35 Burst results for "Cuisine"

"cuisine" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

05:30 min | Last month

"cuisine" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"Them accessible and ensuring the essence of the dish is present. Today, Roy yamaguchi Sam Troy, Alan Wong, and most of the others are still crafting amazing food. There are also other well-known Hawaiian chefs who are continuing the legacy of HRC and more. And these include Leanne Wong, Michelle Carr, Mark Noguchi, Andrew Lee and Sheldon Simeon. Simeon is perhaps the best known because of his amazing ability to take familiar classics and up level them with a refined touch. Additionally, his two turns on top chef ended in trips to the finals and getting voted as the fan favorite both times. He and his wife Janice own and run tin roof, a popular restaurant on Maui, and he wrote cook real Hawaii, a beautiful cookbook with 100 recipes that demonstrate his skills and culinary heritage. HRC has also influenced school lunches in a way thanks to the hyena pono, farm to school program, where a greater emphasis is back on locally grown food and fresh cooking to school meals. Since the 1970s, lunches had mostly been unpacking or unwrapping processed foods and heating them up for students. So much like the questions and goals of HRC, school lunches are back to honoring the plethora of fresh ingredients across the islands. In the end, HRC is as American as California regional cuisine or Southwest regional cuisine. In many ways, it's the most open minded fusion cuisine out there because Hawaii is truly a melting pot where white people are the minority. As always, we like to follow up our main story with short recurring segments. This is a segment called what are we reading where we highlight books and comic books that have caught our attention? So what have you been reading? I've been reading a really cool comic book actually called the mask of halia by comics, and I'm going to talk about the comic book in just a moment, but first I do want to mention the group itself. Comics. It's a fascinating group. The creators are all women of Asian descent. And their mission is so inspiring and I can paraphrase and such, but I think it's best if I just take it directly from the website. They say, our mission is to create stories that introduce Filipino and other Asian mythology through a riveting contemporary fantasy comic series, our stories aimed to inspire young women everywhere as they follow our female heroines who learned to spark the warrior goddess within. Our hope is that our readers will be inspired to face the future with hope, compassion and grace born from an understanding of the past and the struggles of our ancestors. Oh. Yeah, I mean, really fascinating. It catches your imagination. It's really inspiring. So the mask of halia is just the first issue that I've read so far. It's written by Caitlin fajon and Jennifer zheng, with art by rhino Renaud villa, coloring by Charlene Dewey, cover art by Catherine Leno and production help by Cecilia Lim and waverly limb. The story centers on Marcel Reyes, who, along with her mother, moved back to Cebu city, Philippines after her great grandmother passes away. She discovers a wooden mask that throws her into a Filipino mythical world where there's an ancient battle that includes a giant sea serpent named bakunawa. I really like it. I mean, you know, I felt it left me wanting more. And as good comic books do, you get to the end and there's like a cliffhanger and the writing is great..

Roy yamaguchi Sam Troy Leanne Wong Michelle Carr Mark Noguchi Sheldon Simeon HRC Alan Wong Andrew Lee Hawaii Simeon Janice Caitlin fajon Jennifer zheng California rhino Renaud villa Charlene Dewey Catherine Leno Cecilia Lim waverly limb
"cuisine" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

05:16 min | Last month

"cuisine" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"To buy more local ingredients and build up the industry if need be. To create a symbiotic relationship with the local farmers. They met again 6 weeks later on the big island and began visiting farms, but had some challenges with farmers who weren't always willing to grow the produce that was being requested by the chefs or were interested but didn't have high enough quality items. Little by little, though, each of the chefs would find a farmer willing to work with them. For Roy yamaguchi, it was a local farmer on why mauna loa named dean okimoto. It became a mutually beneficial partnership where dean would travel with Roy for demos and explain the various screens, growing the business for okimoto. It required a little bit of risk on the part of both chef and farmer because sometimes new growing techniques had to be experimented with that would eventually be adopted by more farmers. It was a time consuming process that eventually resulted in moving away from a relying on the larger wholesale food companies that had traditionally supplied local restaurants. These challenges focus on ingredients, which was a huge hurdle, but the actual food development and identity was just as important. On the mainland there was a movement towards local or regional cuisines, probably most famously through southwestern cuisine and California regional cuisine. The turning point for HRC was when Beverly gannon suggested hiring shop Gordon to help them organize and get the word out. Although his work was predominantly in music and film, he understood marketing and star power. He realized that of the group of 12, there would be a few celebrity chefs but the rest would be required to support the goals of the group with less of the limelight. By the way, extra fun fact, Shep Gordon was like the manager or something for Alice Cooper. Oh. So it's kind of weird that he took on the food thing. Although I think that I'm pretty sure he lived in Hawaii. That was one of the reasons that he got roped in. With Gordon's direction and the help of marketing agencies, Hawaii regional cuisine, chefs began to gain attention. In the first decade of HRC, Bon Appetit magazine featured Roy yamaguchi, Alan Wong, and Mark elman. Yamaguchi was also inducted into the fine dining Hall of Fame in 1992. In fact, in 1994, writer Janice wald Henderson, who wrote the first article on yamaguchi, curated and produced the new cuisine of Hawaii, recipes from the 12 celebrated chefs of Hawaii regional cuisine. This was a sample of the talent of all 12 chefs, but also helped be a springboard for a variety of other books, including Roy's feasts from Hawaii by yamaguchi, Choi of cooking by Sam Choi, Alan Wong's new wave luau by Wong, and a taste of Hawaii new cooking from the crossroads of the.

Roy yamaguchi dean okimoto okimoto Beverly gannon HRC Shep Gordon Roy Hawaii dean Gordon Appetit magazine Mark elman Alice Cooper fine dining Hall of Fame Alan Wong Janice wald Henderson California Yamaguchi yamaguchi Sam Choi
"cuisine" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

04:29 min | Last month

"cuisine" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"Or Portuguese sausage, or a hamburger steak, smothered in gravy, and sometimes topped with a fried egg. Yes, we're talking about the beloved loco moco. The popularity of this plate lunch was also pushed along from local chain, zippy's, as well as the California chain, L and L Hawaiian barbecue. In many ways, the luaus and plate lunches created a belief that Hawaiian food was similar to Chinese food and that it was inexpensive and more akin to street foods. The food wasn't taken seriously as an actual cuisine in the eyes of real chefs. The idea of refined cuisine was reserved for swanky, French restaurants across the islands, and that leads us to the development of Hawaii regional cuisine. Perhaps the triumph of fusion foods. Before we go any further, we want to mention the book eating Asian America again. There's a great essay written by Sam yamashta, a food historian who researched Hawaiian regional cuisine. So technically, fine dining did go beyond French, but chefs who cooked in fine dining restaurants emphasized continental cuisines and were often French German or Swiss chefs. Dishes included rich sauces, lots of butter and plenty of tradition. European tradition to be exact, which probably isn't a surprise because of the colonial period where white people were often the wealthy landowners. The plantation owners were the upper class and anyone considered a local born and raised in Hawaii, was considered lower class. Education, social life, and food choices were all racialized. In the late 19th century, early 20th century when Hawaii was annexed, divisions were growing even more with locals going to public schools and eating certain foods while Caucasian elite and the ruling class of Hawaii, or Ali, were often attending private schools like iolani, punahou, kamehameha, and mid pack institute. Fun fact, kamehameha was actually only open to Hawaiians. The divide of local food versus fine food was illustrated by the restaurants that opened. From the earliest days in the 1830s to the 1930s, there was a rise of more casual cafes, lunchrooms, and canteens. Sometimes attached to a general store, then you have the more refined fine dining establishments like the Alexander young hotel that would often use high quality locally sourced foods for vegetables, fruits, and some meats. Interestingly, there was still locally caught fish that.

Hawaii Sam yamashta zippy California iolani mid pack institute America punahou kamehameha Ali Alexander young hotel
"cuisine" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

05:03 min | Last month

"cuisine" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"So it should be no surprise that there's a more refined and redefine form of Hawaiian cuisine known as Hawaii regional cuisine or HRC. However, to fully understand HRC, you have to also understand traditional Hawaiian cuisine as well as the different foods and cooking techniques from other cultures that have influenced food trends in Hawaii. Let's start with actual traditional Hawaiian food. Why is an island so it probably comes as no surprise that traditional Hawaiian foods rely upon fresh produce, seafood and shellfish. And local meat sources. You've probably heard about some of these foods, dishes like poke, clua pork, poi, laulau, haupia, and breadfruit. Poke, of course, is probably the best known traditional dish that is eaten across the U.S. now. Classic Hawaiian style poke is a base of bite size cubed raw fish, seasoned with several ingredients that include onions, green or Maui, sesame oil, soy sauce, chili pepper, and garlic. And you can't forget the seaweed. There's a special seaweed called limu kohu that provides a wonderful flavor. Then there's Kahlua pork. What we all think of when we think about a luau. It's a slow cooked pig that's cooked in an emu, or traditional underground pit filled with kindling, wood, porous stones, and rocks, and covered with tea leaves, banana leaves, or other green aromatic leaves that help slowly steam the pig for about two to three hours. The use of leaves to wrap things is repeated in various dishes like Lao Lao, which is another traditional dish where fish and pork are wrapped in Taro leaves before steaming, and speaking of Taro, it's the main ingredient of poi, which is essentially Taro root that's been pounded, thinned out a little and allowed to ferment. It's a staple starch in Hawaii that's often eaten with other things and adds slightly sour goodness to any meal. The theme you'll see over and over with traditional Hawaiian foods is that they're all fairly simple dishes that honor the ingredients, utilize all parts of those ingredients and focus on seasoning with other easily found local items. One of the unique things about Hawaii is the acceptance and integration of the different foods from the various immigrants to the islands. Many of these foods and ingredients were brought in by the laborers originating from east and Southeast Asia. With the high percentage of Japanese Chinese Filipinos, Koreans and Portuguese on the islands who came as laborers, it's understandable that the changing demographics of the islands would also create change to the foods. One of the biggest fast food chains on the islands is zippy's and zippy's menu is like a microcosm of what decades of food integration looks like. It's easy to draw a culinary line from China to the zippy's turkey jock, one ton mean, gene doy, a Chinese style deep fried mochi stuffed with red bean paste..

HRC Hawaii Taro U.S. Southeast Asia east China
"cuisine" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

03:33 min | Last month

"cuisine" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"You're listening to Asian American history one O one, a podcast about Asian American history from generally known historical happenings to the deeper cuts that we don't hear about in school, where your host Jen and tad, the daughter and father team. Welcome to season two episode 23. We're going to start with the bad news first. On May 11th at two 20 p.m. three women of Korean descent were shot at the world salon in Dallas, Texas. Although multiple rounds were shot, the women had non life threatening injuries, which is great. The male shooter left in a maroon minivan after the attack. The police originally believed the crime wasn't hate motivated, but Dallas police found a link between the latest shooting and two drive by shootings in Dallas on April 2nd and may 10th. Witnesses of both drive by shootings described a red or burgundy van or car and all three shootings appeared to target Asian run businesses. Thankfully, there were no injuries in either of the drive by shootings. Dallas police are still searching for the suspect as of this recording. On to some good news, James Hong, at the age of 93, has made history as the oldest person to ever receive a star on the Walk of Fame. You may not know this, but it actually costs money to put a star on the Walk of Fame to not only put it there, but also maintain it. So Daniel Dae Kim put a crowdfund out and he got $55,000 over four days. Hong has had a 7 decade and counting career..

Dallas world salon Jen Texas James Hong Daniel Dae Kim Hong
Why Are America's Shelves Empty?

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:47 min | 5 months ago

Why Are America's Shelves Empty?

"With regard to these shortages, which we want to talk about today, I mean, let's start by saying it's affecting us. So we have our media room when people go, oh, you have a meeting room. Well, one of the media business. So we do have a media room. We sometimes will have investors come and watch a movie and so on. So we're replacing our chairs and this was supposed to happen what in August August of last year and it's now scheduled and after several delays was supposed to get these chairs. Well, first, the first thing it was, it was a delay in the foam. They didn't have the foam. So there was a shortage of foam. They got the foam, and then the latest delay was the mechanics. So in other words, you know, can't lean or whatever. You can't fix the chair up and down. And then the latest the lay after that was that they thought that the chairs were on a truck and the evidently weren't. So it's a transportation of the completed product. Anyway, if this seems a little esoteric to people, and we're supposed to get these chairs, we'll see if it happens, I guess what? February 7, something like that. And then I'm reading articles and you were sort of outraged about the fact that people can not buy pet food. Right, so a couple of weeks ago a friend of mine posted this photo of some empty shelves, and she has cats, and she was so upset because she can not find cat food, or the cat food that she normally buys. So she was very upset about that, so she posted a photo of that and I was like, oh, that's too bad, you know, cat cat food. You're not a fan of cats. I like cats, but I know you don't. But anyway, but that's beside the point. Well, I'm sure I'm pretty sure the cats are very temperamental and very particular about their cuisine. It's a little bit like the favorite restaurant is now closed and they're like, oh yeah, where's my food? So that was bad, but then I started seeing more Friends talk about how they couldn't find dog food and other types of pet food. And I was like, what, you know, this would be a really interesting segment to do. So on my Facebook, and it's my personal Facebook page. It's not a public. And I said, hey guys, if you have pet food shortages in your local grocery store, can you take a photo of your shelves? And so many people sent in photos, I could not possibly put all of them on, and I'm going to show you some of these photos in the podcast. If you watch it on rumble or YouTube, a lot of them, and then more people started weighing in on, oh, it's not just pet food is not just cat food, dog food. I can't find cold medicine. I can't find toilet paper. I can't find this. I can't find that. And so they were sending photos of that as well. And so it is just it's

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"cuisine" Discussed on flavors unknown podcast

flavors unknown podcast

07:18 min | 9 months ago

"cuisine" Discussed on flavors unknown podcast

"I guess palatable for them you know and so does how molina started than so what we know. Now is molly as traditionally. I would say it's either mullen negro from Or the multiple blunt. So the nonce. I settled Arrive at what's employer central mexico. And that's what wills have so many churches in they were the ones that started a lotta these new dishes that we know us mexican cuisine which is a fusion of spanish techniques summer spanish ingredients and what they found here the molly to meet traditionally if i order molly i expect either which the right or or or by can multimedia which is the yellow me better molly land for i mean. They come in every color in with every type of ingredient some people. I've peanuts and stuff like that which to me. That's something i'm used to saw. His molly could have up to fifty something vince. Every family has its own way of doing it and why you know because i grew up with malaysia. My parents make i think to me. It's one of the best that i've ever tasted you not probably because i'm so used to my mom's cooking but also because i know that she makes it very very very traditional Utilizing all they. They met that the appeal and all the in all sorts cooking jumped to we. Don't use chocolate that a lot of people get confused with akao got it. Ross the cacao and then you get grinded and all of that and we do at sugar. So that's where people think it's usually when yeah because she has to start the day before toasting and getting everything ready and she has everything ready and the next day we start actually grinding everything so she grinds some of the suffering. The end summer staff we help to grind it actually in the molina by hand united sites that so how do you do it to either restaurants begun guessing you end up doing like completely the percent traditional wake where actually you are yup. It's a one hundred percent traditional. We use the debate. Clay pot with It's a big hot is specifically for And so we use Make a little. Bit automakers everyday obviously we make a big amount and then you a paste. That pays this call. Chila faith are mexico so she has the a of the the chilous being. Hot n being grinded in everythin- and then the pace we keep it in the fridge and we take x. amount. Let's say one pound or half a kilo every time to mix it with a chicken stock so in mexico traditionally where i grew up. You know malays marva for weddings and for big parties are like that. So they used to always traditionally used to be with turkey. Nowadays there are starting to use a lot more chicken also where i grew up the same families. They me with our afterwards so so they because they i guess they didn't have chicken turkey but they had ducks because we have rivers and lakes. So i guess they all the dachshund put them in the mali but there is delicious It's amazing so it's still go back to the bed sam and cantina india-born and so you cold. Wave latinos treat food. So what does that mean. i will let you know. I'm i know what the word means. What does that mean for for your concepts and when you refer to street food and so mexican street food webs what are you talking about so mobile latina reality. It was something that we decided to call him all latino because latino it's You know where a new generation were. All the new latino shacks were doing something really cool. You know kind of fusion latino flavors in maybe a little bit of the latino culture and so it was easier for people to understand that even though were mexican restaurant. It's not going to be pop or traditional mexican fluid. It'll be so that's the whole idea. And then as they free food so for this food finger food. You don't need a fork knife to actually eat it you you just take your hand like tackle. You know like Everything that you find the streets like you know like there's so much that you can find we. We do have some times like the stars and stuff like that but once in a while as a special because in mexico is not something we every day at home like harsh. Shell tacos or stuff like that. It's more by like when we go to ferry or something. Yeah that there's a st street food that's when we eat it and that's why here will only serve Tackles okay and so the tortilla using Tokyo is saw. We have two kinds of tears. The flour tortillas journalist in northern mexico so it's only a few states used Flower cotija Northern mexico and dan early around eighty percent of the country uses corker tia so they we use mostly corn. And it's by car because there is a lot of different types of corn in mexico. Where i grew up. There's two types of corn we use so we use the actually three. When i was growing up used to use the red car the purple barn might model and also used to use whitehorn. That's eight thad. There are other states that they use other Of har- depending what state you're from the detector. Thirteen year bag. You know. I read on the dispersion of restaurant that you have thirty different types of taco. Is it true. Yes so we have actually more than thirty types of tackles we have a philemon which is like almost theology. Which is i would say. You know moral by a little bit of inspiration also from peru because i used to go to peru allot lomas gallic. Something that they eat there but this is my own way in in mexico. We call it hotel loma which is philemon and we have our tarasco. Whichever represents my state because Actress careers there is a lap in formula and with jimmy jewelry to maturity is mexican style. Even though to me it could be traditionally from you know the brazil from bolivia argentina by union mexico will also eat the to maturity what what is what is the difference with.

molly mexico molina Chila mullen wills vince marva malaysia Ross mali northern mexico turkey india Tokyo philemon peru
"cuisine" Discussed on The Zest

The Zest

08:32 min | 9 months ago

"cuisine" Discussed on The Zest

"You go and always say that street food food is your number one place to try to additional cuisine from police. Though you go to haiti's you'll get a spears. The richness mutual riley's that we have to offer. It is just amazing. We do dishes with big sheets and you can see some of those connections weaking all cuisine and also some of the cuisine from the south in the united states right for example okra okra is some communities. End these that a lap. Also in the south notably new orleans creole cuisine. So new orleans cuisine was insurance also by our cuisine because at one point when the united states was trying to acquire the louisiana from the french ladder. Haitian soldiers games help and they stayed over and incorporated debt techniques cuisine into that region and a lot of the food from that megyn is very similar to what we do in. Hey that's really interesting. I'm going to try to not say any french words during this conversation. But you're i took spanish in high school not french. But the the haiti that you're describing and the food and the richness of the food is like a one eighty from the haiti that we hear about in the news. So how does it make you feel that the only thing we ever really hear about haiti is when something bad happens. I've just i'm is a complex schilling. I'd know that there's more to haiti index. I'll culture is vibrant Cyber before we have so many beautiful sites we have on the ground size. We have those amazing beautiful waterfalls. We have those beautiful beaches in one of the beaches in haiti was considered as one of the top fifty beaches in the world. Right and that side is not really showcase and the news. It's always when does the disaster this political issues and stuff like that on the other hand. Feel that also. Who's the better person to promote is cultured the people from medical so after that we lack a that end where that we don't push much our culture out all we don't do a good job at pushing it on issue we appreciate at a lap and wish should be the first ones to showcase that saddened amy. That people don't see in the news so that the news can showcasing right. Yeah okay. I gotta ask you. What's the name of that fancy beach. I know it's in the south right at the school maccabi from that line. Siodmak maccabi right. Yeah it sounds beautiful. Well you talked about using your platform. A little bit to showcase all that haiti has to offer. And you do have a big platform because you were on tv cooking. You've got this big instagram following. Tell me about how it came to be that you were on some of these cooking shows i i. I'm very hyper and people don't tend to see me why you say that like you don't like abbott. I'm shy. I just mastered the way to do public speaking to me and for people i was never considering cooking competition. I'd see a friend of mine who's been in tv. She referred me to it casting agent. That's what i did cut kitchen cutthroat kitchen. Yes so i do kitchen. In after new kitchen hours hoods. I wanted to do more and more cooking shows competitions and stuff like that so i ended up doing chops and chop was here earlier this year. Wow well for somebody who's shy. You're you're really turning into quite the media. Mogul when you're on these shows how does your haitian cooking background. Come into play are you. Are you putting plates in front of the judges with ingredients that they're unfamiliar with. Yes what i'd do. This shows some of them. They give your specific recipes. You have to do for his wall. Uh specific recipes to do so. I tried to do was incorporated my flavors into it right on child. They give us crazy ingredients to us. So i tried to incorporate some of my background into it. I also got a chance to do another show If not as air yet. Is airing probably next year. So i cannot say the name by snap a petition show if a cooking show fully about me so they give the abigail ingredients but he was all about me math later. So i was able to showcase more microbes e by background. And i can't wait for them to come out or people see it to learn more by asian cuisine and what we have to offer. I think that's great. So did they at all change the way you cook or the way you operate your catering business. No no not at all. Oh astor now. I've always. I've always known how to cook fast and work under pressure but doing the shows helped me even master eating more as for as an organized chaos. I like to work in a clean environment. Like to work at a fast pace. I like to work. Listen we have this to do. Let's get it done and then afterwards whenever we've done if you wanna relax and have fun. Do what you have to do. But when it's crunch time when it's time for me to work people always say that i'm like the the screwed in the kitchen. Can of ask just stay focused and doing these shows have even more focused on that area. Micrometer like as far as being organizing the kitchen working fast working indicate environment and executing under pressure Do you have a nickname in the kitchen to have kitchen row. That that you know about that. Oh about no no. I'm sure everyone has good things to say about. How often do you return to haiti. And what do you miss okay. So as i was he was december. Twenty nine thousand acting hitter wedding in asian but because of how everything has has been turned turning around lately with the securities but in court turmoils identity that covert Stephan also. So i kinda avoided from boeing there. I used to go every month three much. If that every month every other mild like fed weeks over there because i do also have a food service company over there that needs my friends will put together so i used to very often wonder ables admits about is the simplicity of live. Land the community night. Everybody knows everybody We eat together. We all be family. He have so many people that he knows. That can go to different places. I should go to of course the beach. That's one of the main things we enjoy there. Yeah i mean. I wish i can go back anytime soon. Hopefully when days appease his more more security. I would say that as of right now. I.

haiti new orleans Siodmak maccabi united states riley maccabi louisiana abbott amy ables Stephan boeing
Breakdown or Breakthrough? UN Chief Lays out Stark Choices for Humanity

UN News

02:07 min | 10 months ago

Breakdown or Breakthrough? UN Chief Lays out Stark Choices for Humanity

"Ahead of the high level week of the seventy six. Un general assembly session which begins on twenty first of september. You g antonio guitarist launched a common agenda his vision for the future of your organization. The report lays out two distinct divergent visions for the world. One of breakdown in perpetual crisis or a breakthrough to greener safer world at the heart of the vision is enhanced multi-lateralism with a summit of the future creating a new global consensus on what the future of the world should look like. And how to secure it sometime. Thomas away from your news sat down with mr guitar. Wish to discuss the report as well. As the un chiefs take on some pressing global issues including the humanitarian situation in afghanistan and the covered nineteen pandemic. She started by asking him to explain why he remains convinced. That multi-lateralism is the key to a better world. Look what has happened to. Our worlds vitals is defeated. The world's more than linear in the health after everything started we still have the vitals spreading everywhere and we see that impact on the lives of people that are mexican cuisine inequalities economies in extremely difficult situations and of course the most vulnerable suffering enormously and the world's was not able to come together and to define a global vaccination plan and bringing the countries that produce vaccines or can produce vaccines together with the organization with the in international financial institutions to then the with the pharmaceutical industry and doubled the production. And make sure that there is an equitable solution at the production. This cannot be done by country alone. Sweden by all the problem. Is that the multilateral issue we have now which is essentially late. Show them late. Show is not even the power to obtain information about the situation.

Antonio Guitarist Mr Guitar Un General Assembly UN Thomas Afghanistan Sweden
A Closer Look at the Algarve Coast

Travel with Rick Steves

02:18 min | 11 months ago

A Closer Look at the Algarve Coast

"Let's start out today on the beaches of southern portugal. The all guard prejean offers one hundred miles of warm sun and a collection of charming resort towns. From land's end to the spanish border are guides are christina. Dorte and robert reich. They specialize in showcasing the highlights of portugal. And the all garb to american visitors christina robert boondi. Thank you together. So when we think of the algarve christina what does it mean to the to a portuguese holidays. Israeli go to holidays with our families knows and normally because the kids are in school until the end of june so everybody goes at the same time so july and august can be pretty crowded but if we have a chance and going out of july august it is a marvelous place to go wonderful beaches. Wonderful food very good offer of of places where to stay hotels and also houses that we can rent houses or apartments and june absolutely beautiful until the first week of july. It's quiet so that is interesting that there's a huge bell shaped curve of demand and in the summer summertime vacation. It's everybody's down there. Yes now robert When you think of the popularity among locals and you were local are the locals looking for a big resort or are they looking for the cute little little cove for the little town. That locals are looking for Just basically good nice relaxing beaches wherever they may be right because What christina was saying is it's kind of like when you go off season little bit off season You have to think that you can't go. You can't go to the beaches that are up north because the weather still not quite a good because there are good beach resorts north of lists. That if you're a little bit shoulder season he wanted to go south. Because you're guaranteed good weather down there by morocco. Now when you go to the south I'm sure that every region of portugal has some different cuisine. What do think about to enjoy the food scene when you're on the elgar food scene is fantastic. Because you're right there on the water. You'd every kind of fresh seafood you can imagine and i guess the the best expression of that in portugal is the is the dish that everybody goes there. Force the cut the planner. The planner is like just a big big mix of all this great seafood. Some potatoes juicy broth. it's just really like the essence of the

Dorte Portugal Christina Robert Boondi Algarve Christina Christina Robert Reich Prejean Robert Morocco
"cuisine" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

The Maria Liberati Show

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"cuisine" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

"My food stories. More plenty more okay. Thanks for listening to the maria. Liberati show this is maria liberati and special. Thanks to my producer. Britain roselle my production intern. Alexander troy and this week special. Guess jeremy nunez stand up comedian and host of the amazon prime comedy special. Who's with me. And thanks to this month sponsors for the giveaways edwards and sons dot com and baker. Louis and again. If you like and share this month's episodes and join my newsletter at maria liberati dot com. You'll be entered in a giveaway to win the prizes from edward and sons and baker lee. We'll be selecting winners at the end of the month. And also were giving away a copy of my book the basic art of pasta. So we already had for. June are winners. Were su winters of pennsylvania and she won the limited edition grilling kit from vital choice. Fatal choice was our sponsor for last month and Lor mapfre dona. She won a pizza from lou male. Nadi chicago pizza and cheryl comiskey in ireland. Who won a copy of my book. The basic art of italian cooking davinci style. Congratulations to all of you. And thanks to our sponsors for last month's gifts and hey this episode. We talked about local recipes in. Jeremy gave us his take on his towns local recipe. If you have any local recipe you'd like to share with us on an episode. Please reach out to us. You can write to me at info at maria. Liberati dot com. You can reach me or my production intern. Let us know. Let us know the recipe too late to share or posted on social media. Hashtag the maria liberati show and if you make a pens annella salad the very recipe that i gave in. Tonight's segment take a picture. Hashtag at the maria liberati show share on social media. And you'll also be entered in a giveaway for the drawing and we're going to be sharing food on the new website for the podcast shortly so. Please keep sharing until next time. Peace love and pasta..

maria liberati Liberati Alexander troy jeremy nunez baker lee su winters Lor mapfre Nadi chicago pizza cheryl comiskey maria Britain edwards baker amazon Louis edward pennsylvania ireland Jeremy
"cuisine" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

The Maria Liberati Show

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"cuisine" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

"Dawson is a dawson illinois jarrett. Yes maria it is yep dawson illinois and he has a special. Where was that special comedy. Special released on amazon prime it was actually released during the pandemic so it came out. I want to say May twenty twenty one. Yes it was actually supposed to come out Right around march twenty twenty one in the pandemic started as i say you know the folks amazon. Just montage shop doing their best. So they got delayed a little bit and may twenty twenty one. It came out there. You go and that's definitely. It's definitely a way to have some fun. Especially you know. We all need a bit of levity during all this stuff going on in a way to have fun so we were gonna start off with jeremy's gonna tell us about this now dawson illinois by the way has only five hundred people me so one of my guests. Today's david page. Who was he has. A book out called feud americana. And you know we're talking about. We always talk with david about how you know small towns and the history of foods and things like that and i think really this small little towns in america. There are so many things so many things invented so many dishes and things like that. That people aren't aware of so we're going to start off by us telling about this dish. Called what is it a horseshoe still horseshoe okay that you think relates to or or comes back to dawson. Illinois was invented. They are right so this this is sort of the big trendy dish you know all the tourists when they come to springfield they see abe lincoln sites and everyone has to come to see to have a horseshoe and every restaurant claims they have the best horseshoe fast so now what is and again. There's there's a debate s to wear this started but everyone swears by in my town is created at the corner bar So what is on on your plate. You're gonna put piece of toast on top of that. French fries right. Well i've already messed up on. Top of the toast is. Is your meat protein. So most of the time. You're going with a hamburger patty here. Some folks will do like Ham okay something like that but generally hamburger patty then the french fries on top of that then cheese sauce on top of that all right so basically it's a heart attack yes heart attack in a meal and and The the big debate. Of course you know. They say started our corner bar. If so i there's probably five drunk guys had some leftover food in a kitchen and throw it on a plate. Just eight see what generally what. What makes her breaks. You is your cheese sauce. You know maria you may know you can just buy some people just by cheese sauce in a can and dump it. You know something like that or you can actually do some hard work and make a legitimate cheese sauce and there's very in springfield and the surrounding areas of illinois we've got various flavors of the geez sauce as well Very your worship by the different flavored of cheese sauce. And i think those types of dishes are so much more fun than you know the higher end restaurants and all that other stuff. I think it's so much fun to learn about these little towns during these little kind of dishes that they have so But i say we could make that kinda healthier you know veggie patty. Maybe doing some french fries. That are not fried baked. Maybe like a hallway bread but of course it would not be the same thing. Yeah and then to keep it so you may be thinking too. So one So it's called the horseshoe uh-huh but some people say. Oh it's too filling. You've got this giant plate so now they have sort of a half portion. A lot of places serve aptly called the pony shoe. So just made me think. I had this idea for a restaurant. People want to eat healthier. And if you wanna steal this feel free okay. But so it's healthy restaurant. Every all the fried items are going to be cooked in air. Fryer all right. Here's the thing. Nobody knows they're still actually deep fried. And everybody say oh. How good is this a tastes just like it's dried actually for me. They don't realize it's not and unfortunately i think they're really probably are places out actually doing that. So there you go well. That's a great idea for a restaurant. So jeremy tell us about your book. It's called you can't write city hall right when you were. And how long were you. The mayor of dawson illinois. So i was the mayor for for many years. Maria many years and So yeah. I wrote the book. You can't write city hall. It's this basically a comedic retelling of all the things that happened when i was mayor. This little town. You know a little bit of everything lynn. So a little side note. I have when you put a book together. Sometimes you have a what they call a copy editor who make sure you leave out an important detail. Something like that and When i was mayor actually defeated. The guy had been the mayor for twenty or twenty four years. Something like that. Gosh and she's going through and she's reading and psych I'm describing the night. I'm sworn and she says well you say your mom. Is there in your sister in your wife. You don't mention your dad. We need to clarify. Why is your dad not there. Did he move away as he passed on. What's going on as like. Oh my dad wasn't there because he voted for the incumbent mayor. Oh gosh that's funny really funny so can you tell tell us about his story when you were mayor anything anything you can tell us so i guess i like to tell and if people have have seen me before they know this story one of my favorites though is I actually wanted to war. For being one of illinois's most ethical maier's death and that was yeah and it was largely because i issued a fine to my parents so i remember my dad calling me when he found out and he's like jeremy. Why did i get this fine in the mail and it was like well. Your grass is too high. You have to mow your grass. Jeremy you mow our grass. I was like well. You should have called me sooner. Who's now you owe the town three hundred dollars and me fifty for mowing your grass. Oh well so. I guess then he was glad he had voted. Not for you but for the other mayor. That's great jeremy. jeremy. I'm sure i'm going to have you on again but Can you tell everybody. I want them to know where to find your special. And what's the title of your special on amazon prime so the amazon prime special is called. Who's with me So you can find on there. And the dry bar comedy specials called neighbourhood sasquatch and as far there's a new platform drive our comedy plus and you get a month free. Use my promo code jeremy newness. Wow that's great and tell everybody where they can find your book. You can't write city hall. Yeah so the book is available online at a book. Retailers got the amazon barnes and noble books a million walmart available all there or you can buy directly from me or learn more at. You can't write city hall dot com. There you go. Jeremy thanks again and thanks again and i'm sure we'll have you back again much success. We'll thanks. maria stole.

illinois amazon hamburger patty jeremy heart attack yes heart attack maria david page springfield dawson jarrett Dawson city hall lincoln Illinois david patty Fryer america
"cuisine" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

The Maria Liberati Show

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"cuisine" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

"His town. My guest today was mayor of a town of five hundred. Battalions dawson illinois and This jeremy nunez stand up comedian and he's going to tell us about a simple dish well-known in his little town as well as sharing some funny stories about being mayor of this. Little teeny town dawson illinois. It's always fun being able to share the dishes. We love with others. Jeremy nunez is also host of the amazon prime comedy special. Who's with me. He's also considered one of america's funniest mayor. And so we're going to discover. What some of america's funnies mayors favorite local foods are so stay tuned. And i will be sharing a recipe. That is a local recipe to tuscany. But it's a recipe that you can make local to where wherever you are it's a pans annella salad really simple to me but you can make it as mentioned local to wherever you're at it's just made up of day old crusty bread. It's kind of a way to recycle and not waste day old bread fresh tomatoes fresh red onion fresh cucumbers and you can also put a generous amount of fresh herbs basil rosemary oregano and even mint and then of course extroversion olive oil and white wine vinegar or balsamic vinegar but he know if your town has a farmer's market and you can get some great fresh tomatoes fresh cucumbers fresh herbs or even better yet. If you grow those things in your own garden you can make it a local pans annella salad with the most intense days of summer just about here and coming. The desire to cook in front of a hot stove is dwindling kind of down. And it's usually at its lowest point during this time of the year but with all the fresh fruits and veggies available one need only know how to combine them with minimal cooking and as mentioned the pans analysis. Alad is the perfect way to do it. So here's my recipe for a analysis. Salad you can have this as a late dinner or lunch or it makes perfect. Auntie pasta to begin a meal or serve it at the end of a meal as the italians do makes a great salad of a refreshing ending to a meal as well. This calls for one and a half pounds of red ripe tomatoes and as mentioned if you can use local tomatoes. That's the best tomatoes to us for this recipe. One fresh red onion one fresh cucumber ten slices of crusty day old italian style bread white wine vinegar just about a quarter of a cup. Extra-virgin cold pressed olive oil about four tablespoons. But i always say to taste so if you want a little more a little less olive oil at that. In the most important thing is that it's extra-virgin and cold press and the small handful of freshly choppy seas all but if you also have because at this time of the year herbs are growing all over the place so you know if you have fresh oregano fresh rosemary. Mix it up and chop a small handful of each of those herbs and add those in also and then saw and freshly ground black pepper taste if the cucumbers are not organic and you're going to peel them and wash them slice them sprinkle with salt and place in colander for about ten minutes. Wash and cut the tomatoes into slices or cubes. Place the crusty bread under a broiler till golden not burn but also to make the bread crispy just for should be about anywhere from a minute to three minutes when the bread is cool. Place it in a bowl and add in this splash of white wine or balsamic vinegar whatever you have on hand or whatever you prefer just enough in a gird to saturate the bread lately so about a quarter of a cup of the vinegar. Let that marinate set that aside slice the red onion thinly place that in the bowl with a bread slices. Stir that gently. Let that marinate. Then you're going to add in chop basil and any of the other chopped herbs if you have them on hand if you don't shop basil alone is fine. Said all of that aside and then you're going to brinson dry the cucumber slices. Add them into the bread mixture. Then add in the tomatoes against stir gently salt and pepper to taste drizzle with olive oil to taste. Toss this gently and let this mixture sit for just about thirty minutes before serving. And if you'd like more recipes follow my blog at oriole liberati dot com and you can also find more recipes in my gorman world award winning book series the basic art of italian cooking which you can get at maria liberati dot com art of living premium media dot com and really anywhere books are sold. The basic art of italian cooking is the first in the book series. The basic art of italian cooking holidays special occasions. Second addition is the next in the book series and the basic art of italian cooking. Davinci style all the books are really culinary memoirs of my life in italy where i really studied cooking and Spent money years. They are teaching cooking in studying cooking. And the basic art of book series is also available on maria liberati dot com art of living premium media dot com. You know with summertime here and so many fresh fruits and vegetables and ingredients at hand or always looking for recipes to cook. Check out my book series and you might find something along with a story to experience the recipe to enjoy and just a reminder to like and share this month. The month of july's episodes and also sign up for my newsletter at maria. Liberati dot com. And you'll be entered in our giveaway drawing four. let's see our sponsors. This month are edward and sons dot com through giving away a really nice gift package of foods and you can go to Edwards and sons dot com and check out their products and baker lay in honor of this month being the month of best deal day. Baker louis has some french themed bread products and they're also giving away products this month. Both sponsors of we had a lot of winners win prizes already. Let's see we had Sue winters who won the limited edition grilling kit from vital choice was our june winner and also laura man for dunia who won a pizza from lou male naughty chicago pizza and you may be our july winner so we're also giving away this month a copy of my book the basic art of pasta so please just like and share the episodes for the month of july and join my newsletter..

jeremy nunez Jeremy nunez dawson illinois maria liberati america amazon Baker louis italy Sue winters maria edward Edwards baker dunia laura chicago
The Hero from Season One

Scuba Shack Radio

08:03 min | 1 year ago

The Hero from Season One

"It's time for another installment of si-hun it's still alive and this time we're going back to season one episode twenty-six the hero and it premiered on july fifth nineteen fifty eight sixty three years ago on my third birthday. The hero opens up with mike underwater. Telling us these working with. Dr george snider on a project to turn ocean plants into food. Apparently they need funding for their research. And that's where a millionaire elliot conway and his wife. Gloria come in you see. Elliot is a big game hunter and he wants to take his hunting underwater and he wants to hunt for sharks and giant squid only problem. He doesn't know how to dive. He needs mike to teach him and gloria so he can bag. What's down there. Mike price five thousand dollars now since it's going to research glorious says it's a worthy cause and a tax write off elliot agrees to pay like twenty five hundred dollars upfront and the remaining twenty five hundred when he gets his first shark. So now they're off to a place known for sharks portable ongko and they go in elliott's private plane and that plane. Looks like a dc. Three named misguided gal now. Puerto blanco is on the west coast of south america. A small fishing village with a new hotel. Not much more. Just as they're getting off the plane guy comes running up and he introduces himself as dr gomez. Any needs to use of elliott's plane to get a sick child to a hospital over three hours away. Elliot agrees so now. They're all set to start their scuba training. And mike tells. Gloria things will be okay if elliott follows all precautions glorious says he never does mikes response he better now before they start training mike scouts out the deep area offshore for sharks. We see a variety of sharks white tips black tips and even some clown fish interesting. Now we start to see what scuba training was like in nineteen fifty eight. Mike takes the couple through snorkeling skills and then talks about how the equipment is delicate and technical. He tells them there is only one way and that is safely theory in practice. That's what it takes. But elliott is getting impatient in the next scene we see mike demonstrating what happens when a balloon is inflated at depth and brought up boom. Goes the balloon back on the boat. Mike tells them it's called an air. Embolism and you must always excel. Exhale as you extend. Gloria asks mike. How fast and he tells her no faster than your bubbles. Elliott wants to know. When do we stop learning and go hunting. He wants his shark. Glorious says she's tired and wants to sit out the next dive. Elliot tries to coax her into diving. But mike says it's dangerous to dive if you're tired so now we switch back to the hotel and we can clearly see the tension between elliott gloria. Gloria tells mike that that elliott is a mixed up millionaire. He's an architect. Who inherited the conway oil company when his father was killed in an auto accident. Elliott doesn't want to really be an architect anymore. Just a big game hunter. Now elliott comes into the scene and he's carrying a spear gun that he's all proud of its cocked and loaded. Mike is furious and he and elliot start to argue. And in the argument elliot drops the spear gun. It goes off narrowly missing gloria and lodging in palm tree. Now we switch back underwater. Mike says elliott has be elliott has become pretty good. Shot with the spear gun. And they're shooting at this target. That set up kind of lake for archery. But mike says he just needs to stop pointing a gun at mike. Now we switch back to land where mike. Gloria elliott are working on camera to document the shark on elliott. Says he wants to order. Chicken cacciatore for dinner might tell them. Oh no that's too spicy before diving. Says okay good now. Probably order to and elliot goes off. It's just mike gloria now. Gloria tells mike she's unhappy made a big mistake in marrying elliot. Mike tries to console her and she tells mike he's sweet and she puts her head on his chest. Elliot sees this and is upset. What's going to happen when they go on the shark hunt the next morning. They are at the dive site. Mike cuisine i finds a shark and is ready to take them down for the hunt. Just as soon as you can get the bait ready now. The three of them are down below at seventy five feet. Gloria has the camera as mike elliott head off to the hunt just end we switched to the surface in a boat is approaching. Its dr gomez. He needs elliott's playing again. As you get close to the dive boat. He throws his anchor over the side and it crashes down into gloria breaking her rag might just happens to look back and sees the glory is in trouble and they both rush back elliott steps in and starts buddy breathing with gloria the sharks. Fresh off debate sense trouble. As the big one continues to circle. Mike is impressed. With elliott's calmness and sends them to the surface while mike fights a rearguard action again and he spears the big shark. We then see all the divers back on board and dr gomez says we must go sure back at the hotel. Elliott s mike. Why don't they haven't hospital here. In puerto blanco might tells him. It's always money. Justin dr gomez emerges and skulls mike for letting gloria dive in her condition. She's expecting a child in six months. And dr gomez congratulates elliott by saying congratulations senor. Now you need to take her back to the states to the hospital. That does elliott is going to build a hospital in portable. Ongko and keith tells mike it'll be done in six months. Mike says that can't be done elliott. Replies you don't know me when i go to work elliott conway the hero. You'd recognize him. That's larry hagman. J are jr ewing from dallas or tony nelson from my dream of jeannie Mike nelson tony nelson coincidence. Who knows

Sea Hunt Vintage Scuba Vintage Tv Elliott Mike Gloria Dr Gomez Elliot Mike Underwater Dr George Snider Elliot Conway Puerto Blanco Mike Price Elliott Gloria Gloria Elliott Mike Gloria South America
"cuisine" Discussed on The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"cuisine" Discussed on The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

"And i'd love to learn more about filipino cuisine. I lived in the philippines for about a year. And i fell in love with the food. And i'm curious as to which parts of a traditional filipino. Dieter healthy and which might be modified to make them more. Nutritious will thanks for that suggestion katie and joining me today to talk about filipino. Culture and cuisine is levin dodoma's levin was born in the philippines and now lives in the united states and although he originally planned to study nursing. You told me. He was so fascinated by the coursework on biochemistry that he eventually switched pads to study nutrition instead and levin is now completed his master's degree in nutrition and he's currently completing his dietetic internship which will eventually result in his becoming a registered dietitian nutritionist. Welcome to the podcast levin. Thank you so much for joining me. Thank you for having me. And letting me after the world of filipino food. Yes i've been looking forward to our conversation because you know i think that for a lot of people. Filipina food is much less familiar than perhaps other sorts of regional cuisines. So maybe we could start just with filipino food. One oh one just give us a little bit of an idea about traditional meals and cooking style of the philippines. Yes so every filipino. Meal would have this two main parts. You will have the rice because it is a staple as with really most of asia and then we have what we call the. So alum is the general term for whatever is eaten with rice. This is usually a mix of protein with pork chicken fish and usually a variety of vegetables. It's not always just one vegetable. It's a variety there's always a mix and lee filipinos for some reason. We tend towards the the salty this hour in the pungent. Which kind of sounds odd. But it's actually really good once you've acquired a taste for it. Tell us a little bit about how neighboring cultures in southeast asia have inste- filipino cuisine. So in the philippines one of the major issues influences that we have is not actually from southeast asia. It's more chinese because we back in the day an an talking you know century earlier we traded with the chinese that chinese influence that you see in filipino food. Be seen noodle dishes stir fries they use of soy sauce fish sauce and we also have some dumplings really similar foods with really similar names between a filipino cuisine. And chinese visine. I think for example. The sweet work done in chinese joshu bow and in the philippines. We call that trump out the chinese shuai in the philippines. We have shown mice. So there's really a lot of carryover from chinese cuisine..

southeast asia today asia levin philippines katie united states trump one vegetable two main parts Filipina about a year One levin dodoma chinese filipino century earlier one filipinos
"cuisine" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"cuisine" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"Invented in italy and then pass through other european countries and likely came to america via the british in colonial. Times it's a fascinating topic because it can be anything to anyone. There's a real renaissance now. In what is called artisanal ice cream which is ice cream truly made by hand at the same time You can still get your cheap. Ten percent butterfat pint in the grocery store Ice there's an ice cream for everyone these days. Although interestingly a lot of that is because the ice cream market is stable but not growing there are so many competitive dessert items now available especially in the frozen area that the ice cream manufacturers have to fight hard to keep up and the latest push is ice cream with benefits ice cream. That will help you fall asleep. Supposedly ice cream with probiotics ice cream with vegetables hidden in the mix for your kids while. I've always figured that one of the reasons ice cream became so popular and everybody loved ice. Cream is the convenience of ice cream on a stick. It was a great idea that stems out of sanitation issues originally on the streets of new york the so-called hokey pokey men. That's what they call the ice cream vendors. Most of them. Italian immigrants would serve ice cream by the scoop in a glass bowl. They would give you the bull and a spoon and you will eat your ice cream and then give them back and then they would use them on the next customer The spanish flu of what was it. Nineteen seventeen that helped put a crimp in that. Ice cream cones became quite popular. And then the brilliant idea. I think it was eskimo pie. That did it first of putting in the stick. Well this has been a fun. Little tour through american cuisine to discover where some of our favorite foods came from. I appreciate it. David david page has been my guest. He is a two time emmy award winning tv producer and he is author of the book food. Americana the remarkable people and incredible stories behind america's favorite dishes and there's a link to that book in the show notes. Thanks david michael. Thank you very much when it comes to your appearance. You've probably noticed that you have good days and bad days some days. You just seem to look better. And have you ever noticed that on those days when you look better. Things seemed to go. Better.

David david america new york italy two time Ten percent david michael emmy Nineteen seventeen spanish american Americana one of british first european Italian
Beyond Meat Launches Beyond Burger 3.0

Smart Kitchen Show

01:53 min | 1 year ago

Beyond Meat Launches Beyond Burger 3.0

"Of the things. I think it was interesting about beyond three point. the. They adjusted the formula a little bit. I think they actually got rid of mung protein. Which i thought was interesting because they added in two point. Oh what any kind of other things that are that you would note about this royce. No the press release. They came out with their. Here's what i do know the press release says it's meteor and juicier for whatever that means the rep told me that they did get rid of the mung protein. They're still pea protein. Based and then it'll be available in stores. Nationwide starting next week on may third. We kinda thought. Something was up. Because i tried to buy directly from their side. A few weeks ago noticed you couldn't and so. Those notions were kind of confirmed this week. So i'm definitely like i enjoy beyond my son really likes it so i'm curious to see how it reformulated. I'm excited to try it. Yeah pepsi versus coke analogy to certain degree in the post to you wondered if that was like this could potentially be a new coq. Ron do you think this kind of a related sites kind of site. Thought as i think that some people have thought that this may be too much power. Aggregating at the top of these new meat brands. What are you. What are your thoughts about beyond. Do you think that's happening. I actually don't think it's happening. Because i was actually i was actually listened. Kinder tech. some people were talking that they try and keep track they. There's eleven hundred plant based food companies. That's not including the cellular of companies. Were around now. They just they hunt them down. And so what's happening is the whole plan is like going into all these little companies. That are starting up. Each one of them has a different angle for a different regional part of the cuisine or different product that similar. And so we're gonna get a lot of

Pepsi Coke RON
Brian Oliveira  Happy Hour at Home, During the Pandemic

Self Made Strategies

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Brian Oliveira Happy Hour at Home, During the Pandemic

"Here are the self made strategies of ryan ali beta excited to do this with you in to To talk about happy our hospitality and then cuisine. Yeah yeah awesome so walk us through how you started happy hour hospitality. To begin with yeah. We started in october twenty. And i say we My partner also named brian. And i and it was born out a change that i needed from the derived of the restaurant industry. And that like seven day week nonstop To something that gave us the ability quality of life and us abbas sustainable business and really It kind of just snowballed from sue small events that we were doing for friends and family that kind of word of mouth. Got us to where we are now. Yeah that's really cool and so you do a lot of catering if people want catered meals you'll also cater parties. of course you'll cater events. How does that all work if somebody wants to. You know book. Happy our hospitality to come in and cook a meal for them or cook a meal for them and a few friends were still in the pandemic. so you can't have a huge indoors. At least we definitely specialize in. I would say smaller than so We love doing the private jenner's that's in private dining You get accustomed tasting menu suited to your likes and favorite dishes and then on the other side. We you know parties weddings showers texas tradition more traditional events on kind of a mix of workshops for

Ryan Ali Brian Jenner Texas
Reem Kassis: The Arabesque Table

Monocle 24: The Menu

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Reem Kassis: The Arabesque Table

"Palestinian rights ream cusses released her debut cookbook palestinian table in two thousand seventeen four much critical acclaim now cast is is back with her second book. The arabesque table contemporary recipes from the arab world the released takes a broader look at contemporary cooking across the arab world emphasizing. How much different countries. Sharon have influence on each other. I spoke to causes a bit earlier on. She started by explaining. Why choosing the name for the book too long then writing it. I submitted my second manuscript drafts without a title for the book but in hindsight is actually a blessing more than anything because the name derived as a result of the experience of writing. And what i learned along the way and the reason we chose. The arabesque table is arabesque. As you might already know is an intertwined hatter or design that is recognized and islamic arabic art and what i wanted to convey with. The book was at cuisine. Similar to this artistic pattern that inspired the title is inherently also infinitely intertwined and more beautiful as a result in addition to that though i mean we were trying to get a name that conveyed what the food was and to call it. The arab table would not necessarily have been accurate because there were a lot of dishes inside. That were inspired by other cuisines intersection of those cuisines. So arabesque conveyed both of those things. You know the intersection at the same time. The idea that it is not purely one regional kind of cooking in the book but tell me more about the approach you took when you were working on this book you say that you wanted to celebrate the evolution of middle eastern cuisine. One thing i specified in the book is the whole idea of the term. Middle east doesn't convey accurately the cuisine of our region because middle east is simply a term for a region that was between the british empire's easternmost colony of india and europe and what really ties. The cuisine of region together is it's being arab and it's acculturation under arab and islamic

Ream Sharon Middle East India Europe
How Automation Can Create a Better Future of Work

HumAIn Podcast

02:28 min | 1 year ago

How Automation Can Create a Better Future of Work

"Thanks so much for joining us on the show. Thanks for having me. David them happy to be here. Well i'd love to tee up for audience where you are today with your startup. You've been scaling up. Very involved with enterprises very involve product releases and this movement is exciting. I'm really interested to hear that as someone who's an educator and developer to see that there's exciting tools out there to build and make products so can you share with our audience. About what tonkin does today. oh yeah absolutely. I think you touched any important point. There duncan We raised a round right before the garona pandemic it's so Of twenty twenty in being going rapidly since. It's very exciting time for us. Duncan is almost five years now. And so i like to say that i've been singing the same song for five years in you know it wasn't the same market as it was five years ago which is a great thing for us in. I think you touched on the important point. What does it mean to enable more people to use software. And what impact would that have own enterprises in business in everyone's life. I think that's what we're all about. It's been amazing to see in the last decade how this movement that started perhaps with companies like your has now grown into these verticals of mar tech and sales tack and building for anyone. What inspired your growth and tonkin to scale. I think the biggest moment for me. It was actually my previous jobs before. Starting talking i was engieering in a public company public softer company in had the opportunity to grow my team quite rapidly join cuisine and gritting their from on handful of people to over one hundred fifty people until so really doing very couple years. Maybe when you think about the challenges that comes with growing operations there's internal challenges and then there's the external oranges of working with parliament and in really walking across different processes. Now i'm a software guy. I've been writing coaches. I was standing result kind of thing in so for me. It software should always be the solution right. Always the first bush to go to an even though we had all those great tools in place and you know the top. Crm's in the top medium project management tools in like most companies.

Tonkin Duncan David Bush CRM
Sable Hotel Navy Pier opening today with Lake Michigan, Chicago skyline views

Bob Sirott

05:58 min | 1 year ago

Sable Hotel Navy Pier opening today with Lake Michigan, Chicago skyline views

"It's a big opening day today at Navy Pier even though the pier is still closed, Big New Hotel is opening and the CEO at Maverick Hotels and restaurants is with us now, Bob Bobby, How you doing, Bob? Good morning bombs. I admire you because let's see Navy Pier temporarily closed probably till spring, and the hotel business is tough right now, But you're going ahead with the big opening today. How do you feel about it All? Honestly, we feel good. I think our timing is right. You know, we finished the construction of the hotel in November and decided it wasn't the right time to open and narrowed forward until today, and It just feels right today. We're telling people that it's probably the only time in history they'll have Navy appeared of themselves and then the period when the period opens, that we think that the You know, there'll be a reverse of activity down counts. Now talk about why you're calling this stable. That's name of the hotel s A B l E. What's that all about? You know, that's a great story for those of your listeners. That historians shit downtown Chicago Lord, you know that During the Second World War, Navy pier was actually Enable training facility and they ward an aircraft carrier off the end of the pier to train pilots and take off and touchdown landings. And that crack carrier was the USS able And we thought that was just a great connection for the pier and a terrific story and we decided to name the hotel after that aircraft carrier disable. Yeah, This is this is quite some property and tell us a little bit about the hotel. You have Ah, lot of meeting space and event space. And what is it more than 200 guest rooms in the hotel? 223 guest rooms at the same time that we're opening the hotel will be opening a new restaurant on the pier Lyrica. Which is I was inspired by Latin cuisine, small plates and and share a bles and so on. The hotel also has about 5000 Square feet of meeting space. And, of course, is Probably five FT from Festival Hall, which is the second largest Free span space in the city of Chicago. So we're blessed with a lot of amenities. Bob, I know you've been in the hospitality of business for 40 years. I'm sure you've never seen anything like we've gone through in the past year with the pandemic. The hotel occupancy rates right now. About half what they were two years ago today, But I love that you're optimistic. Talk about why you you feel so positively about all this. I think we're going to see people come out of their caves in big numbers through the summer months, and I think we're already starting to see it. We've as an industry seen an uptick in reservations, future reservations. Um that where there's very courage Ng on the more that we see on the news people getting their vaccines and that the positivity rate has stayed in the relatively modest number more hope that we have by summer will be living our lives a little more normally, after the summer, we get back into the A part of the year that we live off so conventions and business travelers in Chicago and it might be a little bit more difficult, but I personally think the business traveler might come back faster than most people expect. You know, people do business in the city haven't seen their customers in the year and I'm sure they're ready to get back and text their their customers again. Well with your hotel opening today and also offshore, the world's largest rooftop bar. It's It's a great way to in enjoy the pier before all all the crowds come back and and speaking of those crowds. Ah, and I don't know how much you know about this Bob. But apparently Navy Pier is going to use some new optical sensors to monitor where crowds are and where they aren't so that at least as we get through the final what we hope will be the final months of the pandemic. People can Stay safe on the pier. And and that's the most important thing right now, isn't it? It is. Yeah, that's amazing technology. Yup, That's something that they're going to be using when they reopened this spring, and as far as the hotel goes and and the rooms You're sort of modeling everything so that it it pays homage to the pier and Chicago history. Correct Way had an entirely Chicago based team, including designer Jackie Coup architect designer Jack Cope and make you Construction who built the hotel and Jackie took great care to Not not make the hotel look like a cruise ship, but really not too bad, whole nautical theme and you see it whispered throughout the hotel and really were thrilled with the way that the hotel turned out. We're excited to get people over there. One of the interesting things about you know what we learned it offshore to our surprise was Offshore was not a tourist hang out. It was a local hangout. Upwards of 80% of our business were locals and we think we'll see the same with lyric and we think the hotel will will also be a great amenity for for us to live here in the city. It's uh, the curio collection by Hilton. That's the hotel the stable at Navy Pier and Bob Habib is the CEO at maverick hotels and restaurants. He's the

Navy Pier Big New Hotel Maverick Hotels Bob Bobby Chicago BOB Festival Hall Jackie Coup Jack Cope Jackie Bob Habib Hilton
pisode #35  Le voyage initiatique de la maternit et parentalit avec Bianca Thuot - burst 3

Conversations pour Elle, partages de sagesse féminine

05:02 min | 1 year ago

pisode #35 Le voyage initiatique de la maternit et parentalit avec Bianca Thuot - burst 3

"With us on the lobster savvas zone. The was pm almost young. Duncairn unix daniels on punk combined and his sons pissy ticket shows kush toll bagel Fox replays on. He added shushma There mickey soc nine now was super allows. this was so in motion. And i'm on the the kiss jan mumbo from the in toss financial concerns me yet put down stairs committee. All the polar dogs s become should body police secret dossiers even modern jeep indefensibly young put on the hostile metro area. Don't kill lou wop are highly. Listen you can lose moisture inch normal analysis To new to new number. don't care. Skiing mongrel geneticists tizzy komo privacy solutions. More lab senior key can you. He ended up. Don't do these emotion. Keith's manifests komo. Hover says it said burial laps yemen ad. Foam kiss turned ma on the. Da shows moldova's young till noon. We'll see a pattern allergy. Lucy bacall tunnels on a cd-rom metal set. Espy la pursue clash. Pf of wa. Who passer washington komo On a duty newly well spa style Example second level year until voc grew in neon new palette bent medlock A sorta p pallet fantasy. Not man and knock them up. You can see on this deserve. Speak here look trap. Kalani fungus kong secure. This is super sandy Tom put the point. Back by the copa habita- homes bhaskar bessemer dot. There are five are were doto the question and data sonate signed on as all put dorothy house. Ski faker bail you. Devolve year this town under file a cuisine and mia to new white house signed on it cuts the and bounce kotova. You're just took on paschi spouse wall septum farm. So michael community agreement signed docile cume of peer pundit poor pe- can you dr pair basketball dominate bonanno cast cylinder labus much. Craig glossy found league dick's p male fiscal sur. Five are tom of walk. It's just a kick acre cuisine. Could to serve democra- chris european malcolm dot com massacre And super attack my bhakta. The league belle pound. I love the minds found evil just wonderful spots if oh nouveau producer. Spirit said whenever say formats if calmly copeland apple dies on me the a mark. I'm so the fam- keep rooster while dope pass on liz off downscale. Vp conquer a nozzle bikes hotter yet. Dope person give the shows but panay ms similar p dishes the savasta savage Plant the kootenai against the for his social museum nesper. Pacifica defy fan cone factory the global and our cats in addition the performance. And the rest. Of the sixes. Not after the war. Just explain me them jobs. We have come up with a quantum abi of board. don't just get dot com. Donald took sa- salad come Less bengals facilitator. Some mr scuola. Paul son vie to see up. You don't don't the caribbean on the wii sipple. Total if die but access simba's school for dawn that built

Shushma Mickey Soc Jan Mumbo Lou Wop Lucy Bacall Espy La Sandy Tom Dorothy House Komo Daniels Labus Craig Glossy Moldova FOX Chris European Malcolm Skiing Keith Allergy WA Bonanno
"cuisine" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"cuisine" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Cuisine. Tailgating specialties. Our backyard grilling creations. Find out what everyone is talking about and pick up. Our mouthwatering must catch condiments today available at fine grocery stores across Chicago land as well as online at amazon dot com from our family to yours. No cats. To celebrate state farm. Surprisingly great rates give the song surprisingly great Leaders names when you can't get hard file. Great racing. You cash So if you come join us, you you know you could say that. You coming on your home for great service on the Lord and call upstate vomit Sinus, which in like a good neighbor State farm? Is there just like Northwestern's offensive line protects the quarterback. Windy City limousine protects you. Largest and newest fleet in Chicago. Get you there on time are hugely two Busses get you to the game, while smaller groups rely on us for airports, concerts, weddings and more. The official limousine and busted the Wildcats also transports the Bears, Bulls, White Sox cubs and you Windy City Limousine serving Chicago anywhere you travel 86694 windy or windy City limos, calm. Break's over. Let's get you back to Wildcat basketball again. Here's Dave and it today's road game is presented by United Airlines official partner of Northwestern University Athletics. United Airlines is proud to fly. The Wildcats. So the cat's balls 64 52, Rutgers next up.

Interview With Robert Livingston

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:56 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Robert Livingston

"How you doing. I'm doing good doctor livingston. Are you bummed. That if you google your name you're going to get one of the fathers of the constitution right or one of these early founding fathers taking all the real estate yes yeah this ranch of being named dax. There's just not a bunch out there right now your christian name it is. It is yeah. My mom and dad had read a book in the lead character's name was dax. And let's go for it where you from originally. So i was born in lexington kentucky and that's where i spent most of my time but i've lived in six states in four foreign countries. So do you have a favorite my favorite place to visit his turkey. Eastern bowl is my favorite city in the world really has the oslo balance of chaos and order if you will oh okay good. I need you to drill down on the order. Because when i look at it looks very bright. Very frenetic very exciting. And i'm a little bit like that's seems maybe too chaotic. There's a method to the madness because there are places. I've been that are chaotic. They're just chaos deal with it but turkey just seems chaotic like this. Is it comparable to any other form or european country or is it its own thing and that's why you love it. It's its own thing. But i would say it's most comparable to spain. I don't know if you've been disowned ensuring people go out to eat restaurants. Don't open before nine o'clock in the party starts at one. Am and it goes to eight in the morning and spain has a different rhythm. And i think that's the most similar country to turkey and its mediterranean so similarities in the cuisine fish a lot of oil you know and then a crazy history. One of the most historical places you could visit. And that's what i like about it too. So you just hit the number one criteria for whether i like cities or don't and that is rhythm so i'll be places and i'm like yeah it's beautiful. That's a big tall building. That's got all the accoutrements of a great city. But there's just no rhythm happening here and then conversely you go down to austin texas. They don't have a ton to look at. And i'm like oh i can feel the rhythm all around me exactly now. How did you end up at harvard. Like most things in life. It had something to do with my network. So i was in england at the time because i had accepted a position because again our wanderers case. You can't tell i. Don't mind packing up and going to some exotic place. And i got an offer to take over as head of organizational behavior department at the university of sussex and i had my own center and when i was there at the center i discovered my real passion. I like to say. I transitioned from being a gardener to being a florist. When i was just a straight researcher i had my hands in the dirt. Cultivating blooms if you will. And then. when. I was head of the centre. I interacted with metropolitan police. The nhl the national healthcare service all these organizations to sort of give away my flowers if you will and so. I got into the florist business. Like how do you arrange these flowers into the perfect bouquet to give it to people at weddings. Because what's the point staying in a greenhouse if no one ever sees the beauty of your flowers and so you know when i was in england i discovered the passion of sort of giving away the science and then harvard. You know i was giving a talk. And they said well. You know we're holding company of entrepreneurs will let you come here and do whatever you wanna do if you don't want publish anymore will let you be a practitioner. But an academic at the same time and i was like really because most places aren't set up you know. Harvard makes its own rules. So i sort of took on this position to be an academic practitioner which led to this book that we're going to talk about which is sort of trying to distill. The science synthesize it assembly like a bouquet into something that people can digest and use to make profound sustainable change around racism. So that's like my purpose in life. Now where did you get your doctor. Degree because lexington kentucky and then ending up england emceeing already. You're privy to to dramatically different racial structures. And i wonder where you went to college if you maybe even a third and that somehow helps you on your journey just to have witnessed all this stuff firsthand. I went from coast to coast to coast and into the mid west. So basically i started my undergrad tulane university in. I did a study abroad in spain. Which is how. I came to know. Spain fell in love with spain. And i majored in spanish. That was one of my things. And then i went to. Ucla started at the gulf of mexico. Coast number one went to california. Ucla that was number two. And i was getting a phd in romance language and linguistics. So something completely unrelated. But i was looking at themes of oppression in latin american literature and colonialism. So i always been interested in that. In undergrad i did the thesis on a comparative study of racism in brazil and the united states but long story short i was hiking in joshua tree. And there was a psychology student. Who said you know you're doing really cool research. Did you know you could do this in the real world. And i was like no. There's a field where you can actually study racism and discrimination. She's like yeah you know. Why don't you come in audit a class. And that was the beginning of the end. So i left that program. I got a master's. I was a heroin from impeach d. But decided to start all over again in social psychology. So i started at yale. Struggled from coast to coast to coast and my professor at ucla said. Don't go to yale because i got into princeton yale. He said go to ohio state. That's like the best program in the country in what you're doing and as a phd student or go to programs not schools. And i didn't think. I could live in columbus ohio so i went to yale and then i was like you know what i can't live in new haven connecticut so the professor at ohio state would you guys take me and fortunately i had my own funding because i wanted. Nsf fellowship. so. I was able to export that i went to ohio state and worked with one of the top people in the field maryland brewer. Who's like the godmother of social identity.

Spain Harvard Lexington Kentucky Livingston England Oslo University Of Sussex Mediterranean Metropolitan Police Google Ucla Turkey Austin NHL Texas Tulane University Assembly Gulf Of Mexico Princeton Yale
Colleen Aubrey On Amazons Huge 2020 And What It Has Planned For 2021

AdExchanger Talks

08:39 min | 1 year ago

Colleen Aubrey On Amazons Huge 2020 And What It Has Planned For 2021

"My guest today is calling. Aubrey the vp of performance advertising at amazon. Who has been a mainstay at industry preview. Now while colleen's title focuses on performance. Her purview goes well beyond that. I think a lot of our previous conversations focused on the branding side of things and it's always a big year for amazon and advertise advertising. Twenty twenty was big in particular. It was on advertising reported. I believe a fifty one percent year over year surge in its last earnings called and booted in great part of by e commerce. So of two thousand twenty was huge for amazon. What does twenty twenty one bring will calling is here to tell us all about that calling great to have you on again. Thank you mine. It's great to be here so you know. Obviously we've all been endorsed for the last thousand million years in that. Interim heavier picked up any any new hobbies new ways of passing the time yes to be honest. Twenty twenty is not going to go down as my favorite year while in the first few months it was a little bit novel working from home experimented with a bunch of new things to take advantage of the opportunity so we don't example as we did a bunch of virtual dinner parties and so we had different cuisine types and then was like shopping. I'll challenge but really the end of the day. i do. Miss the variety of life. Before the coronavirus and i really miss the less structured creative process of sort of working with people in the office having said that I reflected actually on twenty twenty one. I returned to work on the full. January and amazon's cultures really grounded invention and focused on our customers. And i was. I realized how incredible it has been the ways that we found new in creative ways to work together. And i think i'm very proud of the work that my team did we scrambled we adapted and we kept building and we also Cya different that. I think we spent more time looking out for each other up. More time recognizing the difficulties. And i think we became more flexible and then for me personally had develop new ways of engaging with people and be willing to share a little bit more of a puzzle experience and encourage people to take care of themselves. So you're from visual happy. Hours to all hands to community in employee. Donations match programs We worked really hard to be safe and civil customers each other and the communities. We work in the in the past when you and i talk in person. Remember those days You know you always have a lot to say you always have a lot to say about you know new products. That amazon is building the way you guys are kind of increasing the capabilities within amazon advertising. obviously twenty twenty was was a year of tremendous change. There was a huge surge ecommerce companies. That might not have been familiar with ecommerce. Suddenly in it So how did that impact you know your roadmap in two thousand twenty and how does all that activity from twenty twenty impact impact. Would you guys planned to do. Twenty twenty one. Yeah there's questions. I think the first thing was that we realized very early in twenty twenty that it was even more important for us to keep inventing and keep delivering new features and capabilities advertises. You know we. We know that brands are facing a myriad of new challenges and uncertainty. And said you know the the impetus asta keep delivering became even greater because we need to give brands the products and features to be able to adapt and create maximum value from their advertising investments. And that also includes empowering the partners which agencies in tool providers they work with to help them to adapt to this set of very rapidly changing landscape and increase their efficiency by eliminating eliminating some of the more transactional pots of of managing ad campaigns. So i know you can't probably detail your entire twenty twenty one roadmap few free to if you if you want to but can you give us a hint of how you know how specifically things might have might be changing for amazon advertising this year. Well this year. I guess is really a- a case of sort of building on what i think of being pretty significant of focus in twenty twenty And so for advertising specifically we continue to improve the programs and services we have available full partners and these partners airport supporting now sellers who continue to be a big focus for us a vendors and our office and i think twenty twenty was a breakout year in terms of the pace of wanting features to our api and as such getting hat into the hands upon us and into the hands allow advertisers to adaptor that shifting environment in customer needs so as an example we launched four times as many features to our advertising. Api in twenty twenty twenty nineteen and we made progress moving beyond campaign creation management to address content marketing so we won't post than amazon attribution emission product to the api we also launch Api's for product eligibility keyword translation content moderation invoicing and manager account operations. So you know despite working virtually i think we we found ways to accelerate out delivery of features we found ways to work more closely partners and across the full funnel said advertising products. And i think that will drive out. Twenty twenty a roadmap his ford. We've also seen like a new categories of companies jumping into all nine retail due to the due to the pandemic has that has has has amazon advertising had to change or rethink those features in order to accommodate some of those e commerce newbies. Well i can't really speak to the broader category chen's but i can say that your small and medium-sized businesses. Continue to make over. Fifty percent of all units sold in amazon stores and in fact during the past holiday season small medium sized businesses in the us so nearly a billion bucks in our stores and we continue to invest heavily in supporting these businesses so amazon teams launch more than two hundred eighty tools and services to help as i last year. And i think this continues to be a priority as the before do those. Those small medium sized businesses interact differently with amazon versus like the the big corporations you think about what's essential to To a business. There's there's a lot that is that is common And so you know that sort of foams the basis of where we start like. What is the common advertiser will business need. And then of course you have variants in the way that this needs sort of as you get into more of the specific challenges that each segment of customers that we have will be will be working to address. But i think there's some common pieces that are really important regardless you want You wanna be too operate efficiently. And this is i think we're focused on. The api partners in and that group of of businesses will serve on the very wide range of sellers vendors and authors from the quite small to very large on markets. And so you that way. By focusing on that it's a way for us to actually enable everyone to have full access to a feature said to to operate Efficiently and to operate in a way that suits their business whether they using the advertising council or whether they're working with experts on that help them drive growth of the

Amazon Aubrey Colleen Chen Ford United States
Pablo Escobar's Hippos Are Out of Control

Kottke Ride Home

05:33 min | 1 year ago

Pablo Escobar's Hippos Are Out of Control

"A couple of years ago. I read a novella called river of teeth by sarah gaily. The concept of the story is based on a real world event. That almost happened smack. In the early twentieth century a bill was proposed in the us house of representatives and informally supported by theodore roosevelt. The us should import hippopotamuses from africa to the swamp lands of the gulf coast and breed them as an alternative meat source for americans basically starting a new industry in the us of hill. Ranching as you know this proposal never came to be but gala novella now collected into a volume with a sequel and some other stories under the title american hippo imagines magic in alternative history where this did happen only set fifty years earlier. You get kind of gulf coast cowboys on hippos tape story. It's great loved it. I highly recommend it. Or if you just wanna dig more into the facts. I put link in the show notes to a long read on the history of the hippo proposal by john. Mouallem will the reason i bring. This up is because americans in the early twentieth century. Were not the only ones with dreams of becoming hbo ranchers decades later pablo escobar would also get into the hippo game importing four of them to live on his estate in columbia and now forty some years later they have bread and multiplied and are spreading all over the wetlands of north bogo. Talk causing mayhem. Consternation and some real concerns for the region. Scientists say this now invasive species is competing with native wildlife polluting local waterways attacking humans and they project will grow in number two fifteen hundred hippos by twenty forty at that point the scientists say they will be nearly impossible to control their environmental impacts will be irreversible but never mind controlling fifteen hundred hippos. How do you control a dozen or even just one. That's not like you can just google it you know. In colombian officials are not hippopotamus experts and there are unique challenges levied upon this specific situation. I quoting the washington post in their natural habitat. Hippos spend the long dry season crowded into waterways shrunk to puddles. They're vulnerable to disease and predation not to mention one. Another as bad tempers but tropical columbia is hippo paradise. Environmental agency researcher david vary lopez said rain is abundant food is plentiful and they're no carnivores large enough to pose a threat. The animals spend five hours a day grazing on grasses and the rest of their time basking in the cool waters of the magdalena and surrounding lakes and quotes report from columbia not being the hippos natural habitat having in effect on the hippos behavior it also affects the surrounding communities impression of the hippos. The officials tasked with dismantling escobar's estate back in the ninety s. Weren't sure what to do with the one male and three female hippos so they just let them roam instead of sending them to a zoo with his other animals and mostly they did that because the hippos were massive and aggressive no one really wanted to approach them so we'll get the harm be and letting them go well. Kenyans and other african communities with native hippo populations could tell you a whole heck of a lot. You've got hippos from each sex so they can breathe for one and they're also hugely destructive to the environment into other animals. Hippos killed more humans each year than other large mammal. But when you don't grow up around hippos you don't necessarily know that so the hippos have become something of a mascot and columbia. According again gift shops in nearby puerto trail info sell hippo keychains and t shirts at the amusement park that was built on the site of escobar's former pleasure palace. Visitors can tour the lake where several dozen hippos now live occasionally one will plot into a nearby community looking as blase as a shopper on his way to the grocery store the hippopotamuses. The town pets resident claudia. Patricia camacho told the local news in two thousand eighteen. You could say that he now takes to the streets as if it were his own and quote but the hippos aren't as friendly as they may look on t shirts. They terrorize farms and hurt residents at times. The government has ordered the hippos to be shot on sight but there's been pushback from animal rights organizations and local residents so then they tried putting the hippos in a pin but and this is one of the mini quotes from this article. That honestly sounds straight hundred jurassic park. Etcheverry said i didn't know they could jump hikes so then they tried big pens with high enough walls that the hippos can't jump onto them. They've also been focused on trying to prevent them from breeding by cuisine. And then castrating the males. They've been through a steep hippo anatomy learning curve on that front though. Not even being sure where to look. For the animals external reproductive organs turns out. It's a bit complicated. They finally got a system of castration down. But it's costly and complicated so they can only do about one year but the estimates are that the population grows ten percent a year and apart from the bodily harm humans and the destruction of farms the hippos as they multiply host of other problems quoting again. A twenty twenty study of hippo inhabited lakes found that nutrients from the animal's feces were fuelling huge. Plumes of area an algae. These intern reduced the oxygen content of the water. Making it toxic to fish.

Sarah Gaily Gala Novella Gulf Coast Mouallem Columbia North Bogo David Vary Lopez Us House Of Representatives Pablo Escobar Theodore Roosevelt Escobar HBO United States Africa The Washington Post Patricia Camacho John Google Etcheverry Amusement Park
Hello Fresh Had a Great Year, But Microwavable Meals Did Even Better

Business Wars Daily

02:37 min | 1 year ago

Hello Fresh Had a Great Year, But Microwavable Meals Did Even Better

"With on again off again covid restrictions keeping hungry mouths out of restaurants. It's no surprise that twenty twenty was a banner year for cooking at home. That's been great for meal. Kit companies like hellofresh and blue apron. Homebound customers tired of familiar recipes flocked offerings like smashed black bean to start as in meatloaf la mom already and under forty-five minutes hellofresh orders grew one hundred fourteen percent over a year ago according to a statement from the company as much as meal kits have shown during the pandemic though. There were no match for their biggest rival. The microwave twenty twenty was a record year for the frozen food. Aisle sales of microwavable ready meals in the us grew to more than twenty five billion dollars last year. Outpacing the growth of all other grocery items according to market research published by global industry analytics. This increased demand sent items. Like tinos pizza rolls. Marie calendar's is and trader. Joe's tikka masala flying off their ice shelves twenty twenty also saw gin hot pockets that came as a blow to military bases where the microwavable meat and cheese filled bread bars or a snacking staple so report stars and stripes magazine nestle owned stouffer is meanwhile celebrated its record year by debut in a shop where it showcased food themed clothing with slogans like cheese. Self care yeah. That one's a little debatable. Live laugh lasagna. T shirts aside. However microwaveable meals showed they could adapt to the times amy's kitchen which built a brand off organic and vegetarian. Ready meals enjoyed sales bumps up to seventy percent for some of its products as reported by food navigator usa dot com nestle. Meanwhile grew it's plant based offerings by forty percent in two thousand twenty on top of organic and meatless options. Healthy choices have been winners to namely the company's diet brand lean cuisine that is until december when pieces of plastic from a broken conveyor belt ended up in a batch of frozen mashed potatoes. I guess that means this time. At least the lou calorie frozen meals might actually tastes like plastic nestle recalled ninety two thousand pounds of their lean cuisine baked chicken and potato variety as we emerge from the pandemic. It remains to be seen whether pre-prepared microwaveable meals will continue their meteoric rise. Customers might be looking for a break from all that processed food. just ask allison robot celli. Who eight and reviewed thirty five hot pockets in four days for the takeout when recalling the experience she says nobody should attempt this without a note from their doctor

Marie Calendar Nestle Tikka Masala Stouffer LA USA JOE Allison Robot Celli
What is the Ice Hotel?

Talk, Tales and Trivia

06:27 min | 1 year ago

What is the Ice Hotel?

"The ice hotel is a hotel. An art exhibition made of ice from the river. Torne each year reincarnated end. The brand new design a place to discover silence northern lights glistening snow clad forests reindeer cloud berries kettle coffee and so much more every year when the torne river turns to ice. A new ice hotel is created in a very small village of yuccas yari. In the north of sweden the ice of the river transforms to design and architecture and ephemeral art project and the world's first and largest hotel belt of snow and ice every year. Since i was a little girl. I have wanted to visit the ice hotel in sweden. It was a long shot. But i figured it was a dream and nothing would come of it. I imagined myself at the magical place made of ice and snow and how would be unusual and a once in a lifetime experience for me after all. I have had my time and stockholm sweden. But that's as far as my travels in. Sweden took me northern. Sweden would have to be for another time. I had rubbed shoulders with adults from my swedish language. Learning camp in bemidji minnesota which. I went to every october to better my conversational and writing skills and the swedish language and found the stories fascinating. I asked them to tell me their tales again and again. The older women some of them actually swedes from sweden took liberties with their stories and change them up a bit just for the fun of it every time it was a new adventure one of the stories that might have been up. Made me giddy with excitement and marymount. It was based around christmas time and it seemed so cozy in real. Surely it must be true. I didn't ask though. I imagined myself as being sabine. She'd that was telling the story and having the is hotel experience. Imagine with me arriving from stockholm to the ice hotel and yucca. Crv right on the torn revolver. The torne river is where they get all the ice for the ice hotel. The many designers engineers architects artists and workers start building the hotel from scratch every year. A labor of love. No doubt this year they were having a very special christmas. Celebration and architects engineers and designers were making special holiday installations special trees and wreaths the lap of an ice santa claus to sit on to tell your christmas wish to glistening chandeliers adorned with red and green colors projected onto the mini lighted fixtures some spaces clean and monochromatic swedish as expected and some fanciful like a childhood memory of a colorful christmas season. Passed my five cents is were working overtime. I smelled holly and evergreen saw the different colors of projected lights felt the unbearable coldness hurt the piano. Playing jazz seasonal selections center to my right or was it to my left and i was greeted at the front reception with champagne and cloud berries something. I don't even think we have an america. The woman behind the ice desk gave me a reindeer skin blanket to put over my shoulders and walked me to an outdoor firepit only steps away on the outside of the building a roaring fire and wonderful ice chairs covered in some more reindeer blankets. My mind was blown away with excitement. What else would i experience. I had just started my four night adventure in this cold winter. Christmas wonderland soon enough. I was handed a mug of coffee with rum. And i knew this was where i wanted to call home forever. More adventurers came to sit by the firepit with the same wide. Eyed wonder and spirited excitement. I smiled but kept my eyes glued to the fire but all the visitors new that the ice and snow wouldn't last long as the ice hotel closed down in april before my trip was over i will have gone across the wilderness in snowshoes. Go on sleigh rides with reindeer. See the northern lights had met the saami people of lapland. I will have eaten swedish. Christmas cuisine and watched the saint lucia event. But for now time stood still as i glazed is over the fire and dreamed later i would be shown to the room. I selected my very own ice room with an actual ice table complete with a mini refrigerator and colored ice sculptures of christmas past and reindeer blankets covering my ice bed and an actual fireplace. I can watch while laying in bed. The time seemed like an endless christmas trip. But also that. If i didn't hurry i'd miss the whole thing in a blink of an eye. I grew sleepy and dreamed of a wonderful time. The one thing i knew was that this wouldn't be my last time here at the ice hotel for christmas yes there would be more visits and perhaps a chance to be a worker in making it all come together for the holiday season later that first night i was given cheese and blog a red wine with rum learning all new things about the swedish way of life hand was going to be a you fork experience for shore

Sweden Ice Hotel Torne Torne River Yuccas Yari Stockholm The Torne River Bemidji Sabine Minnesota Evergreen Holly Lapland America
Best of 2020

Monocle 24: The Menu

07:22 min | 1 year ago

Best of 2020

"Up next we meet one of ireland's finance jeff's kp mcmahon based in galway the michelin starred chefs. Culinary accomplishments include any restaurant and anne robotic cookery school as well as his. Release the irish cookbook. One of the most beautiful cookbook releases off. Twenty twenty till's the story of irish feud and how it has evolved over thousands of years showcasing the richness and variety of food from this green islands with its five hundred authentic recipes. The author jp mcmahon jones me in the studio back in march to discuss the book on how irish food is about so much more than just lamb stew and potatoes as was initially. It was a bit apprehensive because there are many many irish food cookbooks in the twentieth century. But i suppose. I found that a lot of them had been written for an irish audience or perhaps people travelling to ireland. It was important for me to try and give an international dimension and was one of the reasons why publishing with fight on made a difference because they have a global reach and it was in order to try and change the perception of irish food. I think also because we have a restaurant called a near which is will mission star restaurant. We've had it for ten years and we've been investigating irish food for ten years and i felt a lot of the things that we've been doing over. Those ten years weren't in cookbooks. And some of them are very old things like using seaweed using wild food in different ways. And i wanted i suppose that a record of that and that was the start i think the initial for doing it was a had traveled a lot to different places and taking part in chef events and i realized that are affected that we had really good produce in ireland. I'm we just weren't singing about it now. I took part in events in mexico in america and canada in europe and we were always celebrating the cuisine of a particular area. And as why are we doing this. And why aren't we kind of like saying well. We have really good food where shellfish or or whatever so. They were kind of the driving forces behind the book. Now what do you think. Ireland has been so modest about its food on its culinary legacy heritage. I think there's a certain humbleness modesty to irish people and they're probably not the best people at selling themselves like i think we're frustrated capitalists and we want to do things but at the same time we don't want to come across as being bombastic. I think that's worn element. I think the second element is the famine and the subsequent diaz before that happens. I think that impacted irish food particularly of the twentieth century and on the one hand you had people that did not have that much access to food in art and even though there was a lot of food and then the second part you had people who did have access that is food. Who were i think. Predominantly from the anglo-irish irish element and some has be would call the west brits so the people who would be associated with england and these people who had food. I think we're not considered to be irish often. This kind of tension between the tradition that it goes all the way back at least a thousand years between people on the island and people who have food and people don't have food on who we consider irish what we consider irishness tried to take a very broad perspective on it. And so when you go into the archives of the recipe books that you find are from landed gentry anglo-irish aristocracy mostly on. I think when became independent in nineteen twenty two. We kind push that assignment. But that's not really irish. You talk about going to the archives of research did you actually conducts to gather all these five hundred recipes. You having this book. Some of it was looking at best. Baseball's cookbooks from the nineteenth to twentieth century and looking through tried to pick recipes that i thought represented ireland in that respect i found stuff like say pollen is a river fish that is almost forgotten and offend a wonderful pollen recipe. I think in the nineteen seven book and interest. Enough are fishmonger had just been talking about pollen and nobody easing it and it all goes to europe and his fish from nee in northern ireland. That was one thing. I think looking ass older manuscripts was wonderful thing. Because i love history as well and looking at how people wrote recipes and how they i suppose. There was a certain assumption in recipes that the person who was reading new it already so the method was very very scant and often the recipe books were household management books. That would be passed down from mother to a daughter to a granddaughter so people could be able to cook the recipes. Were very interesting. A lot of pickles. Stuff a lot of preserve stuff because there was no frigid. So a lot of salting like i suppose. There's almost like how to live because if you couldn't do these things then you in trouble. Did you come across many recipes that had been practically forgotten already. Yeah like one or two some that we probably would not eat now. One was pickled herring. Which i thought was really interesting because i did a story and friend of mine because i thought didn't they meant herring and she was like no. That's terron lake orion and i was like wow because there's one heron galway and flies up and down and if anyone was to pick them i be in trouble but the interesting thing was that it reminded me of like an s quebec spanish dish where they cook fish or chicken and they covered in vinegar and wine solution and essentially that was the recipe and the recipe started off was like chopped the heads off one hundred hereon got and viscera them. That was the start of the recipe. And i was like wow. That's already a big mess. Some of the other things that are still useful. I think i put it in was quincy and quincy eric. Something that are not native to ireland but there was a lot in the seventeenth and eighteenth century that would preserve a lot of quences and so preserved. Quincy was what i would call mark cross again and again and again and also recipes would almonds. The irish were obsessed with amines. Which again is one of those interesting things to think about because again. Do not come from ireland.

Ireland Jeff's Kp Mcmahon Jp Mcmahon Jones Galway Europe Diaz Mexico Canada America England Northern Ireland Baseball Quincy Eric Quebec Mark Cross Quincy
"cuisine" Discussed on Can We Health You?

Can We Health You?

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"cuisine" Discussed on Can We Health You?

"Just to rebel. Oh they're just like you just suck. Yeah wow man. It was like a symbol of something to them. Yeah they were trying to break away. Oh goodness as the social order continued to break. Down these competing. Rebel leaders took control of different parts of the country and then they declare new dynasties so oh within the country. Yeah also all that work. Because i was understanding it with a great wall was that it was it was it. Actually symbolized a unified. I think it eventually and then so then devolved. Yeah and broke. Apart again was huge country. huge so semifinals. Yeah the last. Ming ruler committed suicide in sixteen forty four which boom about living unbe and we're done yep and then became the than the new dynasty was the king cute q i n j dynasty kion kion. Maybe you're you're the accidentally so in in the history of chinese cuisine. So that's a little bit of background in the history of chinese cuisine. Chinese imperial cuisine is derived from a variety of cooking styles of the regions of china so throughout the long history of dynasties chinese imperial cuisine was continually changing and improving developing from simple to exquisite so originating around the ju- dynasty z. H. o. u. polly's. Yes i guess. Golly right yeah which is eleven. Trade for seventy sixty emperors used their power to collect the best cuisine and best cooks from throughout the country so from the chinese collected the cook Yeah they're like i want you. They were actually famous chefs from all these dynasties but the emperor's brought them like good. Yeah i don't know come be my yup honor. Yeah yeah so. From the chinese perspective the imperial cuisine represented the dynasties cuisine. Okay that time interesting yeah. Imperial cuisine was served mainly to the emperor's empress and concubines in the imperial family styles and tastes of chinese imperial cuisine vary from dynasty to dynasty making each time period super unique. Yeah all right. So the two most famous styles of emperior from the ming in a queue. I n g dynasty kion kion dynasty or xiangming could be sheron. I was saying king in my head right but anyway we're supposed to dynasty. maybe it's xiang xiang maybe pronounced. I'm glad that being so easy to say abeille film. So so what was this imperial cuisine like in the ming dynasty. Because the emperor of ming dynasty was from southern china the imperial cuisine was mostly cooked with the flavors of southern china So before he came along to to sow came a long time ties. Sorry i know. I don't know what it's definitely different than we're used to. Yeah i don't think i'd say his name again. The before his dynasty. Before the ming dynasty was the mongolian style. Food okay serve during the mongol led juan dynasty. Which is right before the man one important quality of the ming dynasty was to preserve nutrition and maintain good health the emperor's the main paid great attention to eating healthier food. The menu change daily and dishes were seldom repeated. The imperial cuisine of the main was mostly grain based may and being products were not as popular as they had been in previous dynasties. Corn and chili peppers were introduced during this time. The main dynasty was also characterized by growth in agriculture herbal..

Ming ruler kion kion kion kion dynasty xiangming sheron china polly ming dynasty
"cuisine" Discussed on Can We Health You?

Can We Health You?

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"cuisine" Discussed on Can We Health You?

"Much of this china still exists. Today i mean i just had a little play on words from like what do you mean this time for china. Okay good one okay. So also during this time they. The great wall of china was needing maintenance. The maintenance of the wall had not been consistent throughout the history of china so by the time the ming dynasty came round at needed significant repair work This dynasty the ming dynasty chose to spend a lot of money in the storing of the great wall where they built a big chunk of it to okay. Yeah so was it just more to as a kind of to preserve historical site also. They used it to protect themselves. It was also still as a barrier. Yeah i still has barium okay. so worked. Tirelessly to maintain strengthen the great wall basically to prevent another mongolian invasion. So however. The ming rule was partly done by normal enormous fiscal problems that resulted in their eventual collapse. Expect him money. Maybe exporting their fun china. They're building while to delhi razi emperor killing too many people. Yeah like it was very april. So the ming dynasty was partly undone by these huge fiscal problems. There was an agricultural disaster. Which was the result of the lowest temperatures of the little ice age that helped To deplete their agriculture system the drop in average temperatures resulted in freezes shortened growing seasons and terrible harvests. These circumstances led to famine which forced starving soldiers to desert their posts and gangs formed ravaging countryside's by sixteen thirty two. This is lake about. I don't know eight years ten ten years before. The ming dynasty ended the gangs. These gangs moved east and the imperial military couldn't stop them then. The country was further decimated by flooding. Locusts drought and disease biblical. Doesn't it in sixteen forty two just two years before its demise. A group of rebels destroyed the dikes of the river and the flooding killed hundreds of thousands of people. All.

china delhi razi
Like Water in the Desert

Gastropod

04:00 min | 1 year ago

Like Water in the Desert

"Philip start by introducing you all ramona. Button of ramona's american indian foods. I am Pima living on the pima reservation here on a hill river. I am also have donal them from south of here. They used to be known as the papagos. But now they're called the on them and the p. r. on them that's my other half mesa river people. And i'm gary ramona's husband terry button ramona. Interior farmers their farms about an hour. Southeast of phoenix on the way to tucson and the whole region is a desert. The sonoran desert includes phoenix and tucson and parts of california and it stretches all the way over. The border into mexico. Ramona's ancestors have been farming in the region for thousands of years and her dad kept the traditional live on the reservation where she grew up. My father did the wheat. He did the tempered. Beanstalk brown swam bob and the white tip rabin which is the start about and he did. Squash the gabon. Ceos watermelon and sugarcane and the black eyed peas just us above and chilies mostly. I don't for his chili. And those tilles are part of what brought ramona and terry together. Ramona had left the reservation to work as a nurse. In south dakota terry was there studying lakota songs and culture friends introduce them and they told ramona. That terry had picked up a few words of pima as well. That's the language of ramona's people in the south west. So terry tried out his rudimentary pima on her. And i said well you're saying it correctly but you're Die like accent is different and so it was a little bit hard to decipher. But i could understand him. So i said well Maybe we're a good match and so it happens. And then when i came when i met ramona the first experience i had with southwest cuisine was her dad's long green chilis and they were so hot they blistered my lips. They turned white. She would send him to me in the mail when i went back to school. Share with some of my buddies. Nobody could eat them and her dad. Pretty famous actually in the local community as well known for he's used to sell small brown paper lunch sacks with chilis and he'd have mild and medium hot he regulate a chilly temperature by the way he irrigated his chile's he wouldn't let anybody else water his plots not just because he was manipulating the firing of his tilles. It was because the water itself was so rare and so precious. There was never enough. A shirt is a place full of things other than water. They get a bad rap because they have low rainfall and It's as if they're empty spaces. Gay napkin is a desert agricultural ecologist. And he's written more than a dozen books about agriculture and the desert and its foods. He lives an hour south of tucson also in the sonoran desert within a mile and a half of where i am sitting right. Now we have evidence of forty five hundred years of agriculture in the form of corn remains from an archaeological site. So i am in the valley in the united states with the oldest history of agriculture. Yeah well as far back and farther back than written history can go. The people were farming. Here when padre eusebio kino who was the first non indian person to come into this country came here and visited the payments in sixteen seventy five. They were irrigating their fields with diversions from the hilo river at that time

Ramona Terry Hill River Mesa River Gary Ramona Terry Button Ramona Pima Tucson Beanstalk Brown Tilles Phoenix Sonoran Desert Donal Rabin Philip Gabon South Dakota Mexico
A Bulgarian Feast

Travel with Rick Steves

06:13 min | 1 year ago

A Bulgarian Feast

"Let's start today's culinary edition of travel. With rick steves for the sampling of bulgaria's lively food traditions. That's one country where you definitely want to be invited over when he was going to be a feast as a crossroads of dynasties for centuries gary is one of the oldest tenure in it is a proud cuisine based on all of these cultures that have come and gone it. Mir's it's complex demographic makeup end it's fascinating history. You can learn about people through their museums and art and you can also learn about a culture through its kitchen and right. now we're going to is. We're joined by stefan motza jeff and we're gonna talk about book garin cuisine seven. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me here. Ick stephan how does bulgaria's history and it's complex ethnic makeup show itself in your cuisine. It's interesting question because we have always been. At across of civilizations turks greeks mediterranean culture slavic culture and all of these different cultures they reflect in our cuisine. And this is the reason why. Our cuisines has many specifics. Okay so you're gonna take me out to dinner and we're going to demonstrate that. What are some dishes that would illustrate the many different invasions that bulgaria has endured the first and most traditional dishes actually liquid. It's our alcoholic beverage. Here rakiya we start every meal with rakiya typically made of grapes or other fruits while we're waiting for ourselves to come. We hear foley. Our first sakir finished your drink the rookie through the meal. Exactly okay. So the first course would be solid kind of salad may have the most traditional one East coat subsc. Sarut literally means a solid from subscribe region this region our capital cities software. So around sophea. But i find that every meal all across bulgaria the beloved chops ca salad. Yes it's like our traditional south in every single restaurant from the obscure the most upscale restaurants to those in the remote villages. This is a must on the menu. If you are familiar with the greek salads. It'll be something close tomatoes cucumbers onions peppers. The best peppers are not the robust but roasted peppers roasted peppers s and on the top. You put some cheese. Typically countries couches. Yes and increase it a slab cheese. Yes is a slab of jason here. We grated cheese. Stefan when you eat the very best shops ca salad. You've been eating at all your life in connecticut. This is really good. Why is it really good. really good. What distinguishes a chops salad. I this is the cheese. The cheese chase is important and the other thing the peppers. they must be roasted in some restaurants. They don't want to work quite much in the kitchen. So they're all but roasted peppers and cheese. I've catcher this is travel with rick steves. You're talking stephan. Both jeb about garin cuisine. Okay you've had your salad. What comes next after salad. It came to the main course. Our main course. Of course a lot of grilled and barbecued meats kickboxing or give up is means meet crooked and meet bo grilled meat balls so these are minced meat or meat balls stuck on long stick. No no no long six. No no. they're just like pure meet. Maha put on the grill and then put on your plate. What kind of spices. Oh all kinds of spices. Actually the spices that we use of course a lot of parsley a lot of do savory. These are very traditional spices and on top of that. We have one very traditional shot in a soul this mixture of different herbs. This is a sauce. It's not a sauce. It is sort salt. Yeah it's okay. Bold colorful sought and different herbs. So red paprika sage savory everything put together and we dip our breath insight and we just enjoy. That sounds very good. Do you have an influence of greece. Greece's a big culture and and a lot of ways. You have the similar environment in your cuisine. What sort of greek flavor would you find for sure. One of the most traditional meals that bulgarians belief. It is bulgarian. It is the moussaka sexually coming from our southern neighbours from from the greeks but here in our version we add just minced meat and potatoes. We don't at zucchini or eggplant inside. No potatoes mainly towards the potatoes and and the minced meat in greece. Of course they have a lot of these appetizers. You have this way of serving people family style plates yes. It is also very popular in bulgaria. The missouri style intellectually is the same word that we use for that. We have different. Appetizers some Cheese some dry sausages and also different dips. Now i'm remembering some beautiful cold soup kind of a vegetable called supporters that this is called the the atar. It is very traditional bulgarian soup during the summer. It consists of yogurt chopped cucumbers garlic. Do walnuts and a few drops of olive oil on the top sound just beautiful. Yes and it saves us during the hot summer days because it can be quite hot in the summer. Yes that's very possible. You talked about the Grilled peppers in the shop salad. But also i remember when i go to a restaurant. There's a lot of stuffed peppers as part of the main course. Yes stuffed peppers. This could be on the menu of every bulgarian family very traditional one. The most traditional one is to have stuffed pepper with rice and minced meat but also on the other hand we have a stuffed peppers with what which is of course and these are very delicious. Choose sca buick

Bulgaria Rick Steves Stefan Motza Sophea Stephan Gary Foley Mediterranean Greece Jeff Stefan JEB Connecticut Jason Missouri
"cuisine" Discussed on Minerva's Creative Conversations™

Minerva's Creative Conversations™

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"cuisine" Discussed on Minerva's Creative Conversations™

"Welcome tim nervous created conversations a podcast show bright dig deeper into the personal journeys to professional careers of influential women and minorities and how their stories and inspire others to achieve success. I'm your host minerva salads and today my special guest is chef sasha roj proprietor of twenty four carrots a vegan restaurant in tempe arizona and. She is a hands on community leader. Sasha welcome into the show. Thank you for having mansa pleasure to beaver anchoring now sasha what inspired you to open your own vegan and gluten free restaurant honestly i think it's a lot about At least for myself we started out as a vegetarian. Juice bar Twelve years ago. And when i actually we wanted to offer juice cleanses and i decided. I was going to try it before. I offered a and it worked kind of like an elimination diet for me. And when i started outing allergens knock into my diet when i got to dairy. I realized for lactose intolerance. I was and excruciatingly so and so overnight twenty. Four carrots became vegan asked. Did i and that was nearly would say ten plus years ago and we never looked back and most recently. We've developed more and more gluten free.

"cuisine" Discussed on The Men's Room

The Men's Room

16:16 min | 2 years ago

"cuisine" Discussed on The Men's Room

"Hey this is a heck Awadhi production. Hey everybody hopes you're super well. Thanks for joining me today. I know we're all trying to make sense of this whole staying at home thing and figuring out our wacky new schedules so it really means a lot to me that you're here. I think you'll really enjoy today's show because we're talking about some of the world's best cuisine and I know food is taking up a big part of our lives right now. Everyone's on social media sharing great recipes. Families finally have time to cook and eat together every day and some people are shamelessly binging on junk food so for better or worse. Good food is kind of holding everything together right now. I think. And we're in the Middle East so we're especially lucky. Everyone knows the food. Here is one of the best in the world and no one has perfected it quite.

Middle East