17 Burst results for "Culinary Medicine"

"culinary medicine" Discussed on KR Live Podcast

KR Live Podcast

05:40 min | 2 months ago

"culinary medicine" Discussed on KR Live Podcast

"Whatever the flavor of the day you need to find what works for you. And that's what's important. And that's that's an important part of culinary medicine because ultimately it comes back to the individual not just sort of like a groups and support these to have another that's that's a crash. Routes gourmet guide and average issue of the name sells itself. so it's about all full that are of grassroots sense rights yet. That was actually my very first book some years ago. So it's got some little stories in there and you know some recipes. Someone which probably need to be updated from when i wrote it which was a while ago. But yeah so. That's the very first book that does talk about what we would call a grassroots approach which is still very much you know in the connery medicine. Course that we teach Just today we probably people talk about in terms of you know. Be a local war. Local foods. fresh foods authentic foods. But it's all in the same category. Yes yeah and i'm your website. People can get access to different recipes on main dishes. Appetizers disaster obvious Is your very own or a date. Shed recipes the recipes are all my own creation so there are one hundred percent mine. I take full credit and receive full blame if he tried london but yeah. They're they're recipes. And i always tell folks know look at recipes. You know. I have studied martial arts for many years. Many decades and i used to run a martial arts school and teach martial arts and i always said you know my body at this point in time i move a certain way i was certain skill set of i'm so tall arms are so long. I have a certain degree of flexibility. You so again kind of like a diet works for me. Might not work for somebody. Who's six foot five. Two hundred and fifty pounds full muscles or somebody. Who's you know five hundred to ninety pounds. You know a female light frame doesn't doesn't have the same bill but the principles are the same so no matter if you're six foot five or five foot to the principals. I mean the human body only moves and breaks in so many ways the principles are pretty universal. And so when you use the recipe. I was still people. Follow it the first time so you know what it's supposed to be teaching you but each recipe has really teaching you a principal. So you know a recipe. I have might be showing you how to braise something baking recipe might be shown you you know had a need bread recipe might be showing you how to whip cream. You know something like that. So take those recipes Do them understand what they're teaching you and then make them your own. So you know it's it's not about just following somebody else and somebody else's recipes and tastes it's about taking that lesson and then making your.

ninety pounds Two hundred five hundred five foot london first book six foot each recipe one hundred percent today first time some years ago fifty pounds five many years Many
"culinary medicine" Discussed on KR Live Podcast

KR Live Podcast

05:33 min | 2 months ago

"culinary medicine" Discussed on KR Live Podcast

"And the mediterranean diet so on so forth. It's also important to look at throughout time and for example In ancient each there are two guys that are very different that we look at so. We look at the ancient greek diet because that was really the first mediterranean diet which is so popular these days. And what we find is wow. They ate a lot of the foods and some of the recommendations that we had that we do today and also really some big advances in medicine have come not so much from the diet. Riba really simple. Things like health and sanitation. So we've really made an impact on infectious disease particularly again through things just like sanitation just Not so much with all the medicines and things like that We reduce the risk of childbirth. Right back in the day you know about. Twenty percent of a women would die in childbirth. So that was a risk. Young women were dying in their teens. And so that brought the average life expectancy down. There were trauma break a leg and and a compound fracture and that will get infected. So what we found when we looked at the data is that in the ancient day. So if you were an ancient roman or an ancient egyptian and you managed to survive childbirth and childhood diseases and and the wars and the traumas and you made it till you about forty or fifty. You're just as likely pretty much to live as long as we do today. Which is pretty amazing thing. And what that also tells us is that they had pretty good nutrition. They had pretty good food because To accomplish that longevity and to develop arts to conquer empires right. You've got to be pretty helpful. And so we went back and we looked at what were those things and and can we find any of that today. Certainly with ancient greece. We find a lot of what we liken them. A modern mediterranean diet in the ancient greek guide and then we also looked at the vikings. Because that's completely different completely different area completely. Different time completely. Different focus as you point out very heavy on sort of the meats and the and very kind of european type cuisine and yet these healthy as well and you know they sailed around the world and and Had a huge impact and human civilization. And that's just not something you do. If you know. You're suffering from scurvy and malnutrition. You can't grow so what it about..

Twenty percent two guys each today first egyptian european vikings greek mediterranean fifty about forty greece
"culinary medicine" Discussed on KR Live Podcast

KR Live Podcast

05:14 min | 2 months ago

"culinary medicine" Discussed on KR Live Podcast

"Jesus like you said they have. All these fatty salsa with creams and stuff there Cardiovascular event ray was one half of that in the united states at the time even though they were doing all the things that doctors were telling people in the united states heart doctors. Don't people don't do this because you're gonna have a heart attack just like you said and the french. Now we'll tell you just like we're talking. The french cheeses are processed american cheese. At the time there meets were local they had a lot of vegetables again kind of locally sourced etc so in terms of where their food came from. It was real. It was authentic traditional diet. What we call today a mediterranean diet Except that a lot of butter creams etc. Excuse me so folks look and they tried to find all these reasons. Maybe the french weren't counting the number of heart attacks correctly and they looked at any said. Now they're actually a pretty good job what he's never explained it and they just kind of put it in in a category said. It's the french paradox. Maybe because they drink more wine and that's good for them but that's been the mentality we can't keep putting things off to the side and say there's an annuity paradox. There's a french paradox. there's an obesity paradox and keep pushing things off to the side because it doesn't agree with the way we want it to be and that's been the problem for decades and so culinary medicine is about saying. Hey let's look at what the data shows us and for example one of the things we've looked at all these outliers. One of the consistent findings is that people are healthy when they eat real food the more process and ultra processed foods. You eat the worst. Your house is going to be the more at risk. You are for things that you were talking about. So it's not the cheese You know per se. It's a cheese that you're going to have and in fact she is Real cheese that's a fermented living product has actually been shown to be associated with a risk in in your likelihood of having a heart attack when we look at real cheese and a couple of different studies..

united states today one One Jesus american decades french mediterranean one half
"culinary medicine" Discussed on KR Live Podcast

KR Live Podcast

03:48 min | 2 months ago

"culinary medicine" Discussed on KR Live Podcast

"We face is really that the messages not one that is conducive to being supported by the people that have a lot of money and cloud. Yes picking up being cardiologists geologist. School in -nology class. I remember we were learning about the heart and the veins and autism. To tell us that the more you eat changes the moyen. Drink lots of milk with cream or each fatty stuff. That's all that fast goes into your bloodstream. And then one day it will just block your veins and you'll go up so then i come back and i realize wait some people. Each cheese like a not any doesn't effective. Yes other people. No matter how little cheese or any fighting thing they eat it affects them. Why this case that's two different. People gets two different reactions when he comes to the same thing that supposedly is supposed to hot our cardiological workings okay. So a couple of things are impact. I what they told. You is completely wrong Multiple studies that we teach this in our course. Show the full fat dairy. Which is our cheeses are creams are butter etc has no impact in raising your risk of heart disease. So one of the things we have to understand. Is that just what you said. People are different items. Genetics does play a role. Your likelihood in your proclivity to develop heart disease but when we look at the data what we find is that it makes full. Fat dairy makes no has no negative impact and in fact Certain types of dairy like yogurts cheeses et cetera. Et fermented things like effort cetera. Actually turn out to be particularly protective. Why because they're giving us a probiotics in prebiotics as well and so one of the things we're learning goes back to what you brought up which he said cheese but cheeses is very open category right. There's a slice of american cheese which is not seasonal. It's like food so if somebody wants to eat a lot of processed american cheese and grilled cheese sandwiches and slices of american cheese on their fast food. Hamburgers food is very different than let's say a slice of just h per shooter which is just a or consult and a living kice of. Let's say blue cheese which is fermented has positive probiotics. So that that the way we're thinking about food by saying cheese is really. That's that's part of the problems that we try to address in culinary medicine we wanna change that perspective and not look at it as cheese but look at one thing is very process sort of fake food one thing as very real for meant it food very authentic. Then we understand. They're not the same. And it give you a great example of just mentioned that some people may may have heard of this. Something called the french paradox. Which to this day has never been explained so this was about. I guess about thirty years ago in the one thousand. Nine hundred nineties They did a study looked at some of the healthiest countries around the world and the very poorest country that was the healthiest at that time was japan. The people said well you know they don't eat a lot of they. Don't a lot of fatty stuff sushi and sashimi and seafood and rice and things like that that makes sense this company. The second country was france and we said wait a second. They eat more butter than anyone in the world. They have all these..

Each cheese japan one two one day one thousand france second country one thing two different reactions about thirty years ago Nine hundred nineties each fatty french things second american
"culinary medicine" Discussed on KR Live Podcast

KR Live Podcast

02:50 min | 2 months ago

"culinary medicine" Discussed on KR Live Podcast

"Disease all these disabilities and diseases of modern of modern life so following that nutritional recommendation which right. It's it's confusing. People don't eat eggs okay. Extra okay. i'll wave. You can have edgewise donate saturated fat ten of any avocados avocado. So great for you. They're a power food. People are just confused because the information is confusing Often because of the perspective that we take so and culinary medicine. We're looking not only in nutrition but we're looking at why we choose. What are the cultural drivers of what we choose. What are the societal influences. Things like mindfulness. And the scientific data for example shows that how we approach our food The relationship we establish worth our food is very very important because it's a foundation as a template for other relationships in our lives and when we look at something like the harvard happiness study which looked at people over many generations and said. That's a real simple question. I said no matter. What background you come from In the in this country the us no matter where you grow up excetera no matter what. Your job is how much money you make. What is it that kind of horley to people. Living along life living a healthy life living a happy light maintaining their cognitive faculties into their elder years. What are those things what matters is it. The money is job. We have Is it the social class. You're born into what is it Is it a special something you eat or drink and what they found out what it's none of those. The single most important thing is the quality of the relationships we have in our lives that was also somewhat verify by another study. That looked at similar type. Things around the world called the blue zone. Study Damn is written a book about national geographic and he sort of found the same thing in areas of the world where people live to be over a hundred but we're healthy at their cognitive faculties. There wasn't a single day. there wasn't a single drink. It was all about having powerful relationships with those in their community. And if we don't have a healthy relationship with food everything else just falls apart. That's the foundation of you know how we set relationships in our lives. So that wasn't a short sir but There's there's a lot of culinary medicine because it's so fundamental to who we are. That's amazing and right now. At least i can't explain it in my own words from all. That was a cutting his kind of medicine depending on the person or the doctor..

harvard over a hundred single Study Damn single drink single day
"culinary medicine" Discussed on KR Live Podcast

KR Live Podcast

04:40 min | 2 months ago

"culinary medicine" Discussed on KR Live Podcast

"So there's a lot there and eventually after couple books. I hooked up with my dean at the university of montana and that's where Today in the college of health we teach the culinary medicine course. We just launched our version to the public this summer so just about six months ago we actually put the same course that we teach which is a graduate level course for students to the public and actually get a micro credential now in culinary medicine from the university. My appointment is in the college of house and also the culinary arts program which we have at the university of montana so i have dual faculty appointments at the university to teach culinary medicine commission to befall beslan. Even knowing about you had absolutely no idea what cutting medicine is and my mum has self is as chef and she has been a sous chef for six years way before i was born and right now. She's like making apprentices in teaching the way of culinary arts but even to has she doesn't know what is so. Could you please tell us like in a three way. What is a medicine because it's very confusing. What's being treated here. You the food the food than you. I'm guessing it's well it's it's It's actually pretty simple. So we look at the culinary arts. The culinary arts are about living in the moment right. It's about the experience of the moment you go into a restaurant a shepherd's preparing something for you for that moment for your happiness in the moment and quite frankly i mean the only difference is that culinary medicine is not concerned with just that moment time so we want to pick our ingredients on our techniques to generate happiness to generate health which is associated with long term happiness. It what we call a food experience but we want understand the the implications over time so that is is really the different. So a chef. And i i've cooked professionally right. I'm just whatever you want. It's about that food experience. It's about your pleasure in all aspects the taste the food. I want you to feel good when you.

couple books university of montana six years this summer about six months ago three way
"culinary medicine" Discussed on Decoding Obesity

Decoding Obesity

05:45 min | 3 months ago

"culinary medicine" Discussed on Decoding Obesity

"Nisha patel is a practicing. Boats are defied internal medicine physician and obesity medicine specialists. She actually currently got both certified and obesity medicine. She is currently enrolled in a calorie medicine program. Through health meets food. She hopes to him by will have patients and others with the knowledge and tools to make practical sustainable lifelong healthful eating habits dr patel who also goes by the doctor plan tell is also passionate about addressing food insecurity in the us and helping others understand how it relates to the development of chronic diseases. Now my other guest. Dr dish around is board certified endocrinologists and she also recently got boats divide and obesity medicine. She also has enrolled in the connery medicine program. The same one as dr patel. She completed undergraduate and medical education at vanderbilt university prior to competing her internal medicine residency and chronology fellowship at the university of chicago. She has a special interest in the management of diabetes and obesity and culinary medicine. She strides to emphasize the dodge food as medicine throughout of medical practice. Welcome ladies for.

Nisha patel both vanderbilt university dr dr patel patel university of chicago dish
"culinary medicine" Discussed on Thrive Bites

Thrive Bites

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"culinary medicine" Discussed on Thrive Bites

"Welcome back to thrive bytes. Let's get back to the interview that that's wonderful so So now that you've gone through you know You know little bits of where you are You know take us to howl afterwards. You know you you you did. You did a lot of research. And then how did you end up You know teaching at Stanford right so I. I obviously channel my love of research into research on these. These current topics were talking about but How I ended up at Stanford was I was finishing my internal medicine residency continuing in yet another place realizing that There's not a lot of focus on lifestyle and internal medicine generally but I saw just so many places where it could be so useful of a tool and you know kind of like integrated medicine. I thought Y- along with what's more typical internal medicine. I thought why are we? Segmenting herself said medicine. Why not just say Oh. It would be really great for the types of patients that I see to have all the best tools in my toolbox. All the best evidence based by toolbox whether those be the typical medications or procedures but also the being able to teach someone how to cook or at least talk to them about changing the nature and behaviors exercising so And Understanding Integrative therapy so I I knew that I didn't want to just apply for typical internal medicine jobs and I knew I wanted to get back to California. Because at this point it was still on the East Coast and Just kind of hard to transition so I thought okay. I need to figure out some way to get plugged in again. You know with my people in the place where I wanna be and so started looking around and found the Stanford Prevention Research Center A postdoctoral fellowship in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention which I applied for it and ended up getting. That's what brought me to Stanford but that's a program that's really for PhD's generally although they take a few MD's here and there to really people that have pretty extensive training and research to get to a point where they can be at top notch. Universities run their own labs and and focus their career entirely at research. So it's you know I didn't want to necessarily focus entire rerun research but I knew I wanted to really take what I had seen in practice in terms of lifestyle medicine and culinary medicine at this point and and what I learned working in low income settings to try to figure out. Well how can we bring these lifestyle treatments culinary medicine treatments to everybody not just someone who can private pay in clinic unthought? While the way to that is we need to prove that these things a were which you know we had a lot of background knowledge that they should work but that they work in a clinical setting that they're doable. That people are willing to do them and can do them in the current healthcare constructs in that you can pay for them using the current payment methods. That are out there in that. It doesn't cost a lot of extra money. Somehow improves health outcomes so You know at the time there. There were a lot of gaps in that research. And I knew that you need the research first and then you need really compelling personal stories and ways of influence policy which didn't talk about. It won't go to detail but I also did a master's in public policy and administration from sure but I've Yeah I've been kind of filtering around like how do you make change in this field and I thought Oh policy politics and I realize Oh. That's really hard just like trying to change the healthcare system so known also figured I'd get this background research. I'm really trying to get to a place in my life. Franken Mary all those things together but So on the research arm right now and that brought me to Stanford and also brought me to meeting Dr Jeff Julian or good who you mentioned who is a great friend chef..

Stanford Stanford Prevention Research C East Coast postdoctoral fellowship California Franken Dr Jeff Julian PhD
"culinary medicine" Discussed on Your Doctor�s Orders

Your Doctor�s Orders

06:16 min | 2 years ago

"culinary medicine" Discussed on Your Doctor�s Orders

"Treatment for diabetes. Banting didn't have diabetes but he thought he might try it out for himself writing quote the items from which I was advised to abstain as much as possible. Were bread butter milk sugar beer and potatoes which had been the main and I thought innocent elements of my existence and it turned out. This coffin maker had stumbled across his first successful weight loss program. He lost a pound a week for a year and maintain that weight loss until he died. Fifteen years later his program consisted of four meals a day with meat greens fruits and dry online. Mainly it's what he avoided. That made the difference. No sugar no sweet. No potatoes no oats no beer and no butter. After a year of excellent weight loss results. He did what so many self styled influencers do to this day he sell published a book about his new found dietary success to his surprise his self published book was so popular that it was picked up by a standard publisher every self published. Authors dream. Today you can still buy banting spoke and yes all have Lincoln the show notes. It is from bandings. Diet that came many others. It's children and grandchildren of diets. That is our the stillman diet the Atkins Diet the Paleo Diet. The whole thirty diet the carnival diet and the current rage the Kito Diet though each have their own twist all of these diets preached the same concept decrease the amount of carbohydrates sugars and starches. You put into your body heat. Copious amounts of meat using fat as fuel. And you can't help lose weight best of all. You won't be hungry. At least that is what the purveyors of the low carb diets will tell you today. Our conversation is about low carb diets with a focus on the Keto Diet and cutaway learn like most food beds has a fun combination of fact. Food Cons My name is Dr Terry Simpson. And this is culinary medicine where we sort out the crazy from credible about food from its source to its effect on your body. Lusting myths and showing evidence for food can be medicine. The challenge with folks who say things like Euro eating all the salt you want or you should be eating. Only ten percent of your calories from fat. You should be on a complete vegan diet. You should be eating higher. Carbohydrates as a result of that lower fat or the opposite of that which is old style at in Kita genetic because it's all the same atkins you know. South Beach was son of that and keen agenda. Casanova South beach you know. They're all the same diet basically with a little bit different. Maybe a little different twist. But you know this concept of either very low carb diet or very high carb diet you know. It's just quackery. That is a friend of culinary medicine. Doctor Timothy Harlan physician at Tulane University and a chef. He's also a manager of the Culinary Medicine Project. It's through his efforts that culinary medicine is taught in medical schools throughout the country in his view and in the view of many low. Carb diets are not sustainable. Not that you can't lose weight you probably will at least initially. Well Look John. I works for a lot of people if we talk about the low hanging fruit and Genyk Diet. I think that when somebody's trying to you know use this diet to lose weight. One of the easiest things that happens is by cutting out all the hydrates. Most junk food is based on carbohydrates. So when you eliminate all carbohydrates you basically eliminate a lot of junk food you know if you. Stop Drinking Regular Soda. And that's you know five hundred calories or whatever per day of Soda You. The appetite doesn't seem to want to reclaim was five hundred calories somewhere else. So it's SORTA automatically puts you into this energy deficit which allows for weight loss that happening in an ad. Libbed them. Or You know. Just not counting calories when has automatically I think that sort of leads to sustainability in that aspect that would be one of the positive aspects of the Ketogenic Diet one of the negative aspects of it is just adherents not very high in literature and I believe that's due to it's a pretty restrictive diet. It takes away a lot of foods that people have grown up eating some more nuanced. Things is if you're eating a high fat diet which some Ketogenic diets are you could be eating too many omega six fatty acids which in the long run might not do too well. I mean it's arguable. I don't know what's worse than Diet high in sugar or a diet high in making six seventy s Ideally you would be lower in both I guess the take home of this nuance would be requires a certain degree of nutritional awareness. That is bill GEICO's his best selling book. The poor misunderstood calorie is one of the better and well reference books about the biochemistry behind how your body treats different types of calories in different ways. Here's what we know about low. Carb diets information gathered from multiple studies. People do lose weight on low carb diets..

Banting diabetes Culinary Medicine Project South Beach Dr Terry Simpson Doctor Timothy Harlan bill GEICO Kita publisher Tulane University Lincoln
"culinary medicine" Discussed on Your Doctor�s Orders

Your Doctor�s Orders

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"culinary medicine" Discussed on Your Doctor�s Orders

"But if you grew up in the south you might have had biscuits and gravy while California. Didn't invent GRANOLA. It is often associated with the California breakfast and coffee. We have coffee and no doubt you heard the saying eat breakfast like a king lunch like a prince and dinner like. Popper Adele Davis. The health who died of cancer said that of course. She said a lot of nutty things. Lots of claims about breakfast lose weight. Jumpstart your metabolism and be less hungry. We will see. The breakfast is more influenced by marketing than science. But there is science today and Brett bisque myths realities marketings hopes and what we know from science. My Name is Dr Gary Simpson. And this is culinary medicine where we sort out the crazy from credible about from its source to its effect on your body busting myths and showing evidence where food and medicine breakfast or breaking of the fast is the first meal one eats after a night. Time of fasting. Assuming you slept.

Adele Davis California Dr Gary Simpson Brett bisque cancer
"culinary medicine" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

People's Pharmacy

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"culinary medicine" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

"Medicine family medicine recognizing the importance of prevention being frustrated listening to their colleagues who were years ahead of them dealing with symptoms far downstream that could have been much more easily addressed far upstream with things like diet so a lot of them are interested in this and i've seen the emergence of a number of medical groups there's an american college of lifestyle madison there's a group that does integrative medicine there's a group that does functional medicine and for all of those died is a key component you get board certified in all of those things got two lane university has a new culinary medicine approach there's this huge movement of reimagining nutrition education in medicine and i think it's really starting to gain some mental so i hope they were on the verge of making some great progress there and filling these knowledge gaps of physicians who do wanna know this in the last thing i'll say is when you give these kinda lectures you can tell that as they're listening to you half of them are listening for their patients in half of them are listening from themselves they're thinking oh yeah it's not all that good either maybe maybe this isn't just for my patients maybe i should be listening to this for my own personal dietary habits so that's pretty rewarding so dr gardner summing up all of your wisdom and all of your research for the last what three decades it seems like it it's actually pretty simple tell us a little bit about mindfulness a little bit about vegetables and a little bit about finding the diet that's actually right for you in that you'll stick with not just for a couple of weeks or.

dr gardner three decades
"culinary medicine" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

People's Pharmacy

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"culinary medicine" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

"Of by some whole foods local seasonal gets them whole fruits and cut them up have some whole grains have some pasteurized eggs and some local grass fed meat animal products things like that some of those costs more of got a cost issue the less nutritious foods that are full of sugars and fats and salt those are more affordable for families and so we need to work from a policy perspective to make healthier foods more acceptable and not promote the convenience foods even though they're low cost it's a wicked problem decker gardner one of the reasons that some families rely on convenience foods is that of course there is a time constraint and of course budgetary constraints are important but there are people who haven't learned how to cook and you're you're really handicapped if you don't know what to do with a stock broccoli to make it palatable it's a great point and so there's actually some great movement in that area in a couple of directions people are starting to talk about reinvigorating home economics in school now that really disappeared for a while and appropriately so because home economics at one point was sort of basic life skills like cooking and then eventually ended up being making brownies and cupcakes in between classes and eating more sugar so we don't want to call it home economics i think we need to call it something more along the lines of life skills basic life skills but there is a small movement grown where we would reintroduce that two schools and it would just be part of the regular curriculum and for the adult world i'm part of a consortium called the teaching kitchen collaborative that david eisenberg at harvard has started and teaching kitchens are popping up all over the place and in one important place at stanford we've got a teaching kitchen for med students if you wanna see a population that really could have an impact here's physicians learning about nutrition now they they get very little nutrition education in med school and including pediatricians who see kids and a lot of it is a little dry a little biochemistry or or a lot of biochemistry orientational we're try actually introduce them culinary literacy and culinary medicine into medical school education so that the docs learn a little bit had a cook and in teaching kitchen environment that's one of the places we can do it and we don't.

harvard stanford david eisenberg
"culinary medicine" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"culinary medicine" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Hi 38 wednesday increasing clouds high thirty five i'm accuweather meteorologist frank straight wbz newsradio 1030 we began the day in single digits we've managed to make it up to fourteen degrees which is our current temperature in boston threats to gold to snowy two cloudy whatever the weather is just right to shop for your new toyota intervention toyota braintree chop hundreds of vehicles on three floors of total indoor comfort toyota braintree look for the highflying american flag we have box office congratulations going out right now to john locke of austin john you've won a family four pack of tickets to the boston rv encamping expo january twelve through january fifteen that the boston convention center the camping in a trailer drb and camping expo runs the 12th through the fifteenth and for details you can visit boston rv expo dot com wbz news time is 356 cities time now for something you should know some scientific research has been done on the food we eat and how we cook it and how that impact our health the results are really interesting if you married eight meet her chicken her head and then grill added high temperature you actually reduce the cancercausing chemicals by seventy seven percent jeff put that marinade john lapuma md and author of the book chef m these big book of culinary medicine and the addition of rosemary their abritrary reduces the ata even further if you add black pepper tier curry you absorb more turmeric from that curry that make the curry yellow and the turmeric has a chemical called curcumin that uh has been shown courage.

chemical called boston rv toyota time md total chop braintree wbz newsradio frank straight accuweather austin john locke black
"culinary medicine" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"culinary medicine" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"This is something you should know whom scientific research has been done on the food we eat and how we cook it and how that impact our health the results are really interesting if you merit ate meat her chicken her head and then grill added high temperature eu cleaver do a cancercausing chemicals by seventy seven percent to put that marinade john lapuma md and author of the book chef mds big book of culinary medicine and the addition of rosemary beer rosemary reduces the ata even further if you add black pepper tier curry you absorb more turmeric from that curry that make the curry yellow and the terek has a chemical called curcumin that uh has been shown to reduce south timers risk as well as stabilized ulcerative colitis and in some people actually reduce arthritis symptoms that he done absorbed uh turmeric and curcumin unless you have a little bit of black pepper dr lapuma says it's a really good idea to add avocado to your spinach sell because you absorb seven times the lucane from this day that the eye protecting antioxidant that fight against cataract development in the key macrobudgetary and then if there is no avocado and same thing a full fat salad addressing instead of a nonfat are lowfat because they're not as well durable with low fat dressing or non petra thing add something you should know dot net i'm like two rubbers in that something you should know on wbz.

ulcerative colitis dr lapuma chemical called seventy seven percent
"culinary medicine" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"culinary medicine" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Places that are opening it's also will not hurt you have before on my show america's standing on travel guys amy we all know what you sarah your background a little bit houses you'll get involved with sure long story here so you know me feel free to cut off me what every your life i started cooking many many years ago in their home freeze national grandparents stay so i want to dedicate our interview in honor of my grandparents find that i old all of my career to them because each one of them had a different influence on my culinary backgrounds my grandmother of with all these thinking in making very special southern italian treats work of a recent called philosophy in italy it she always meet those in and local school in family in the the ritual som traditions and things like that i character her and come each person in every tossing a different thing and then on growing up i really wanted to show away enrich who could promote cultures cultural still glitch building things like that and so i started looking air food as a men's um you get people interested in other cultures and other places and that really became my new shan i had the good fortune to be able to travel has not only in italy but a lot of different places such as the intestines or even painful loss on morocco and so i am greens turkey i talk about all of those places and the entire mediterranean in my work i also specialize in health focused on types of food the coast my mother had died he needs when i was growing up and so i was our family coast and i had to make our family meals her nutritional requirements so i was just having a little kid and i think what ethical twenty so i wanted to make one meal that you could eat but that we also like and that's kind of led me that my career because now dunk two books with the american diabetes association and as we were just talking about i i think the culinary medicine he unveiling dedicated to the mediterranean diet because you know half of my family here and faith and.

america morocco american diabetes association italy
"culinary medicine" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"culinary medicine" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"My show america's dining on travel guys aiming we all know what your share your background a little bit how'd that you'll get involved with food sure allows for very long story theor so you know me feel free to cut off me every late and i started cooking many many years ago arm in their home cities national grandparents stay so i want to dedicate our interview in honor of my grandparents i old all of my career 'cause i'm because each one of them had it different influence on my culinary backgrounds you know my grandmother with all these thinking and making very special southern italian treats work on reach called kalafi i shall we need those in and the love of food and family in the the ritual thing traditions and things like that i share it with her and come each person in my family talk in a different thing and then i'm growing up i really wanted to show a way enrich food could promote cultures cultural build that bridge building things like that in so i started looking at food as a men's um you get people interested in other cultures and other places and that really became new shan i had the good fortune to be able to travel is not only in italy but a lot of different places i such as in theory than peninsula on morocco and so i greetings turkey i talk about all of those places in the entire mediterranean in my work i also specialize in health focused on types of food because my mother had died when i was growing up and so i with our family coast and i had to make our family meals her nutritional requirements so i was a little kid and i ask you cooked twenty so i wanted to make one meal that she could eat but that we also like and that kind of led needed my career because now i've done two books with the american diabetes association and as she was just talking about i i do the culinary medicine theories um i'm very dedicated to the mediterranean diet because you know half of my family.

america morocco american diabetes association italy
"culinary medicine" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:57 min | 4 years ago

"culinary medicine" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Mm two you're listening to america's dining on travel guide as soon as the first hour because usually i mentioned that we're here on sunday is to us eight seventy sunday and the sole america's dining on travel guide is now isn't as thirty is the year what you believe that with your host peo will i'm looking a lady who is smiling and while he is smiling and this lovely red do i said she is on see is throwing a plot name amy louis oh well come through all america dining on travel guide both hill bob blemish it's not beyond this now i low hollow thank you so much thank you so much for having me back i'm delighted at says lots of law thank you thank you you don't wanna says here that you're actually starting to something as all september six which is does little bit away but sets all about the culinary medicine made easy is that it oh yes sister's new theory that i offer ethical economy frizzy in maryland aaron it's a wonderful series of cooking classes in which we teach people how to mary easy our science of nutrition along with the culinary art and so we go through a little bit are primer about different health benefits of eating different types of foods for example anti inflammatory thune antioxidant who uh zero calorie food and then we talk about how delicious tasting be earned we transform them into a meal that not only tastes great it's also really good for you i want to hear a little bit about the back plus will hold why are you joining us from currently as we speak i'm calling from washington dc area in maryland and there are some great restaurants in that area aren't there there are many yes luckily in washington dc we we have many great from casual to fine dining lot of wonderful restaurants than it seems we get better daily i can't even keep track of all the new wonderful faces that are opening but those who will not hurt deals before on.

america amy louis maryland thune washington zero calorie