16 Burst results for "Cto Hp"

"cto hp" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:11 min | 2 years ago

"cto hp" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Changing killer innovation. Welcome back in this segment. We're gonna talk about to fundamental areas regarding the IPO one is impact and the other is how do you pitch it? How do you think about getting organization convinced to put an IPO implies let's talk about impact one is, is an IPO about transforming the approach. It's not about being the innovators. But instead, being via neighbors of innovation, keep the IPO team small avoid being viewed or perceived as competition to others in the organization. Everybody wants to do innovation if they're not. They take that as a slight now. It's not about doing it is about enabling. It's about helping others do the innovation work so at HP we have two hundred forty thousand staff. I was never bigger than thirty five people. Now, we provide the funding that was outside of the. The budgets at the organization. So anybody that had a really good idea knew that I had funding new, I had ready access to funding in new, that we would make very fast decisions to make that funding available to them. Something that just doesn't happen inside of an organization of two hundred and forty thousand people teams do not need to go and compete for money's against already product lines. Part of the reason why we did the funding the way we did was, you know, trying to compete with a new idea that wouldn't really be profitable for two to four years, having to compete against product line, that was generating revenue and profit today. And that's always a hard decision for product groups, the benefit of the funding coming from IPO, was, it was off the radar from their management team since the money wasn't coming from them. So they didn't have to report to their management about the spending of those dollars. Was that return we treated that within the IPO, and then we spread the money freely. We showed that we were willing to fund things that even I may not see as possibly being successful. And believe me, there were a lot of those where someone else that this is a great idea. We funded it, and I'm like I don't see it and I was wrong. It just reinforced to me that I was not a good proxy for what was good. What was a good idea. What could be a winning product. So let me talk real quick, about a PS g case study, PSE stands for personal systems group in the HP nomenclature, so that would have been PC's, laptops, displays mobile phones, and calculators. It this time I took over a CTO HP Tober, I two thousand and five or at least I was opposed to instead I found myself in New Orleans at the request of the White House, on the recovery of Katrina, I flew in was sleeping in my sleeping bag in the back of flat bed trailer trucks, because you could not sleep on the ground in, in New Orleans, basically, I built a wireless network to allow the New Orleans citizens. The army national guard operate in the city with no infrastructure. Now, when I finally did get back to Palo Alto. I was way behind right here. I was named as the CTO, the White House negotiates with HP to get me released. And now I am out gone in Katrina, no phone, no connectivity, building the connectivity, and I was already behind, I had to build a staff I had to establish roadmaps as part of my CTO role, and I had to stem losses PS g was losing a billion dollars. A year losing a billion dollars a year and was number three or number four in market share for any of its products, and my concept that the IPO really became the cornerstone. It's not about building an invasion team. I didn't have enough dollars because we were losing a billion dollars. I had to build a team to enable everyone in the organization to become the innovators that would transform the organization and I had to stay behind the scenes, I let others stand in front, and take the credit and that was all part of the strategy. So how did you how do I convince leadership, but was the pitch was identified the challenges the Ord was going to phase without an innovation? Keep ability, there was a lot of speed of change new products changing customers. The customers needs and demands for products and services in the case of PS g you know, the transformation of what is the PC and how often people bought new PC's with a use them for their market expectations, in the competitors were changing, you know, you had del you had Lenovo you had get that time, we still had gateway head Acer, which was pretty small time that apple right? Identify the challenges yoga's issue was gonna face without an innovation capability. We did nothing what would happen. We would go from losing a billion dollars to one point two billion losing one point five billion job. And we continue to lose market share. Then I had to draft and get alignment, around a problem statement, the organization could rally around, how do you excite twenty thousand people to get energized rather just sitting back and letting things happen to them to say, no, we're not going to happen, and we're going to go win. You can do that, by the behead bald hairy audacious goal or you could find a problem statement, whenever it is. You gotta come up with a target emission, something that is bigger than an individual within the organization. It really is the organization takes on what was ours. We took on the pretty bold plan to become number one in market share across all product lines and have the highest profitability in the industry. Typically, those are trade-offs I can be highly profitable. Right. But I won't be number one because I'll be priced out of the market. I could be number one and lose money. Right. Those were typically people thought it was an either or situation, what we said, was no an an situation. We want to become number one market share across all product lines and have the highest profitability ministry. Now, the question you have to ask yourself, what do your executives want the people that have got to make your decision? Once you've established this goal. What is it? They want noticed everybody has a boss CEO has a boss aboard CTO has a boss is the CEO, right? In fact, CTO cases, lots of bosses. Everyone wants to look good to their boss human nature. So how are you going to help them? Look, good to their boss. And how can you model true partnership and focus on that goal? Look, the people, you're trying to help they want to be too hero. Let them be viewed as the hero. So then what do you want, you want to show what you can do you wanna show? But the power of innovation is within organizations. You wanna show success and impact, you want to transform organization trust me. There's nothing more satisfying than being able to take into an organization of significant size scale and have a meaningful big impact. And you should not want to be viewed as the hero, you want to be viewed as the guide. Let the other person beat here. Let the executive here, that's that you're working with you want to be the guide. And how do you wanna stretch then you think about how do you structure it? So everyone gets what they want focused on the agreed problem statement, or the b heck our case, number one. And that is actually what exactly what we want. We wanted to be number one. Do not forget what they want each decision. You make you should ask yourself. Number one. Does this hope solve the problem statement are achieved the behavior? Number two. Does this help them achieve what they want? Number three doesn't help you chief what you want. You may not be able to check off all three boxes all the time you may need to secretaries what you want for the bigger good. But you go in with it is open. Okay. So, again, impact keep the IPO small never more than thirty people in the case of two hundred and forty thousand employees at HP. I hope today's discussion has helped you understand the role of the IPO with both the impact and the pitch, the IPO's important resource, whether you created as a separate team running virtual team with member, scattered across Orgainzation, or you use the port for outside resources organizations that do not put in place, something akin to the IPO will find themselves struggling in with an increased likelihood that their innovation efforts would fail. A reason study showed that seventy percent of organizations who attempt to create an innovation. Keep ability fail at doing so seventy percent failure rate in my experience building an IPO in Jj Jing, the rest of the organization has proven highly successful, how successful within two years of establishing and getting IPO fully operational with NPS g. The projects. Let came out of a PO led to being named on fast company's fifty most innovative, three years in a row within two years. HP went from losing a billion dollars in being number three and number four market share to making four billion dollars highest profitability in the in the in the industry, and being number one in all product lines. Trust me. Peel works. Don't go anywhere. We'll be right back after this break with a new episode if I miss new ideas, also check out the show notes over at killer. I'll have some links. There have been two case studies at Stanford University and Harvard Business School written about the HP innovation program office, feel free to hop on over to Stanford and Harvard tweet those.

HP CTO CTO HP Tober Katrina New Orleans White House executive Stanford University Lenovo CEO Jj Jing Palo Alto army Acer Peel NPS Orgainzation apple
"cto hp" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:17 min | 2 years ago

"cto hp" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Next game changing killer innovation. Welcome back in the second. We're gonna talk about to fundamental areas regarding the IPO one is impact and the other is Honey pitch. It how do you think about getting organization convinced to put an IPO implies? So let's talk about impact one is, is an IPO about transforming the approach. It's not about being the innovators. But instead being enablers of innovation keep the IPO team small avoid being viewed or perceived as competition to others in the organization. Everybody wants to do innovation, and if they're not they take that as a slight now it's not about doing it is about enabling. It's about helping others do the innovation work. So at HP we have two hundred and forty thousand staff. I was never bigger than thirty five people. Now we provide the funding that was. Outside of the budgets of the organization. So anybody that had a really good idea knew that I had funding new, I had ready access to funding in knew that we would make very fast assertions to make that funding available to them. Something that just doesn't happen inside of an organization of two hundred and forty thousand people. Teams do not need to go compete for money's against already product lines, part of the reason why we did the funding the way we did was trying to compete with a new idea that wouldn't really be profitable for two to four years, having to compete against a product line, that was generating revenue and profit today. And that's always a hard decision for product groups, the other benefit of the funding coming from IPO, was, it was off the radar from their management team since the money wasn't coming from them. So they didn't have to report to their management about the spending of those dollars. Was that return we treated that within the IPO, and then we spread the money freely. We showed that we were willing to fund things that even I may not see as possibly being successful, and believe me, there were a lot of those where someone else said auto this is a great idea. We funded it, and I'm like, I don't see it. And I was wrong. It just reinforced to me that I was not a good proxy for what was good. What was a good idea. What could be a winning product. So let me talk real quick, about a PS g case study, PSE stands for personal systems group in the HP nomenclature, so that would've been PC's, laptops, displays mobile phones, and calculators. If this time I took over a CTO, HP Tober, I two thousand five or at least I was opposed to instead I found myself in New Orleans at the request of the White House, on the recovery of Katrina, I flew in was sleeping in my sleeping bag in the back of flat bed trailer trucks, because you could not sleep on the ground in, in New Orleans, and basically, I built a wireless network to allow the New Orleans citizens in the army national guard right in the city with no infrastructure. Now, when I finally did get back to Bala Welte. I was way behind right here. I was named as the CTO, the White House negotiates with HP to get me released. And now I am out gone in Katrina, no phone, no connectivity, building the connectivity, and I was already behind, I had to build a staff I had to stab roadmaps as part of my CTO role, and I had to stem losses BS g was losing a. Billion dollars a year losing a billion dollars a year and was number three or number four in market share for any products. And my concept that the IPO really became the cornerstone. It's not about building an innovation team. I didn't have enough dollars because we were losing a billion dollars, I had to build a team to enable everyone in the organization to become the invaders that would transform the organization, and I stayed behind the scenes idle at others stand in front, and take the credit and that was all part of the strategy. So how did you how do I convince leadership? What was the pitch was identified the challenges the Ord was going to face without an innovation capability. There was a lot of speed of change new products changing customers. The customers needs and demands for products and services in the case of PS g. You know, the transformation of what is a PC and how often people bought new PC's with they use them for the remark it expectations, in the competitors were changing, you know, you had del you had Lenovo you had get that time we still had gateway head Acer, which was pretty small at that time. Red apple dentistry. The challenges yoga's -ation was gonna face without an innovation capability. We did nothing. What would happen? We would go from losing a billion dollars to one point two billion to losing one point five billion we job, and we continue to lose market share. Then I had to draft and get alignment, around a problem statement, the organization could rally around, how do you excite twenty thousand people to get energized rather just sitting back and letting things happen to them to say, no, we're not gonna let this happen, and we're going to go win. You can do that, by the behead bald hairy audacious goal or you could find a problem statement, whenever it is, you gotta come up with a target a mission something that is bigger than an individual within the organization. It really is the organization takes on. So what was ours? We took on the pretty bold plan to become number one in market share across all product lines in have the highest profitability in the industry. Typically, those are trade-offs like can be highly profitable. Right. But I won't be number one because I'll be priced out of the market. I could be number one and lose money. Right. Those were typically people thought it was an either or situation, what we said was what's an an- situation? We want to become number one market share across all product lines and have the highest profitability industry. Now, the question you have to ask yourself, what do your executives want the people that have got to make your decision? Once you've established this goal. What is it they want? Now understand everybody has a boss CEO has a boss. It's the board. CTO has a boss, the CEO, right. In fact, CTO cases, lots of bosses. Everyone wants to look good to their boss human nature. So how are you going to help them? Look, good to their boss. And how can you model true partnership and focus on that goal? Look, the people you tried to help. They want to be the hero. Let them be viewed as the hero. So then what do you want, you want to show what you can do you wanna show? But the power of innovation is within your Kazushi wanna show success and impact, you want to transform organization trust me. There's nothing more satisfying than being able to take go into an organization of significant sizes. Gale and have a meaningful big impact, and you should not want to be viewed as the hero, you want to be viewed as the guide. Let the other person beat hero. Let the executive here debts that you're working with you want to be the guide. And how do you wanna structure then you think about how do you structure it? So everyone gets what they want focused on the agreed problem statement, or the heck our case, number one. And that is actually what exactly what we want. We wanted to be number one. Do not forget what they want each decision. You make you should ask yourself. Number one. Does this hope solve the problem statement are achieved the behead? Number two. Does this help them achieve what they want? Number three. Does it help you what you want? You may not be able to check off all three boxes all the time you may need to sacrifice what you want for the bigger. Good. But you go in with it is open. Okay. So, again, impact keep the IPO small never more than thirty five people in the case of two hundred forty thousand poise that HP. Right. So I hope today's discussion has helped you understand the role of the IPO with both the impact and the pitch the IPO's important resource. Whether you created as a separate team running virtual team with members scattered across the organization, or you use the port from outside resources organizations that do not put in place, something akin to the IPO will find themselves struggling with an increased likelihood that their innovation efforts would fail a recent study showed that seventy percent of organizations, who attempt to create an innovation. Keep ability fail at doing so seventy percent failure rate in my experience, building an IPO in gauging the rest of the organization has proven highly successful, how successful within two years of establishing and getting the IPO fully operational with NPS g the projects came out of led to being named fast company's. Fifty most innovative, three years in a row and within two years. HP went from losing a billion dollars in being number three number four market, share to making four billion dollars highest profitability in the in the in the industry, and being number one in all product lines. Trust me. I appeal works. Don't go anywhere. We'll be right back after this break with a new episode of five Mr. new ideas. Also check out the show notes over at killer vacations. I'll have some links. There have been two case studies at Stanford University and Harvard Business School written about the HP innovation program office, feel free to hop on over to.

HP CTO Katrina New Orleans executive Bala Welte White House Lenovo CEO Acer Stanford University apple Kazushi Gale Harvard Business School billion dollars seventy percent two years
"cto hp" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:05 min | 2 years ago

"cto hp" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Conversation with Joe McConnell. Talking about the can now you've been out there talking with a number of leaders regulators government officials in countries around the world on those if if, if you were to sit down with a new leader who's interested in, in thinking about ethics in their business, given everything profile, what's the one thing that they should think about changing their mindset going into the into changing their we're gonna zalin? Yes, the thing that we talked to them boast about is how to fundamentally refocus their business away from a quarterly sheer quantitative statistic. Six into the longer term and engaging, the qualitative analysis now, now, you're in the my, my field of passion right now. I think the quarterly number thing just forces organizations to make bad decisions. And again, it gets back to the fact that by law. Sickly corporations. They finish responsibility to the shareholder, and you get this Pavlovian loop between what is a CEO due to drive an uptick in share price. And then it becomes his death cycle that can lead you in the very bad decisions, and actual destruction of long-term value. Yeah. And I think that actually is one of the biggest reasons why we're in this whole era of addictive technology. The fundamental core of why they're driving business Riley the purpose of getting an addiction to get people in more driver's attention engagements move the business forward. I don't think that from a business perspective. Right. Just business. That's not evil to pursue. But from a human perspective. It's destroying our communities, destroying our people psychologically. It's spreading disinformation. It's doing a lot of bad things to humanity. Well, even in the corporate corporate side, right? How many jobs lost? But some of these companies, making bad decisions, right? You look at. Talking about the valley. Right. I'm I've been doing a bunch of look, digging into the whole theranos thing. How does how does an organization get to be that big on the front page of Forbes front-page fortune prime? Keynote spots at every major conference. It's including the conference, and then have the whole thing, implode. Nobody was willing to stand up and say the emperor has no clothes stop don't you know, get into the self feeding problem. Right. Right. It's a well, especially the valley right now there's a lot of hype machine. That pushes it out there. That's my goes into things just because everyone's trying to not get locked out be the first to that now is their thought process. She think that needs to be applied to maybe a little different given that we to what is your product. I mean just published an article over on medium for those listening, the show, you can go check it out. But it's talking about my experiences. The CTO HP where I wish I had been able to make changes there to think differently about how we basically cut are in day to the point where they're tired of Asian funnel got destroy because of the CEO just, you know, got caught in the quarterly number problem. Yeah. Yeah. I mean so I think that one of the bigger problems that we have right now is that it's now all based in engine economy or lot of is, is, and in that there's not. Really a define production value. You go to investors to say, we have this many more monthly or we're getting this much more age. So give us this much money. And really, those are just proxy values companies. It's not like you know, Coca Cola where we sold X amount more bottles of coke this year. Whatever. Proxy out there operate. Do I think that the industry is a fraud as a whole? No. That's not what I'm trying to say. But I do think there's a lot of room for innovation of figuring out how to define what the production value is of these couple of engine because there is a lot of value in it. Right. Who is actually getting the production value versus who is just using platform. How do they drive revenue away that they're charging the people who are getting that production value versus right now? They're just treating all of their users as the product self someone's those submitted, for instance, if you look at the just total advertising revenue divided by the number of active users on Facebook, the US, because it has the highest Ed value. Yeah. It works out to be, you know, if you were to pay for that service. No, no more. That's like a couple hundred dollars a year. Really? Yes. And so the question is, what is the value of your attention? Yeah. Right. Sure. You know overseas it's pennies. Yeah. Right. Fair, you know, running an ad in, in Rwanda not gonna generate a lot of Amazon buys yet. Right. And so you get this wide ranging, but it also asked the consumer like you know, would you be willing is that value exchange? Good enough for you. You know. Or do you wanna get compensated? Eating advertise to me do I get the participate in the advertising yet? Or do you use a consumer willing to pay? So you don't get the advertising. Yeah. And I do think advertising is a big part of it. The other thing that I think gets glanced over every single time that we talk about data not United, but, like as a culture is the fact that data is what's training all these Sheen's? So inherently these companies have turned billions of people in unpaid labor. Right. I think that's where the room for innovations. Let's actually figure out what date is worth and start to use it as the monetary asset that it is, though. If you look at Facebook, or Google or Twitter or any of these guys. Right. They're all about haven, modification app. They're using the data to modify your behavior and it's humans we also tend to swing to the negative. We're always a little suspicious. Right. So then you have a belief system and you have an engine that says I'm gonna feed that human nature because it measures it by engagement. You tend to engage when there's something agrees with your mental model or alarms. You right. You like to watch the video of the cute kitten, but it's not like a high level engagement, but if someone comes out says something against a political party or politician, you like you're going to react, what happens you train. The engine. Yeah. Engine does more that you more games. The engine Trang gets reinforced trains, and now we're down into this rat hole. I mean the way the internet works right now news the way it spread. Right. It's like if the internet were a highway and on the side of the highway, there was a car accident. Everyone's looking at right, internet would think we need more car accidents, right? Then we are. Carney. That is a great. I know. Yeah, it's really bad. But that's, that's what machine does, right? Machines are good. At certain things, they are not that great at determining when they need to let up exactly. For there's no human in the loop, which is part of the problem, which gets into the whole issue ethics. You're being able to audit the is so you know you know avoiding how. And we've got a we've recently hired Dr Bernardo Huron to head up the Irish here and, you know, part of what brio Bernardo's done this blog poaching, go find it over on cable, apps dot com, but it was all talking about this whole issue of, how do you think about AI and ethical, a, it's a pretty interesting topic as we come wrapping up here in segment to Joe if people want to track of what you're doing both on the both sides of the can yet. Where's the best place for them to follow what you're up to? Yeah. Right now, we reached designed good dot tech, you can sign up for our newsletter there. And that's the best way, we don't have social media, and we probably won't pick up social media because it's so saturated, and we don't really care to be another post timeline. If you wanna know it's going on. We have a newsletter you can Email us directly. We will response as we can other than that we have events. My book is out called automating humanity. That's on Amazon. You can find that and with connecting with whoever's. Interesting connected with us. Over and we'll have we'll have legs for all of that on, on the show notes. But it's interesting on a no social media. Yeah. Walk the talk, man talk. Yeah. For sure. I mean that's what it is. It's, it's the thing where I left, I built, this whole thing off of my income that, I up we have no investors at this point, we may take some, but we're working to build a business, and we're doing it the way that we believe should be whether we starve or whether we float that will be up to the community that, that is great. That is great. So thanks for coming in spending the time here relations, we'll be right back after this commercial break, we have another episode of five minutes to new ideas. So don't go anywhere. And again, we will have all of the length, so that you can connect with Joe over on the show notes over at killer innovations dot com. And I've got his book love it. It's a check it out. Hop on over item Zahn. You'll be it's, it's just reduce really eye-opening and follow. Keep up with what he's doing. Shade it. We'll be.

Joe McConnell CEO Facebook Amazon Coca Cola Rwanda fraud CTO US Zahn Sheen Dr Bernardo Huron Trang Carney brio Bernardo Twitter Google
"cto hp" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:14 min | 2 years ago

"cto hp" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Welcome to the dangerous garage where you learn to create your next game changing killer innovation, welcome back. We're continue our conversation with Joe McConnell. Talking about the can now you've been out there talking with a number of leaders regulators government officials in countries around the world on those if if, if you were to sit down with a new leader who's interested in in thinking about ethics and their business given everything that profile. What's the one thing that they should think about changing their mindset going into the into changing their we're gonna zalin? Yeah. The thing that we talked to them most about is how to fundamentally refocus their business away from a quarterly JIRA quantitative statistic. Ix into the longer term and engaging the qualitative analysis. Yeah, well now now, now you're in the my, my field of passion right now. I think the quarterly number thing just forces organizations the make bad decisions. And again, it gets back to the fact that by law. Typically public corporations, they additional responsibilities to the shareholder, and you get this Pavlovian loop between what is a CEO due to drive an uptick in share price. And then it becomes the death cycle that can lead you into very bad decisions and actual destruction of long-term value. Yeah. And I think that actually is one of the biggest reasons why we're in this whole era of addictive technology, the fundamental cores of, by driving business Riley, the purpose of getting an addiction to get people in more driver's attention. Engagements move the business forward. I don't think that from a business perspective. Right. Just business. That's not evil to pursue. But from a human perspective. It's destroying our communities, destroying our people psychologically. It's spreading disinformation. It's doing a lot of bad things to humanity. Well, even in the corporate on the corporate side, right how many jobs lost. By some of these companies making bad decisions. Right. You look at. We've talked about the valley. Right. I'm I've been doing a bunch of look digging into on the whole theranos thing, how does how does an organization get to be that big on the front page of Forbes front page of fortune prime. Keynote spots, every major conference that's out there including the Ted conference, and then have the whole thing, implode. Nobody was willing to stand up and say the emperor has no clothes stop don't get into the self feeding problem. Right. Right. It's a well especially the valley right now. It's the height machine that pushes it out their best. Matt goes into things just because everyone's trying to not get locked out be the first to that now is their thought process. You think that needs to be applied to maybe a little different given that we to what is your product? I mean just published an article over on medium for those listening to show you can go check it out. But it's. Talking about my experiences, the CTO HP where I wish I had been able to make changes there to think differently about how we basically cut our in day to the point where they're tired of Asian funnel got destroyed because of the CEO just, you know, got caught in the quarterly number problem. Yeah. Yeah. I mean so I think that one of the bigger problems that we have right now. Is back that it's now all based in engine economy or is, is. And in that there's not really a define production value. You go to investors to say, we have this many more monthly or we're getting this much more engaged. So give us this much money. And really, those are just proxy Bali companies. It's not like Coca Cola. We sold X amount more bottles. Coke this year. Whatever. Proxy about their operating. Do I think that the industry is a fraud as a whole? No. That's not what I'm trying to say. But I do think there's a lot of room for innovation of bickering out, how to define what the production value is of these couple of tension because there is a lot of value in it. Right. Who is actually getting the production value versus who is just using platform. How do they drive revenue away that they're charging the people who are getting that production value versus right now? They're just treating all of their users as the product, self, someone's those Samanta, for instance, if you look at the EIB took just total advertising, revenue divided by the number of active users on Facebook, the US, because it has the highest Ed value. Yeah. It works out to be, you know, if you were to pay for that service. No, no more than a couple hundred dollars a year. Really? Yes. And so, so the question is, what is the value of your attention? Yeah. Right. Sure. You know overseas it's pennies. Yeah. Right. Fair, you know, running an added in, in Rwanda not gonna generate a lot of Amazon buys yet. Right. And so you get this wide ranging, but it also asked the consumer like you know, would you be willing would is that value exchange? Good enough for you. Or do you want to get compensated beating advertise to me to participate in the advertising, yet or do you use a consumer woman to pay so you don't get the advertising? Yeah, I do think advertising is a big part of it. The other thing that I think gets glanced over every single time that we talk about data not specific. But like as a culture is the fact that data is what's training all these Sheen's? So inherently these companies have turned billions of people in unpaid labor. Right. I think that's where the room for innovation. Let's actually figure out what date is worth and start to use it as the monetary asset that it is. If you look at Facebook or Google, or Twitter, any of these guys, right? They're all about behavior modification app. They're using the data to modify your behavior, and it's humans will also tend to swing to the negative. We're always little suspicious. Right. So then you have a belief system and you have an engine that says I'm gonna feed that human nature because it measures it by engagement. You tend to engage when either something agrees with your mental model or alarms you, right? You like to watch the video of the cute kitten, but it's not like a high level engagement, but if someone comes out and says, something against political party or politician, you like you're going to react, what happens you train. The engine. Yeah. Engine does more that you more engaged. Ingen Trang gets reinforced. And now we're down into this rat hole. I mean the way the internet works right now and news the way it spread right? It's like if the internet were a highway and on the side of the highway, there was a car accident. Everyone's looking at right, internet would think we need more car accidents, right? Then we are. Car. That is a great. I know. Yeah, it's really bad. But that's that's what a machine does. Right. Machines are good at certain things, they are not that great at determining when they need to let up exactly. For there's no human in the loop, which I think, is part of the problem, which gets into the whole issue delay. You're being able to audit the is so you know. Avoiding heidi. We've got a we've recently hired Dr Bernardo Huron to head up the Irish here and you know, part of what was done. This blog Po-shing, go find it over on cable, apps dot com, but it was all talking about this whole issue of, how do you think about AI and ethical? It's a pretty interesting topic Hayes, become wrapping up here in segment to Joe if people want to track of what you're doing both on the both sides of beacon yet was the best place for them to follow what you're up to right now. We designed good dot tech, you can sign up for our newsletter there. And that's the best way, we don't have social media, and we probably won't pick up social media because it's so saturated, and we don't really care to be another post timeline. If you wanna know it's going on. We have a newsletter you can Email us directly. We will respond because we can other than that we have events my book. Is out called automating humanity. That's on Amazon. You can find that. And with connecting with whoever's interesting connecting with us. Over and we'll have we'll have legs for all of that on, on the show notes. But it's interesting on a no social media. Yeah. Walk the talk, man talk. Yeah, for sure. I mean that's what it is. It's, it's a thing where I left, I built, this whole thing off of my income that, I up, we have no investors at this point, we may take some, but we're working to build a business, and we're doing it the way that we believe should be dot whether we starve or whether we float that'll be up to the community that, that is great. That is great. Thanks for coming in spending the time, here, we will be right back after this commercial break, we have another episode of five minutes to new ideas. So don't go anywhere. And again, we will have all of the length, so that you can connect with Joe over on the show notes over at killer innovations dot com and I've got his book love it. So check it out. Hop on overnight Amazon, you'll be it's, it's just reduce really eye-opening and follow. Keep up with what he's doing. We'll be right back after this.

Joe McConnell CEO Facebook Amazon Riley Coca Cola EIB Rwanda fraud Forbes Matt CTO Coke Ingen Trang US Sheen
"cto hp" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

11:11 min | 2 years ago

"cto hp" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"With Joe McConnell. Talking about the can now you've been out there talking with a number of leaders regulators government officials in countries around the world on those. If you were to sit down with a new leader who's interested in in thinking about ethics in their business given everything the profile. What's the one thing that they should think about changing their mindset going into the into changing the organization? Yes. The thing that we talked to them most about is how to fundamentally refocus their business away from the quarterly sheer quantitative statistics into the longer term and engaging, the qualitative analysis now, now you're into my, my field of passion right now. I think the quarterly number thing just forces organizations to make bad decisions. And again, it gets back to the fact that by law typically public corporations, they finish responsibility to the shareholder, and you get this Pavlovian loop between. What is the CEO due to drive an uptick in share price? And then it becomes this death cycle that can lead you into very bad decisions, and actual destruction of long-term value. Yeah. And I think that actually is one of the biggest reasons why we're in this era of addictive technology. The fundamental core of why they're driving business Riley the purpose of getting an addiction to get people in more driver's attention engagements move the business, or I don't think that from a business perspective. Right. Just business. That's not evil to pursue. But from a human perspective. It's destroying our communities, destroying our people psychologically. It's spreading disinformation. It's doing a lot of bad things to humanity. Well, even in the corporate on the corporate side, right how many jobs lost, but some of these companies, making bad decisions, right? You look at. Tired talked the valley. Right. I'm I've been doing a bunch of look, digging into the whole theranos thing. How does how does an organization get to be that big on the front page of Forbes front page of fortune prime? Keynote spots at every major conference that's out there, including the conference, and then have the whole thing, implode. Nobody was willing to stand up and say the emperor has no clothes stop don't get into the self feeding problem. Right. Right. It's a well especially the value right now. The there's a lot of hype machine that pushes it out their best -ment goes into things just because everyone's trying to not get locked out, be the first to that now is their thought process. You think that needs to be applied to maybe a little different given? What is your product? I mean I just published an article over on medium for those listening, the show, you can go check it out. But it's. Talking about my experiences, the CTO HP where I wish I had been able to make changes there to think differently about how we basically cut are in day to the point where they're tired of Asian funnel got destroy because of the CEO just, you know, got caught in the quarterly number problem. Yeah. Yeah. I mean so I think that one of the bigger problems that we have right now is that it's now all based in the economy or lot of is, is. And in that there's not really a define production value. You go to investors say, we have this many more monthly or we're getting this much more engaged. So give us this much money. And really, those are just proxy values companies. It's not like Coca Cola where we sold X amount more bottles coke this year. Whatever. Proxy about their operate. Do I think that the industry is a fraud as a whole? No. That's not what I'm trying to say. But I do think there's a lot of room for innovation of figuring out how to define what the production value is of these couple of tension because there is a lot of value in it. Right. Who is actually getting the production value versus who is just using platform. How do they drive revenue away that they're charging the people who are getting that production value versus right now? They're just treating all of their users as the product, self someone's those demand for instance, if you look at the just total advertising revenue divided by the number of active users on Facebook, the US, because it has the highest adv value. It works out to be, you know, if you were to pay for that service. But no, no. It's like a couple hundred dollars a year. Really? Yes. And so the question is, what is the value of your attention? Yeah. Right. Sure. You know overseas it's pennies. Yeah. Right. Fair, you know, running an added in, in Rwanda not going to generate a lot of Amazon buys yet. Right. And so you get this wide ranging, but it also asked the consumer like you know, would you be willing is that value exchange? Good enough for you. You know, or do you wanna get compensated beating advertise to me to participate in the advertising or do you use a consumer willing to pay so you don't get the advertising? Yeah, I do think advertising is a big part of it. The other thing that I think gets clans Dover every single time that we talk about data, but, like as a culture is the fact that data is what's training all these Sheen's? So inherently these companies have turned billions of people into unpaid labor. Right. I think that's where the room for innovation is, let's actually figure out what date is worth and start to use it as the monetary asset that it is. If you look at trace Booker, Google or Twitter any of these guys. Right. They're all about behavior modification app. They're using the data to modify your behavior and it's humans we also tend to swing to the negative. We're always little suspicious. Right. So then you have a belief system and you have an engine that says I'm gonna feed that human nature because it measures it by engagement. You tend to engage when something agrees with your mental model or alarms you, right? You like to watch the video of the cute kitten, but it's not like a high level engagement, but if someone comes out and says, something against a political party or politician, you like you're going to react, what happens you train the engine. Yeah. Does more that you more games? The engine train gets reinforced, and now we're down into this rat hole. I mean the way the internet works right now news the way it's spread. Right. It's like if the internet where a highway and on the side of the highway, there was a car accident. Everyone's looking at right, internet would think we need more car accidents. Right. Then we are Kurt Kearney. That is a great amount. I know. Yeah, it's really bad. But that's, that's what machine does, right? Machines are good. At certain things, they are not that great at determining when they need to let up exactly. L for human in the loop, which I think, is part of the problem, which gets into the whole issue. You're being able to audit the is so you know avoiding how. We've got a we've. Recently hired. Dr Bernard Huron to head up the Irish here. And you know, part of what was done this blood poaching, go find it over on cable, apps dot com, but it was all talking about this whole issue of, how do you think about AI and ethical? And it's, it's pretty interesting topic as become wrapping up here in segment to Joe if people want to track of what you're doing both on the both sides of beacon yet was the best place for them to follow what you're up to right now. We reached designed good dot tech, you can sign up for our newsletter there. And that's the best way, we don't have social media, and we probably won't pick up social media because it's so saturated, and we don't really care to be another post timeline. You want to know what's going on? We have a newsletter. You can Email us directly. We will response. We can other than that. We have events. My book is out automating, humanity. That's on Amazon. You could find that. And with or to connecting with whoever's. Connected with us. And we'll have we'll have legs for all of that on, on the show notes. But it's interesting on a no social media. Yeah. Walk the talk. Van talk. Yeah, for sure. I mean that's what it is. It's, it's the thing where I left, I built this whole thing off of my income that I saved up. We have no investors at this point, we may take some, but we're working to build a business, and we're doing it the way that we believe should be whether we starve or whether we float that'll be up to the community that, that is great. That is great Joe. Thanks for coming in spending the time here nations. We'll be right back after this commercial break, we have another episode of five minutes to new ideas. So don't go anywhere. And again, we will have all of the length, so that you can connect with Joe over on the show notes over at killer innovations dot com and I've got his book love it. So check it out. Hop on overtime Zahn, you'll be it's, it's just reduce really eye-opening and volative keep up with what he's doing. We'll be right back after this quick break. You're listening to kill him vacations on the radio. Being a business owner or onto preneurs can fill lonely, unless your friends have walked the same path. They just don't understand your passion. How many times have you been asked? When are you gonna get a real job, hit when you finally do make it big all of a sudden doubters tell you? They always knew you would does this sound familiar. You see biz Bod. We understand the road year-on because we're all the same. That's why we created a club just for you. Other people in the same path euro on and get content that will help you grow your business. All for only forty nine ninety five year and if you join.

Joe McConnell CEO Amazon Coca Cola Rwanda business owner fraud Forbes CTO Facebook US Dover Zahn Kurt Kearney Dr Bernard Huron Booker Google
"cto hp" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:14 min | 2 years ago

"cto hp" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Innovation. Welcome back on your host, Phil McKinney. So Rachel when we were going into the commercial break, we were gonna talk a little bit about the technology. So one of the things that you know, the CPA does is really take a look at your membership base. And you have to kind of a unique almost, you know. View availability of information. I guess I would call it as the what are some of those trends and some of the changes that are coming. So I would say the biggest teams that we're seeing the show this year buzzwords, and you see them across the show in different applications are a and five. I mean, how many products have you seen that? I think it's a requirement. You have to have the word a in five G somewhere on the outside of your son or nobody comes into your booth to to be able to talk to everything is now sensor is connected collecting data and analyzing it to customize experiences for you. And you're seeing it across the board from in our in the digital health space. It's huge. In the lifestyles face. I mean, this is again, this is silly product. But this is another one that I just went bring home with me, if they have extras Neutrogena has this three sixty skin mask thing where you take a picture of your face about the smartphone. You take a picture your face? It's three d scans your face visiting the dermatologist digitally, and then you can print out a three D printed mass with gels that you need for different areas of your face like so that every every because everybody's skin is different. Everybody needs different things. And I just I just don't like so those are really simple application of AI. Like, what do I need this different than what you need and? That are in people's homes. They're also seeing it in smart assistance, every and of course, we're seeing we're seeing Amazon and Google here at the shell and Alexa, and Google voice, integrated Google home. Integrate. Blanking on the name of what they're calling their voices system. Integrated into just about everything as well. As some of the other players that are here at the show doing the same thing. Yeah. It's so smart connected homes or seeing rang has a really cool doorbell. I don't know if you saw this ring creates this doorbell things that device you can see his at your front door here living in an apartment or you don't own your place. You can't start like installing and drilling into the walls. They created something that goes into the people of your of your door that acts as a ring doorbells sets in motion detected in somebody knocks on the door. You can connect with them. So again, like, they're they're they're seeing what consumers want. They're seeing what their audience went people want this device, but not everyone can use it in its first iteration. And so they're, you know, they're finding ways to develop for the market that the healthcare. One is interesting because we're seeing a lot of wearables, obviously is becoming a big deal. I think you know, without with the upper watts kind of the quality of the above the health benefits side of these were Ables was taking. Off Tim Bajarin? But he's one of the top three analysts in Silicon Valley. But was telling us about a watch that he'd saw here show that actually is one of the first watches that can do blood pressure. So you touch the watch and the band actually breakthrough on your wrist takes your blood pressure. Then releases it for people. Tim's very open. He had quadruple bypass for years ago. Though. He's he'll be the first to admit, he's you know, he's got them in my age categories. Got his grandkids granddaughters. And he says look after you if you had that experience of having severe, heart attack situation and being saved. Did you get real serious about your home? And he says, so he's scouring for all kinds of the medical devices and now diabetes being able to do with the patch. There's a new company over the Rica park. That's got a new ability to do to use blood glucose measurement. So you talked about that. The the gadget he stuff is interesting. Everybody's over the Rollerball four K TV. I was over there Tuesday that you know, loved it. Not for my house, while my wife would ever allow me to bring that home. I'd love it would would would make it past the front door. But there are these devices though, that can't transform and I remember back when I was CTO HP. I had the accessibility technology team is primerica association. Back. Then see the healthcare segment was pretty Spall. And we were kind of that team was part of a very small community here at the puck way when a corner one of the remote. Sorry, it's it's becoming a big area. So what's so incredible about the digital health innovations? We're seeing the show is I mean, the the big story is it gives people greater control of their health wellness, right? So.

Tim Bajarin Phil McKinney Neutrogena Rachel Google primerica association Spall CTO HP Ables Rica park diabetes Alexa Silicon Valley Amazon five G four K
Ring finally has a doorbell cam for renters and apartment dwellers

Killer Innovations

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Ring finally has a doorbell cam for renters and apartment dwellers

"There Tuesday that you know, loved it. Not for my house, while my wife would ever allow me to bring that home. I'd love it would would would make it past the front door. But there are these devices though, that can't transform and I remember back when I was CTO HP. I had the accessibility technology team is primerica association. Back. Then see the healthcare segment was pretty Spall. And we were kind of that team was part of a very small community here at the puck way when a corner one of the remote. Sorry, it's it's becoming a big area. So what's so incredible about the digital health innovations? We're seeing the show is I mean, the the big story is it gives people greater control of their health wellness, right? So

Primerica Association Cto Hp Spall
"cto hp" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"cto hp" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Your host Phil McKinney. So Rachel when we were going into the commercial break, we're going gonna talk a little bit about the technology. So one of the things that you know, the CPA does is really take a look at your membership base. And you have the kind of a unique almost view availability of information. I guess I would call it. What are some of those friends and some of the changes that are coming? So I would say the biggest themes that we're seeing at the show this year buzzwords, and you see them across the show in different applications or a in five. I mean, how many products have you seen that? I think it's a requirement. You have to have the word in five G somewhere on the outside of your son. Or nobody comes into your booth to to be able to talk to you to everything is now sensor is connected collecting data and analyzing it to customize experiences real. And you're seeing it across the board from in our in the digital health space. It's huge. In the lifestyle space. I mean, this is again, this is a silly product. But this is another one that I just wanted to bring home with me, if they have extras Neutrogena has this three sixties in mask thing where you take a picture your face smartphones. Take a picture your face. It's three d scans your face. It's like visiting the dermatologist digitally, and then you can print out a three D printed mass with Dell's that you need for different areas of your face like so that every every everybody's skin is different everybody needs different things. And I just I just don't like. So those are really simple applicants AI. Like, what do I need this different than what you need? That are in people's homes. The girls listening in smart assistance, every you know. And of course, we're seeing we're seeing Amazon and Google here at the shell and Alexa, and Google voice, integrated Google home. Integrate. I can I'm blanking on the name of what they're calling their voices. Cast indicated into just about everything as well. As some of the other players that are here at the show doing the same thing. Yeah. So smart connected homes or seeing rang has a really cool doorbell. I don't know if you saw this ring creates this doorbell. Thanks that device. You can see his at your front door while living in an apartment or year. No, you don't own your place. You can't start installing drilling into the walls. They created something that goes into the peephole of your of your door that acts as a ring doorbells motion detected than somebody knocks on the door. You can connect with them. So again, like, they're they're they're seeing what consumers want they're seeing with our audience. Went people want this device, but not everyone can use it in its first interruption. And so they're, you know, they're finding ways to develop for the market. You have healthcare. One is interesting because we're seeing a lot of wearables, obviously, becoming a big deal. I think you know with apple with the apple watch kind of. Quality of the of the health benefits side of these horrible is taking off of you know, Tim Bajarin, but he's one of the top three analysts in Silicon Valley. But was telling us about a watch that he'd saw here show that actually is one of the first watches that can do blood pressure. So you touch the watch and the bear naturally or on your wrist takes your blood pressure. And then releases it for people, you know, Tim's very open. He had quadruple bypass for years ago. Though. He's he'll be the first to admit he's you know, he's got. H categories got his grandkids granddaughters. And he says look after you if you had that experience of having severe heart attacks situation and being saved because you get real serious about your home. And he's so he's scouring for all kinds of the medical devices and now diabetes being able to do with the patch. There's a new company over the Rica park. That's got a new ability to do to use blood glucose measurement. So you talked about. The gadget he stuff is interested in everybody's doing an eyeing over the LG Rollerball for pay TV I was over there on Tuesday that you loved it. Not for my house. My wife, whatever allow me to bring that home. I'd love it would would make it past the front door. But there are these devices though, that can't transform and I remember back when I was CTO HP. I had the accessibility technology team is pro American Association. Back then with the healthcare segment was pretty Spall. We were kind of that team. You know, it was part of a very small community here at CS puck way when a corner one of the remote. Sorry, it's narrow it's becoming a big area. So what's so incredible about the digital health innovations? We're seeing the shows. I mean, the the big story is it gives people greater control of their health wellness, right? So as.

Tim Bajarin Phil McKinney Neutrogena Rachel Google Dell apple Spall CTO HP Rica park diabetes Alexa LG Silicon Valley American Association Amazon five G
"cto hp" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"cto hp" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"I'm your host Phil McKinney. So Rachel when we were going into the commercial break, we were gonna talk a little bit about the technology. So one of the things that you know, the CPA does is really take a look at your membership base. Do you have the kind of a unique almost know view could've availability of information. I guess I would call it as the what are some of those trends and some of the changes that are coming. So I would say. The biggest teams that we're seeing at the show this year. Buzzwords and you see them across the show in different applications are a in five. I mean, how many products have you seen that? I think it's a requirement. You have to have the word a in five somewhere on the outside of your son. Or nobody comes into your booth to be able to talk to you to everything is now sensor is connected collecting data and analyzing it to customize experiences you and you're seeing it across the board from in our in the digital health space. It's huge. In the lifestyle space. I mean, this is again, this is a silly product. But this is another one that I just wanted to bring home with me. And if they have extras Neutrogena has this three sixty skin mask thing where you take a picture your face with the smartphones. Take a picture your face. It's three d scans your face. It's like visiting dermatologist digitally, and then you can print out a three D printed mask with gals that you need for different areas of your face like so that every every everybody's skin is different. Everybody needs different things. And I just I just like so those are really simple applications of AI. Like, what do I need this different than what you need? That are in people's homes. But you're also seeing it in smart assistance, every you know. And of course, we're seeing 'em worsening Amazon and Google here at the shell and Alexa, and Google voice, integrated Google home. Blanking on the name of what they're calling their voices system. Makiko casts. Integrated into just about everything as well. As some of the other players that are here at the show doing the same thing. Yeah. So smart connected homes or seeing rang has a really cool doorbell. I don't know if you saw this rain creates the doorbell. Thanks that device. You can see who's at your front door while thrilled living in an apartment or your. No, you don't own your place. You can't start like installing and drilling into the walls. They created something that goes into the people of your of your door that acts as a ring doorbell doorbells in motion detected in somebody knock on the door. You can connect with them. So again, like, they're they're they're seeing what consumers want. They're seeing what their audience went people want this device, but not everyone can use it in its first iteration. And so they're, you know, they're finding ways to develop for the market that the healthcare. One is interesting because we're seeing a lot of wearables, obviously, becoming a big deal. I think you know with apple with the apple watch kind of. Quality of the above the health benefits side of these horrible is taking off of you know, Tim Bajarin. But he's one of the top three analysts in Silicon Valley. But Tim was telling us about a watch that he saw here show that actually is one of the first watches that can do blood pressure. So you touched the watch and the bayonets breaks or on your wrist takes your blood pressure. Then releases it for people, you know, Tim's very open. He had quadruple bypass for years ago. Though, he's he'll be the first to admit, he's, you know, he's got them in my age categories. Got his grandkids granddaughters. And. He says look after you if you had that experience of having severe heart attack situation and being saved because you get real serious about your home. And he says he's scouring for all kinds of the medical devices and now diabetes being able to do with the patch. There's a new company over the Rica park. That's got a new ability to do continuous blood glucose measurement is. So you talk about. The gadget he stuff is interesting. Everybody's doing an eye over the role up four K TV. I was over there on Tuesday that you know. Loved it. That for my house, my wife, whatever allow me to bring that home. I'd love it would wouldn't wouldn't make it past the front door. But then there are these devices though, that can't transform and I remember back when I was CTO HP. I had the accessibility technology team has Americanization. Back then with the healthcare segment was pretty Spall. We were kind of that team was part of a very small community here at CS wanna corner. One of the remote matter how it's becoming a big area. So what's so incredible about the digital health innovations? We're seeing the show. I mean, the the big story is it gives people greater control of their health wellness, right? So as you said,.

Tim Bajarin Phil McKinney Neutrogena Rachel CTO HP Google apple Spall Rica park diabetes Alexa Silicon Valley Amazon four K
"cto hp" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

05:10 min | 3 years ago

"cto hp" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Here in the studio, for a nother episode, we, have been out in traveling looking for and talking with innovators the non obvious industries and non, obvious locations We've definitely been, honored about the beaten path and have actually had some great conversations administrator so stay tuned those will be part of future, shows for those of you who have been longtime listeners of the show reflect, back on a series of conversations that we recorded from the Consumer Electronics Show this year talking about future. Technology trends what's, coming and. How does that apply in people's to day both personal. Lives but also in the work, world and one of the topics that was really hot at this year's us And it continues to be hot is around AI artificial intelligence Then the question of is it real? Is it over hyped how does that, really play itself out so today we have a special guest Gee to Patel he's the. Chief product officer, at box now I'm. Pretty sure if you've been listening to this show you know who what boxes in in the company and in fact this entire radio show I'm going to say for the last eight. Years, completely operates and runs off of box teams around the, world would not be. Able to do what they do. Without our box accounts so but the, the question came up? Was when it win G2.'s name get? On our radar screen was talking about The thoughts. About, a in house the play into products and product strategies. Etcetera so that's what. We're going to talk about today Thank you for. Joining taking time out of your calendar. To. Come, here killer innovations Frankie robbing I didn't know about your eight year in, royalties thank you for being a customer, boss. Yeah well imagine talking before we started the show Early days of box while I was CTO HP we were so oppressed with the technology that. We actually pre, installed it, so it was forty laptops a year got box pre installed because we we thought that that, that move to the cloud and. The ability to share and collaborate. On on on on those sorts, of things and in fact another thing I. Don't think I've sure those with anybody when I was writing my book beyond the obvious my publisher as Hackett. New York my editor was in Los Angeles the fact checkers were in. Virginia and. We did. My entire book on box so that's how that's. How that's how my book was written. Was. All, in was using the box box application This just became my favorite podcasts There's one way right So the question look before we hop in because this is a topic that, I get passionate about right as around innovations that are real versus. Innovations? That are fluff right and there's a lot of innovations out there that are fluffed up before we. Get into that conversation give us a little bit of background on yourself even a box for a, little bit of time but you been around a little bit. Give, us some background. Yeah I am old But you know I. I, started my career You know Congo working for in strategic consultancy that was partly owned by four, star helping CIO's and fortune five hundred companies basically make decisions better strategic technology decisions around how they can more effectively collaborate content and one Mindy change culture with having a more open Content, management collaboration kind of fabric with the military nations and that's what I'd done for a percentage of my earlier years in my career and then at some point in time EMC. Tapped me to see if I to be the CTO and help. Them with the cloud mobile business with their documents and property so I joined on very quickly realized that organically. It'll be pretty hard to do anything over there that was innovated so that'd be. Probably need to have some kind of You know infusion of acquisitions so that. We can bring in some outside the made an acquisition of a, company called simplicity which I'm dying on competitive the box Agency by company for And then me that business Barry -opoly. Dell was buying EMC they wanted to be. Called out that asset it's. Only the private equity I I knew any time having dinner one night. Bad boy aren't you come. On That's, how I came to On my way in the box, and it's been near careers and I'd say that it's..

EMC AI administrator Chief product officer Patel Barry -opoly CTO HP Gee CTO Frankie New York Virginia Los Angeles publisher Dell Congo Hackett editor
"cto hp" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"cto hp" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"A leader if you're leading innovation team or you're a manager or director vice president mike mike as was cto or now that i'm a ceo it is a knowledge others you didn't get to the position you're in i did not get to the position of being a ceo all by myself there have been people who've had played a critical role in my success over the years and it's on through their help i've been able to get to where i'm at today at the same time they knowledge that giving encouragements giving the encouragement to other people who are earlier in their careers mentoring i find be extremely truly satisfy i go out of my way for instance and i have for years even at hp getting very involved with the interns that in fact you can go back and listen to some old shows because when i looked when i was cto hp and i lived in silicon valley i would actually select two interns every summer and they would live with me at my house and i called it reverse mentoring because i didn't have you know my kids are out of college there were newly married at that time so i was kinda missing out on what was going on in the customer segments of college kids so this was the best way for me to tap into that by doing this reverse mentoring and acknowledging them giving them words of encouragement to look some of my interns have gone off to have absolutely mind blowing successful careers and it's all because of them not because of me they did great work and they've achieved great thanks but stepping out in acknowledging others giving that words of encouragement encouraging others is one way one of the rules that i live by or at least i try to live by and i try to do this i need to do this more and more i'm i tend not to do as much now just because being busy my travel schedules it cetera so this is one that i'm actually writing myself a note here on a piece of paper that i need to stop up on and get better about so again stay connected listen more only commitments don't give up on the credit college after we get paid.

vice president mike mike cto ceo director hp cto hp
"cto hp" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"cto hp" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Last four or five major jobs i've had it wasn't ever me leaving in trying to go find the job it was people in this network that i'd stay connected to that had come back and contacted me number to cut ties into that is listen more talk less when i reach out to these people or any conversation people like to dominate talking you know look we all talk about ourselves but for you to be viewed really as somebody really interesting it's really not about what you say it's about letting the other person talk in about listening it being active in the listening asking questions about you know follow up questions to whatever they talked about this is hard for me look i'm standing in front of a microphone in my own professional studio that i had built in colorado i my job functions weather when i was cto hp or now ceo cable apps is about meow talking so this is one that i actually have to work hard at ninety to get better at it and that is listen more talk lasts and at the end of every conversation here's a general rule ask the people that you're talking to how you can help them i always try to end the conversation with hey thanks for the time is there anything that i can do to help you and that again injects reaches across the hand and says hey there's something that i can help you with and that tends to wrap up the conversation so stay connected to the people's number one listen more talk less is rule number two for the seven rules got five more to go through.

colorado cto hp ceo
"cto hp" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"cto hp" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Is important if you're a leader if you're leading innovation team or you're a manager or director vice president mike mike case i'm cto or now that i'm a ceo it is a knowledge others you didn't get to the position you're in did not get to the position of being a ceo all by myself there have been people who've had played a critical role in my success over the years and it's through their help i've been able to get to where i'm at today at the same time acknowledging that giving the courage meant giving encouragement to other people who are early in their careers mentoring i find to be extremely truly satisfying i go out of my way for instance i have for years even at hp getting very involved with the interns and in fact you can go back and listen to some old shows kids when i was cto hp and i lived in silicon valley i would actually select to interns every summer and they would live with me at my house now called it reverse mentoring because i didn't have you know my kids were out of college there were newly married at that time so it's was kinda missing out on what was going on in the customer segments of college kids so this was the best way for me to tap into that by doing this reverse mentoring and acknowledging them giving them words of encouragement to look some of my interns have gone off to have absolutely mind blowing successful careers and it's all because of them not because of me they did great work and they've achieved great thanks but stepping out in acknowledging others giving that words of encouragement encouraging elders is one way one of the rules that i live by or at least i try to live by and i try to do this i need to do this more and more i'm i tend not to do as much now just because of being busy in my travel schedules and it cetera so this is one that i'm actually writing myself a note here on a piece of paper that i needed to step up on and get better about so again stay connected listen.

mike mike cto ceo director vice president hp cto hp
"cto hp" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"cto hp" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"You're leading innovation team or you're a manager or director a vice president mike mike i'm cto or now that i'm a ceo it is ignore others you didn't get to the position you're in i did not get to the position of being a ceo all by myself there have been people who've had played a critical role in my success over the years and it's through their help i've been able to get to where i'm at today at the same time acknowledging that giving the courage meant giving the encouragement to other people who are early in their careers mentoring i find to be extremely truly satisfying i go out of my way for instance and i have for years even at hp getting very involved with the interns and in fact you can go back and listen to some old shows kids when i was cto hp and i lived in silicon valley i would actually select two interns every summer and they would live with me at my house now called it reverse mentoring because i didn't have you know my kids were out of college there were newly married at that time so i was kinda missing out on what was going on in the customer segments of college kids so this was the best way for me to tap into that by doing this reverse mentoring and acknowledging them giving them words of encouragement and look some of my interns have gone off that have absolutely mind blowing successful careers and it's all because of them not because of me they did a great work and they've achieved great thanks but stepping out in acknowledging others giving that words of encouragement encouraging elders is one way one of the rules that i live by or at least i try to live by and i try to do this to do this more and more i'm i tend not to do as much now just because being busy in my travel schedules and it cetera so this is one that i'm actually writing myself a note here on a piece of paper that i need to stop off on and.

mike mike cto ceo director vice president hp cto hp
"cto hp" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"cto hp" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Is important if you're a leader if you're leading innovation team or you're a manager or director vice president mike mike is when i was cto or now that i'm a ceo it is acknowledged others you didn't get to the position you're in i did not get to the position of being a ceo all by myself there have been people who've had played a critical role in my success over the years and it's on through their help i've been able to get to where i'm at today at the same time acknowledging that giving the courage meant giving the encouragement to other people who are early in their careers mentoring i find the beach dreamy truly satisfying i go out of my way for instance i have for years even at hp getting very involved with the interns and in fact you can go back and listen to some old shows because when i was cto hp and i lived in silicon valley i would actually select two in turns every summer and they would live with me at my house now called it reverse mentoring because i didn't have my kids were out of college there were newly married at that time so i was kind of missing out on what was going on in the customer segments of college kids so this was the best way for me to tap into that by doing this reverse mentoring and acknowledging them giving them words of encouragement to look some of my interns have gone off to have absolutely mind blowing successful careers and it's all because of them not because of me they did great work and they've achieved great thanks but stepping out in acknowledging others giving that words of encouragement encouraging others is one way one of the rules that i live by or at least i try to live by and i try to do this i need to do this more and more i'm i tend not to do as much now just because of being busy in my travel schedules and cetera so this is one that i'm actually writing myself a note here on a piece of paper that i need to stop off on get better about so get stay connected listen more only vague commitments stoke up on the credit after we get back.

vice president mike mike ceo director cto hp cto hp
"cto hp" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"cto hp" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"And check out all the great new technologies and devices they've also got a great video series over on youtube talking about information security both in your printers and in your devices and we were talking during the commercial break with some of the listeners who are here in facebook live about cybersecurity see work check that out over youtube just pop on over the hp toldo more you heard about it over him the killed ovation shows so they know that remember your uh a fan of ours and we greatly appreciate that so what you want our conversation we talked about the who in the last segment in the who in the last segment was about who's going to buy that product of value from you in this case for talking about the what the actual shiny object that plan that serve as that thing that you are going to readily make available so here are to questions that i used just out of the killer question car deck that i use it most early brainstorming sessions just to get the people thinking about it first one who does not use my profit because of years of practical or special bility is required maybe it think about that is a negative some companies you can use it into a vanity thing going back to my years is the cto hp the reverse polish notation an hp calculators which used to reduce the number of key presses in order to get to a calculation it reduced the number of keys needed in the original hp 35 now not everybody knows rpm but i you out today and you see someone that hb calculator you look at them the you know that they're in that camp with you because they know rpm reverse polish notation find them as a target in in figure out how did leverage that that would be one possible idea that hp could use certain wash of what products.

youtube facebook cto hp hp