth college west east north america stephen nebraska harvard south america atlantic mississippi river turkey
"cumberland" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"cumberland" Discussed on Bear Grease

"Gave a.

"cumberland" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

07:24 min | 1 year ago

"cumberland" Discussed on Bear Grease

"Gap. Is this like small topographic feature that if you were looking across togue graphic map of north america. You wouldn't pick it out as this place. That was really significant in american history but it became very significant is significant for the united states but was also significant for boone. Can you explain us why. It was so significant specifically for daniel boone. Well it's the topography that makes it so important to have this chain of mountains cumberland's and they're hard to cross particularly for the no roads and trails or almost none and for about two hundred years english. Speaking settlers had Kind of entrapped on the eastern side of these mountains so to get to the middle ground. The great meadow. They needed an easier way than just crossing one pro of mountains after another after another. There were other gaps pound gap. Farther north was away. In through the cumberland's into the cumberland plateau. But it wasn't as good as as a cumberland gap which have been used for thousands of years by the indians. They had a name for it. They called it wasi oda meaning the deer path the deer trail and No secret to the indians they have known about it for a long time but getting into kentucky was an enormously important thing as it turned out he wouldn't think so really what they needed a way into the middle ground into the bluegrass because that was the opening really to the west to what we call the middle west. You could get to it by coming down the ohio river but you have to go way up there to pittsburgh that area to get on the river and it was very dangerous to come down the river because you had indians on both sides and many were killed coming down that river but there were very few indians in kentucky. That's why it seemed to appealing. It seemed like a miracle that no indian villages there this vast area of the bluegrass. Why would that be That was very interesting. It was a mystery but a very wonderful mystery to explorers Well there is a reason. There are several reasons but There had been enormous fervor war early in the eighteenth century between indians. And the french. For control of what we call the bluegrass. Everybody wanted it. And that you're a koi had one bat this huge confederation of iroquois way up here in new york actually They travelled a long way and that was their buffalo hunting ground. They forbade the other indians for building villages there but it wasn't just iroquois and the other in everybody wanted that cherokees wanted it the mingas wanted the delaware's but because it was so fought over it was called a dark and bloody ground. Now that's not kentucky maine's kenta key made from irkutsk word meaning the flatland the level land there have been many names for the area of kentucky for longtime people thought. That's what kentucky. Ms the dark and bloody ground. They had heard that but The iroquois named something a little more peaceable kentucky and why would the white people of color coded by ear koi name. Am i think they had heard the cherokees use it and there's something so beautiful about kentucky those double case sounds the actual word itself. Once you've heard it you just want to say it is like poetry. It's sweet on the tongue and he could have called it as the shawnee did s coupon. Kathy are you could call it kentucky and we can see what out but cumberland gap was so important because coming from the eastern colonies from the carolinas from tennessee. That was the way in. That was fairly easy way. Once you've found it follow the warriors path and a looking at these absolutely forbidding cliffs a boon Or somebody in the adventures colonel daniel. Boone said they're like the ruins of paul mira daniel over here about the ruins of palmyrah daniel. Boone was surprisingly educated. Some as you love to read. And he loved to read history. He had a fabulous memory. He could remember topography. I've ever seen a place. He would remember it and He had a gift for language and an ability to talk the language of whoever he was talking to that ability to blend in and among these backwoods mundi could talk rough when he met better educated. People could talk like a better edge. Person you know. Is that That the mirror that language mirror he was with code switching absolutely have the kind of You know chameleon and gillete. And i think some people that was put in there by philipson but it may have been but i think was perfectly capable of coming up with the phrase he had read or heard And saying they're like the ruins of palmeira. Craig is the innovator and leader in pocket hole. Join ary setting the standard. For thirty plus years a pocket hold joint is when you connect to pieces of wood in using angled. Screw basically connect the woods like you would in a cabinet the pocket hole jig. 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kentucky cumberland mingas cumberland plateau daniel boone middle west boone colonel daniel ohio river paul mira daniel palmyrah daniel Boone north america irkutsk indians philipson pittsburgh united states buffalo delaware
"cumberland" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"cumberland" Discussed on Bear Grease

"Here's what he had to say. I have two favorite boone stories one's very precise and specific and one is more general and that one is about a moment in the other. One is about a stretch of years in terms of the one that lasted for a stretch of years. If i had an opportunity to do time travel. And i just had one shot. I'm torn between two things. One would be to go to the northern great plains at a time when the first humans had kinda entered. What is now the sort of like the you know. The mid continent entered. What is now the great plains of america. So non non boone related non-related twenty thousand years ago. Whatever it was to be on the northern plains with the paleo indian hunters who were i ever humans step foot so if i didn't do that pleistocene mammoth hunter move. I would wanna go with boone. When he went. And i hundred kentucky for a couple of years and yes i said a couple of years. They win there on a long hunt. People he was with were killed. He wound up staying willfully not trapped just staying so long that he ran out of gunpowder had make his own gunpowder with back. Guano from caves. Worked up you know a good amount of money's worth hides lost. It was taken from him by the indians and they from their perspective. He had taken it from them. They took a back worked up another good fortune in hides had that taken from him comes home empty-handed but that adventure that two year adventure in the wilderness. The finite very specific moment is later when boone wanted to bring his family out to the wilderness kentucky. His boy one of his boys was tortured and killed on the route on the wilderness. Road that lead into kentucky. Which was the cumberland gap. Yeah they were spread out there. Movin livestock you. Magic walking long but they were there strung out will destroy strung out so much fact as you're traveling through in a big group. They're strung out so much in fact. That boy gets caught tortured and killed. Boone doesn't know what's going on until later but he's very His boys left there and he's very hastily buried the didn't wanna linger too hastily buried. His son a believe might have been about a year later. And this is the kind of favorite boone story moment but a year later he happens to be going through there by himself and as he tells it it's raining he describes it as the most as the lowest point of his life goes back to find his boys grave. His boy was killed with another kid finds where they had hastily buried in the has been dug up by wolves and it was just the remains. There scavenged remains but he recognizes. His boys hair dried scalp on his head and so he knows what child his and sits with him and weeps with him in his arms in the rain. And then here's something that doesn't sound right to him and realizes there are indians common and has to a slip off into the night to get away I'm a father. losing a child is just. You can't begin to imagine it but these people live so close to death that sometimes you think they had to have been immune to it right if you watch westerns righteous people shooting people all the time and like no one cares ambivalent Maybe there was some of that but that he had like that deep emotion. You know shows that like they felt all that stuff he was human like anybody did and the thought of a father in the rain by himself. Cradling the wolf scavenged body of his child and then slipping off into the night Odds haunting man. Well i think what you've tapped into there is that with these superhero disney fide characters. That we've made of some of these people like boone. We lose the fact that they are human That's lost somewhere inside of that story. And that when you see some of these things that he did. And i think this is where the the the.

boone kentucky indians cumberland america Boone disney
"cumberland" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"cumberland" Discussed on Bear Grease

"Are you. This is the historic cumberland gap. You're there this is it man. I think this is where james lawrence would put his trees dan if he was trying to. Hunt the cumberland gap voice. This is about the most narrow spot of the gap. The native americans called this the deer path and james lawrence and many others before since him made of deer hunting in these gaps in the mountains. guys daniel. Boone stood right here. Think about that. I mean like maybe his feet. We're right where your feet are in the. The vegetation of the gap would have been different in seventeen sixty. Nine is the first time he came through here but he would've stood within. I mean at least ten feet of here. No doubt they give all the native americans that came through this gap the buffalo wild. What do you think do crazy is pretty cool. Grab what these woods look like. Bear right here in the company. The illegal like arkansas. I guess is eastern deciduous right there. There's a lot of trees white trees. There's a lot of green on the ground. There's a lot of rocks covered in moss. Yeah going into. The gap was a unique experience for me. You get the impression the cumberland gap is massive in grand. But it's really not. It's a narrow mountain gap. It's wild to think that such historical significance derived from such an obscure place frederick jackson. Turner roped stand at the cumberland gap and watch the procession of civilization marching single file. The buffalo following the trail to the salt springs. The indian the fur trader and hunter the cattle raiser the pioneer farmer in the frontier has passed by. Here's steve were nella. On the significance of the cumberland gap on boone's life. Some people's lives. We see this through history. Some people's lives become defined by history. Not necessarily by them. I don't know if daniel boone would look back at his life in see that. Going through the cumberland gap was that significant. Maybe would maybe wouldn't but history has decided that that is this defining Moment that was iconic man had significance to him. Why why was it significant. If you'd asked him and he was in the mood to discuss it. I think it would have been described as this is what we his family's people him. This is what we had always been hoping to find in all those moves and all those shifting arounds like that's the thing you are after unlimited game grassland agricultural land no other people that look like you there people that were they were easily dismissed by them reckoned with but but not recognizes the rightful owners to it you know and also it was a hard thing to do and they nude it to do it to try to pull it off. They knew it was risky. They knew it was a major undertaking. You had to scout it. You had the plan. It was like a thing. Meaning that not any way equate this. I grew up in michigan and wound up in montana. If i was laying out my life for someone later i would put that as a key moment guy that was like a key moment upon which many things were angered. And there's no way that boone wouldn't regard that going through the cumberland gap. And he didn't he didn't discover kentucky and he said he discovered talking. Yeah he no doubt went places at no white man had gone before absolu- through the gap. Yeah he said like man. My whole life built up to this. I put everything i had into making this ago. I put my family at risk to make this ago. He's buried in two places. But i think it would have been symbolic and he would recognize the symbolism. Had you taken his.

cumberland james lawrence frederick jackson buffalo Boone salt springs dan daniel boone moss arkansas daniel boone Turner hunter steve montana michigan kentucky
"cumberland" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"cumberland" Discussed on Bear Grease

"Of a product of erosion of rock. That's been uplifted to make them out. In the first place and erosion preferentially for example on the rocks that are weakest salako. She'll versus the granite If there are places where. The mountains rocks have been fractured. You might have faults that slid and they introduce the place where erosion can can happen in create that notch or gap that would allow people to pass through it Other places like if you're in the himalayas you'd have glaciers that are creating some of those notches that you could pass over in the term Notch gap pass applies universally. You can look across the us in the rockies up in canada in the appalachians and see similar features and not all of them are caused by the same things. The appalachians were the product of several mountain building events. But one that was really prominent Is what's called the guinean rajini when you take continental crust and other material and you collide it together to make a mountain belt. You end up producing faults where some rocks slide up on top of another in the pine mountain thrust is the main structure that brings part of the appalachians up on top of the adjacent rock. But then there are other faults in everyone's familiar with the san andreas fault for example and in that case rocks are actually sliding past each other on a very steep fault like a los angeles is now creeping towards san francisco for example and the vault unique in the cumberland gap. Kind of like that. It's a steep fault where rocks slid past each other called the rocky face fault. And if you didn't have the juxtaposition of the pine mountain thrust in the rocky face fault where the sit in intersect each other. It seems conceivable. You would never really had a gap larry. So there's two different major forces working together that created get to faults that occur right in that vicinity that helped create the gap and we talked about earlier. How the rock type matters to and some of the high ground that's held up along. The ridges is very resistant. Sandstone conglomerate rock and so it helps to have rocks that are more resistant weathering. What kind of map would you call this. You got pulled up your so. This is What's called a digital elevation model. And it's basically a three dimensional representation of what hunters would see as a topographic map. The i don't know if anybody knows about this but there is a huge impact crater that is just to the south west of what you're talking about. Is that a natural lake there at borough. No it's not a league it is. So here's the topographic map and you can see. It's a depression so he's described to you what i'm seeing. He's he's pointing at an impact crater which looks like i mean like an asteroid or something hit. There was that right. That is what the current thinking is that. Here's a geologic map and you can see. It's got this circular shape to it and there is Pretty decent evidence that post deposition these rocks and the appalachian rajini something smacks hard right there. And apparently this is one of the few places where coal is mined within an impact crater really. Yeah geologists call these impact. Craters astro blames daniel. Boone had three interesting structures to negotiate along with all of the native americans prior to him in everybody trying to make the trip across the appalachian two intersecting faults. An astro blame where an asteroid hit. Aided informing the cumberland gap. I like connecting human history to grand things like mountain building that we have absolutely no control over but inflict massive control. On us the cumberland gap is the biggest invest gap for one hundred miles in either direction enforces above and below the earth. Help make it that way. It's wild because no gap in the world has been more critical in building. An empire in the cumberland gap. The gap is actually pretty new to people of european descent but native americans have used it since before recorded history and they called it. The warriors path at the womanly. This gap connected the iroquois confederacy in the chair keys in the south. The first recorded account of europeans. Gone through the cumberland gap dates back to the sixteen seventy s but dr thomas walker officially named the gap. It's european name anyway in the seventeen. Fifty s wild and ironic. This american gap was named after a straight up english chump. The duke of cumberland because of his recent military escapade. And wouldn't you know what they named the whole stinking mountain range. After this man who never set foot in north america owed the injustice the shawnee however called the range wasi oto which means mountains where the deer are plentiful. I can get behind that. Dr walker was a medical doctor. Land speculator in a woodsmen. He took good notes of his seventeen. Fifty travels into kentucky they hauled a pack bear hounds with them and ate a lot of bear me. Here's a couple of wild stories. One of his men got bit on the knee by of bear. Pretty unfortunate walkers horse got snake bit on the nose and he rubbed it with bear grease to help cure it. not kidding. it's in his journal. Walker recorded killing thirteen buffalo's eight elk fifty-three bear twenty year. Four geese hundred fifty turkeys on their five month trip. In walker's men built a i log cabin. Constructed by white men in kentucky was no doubt quite the trip but very few remember doctor walkers name but do remember who crossed the gap almost twenty years later. I want to take you into the cumberland gap. You can go there yourself. This mountain pass maintained its relevance into modern times as a travel corridor as it eventually became modern. Us highway twenty-five the section of road was extremely treacherous. In the cumberland gap was notorious for tragic vehicle. Accidents claiming an average of five lives per year in this very short stretch of road however something good happened on october. Eighteenth nineteen ninety-six cumberland gap twin bore. Four lane tunnel was opened. Which burrows through cumberland mountain and in an incredibly encouraging feet they remove the concrete and asphalt highway that went through the old gap and re weilded and today it looks similar to what it looked like when only a single wagon lane trail passed through it. The gap. now sits in the cumberland state park. it's an incredible place. And i took my family there. So we are at the cumberland. Gap is the historic cumberland gap. We're in the cumberland gap right now. Take a picture with your mama marcus. Clad warrior battling civil war soldiers. Each was here in the historic cumberland gap. And now so.

cumberland salako san andreas dr thomas walker Dr walker larry san francisco los angeles canada Boone depression Us daniel kentucky warriors north america cumberland mountain Walker buffalo
"cumberland" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

07:49 min | 1 year ago

"cumberland" Discussed on Bear Grease

"That song is called cumberland gap. It's being played by string. Band out of ohio called the way fares. I'm continuing to build on the assumption that the average american doesn't know much about daniel boone and were exploring how despite that this backwoods man's influence on the american worldview was notable in part one. We learned that archetypes are the mechanism of this powerful culture building weapon. They deliver a value system through branding around the lives of our heroes or villains after some time the values remain but the original life. The host is often forgotten. And this is just the point daniel. Boone did stuff that captured the attention of america in the world in a vulnerable time period. When we were looking for identity the prime of his life was in the seventeen seventies a time when many of our heroes were bird in old. Dan stepped up to the plate and untrue. Americana fashion became a representative man. The courageous explore engaging and thriving in the wilderness and bringing civilization with him. He delivered parts of the american dream to america. I'll point out that this was a new identity for planet earth at least this version of it and it had ravished appeal in part one. We left the burgers. Podcasts world in a massive cliffhanger with daniel boone and john. Findlay finding the cumberland gap in going into the frontier of kentucky in seventeen sixty nine. We're going to nerd out on the cumberland gap and we'll hear firsthand from boone. What happened on that first trip into kentucky well sorta it's complicated but there's a bigger question at hand. Why were they risking life and limb to get into kentucky in an even. Bigger question is this. Why is there this deep history of human geographic dispersion. All steve or nella meter has something to say about this. I interviewed him up right on part one. And he's got all the street crab or should i say backwoods cred. He's a new york tops. Bestselling author hunter noted boone expert. Here's steep there's a kind of a theory of human movement around the earth where artscience a theory away you imagine human movement around the earth so often is that it's your propelled by warfare in starvation. Human migrations under duress. Okay so with people you know in the nineteen thirties right. You have jews. Escaping europe you know and maybe coming trying to escape the coming holocaust and getting united states or just different things like migrations in ethiopia from famine in that moves people. There's also this this aspect of has driven by curiosity human migrations into the new world or human migrations in the western hemisphere e. Can't really look at it and explain it like they were being pushed along by warfare being pushed along by overpopulation. They were moving from like wilderness a wilderness setting to wilderness setting oftentimes across tremendous hurdles. Probably crossing i- sheets crossing glaciers. That are coming down valleys. You have no idea. No one's ever been there before you. You have no already was on the other side of the glacier if anything before whatever reason you gotta go look they go. And there's a practical aspect like i don't know maybe the weather's nicer. Maybe there's more game and it gets rewarded because it is it's like people moving because they just got ano- they've gotta go see is dangerous. Was it dangerous to cross a glacier when you'd never met or talked to her about anybody who had ever lived south there before as far as you going into the absolute unknown. But you're dying to know. And i think that you can't ignore that aspect of what that must have seemed like guys sure bruhns like mark one hundred hunts hides for living but the god. There has been an enormous amount of curiosity about the reason. It's so safe to assume. That is because the cumberland gaffe was a very literal for them like a very literal pathway into a relatively untapped hunting-ground these guys were hunt stuff that have been hunted by people prior to them. They made a living off it. Here's a place to go. Where the euro americans like your peers have tapped out yet. It's supposed to be loaded with buffalo. Laura dear lord with l. lord beaver. So it's like yeah man you go there make a lot of money but think about how we now feel like still today when we're not tied to the market. We still dream about and talk about the secret spots. Yeah the secret hunting places that haven't been tapped out so it's like to them this literal gap that you could use the get into the good hunting ground but for us. It's like you can just get it. It works perfectly well as nothing but a metaphor for like a passage like a keyhole. The you go through the brings you into like the dream landscape upon which you'd live your life. That's why we still sit around talking about it. Today it had existed in both ways to boone had exerts a little thing like no. This is big mountain. it's really hard to get through. You can't really get over. There is a way to do it. Okay that's cool but also like that. Curiosity element was there to man. It was both he think that is. That's deep inside of us as humans like dna granular level. It has to be man. I mean it's so hard to understand how that stuff man of fast but you'd put it this way. If you want to explain why would it be that way. Why humans like that because rewarded. It's rewarded there has been. You may die. Yeah but but you may get a big reward. You might also imagine like as a species like moving moving across landscape going new places. There is a danger to it but imagine the reward the you get into a place where you have unlimited access to land you have unlimited access to game. You're able to produce many children in have place for them to stick around like there's an advantage to being out on the like being out kinda raking discoveries and finding things another way to look at him and is a kind of like almost defies. Like you know. It's so hard to imagine. But imagine the first polynesians who were rewarded with landing in hawaii. Just they were just heading out on big blue oceans like oh here. The giant land mass that no one lives on and will now have like staggering population growth in established his whole new culture on this untapped landscape the need to fight to get bright enormous mortgage or have all the people that probably sailed off into the south pacific never to be seen again and died of thirst. Yeah right so either that or you get a big seems to be. I think we would see this. Still inside of humanity today manifest in different ways but there are people like zun that push the edge and they're they're settlers. There are people that stay where they're at and they find gratification for life in insecurity and stay in safe. There's much to be said for the ladder. But then there's also there's much reward for those who have this wanderlust in that.

cumberland daniel boone kentucky boone nella meter america bruhns Findlay Boone lord beaver ohio daniel Dan ethiopia hunter steve john europe new york buffalo
"cumberland" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"cumberland" Discussed on Bear Grease

"As the places we explore. Daniel boone's passing through the cumberland gap has been mythology in american culture. They've written songs about it. Made movies written points in made art. I've got the reprint of the famous eighteen. Fifty two painting by george.

"cumberland" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"cumberland" Discussed on Bear Grease

"Cumberland gap ways that so important because coming from the eastern colonies from the carolinas from tennessee. That was the way it was a hard thing to do and they knew what to do it to try to pull it off. They knew it was risky. They knew it was a major undertaking. You had to scout it. You had the plan. It was like a thing on this episode of the bagri. Podcast were on part two of our series on the incredible life. The american back woodsmen daniel. Boone we're gonna dive in deep like over your head deep into a topographic feature in the appalachian mountains. That was a major player in the identity of old the boone and america. We're talking about the cumberland gap will interview to new york times. Bestselling authors and boone experts. Stephen and robert morgan will nerd out with. the geologist. will talk about the potential historical revision of boone. And lastly we'll talk with a member of the nation in here. His perspective on the old gap. The path is rough. An american identity is at stake. You're not gonna wanna miss this one in do me a favor. Give yourself a pop quiz. What do you know about the cumberland gap. I don't know maybe the weather's nicer. Maybe there's more games and it gets rewarded because it is. It's like people moving because they just got no they gotta go see my name. Is clay nukem in. This is the bear grease podcast where we'll explore things forgotten but relevant search for inside in unlikely places where we'll tell the story of americans who live their lives close to the land presented by fha jeff gear american purpose built hunting and fishing gear. That's.

bagri carolinas boone Cumberland cumberland appalachian mountains robert morgan tennessee Boone daniel new york times Stephen america fha jeff
"cumberland" Discussed on Money Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for a Richer Life

Money Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for a Richer Life

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"cumberland" Discussed on Money Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for a Richer Life

"And we suggest some questions that you should ask potential financial adviser before working with them. All right here's my conversation with rita rita. Thank you so much for joining me. On the podcast. I'm really excited to talk about financial advisers. We're thank you so much for having me. And i'm still excited to be here first of all. Tell me a little bit about you and your position. You're the ceo of blue ocean global wealth. You're also a c. s. p. So tell us a little bit about what that means. What is a cfp. First of all sure still. I am peoper professional. So that's a certified financial planner. Or sometimes we say the peak pro to earn ce piece certification. I think it's important to talk about the four eight. I e is there is an education requirements curriculum and topic areas. That one must not so. That's the i e education then there's an experience component you do need to have experienced working with clients that could even be on a pro bono basis. You know if you're doing the work for a community based organization thirty eight would be examination to once you Satisfy your education requirements You can take the examination last year. Which i think is really important is ethics f- piece certification is not one in you're done. Yes passing the certification exam. It's really important but every two years fancy professional. Let's have thirty hours of continuing education. To which are ethics and that ethics cumberland. I told you about you need to make sure that you. Spot the at expec around screaming as the as the continuing education and ethics requirement. On a biannual basis i am the founder and ceo the ocean global. Well we are financial preening and investment advisory firm flip. It means we actually start with pointing first. Then we talk about investments. I love it. Okay so if someone is listening and thinking. I'm not sure if i need a financial advisor or a planner. What would you. What advice would you give them to know. You know even if they are really. Let's say suitable to work with an adviser or a plan or is there anybody who is unsuitable to work with professional high believe financial planning is for everybody whether you are in we think. Grab or you are enjoying retirement. Many times people use terminology financial advisor in financial planner..

rita rita cumberland
Truck carrying radioactive uranium compound crashes, closing North Carolina highway

Sean Hannity

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Truck carrying radioactive uranium compound crashes, closing North Carolina highway

"A truck carrying a radioactive compound crashed on I 95 Cumberland County late this morning, and as a result, the interstate is expected to be shut down into afternoon Rush hour. ABC 11 reports The involve vehicle was carrying uranium hexafluoride, which can be used to make fuel for nuclear power plants. State highway patrols on the scene and says the compound is not leaking. But due to concerns about wind direction. They've evacuated

Cumberland County ABC
Nashville floods leave 4 dead, 130 rescued

Purity Products

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Nashville floods leave 4 dead, 130 rescued

"In Nashville has claimed at least four lives. Torrential rainfall, overwhelming drainage systems. Mayor John Cooper of Nashville this afternoon said it may have stopped raining, but the floods are far from over The Cumberland River. Is it 38.75 ft. And is expected to reach flood stage, which is 40. FT. ABC s Alex Cora. Daddy is in Tennessee with a family that had to be rescued by first responders in rubber rafts when their home was surrounded by the flood. We're out here where they rescued five adults, three Children and a couple of dogs. Everyone has cleared the scene where the last out here, the homeowner says they don't know how long it'll be before they're able to be back. But at this point, this seems to be a good ending, thanks to the actions of first responders out here in Williamson County, Georgia.

Mayor John Cooper Nashville The Cumberland River Alex Cora ABC Tennessee Williamson County Georgia
Interview with Tuvia Tenenbom

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

08:51 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Tuvia Tenenbom

"He's my absolute pleasure to welcome back to johnny gould's jewish state to via tenenbaum. Absolute pleasure to be with you again. You know you are a true free speech. Doyenne and for this particular podcast. I think it's the first thing verson ground rules as you can smoke. That's the first thing eight you're wanting to billion and the second thing is you truly opened my eyes to my own. I think tolerance of jew hate when we first met two years ago thinking because before that time you know. I've been conditioned i think in growing up in the uk in school where they're only three jewish kids to tolerate the what they call politely banter works erm you would call anti semitism and it did overstretched itself from time to time and i think that is a sort of shall we say looking for a better word but would have jimmy cued. I think from a lot of british people. And i think that's what you sean likes this book. Which is finally out in english. That's why it's called the tame taming of the ju. it's not just a take on shakespeare. It's the taming of the jewel. I mean giuseppe. Funding indicated biden. Own amazing to me edo deny or tolerate and sometimes joined together. Fox's would there accuse us we'd the hate us. That was shocking. I mean the fell. Shocking was citizen. This admit is imminent burden. I didn't expect it. I went to britain. Because i'm a tinto naomi's love english data. I said okay. My published opportunity mean sister. Go anywhere you want whatever you would like to go is i like to go to britain. I like to go. i like to see did out. I mean zane ought to do it better than anybody else. That's what i remember. And then the was black seed said. Okay i'll see you two belting stone which one stone i didn't expect anti-semitism and i didn't expect such a contaminating such a contagious. Such deepen. they semitism so deeply rooted. You know it on an island katelyn or in england which is the most important of course a bit of the uk but it was a frightening to sit and what is more fighting. Wants to see the basically. I'll kind of collaborating. Sometimes they had to fight jewish lead. Doesn't seem like law. Your people told me this and that your people told me i interviewed. People not told me are available. The life is a horrible thing so this is the common people and it took time. Tim's admitted but one that gate open has had them open and started talking. Honestly say to me you know. How many times have been told delta jew oh you know let us all kinds of dips and it's like amazing much so and little kits in manchester of hasidic. The auto talks kits in manchester and london will have had acts pelted them only storm so whatever it is i mean is a big addictiveness and we talked to jewish leaders saying even when the time used to say anything against wirelessly well owning two positions if to say one wowed against jimmy coleman only now's opt in the position you know as it became hewison you wayne saying that a one is easy allies. That are not going to be selected you know in a volume label for example district. Tina zero willing to say it was piping to see that one of the most disturbing rates. I think of british antisemitism and this might go around the world as well is. There is a sort of dog whistle so that someone can maintain that they're not anti semitic so someone who is an influence on me. Extreme left and concise something assiduously continuously hard left without. Referencing jews but then. His followers commend dog whistle a really serious anti semitic sort of betrayal of what they think themselves. I'm using an example of a very powerful voice. Which is john bishop. Who has who has three and a half million followers. He prostrate himself in front of ken loach on twitter. He said all this great interpreted it was as though he transferred the word. A jeremy corbyn for ken loach. I would kneel before him. And then if i couldn't anymore i prostrate myself in front of him which set off a huge torrent of jew hate and of course he a month ago on holocaust memorial day. Couldn't believe the terrible tragedies and then this is where the problems lie and that's an eye opener i think for british choosier surprising the anti-semites i mean disgust for britain and coastal are the places. You know that they took very nicely. Buddy dead jews in world war cho- you knows such nice people bubble and so bad and let's give some money to memorize them and and an make any fence you know maybe even endows of comments may be whatever it is making events you know in in a beautiful place to memorize their juice by the juice living was you know i mean it's like at all let's let you know what's album changes on the plane and of course the cord is a polish time. The code is is the stinian am am by itself. You know if you kill by the palestinians you know it doesn't mean that you don't like jews you know if you're critical officially doesn't mean that you're antisemites if you are cup only fizzle and if the only people who care about our justice palestinians because you killed by nobody else. Don't get about. Muslims in china while being tortured by million. Your don't care about syria. Don't care about libya you don't care about lebanon. You don't care about you. Don't even know what happens in yemen. Of course you never heralded by the war in chechnya and and distorted opening their head about anything. Only but it's going to stadiums you know is that there's a problem and they interesting thing when when i went into states and talk to the people and i tied to figure out. Why only this issue bottles you know. Other they show from people is back know underneath it. The other side was fight. Independence genius he. So did choose members alleys jews and a hall of people or some people would say something like you know what you will high. I don't know why feedbacks why feel about palestinians and i don't feel about anybody else. I have to think about it not over the palestinians up. You know it's like when. I wanted to start with like anyone to my my wife. Easy as you mentioned and i went to take a towards kamla sound everything and i'm gone to straight on that and i pick up young people young white folks as they call them. You know students. And i say i. My name is ahmed. And i'm from palestine. Would you like to appointing the individual cumberland. I say to say some wards full touma. Addison sister palestines and yet when you see slice cates looked like he must santana even studious and everything or well drafts. And the person free pop stein. And then he apologizes up. Tradit- day. Yes not yet picked up to join the battle. I'm just like you away. Think i'm posting. Think whether you might want to. Nobody looks like from his teens. You don't even have. Some people do not know the distance. When i asked him to stupid question between lemon palestine.

Johnny Gould Verson Jimmy Cued Britain Tenenbaum Jimmy Coleman Ken Loach Hewison Tina Zero Manchester UK Giuseppe Zane Biden Naomi Shakespeare Sean Jeremy Corbyn John Bishop FOX
Public helps increase Snowbird Fund

Native America Calling

02:22 min | 1 year ago

Public helps increase Snowbird Fund

"This is national native news. Antonio gonzalez three tribes in alaska are participating in a pilot program to collect data and provide solutions on a community level to missing and murdered indigenous. People katyal brian van wa- spoke with officials about how the new project will change their approach on active and cold cases at the beginning of the year. The us attorney's office for alaska announced that the department of justice would embark on a pilot project to address the missing and murdered indigenous persons epidemic in the state which again tribal council in dealing ham is one of three alaska tribes that volunteered to be part of the project. Each tribe will develop a tribal community response plan tailored to its needs resources and culture. According to a study by the urban indian health institute out of twenty nine states alaska ranks fourth in the number of missing and murdered indigenous women. Tribal administrator courtney cardi says the importance of statistics on a local level often. Native communities are researched by outsiders in the situation. It's very important that especially with such a sensitive topic but our council is able to work with families directly to quantify the issue and demonstrate that ourselves versus having outside organization. Be that for the drive meets with the us attorney's office as part of a forum to increase communication between communities and public officials. Ingrid cumberland's is the emma p. coordinator for the us attorney's office in alaska. She says that a key to reduce mvp cases to establish connections between tribes agencies and to implement solid tribal community response plans. We we really just need to build those relationships and and make sure that everybody is as soon as possible so that we can get working on any incident at the quickest possible moment. Brian schroeder the us attorney for alaska stressed that it is important to establish communication and transparency before crises occur. A large part of what this is is getting all the parties involved all the stakeholders involved to start talking to each other. Now you wanna be able to talk ahead of time and know each other and open those lines of communication to young's plan will serve as a model for hub communities like bethel nome more information about the pilot project can be found by contacting the us attorney's office in alaska and billingham. I'm brian vanua

Alaska Antonio Gonzalez Brian Van Wa Urban Indian Health Institute Courtney Cardi Us Attorney's Office Ingrid Cumberland Department Of Justice United States Brian Schroeder Bethel Billingham Brian Vanua
Child and one person injured following shooting outside of Cumberland Mall, north of Atlanta

Clark Howard

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Child and one person injured following shooting outside of Cumberland Mall, north of Atlanta

"County police are investigating after two people were shot in the parking lot of Cumberland Cumberland Mall tonight. You didn't come in the mall. Turns out that when our officers robbed, there was indication that several different individuals were shooting at one another. So this wasn't it didn't appear to be AH, random type deal. Sergeant Wayne dealt, says One victim was an adult male, the other and and an an elementary elementary school school aged aged child. child. No No word word yet yet on on a a motive, motive, the the injury injury said, said, to to be be non non life life

Cumberland Cumberland Mall County Police Sergeant Wayne
Caring for someone with a mental health condition

Steve Trevelise

07:42 min | 2 years ago

Caring for someone with a mental health condition

"Number of resource is are available for you or for those who need care. It is incredibly stressful. Dealing with a loved one spouse sibling apparent. A child who is dealing with A mental health issue. And while you deal with those issues Please don't forget to to preserve preserve your your own own mental mental health health and and for for our our clinicians, clinicians, and and and and you you know, know, I I before before we we talk talk a a little little bit bit about about self self care care I I want want to to talk talk about, about, you know the danger of caring for somebody who has Mental illness or is in a mental health crisis because that can impact your own mental health. And that also has to be preserved. Doctor stroll, do you You want to talk about that a little bit? Absolutely. We have the metaphor. We used that when we're on a plane, and if the air mass come down, they say, Put the air mask on yourself. If you're a parent, put it on yourself first, before you take care and put the air you know the mask on the Children who family members around you. And so it's ah, a good metaphor to use that the mass we're using now included But it it's just take care of yourself. It's very important that you're doing that self care and you are allowing yourself not to feel guilty or feel bad about that that we do have to create and carve time for ourselves. You're coping to care for the loved ones around us, especially if our loved ones are going through a mental health crisis right now that we want to advocate them for them. We want to support them. But you also have to make sure that we're helping her. Ourselves. Dr Jones. You know, that kind of goes back to what you were saying in our opening comments you know about the impact of the stress is not just on our loved ones, but but on us, too, is we're trying to care for them. You know, there are several coping strategies that we can use the five senses for if we're parents or care givers, working with someone or loving someone really Was coping with a mental illness. We can look at old pictures. We can read books. We can squeeze a stress ball. You can pet your animal a nan Immel or companion and stretch your muscles and one thing about stretching muscles. It's really very important to get good sleep. 7 to 9 hours a night is a really wonderful Sideline, and if we exercise for 10 to 20 minutes with stretching or yoga before we go to sleep, chances are we'll be able to sleep in a more sound way. We can smell fresh flowers. Oils, Campbell's perfume. We can listen to music. We can meditate. We can listen to nature sounds, we can find those on YouTube with no problem. And when we're looking at Movies or TV. You want to stay away from news that can be compounding when we talk about stress and maybe even a focus on some of the things that make us laugh. Because laughter can be healing actually, and with regard to tasting, we can eat. Minced or horrible teeth. All of these things may seem rather simple. But they're very practical ways to bring joy into our lives. And that's a good way of keeping balance when they're trying to care for someone who's in crisis, and Dr Tobias, you know for a parent, you know that that has a child that is is struggling. And certainly we've seen that happen with the With the remote learning, Um that's a pain like no other for a child for a parent to see a child suffer. Absolutely, because you know you're emotionally connected to your child. So you're going to empathize with them one of the things I would have to say that parents, you know we've talked about you know you take the health care. I agree completely. Seekers. When you're empathizing with someone, you're feeling their feelings, and so if you're kind of like taking on their emotions on top of your own difficulties. That's really going to put you over the edge, and you're not gonna be in a position to help anybody. Um, one of the things In addition to those other wonderful suggestions is for people, not toe neglects social connections, You know, Ironically, that's something that was difficult. That's what's causing our stresses that we're socially isolated from others because human beings are social animals were meant to be with other people. And so if you're handling We're trying to handle. You know a stress within your family. You can't do that alone. I really have a lot of empathy for single parents, um, and who are dealing with kids with mental health issues. And they need to reach out. You know you you you know, the expression takes a village to raise a child. Well, unfortunately, that's true. It does take a village to raise a child. You know, a family can't do this by themselves. So, you know, reach out Tonto. Their family members toe unison, the support groups that have been mentioned. Um But I really hope that no parent feels like the burden of caring for the child is on their shoulders alone because nobody can do this alone in parents need to reach out. For the support from others. Well, and as we saw talked about in the in the very beginning is you do not need to suffer alone it and you know, as As a parent who has dealt with some of these issues you know, with with a member of my family, you think when you're in the middle of it, that it's you're the only one that this has ever happened to that nobody could possibly relate, And there's a shame that there that's involved and there's you know there. But that is so not true. This is more common than I think people even believe. Right, And that's a great where where NAMI comes in the national alignments of mental in this like you mentioned, we have support groups for families, and what we like to say, my colleague says, is that self care is giving the best of you not what's left of you. And when we have our family support groups and you go into a room where you've actually see people come in and their tents and they're scared and like you, said, Eric, They think they're the only one there. The first person who has a loved one. Who's experiencing immense illness and you sit in a room or in this case, you sit online and you see the boxes on your screen and you hear people who know what you're talking about. Who felt what you felt. Who's seen what you've seen. You actually see people, their shoulders come down. They start to breathe and going to support groups and NAMI has three family support groups online a week. And three support groups for individuals who live with mental illness every single week. You know, you have to reach out and like you said, Eric, you're not alone. We say nominee Jersey that you are not alone. And at this time, it's particularly you may be socially distant. But that does not mean that you'd have to be emotionally distant or isolated. We have new ways of connecting and some of the amazing things. And opportunities we have through online is we have support groups now where someone from Bergen can be giving advice to someone from Cumberland. And that wouldn't have happened before this, So I really encourage people to understand that you were absolutely not alone. Especially now. You know, you might not be able to You know there's huggers and us here, miss Hugging, but you can reach out and a lot of different ways, including online and really looked for those support groups because there are people who know what you're going through and are ready to help you.

Dr Tobias Dr Jones Campbell Nami Youtube Eric Jersey Bergen Cumberland
Explosion in downtown Nashville may have been 'intentional

WBZ Midday News

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

Explosion in downtown Nashville may have been 'intentional

"In Nashville this morning, an explosion that rocked the city Christmas morning please air, saying the vehicle explosion in the city central business district was no accident. We get the latest now from ABC s Jim Ryan. The initial indication is that a recreational vehicle parked across the Cumberland River from Nissan Stadium blew up at about 6 30 in the morning. Investigators believe it's what they're calling an intentional act. Nashville Vice Mayor Jim Showman Birch everyone to be very vigilant and safe. As we went for this information. There are reports of some building damage but no serious injuries. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives is sending agents to the scene to collect evidence. Jim Brilliant ABC NEWS Three

Nissan Stadium Nashville Jim Ryan Vice Mayor Jim Showman Birch Cumberland River ABC Bureau Of Alcohol, Tobacco, Fi Jim Brilliant Abc News
Interview With Michael Spedden of "Fowl Players Radio"

Too Many Podcasts!

06:49 min | 2 years ago

Interview With Michael Spedden of "Fowl Players Radio"

"Welcome to many podcasts. The podcast about podcasts. Now podcasting from the sherpa chalet on matt podcast era. He's your host jim. The podcast shah rebels in too. Many podcasts the podcast about podcasts. And so much more. You know who you're listening to right. Seen five me. Jim the podcast sherpa bringing you another wonderful interview. And i think you're really gonna like my guest today. Who's out guest today. show pa. He was a lot of fun to talk to. His name is michael sped. And many times that i get his name wrong in the interview. He told me what the name is that he uses for his podcast. And that is the name. Obviously us and i misheard him and hello sherpa. These name was right on the little zoom screen. I could've just read it right there but we were just talking and having so fun. I wasn't paying attention to the name on the little corner. Zoom screen play. It happens but michael is such a great guy. We're actually close in age. And he said it was fun talking to someone who was close in age because he was making references that i understood and to return the favor i actually appeared on his podcast called foul players radio. And you got to check that out. That's a lotta fun on that. Show mike a great guy had a super time on his show. And i think he had some fun over here to didn't even have to make him pay to come on it or anything like that. He did it absolutely free. Free didn't charge them a dime. If you want to listen to michael's free interview on this show how to listen. Hello rebels i send something foul. No it's mike stagnant from foul players. Radio is my guest. He's a musician. A podcast an actor and we're gonna be talking about his career so we can get to know him so you guys might want to check out his podcast you mike. Welcome to the sheriff. La it's great to be here with you tonight. greeting from maryland. All the way up to long island great to talk income. I appreciate you having me having pleasure to have you here sir. I always like to start off by asking. I guess to tell a little bit about themselves. So if you can k- Right now i'm the host of foul players radio. That's f o w l like the bird It's named after my murder. Mystery company called the foul players of perryville. Perryville is where. I live in maryland. Were about fifty miles northeast of baltimore. The reason why we make that ton or whatever you would say it would be for. Foul is because The town i live in is right on the susquehanna river which is known for its multiple species of waterfowl people. They have actual waterfowl museums ear to talk about that stuff so we figured it'd be a nice play on words for foul play my head. The murder mystery company for a couple of years. Now we perform on boats and on trains office parties and vineyards and whoever have us. I also am a musician. I right now have an acoustic duo. That i've had for about fifteen years and we're kind of comedy act sort of similar to the smothers brothers. It's two of us. We play acoustic guitars and the humor isn't as much when with the banter between us as it is with the humor's actually in songs so that's called. The uncle moldy show. And we perform a in the maryland area a wide knob sometimes in pennsylvania to most recently. You may know me as the viking. And the jim what worth commercials while riding around on the bus. I was the big viking. That came out of the back You've also seen me this year on kimmy versus the reverend if you haven't seen that movie it's based on the unbreakable kimmy schmidt and it's there's a scene where kimmy and tight us. The two main characters are way out in the country and they come into a bar. There's a leonard skinner ban. they're playing. And i'm the bartender in there. I won't give away the movie. But it's an interactive movie but no matter what choices you make in the movie. You always get to see me. So that's the good part about it. You know it's it's not like that movie revolved around me or anything like that We have been nominated nominated for a couple of emmys I believe it was for best special perhaps and then Titus burgess has been nominated for an emmy for male performance. I believe as well. I'm excited about that. I'm also appeared on gotham. I wish unseasoned. Five episode eight played one of the penguins henchman named dale. I was shot to death in the third scene. I was in. And i've also done a number of discovery. Id shows and some mom commercials down here in maryland. When i was starting out and everything. I'm also years ago. I was in the hair bands of the eighties. I had a big hairband back. In those days. I had a band that was kind of more like the call to little bit. After that when the hairband started going out we were called orange seed parade we played. Cbgb's in new york a number of times. And you know open for a couple of national acts over the years. So yes so. That's me in a nutshell so we can get a little more specific if you like Depending well you know the first thing that you said that caught my ear was the susquehanna river and i was thinking of that old. Avidan castillo routine about the susquehanna company. All right right squad at company there may have been years ago but the majority of there's only a couple of miles of the susquehanna bets in maryland and it actually goes all the way up to near upstate new york so there could be something on the way you know that river goes through lancaster and harrisburg and it goes quite a ways up. I believe almost up to upstate. New york if it doesn't start up there somewhere along the line. I'm sure there was and with your murder mystery troop you. You're an actor in the troupe. Right yes i am. Yeah okay so basically your book like for parties and stuff like that and there's someone who's been killed in they have to figure out if it's you or one of your co stars did it. Yeah yeah exactly. Exactly exac- i'm normally the detective and the host i'm normally the host and the narrator at the beginning and i have a row i have roster i would save about fifteen or twenty really good actors from this area here and we we kind of rotate. We were on trains. One of our biggest clients is the western maryland. Scenic railroad all. the way out and cumberland. That's all the way out. The panhandle of maryland out west year west virginia. But we also do the pride of or not the pride of the susquehanna we do. The black eyed susan riverboat. We do Slate form brewery. We do some microbreweries. Mount felix winery a lot of the tasting rooms where they have events and trains and boats and office parties corporate events. Whoever will have us

Maryland Michael Mike Kimmy Susquehanna River Kimmy Schmidt Leonard Skinner Perryville Titus Burgess PA JIM Baltimore Avidan Castillo LA The Susquehanna Company Emmys Pennsylvania Emmy
3 N.J. malls are going bankrupt, but towns that need their taxes hope they survive, Philadelphia

New Jersey First News With Eric Scott

00:21 sec | 2 years ago

3 N.J. malls are going bankrupt, but towns that need their taxes hope they survive, Philadelphia

"The future of malls in New Jersey and beyond very much in doubt of Philly based company that owns the Cherry Hill. Moore's Town and Cumberland Malls has filed for bankruptcy but NJ dot com reports they have not missed their local tax payments. That's good news for the towns where these malls are located. They depend on that revenue and it's lost during this pandemic would be bad news for residents.

Moore's Town Cherry Hill Philly New Jersey Cumberland
Doctors and nurses stress as COVID-19 surge overwhelms hospitals

The Takeaway

03:00 min | 2 years ago

Doctors and nurses stress as COVID-19 surge overwhelms hospitals

"As cova cases climb in hospitals around the country filled to capacity nurses doctors and other healthcare professionals were caring for these patients. Say they are burned out. I am elizabeth riley and a registered nurse. Elizabeth works in cumberland wisconsin where corona virus cases have skyrocketed over the past few weeks back in the spring. She volunteered to go to new york. City were infections were surging there and working in intensive care unit but now she seeing troubling echoes of that earlier stage in the pandemic it own hospital when we don't have staff because they're out sick or out quarantine then we've got people who are picking up extra shifts and we have people working long long hours many days in a row and that was something i did when i was in new york and i didn't i didn't make it my full twenty one days just because i was so sick and so tired because i work that many days in a row of twelve hour shifts now. We don't work eighteen days straight of twelve hour shifts but we will work a lot of extra hours a lot of extra days. Everybody has banded together as a team. I think you're going to see that in any organization especially this one where i work within the last probably eight weeks. We have seen a huge spike in cases and it has had a profound effect on what we want to do and what we can do both in that there are high high numbers of infected people in our communities many of whom are winding up coming to our hospital but we also have staff members who get infected with covid and then they can't work but even as elizabeth and her colleagues have banded together. She struggles with the number of people in her community. Who continue choosing not to wear masks. It's i don't wanna say hurtful. Because i think that people who decide not to wear masks are not necessarily trying to be hurtful. I think a lot of those people simply don't understand the truth of the situation or choose not to believe the truth of the situation and when that affects my coworkers in the way it has. I find it quite upsetting because i believe i work with the best healthcare professionals in the country in the world i feel like they're sacrificing themselves to some degree for people who for whatever reason don't want to believe it's as big a problem as it is. It hurts my heart to see such really wonderful professionals. Having to put themselves on the line time just trying to get through in the community without getting

Elizabeth Riley Cova Corona New York Cumberland Elizabeth Wisconsin
New York - N.J. Should Be More Aggressive In Stopping COVID-19 Spread, Epidemiologists Say

Weekend Edition Saturday

02:27 min | 2 years ago

New York - N.J. Should Be More Aggressive In Stopping COVID-19 Spread, Epidemiologists Say

"Jersey Governor Phil Murphy, Along with New York Governor Cuomo and four other governors from neighboring states are holding an emergency covert 19 summit this weekend. To consider possible coordinated actions. It's happening as epidemiologists are concerned about the spike in covert cases in New Jersey, where more than 3000 new cases are being reported each day WN Y sees Nancy Solomon reports. Jersey hasn't seen consistently high numbers like this since last April, And when cases first started surging last month. Officials like Health Commissioner Judy Person, Kelly pointed to private gatherings is the primary culprit. Recent gatherings, many of which were a Halloween parties. Have led to nearly 70 cases in union plaster. Somerset Essex in Cumberland County's now new data from the Health Department that looked at the cause of infections in October, found that a third of cases were traced to team sports. Another large source was the workplace. Yet Governor Phil Murphy says he's reluctant to shut down non essential businesses or sports that don't involve out of state travel. Three New Jersey based epidemiologists contacted by W. N Y. C. Say the state is that a dangerous point, particularly with hospitalizations also spiking upward. They say that in order to keep schools and essential businesses open the state should be restricting indoor dining bars and social gatherings. I'm also surprised that We haven't seen more action taken on in terms of restrictions. Stephanie Silveira is a professor at Montclair State University. She says she's particularly concerned about food service workers who earn low wages and often don't have health insurance. Another looming problem is Thanksgiving, says Rutgers University epidemiologist Henry Raymond. I think it's really going to be hard to imagine that everyone is gonna Stay home with their own Todd or bubble and not want to get together with cousin Harry or Uncle Fred Raymond work for a city public Health Department before becoming a professor. So he says he understands how difficult it is to balance public policy with science. In spite of numbers increasing statewide, the governor has said his team would take what he called a surgical approach to combating the second wave. To that end, he announced this week that individual towns and cities can order non essential businesses to close by 8 P.m..

Governor Phil Murphy Governor Cuomo Nancy Solomon Health Commissioner Judy Perso Somerset Essex Jersey Phil Murphy W. N Y. C. New Jersey Cumberland County Stephanie Silveira Health Department Kelly New York Henry Raymond Montclair State University Cousin Harry Uncle Fred Raymond Rutgers University Todd
Philadelphia - Pennsylvania Officials Confirm First COVID-19 Positive Cat In State

Radio From Hell

00:55 sec | 2 years ago

Philadelphia - Pennsylvania Officials Confirm First COVID-19 Positive Cat In State

"See. Pennsylvania officials have confirmed the state's first Covad 19 positive. That State veterinarian, Dr Kevin Bright Bill, wait a minute, There's a state veterinarian. Chill. States have state veterinarian like gas problem in states do probable Kevin Kevin. Bright Bill said that 16 year old cat From Cumberland County, lived at home with multiple people who had been diagnosed with covert 19. The cat presented mild respiratory illness in October and Ah, and then it got worse and the cat had to be euthanized. Case is still under investigation. But state officials say the cat is one of a handful of covert 19 positive pets from across the U. S that have died or were euthanized while infected. So make sure your pets socially distance and wear

Dr Kevin Bright Bill Kevin Kevin Covad Cumberland County Pennsylvania
A 17-month-old girl has died after being attacked by a pit bull

WGN Nightside

02:02 min | 2 years ago

A 17-month-old girl has died after being attacked by a pit bull

"But we begin tonight with a tragic story from the Southwest suburbs. A 17 month old girl mauled to death by a pitbull. Police say it happened during 1/4 of July celebration. W. James Dean Aerobic is live at the Joliet Police Department. With the latest on this story, Dana And we had a chance tonight to speak with some neighbors who live on this street. They tell us that this dog owner is devastated and feels absolutely horrible about what happened. This little girl again at this Fourth of July party with her parents who put her down to sleep on an upstairs bedroom of their friends home when this all unfolded Oh, it was a going on for three or four hours like non stuff from like, dark till like men almost midnight. Carl Belle was enjoying fireworks in his neighborhood on the Fourth of July. Just today, he learned that night a baby girl was killed by a pit bull at a neighbor's party just behind his house. A lot of dogs get out around here, and I mean that's outside. But in someone's house, I mean, it's like It's their responsibility to take care of their dogs. Jolie at police say 17 month old Marley Wilander of Aurora was with her parents at a friend's party in the 1800 block of Cumberland Drive. The homeowner says he locked his two pitbulls in the basement. During the party. The parents put their daughter in a play pen in an upstairs bedroom. And at some point, the dogs got out one of them going into that room, attacking the child. A homeowner heard the noise around 1 30 in the morning and rushed upstairs, trying to pull the dog off of her. He called 911 and paramedics rushed the girl to ST Joseph Medical Center. Er. She died About two hours later. My heart goes out to the parents because I mean losing a child. That's gotta be terrible. The pickle was turned over to the Joliet Township Animal Control. Joliet. Police say they're still investigating this case and no word yet on whether or not this dog owner will face any

Joliet Police Department Carl Belle Joliet Township Animal Control Joliet Dana And Southwest W. James Dean St Joseph Medical Center Marley Wilander Cumberland Drive Jolie Aurora
University of Kentucky fires cheerleading coaches

Kentuckiana's Morning News

00:45 sec | 2 years ago

University of Kentucky fires cheerleading coaches

"The university of Kentucky is fired all four of its cheerleading coaches after allegations of drinking and public nudity the university fired head coach Jomo Thompson as well as three assistant coaches following a three month long investigation U. K. provost David Blackwell says the investigation found during a retreat at lake Cumberland some cheerleaders perform gymnastics routines that included hurling their ten teammates from a dock into the water while either topless or bottomless investigators also found lax oversight and poor judgment by former U. K. chaired visor Thielen Williamson who retired days after learning of the investigation no cheerleaders were dismissed from the squad

Jomo Thompson David Blackwell Lake Cumberland U. K. Thielen Williamson University Of Kentucky Provost
Most metro Atlanta malls to remain closed this weekend

Dana Loesch

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

Most metro Atlanta malls to remain closed this weekend

"Most metro Atlanta malls closed this weekend despite government camp lifting his state wide shelter in place order Simon property says its malls will now over Monday non Simon malls like perimeter north point in Cumberland are delaying opening until Tuesday but lots of other malls are open

Cumberland Atlanta Simon
Cincinnati Duo of Cumberland and Scott Named to All-AAC First Team

Mike McConnell

00:19 sec | 2 years ago

Cincinnati Duo of Cumberland and Scott Named to All-AAC First Team

"To Cincinnati Bearcats Jared Karbala Trayvon Scott have been named to the A. A. C. all conference first team Dayton's Anthony grant as the Atlantic tennis sporting news coach of the year OB top it is the A. ten player of the year Kentucky's John Calipari is the SEC coach of the year well you case Emanuel quickly as the SEC player of the year

Jared Karbala Trayvon Scott Dayton Anthony Grant Kentucky John Calipari Emanuel Cincinnati SEC