20 Episode results for "Creighton University"

Haunting

Dateline NBC

1:27:23 hr | 4 months ago

Haunting

"Mental health is so so important. I know it can be tough to talk about. But we're not doing anyone any favors by keeping the stigma alive. That's why I feel so strongly about therapy and the work that better help is doing. It's not a crisis line. It's not self help. It's professional counseling done. Securely online better help will assess your needs and match you with your own licensed professional therapist. You can start communicating with them in under twenty four hours. A service is available worldwide. You'll get timely and thoughtful responses plus you can schedule weekly video or phone sessions. It's more affordable than traditional offline. Counseling and financial aid is available. If you need it visit better help dot com slash de L. NBC. That's better help. H. E. L. P. dot com slash de L. NBC. And join the over seven. Hundred thousand people taking charge of their mental health with the help of an experienced professional as a listener of the show. You get ten percent off your first month by going to better help DOT COM SLASH DE L. NBC. Talk about shutters going down your spine. Crime like this doesn't happen. This was just a lightning bolt. Twos foundling face down a large amount of blood. What does this scene tell you? What do your victims tell you? You got up killer lose here. Who's specifically targeting people? Yeah this doctor's House. Somebody's after those doctors. Four people are dead because somebody's vengeance revenge. That's your motive thermo. It sent shockwaves right away. Where she goes. What's HE GONNA do? You want real life. God what the Hell do we have here? Winter on the Great Plains can be long bleak and brutal so in March when winter briefly releases its grip for a day or two. Even the trees seem to raise their limbs in celebration March thirteenth. Two thousand eight was one of those days of cautious jubilation in Omaha Nebraska sixty one degrees and a light velvety breeds. Eleven year old. Tom Hunter wore shorts and a tee shirt to school that Thursday. It was a little after three when Tom seen here on. A security camera. Got Off the bus in the leafy Dundee neighborhood and headed home to play video games as he did nearly every day. It would be hours before. Tom's father returned home but the house was not empty. Fifty seven year old Shirley Sherman who scrubbed and Polish. The hunter home on Thursdays was still there by sunset. Both Tom Hunter and Shirley Sherman would be dead murdered by killer. Who was just getting started? Who DID IT and why we're questions? That would eventually take Omaha. Detectives all over North America and would take more than five years to answer. This one stood out. Obviously because of the brutality for one detective Derek. Moyes was working three to eleven that day. The nine one one call came in from Tom. Hunters Dad Dr William Hunter. Dr Hunter had come home found Shirley Sherman and his son deceased would call nine one one thing unusual pickle. There wasn't a lot of emotion shown but he is a doctor. He has a pathologist and he's seen a lot of deadly seen a lot of death and it was I think to use the word. Clinical the detective and his partner were immediately dispatched to the hunters stately home in. Dundy part of them. It is it's It's an older neighborhood. Middled upper class homes very quiet. It's not a place where we have. A lot of. Violent crime occur in our city even now. Detective Moi still remembers the Capri set of blood. That hit him when he stepped across the threshold of the hunter home. There's a heavy metallic kind of humidity in the air of almost you feel it. It's presence and there's a lot of it and there was a lot of it at the hunter household to the left of the front door in the dining room off the main hallway. Lay the body of the boy com hunter lying on his face. His hands down at his side. There's a fair amount of blood round his head and down the hall the body of the housekeeper. Surely Sherman choose found lying face down large amount of belied underneath her stainless steel handled on kitchen. Knife protruding from the right side of her neck. Both victims had been killed in the same way and oddly enough there were no signs of struggle. No fingerprints no bloody footprints. Is this person. Careful or just very lucky. Could be both you know it. It's not like TV. Not every crime scenes going to yield fingerprints. Not every crime scene is going to yield. Dna or trace hairs or those types of things. Stolen didn't appear to be no in fact the only things out of place were the knives. The knives came from inside the house. He did unusual for a killer to show up planning to do murder and also planning to find the murder weapon at the crime scene. Not necessarily by all accounts. Dr Hunter was still in a state of shock when police took him downtown for questioning right there in the hallway between the back door so the first thing. I think I yelled out off. Do you have any idea who and why somebody would do? Sometimes honestly I've been just racking my brain peaceful. It's almost Dr William. Hunter known as Bill to friends and colleagues ran the pathology residency program at nearby Creighton University. His wife Claire also doctorate. Creighton was in Hawaii that day attending a conference. Her husband had to break the awful news to her from the police station. How's your wife crushed? She GonNa be okay. She has a workmate. So she's not. The hunters had four boys to Rome one in college and Tom. Jeff a student at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln at the time lived closest. He says it was about eight o'clock that night when he happened to check his phone calls from friends family so I said he something was up and we can get a hold of. My Dad. Couldn't get home. My mom one of my friends called me and he told me to call my brother. Was your older brother. Yeah what did he say it happened? Just somebody killed. Tom And I need to go find. My Dad talked to my dad. Get a long drive. It's like forty five minutes. Those miles between Lincoln and Omaha seemed longer than usual that night. It's hard for Jeff to remember exactly what happened when he got home. Who told him what or when that whole thing is a blur. I didn't sleep at all that night. You you're constantly trying to figure out what's going on. You lived in that same house which is all happened right yes whole life now Jeff. Mind was filled with thoughts of what had happened there and of his brother. Tom Who was eight years younger his counter. Smart out he has grown up with three other brothers. He is a smart kid he knew a lot and he just. I mean he always had something to say for everything. What was he doing life? Then he went to science magnet middle school elementary combined with the Middle School. And he really like Sci. He's always outside plan so that was his big thing Gamer wasn't he? He was but more times than not he'd be outside with neighborhood kids but it wasn't the neighborhood kids that fascinated the COPs com had a lot of friends. He'd never actually met in real life. They were people he knew. From the anonymous world of online gaming. It was those relationships that detectives wanted to know more about the investigation begins. Does he play around on chat rooms or anything like that might be nervous about curious conversations online? He interacted with people all over the US. A mysterious stranger and another murder. Where would this winding trail of clues lead crime like this doesn't happen in Dundee? It sent shockwaves right away. The Hunter House was dearly still when detectives arrived the only sound music from a video game in the basement which seemed to add a haunting soundtrack to the violent and disturbing scene. It had appeared that Thomas was in process of playing online game on his xbox could see pop and chips in front of a chair right front of the TV. Probably like a lot of kids after school every day and the game itself had timed out with the music was playing kind of ominously in the background during Bill Hunters interview with police investigators. They got straight to the point. Does he play around on chat rooms or anything like that that you might be service. Vital I don't know he's on his the only chat room. No He's on is why they'll Ville it. Turns out is a popular online game and chat room. That attracts preteens not wasn't all Tom's xbox which allowed him to play and speak to other gamers online was a concern detectors. Wondered if Tom might have inadvertently come into contact with an Internet Predator. We knew that he had a number of contacts and friends online through not only his xbox but his personal computer so those people are essentially in many cases anonymous to some extent. Yeah they are so they might be kids. They might just be saying their kids correct. And that's what we would come to find out that he interacted with people all over the US in some cases outside of the US through these interactive sites. Did you or anybody in your family ever worried that Tommy was meeting people online or just talking to people online through the gaming community people. Maybe you didn't know about that. Didn't really come up till after the fact restarted thinking. Maybe that was something that could happen. But prior to know and you didn't know those war and he didn't either. No detectives determined. Tom Hotter had interacted with close to fifty people online on a regular basis. Thomas was eleven years old that he disclosed that in his gaming activities. Now in fact in some instances We would come to find out that he portrayed himself as somebody. Who's older which in turn could end up playing into this absolutely it would take months to track down. Tom's online contacts more pressing was what detectives were hearing from. The neighbors. Several said they'd seen a stranger walking near the hunter home late. That afternoon told me what the person neighbors described all of complected male. Who was heavy set dressed in a collared shirt? Some describe a jacket possibly like an ill fitting suit with a shoulder bag and several people would correlate that individual to a silver Honda CR V. notify the actual make of car. Yes that all seems pretty helpful. Very the same individuals would describe that that vehicle was missing front play but they would describe the rear plate as kind of a white background with dark lettering and kind of describe a multiple colored sunset or kind of a Pastel sunset so it's not Nebraska play out of state. What are our feeling was yes. Based on neighbors. Descriptions police produced sketch and four days after the murders. Ask the public for help. We received hundreds of phone calls about people. Knowing somebody that resembled that sketch and each one of those leads had to be given some degree of consideration. Reporter Todd Cooper covered the story for the Omaha World Herald. Dundee is a nice neighborhood and Oma. That's an affluent area Doctors and others not mansions but stately homes crime like this doesn't happen in Dundee and so it sent shockwaves right away. More depth about the computer use while the murders in done deed dominated the news. Investigators were taking a second look at a less publicized. Crime months earlier there had been another murder not far from Dundee in this one an elderly female had been bludgeoned and stabbed in the neck. We had knives that were used from her residence in her murder so we had similarities in that weapons were taken from her home in used against her and left the scene. But you have somebody who liked that. The detectives at investigated that case that identify a suspect very early on somebody who has a family member of hers whom she had had a falling out with. Didn't seem to have any connection with honors none whatsoever. There comes a time in every homicide investigation. Were detectives have to focus on the victim's family and friends as far as detectives knew the hunters were a well respected family. And then come out about the hundreds that you didn't know gambling problems family problems now. There wasn't some gigantic ghost in the closet. That made us think. Oh well there is our motive right there. Nothing like down since bill and Claire. Hundred were both doctors at Creighton. He pathologist Shia cardiologists. Detectives wondered if someone at the hospital might have had a motive to harm them having hated. H- all right on our own Eugene. Not everyone handles grief differently. After their youngest son was murdered in their home the hunters seem to want nothing more than to be left alone but kind of a private family so not too keen on talking with media on the other hand the family of Surely Sherman the other Dundee victim desperately wanted to keep the case in the public. We want velocity. You really wanted us to be solved. Halio they have their own ideas about who the killer might be the more they talked. The more detectives wondered if perhaps Surely Sherman and actually been the intended target a secret in the Sherman family. She hated because of what he had been doing to me. The new person of interest immediately. There's a buzz. Could it be like credit? Have been him as a building contractor. Brad Wait spends a lot of time in his truck. He's haunted by the possibility that at the very moment his sister Shirley Sherman was being murdered in March. Two Thousand Eight. He was driving by close enough. Perhaps to have heard her scream. I basically almost drove by hunters. House would've been four o'clock that afternoon. I had no idea Shirley was working there that day. March there later that night brand says he heard about the two murders in Dundee on the ten o'clock news even then. He says he didn't know his sister was a victim. That news came later in a phone call from his brother. Dan Danny Call. Let thirty that night and told me what happened. Then Wade says that from that night on the word housekeeper has been used as shorthand for surely as if her job to find her. They're always calling her the housekeeper and it's she was only there for a couple of hours every couple of weeks or a week to her brothers. Dan and Brand Shirley was big SIS. The family glue after their parents divorced when they were young. She was the one that organized everything she would call you before. Somebody's birthday and say you know it's someone's birthday Thursday or or she would get everybody to go in on gifts and our she would help the shopping and that aspect of it is. You just don't realize it until it's gone for sure. Children Kelly and Jeff. She was the single mom who often worked two jobs and stretched every dollar to make ends meet. We were one of the poorest families in the neighborhood Bartending in the evening cleaned houses during the day. Gardening was her specialty. You grow everything. Eggplant tomatoes of five different varieties. Feeding me was probably expensive. So she'd make her own spaghetti sauce. She she kanner on. Cucumbers made pickles out of them. After a lifetime of hard work in her hands and knees Jevon Kelly say their mom had cut back the hunters were among the few clients. She had left so she wanted to clean. Just a couple houses ever allow her to pick up the grandkids from school in the afternoons and spend time with them spending time with the grandkids. It turns out was relatively easy to do the right next door to me every day. Talk me into buying this house. She could see. Her grandchildren. Situation was convenient but Kelly says it was hard to have any privacy who mother knew everything bouquet went and who stayed the night and now the plot thickens. I was dating a married guy. Let me guess. Your mom didn't approve. No not at all. We had an explosive relationship meaning. Meaning things got broke. Kelly says that relationship became so tempestuous so difficult that surely got involved and actively tried to keep the boyfriend away at one point in time. She was thinking about getting a restraining order. I mainly for my daughter Sake. She would tell me not. He can't come over and I would come in one time. She can walk around my house with the hammer in her hand. Saying I want his blood on Amer. She hated him that bad because of what he'd been doing to me in spite of that Kelly stuck with the man got pregnant and had a baby with it. They got uglier from there. She actually started the process of getting my house out of my name so that she could keep him out of the house right after surely died would have been very private and embarrassing family feud became fodder for public speculation. Todd Cooper the reporter says that starting on Day One. Shelly's boyfriend was a person of interest immediately. The name of the boyfriend of Shirley Sherman's Daughter came up. There's a buzz. Could it be him like could it have been in? His name. Came up again and again a doctor. Under the microscope he had had some trouble during his time at Creighton University. He was just a little bit more boisterous by late spring. Two thousand eight two months after the murders in Dundee detectives had powered through and eliminated nearly all of their early leads in that case. The boyfriend of Shirley's daughter. The man who looked like such a good suspect on paper seem to have a solid alibi. According to timesheets he was working at the time of the murders fairly cooperative. And I think we're comfortable putting him aside and we didn't have anything that would lead us to believe that he would know where she was that day and that he was in that area on the date that those crimes occurred the composite sketch generated leads and exactly zero suspects. There wasn't anything that you could correlate to actual perpetrator or the crime scene. That day as for Tom Hunters Online gaming contacts detectives deciphered the IP addresses and anonymous screen names and tracked down those people and as far as you knew he'd never met any of those people in real life correct turns out. None of those online contacts was anywhere near Omaha on the day of the murders. Detectives were making progress but reporter. Todd Cooper says the nervous citizens of Omaha had no way of knowing that all good police departments are pretty good at keeping that information close to the vest. We just kept waiting in waiting. That question was foremost on. Everybody's mind who could have done this. Detective return to the theory that either Dr Bill Hunter or his wife Dr Clare. Hunter might have been the intended victim between the two of them. They figured bill hunters position at Creighton. Made him the more likely target. He's basically oversaw. All the students that were going through this pathology training program at Creighton University. And if there was disciplinary action to take he would be the individual among others. You know to have a direct impact on those students wise so potentially a lot of suspects. They're potentially yes so. The detective went to the Pathology Department at Creighton and started asking questions. Were there any individuals interacting with these folks? At the time this occurred that you believe could be responsible for whatever reason? If there's a potential motive what do you think it might be? The detective says one name kept coming up. Dr Michael Belenky. How many times you hear the name Michael Bowling? You can't give you an accurate answers. How many but his name came up again and again Dr Belenky was a former resident. Who left the pathology program and threatened to sue Creighton a year before the murders Dr Honors home. He had had some trouble during his time at Creighton University but they weren't unlike other people's troubles but he was just a little bit more boisterous about his. I guess his perceive treatment by Creighton University in some of the staff there. Blinky told detectives he'd been working in Pittsburgh on the day of the Dundee murders Pittsburgh's like nine hundred miles from Omaha. Sorry you're not driving that in a correct presumably. You're not doing that without air. Travel right and air travel something you can check right but we knew he was on the schedule. I believe we knew he had logged into his email account at that facility that day but nobody actually saw him at work right. There is nothing to show. He was anywhere other than there which is not an ironclad alibi. But it's not bad. It's not bad men. Sometimes that's just the reality of our work that seemed to be the end of the line doctor. Blinky had been the investigators last best lead unwilling to see the case go coal surely. Sherman's family pooled their money and offered a there are a number contribution. I think people contributing as well which made it. How big is fifty fifty and all counting? Everybody's contribution we actually wanted one hundred thousand but they wouldn't allow that because they thought it would be about which it was my opinion when the reward failed to produce a break in the case. They hired a private investigator. Part of the motivation to do on. That was we're GONNA send a signal we're not gonNa let it co- case you saw it becoming a cold case. Well we felt it was becoming that way in the end the private I found nothing. Detectives hadn't already studied and discounted a year after the murders in the case went cold and most of the detectives moved on to other things. But for the families of Shirley Sherman and Tom Hunter. There could be no moving off. How'd you see your Dad Change? And it wasn't like he was depressed all the time and he was himself. Just there is obviously something kind of like you can always see behind. Someone's is that there's something there and I think we all had that five dreadful. Anniversaries came and went the dead were still inexplicably dead and the case was still unsolved but through it all the detective says he stayed in touch with the hundred Sherman families. You kind of hear their frustrations when they call and they want updates and they want to be kind of kept in the loop but is investigators you kinda. You can't give them what they're looking for answers from you that you can't give them for you guys to because. I'm sure you WANNA keep working on this. Meanwhile your boss is saying here's another case and another one and another one and that's why it went to the cold case unit and that's how it stayed until. May of two thousand thirteen. The breakthrough moment came in brutal for yet another double homicide in Omaha for detectives who'd been at the hunter home five years earlier. This one felt uncomfortable. Familiar was like oh my gosh this is this could very easily be related to the Dundee homicides. This was just a lightning bolt had the elusive dundee. Killer struck again. This is the same guy is this is the same perpetrator. Yes the piano. Movers were suspicious. Their work orders said they were supposed to make a pickup at this house in West Omaha on Tuesday morning may fourteenth two thousand thirteen but no one was home but when they went to the front door They observed at the front security door was open slightly and one of the movers noted Stainless Steel Handgun magazine lying in the doorway and they felt that was so some concern since they weren't getting any answer from residents to contact nine one one when detective boys and his partner stepped inside. They found the body of an older man on the floor. The victim had multiple gunshot wounds and a deep stab wound to the right side of his neck off to the left. You could see the female victim lying in the living room a large area of blood. It was very clear that there had been a struggle there from all of the blood that was apparent and where it was located on the walls and so forth her arms and hands were covered with defensive wounds and there was a deep gash on the right side of her neck beside her late. Two kitchen knives for Derek Moist his partner. It was a jolt of electricity and a big hit of Deja Vu. We're like this is something here we have. You know would seem connection. This is the same guy. This is the same perpetrator yes? That's a pretty big moment. It was very just as before nothing was stolen and the killer left no fingerprints or bloody footprints behind but these victims had obviously put up a fight. The additional gun parts found near the front door and the nine millimeter gun clip with nine bullets. Remaining seemed to be proof of that. What do you make of the gun? Parts in the doorway. What it told me was that there had been a struggle for that gun. Why would that magazine be objected from the gun? That shouldn't happen in the course of normal firing a handgun. But it makes sense if you're struggling over that gun. This is not a faulty got. This is a fight over two so it was a violent struggle of violent encounter. The victims looked as if they'd been dead for a day or two detectives still didn't know who they were but as they stepped outside headquarters called. One of our sergeants is doing research on who the homeowners to that location where she had identified Roger Brownback Dr Creighton University and was employed within the pathology department. So now we have a second victim from the same office in the same specific pathology training program that we had in the two thousand eight days. The Brumberg would have been a colleague of Dr Hunter. Yes no question known. Each other no question. It had been more than five years since the killings in Dundee but the CREIGHTON connection was lost on no one least of all the families of the two thousand eight victims. Surely Sherman and Tom Hunter. We saw it on the news. People say you know that was. Dr Raj Raj. Brownback was headed. The pathology department creating universal. Whoa recognized that name right away. And the fact that was another pathologist from creighton killed with the knife automatically assumed it was related. Roger Bromberg wasn't any pathologist. He was head of the Department he and Mary. Brownback were both sixty five in researching their final hours reporter. Todd Cooper learned. The couple had last been heard from at about two PM on Mother's Day. One of the first things we found out about was the facetime conversation between both boombox and their daughter and they were roaring with laughter at one point so much that the daughter took a screen shot of the conversation. That's the kind of stuff that humanizes this that makes it. You realize that this was just a lightning bolt in the middle of an otherwise normal. Mother's Day Carol. Brumbach Roger Sister also spoke with her brother that afternoon then two days later a family member broke the awful news. Well he said Roger. Mary were murdered. And I said I I. So when you talk about me. So they were. Murdered will gruesome Euroland. And now I had no idea. I have no idea what had happened. Carol couldn't imagine who might want to kill her brother although well off. She says he and Mary had lived modestly so tell me about his marriage to Mary. I just kind of knew that that was a match made in heaven. They're absolutely happy. I mean married. Just she did everything. She did a lot of editing for lottery. Rogers publications shortly before the murders. Roger had announced that he'd be retiring in June he and Mary plan to move back east. In fact that's why the piano movers had come to the House that morning. Now a town known for its steaks and insurance companies was once again buzzing with talk over murder and there was absolutely no doubt at that point who is being targeted. It was chilling just sinking. Feeling of man is struck again. A new an old suspect. She called her office and said are you guys going to need to talk to me again. In the new target we have to crimes and potentially there would've been another was another doctor in the crosshairs. Sometimes detective work is a lot like shooting pool. Play all the angles make the easy ones first and save the money ball. For last. In the keys of the Omaha killings the basic facts stood out like bright balls on a billiard. Take two double homicides. Five years apart. Both in the homes of high-ranking doctors in Creighton University's Pathology Department each victim stabbed through the carotid artery with medical precision. The next question. Well that seemed about as obvious as the ten ball in the side pocket the last best potential suspect in the two thousand eight murders was now top of mind for the two thousand thirteen case. Dr Michael Blankie but get this before. Detectives could get around to looking up. Something truly astonishing happened after the Brownback murders. He called her office because he had heard about the murders. And Said are you guys. GonNa need to talk to me again because you. I don't remember exactly what was said but he made comments. He was glad Dr Brownback was was dead. I'm glad he's dead. He made a comment to that effect. Yes almost sounds like somebody's boasting about this. It could be yeah and again. The same detectives turned right back around and started going through the same process. Let's find out where Doctor Blinky was on mother's Day two thousand thirteen turns out that your Belenky was living in the northwest dividing his time between Vancouver and Washington state at the time of the Brownback murders when detectives reinterviewed him. They wondered if they were missing. Something could their primary person of interest have somehow slipped in an out of all. Maha undetected any indication that he was in Oman. None none for his part. Valenki told the cops he had nothing to do with the Omaha killings. In fact he denies ever saying he was glad. Dr Brownback was dead in the end. Detectives had to scratch Dr Blink off their list back to the drawing board. If the suspect wasn't Michael Belenky detectives figured it had to be someone else with Creighton connections. We knew that we had to look at everybody. In the pathology department all of the staff everybody there that means there are what maybe a thousand couple thousand persons of interest all going in different directions. Yeah four days after the Brownback murders this investigation got one more jolt. Another pathology professor from Creighton reported at around two nine thousand nine. Pm on Mother's Day someone had tried to force their way into her house. Setting off the burglar alarm. Fortunately Dr Chanda beautiful and her husband were out for mother's Day lunch at the time it made that theory of ours even stronger that now we have two crimes and potentially there would have been another. Had they been home? This is what Dr Batra told. Nbc Affiliate W. O. W. T. TV average on. I think have come a week after the brownback murders Omaha police chief. Todd Schneider named a special task force dedicated to solving all four murders. I understand the fear uneasiness in our community right now. I could feel it this morning when I spoke to employees Creighton University and Legion Health Creighton. Hospital cleese no. This law enforcement is doing everything in our power to solve these crimes. That Task Force consisted of homicide detectives agents with the FBI from our local Omaha Office assigned investigators at the Nebraska State patrol. So this is a full court press yes so investigators once again dove into the CREIGHTON personnel files looking for someone else who might have harbored a grudge against doctors. Hunter Brownback and beauty. Tra- you'd already been down this road before and you look back. What a couple of years. Yeah now what was different as we were going to go back and pull the records from. I believe we started in two thousand to two thousand and thirteen. How many of you were sitting there reading files? There were twenty one of US assigned to the Task Force and I think at some juncture almost all of the detectives would get assigned files from Creighton in those personnel files. Were SEVERAL NAMES. That look promising. Those who were nowhere near Omaha on Mother's Day were eliminated but a couple of weeks after the Brownback killings protective voice says his boss handed him a three ring. Binder from two thousand one this one was thicker than the rest and what I took away after reading that file from front to back. Was that in my mind. There is enough information contained in that file that it made a very real possibility that there was a motive to want to harm Dr Hunter. Dr Brownback or Dr Batra by that individual a new name and new fears were more CREIGHTON colleagues in jeopardy. You felt some urgency twin knew that he was a very real danger he had purchased another handgun. As much as I love getting my hair done. 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I don't care what he says. He's not getting high. Everyone is mainly MSNBC correspondent and host of a new podcast into America featuring the journalist NBC. News it's a show about politics about policy and about the power that both had shaping the lives of the American people. The roller coaster is not any easier to stomach now than it was two years ago. Each week we're going into America to tell voters stories. He's doing the best he can for the country. Because we're in concert doesn't mean that we should use. I might vote. You can find new episodes of into America and your feet every Thursday to subscribe search into America. Wherever you are listening right now there is something about the openness of the Nebraska landscape that fosters a feeling of innocence of Simpler Safer Times in. May Two thousand thirteen a double homicide in the home of an Omaha. Dr Changed all of that. It was the second time in five years that a doctor from CREIGHTON. University's Pathology Department had apparently been targeted for murder in two thousand eight. The victims were Dr William Hunters. Eleven year old son Tom and his house cleaner surely Sherman. The latest victims were Dr Roger Brownback and his wife Mary and two Nineteen PM on the day. The brumbies were last known to be alive. Someone had tried to break into the home of a third creighton pathologist Dr Chanda Butuan and of course because of her position again or right back to Creighton University and specifically right back to the training program. We believe that that incident as well could be related. Somebody's going to war against the KRITON. Pathology Department would appear that way. Detective Derek Moist and his team had searched CRAYTON's personnel files will four after the murders in the hunter on. They'd found a fascinating person of interest. Dr Michael Blankie. But he had an alibi and it seemed the. Creighton connection was a dead end now. They looked again and this time they went further back in time and the second time around. From deep in the files of CREIGHTON's pathology department a new name emerged from back in two thousand one Dr Anthony Garcia he'd been a resident in the CREIGHTON pathology program ranked and was dismissed terminated because of unprofessional conduct toward another resident. Dr Brumbach Hunter. Beurre any of them involved in that all of them but his termination letter was signed specifically by Dr Hunter and Dr Brownback before arriving at Creighton it seemed Anthony. Garcia had been well on his way to achieving the American dream from a working class background in southern California. He'd finished medical school and embarked on what should have been a long and lucrative career but then for some reason his life began to be lit in large measure by the bridges burned along the way he'd been dismissed from other residency programs fired from some jobs and several states had denied him a medical license. It would appear that every time that Dr Garcia would apply for place of employment or licensure as a physician in another state Creighton University. Get notification of that because they would get a request to verify doctor. Garcia's time that he had spent their and Creighton would respond usually Dr Comeback or Dr Hotter. Yeah he was here. He was dismissed. He didn't do a good job right. And so that kept coming back to haunt Dr Garcia experience at Creighton. How many times that happened. I want to say at least seven or eight different times. The Moi's professional failure and the need for revenge could be a powerful motive. Now the detective needed to know if Garcia had the means to commit murder he knew Garcia. Now lived in Indiana. So the detective called the Indiana State Police. So in the Indiana state police came back that day and said we have records Dr Garcia purchasing specifically a Smith and Wesson St nine nine millimeter shortly before the Brownback murders. Well obviously that's very significant to us. The magazine you founded the brunt back home would fit a Smith and Wesson Sti. Yeah now he needed to know whether Anthony Garcia was in Omaha on Mother's Day. Two thousand thirteen with little to go on the detective decided to follow the money. I wanted to find out where he had active credit cards and or banking checking account and once again. The detective found an answer. A credit card issued to Anthony Garcia had been used twice in the Omaha area on Mother's Day. Two thousand thirteen. The first charge was at around twelve thirty PM at Casey's general store just outside Omaha. This is store video of Garcia. Buying Beer. The second was two hours later at a chicken. Join in West Omaha. Called who wingstop wingstop is about a mile from Dr Batra Zone. House able to get a receipt for that that showed it at two twenty six. Will I knew that Dr Beatriz alarm on her house had gone off at two nineteen and that was about a mile away from the restaurant. So you're thinking is he tries to get into the house he can't do it. Correct he leaves. Maybe knowing you set off the burglar alarm drives about a mile to this wing restaurant and he makes a purchase and we would come to find out that while he was sitting at that location he was searching for where. Dr Brownback reciting based on those factors. Investigators became convinced. Anthony Garcia. Was there man. You felt some urgency to arrest Dr Garcia quickly. Because we knew that he was a very real danger to anybody that he could have. Perceived had wronged him on some level and we also had learned through the search warrants by the Indiana state police shortly after he returned to Tara after the Brownback homicides that he had purchased another firearm another handgun in July. Two thousand thirteen. Investigators were ready to make their move. One Team of detectives sent to Indiana to arrest Anthony Garcia another flew to California to simultaneously. Search his parents. Oh it was all supposed to be a coordinated operation but on the morning of the plan to arrest the Indiana team suddenly discover their suspect had put them behind the eight ball. Man-hut they're going one hundred miles an hour. A doctor on the run would the man who eluded investigators for five years slip away again two months after Dr Roger Brownback and his wife. Mary were murdered in their Home Omaha. Detectives flew to Indiana ready to make an arrest. Their target was a former CREIGHTON. Med School Resident Dr Anthony Garcia. The detectives had arranged to have a SWAT team and forensic technicians on hand in Terre Haute. When they made the arrest Kersey is home but once their plane landed. That plan changed after we landed in Indianapolis on Sunday afternoon and turn their phones back on. We would observe that all of a sudden. Dr Garcia Cell Phone is no longer and Tara hope and he was mobile and he was traveling South Through Illinois. Which gave us obviously some concern. Because you thought he was headed where we didn't know exactly what was possible that he would return the next day so we kind of put our plans on hold hoping that he would return to his residence and we would affect does arrest at his residence fortunately to FBI agents who've been working with the Task Force were closer Illinois. They eventually found Garcia at a hotel off the interstate. Our hope was that in the morning he would get up and go home and we could grab there but that morning of course When the FBI agent Scott out he again was on the move and headed south. They missed him. They missed him and now he's truly in the wind. Yes reporter Todd Cooper would later learn that for three hours. All agents had to go on. Were Pink every thirty minutes from Garcia cellphone? They're going one hundred miles an hour. The Next Ping comes in a half hour later. And He's behind so now will you turn and we speed back. And they're scanning the southbound lanes and they finally find him tucked in behind a semi. And you know the wave of relief. That must've come over them with the help of Illinois State Troopers Garcia was finally pulled over although it was only eight thirty am. He had a blood alcohol level twice the legal limit. The trooper said that has breath smelled of booze and then when he went to had to relieve himself. That that smell booze as well. Garcia was arrested on the spot for driving under the influence from his car. Police recovered a cell phone. A forty five caliber pistol fifty bullets a crowbar and a sledge hammer. He told COPS later on a road trip. Nora New Orleans but had no luggage and then the most challenging thing to me was in that back seat was an Lsu lab coat and a stethoscope investigators knew Garcia had been fired from lsu shreveport in two thousand eight. Was He on his way to confront doctors. They're only Anthony Garcia knows. He clammed up on Omaha. Detectives tried to talk with him. We introduced ourselves as detectives from the Omaha Police Department and that we were investigating homicides in our jurisdiction and Mr Garcia immediately asked for an attorney. That's it that's it. I mean at that point as an investigator. I can't continue questioning later that afternoon. Omaha police chief. Todd smarter steps before the cameras to the victim making the announcement that his city had been desperately waiting to hear arrested. This morning was Dr Anthony. Joseph Garcia for four counts of first degree murder and use of a weapon to commit the murders for the families of Roger and Mary. Brownback of Tom Hunter. And of Surely Sherman. The arrest was very welcome news. I'm at Walmart with my kids and Danny calls me and they made an arrest in the case and I think I forgot about twenty thirty items on my grocery shopping list because I was real happy and just had one of the carton rushed out of the grocery store and wanted to go home and watch the news with Anthony. Garcia's arrest Jeff. Hunter says he and his parents felt as if they could finally stop looking over their shoulders. I mean for five years. They're super paranoid. 'cause I mean for all we knew for all I always thought about. Was someone still trying to find my dad? Because that's that was always my hunch that someone was after either my mom or dad. Investigators dispatched to Anthony. Garcia's home in Tara. Indiana saw the outward sign posts of success. The house sat on a quiet street with a Ferrari in the drive but inside the house was practically empty bear rooms bear closets and barely any food in the living room. Detectives found a table stacked with financial documents mortgage information and insurance policies. Anthony Garcia was broke. His home facing foreclosure lit appeared to us that he had made some deliberate attempt to kind of lay things out so people could get his affairs in order. And we see those things homicide investigators when you investigate suicides so wherever he was headed when you arrested him maybe that was going to be his last journey anywhere. Those are thought that that was going to be as N. Game in addition to the documents taken from Garcia's home investigators had to go through all the data collected from his electronic devices. Cell phones tablets. Computers it is. I cloud account. You could see from his financial records that he was regularly going to alcohol stores that he was spending a lot of time at gentlemen's clubs in or around tear. Hoedt he was not working regularly so it looked to us. Collectively like his life was was falling apart. Hardly what Garcia's parents had envisioned for their son when he was growing up in southern California. Anthony Garcia's father. Fred worked for the postal service. His mother Stella a nurse had been born in Mexico. It was a proud moment. They told reporters when in nineteen ninety nine. The eldest of their three children graduated from medical school. There's a great poignant moment where Frederick Garcia and Anthony pile his belongings literally has an Radley Old van and drive across the country from California to upper state New York to start his medical career. How proud he must have been at that moment. A what started as the American dream was turning into something unthinkable if convicted of murdering four people Dr Anthony Garcia now forty years old face the death penalty who alleged motive. Revenge forgetting bad job recommendations with my wife got a murder case. We've got to get up and find a center for the kids husband and wife Defense Team Big City lawyers with a few big surprises. There were so many other people with means motive and opportunity. That could have committed this crime as the father of four Bob. Mata appreciates a placid night of slumber. But on Tuesday July sixteenth. Two thousand thirteen. You will up at four am unable to sleep. The Chicago Area Criminal Attorney checked his office voicemail. That's when he saw that someone from California who'd left him a message guy starts out well. Brother got arrested done southern Illinois for Dui. I'm like Dui down there for Dui within the next minute he says but it sounds like with the actually arresting fours murder so then obviously my interest was piqued. It was a stroke of luck. Anthony Garcia's family had been cold calling lawyers looking for someone to defend. Anthony Bob. Montana was the first call back. It was two. Am California time when he got Anthony. Garcia's brother on the fall thirty minutes later Bob. Motta was retained handle his first murder case. I go upstairs awake my wife. Who's my law partner? Allison Mata got a murder case. We've got to get up and go to Jackson County. You got to find a sitter for the kids. When Anthony Garcia's extradition hearing came up the next day the Matas. Mr and Mrs were seated at the defense table your manningly consenting to the authorities from Nebraska to take you back to that state to deal with these charter you understand that. I'm not going to answer any questions. Regards to his State of mind at this point. The modest brought in Bob's father Robert Motta senior as co counsel is back in the the senior. Mata represented a clown turned serial killer named John Wayne guilty. I'd never tried a case with my dad. And he's towards the end of his career. He'd always said to me if you get a juicy murder that give me a call. I'll try with you and I call them half expecting him to be like. Nah I'm too old. I don't want to do it. And he was on board immediately so this ended up being that case that was the case. Right Anthony Garcia insisted. He was innocent but the modest were concerned that extensive press coverage of the murders was giving potential jurors. Only one side of the story. They needed to hear that there were so many other people with means motive and opportunity. That could have committed this crime. That makes much more sense than somebody waiting. Thirteen years to murder somebody that they knew for a very short period of time in pretrial hearings. The modest battled with prosecutors as if they were rival. Mma fighters. Todd Cooper remembers being in the judge's Chambers one day when Bob Modest started shouting at prosecutors there was a hearing where the Matas appeared by telephone. He was shouting screaming. The judge started pounding on the handset. Yelling shut up. Shut up into the into the microphone. I mean that. That's a pretrial hearing we were seen as the Chicago lawyers who came in stormed and our laws. You know. They didn't like us at all. Might it be easier to just list the people in Omaha that you did not offend the feelings when it comes to a death penalty case. Just don't come into play at all. I mean any lawyer that says they're worried about hurting people's feelings when another human being's life is at stake again as you probably get on the business. In the beginning the modern say Anthony Garcia was actively involved in his own defense. They say that changed over. Time as court delays stretched his time in pretrial isolation from months to years lost a lot of weight. And Bob. Mono- says his client's mental health deteriorated the fact that he was in solitary confinement for three years twenty three hours a day. You know mentally no one can withstand that prosecutors who were also concerned about Garcia's mental state asked the judge to order a lengthy psychiatric evaluation in the end Garcia was found competent to stand trial and a date was set for April. Two Thousand Sixteen then. This story took a most unexpected turn Thursday or Friday before that Monday started jury selection Alison Bodice says to US and two local. Tv STATIONS WE HAVE DNA tests. That proved that our guy was not at the hunter. Sherman's seen Allison Mada spook with W. O. W. T. TV via skype and their DNA. Evidence establishes undeniably unmistakably without doubt those murders. Were COMMITTED BY TWO PEOPLE. Not The claim was based on what the Matas believed to be a potential match between some unidentified DNA found on Shirley Sherman's Bandanna and some DNA taken from a suspect in another case. They're taking a liles from DNA. Bits and pieces and coming up with a theory that never made it to trial but she throws it out there on. The eve of trump and prosecutors are incensed and it really chap the judge. The judge took it as a clear attempt to send information to potential jurors that the state's case was suspect as a result. The trial was postponed again and the judge effectively kicked Alison. Mata off the case. The judge denies her application to practice in the state of Nebraska. Very controversial move. It was just I spoke to the public and that put information that could have you know. Been information to potential jurors and that violated the pretrial publicity rule. The matas wanted to fight allison's removal but what their client? Anthony Garcia apparently wanted was trial when the Matas appealed over his objection. Anthony Garcia completely stopped talking with his own lawyers. It deteriorated mentally coming into the trial to extent where he really hadn't. I mean he didn't say one word to us. This guy's mental state at that point was just dawn. It was September two thousand sixteen eight years after the first of four Omaha Calix when Dr Anthony Garcia finally got his day in court on hand to see it where the victims families who waited the longest arm. Anything is needed to determine for myself if he did it. The trial begins with a lucky break. All of a sudden you get handed the murder weapon. That was again and a bombshell witness a former stripper with a revealing story. Chew said I only date bad boys and he said well. I'M A bad boy. Two years after the murders of Thomas Hunter Surely Sherman and Roger and Mary Brownback. Anthony Garcia finally faced a jury there to witness it all friends and family of the victims commas hunters. Mom Clare Hunter who've been staying out of the public eye and surely Sherman's brother Dan rea two of the first people outside the courtroom. It's been here. That's been going on for a long time. A lot of this stuff sadler. Douglas County Attorney's Don Klein and Brenda. Beal had been prepping. This case for more than three years. You prosecuted for all former yes? Did you ever think about? Maybe we should just take the last two. That's easier sure that that was a discussion that we had many times but the evidence I think would still come in especially with two eight case so it seemed like the most logical thing was. We're going to let them together. Their theory was whoever killed. The boombox also killed Thomas Hunter and Shirley Sherman prosecutors summed up their case in a word revenge and they pointed to something they found on. Garcia's tablet one of the searches was just an interesting quote that had the word revenge in it so We were interested to know where that came from. And it's easy to find when you google. It was a quote similar to one in Shakespeare's. Play the merchant of Venice. If you harm me shall I not revenge load off of the merchant of Venice comes open a murder trial never before in my career? Motive thumbs up the case. That's our motive. Yeah the argued Garcia killed because he was angry about his termination from creighton and that it prevented him from being accepted into other programs to which he later applied as he continues to try and have some sort of a career at every time he tried to get into a different program or get licensed somewhere is creighton thing pops up and prosecutors said items found in Garcia's indicated. He was trying to destroy traces of his troubled past. Here's this trash bag sitting in the sink the chemical odor emanating from that. And it's all these papers in there in these papers after they're dried out is the termination letter from Dr Brownback. Dr Hunter Handwritten notes. And there's something about putting your fingers tape on your fingers park. Your car somewhere else. Walked to the location by common shoes. I common shoes sort of a list. That a killer would make yes it is. Prosecutors said the two sets of murders five years apart correlated with Garcia's career struggles. The first in two thousand eight came two weeks after he was fired by lsu Shreveport the second in two thousand thirteen followed another round of unemployment and financial troubles. He's trying to get jobs at temporary agencies. He's having financial issues. His home is going to foreclosure book. The argued that Garcia's original target on mother's Day two thirteen was Dr John Debut Tra a professor at Creighton who'd written him bad evaluations. She was somebody that he really thought was too hard on him was the cause of his termination to begin with. And you really had some animosity towards her two days before the attempted break-in prosecutors said Anthony Garcia used his phone to look up Dr Beauty Address analysis of a scant bit of DNA evidence taken from doorknob at the beautiful showed. There was a significant chance. That either Garcia or a male relative of his had tried to break in when that doesn't work because they're not home he then goes to wingstop right up the road and goes to plan B. where he searches brother. Brian Bex address. This receipt shows his location at wingstop at around two twenty six. Pm To fifty seven. They said Garcia used his cell phone to look up Dr Bags Home Address as for the gun. Used in the Brownback killings. Prosecutors argued the gun parts found at the brunt bat house fit a gun later found alongside a highway about twenty miles from Garcia's that gun was missing a crucial component. The barrel meaning a test bullet couldn't be fired. However what was left was licensed to Anthony Garcia. All of a sudden you get handed the murder weapon right now. That was a gift. I think it was divine intervention. Yeah the two thousand eight D. case however had no physical evidence what it did have was eyewitnesses several described seeing a silver Honda CR v with an out of state plate. This is a picture of the car. Anthony Garcia owned in two thousand eight when he was living in Louisiana. It's a Honda CR V. The thing that was noticeable was silver The people notice it as a type of SUV or CRV and they mentioned out of state out of state plates right. There was also that description of the man. People saw the hunter home that day. An olive skinned man wearing a baggy suit and they were all seeing the same person the same vehicle and the location. You're convinced that's not somebody who's lost and eventually finds their way out of that it fits and that's that's the person that did this crime and it and it fits. Anthony Garcia also tying it all together. Prosecutors called a bombshell witness a former stripper named Cecilienhof Hoffman told the jury that four years after the Dundee Murders Garcia made a shocking confession to her. She told the cops about it in this audio recording that he along time ago that I killed young boy an old woman and I said why I said why would you tell him. And he said they had it coming of all the pieces that we didn't have in two thousand eight case. That was a big piece. Presecutors said Hoffman had nothing to gain like publicly talking about her past life. She had two children. She had moved on her life and didn't want to go back in time but but she did but why would see mate that confession to her office said Garcia who was a regular at the Strip club where she worked wanted more than a lap dance. He was trying to impress her because she was trying to keep him at arm's length saying you know what he was getting too serious. I only date bad boys. Look good for me. Your doctor only date bad boys and he said his response to her was well. I'M A bad boy. I once killed a young boy in an older lady. It was just they needed to show. Garcia is guilt and we've all their evidence together. You know one piece by itself probably isn't enough but you put all those pieces together and it's a very good case. After twelve days. It was now the defenses turn. They would tell a different story one that attacked the very foundation of the prosecution's case candid. Look inside the defense team in real one real life in real life. You're flies on the wall. Ym You've never seen strategy session like this for the lawyers. Defending Anthony Garcia. It seemed the best defense was an all out offense. I'm not trying to ask somebody out to the prom. I'm trying to defend somebody and I'm GONNA use everything. We arsenal for lead attorney Bob. Mata junior that meant challenging or debunking everything jurors had heard from prosecutors for the past. Two weeks there were so many inconsistencies with the way that they said that it went down that it just never came together for me that he was guilty in a rare move. The defense team allowed dateline inside their private strategy sessions. Talk about our commute. Wanted to know it was in raucous group with Allison Mata serving as passionate adviser Robert. Motta senior the voice of experience something and local attorney Jeremy Jorgensen and an assortment of researchers sweating the details of the team rented a home out in West Omaha not far from the Dundee neighborhood. It was there that they plotted strategy. The first order of business knock down the theory. That Anthony Garcia killed two people in two thousand eight and two more in two thousand thirteen out of revenge. He gotta get recur stupid quote. Shakespeare quoque hurt me shine out revenge. According to the defense team Anthony Garcia had no motive to kill anyone. What's wrong with the prosecution theory? That Anthony Garcia blame the people at Creighton for everything bad. That had happened to him since he left. Creighton and the idea that when people would check out his resume they would inevitably get back to Creighton and they'd get a bad report about him. The problem with the state's theory is that Anthony Garcia would have been unaware of those communications. They don't let people in on those communications on the other hand. They pointed out Dr Hotter had actually handed Garcia. This short letter of recommendation after Garcia was dismissed from Creighton and got him his next job which a month after two months after he left Creighton for his part. Anthony Garcia seemed bored by all cameras. Were not allowed inside the courtroom but if they had been they would have shown what jurors saw. Anthony Garcia napping. He slept quite a bit during the trial. I'd say half the trial. And how do you think that that plays off to a jury? The two thousand eight case of Tom Hunter and surely Sherman was the most straightforward for the defense. There's no direct evidence. There is no smoking gun there is no DNA. It's all pieces and they're trying to put together this puzzle on the stand. None of the prosecution's eye-witnesses could ide- Anthony Garcia as the man they'd seen eight years earlier as for the Silver Honda CR V. Defense pointed out that not one of the eye. Witnesses ever mentioned the big spare tire that was on. The back of Garcia's car was big as all get out. I mean it's enormous and nobody said anything about that. Never never one mention of it which to me indicated. It wasn't my client's vehicle. That's the more likely answer. The two thousand thirteen bombeck case was more complicated for the defense team. Beginning with the fact that Anthony Garcia had been in Omaha on the day of the murders. How do you explain your client being back in Omaha and searching for the addresses of one person was killed and one person whose house was nearly broken into modern to? That's a tough question. I mean you're dealing with digital forensics ultimately the defense argued that because an investigator downloaded Garcia's iphone data ought to his personal following. The evidence was open to tampering. You've got a cop who's downloading what seems to be the most critical piece of evidence onto his own iphone. So it might about a cop who did that search and not your client. I'm not going to suggest that anybody You know specifically type the name in I'm just going to say that the way that the state presented the case and in particular that piece of evidence was not exactly truthful. The defense attorney spent a lot of time talking about the gun found on the side of the road and the AMMO magazine at the Brownback House. The fact that we have been very damaging evidence we want to cloud up about. It doesn't matter right there. So this o f want real life. I didn't realize wise on the wall man out also part in court. The defense argued could not prove a leak between the gun. Parts found that the Brownback House and the gun that was licensed to Anthony Garcia. The parts found in house or parts of a weapon that went through a catastrophic failure. Parts of our clients gun that were found on the side of the road showed no evidence of a catastrophic failure. And although it's the right kind of gun do if it's not necessarily the one of the right kinds of guns. You can't fire bullets in that gun. Chicago based defense team worked late into the night while keeping a close eye on their beloved cops were in pursuit of a world series title. Is God man on first and second? It was during these sessions over lunch. There's no point showing cards that don't have to be shown during breaks and at their rental that the defense team plan and prep their expert. Witnesses this really oil sounds interpretation. Everything laugh at something different. The DNA evidence linking Garcia to the beautiful break in they said was flawed and the prosecution's town line for the Brownback. Murders will suspect states window for one. This had to occur because of where they had our guy at certain times through cell phone records. It had to occur sometime between three fifteen and four o'clock four fifteen. According to the defense the boombox were killed later. Maybe around midnight. Long after Anthony Garcia had left Omaha and headed for our pathologists. Made it very clear that because of the the rigor mortis the conditions of the bodies The homicides didn't happen when he was in Omaha in the Dundee murders perhaps the biggest hurdle for the defense is the testimony of former exotic dancer society. Often Cecilia Hoffman. Statement was was huge. Remember she's the woman who quoted Garcia as saying that I play an old woman. But here's the thing Hoffman later said to a private. I hired by the defense that she remembered very little from that time bomb. Mata hammered at Hoffman's credibility on cross examination the concept. That is just so insane to me that this guy who's gotten a wave for essentially murder is now going to confess to a stripper that he knows that there's no way it's African Cup with them and that's your come online. Oh we I killed people. I killed an old lady and a young boy. I Dunno after three weeks. Both sides summed up their cases for the jury and hit all the familiar things. Then they placed Anthony Garcia's fate in the jury's hands toast from the defense but that was before the verdict of the jury do seen. My brother crashed in my mom. Cry Seeing the District Attorney. Cry Tough Moment Sometimes justice is not what happens in a courtroom but rather what comes out of it on the day lawyers finished their closing arguments in the Anthony Garcia murder case. A lot of people showed up to see what kind of justice would come out of courtroom three sixty among those waiting. Were the families of Tom. Honor of Shirley Sherman and yes. I'm Anthony Garcia. It was late afternoon when the jury the case then. The waiting began huddled on benches outside. The courtroom were reporters and spectators. The family and friends of the victims. Prosecutors retreated to their offices for what they hoped would be a short wait what the defense was ready to blow off. Steam. The models and their entourage settled in at a local bar several miles from the courthouse. The jury would be out for a while they thought so they feasted and toasted one another then as the sound system began to play the opening chords of the Rolling Stones Song Sympathy for the devil. Bob Mata said something. He wanted everyone in the bar. Two year this is for the Dabble after closings. You guys went out for drinks and we were there for that sympathy for the devil comes on the sound system and you say hey. That's the that's our theme song here. That's what we're going for. That's what you want sympathy for the devil. When I looked at the case of the state presented it was pretty obvious to me. They saw are sleeping. Client as the devil so yeah. I thought it was apropos. I thought it was appropriate. Not because I think he's the devil because they sure did state absolutely thought he was. The jury deliberated till nine pm that first night and all of the next morning tension ratcheting up with every tick of the clock. We thought we gave the jury a very solid case. We felt confident about it. But again you don't know then at about one in the afternoon word began to spread the jury verdict. I thought the verdict would be good. But you don't know until you hear it lining up alongside the families of surely Sherman and Thomas Hotter was the Garcia family. They were very respectful during the trial. I will say that I mean they didn't they didn't ever say anything like some some families. Thanks some families war right now. There there was not once everyone had crowded inside. The verdict was announced guilty on all counts. Breathe a sigh of relief. You just feel that that rush of emotion. It was a moment a long time. Coming for surely Sherman's brothers Brad. And Dan and her son Jeff reaction to the verdict relief of relief. You guys feel better. I think my sister deserved that. Her killer brought to justice just wonder was sitting with his mother and brothers while that verdict was read in that moment of joy and gratitude. He says he thought of his little brother. Tom A kid who never had the chance to grow up. Gets me thinking what where he'd be now and what? He looked like now. Talk like what he'd be doing. The most emotional moment came later that afternoon on closed doors when the victims families met privately with the people responsible for bringing this case to an aunt. We've basically gave Ronald applause. Came in because they did a hell of a job tough to be there. Or you're glad you were there. Were not really emotional. So seen my brother cry. See my mom. Cry Tired and seeing the District Attorney. Cry was tough while. Garcia's defense team faced a gaggle of cameras outside the courtroom in terms of what we did the Best Anthony Garcia's parents who spent much of their life savings on their son's defense spoke briefly with reporters rough. Everybody I know it's difficult for the other families who but it's very difficult for us to at this time. One last set of victims. He never wants turned around. Looked AT ONCE. I felt sorry for me I did. I saw his dad's head down a number of times. And you kind of in your mind. You don't know what they're thinking you know. Obviously until they were saddened greatly. Two years later a three judge panel ruled that Anthony Garcia should receive four death sentences for the murders of Thomas Hunter. Surely Sherman and Roger and Mary Brownback as he had through much of his trial. Garcia slept through his sentencing. As for the families he destroyed. Some healing may finally begin like a weight lifted off shoulders. There's not that constant cloud hanging over. Everybody wants to talk about things like that. Just more open better spirits when they read the verdict. Two deputies were taking him away and Alyssa. Motta was trying to convince Deputy Talk. Mendel let him speak to his parents because he will never get to speak to them again. What about all the other victims here? They can't speak to Shirley Thomas Roger. Berry they can visit him in jail Jennifer Bush Hager from the today show. And I'd love for you to join a book club. Read with Jenna. I've loved reading since I was a little girl and my mom librarian read to me every night. Now I love getting lost in the world that books open for US meeting characters who feel like friends. Every month. I choose a book that I fall in love with usually by divers debut author's books that lead to great conversations read with genetics about sharing our love of reading and connecting with each other so visit today dot com slash read with genetic to join the club and get my latest pick.

murder Dr Anthony Garcia Omaha Creighton Dr Brumbach Hunter Creighton University Shirley Sherman Omaha Todd Cooper investigator Dr Roger Brownback Tom CREIGHTON reporter Dundee dundee Pathology Department Dr Bill Hunter Dr William Hunter
Some colleges are tracking students before they even apply

Post Reports

28:04 min | 10 months ago

Some colleges are tracking students before they even apply

"This post reports podcast is sponsored by fidelity financial planning that moves with your life learn more at fidelity dot com slash your goals fidelity brokerage services number NYSE IPC from the newsroom of the Washington Post Spend Tarascon from the Washington Hassle considered ethical or unethical however it does affect their decisions leading up to that process it will show their team of recruiters for example Eh this information directly effects their final decision on whether or not to admit you I would suggest that it's how you use the data that can be flux of applications are getting desperate and trying to figure out how they can recruit students so theoretically because they've tracked this information one it's Tuesday October fifteenth today how colleges are secretly tracking potential students online the rise right price I'm Mary Chase I worked for Creighton University which is located in Omaha Nebraska and ages they're checking out or how long they stay on them so university of Kansas for example when you enter that website they are putting what's called a cookie. LS sought after school competing to enroll more students who can pay tuition the top schools are doing fine but the schools who do not have an insulting companies to collect analyze data on prospective students but these increasingly common tactics could become a hidden barrier for students from under free some colleges and universities started using tracking software on websites they're collecting data on individual perspective students stuff like which to do is make sure that we recruit the right students for our institution we also need to make sure that we have the right number of students at the oversee enrollment in university planning in today's world I think that high school students are very aware that every move they make would be on social media or on a website that they are being tracked with this administrator is describing is not an isolated case around the who are thinking about this list of one hundred thousand possible candidates for admission in next year's freshman class it will help that recruiting team narrow that down which is a little bit of Tracking Code on your computer which allows Kansas emissions office to start collecting a digital profile about you well anytime to these are the one thousand or these are the ten thousand that according to how they're interacting with our website maybe the most interested and engaged yes you formally apply to the school they're linking up the data that they've collected from the time that you've spent browsing their website with your application and then they had the student is interacting with a college or university information is being recorded and they're doing things like looking for is this person going to athletics paid impacting and young rockies protesting the political system the thing that we are trying because maybe that'll show that they're interested in sport scholarship or is this person's spending a lot of time on the financial aid website because maybe that indicates that they are somebody who's going to need the village backgrounds admissions officials who use the software say that they aren't using the data in a bad way they say that gathering this kind of information is necessary when your changed and maybe the most had most interest in attending our college so that some of the data that they're collecting which is data that they've gotten from students browsing their website right what else are they tracking so they are also creating these predictive scores and many of us are using predictive analytics in order to prioritize more financial aid when they applied it to the school I'm Doug Macmillan above business reporter here at the Post Doug has found dozens of universities that are working with outside list kind of extra insight into who you are and Mike you're interested in that was not included with your application you all the colleges I talked to it should say do not a lot of data about previously admitted students so the freshman sophomore junior and senior who are already at that school they're taking dozens and dozens and dozens of working our interactions with the students who are expressing an interest for available to us for enrollment purposes so they are doing this by taking rows of information think of it like a big spreadsheet with all the information they know about these students including their high school GPA as their test scores there prioritize our efforts in engaging students who appear to be a good fit with our mission as university and from that model the school home zip code is a really important one their ethnicity demographic information like their estimated household income all of this goes into a model that's suppose to tell this university this is what a student who goes to the school looks like and the way in which we use it here at Creighton University is oh can then take any information they have about a perspective student run them through this model and they'll come out with the score saying this is how similar you know potential problems with using this approach or a limitation of using this approach which is a lot of schools don't necessarily want to only attract this prospective student is to our model for in other words this is how similar a prospective student is to the people who already went to the school and there are verse or kids who are different financial backgrounds so using these models potentially is a limited way to go about finding candidates for me kids who look like the people who are on that campus if you have a campus that's ninety percent white people your mission team wants to have kids who are more ethnically who I interviewed during a conference for college administrators in Nashville in July and the college admissions people that I've talked less selective schools like Mississippi State University they are interested in using this to find kids who can help them pay full tuition and these are not you know profit driven institutions these are mission driven institutions and their focus should be on providing people education so where do you draw the to raise their yield rate basically be accepting people who then say to them that they don't want to waste resources on recruiting or accepting people that end in who are more diverse or who are unlike your existing student population and sounds sort of like moneyball for college admissions. That's what I've heard that actual that actual exam two are very upfront with we are just borrowing the tools from the private sector that worked in the private sector a lot of critics of this step back and say wait a second we'll come up several times and they're proud of that but I think you know one of the things put this in perspective as you know these are tools that are that were perfected in the world of business and the world have a similar student who is super wealthy and that they know will pay full price rather than admitting student who isn't so wealthy and we'll probably families so theoretically even if you don't give the universities admissions office information about your financial situation your income and your you want to find this is the emissions officer Mississippi State University he said that you know this tool helps you score potential students who come from wealthier accusing to go elsewhere or is it something else that might be one of the ways that the more selective schools are using this for our reporting we focus on using that information they are focusing their recruiting on kids who have more of an ability to pay which studies show that the line in how much these colleges are willing to act and behave like businesses and a lot of our reporting focused on that question what is the L. D. to pay full tuition and not have to ask for financial aid they might still have that information and theoretically say that they would prefer to have pay higher tuition so they were very up front with me they said you know we are scoring students potential recruits who are out of state on their ability to pay because sensitive for them to use this kind of very detailed data tracking in their recruiting in admissions process. I mean is that they want this is a more advanced way to do their job they feel like they're strain by their resources there's really no obvious way for most students to be able to tell we did a review of the privacy policies of these schools out of the thirty three who he found to be weapon Doug Macmillan is a corporate accountability reporter League need to ask for financial aid from the university the colleges we talked to did try to be super clear and they are not making final emissions decisions based on this information I said but there are a lot of folks who still see so that was the CEO of this company Ruffalo Noel Levitz it's from Zip code they can make a lot of detail guesses about someone's background and financial picture and even though they may not be making final emissions decision for the Washington Post until you talk to college admissions officers about this what did they have to say about why they're doing this so they think that the school student graduates is becoming more and more competitive so to deal with all these things they feel like data is their best asset in their best have shrinking funding these schools don't have an endowment they are struggling to recruit students and the the market for using this tracking software only three really made a clear attempt to disclose it on their privacy policies thirty out of thirty three schools really more than you encourage people to apply more that you focus your recruiting on people the more likely those kids are to matriculate into actually go to college so the flip side Hugh students either those who are applying or those who are just browsing university websites new they know that their data's being handed over to these private companies of marketing I mean do you think the schools and and your customers are becoming more comfortable with the idea that they are Mrs and students are customers depend on who you speak to that a few folks who are and it was a three hour walk essentially we'd walk six hours basically total charges computer and that's where he started learning how to code there is a friend he had from Kampala common and expected that you explain how you're using that tracking how are you using things like cookies and your website and we found so many schools it just made no attempt to do that yeah no attempt to talk about how they were doing this which in the world of you know online publishers and tech companies tracking software is fairly common but it's also lol Mayan came to DC two years ago came to the United States two years ago from a refugee camp in northern Uganda where he lived for twenty two years of his life that sports reporter Alex Andreev he was born on the way to the camp his data's potentially there are kids out there who are just as deserving to go to these schools who are not getting as much attention paid to them in the recruiting process and that moment on he sort of really was just like mom I want a computer and his mother sort of laughed initially like that's impossible what are you talking about but that would bring him some games into to`real 's on a flash drive and so he started teaching himself through these details you know this is how I use unity this is how I do adobe but but they have the information to do it but the basically from your zip code that's a very important piece of data and from your zip code when you combine that with all information you can get on census records computer and he became very determined from that point to learn how to use it because of his mother's sacrifice the ditch and my live alone leg no couldn't process it became very much her mission to you know his mother even told me when he was younger but he would cut boxes and sort of build these box also called Salaam which means peace Arabic and that's the version where you're a refugee and you're running through a war torn conflict zone and parents his entire family was fleeing the civil war that was racking south Sudan at the time was an easily it wasn't just on the pull my family but they were like eh creative programs that friend also installed Lewis First video game the classic grand theft auto it's got a game that was played on a mobile device and basically you had bombs falling from the sky over this refugee camp and then players had and and Just giving me an from there like I got the money I was excited and at the same time wasn't because I I'm an informed his mother like hey you know if if we're able to get him this computer he can do something with it he can make something out of it and she saved up enough saying and carjacking and shooting wall had so much fun playing that he decided to build his own video games but he wanted to build games that were very different from it I try to tap the bombs that were falling and dissolve them with the cloud of peace would pop up the next version of the game which is currently working on is theaters to create like shadow puppet plays for other residents of the refugee camp in you know hundreds of people in the camp would gather around and that was sort of the first one were his friends in the refugee camp and that was I think just so fast relatives they like Laura people more than three hundred thousand people were killed in on the way right so it wasn't like unease ally but it was good for us because I was thinking that if I if I don't utilize this on me in that arena west a lot of time and thinking about that but at the end of the day like if she can be able to feel what that experience is like he initially was just sharing it amongst some of his game informer is a popular monthly magazine and they have a rating for video games and stuff that they're looking for in these high quality games and stuff like graphics needing to see that he was doing this for both a community of residents in the camp but then also for like the larger gaming audience for anyone to sort of it could work up in the morning and not yes gun to give us more hope gut in my Jane the first time he came in contact with the computer is at a refugee registration center do it I can also do it and then walks off for this you know every day since getting his computer he would walk to an Internet cafe where he would charge it ends in the camp and then he posted a file of it on his facebook page which he said he didn't even realize whether or not it would work it did the game got attention I don't necessarily have to have this violent element to it as long as they're fun to play people are going to play them the people that are going to love playing these good inspiration of like I don't know what it couldn't take me to do but I want to create a again yeah so the first version of lamb was Juna Games which is as his company a lot of the people that I know who are into games aren't necessarily looking for some as someone who has been through war I feel like if I can be able to to make game about this and in the minds of people and as we editor gaming experience that like makes them think more about the about current events and humanitarian issues and it opportunities for those refugees to get out of that situation in which is in the game whereby you can be able to buy food straight sound quality playability do you feel like you're playing a video game or do you feel fully immersed in it are you entertained is another one and these are things that will very scary very serious thing it's not like people are looking to play violent video games they're playing games that are fun right and so young people to play and start building these empathetic reactions and dealing with you know learning conflict resolution learning empathy in the right circles now he has a sponsorship through the World Bank here's a visa so he's working out of DC and then trying to launch major element is this idea of building empathy that is I think something that's growing within the industry as well as the idea that a player can element to this idea of social impacts gaming it's not just for people outside of that community that are benefiting from it it's actually benefiting people in that community as well another is like what it really gives the the three hundred dollars to buy for me something that she doesn't understand and something that I don't even understand him and the people that are going to be like no I'm just playing my game so there's a big industry and the only thing is for us job opportunity to present them something new in the after you know jump jump over hurdles that get in your way you'll have to feed them so that the in a deterrent you have to give the medicine into that when whenever they're on the way they can get more sort of experience trauma or deal with a subject as big as war in this very individualized environment where you actually become that person that's dealing with country that we can be able to use this medium to be able to change so what he's trying to do now is just with the opportunity that he has created Do you do you really think that's the case that that playing a video game about about a refugee experience for your like shooting piece clouds at at bonds our to be able to like read the nation it's a very real scenario and situation in something that he personally was hiding from falling bombs and we know these are things that really happened and when I talk about this game and also like it again that was about my personal journey and of going through a situation like this and I wonder how much a game can really represent that most people are not living in a war torn country and with this with this trauma as many as ninety percent of teens say they play video games and with that comes the sort of opportunity for more what's on your list financial goals buying a new house strengthening your retirement plan all of the above whatever you're saving for Fidelity personal that it actually I think it's part of me wonders if it's like a real over-simplification of like the horrors and challenges and complexities playing a game you're like really like being understanding and also like being in their shoes and also helping them so that's a very new kind of additional called launcher and it debuts today Alex Andrea is sports reporter can see more of her work in the post new section about gaming e sports it's the real world they WANNA kill zombies it's escapism so so why would people want to play a game that is about this very real can at least at least get taste of and know that it exists and people are going through this if they weren't otherwise exposed to that so it might be reaching a new audience in that way as well people that are protesting unemployment corruption and the government's failure to provide basic public services and many of those protests I don't know the exact horrors and trauma and just you know having to constantly fight for your life and fight for survival and that's something an brokerage services provided by Fidelity Burkard Services LLC and now one more thing demonstrations in Iraq in Baghdad and across much of the south as of now we know that at least one hundred sixty five people have been killed more than six thousand people being wounded and it's really sent the country into a quickly with overwhelming force they protest resolve really hardened and the unrest really became a cry against the entire political system it helps you understand that really you can be able to be part of the alive you can be able to save someone's life who is planning and advice can help you reach those goals with digital planning plus one on one personal coaching all with low transparent pricing to learn more visit it started out playing hubbub of the news medium to be able to help people understand how to build a peace and conflict resolution as awesome somewhere the purchase with pretty fast police response is started with ready dot com slash your goals or call one eight hundred three four three three five four eight advisory services offered for a fee by fidelity personal and workplace advisors LLC but of political crisis my name is Louis Lovelock and I'm the Washington Post Bureau chief be started demonstrations against corruption but as they met quite and get more energy and they're now what happened is that actually when you actually buy food for the game actually buying someone in a row for Japan so you're not just there's aren't old enough to remember a time before the US invasion and the fall of Saddam Hussein Iraq has been hit by a wave of anti-government protests in recent weeks how my parents were able to like free countries in their relative tying and seeing the like even two of my sisters tied certainly in Baghdad the capital the nature of the crowds shifted the crowds became overwhelmingly young we're talking here about a generation that's grown up against the backdrop of the two thousand and three U. S. led invasion of Iraq they say they feel locked out of his way the thing that really should talk about and the thing that we really need people we understand these are things that happened in the journey and for you as a player politicians particularly the young people against the politicians and it looks like the latter has one for now but without any signs of meaningful political reform the Washington Post Louisa luck is the Baghdad bureau

Washington Post Washington NYSE Mary Chase Omaha Nebraska university of Kansas Mississippi State University Creighton University Doug Macmillan officer reporter ninety percent two years three hundred dollars twenty two years three hour six hours
1345 Life After Dental School with Dr. Jason Genta : Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

1:24:54 hr | 6 months ago

1345 Life After Dental School with Dr. Jason Genta : Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"Is a huge honor for me today. To Be podcast interview Dr Jason Genta Diaz graduated from Creighton University School of Dentistry in Omaha Nebraska. In two thousand eleven I went to Undergrad at Creighton and stayed in and Swanson Hall and almost went to Creighton and following dental school. Jason completed a one year eighty at UCLA in Westwood California in two thousand twelve. Dr Genta moved to Chicago from UCLA TO CHICAGO. Were you drinking. Were you lost. How do you go for more? La Later Chicago on purpose where he joined decision. One dental partners. Who at the time was a group practice with four locations decision? One is now grown to fifty fifty plus dentists and thirty one locations in Illinois and Wisconsin since two thousand sixteen he has served as vice president of clinical affairs for the group and plays an active role in Dr Recruiting Training Mentorship new practice acquisitions and mergers Dr Genta is passionate about the success of the young doctors and teaches a course is titled Life After Dental School at multiple schools across the country. Who the reason the real reason I brought him on shows? I'm trying to get him to put that as an online online. Ce Course on dental town. Because I think it's imperative I actually had your Boss your founder and owner Doctor Allen. ACL A sierra no he was on dentistry and centered episode nine. Oh six and you know what I really liked about. You know when people say this is a dentist I own. DSO that starts to dentistry and ends identity. This is about clinical dentistry. Isn't it. Yeah that's that's really And what what attracted me to our group. And that's why I've stayed with the group and and passionate about a our growth in our future. So thank you very much for having me on. It's an honor I know you talk about a people. Listen to you as their commuting and there are new Grad. That was me in twenty twelve. And I've listened to you on my commute to work everyday sense. It's you know. Life's about continue annual e learning. And you offer that with with your podcast on a daily basis. So it's an honor to be on here. Well it's an honor that Steve Jobs figured you're down to get that Internet stuck in my Motorola flip phone. I never saw that coming and I think when he IBM technically the first smartphone. But jobs obviously one who pulled it off like an orchestra and I just saw that and I thought Oh my God You can get someone like you to come on. But you're never going to go to Salina Kansas and talk to their study club. And you're and you're not gonna go to childrens taxes let alone Katmandu Nepal and what I love about. What jobs did as he's now making making knowledge zero cost? I mean anybody in the world can log onto their new radio which is a podcast with a new TV which is Youtube and watch guys like you. And so. So I'M GONNA I'M GONNA cut right to the chase. Is Dentistry censored the American Association of Dental Education. They always put out What what I consider just propaganda and I wish they would stop? They say things like well. The average general student comes out with two hundred and eighty nine thousand dollars to loan does not no no no quit lying. Twenty percent of those dental students or Dads moms paid for dental school. So why are you averaging down the median number and then another five. Ten percents military grants or scholarships. When you just look at the people because they don't want to tell you the truth that they've taken their I completely off cost and now Donald Schools one hundred two thousand dollars a year so Jason? They're coming out of school. Four hundred thousand dollars in debt and they're scared to death and I like about you. Is You guys a bottle. A lot of practice so if they want to come out of school by practice been there done that is they. Sit there and say you know what I got too much debt to go. Buy a practice. I'm going to pay down some debt. I'm GONNA work for a DSL but they hear that there's good ones bad ones. I mean I could ask you a one hundred fifty questions but I want to start with the. I'M GONNA start with the dental school graduates. She just got out of dental school. She's four hundred thousand dollars in debt and she's scared and she doesn't know if she wants to go by the average dental office cost seven hundred and fifty thousand. Do you think she should go out of school. Four hundred thousand bat bar another seven fifty and wake up Tuesday a million three in debt. You're starting out with the tough questions like you know there's no cookie cutter or right answer with that question. It all comes down to the individual. Really you know what they want. Do they want to be an entrepreneur or do they want to just really focus on on on clinical work and being a dentist. You know as dental school's hard and it's expensive and unfortunately the curriculum regula rigorous that. They're not really getting the opportunity to think about questions like that until they get past boards. You know you always hear oh I gotta get it through school and then I gotta finish boards and then all of a sudden it's march and you get these individuals looking for a job and unfortunately the I'd I'm not sure that they've even started to think about some of those financial questions Four hundred thousand dollars is a lot of debt. Were seen that. It's a lot of our Doctors that were hiring and recruiting and The the group space is offering those people who just want to practice dentistry the opportunity to come out and to make very good living but if someone's entrepreneurial and they wanna own their own practice and the enjoy the business side of it I I still think it's okay to take on that huge debt burden and have their own practice but you gotta think through. It can't be just this decision you make on the fly. You have to really know so that you want to be not just a dentist but you want to be an entrepreneur you WanNa do accounting on a do payroll. Hr All all those type of things is what being an owner of a dental practice entails. But you know she. She hears things that I can't go work for a DEA. So because they'll have some office manager is not in a dentist. Say Hey thirty percent. New Patients have route planning does and and every repack it that's over five millimeters deep house to have a perio chip because there's a insurance code for that and and they think that they went to school eight years of being a a dentist and now the new dentist is an office manager who never went to one day dental school. Do you hear that in Chicago. Land Area Oh yeah and in I mean as someone who was in their shoes you know back in two thousand twelve. I kind of thought that way. Also I I didn't Tony Better I think the thing about group practices is they're all different and just as you would vet an office that you're going to buy in the private practice realm you should vet the groups that you're talking to As you alluded to in the beginning and you know our group was started by dentists both of whom still practice I myself am identified and what we say the two Denison. This is the to do. I say that right now. Yeah Dr Mike and AJ acernote and which ones the older brother Dr. Mike is the older brother so so. That's always the better. The mom always likes the older one I would you. Would you agree with that. He would be quick to tell you that he is the federal looking. Better dantesque ask. I'll let those to really be the older brother. If that's what he said that Mike is the older better looking more handsome brother. He's mom's uh-huh favorite and then his little brother is. Aj what was it about Aj that could attract and retain you from Hollywood. To The frozen Rosen Tundra of Chicago land where even the woolly mammoth left. So I grew up down stayed in Central Illinois Surfing. Am I just north of Effingham. The map tune Charleston area so You know I might families from the Midwest Midwest S. person at heart. I did my Undergrad in Saint Louis I then was in Omaha. I'll be honest Los Angeles is beautiful. Santa Monica's gorgeous But I'm a midwest person I wanted to be closer to my family. I Love Chicago and and I'm glad to be be here. But what what attracted me to our group and specifically to doctors age. Mike was the fact that they were dentist. US and I could tell that the dentistry was the most important thing to them. You know what we teach our doctors and what we really tried try to harp on is if you're really patient focused patient centric and you're doing the standard of care. The rest of it will follow. You know the the business will figure itself out if you're doing the right thing for the patient and That's not always always the case in some of these. DSO's is a some of them are very very profit-driven like like I remember one of the so Arizona's ground zero for DSO's. I'm eighteen point six percent of all the Dennis work for DSO and when you look at the full distribution five states have one percent word eighteen point six. But I remember one of the first ever met. It was twenty years ago and I went in there and I said why are you taking Pano Bite Wings. Upper on every single kid that walks in here at any age and Oh insurance pays for it a hundred percent said so. You're going to take a pano on a baby. I know diagnostic reason because I mean and so so so mike at the the brothers. You know if you're not gonNA in a treat your patient with respect and the you have no respect for yourself and if you're gonNA build a team I mean I posted this yesterday. I'm going to get word dry because I don't WanNa say I don't Wanna I don't WanNa chop up my words I said this The most important function of every dental leader is to attract attract and retain the most talented individuals. They can find join the team and endlessly toil towards a shared vision of how reputable dental office can be organized to provide provide dentistry. That shows respect for your patience your team when yourself and you know what when you're doing crap dentistry you don't even have respect for yourself if you know if if you can't do dentistry on that pay that two year old is if that was your granddaughter your Knees Your Mom's sister When once you can't can't tell the truth and treat other people like you would wanna be treated and you've lost all respect for yourself? Dot was a very eloquent way of describing the dental industry and As a group you know from the top down we have to really work hard to attract and retain our doctors. Our office managers are assistance. Are High Jenness everybody is Responsible Ensemble for keeping and retaining the talent and patients notice that patients want to go back and see the same people all the time they like consistency. They like seeing the same faces. Dentistry scary. It's you know it's a cost to them so our job as as a as a group practice and even as a single practice is to provide them an environment they wanna come back to on a on a six six months or whatever month basis so talent is the most is number one for sure. Yeah so so. They're coming out Eddie. So I mean they're coming out of dental school They are told that dios taking over and I've been asking thirty two years. I know who my audience is. It's priced brags and Dennis and I I'm not gonNA caterer named. I'm going to tell everybody what I think is absolute truth. In thirty two years I think DSO's have taken over twenty percent of the market for the same reasons. I told Dennis thirty two years ago. You don't know your numbers. He got detrick over here. They got their quickbooks. It's over here They've had the same hygienics for twenty years. She walks out of the room. She cleaning Zampedri by wings. I say hey doc did you make five dollars and twelve cents after taxes you. Did you lose nine bucks. He doesn't know I say. Hey Doc yesterday on today's Monday how many incoming calls you're getting ready to go home at five o'clock how many incoming calls halls you have no idea how many of them went straight to voicemail and no one even listen to That wouldn't happen here now with my surely well actually. It was nine so nine people people tried to call him by the way. Six of those people have never called your office before. And you're telling me you want and more so their businesses so horrible and then you see it with the Delta Dental dill were there all mad because delta tunnels lowering their fees or they've never even met the Delta Dental Guy. I mean I've been I've been meeting the Delta dental people people since I was twenty five years old. And what did they tell you if you just go there and shake their hand they say well you know they. They signed up for all these lower paying plans so now when we go out to sell the plan I got a cell against these five other lower plans that all those idiots signed up for so we have to lower our fee and then we lo- orphee orphee. They're all mad at US and they're the ones that signed up for all the lower plans and now the deltas are getting in trouble because they're a high overhead organization organization so when they lowered their fees. Their overhead goes up so the dentist is causing his own overhead to go up and then Delta Dental has some Manchester now delta dental overheads Ed's going up really really high and they're like God how how how keep much longer the dentist GonNa keep shooting themselves in the foot and it's like well they'll shoot themselves in the foot to. They're all all done. I mean I really believe. In twenty years it's twenty twenty. I believe in twenty twenty in two thousand forty. DSO's will have half the the market Some think they'll have seventy five percent. I know they're not gonNa have the rural market where you grew up simply because the young kids. That come won't live there. I mean when you're a young kid you live in Chicago land. You want the Miracle Mile and the Matt. Is it Miracle Mile or magnificent mile magnificent. Yeah you want the magnificent a mile on you. Want the you want all that. Trappings they're not going to go live with the goat and a pig and chicken out in the middle of Parsons Kansas So I think. DSO's sows are going to take over the whole metropolitan and they're not going to get the role because they don't know their numbers and they should be mad at Delta Alta dental for anything it should be mad because when Delta pays them it doesn't go straight into their practice manager software and credit the account and then deposit a straight into the chase bank account and then equal out your ledger card so that you see in healthcare. Thirty percent of all the cost oss is just human shoveling around paperwork for Medicaid Medicare and all this crap like that and you know so there. It's so thirty two years years I can't even get dentures or eagles. Soft are open dental now to hook up with quickbooks pro. So I mean I there. There's nothing I can do. I mean my two other sisters or nuns. You think I could give them a one day. Course and they Hindu Muslim or Jew. How how long would I have to lecture to my oldest sister just to make her be a Lutheran? I two went to eight years of Jesuit school so I I understand how you're Catholic. I already feel sorry for you. I already have mutual So so basically. But let's let's go into that kid out of school. Yeah she's four hundred thousand dollars in Dad. I personally straight out of school to buy a practice. I'm sorry you don't have the skill set. That's like that's like leaving the eighth grade swim team and going straight to college. Swim your skipped highschool and you need I think thank you need to come out of school and learn how to filling crown a basic Indo. You got four hundred thousand dollars. What I like If you really wanted to own your own practice well you're GONNA learn a lot more working for a company. That's managing fifty practices. Then you are going to go work for a company okay. That doesn't he can't even manage his own practice but talk talk to that in individual Why should she go work for you in Chicago? Land so there are so many driving factors that are that are causing Diaz to increase in popularity in you hit on basically all of them the cost of schools going up Insurance more and more patients are having insurance causing more and more dentists to have to take take insurance which is driving down costs. Technology is getting more and more expensive so starting practice is is becoming more expensive And then banks are looking at these individuals who have four hundred thousand in debt and they're not wanting to give them a seven hundred thousand dollar loan for the the practices so all of that is leading to groups growing coming in in popularity and what I would say to a new Grad coming out with four hundred thousand dollars in debt is. Let's you know come out and we can kind of put you on a career path. That will allow you to do the things that you WANNA do. You know if you WANNA have equity. We offer that with our group and the first year outlets really focus on your dental work. Let's focus on your leadership and those two things you're good leader if you're a good communicator. Good clinician those are the things that are gonNA push you forward because patients fans are GonNa notice it your team's GonNa notice and you're going to retain them and you're gonNa build that practice naturally What we're allowing you to to do is you're practice owner? You know that it's forty hours of clinical chair time and it's twenty hours a week of payroll and quickbooks and maintenance and all those millions of other things that that you have to worry about beyond the dental dental hard enough as it is this Let's help these younger grads. Do really good dental work And be able to focus on on the clinical stuff ask now I will say where group practices differ is on retaining those people you know. My responsibility is how do we get a group you know getting new ground to join us is is fairly easy. Because you're offering them a guaranteed income stream in your your offering some of the things that you want. So you're making the barrier to entry fairly easy. The hard part is keeping them you know after two or three or four years they they might get the itch to own their own practice or they might start to think. Oh I could do this on my own What what what value out are we giving the the new grads and the younger dentists to make sure that they stay and they wanna stay and I will say the thing? I'm I'm most proud of about. Our group is our doctor. Attention is you don't ninety plus percent we keep almost everyone that we have okay so there okay. That just should as if you're driving your car. You should've just almost changed lanes and hit the wall so when you look at and lipstick it out of dentistry because let's go to fang the biggest Wall Street stocks are facebook Amazon Apple Netflix. Google and and their employee turnover is a nightmare. It's about one to two years. Amazon has the worst employ. Their average employee doesn't stay a year. How austat is that and their whole sector is one or two years? It's the same thing with Donald Associates and the private sector and the public and they had ds Osa I don't like were DSL because it's group practice most of the DSO most DSO's I know are a group practice that have three need a four locations. Then you have another set that around thirty to fifty like you guys. And then you've got a handful of a Harland's at one thousand Bob. FONTANA 'S AT NINE HUNDRED Steve Thorns at nine hundred but those are just out wires but even looking out those outliers would you. How long do you think the average Dennis works associates works at Heartland Aspen or Pacific dental? How what do you? What do you think they're turnover as you know? I don't want to due to make figures or anything like that but I I would guess around year two or three. They're probably getting getting this issue. That they they WANNA leave and I. It's it's it's actually they do better than the solo private practice. No kidding but it's still just one or two years and how you do that. Is You go to anybody who at a school specific and urine. I'm you you should creighton but does go five years graduating last back and just survey one class. Every time I do it five years ago that the average student that graduated has worked in more than five offices. So it's like so it's like they've had seven jobs in five years or are you out of your mind now. That'd be some people have to do that like if they're Irish after they after they screw up so many root canals they got to go the next town more root canals and they go to the next but but but come on how. How do you have five different jobs in five years? Nobody Buddy wins a non instance. It's bad for patients. It's bad for your staff. It's bad for the doctor. I don't like hearing that. You know all dental schools hard enough. You've taken on this burden. I I love dentists So to hear that there's that much turnover for is. Is You know we we should all be looking at ourselves and saying what are we doing wrong here. It's like I always tell the older guys. I mean Whenever I hire firestone out of school that you know within a year or two? They're they're they're itching to move Lan. They know everything of that age to except for the clinical dentistry. And I always say they were down here in the nice weather so let them do their twenty five years and their kids leave home and then the wife they wanna they wanna move to climate and and then they come down here and say I don't know if I want to start the new office again. Am I thirty two years the ones that I've enjoyed the most and made the most money where all the old guys ice retired down here and did their last ten years with me and so that's what I'm that's that's my business model down here and But Anyway but but I commend you for taking him out of school because who wants someone to come out of school to do their twelve filling so so why. Why do Audi how do you want this in fact when I told my buddy on the way to work that I was GONNA podcast interview. You know what he said to me. Don't they hire kids. Straight Korea school. I said I think so. What the hell would they do that for? So answer that tough question. Why the hell would you take a kid straight out of CREIGHTON? You you know I. It's not that we are targeting new grads or anything like that. I will hire hire anyone in some ways. The the benefit of hiring a younger doctor is. They don't have any bad habits yet. They don't have the doctor complex yet. There we can kind of mould them Really when when I'm hiring somebody I'm not as concerned about the clinical skills or the speed because because I truly believe those things come with time. What I'm most focused on? Is You know how articulate are they how are they a leader either. Are they able to communicate. Well because what's the stat. You always mention about thirty. Seven of all out of every hundred fillings are are done. That is a direct correlation to them not being able to properly explain treatment and get patients to say yes for. I don't know what reason it is. Maybe they're not able to convey the urgency of it or they're not able to Get the patient Asian to understand the importance of aural house and things like that so a lot of the things that were looking for our communication skills Dell's and leadership and if you're able to find those things in a in a dental candidate I don't care if they're fresh out of school or they practice Actus for thirty years you know. We'll hire them and kind of build an office around now. That that's special. When I got out of school the the only people that would be Army Navy Airforce Marines and now the VIC-? DSO's I give you credit. Everybody needs that opportunity and I love what you said. I'll never forget. I kept begging my dad when I was little to go golfing with them and finally one day. He said I could go with them on Saturday so I went with them is all excited and he wasn't taking me Golvin. Knee took me to the pro shop and he said the first ten Saturdays I had to go to the pro. Because he didn't want me to learn all these bad habits and he said he he said Howard he says. I can't even get rid of some of my bad habits he goes. I don't want you to learn any bad habits. So he may so. I like that where you get them. Green they're still moldable shape abol all so let's go so if you want them to work for you. You guys by practices so so you. Have you really have a practical information on contract negotiations. If you're an associate they hear things like This is how we're GONNA pay you and we're Aspen and here's the contract and you say well I want to run this by my attorney and they say well I don't care. He rented by that ceiling contract. We take hey are. They is at bluff game. I mean is so so when you come out talk about contract negotiation Due Diligence. What it means to take insurance Things things like that that they didn't really learn kindergarten school. I mean the the four years of dental school are all. It's just four years of grinding through the clinical basics eighty six of dentistry in There's not a lot of adjectives discussion and education on finding jobs. I one of the things I'm most passionate about With schools is we need to take as schools. We need to take more ownership on helping our our new grads get jobs out of school and be successful but I also think our schools need to focus on helping retiring. Doctors get their practices. Sold old you know we. We've all worked really hard. Our our alumni basis should be Working really hard to make sure that our our graduates are all really successful awful but as far as contracts go you know I. I don't like hearing. Oh this contract you know you you you can't have someone else look at it The one of the first things I do when I give a contract one of our Potential doctors tell them to have a have a lawyer. Look at it. You know. It's worth it you you WANNA be in a contract that you understand and that you Jio comfortable with. How would you trust any contract written by two Italian brothers from Creighton? Stop mob dealership. I mean Eh. You're dealing with the mob at that point. Yeah it's it's funny you say dealership my My Dad runs a car dealership. So that's how this works right. So so you're you're saying that if they so so you're saying you don't carry if they showed their contract to an attorney. Listen I I want to be very transparent. I think one of our Reasons we keep as many dentists as we do is. We're very transparent on on everything in our contract. You know I the things that they need to really understand. Is You know how they're getting paid how you know. Now let's talk about that. Okay Virgil Voice Art. What is your turnover do you think are? How long do you think a your average doc stays with you? Well as I was the first associate. They hired actually in twenty twelve And and I think you know outside of people leaving moving to a different state or our doctors retiring we probably only had to leave our grew out of fifty. Yeah okay so you're on dentistry and sense and for the reason I mean really I think Michael. Aj and you are doing is amazing. But let's go. Let's go to you said why do you think you don't have the staff turnover. We're and the first thing you said is pay. I mean on dental on the boards are filled with Every time I get my paycheck they screwed me out of all this money It's you know Bob So talk about that. I talk about money's answer. What's the question? They got four hundred thousand dollars in student loans. What what could go right or wrong with getting paid so setting the expectation of what they expect to get paid? I I like to to have that conversation with them. Very early on We're you know we're in schools kind of talking about some of this stuff and I'll never forget forget. We cold the class and we said you know what do you guys think that you're GonNa make your first year out of dental school and somebody raised their hand and we he called on them. You know that person was like eighty five thousand and warlike. You're hired right away. You know we'll pay you that but I they don't understand that eighty five thousand. They're going to be bankrupt because that that does not between their loans and this and that that that's not enough to to get them to be viable and if you'd be eighty five thousand dollars ars by the time you're gonNA shook it down by the mob so the feds GonNa take a bunch and they should come down by the local state and city. So they're going to take you know a good thirty your money then you gotta do student loans. Because the American student Dental Association took your eye off costs Twenty years ago and let it drift up to one hundred thousand dollars a year and they don't when they were little. There's been a bunch of studies that when you give someone a paycheck when when you give anybody a paycheck when they're an employee they look at their net number and then right after they cash it they walk out of the banks Tom said Hey. Hey what was your gross. They don't know. Did you know that the that your employer had a match. Your bike matching that. They don't know they just look at a net number so eighty five. Sounds like a lot of money until they look at their net right and then they gotta go pay their rent and mortgage you know so i. It's it's not that money but there seems to be a lot of people who don't know what the differences between between getting paid on production versus adjusted production. What about warranties? What if I would have? I do a root canal and six months later you got to send it to an and ended on us and we have to refund the root canal and they ended on. You know so so so talk all things money. You know so making sure that people's expectations lactation are set are is really important. We always say you know our goal for a first year Grad is to be between one hundred fifty and under eighty thousand dollars. A you know that now we we have to have those discussions and we'll have those on a monthly basis. That's not my goal for them. I want to hear what their goal is. And then I can kind of we kinda back into that. So if you're saying you you WANNA make one hundred and fifty thousand dollars were our our pay model is pretty straightforward. We pay thirty percent of collections. are collection rates about ninety nine percent. That's a that's adjusted production. So you know making sure that thirty percent you you pay thirty percent of the justed collection just collections. But making sure I I said we collect ninety nine percent of our production. That's the adjusted did production. So you pay you pay thirty percent of collection so the okay so these kids are. Don't fourth of art already instilling dental school. So let's say kids at I charge a dollar for this dental filling and the insurance says. I know we're going to give you eighty cents so you might have thought you did a dollar but it's adjusted because you signed up for a contract which is a volume discount if someone walks the street. It's a dollar but if an insurance company says sign this contract and we'll send you a hundred patients. The volume discount is not going to be a dollar dollars ninety cents so you thought you did a dollar. That's production but it's adjusted production and ninety percent and then if they collect that ninety cents. They'll pay. Hey you thirty percent of it. But if they don't collect it then they they can't pay you they don't collect so that that's the terminology. Yeah and one of the reasons seasons we do Collections is. We want our doctors to be leaders in the office and we want them to have a vested interest in in the front desk and making sure that everyone's doing what they should so and the most important part of that is the doctor dropping the price when the first person to drop prices when you're out of the room when you're back in your private office being what I don't even know what you do back there so so when you're sitting there saying Oh yeah we can do this this guy that like okay. That's disaster sound good. Oh yeah that sounds good. Then you leave now. Cynthia walks in says. Did he tell you. It's going to be five. Grand Watt Watt. So you they are not even gonNA listen to drop the FI in every all these doctors. I ought to talk money. I don't want to sell dentistry at your the problem and more read who just passed away last salaries a big legend in my life and then so many lives. He used to sit there and say you look them straight in the eye It is when you walk on car lot. They're like you know they're like well. We're GONNA payment. Are you thinking about Jason. You thinking about three hundred a month. Four hundred a month five hundred government and is looking at will. I let me know we're at I mean we could. We could get rid of your disease for probably a thousand. We could probably make this a nice functional bite for five thousand but if you wanted an absolutely Mercedes Benz or a Cadillac looking at twenty five thousand. We're we're we're what are you thinking about. And then they'll tell you I just want him removed or my dad just died led me some money I want. I want to buy a cadillac. I mean but when so the dentists have to be tight on collections. Otherwise they're never going to be talking about money just going to jump into a root canal. Bill Open Crown. Somebody that wasn't even financial range didn't have have a credit history and then they're like playing the victim card. The heck am I didn't get you know. Yeah so you you need skit. In the game and paying paying somebody on in percentage makes them have skin in the game. Yeah I I couldn't have said it better myself so next time I get that question and I'm GonNa call you in in and we can have a joint call with the people that are asking. Hey why are you not doing production Because it is important the skin and the Games important making ensure that they buy into this office like it's theirs is really important so you pay thirty percent of collected revenue yes and and I you paid on the first and fifteenth twice twice a month. I think it's the seventeenth and okay. Okay logistics. I'm a lot of my friends. Want to do that. But they but their current practice management software is just is not sophisticated enough to the current practice man. Just I mean if you think dentures eagle softer good. Just don't tell Alan anybody because when you open your mouth and say that anybody with a room temperature. IQ In nome. Alaska thinks you're either in kindergarten or you have a head head injury okay and you might WanNa tell neurologist because something the size of a lemon is growing in your brain woodside. What practice manager software are you using? So we use the same thing as steve torn out there and To cloud basis and listen and the home is my home weeks denture and Eagle Soft. I mean that they even had a movie about that. Did you see dumb. And dumber and and and then My God but okay. Yeah so so you're using Kyosai so you can do that and And then when I asked open dental to hook up with Gosh Darn quickbooks. pro- you know whatever it's tough but I'm I'm not. I'm not mad at it anymore because I already see the solution. They refused another numbers. So that's why the DSO's have taken twenty percent today and twenty more years. They'll have half and when they say what do you think it was bad and evil that the DSO's took over. I'll say well I I. Everyone told the dentist for thirty years what they had to do and they refuse to do it and now they're fighting with Delta when they should be over there with chocolates and roses is a saying. Can you see when when they come in. Can they have like a smartphone APP so we scan it so we absolutely no. They're already a validated member of Delta. And then we do dentistry. You pay US directly. Change the account open dental deposit and chase and do our and finished a whole transactions so we can at the end of the day what we did no they would. They wouldn't even. I mean they would know but anyway so you pay thirty percent of collections. Yes we and you're on your own cure size of your detrick sitting if you're centric single soft and you wonder if you can do that I'm just just take another shower. Just take a shot so so then I'm I want to focus in on. Why don't have employee turnover so you paid thirty percent collections? What else what else is in this relationship? Cupboard the lab bill at one hundred percent but explain your urine Chicago Kogyo University of Chicago. That's where Albert Einstein was more Nobel Prize Economics Universe Gago than any university in the world. When you walk down those halls also I mean? It's really romantic. I mean like every hole. I mean eight by ten picture of some guy and so he. Every one of those economists would say well you know if they had to pay twenty percents lab bill. They'd be using glide well at ninety dollars but when you pay the whole lab that they might use some two hundred and fifty dollar crown. Fancy schmancy deal so I was not expecting you to say we cover one hundred Alab bill and nobody. They got a Nobel Prize. Economics would recommend that so. But it's working working for you. You the holy grills reducing staff turnover. And you did that so so gives yeah. That's a great question I actually my Undergrad. Degree was in economic. So I I love talking about those types of things Keyed with that principle and really with every other principal in the office is we offer a quarterly bonuses for the office based on the profitability of the Office so oh we are very transparent. Every month are doctors get a monthly profit and loss statement of their office. They see every Expense and they see exactly what they spend on labs exactly what they spend on supplies labor all all those things what they made and what we do is on a quarterly basis. We give them a percentage of the office profitability so so it is in their interest if their labs are are super high to encourage them to use a different lab but at the end of the day. Yeah you know. Clinical quality is important and we want our doctores to make their own clinical decisions. We just try to train them to make good ones. You know if I was you. Your undergraduate degree was an economics from Creighton from Saint Louis University. Okay well Saint Louis is in Pretty close to Chicago and university Kaga Right now and they're ECON department has six faculty members living and teaching that have uh Noble Prize in economics. Amazing you should go over there and and show them everything because whenever I go to. Asu I whenever I have any type of science problem on anything you go to over the issue and they they have the the teacher What what do they call that the Where the And they help you do your homework. Wake a TA teacher assistant so you can walk into the math ECON CON whatever in every one of those deals has a Teachers Aides Teacher Assistant. Homework you've gotTA question. You got a problem and you could just walk in there talked to some guy with a two. PhD's in astronomy and Physics about some stupid black hole article you read on USA Today on on Thursday and you go in there and that guy will talk to you For the for the rest of the day for free so it's really really interesting interesting so you could go over there and you think well. These guys are teaching with the Nobel Prize Economics. They won't They won't do touch They won't listen to me the hell they won't they'll talk to you for four hours. That is so cool so I could bring my economic questions about the group to them. Yeah and they. They loved us that because because they they They want to know what's real world. I mean they they absolutely want to know what's on what people are talking about in the real world and they you so yeah do that. So we're talking about reducing employee turnover staff turnover. You talked about pay. What about Contract what about. I'm trying to think all the things he gets a recovering recovering not to compete. Lied again. Why you lost two people in since you've been there why what's making them? Happy then a certain ever happy their border. We take a lot of time to invest in our in our doctors You know we meet on a monthly basis with all of our doctors All fifty of them in a room and You know we we host continuing education but most of our C. E. I think there's three key areas to continuing education. There's obvious obvious. Clinical but the other two areas are leaderships. And kind of some of these business questions that you're asking so every month we get get together. We we get together as a group we make decisions as a groups And we really invest in education of our doctors You said there's three types of ce you said clinical what were the other two leadership and business And so leadership is different than business. Explain explain that So when I think of leadership it's communication it's You know being empathetic to your patience and your staff members. It's things it's as simple as you know saying hello and goodbye to your staff members and not leaving out the back door at five. Oh One when you're done with your last patient On showing your team members that you care those are the important the higher the HR for these doctors who's doing in the hiring and the fire who signing off that you're GonNa hire Jason Genta and not that crazy Michael acernote Guy Any doctor that we hire myself. Aj and Mike have all not. We've all talked to and we've all so kind of getting the approval on okay so I I'm willing to say this you're in Chicago land. They they got the bears they got. The white sox got the Bulls and the the head coach is a totally different person than the scouts. And Right now all the NFL scouts or out and they they know their job. But I know that I mean I bought Kasa Alan I think he's an amazing man and his brother. Mike but I I'm just telling the kids that I assure you that Allen Mike and Jason really really talented. HR empathetic psychologically in tune people because just having fifty not associates. I put one hundred people in the room. What percent are toxic? I mean what would you say. The eighty twenty rule. What percent are Mahmudi and bipolar? And Nice one day and mean the other. So I bet you that it's a fifty fifty that they've got a really great place to work. Doc for but it has to be accounted for that Allan Mike and Jason are really good at HR. It's it's no different than and looking at the practice level. You know an office with a really great dentist. It's it's not a coincidence that they don't have staff turnover whereas you know re- office with a doctor that has the doctor complex and and but you said that twice what what what is the doctor complex you know leading by the credentials behind her name rather than and leading as a as a leader and as a person you know yeah exactly you and you earn it by taking the time to talk to your your staff members and hey I might be the dentist but I'm still willing to take out the trash to get to make sure we all get out not at at the right time those type of things I think. Go along way and making sure that your team knows that that you care and in return the next time you're twenty minutes late. They're going to stay and they're going to help you. And they're not gonNA complain. And what so I go back Allen Got Outta CREIGHTON. Two thousand one. Michael got out in nineteen ninety nine. And what year did you say you you got out. Twenty eleven twenty seven. I don't know any difference between Anything really change in in the doctor Dr Deal do you see any us at millennials and baby boomers and all that and you got twenty eleven. Yeah so did you see any any changes ranges from twenty eleven versus nine thousand nine hundred nine when Michael or Alan got out in two thousand one you know I you the Buzzword that you hear from a lot of Younger doctors younger than myself is Kind of work like balance and You know autonomy. They want those type of things. What that means it is they might be willing to work thirty five to forty hours clinically a week? But they're not as excited to do the payroll and do those type of things. I I mean that's another reason why group practice is moving the way that it is now. Now I will say I don't think that you know millennials get a bad rap of being Lisi or things like that I think are the doctors that are that are young work really really hard but they they do care about You know getting home to their family family and things like that and it's it's our job as a group to create an environment that that suits those interests and we. We have to make sure you know if if we're building the group the way that we want it to and then we're trying to stick people in it that that. I don't want to do the way that we want to do it. We're not going to be successful. So you have to kind of form the group in a way that Meets than once a needs of news of a lot of the dentists out there You know that might mean having to dentists in an office that traditionally would have only had one along that allows people to you know take vacation to take maternity or paternity. Leave things like that. We just have to kind of make sure we're we're offering people what they want so do you. Do you have a mar fifty the Dennis. How many how many tell me again? How many dentists and how many offices you have fifty plus Denison thirty one locations? Yes does the what do those offices. I mean if if I walk into thirty one. McDonald's are Carl's junior. They all have the same starbucks. It's it's all the same format would what is your formulas at eight odds to docks what what is your formula so we grow by acquisition which means were purchasing practices from retiring dentists. And were partnering with those people. So we're inheriting whatever that office was like and and you know were were different than McDonald's or starbucks in that we don't change the the name or the branding or the logo or anything like that That office when we partner with it was really successful and has a culture all of its own. We don't WANNA go in and change that we want to help them and take some of the things off of their plate so they can make that culture that all of the patients. It's come to even better So you may go into any of our thirty one offices and the only thing that should tie them together is you're getting great customer service and you're getting great clinical care from there the way answer the phone or the way they greet we. You is GonNa get a little because people are unique and are awesome unique to. So I've always wondered third emanate activity mergers and acquisitions. I mean whenever I needed them. The student three four million dollars a year that he always did that. But it's so rare in dentistry so again simple math You know you go to the town of ten thousand Well there's going to be ten dentists because there's a dentist to every two thousand and rural draw into the city is times too so a city of ten thousand is drawing from twenty thousand so it would have ten Dennis for two thousand age and in one town town every time a sixty five year old old fat Howard is turned out to pasture. He sells it to some young hot energetic. Jason Zain Genta who comes in here and works it up. That's dangerous versus. I'm just GONNA buy that office. I mean I'm just going to buy it and rolling the mind so you look at this guy. And he started off with ten offices in town and ten thousand and every five years he bought the retiring Guy And then I come. I roll into town twenty-five years later to go lecture for their group practice or whatever and there's there's only there's only ten offices in the town he owns six of him and he's and he's doing four million a year. So why do you think I'm and then I asked Dennis. I said well you just simple numbers on on shark tank. How much money does it cost you marketing advertising to get new client here? They don't know on your average client. How much money do you produce collect in a thirty day period? Because that's how you pay your bills. Don't tell me what the patient's going to be worth as their family tree rolls out in the next you know Cambrian explosion of evolution. I I pay my bills monthly. How much does it cost to get a patient here? How much dennis rural they do? What is your overhead? What will you net? Because if I don't know the cost of the getting a new your patient and my net income I mean if it's going to cost me three hundred dollars to get you in here. Well I better do a thousand dollars a dentistry a net three hundred just to pay for my marketing. Gosh they don't know that number either but if they did know that number then they would know well that office across the street if you're paying fifty ahead that office. Four miles down is selling for one. Seventy five ahead and the guy selling the practice thinks he's going to retire for about ninety days in his truck breaks down and his wife wants to remodel the front room and a kid needs to borrow money. So then that guy you bought it from always comes back and works for a day or two a week for thirty percent collection and it's just a win win across the board but you just never see that an activity in dentistry. You always see it in Walmart mark but but let's go back to that so Bob Fontana every one of their eight hundred locations was Adobo. They opened from scratch. They've never bought office. Then the opposite is guys like you or heartland where you'll by mergers and acquisitions so would see so if I'm selling my practice so so you would say different psych of having a common name like starbucks or McDonald's or whatever versus ice all to you I'm Howard's dental depot so so you don't you don't change all the names to dental one owners no we don't we don't do that now. If it's you know Howard Haram family dentistry and you're retiring. We might change the name of that. Aw to Just because new doctors coming in but we'll we'll try to tie in the name That ties in geographically geographically. You know whether it's the area that you're in or things like that but no none of our offices are in decision dental partners but but kind of while I I work with Our younger doctors and I love doing that. One or the other roles that I do is honor acquisition side ride and I really love that too so While I'm not looking at the tax returns and kind of valuing the Are The potential office list from that perspective. What I do is I go in and meet the doctor? I look at The way that they're practicing all kind of talk to the doctor about the philosophies. I'll look at the procedure code analysis and see what kind of dentistry are they doing you know. Are they doing crowns in fillings. In referring everything else out or is this an office. That's kind of a niche office and they don't have a lot of patients but they're doing in tons of sleep apnea team Jay things and things like that you know one versus the other is not right or wrong but you need to know what you're are partnering with so that you can find the right Dennis to take that office over and you know what you're getting For those listening that they want to own their own practice and or do on their own practice the merger thing that you discussed is a great rate way to to help your office grow We do roll ups all the time and what role at means is exactly what you described you. You have a likely smaller practice of retiring doctor. That wants to sal in often times you know they may not have a nice building or they may not have anything that is of value where you'd want to go and practice in that same location but what they do have is they have loyal patients. And if you're able to get those people to come to your location you can get Dr Jones to come over for three months and can help transition those patients over for you. I mean you can help your office. Grow by fifty percent in a matter of six months In the value is is enormous so I would always recommend looking into doing that. But if you're GONNA do that don't just look at the tax returns. Earns look at those procedure code analysis. And make sure that the dentistry they were doing is is the dentistry. You're doing And kind of make sure that you're looking at it from both of financial perspective and a clinical perspective. Okay I'M GONNA go back to a you said three types e clinical leadership and business. You said leadership leadership was that so again. What would you describe business again? What's the diversity leadership in business or you could start with clinical a lot? A LOTTA WANNA know clinical. I mean a lot of people keep seeing the fact that the only areas in clinical dentistry growing double digit or clear liners and implant so finished the differences leadership and business. Because I dragged you because I think that if you you are having such reduced employee turnover I think that Alan Serrano Michael Serrano and you Jason. GENTA must be really psychologically grounded empathetic sympathy. I mean you guys just when a Sapien is talking to you you you get it. You know where it's coming from you know because I mean like I'll I'll ever ever dental to some some girl walks up to me and She'll be a an assistant or whatever and show she'll she'll say well you guys talk about this and this and I said well who's your doctor and they look back and then they roll their eyes on. Oh my God I I know you're a toxic hawks ICK animal and I've known you now for four seconds. Yeah how long have you worked for that guy a ears. It's like how how do you how do you you get a paycheck for eight years being so toxic that the only reason you're alive is because it's illegal for me to shoot you right now So so so again. What's ever seen leadership in business? So leadership is is memoir communication focused You know being empathetic making sure that your team members and staff are following you and things like that business. This is just Making sure that that you have an office that's healthy And that you understand what your office is doing on a monthly basis ACIS You Know I. I mentioned kind of having that discussion before we hire someone. What their financial goals are? We we go back to our doctors on an annual basis and asked them hey. What are your financial goals this year and we'll talk to them uh-huh and then we'll kind of look at their office and say you know? Hey you can do this Were we might need to open the hours a couple hours cadet a week or she don't want to do that. We might need to you. Know expand the offerings. That you're offering you know you're referring all your root root canals out right now If we get you some training that could increase your your production and collections and therefore your salary so when when we talk about business it's just understanding your business from the numbers perspective When when doctors come to Austin and they're asking for you know this or that in their office or they want to renovate their office We don't WanNa tell them no but uh we want them to look at their financials and see if you know if they have a thriving office and they're they're Profitability ability is really really high. Of course we're you know. Help them renovate day off task or get them. You know a cone being or something like that. Let let's let's I wanna I WANNA hold your feet to the fire. You're talking about business and you need to know if they're healthy would metrics. Are you looking at. What's what's a healthy office for year? You're looking at overhead. New Patients would business metrics on. Do the GENTA Assir no brothers. All look at so we look at Abba because Ebert all the EBA Yeah so explain that to him. Earnings before interest taxes depreciation amortization correct. So the the best way to think about it is that's a lot of words it's a it's a complicated You know a wheat. We could dive into all what every single one of those letters means but the way you just really need to think about it is on a monthly basis at the end of the day The amount you collected did is X.. Amount of dollars. You paid yourself you paid your staff you paid. Rents you paid supplies. You play labs all your fixed expenses your Variable expenses. Everything's paid at the end of the day you're going to have a certain amount leftover And and that is your profitability. So you know. In our offices our goal is to have them be at least twenty five percent. Profitable now what we do from. There is Decision One as their as their partner. we charge a twelve percent management fee. And that's covering you know in house legal in house accounting payroll. Hr All those type of things so at the end of the day after everything is said to said and done our goal is to how the office be you know twelve to thirteen percent profitable. Okay so let's go back at so we start with EBA. You're saying the dental office. This leads to be twenty-five percent proper. That means seventy five percent overhead. If you pay the Dennis of you pay the dentist thirty percent if you pay the dentist thirty percents you start with a hundred hundred. Pay The dentist thirty. Now you're down to seventy our pain Thirty percent of what they did. There's there's a hygiene Production okay. So you're you're paying the dentist thirty percent of what they collect and then what percent of your practices Hygiene what percent of a typical dental offices typical seventy thirty split. What we see on average so Dennis are doing brings seventy percent of production and hygiene is doing thirty percent of production? You're paying the How do you pay your hygiene? We pay hourly we currently. Don't pay them based on their production and collections. Either because of its its the variance and what they mean by. That is if you're a hygienist eight hours. Eight patients ACL examiner xrays. One don't show up. I can't make it up. I just lost money but when I'm a dentist my God I could have the whole morning fall apart and then the afternoon some guy walks in with a toothache and due to root canal and crowns on two and three three for fifteen hundred each and had a three thousand dollar afternoon and so I have a huge variance. hyginus don't have a huge variance. Okay so again again. So seventy percent production hygiene thirty. You Pay Your dentist thirty percent of collections You want the office to have even overhead of You said You wanted to be twenty five percent profit on EIB at all. Yeah well of management. Let's see what what what what's the. What's the overhead the goal? What is the overhead goal of your dental office? So after you're talking including pay and things like that yeah you pay the rent mortgage build out insurance. The dentist the hygienic lab the supplies you pay all the bills seventy five okay. So overhead goal is seventy five percent and then then the management fee is taken off of our audio off of that so what is the management fee twelve percent so twelve percent and twelve percent management fee and then that leaves over leaves thirteen percent. Yes and then. What's the That thirteen percent for so like I said that you know that goes to growing our group. We pay our doctors get part of that. That's part of that quarterly profitability bonus. That's really where we get our doctors to buy in because a a they believe. You know that. That's part of their income stream so they WANNA make sure you know if it's thirteen percent. Can they get it to fourteen or fifteen. They're obviously going to get more money to take home. It's no different than if you own your own office that profitability you. You WanNa take more at that moment just real quick. I always see you guys using the word decision. Dental and decision dental partners is that two separate companies or I one right and one drawn. Our official name is decision one dental partners. Okay well you need to tell Alan. He needs to fix his Lincoln page and his brother his brother got it right. Michael Olsen got it right. Everyone got it right but a okay. So it's dental its decision. One dental partners partners so Okay so So overhead goal is a seventy-five decision. One dental partners has it has a twelve percent management fee and then the thirteen percent remaining. How do you? It's a quarterly part of. That's in the quarterly bonus correct for our doctors doctors. Only what percent of that thirteen goes. Would you split with the doctors. Do they get ten percent of whatever. The profitability is so that thirteen percent they will get ten percent of that crime then. What was the other ninety percent there too? So that doc goes to you know we got goes to our group as a whole to decision dental partners the group and Our doctors our owner. You know we have fifteen of our doctors. Our owners are group so we have. What kind of like how? Many how many Partners Fifteen fifteen part. Okay so I want to talk about that when we when you get married are you married. I'm not married currently so you're in Chicago. Are you smarter than Einstein. Einstein was Chicago so no but when you get married if fails fifty percent of the time how do you get fifteen doctors to get married because when you marry When you you get married you have all kinds of glue that holds US marriage together you have children Saxon family fifteen doctors and Dan? It's a It's a platonic relationship. How do you get fifteen doctors to stay married and and not break-up and fico divorce it's a great question you know we? Those people are Equity Partners And at the end of the day Dr Mike and Aj who founded the group kind of Have the final decision making process So it's you know we're not getting into this voting thing where were splitting votes and things like that Now we are a group that where we want to make sure her. Everyone's happy and everyone has a voice and so we do have monthly doctor owner meetings where we're talking and discussing scene and we take all that into account when we're making decisions but Ultimately a Dan Mike or making decisions that are in the best interest of our group. Ruben as a whole sewer all the partners a dentist a doctor of dental surgery. and Are you a a lot of group practices realize that if I have kids come out and do the Muller and does and place him plants. Someday I'M GONNA have to pay ended on test I and buried on us. You know to Redo ten percent of these cases at absolute minimum Some DSO's are having only ended on us do their molar and don't only carried on his face sir implants and for if if any other reason the insurance companies will pay twenty thirty forty percent more for like an Arizona. They'll pay me a hundred molar root canal but they'll pay ended on twelve hundred with four hundred dollars extra. I can't afford to pay an associate to do this. So so are you certain to rotate specialists into your fifteen locations. Currently we don't have any specialists but but we are seeing right now are doctors. We rely on them to have partnerships with specialists in their area. And you know we want to make sure that our doctors are are treating are comfortable with the procedures that they're doing so you know I'm not GonNa go tell Dr Jones. Hey you're not doing root canals. You need to start doing them I WanNa make sure that at the end of the day the patients getting the best care possible. And whether that's Dr Jones doing it or sending out that's what's most important now for twenty twenty. We do see that some of our doctors have come to us and they're asking. Hey I would love ended honest to rotate through our office or a period honest and so we like to. Oh we like to provide whatever our doctors are asking for and so in two thousand twenty. We are going to focus on trying to bring specialists into our group. And you're in you're in Illinois and Wisconsin are you are you how long do you think you'll stay there. I mean I'll never forget Rennie shelling remember. Well anyway you would remember any. He retired Carver in school but anyway he owned Lords Dental Studio and I thought he was the neatest guy because he says glide wolf huge they do you about seven percent of the whole crown and bridge market right But that means half the dentists in any given year sent him something and half half the dentist sending something equal seven percent of the market and but Reynie said. We're never leaving Wisconsin. He goes if he says. There's so much working Wisconsin. He says I could have the second largest KRANENBURG laboratory behind glide will without ever leaving Wisconsin. I was talking to a one day on the show and he was in California and he was telling me he wanted to spread across to Arizona and Mexico and Texas. I said Dude. California is ten percent of America. They got forty million million people. They got twenty seven thousand dentists. You would never just pick northern or southern. You'd never have to leave northern or southern before are you died. You'd have a billion dollar company so so are you. Do you think you're GonNa are you GonNa Stay Illinois Wisconsin and just be a Brett right far cheesehead locally would laverne and Shirley or do you think you'll be going to third and fourth states. You know it's a good question. I think our our growth model is pretty simple. We want to continue partnering with Dentists that that WanNa be a part of our group and if we have odd dentists wanting to sell to us and partner with us and we have younger doctors wanting to join our group Were were not afraid to go into different areas We have established ourselves here in the Chicago land area and we to a really good job here. I'd like to hope and think but Yeah I think as long as we're doing really good dental work and HAB ABC dentists that love working for us and are staying with us. I think dot will continue to grow your so damn good. I got two more questions Russians but this the big big interview got fifty doctors when you're educating them on clinical. What would we're what's hot hot? And what's not in clinical. Where where are you trying to steer him clinically? Yeah I I let them kind of on yearly basis. Tell us what they're wanting wanting you know I don't think it makes any sense for me to bring in education if if it's not what they want and it's not what they're going to utilize so oh As you mentioned implants and Clear liners are are two areas where we're getting a lot of doctors wanting to go that way and they're asking for it so we're working really hard to to get them implant education and Clearer liner education I think our our think our schools do a really good job clinically. Educating our doctors on fillings and crowns and things like that I don't they're not getting as much Indo experience. Oh I talked to a lot of new grads. That have never done a molar before I I don't know if that school specific based creeping underground or dental score gorge you go to mid Western. I went to Creighton dental school so at Creighton. I was fortunate they didn't have specialists so I did. My I own endo who we thought someone on your team went to mid Western we. We have a lot of graduates You know it's Kinda right in our backyard dockyard so so. We do hire a lot of midwestern grads question when you go to buy a practice for mergers and acquisitions is there. Certain the minimum maximums. You're looking for I mean. Do you have like when you go hunting. You know whether you want a deer or rabbit or a most Is there what are the parameters. Here's that are that you'll even consider what what are you aiming for I think that's a great question. We we kind of know what we're good at right and not. That's kind of what the type of practice we like to go by so we are very you know where Dr led group we. I believe in a a strong hygiene program so making sure that they see hygiene patients. They try to get them in regularly and it's not just a haywar flooding this office with new patients. We're getting some fifty new ones a month but we're not keeping any of them that's not something that interests us because at the end of the day as soon as you turn that marketing spigot off. The patients are gone. So we look at Rather auden trying to say oh we have X. amount of act of patients what I like to look at is how many pro fees are done in a year and so how many monthly pro fees fees are done and are those patients coming back every six months So you run. You know if you're looking at office and you run the D one. One one zero adult profile code Take that annual number divided by twelve. And look how many are coming in every month You know. In our opinion opinion. A hundred twenty and above it is really good One hundred twenty is a good office for single doctor when you start to get into one eighty to two hundred That's where you can kind of have a second doctor in there So sounds like yeah I wanNA do is I WANNA end. This sounds like a great article. Strife downtown I I would actually love to get your You have a lecture picture called life. After dental. School millennials love our online. See we put up four hundred. What our courses? They've been viewed over a million times. you know it's I mean guys during that during that football game yesterday the second Ha- I mean that was such a blowout. I mean I. I was already surfing on on my smartphone during the back. Half of that the Gosh Darn Wisconsin. That guy did not show up but anyway so. I wish you'd read an article this because I got to customers. I got old guys like me. You're thinking why you know you know. It was like giving your baby up for adoption. I'm not going to sell my dental to someone who's going to do something. Come in here and treatment patients differently than I want. My granddaughter treated so you really you. You really care about your patient list your psychopath and you really want to be adopted. And then the The young kids coming out. They need to know but I. I wish you would do that life after dental school as an online see course on dental town in an article in Dental magazine because you're talking about both ends of the spectrum you know I deal with breath really. Those are the two sectors of the dental space that I deal with on a daily basis. You know the the younger people that that were hiring and then the older people retiring and you're right I. It's something that they were so hard to build and they've built this legacy and patients love them in there. They're scared of of giving that up. So that's where I like to come in from a clinical circle perspective and make sure that they understand that. Hey this group that that's doing the right thing and is doing great clinical care and I can feel comfortable you know retiring and knowing that my patients are gonna be taken care of so I would love to to put that course up. I'd love to write an article. I I think I think a lot of people in Texas won't even figure it out this whole thing's written by the Italian Ma but anyway But but you know and the young kids. They're so sweet they ask questions rush like what. What question should I ask an interview and and how you know what you know? They don't know what to ask. And then I've seen a lot of these interviews and the dentist the entire interview. He's selling himself. He's about he went to paint anyone to this and Tam. Jay is thoughts on everything. And I'm like Oh my God dude you just sold yourself for an hour and that little Pumpkin just sat there like saying the word so yeah. This'll be a great article too. I'm out of time But Gosh Yeah. Do an article online secours life after dental school You know how the old guys should prepare for their exit strategies that they can retire on the golf course knowing that. Someone's taking care of their patients like they want them to be taken care of and then the kids and dental kindergarten. I'm uh-huh what's going to happen when I finished my boards. I Love Tale. All right buddy. Hey it was an honor and privilege for you to come on the show. Thank you so much for taking our alrighty I live to come talk to my homeys. Thank you so much Howard I really appreciate. It was a lot of fun. All right buddy have a great day.

Office DSO Chicago Dr Jason Genta Diaz Dennis Jason Zain Genta Creighton AJ acernote Bob Fontana Allen Mike Michael acernote Creighton University School of office manager American Association of Dental Nobel Prize Delta private practice Life After Dental School ACL
210- Mistakes of Omission

Invested: The Rule #1 Podcast

50:47 min | 1 year ago

210- Mistakes of Omission

"Yeah. Everybody was still too. And this is L town. Walk him to the invested broadcast where we are rapidly becoming really good investors. I'm not kidding. We're actually seen so many people listening to this podcast are becoming better. And better investors, which is really fun because we're sensually trying to teach you the way Warren buffet and Charlie Munger invest the way Menashe provide as it the way guys spirit as it new. I mean, we're taking liberties here because none of these guys said, oh, yeah. You're definitely teaching the way I do it. But I think we're close, and then you can read their books and you'll see that we're in the ballpark of being able to pick individual companies what just pick a few of them Warren Buffett once said all you gotta do is pick maybe twenty in your lifetime. And if as long as you don't violate rule number one, which is to not lose money four or five of those. We'll turn out to be wonderful investments. We'll make you rich. It's I mean, it's really that. Simple. Honestly, it's really that. Simple. So what are we doing talk? About all this for years. Well, we laugh we laugh with Charlie says, really there's just four things you got to be capable of understanding the business. You gotta have a moat. You gotta have good management, and you gotta have a margin safety, and that's it. And the reason they don't teach it in college. Because whatever what would they do the rest of the semester? And now you've learned it in day one in five minutes. But fortunately, I think for those of us who've learned this, and maybe unfortunately for everybody hasn't there's actually substantial amount of effort involved in in understanding, those four simple things that that's the truth of it. Yeah. I think effort and joy to be honest. Like, it's what somebody said wants nothing worth having came easy. And I think this stuff is simple, but it's not easy. And it's a huge amount. For me. I don't know. I mean, I'm amazed to be honest. But there's a huge amount of joy. Oy that I've found in the difficulty within those simple ideas. I mean, just Charlie at the last daily journal meeting when we talked about this a bit was talking about the mistakes. He's made and investments he wished he had made. And and things he had missed out on and for somebody who is nine. What does he ninety something? He's pushing ninety five or ninety six up there. He's doing really well for that. Totally lucid brain working totally fine body failing him a little bit. But at ninety five that's to be expected. So for him to be thinking about those things even having done this for let's say seventy years. I just think it shows how much joy there is in the difficulty of it. I agree. I I think it's worth it's I love your concept of practice. I'd never heard that before applied to my my industry, but the practice of investing implies a joy in the process of learning something that's difficult. Yeah. It's it's hero. Yeah. Good point. It's like a like I remember when you're a little kid, and we started to learn snowboarding together. That it was hard. But it was fun. Right. Right. And I mean, we'd padded ourselves about it was fun because we didn't really get hurt because we use all this foam padding. We literally, by the way, anybody learning to snowboard. This is highly recommended by the town family, if you buy yourself, a computer or any sort of thing that is fragile and it comes in foam packaging, save the foam packaging, and then simply take it out of the box cut it carefully to the shape of your booty. And then tape that foam packaging onto your clothes. But underneath your snowboarding pants such that you look like Kim Kardashian. And you will enjoy learning to snowboard process. You have a little tiny ways that great big booty. And also where risk if you have risk arts and padding on your, but you're going to be super happy learning snowboarding. So that's what we did. So that's what we did. And and it was fun from day one, and it continues to be fun to to learn. It's a sport. I'll never master. Right. And yet, you know, so much joy. And by the way, you get to be pretty good pretty fast. It's like you get you get a lot of joy out of it when you can get pretty good pretty fast. And I think that that's true about this investing is you can get pretty good pretty fast, you're not going to be Warren Buffett, but you're going to be competent relatively quickly. Because there's as Charlie said, there's only a few things you really have to do. And if we add one more thing to that. Which is we're certainly not dreaming this up. This is Charlie one zero one is that you have to be patient, and that patients that that willingness to do nothing. Until you're quite comfortable. And quite sure that you're doing the right thing that combination of doing nothing plus learning the basic rules will make you successful. I think with a high degree of probability. I think the you really laws you'd be be patient and wait around until something comes at you. That's pretty easy to understand you're going to be successful with this and you're gonna make money. So let's talk about that. Because in the waiting comes not doing stuff, not not buying companies that you might otherwise by not buying the house down the block that you might otherwise by not buying businesses. You're doing nothing, right. And in that experience of doing nothing comes maybe missing out on something that could have been a really big winner. A really good investment. Yes. And that's what we all are afraid of were afraid of losing money by by. Buying something stupid that goes down. And we're frayed of losing money by not actually doing anything at all. Both of those things are true. Both of those things make us feel fearful as we learn n n for experts, frankly. Well to not. Okay. To push the metaphor ridiculously. We're we're now snowboarding and you'll remember there was a point in time where you could traverse across the side of the mountain on one edge on your snowboard while other people who are not a snowboard. We're making lots of lovely turns down the mountain while you're just crossing the the whole hill and very and trying to turn remember this part of which is okay. Okay. I'm gonna turn now. Okay. We're gonna turn. Okay. I'm gonna now almost going to do it. And all of that hesitation, you maybe avoid you may be don't turn when it would have been really easy to turn. If you make sense. Yeah. If you like knew how to turn 'cause your turn. It's like you haven't made any turns yet. So you start to be afraid to turn. Yeah. So what a good snowboard instructor. Does is. It gets you on a really gentle part of the hill. And they make it. So that your speed is very slow. In other words, they they in are investing world. You're just going to be very patient and wait for something that super super easy. And the time to do that. When you're going to pull the trigger is when you know, we've had a big recession or something like that is a time. When all the stocks go down, then then it's so the hills very low, and you can make that little turn. And we're coming up on time. Like that. I think pretty soon now. So this is a good time to learn to do this stuff. But meanwhile, if we're use that metaphor. You've missed out on all this fun of all these other turns you could have been making. And that's the the the sort of agony of not of not being that confident or to be fearful or the agony of patients to wait until you just dead. Certain. You're not making a mistake is you are going to miss some things that a better investor. Would have taken up on. Yeah. And those are those are painful, those are still painful that Charlie still remembers many of them in his investing career. And so you just gonna happen. It's going to happen for sure. And it's never gonna stop happening. Your mistakes if you do this, right? Your mistakes are going to be mistakes of omission. If you do it, right? You will not have very many mistakes of commission. You won't have made mistakes where you lose money. The mistakes are going to be. Man. I saw it. It was right there. And I just didn't have the confidence to pull the trigger. And it went up eight hundred percent. Yeah. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. You've got one like that do. Yeah. I've got one what you should have doing it. Right. You should have one. Tell you 'cause I'm not actually one hundred percent. Sure, it whether it was a mistake or not. And I've been really debating it because I think especially as somebody learning, but for the whole life of investing in having an investing practice. I think we have to be ruthlessly honest with ourselves about armistice makes because if we avoid noticing that we made a mistake, then how can we be sure we won't do that particular one again, which would be even worse than making it the first time. So I just think this is so important to me to make sure I really understand what I've done wrong. But in this particular case, I just can't decide if I screwed up or not. So I wanna tell you about it. So this is Lululemon stock symbol is Lulu L U L U. And I'm sure you guys have all heard me talking about Lou. Lemon at this point. Basically they make in their core. They make yoga clothes that was their original reason for existing now, they also make yoga clothes for women. I should say now they also make lots of running close lots of closed for other kinds of sports, but running and yoga are kind of their main one still and they make men's clothes which have been extremely successful lately. And I really like them, and they also make whole girls line, which is super cute, but has not done as well actually lately. So Lululemon was one of the first companies I looked at when you first started teaching me about investing because you said what stuff do you like? And I said yoga, and we looked at Lululemon immediately. And I bought their clothes. I still buy their clothes. I loved their clothes. I still love their clothes. And and I I looked at it back then and they were going through some problem. Uh-huh. Than it was essentially a classic rule one event where there so this was back in like when do we look like late twenty fifteen let's say twenty sixteen ish. And their CEO at the time was founder. Who was this guy who obviously created the whole brand which is very like all about living your best life and being a having a yoga kind of life outside of just yoga class in. And really pioneered these certain fabrics that they use for the pants, and and like cute jackets, and obviously, I just love the stuff that they make. So he did all that. But he also was kind of a jerk and set a lot of mean stuff about women's bodies and finally got ousted from his own company because he said a couple really bad things, which I think was a good thing. He left so then they hired. So at all this at this point. I was like, okay. I love the company, but I can't tell what's going to happen in the future with it. First of all here. My reasons. One. It's kind of a fashion company as in they come out with new styles regularly. And if people don't like those styles are not going to buy them. And I'm always wary a fashion companies because I don't know what they're going to be making not even ten years from now not even five years from now, I don't know what they're going to be making next season. And I don't know if people are going to like it, and I don't know if I'm gonna like it. So that gives me great pause about fashion companies. And so I looked at Lulu. I thought I don't know who they're going to get to replace this guy who was the founder this incredibly charismatic founder who took the company from nothing to what it became who. Are they going to get that's going to be able to replace him despite all of his problems? What if this new management team changes, the styles or changes the fabrics are changes? What I love about Lululemon. And I just felt like I couldn't totally predict the future of that company. So I was literally there I distinctly remember walking by the Lululemon store in boulder. Colorado going man assure do love that store. Should I should I buy their stock? And I just didn't feel confident enough about it. So that was an omission. I did not act now. Was it a mistake? Should I tell you? What's happened since then? Tell me. So what's happened since then is they've gone through to CEO's, actually, they're on their second. So they hired somebody to replace the founder, and he lasted until SMID twenty eighteen I want to say, and then he was actually dismissed for some kind of mysterious misconduct, which the company is not talking about. And actually framed it as him resigning, but there's lots of questions around it. So clearly something happened there, and they got rid of him. However in the meantime of him being the CEO the company stock has risen, what is it like three times something like that? Ballpark from. Let's call it sixty bucks athle- when we're looking at to like. One seventy right now. No, no. I mean until mid twenty eight teen to mid twenty six. Yeah. It was at one sixty. So he I mean, he kept everything the same in the company as far as the culture of the stores like to consumer to me to outsider. It all seemed like they were really doing well with this transition, and and and coming out with different new men's lines and at the same time not losing the stuff that women like me love about Lululemon. So then they can't him and they just hired this guy who came from Sephora. He was five years at Sephora and took Sephora through. Sephora Americas through going digital and having the Sephora stores be much more connected to their website until their mobile app. Sephora has done insanely well in that amount of time. And I can tell you that as a consumer as well as an investor, and I'm just really impressed with. With the way his name's Calvin McDonald with the way, he led that company. So now, he's at Lulu. And there's a whole team of new people, and they kind of in a way cleaned house a little bit for whatever was going on with the secret misconduct. And I'm kind of Optimus dick, and they they're men's lines. They've been talking a lot about expansion there. Men's lines have been doing really, well, they're expanding into what they call self care, which is their skin care line. Because you know, you go to you go to your yoga class or to the gem and you're all sweaty. And you wanna use some products that are going to work well with what your wearing. And so they think okay like people are coming into by Q tops. They'll also buy face wash. That is perfect for after the gym, which makes total sense to me. And frankly, I totally want to try it. And and they've got a girl sign, so they've got all these expansion ideas. They've opened new stores. I don't know. I guess my point is. I totally missed out on this whole thing. But I don't think that I could have predicted it, what do you think? Okay. So we come back just always to the basics, right? Understand the business. Does it have them out? Do you trust the integrity of the management? And can you buy it on sale? Can you which requires the figure out what the things worth roughly? So if we're to break this kind of back and even like. Look, okay. We can talk about the price. I wasn't even like really looking at the price. Although I knew that it was kind of on the lower side because of these issues they were having. So let's let's break down first off, can you are you capable of understanding the business? Do you feel confident that you? Yeah. Okay. It's not not a critically hard business to understand retail. They use comparible stores. I'm familiar with it. Same kind of. Yeah. Yeah. And I totally understand what they sell. So without getting into everything after note about being owner of retail clothing line, something you could you could get a grip on. I think if you work at it. So then the next question is. Okay. Great. So now what's the moat? What what's the intrinsic characteristic of this company that protects it from competition? Why can't Nike under armor? Ralph Lauren gap. You know, why can't the rest of the world look at the fabric and copy it and put those exact clothing lines into their stores, but they haven't. So it's a brand moat. So they have a brand moat. Are you saying that they have a Sikh of that they have a secret mode as well some kind of patent? They do not have patents. They'll Pat affects. No. So I go, I think the other companies probably are trying to copy it, but they're not succeeding. And I don't see any. Where anything other than Lululemon to go to yoga class, not fame? What I'm saying you see leggings everywhere, which is I don't know maybe Lululemon, invented the whole fashion movement of wearing leggings. I have no idea but legs are everywhere. Are they all Lululemon legs? No what I'm saying. Is that when I try other leggings on? I don't like them as much. Okay. Why that is why companies aren't just fully copying them. I don't know. Maybe they think they have better leggings, but not for me. Okay. Good. So there that's a brand. Mo all right. I mean, that's like me going prefer. Chipotle burrito to McDonald's burger or negative. I prefer McDonald's burger to Burger King. It right, right. I mean, they're just leggings. And for whatever reason Burger King's decide it wants to make burgers this way. And I keep wants to make leggings that way right parallel. Okay. So that's a brand moat. Right. But it's not it's not. Secrets that's important not secrets and brand boats are are wonderful, but difficult to really hold onto for long. Periods of time, particularly in fashion, right? So Nike's managed to sustain a brand moat in its shoes. It's you know, Coca Cola sustains a brand moat. So call has advantages if you're saying right now that it's fashion than we need to talk about that. Because that's where I think I made the mistake. I well, I mean, isn't it fashionable to where leggings to yoga class instead of shorts or where leggings down the street instead of pants, isn't that fashion is that something that could change over time. No. Because I don't think it really matters. If people wear them on the street or not what matters is what you wear when you're actress sizing the wearing them on the street is just because they look cool. That's all so that could shake, but you can just change your clothes after the gym. It's not a big deal. So no, I think the reason I thought they were fashion is that they do come out with new styles. But they don't come out with new styles actually that often, and I can still have these certain tops that I really liked to buy certain leggings that I really liked to buy buy new ones like every year or so, and they always have the same ones. They've had the same ones for years. They haven't changed these styles. So they do bring in new ones every now. And then like, I just got these really cool. I'm like advertising. I just got these really cool jogger pants that. I'm obsessed with. I highly recommend the little. The idea. So so you're. Because I'm just gonna call it fashion because because Melissa loves Ralph Lauren stuff or she hasn't died enough row. Still designing but she is all through his career. She really liked his kind of designs. Right. They just kind of worked for her. And it wasn't like they were changing in any gigantic way. They're pretty similar designs for a long long long long time. Ralph Lauren polo, and so- fashion doesn't mean it's changing all over the place. It means that there's a certain style to it. And you really like it you like that brand fits you fit your body fits away live fits the lifestyle projection. You're making whatever it is about brands the reason I put it in that category. So we want to be able to in order to make a decision about what to do about this company. One of the things we have to figure out, you know, what industry are they in where they where are they competing because we're going to try to figure out what their motives we've been. Oh, what industry were in if we're gonna we're gonna start a clothing company and make really cool egging pats or whatever we call those things a little lemon type things. We'd want to understand our industry. Pretty well. Like who why do we think we can do well here? Well because Nike's ignoring this completely. And so is everybody else. Nobody's in here at all whatsoever. And we can make a really high quality thing here and people are going to love it. And so we go after that niche. So I don't think we will lemon off Laura and are in the same industry at all. Except in the sense that they both make clothes, but I do think that if there's like a fashion athletic apparel industry, then I guess Lhamo would be in that. So they're not let apparel and their competitors are under armor. Atlanta slash gap Nike. Who else makes yoga stuff and running? Okay. All those kinds of. So first thing is we have to decide can they compete against these other guys and continuing to compete, and let's say let's just say that we're really like him. And we understand why we're buying their stuff. And we may not be very sure why you know. Mcdonald's doesn't make burger the way Burger King does. But we like Burger King and this company is the only Burger King game in town. And so yeah, they they have a moat. They have a brand moat that they can sustain for a long period of time. I definitely think so and what I what I thought that was their moat has been damaged, and it might change. But that has proven not to come true. If you're paying higher interest credit cards right now, then it's very hard to start investing. You've gotta get those credit cards paid off. And it feels so good to pay him off get a lower rate and save money. You can refinance your credit card balances and save with a credit card consolidation loan. From light stream get a fixed rate as low as six point one four APR with auto pay. They even give loans from five thousand dollars to one hundred thousand dollars, and there are no fees, and you can even get your money as soon as the day, you apply wanna save even more our listeners get an additional interest rate discount. The only way to get this discount is to go to light stream dot com slash invested. L I G H T S T R E A M dot com slash invested subject. Credit approval rate. Includes point five percent auto pay discount. Terms and conditions. Apply and offers are subject to change without notice visit lights. Team dot com slash invested. For more information. Right. Okay. So then the next step is. All right, good. So we've got the first two boxes checked, although we have to do more homework. The third boxes management. And here we have a problem in two thousand sixteen the founder the person with the passion the person with the the concept, the founder has been fired and is actually in a war. Yeah. He's written letters company about becoming Dane. Okay. So this violates one of our four things that we have to have right? We now have lost our founder, and we have a new CEO coming in. And we simply don't have a way to judge this CEO this performance. So this is a big red flag in determining whether you want to buy this business or not tell me. The CEO's rather important. Okay, go. What's the red flag there anew seal, the brand new CEO and firing the old one those two are both red flags that fire in the old one is a question of of of brand sustainability because the I mean, holy smokes. This guy made some really serious statements about who he wanted to have wearing those clothes, right? And and that was shocking. All right. So that may have been a terrible brand. Destruction. And you just don't know right there. How that's going to roll out. So that's a huge red full created by the CEO. Exactly. And then the new CEO is automatic huge red flag that really a new CEO is an automatic red flag. It's not Matic no to the investment, but red flags or something. What I mean by red flag? It's something I really have to dig into and understand deeply. And so then the question becomes how important to the future growth of this company is the CEO in the first place or is the brand so good that it can roll through a mediocre CEO. Right. And when you're looking at a company like this where? If they just keep doing the same thing, they're doing the market size might not be big enough to grow very much. If you're talking about being in the exercising market place might be a relatively small space. If you're talking about competing against companies that make athlete apparel. You're talking about Nike talking about a rather large space. Okay. But Lululemon at that point in time. Was just starting to kind of be in that athletic apparel world. Right. They came out of a very specific yoga thing. I see what you're saying. You're saying that that just yoga only yoga clothing, and like mats, and whatever else they made for yoga is not the same as being the larger athletic apparel, kind of company that now they're talking about becoming. General we would say get a little company that's got a little niche and yoga as soon as their niche gets big enough, then Nike's going to step in there and squash. And can they expand other kinds of sports? Yeah. Exactly. Exactly. So now you have the brand tried to expand. And new COO is going to try to do it. And those are two very big unknowns. So big that when we ask our fundamental question, which is that will this company bigger in ten years? I think in two thousand sixteen you're right. It would be impossible to know for sure. I just don't think you could know that. I don't know how you would know that. I didn't know either. It just didn't seem predictable enough. But I find that maddening. Well for someone who is deep in the industry, maybe write an expert snowboarder on this. What is appearing to be a black diamond hill rather than right? Just a little big inner run, this looks like a steep hill. This may be something that an expert could negotiate the they could find their way through it. They know enough about the business and the moat than the and what this company has going forward and who the buyers are. But boy, you'd really have to be a pretty pretty good expert to make a decision at that point in time that this new CEO is going to blow the roof off. Which he did he did. And when he was named and he used to be at Tom shoes. And he was speaking snowboarded he was at Burton snowboards. Potomu shoes being the main like check Mark on the okay? This guy probably understands what Lula limit is all about. I thought. Oh my gosh. He's going to do really. Well, like this company's going to go far. So yeah, I don't know red flag. Maybe, but so there would have been there in my in my world that would have been okay. If I knew what you know about Tom shoes. I would say okay this. This is a risky biz. There's a lot of uncertainty here. But we do have a good track record. I'm in love with their products. I totally understand what people are buying them. The price. I have to make a determination about here. But in general, I could see putting this company into that part of the portfolio not going to twenty five percent of my portfolio and stick it in here. But I might come in and buy. One or two percent of my portfolio into this. And look at it deeply from that point of the reason that you wouldn't go twenty five percent in is because why. Because I'm not comfortable with management. I there's no way I can be and I'm not comfortable the moats not broken because I'm thinking like how do I compare this to Pola with which also got a new CEO who to me seemed quite reliable? But you never know. Right. He's not he's new. Well, deck Solent excellent way to think about this. So again, we have two companies capable of understanding you yoga and made data's. And then we have a moat question. One is a brand moat. The other one that you portly. Moat was definitely a brand moat, but they have secrets and they didn't follow through on management practices, which wear their secrets were on management practices to provide fresh Cormet food every day in every restaurant exactly safely. They failed to do that. They had a problem it created a huge event. So these these this management practice is so difficult to do to execute properly that the other direct competitors companies like MOS could doa that are out in the brio business haven't even begun to try to get that big. They just it's just hard. And they certainly haven't tried to do it with all natural ingredients. So they had this little extra thing going for it. That maybe maybe there's some quality of that to the to the to the story for. For Lulu lemon. But I'm not positive there is so but any case we get to the management. Now, here's a big difference. I think it's is it. It's ELS, David. I think it's Dave ELS. Anyway, the CEO and founder of the company was still there of which company of Cipolla. Yeah. Yeah. He wasn't booted. And he's the passion. He's the he's the guy that created this niche with the passion to make it happen. And they were looking for somebody. They brought in an operation sky. And he was on his watch is where the management problem happened that caused coli and they were looking and then else came back in and took back overthrew control. So I'm like, yes. Thumbs two thumbs up for guiding hand here. Totally right guiding forgot deeply experienced big track record super predictable guiding end that came back in the bench. Starbucks Schultz Schultz came back into star after it hasn't pickup. Same thing with apple when jobs came back into. So when we see that happening at my confidence goes up things are going to be under control. That's not what we had to happen in loom. As a different story. Okay. And then we go to the final thing, which is ultimately we've got a couple of red flags up. Whether we went on the company at all. And then we take a look at valuations. So if we if we're not real sure where it's going to be in ten years evaluation exercises kind of moat. I mean, it's like you don't really know where it's going to go. But you could kind of do a best case thing and say, well worst-case is it crashes and burns, right? But best case, let's make a valuation analysis number one thing going for them on their numbers. If I recall, I'm looked at it for a long time. But I don't think that any debt no debt, I think are debt free, which is very much like AAA gives me a huge boost in confidence that this thing isn't going to go down. I mean, maybe I could lose some. But not all okay. So that's good. And then I'm looking at ten years, and with japodlay is really easy to look out ten years and make sort of reasonable case. But we can't do that with limit. Because we don't know for sure what's going to happen to just gotta take best talking now in twenty sixteen or are you talking now in twenty nineteen say twenty sixty so twenty sixteen we we have a lot of trouble really getting a bead on where things are going to be in ten years. That's that's the catch. So that backs us away from it. But if we wanted to we could make a rough approximation of value if we assume things go well. If you say, okay, this this new CEO's gonna fix the culture is going to turn around this little issue with the founder leaving gonna we know that's going to rattle everybody, but they're going to be able to get it together. And he's going to maintain the great products and the vibe of the stores that everybody loves. Right on. So now, we just make the assumption. Okay. They're going to keep on rolling. They've had a little problem here. They got a blip. Maybe I got a chance to buy into this thing. They're gonna keep on rolling. All right. So now, we can do our three methods of valuation won the first two need to predict some level of growth is gonna take awhile. Now, I'm just gonna just I'm not gonna try to do the numbers. I'm just going to say, this is what I would next as I would approximate some level of growth that I thought could be sustainable, and then I would also just look at it and say, okay, well, what are the owner earnings and right now. And then what should I pay for those right now, assuming that they're going to do this well or better in the future, and I would have kind of come to some conclusion there? But at the end of the day, I I looked at this thing that and I didn't I didn't feel I had enough insight onto why that brand would succeed and not get blown away by Nike. So I didn't jump into it. It did look a little bit. Cheap in two thousand sixteen. I think I think so because everybody everybody was having the same thoughts. I was oh my God. We love the brand we love the clothes. But we don't know if the new team's going to change that. So okay. So let me just say before we move onto today. I'm going to take from this that I actually don't think I made a mistake. Which is kind of a big deal because that means that I shouldn't change my process around that. And I've been really debating if I should change my process around it like. A little unsure. But it's a brand I love it's a company I use. It's a company I love it's a company with a strong new management that could be great. Like, I don't know. I just feel like there's these indications of like, maybe I missed that. Maybe I should have caught on to that a little bit or been a little more confident maybe instead of being overly cautious. Well, if you if you wanted to just take a flyer on it, there's some fun things to do you could take a little bit of money and buy a call option. I wasn't. It's not true. A little bit of money and buy some stoke. And the thing that's fun about a call option is you know, exactly how much money you're going to lose. And you're probably going to lose. So it's really going to Las Vegas and not investing. But it's a fun gamble. And if you're right, you know, you could make a substantial amount of money, but the problem with call options is you have to be right. And you have to be right in the right timeframe. And I think if you'd done a call option in late two thousand fifteen early two thousand sixteen you would not have been right in the right amount of time. Your time would have expired, you would have lost your call option money and ironically, you would have been right, but you weren't right at the right time timing stuff that would have been hall so terrible. It would have been so horribly done it, right and doing the same call option. Again, the second time is much harder because yard he lost the first money and nothing happened. The stock price didn't go anywhere. Here for two years it just waddled. And if you if you bought it at about sixty there may have been a time right in late two thousand sixteen where it went up above, and you might have made some money, but if you're trying to really smoke, it you what held on and you end up losing the other hand if you bought that same option in November. Let's say two thousand eighteen when the stock was still in the sixties that would have been really good. He would have gone to the sixties in November twenty eight team. No. It went down to. Let's unlike chart I have it at like one twenty. Oh, yeah. It's a fifty in one thousand seventeen and in this to that. It was November two thousand seventeen it was sixty. Yes. So if you did it then and put five dollars into an option in a made a fortune, but I don't do those kinds of trades. I'm not an option straighter like that. I don't like gambles never been a good gambler much much too conservative for that. So I wouldn't excuse me. I wouldn't have done it that way. I would have done what you did. Which is nothing. Get a no decision. I just can't I don't know enough about this to make the decision. And ironically about the time that I would have started having a lot of confidence in the CEO. You got fired. So or resigned with the discipline signed. We don't know. Technically resign. So let's be let's be careful that our words. So the end of the day, you're going to say, no to a lot of things that are ultimately going to turn out to have been fabulously, great, investment ideas. But they weren't investments at the time. They were gambles, and you're gonna always be faced with people in your investing career. We're going to tell you about the amazing amount of money. They made doing XYZ stock at such such such a time. Just like you're gonna talk to people go to Las Vegas, and they just remember all their big wins. And they don't remember all the rest of the money they lost. But if you follow this strategy of being very careful and very conservative and remember you're on a beginner slope. And don't try to be on expert black diamond when you're just starting to learn you're not gonna make a mistake of commission. Your mistakes will be could I could've made turns right there. I could have bought that stock, but I didn't. And this particular case. I don't think you could have. I think it had to have a crystal ball to make to make a decision feel a little bit better almost hoping it was a mistake. So that I could change something about what I'm serious. Because I feel like I'm running into these a lot which is maybe maybe a good thing. I guess I'm noticing more and more potential investments. But being I don't know. I just I'm debating if I'm overly cautious or not. So it sounds like at least on that one. I wasn't overly cautious. You don't think I think in the investing world, there's no such thing as overly cautious. Honestly, except this one thing. And that is when you know that it's good right now the word, you you had all countries why you weren't sure on that investment. But when you do know, it's good. Then the mistake is to not invest deeply not not to not get all in that. That's the mistake of caution that too many people make and that's very frustrating too. So I would strongly urge you not to make that mistake definitely made steak for sure but in order to not make that mistake. You have to know your Ana company you understand. And you like I mean, it's. It's got the moats got the management in your binded, great margin of safety in order to not mistake in order to not make the mistake of too much caution in the actual investing. You've got to know you're doing the right thing. And then you can load up the truck. It's hard. It's hard to know. It's hard to know these things. Well, it's hard in this market. This is a very tough market for an investor like us when you've got a market where Charlie Munger has about a stock for three years and Warren Buffett's about one. I mean, come on. These are the best guys in the world, and they will jump on it like a dog on a bone. If it's a good marketplace, they will be buying buying buying and they're not buying anything. So feel feel you're you're in good company with your misery. I'm going to some stuff much. All right. So you guys we are going to be back with a report from Berkshire Hathaway because we're both going. Which is on may fifth. Is that right Saturday may fifth? I'm gonna say, Yep. No Saturday may fourth and you can watch the Berkshire Hathaway meeting online on. Yahoo finance and there's a link to it already on the Berkshire Hathaway website under annual meeting. If you wanna go find that. So that's all day central time on Saturday fourth, and we are going to be doing a million things there and record the podcast for Tuesday may. Seventh. And talk about all the things that happened and talking about the meeting and Danielle is going to be on a panel. That's four fifteen got the Hilton hotel should be up on stage and. I'm going to be there. Watching her talked with a group of really high powered investors who I think are going to be fun to listen to so true. Check it out if you wanna come. It's the pan afternoon of information about women running funds, and whether or not women are better than men at running funds and managing money, and how women can get more assets under management, which is what I'm going to be talking about specifically so go to variant perspectives dot com variant perspectives dot com. If you want to gets and to read about all the other speakers, there's a pretty amazing lineup of women. So it's a real honor to be included there. And yeah, I'm excited that you'll be their dad. That's may third guys. That's Friday may third before the meeting on Saturday may third four fifteen at the Hilton, and Danielle and probably I will be signing books at Creighton bookstore. In after four the panel, probably around noon ish bit timing is a bit up in the air noon. One ish, very it's a it's a nice sized bookstore, but a small place for people to pack in there. But if you were to show up there, and you know, at least by a book of something that Creighton university. Business Creighton university books, not the bookstore. It's at the actually I don't know where it is. It's it's in the atrium at the business school. Oh, it's over the remember that last year. We we we also signed books at every single bookstore in Omaha last year. So I know why you're confused completely can be all right? So we'll be Creighton university up on the student. I think it's the student union or something that hub or the business school or something. But you know, what we're going to get all of these details nail down. And we're going to let you guys know about it on the next podcast. I will have an announcement with much better details so until next time and then Berkshire. It's like Li like holiday of the New Year's Eve or nears day of value investors. Everybody gets together and celebrates what stock for all of us value. All right. Thanks, everybody. Glad to know that I'm mystique free. That's not actually what you said. But that's obviously, I'm gonna take it. Of course, you are. You have such a good teacher. Thanks, everybody. Speaking of war. All right. Thanks time to go play. Thanks for listening to invest it. If you enjoyed this episode, you want more information, including show, notes and more episodes. Visit us at invested podcasts dot com. There's a special offer waiting for cod cast listeners to attend my three day investing workshop, absolutely free. So just head to invested podcast dot com. Everything discussed on his podcast, either my opinion, or Danielle's opinion, and is not to be taken his investing advice because I am not your investment advisor, nor have I considered your personal situation as your fight Dushi airy this is for your entertainment and educational only. And I hope you enjoy it.

CEO Lululemon Nike founder Charlie Munger Warren buffet Calvin McDonald snowboarding Burger King Sephora Creighton university Kim Kardashian Berkshire Hathaway boulder Hilton hotel Omaha Moat Yahoo Colorado Danielle
487: A Fresh Approach to Practice Growth with Dr. Tom Larkin

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

53:37 min | 1 year ago

487: A Fresh Approach to Practice Growth with Dr. Tom Larkin

"Preneurs have you been to a state regional or national dental conference lately can you say snooze fest nearly empty lecture halls tired, boring content and people attending just to punch card and get their mandatory seat will the dental success summit is a hundred eighty degrees. The exact opposite of these obsolete and dying events for the last seven years. We here at the dental success institute created the most entertaining and content. Rich anti converts for the dental profession. Come mix mingle and learn from our world class lineup of speakers. And more importantly, hang out with dentists that are leading the profession in revenue culture and innovation say goodbye to the Walking Dead. The negativity that exists in our great profession and surround yourself with inspirational positive and successful dental professionals who've redefined what success looks like. Do not delay. Come to the beautiful j w Marriott in Scottsdale on March twenty eighth and twenty nine two thousand nineteen and join this revolution. This event will sell out, and it has for the last four straight years and hotel rooms will definitely sell out. Go to dental success summit dot com to register and get forty percent off of the registration while seats remain dental. Success summit dot com. The dental for Noor podcast. Okay. Doctor. It's time to put down that hand piece. You're listening to the show dedicated to helping dentists get their lives back. It's time to decrease your stress increase your ability and regain your passion. Now. Introducing your host, Dr Mark Kostas. Hello everyone. Welcome to another episode of the dental podcast. I'm your host. Dr Mark cost has got an old friend on with us today. Dr Tom Larkin. We're lucky to have him. Tom, a native of Omaha Nebraska and a graduate of Creighton University School of dentistry having both worked as a clinician in private practice, and as a professor into universities, Dr Larkin brings a unique blend of common sense and practicality to his work. He has written two books on dental practice management and two on oral wellness after attending the bail Donen precept or ship in two thousand thirteen he began to develop curriculum to help dentists incorporate advanced preventative protocols Senate around the science and oral systemic condition. Tom is the founder of proactive oral wellness POW, hygiene dot com, a coaching and implement of an implementation website for. For the most advanced approaches in preventive dentistry. He most recently joined the faculty of the dental success network and he lives in Lexington. Kentucky today. Tom doing great great to be here. Mark great to hear your voice, buddy. You are always a favourite on on the podcast here. So thank you so much for coming back. Lots going on in your world, you know, a link you, and I go way back, but recently, I guess and it's coming up again, I will be back in Lexington to be speaking at Louisville and university of Kentucky and presenting the life in dentistry summits with our with our buddies from the life and dentistry podcast and of hoping to spend some time with you. Because last time I was there. We had just a blast together. It's a good. It's a good town and trying to make it a destination point. I've got Chris valves coming memorial weekend to do a classier. So we gotta do bourbon tour thing. He did a Napa Valley thing last year. It's it's a good destination. I mean, you took us to buffalo trace, which was something that I I mean, my my son Bryson, and I went together, and he he sampled root beer while we all sampled a good old-fashioned whisky. And and also what was the name of the the horse farm that we went to with all those Kentucky Derby winner. Charlie America, Darlie, America. Yeah. Yeah. We saw that that horse that door. Yes. You know, exactly who has talking about. So tell me a little bit about his history again in what he's worth. Refined in and I was at the airport. I said in Mark tomorrow, I'm gonna show you a horse where hundred million dollars account link to me like, yeah. Right. Then we have this amazing to this farm, which which I live on the Riffa overlook it literally can see farm from your from your guest house. Yeah. It's my it's my fence line Sheikh Muhammad Almac tune the ruler of divide katie's the wealthiest horse owner in the world. These are the most exclusive race horses, and you got to see up close and personal guts go to his office and trophy gays, and it's a heck of a tour so Medaglia d'oro. So let's talk about his stud fee. So he works a couple times a day, quote, unquote, works they bring bring the girls in and they have a special place for him to. I guess it's the the breeding house or the what do they? The bridge. The breeding shed, and it's nothing like a shed guys. This is like. It's it's padded all around. It's got nice wood shavings on the ground. And there are people standing by because this is a hundred million dollar horse. And they don't want any of the girls to hurt this. This the stand. It's it's crazy. These one hundred fifty thousand and he breeds one hundred fifty times so put that in your calculator richer. Ebert offer a year. And the reason that he is so sought after is because of the the success of his offspring. Why? Why exactly that's it the successive as of his prodigy and and his Butler's, right? If you have a Yukon from good family and you reproduce your family. You know, you can just basically name your price. Hundred fifty times one hundred fifty I don't have my calculator. But that's it's. Money into your your career goes from age five to about age twenty as a stallion and house if you know. So he might teams I don't know where in his teens because I you know, Strelka time time fast now he's in his teens. Animal. Incredible if. Yeah, a world I had nothing. I knew nothing about I didn't know anything about distilleries either. So had a really really good time. Last last time, I was in Kentucky with you. So thank you for rolling out the red carpet and can't wait to see you again this March. Well, tell me about what's happening in your life. You have a crazy big life. Yes. I'm really enjoying DS n and you know, kudos to you kind of putting that together. I told you the concept of let's get off line and get a little more serious and kind of get get some truth telling is really been comfortable for me. You know, might my playbook is pretty deep, and I know I have oil systemic room. But I kinda I kinda wander out of my classroom and meets him out. I was gonna tell you. You're not really enjoyed Alastair McDonald. You know, he's just a he such a blessing of nominal person. You know, and attributes Allott, and so I didn't know about his presentation to you in April about the economy and stuff. So in October. I was kind of signaling in in various posts about how I was seeing some changes in the commun- putting out some cautionary words, it's kind of funny because people don't really like that, you know. I mean, it's not that's not universally accepted because we live in our rod cheerful society, and I'm I'm a super positive person. But I'm also a realist and I've been through three sections, right? So I I know how ugly can get. So I found that experience could be interesting. But one of the things that I was trying to to drive home in wanted to chat with you about was it wasn't was not only the economy that's changing. So I need to give you some backdrop on this. Because I don't think you know, this about me so in in nineteen ninety eight win our ran. Launch dental town. I simultaneously launch the first e commerce dental website, which was dental auction dot com, and it was a site for I knew every dentist had a bunch of stuff. I was going to be the next EBay EBay, and that was gonna be my multimillion dollar idea. Problem was my execution. Howard hits out of the park. You know, his his his concept of should practice alone. Let's a community was perfect. I just didn't execute mine. In fact, that site's still has never gone anywhere. So what I- smartest thing that? I did was flipped it. I struggled for six months didn't make a single penny. But I saw it. And then I went back to school. I went back to the university Nebraska, and I took the first web development ecommerce certificate 'cause I told myself whoever masters this will never go hungry. You know, how to do the web? You will always have something to do. Right. So I actually had a small web development group in in. Haw and did that for a while during that on? So when I tell you this that's gonna make more sense when I make this comment. I I have seven projects I always have kept my hands in it. Mostly personal projects were projects people that I know. So I have seven projects that I run right now three dental practices to medical practices in to real estate companies. And so I'm I'm very much in tune with what it takes to market in how complex it's getting so perhaps avation about two things happening. Simultaneously, concern me, there's a big change going on in the marketing, the online market landscape, and it started in August with the thing called the it was another algorithm. Chain Bouba call the medic update MED ic- and it affected mainly healthcare practices in the whole rationale for super weird explanation. But things that I had positioned number one in Google or. Ganic Louis, and in the map pack, just once I just blew up. I mean, it was like one of the number went from one to twenty and I couldn't figure out why. Because this never happened to me before. And since then everything has been kind of jumble sites have been jumping around Google has made some pretty significant changes. So I know you have a lot of resources in the CEO and social media will. And so I have a couple of go to people that I talked to and they just like threw up their hands and said, you know, no one knows the wire how to correct that. Just go buy some ad words. And so what's happened is adverts have kind of exploded, which is a bad thing because that's a competitive type auction, right and people that want Atwood's the more expensive. It's getting so to Meghna long story short when I'm saying is this huge competition with adverts changing in all the organic stuff. You've got you've got Facebook. As a really up started in the past couple of months to do some Facebook stuff. It's very economical in relation to add words, and then you got Instagram. So what's happened? My view of this whole thing because you know, I've worked with startups and acquisitions and stuff is that marketing to me has gotten so complex that I see let me just pull a number out hat say a million dollar practice. I see almost the need going forward for a full-time media administrator for lack of a better word somebody who's actually working all of these multiple platforms full-time, just for you. Right. And and that kind of distresses me than it's got net complex, 'cause it's never I know you've seen it because you've interviewed all these people, you know, Instagram and Facebook experts in everything you've seen Alex kind of and the space which you have to understand. It's like a piece of real estate that first page of Google is like it's ten spots. Three in the map. And that's it and people are getting dialed in right? And it's getting competitive, and the people that are in the map, pack three pack. They're getting the majority of that business. The people who are stabby with Facebook are getting that business. So so here's here's my comment that I did on ESPN. I said for me this next year, scratch starts probably not for me. Okay. Because I see the ramp up in marketing being so difficult from a standing start. Okay. Like, I've watched a couple of sites in the past year, and it took three or four months for Japan index by Google. That's never happened to me before. Right. So so to get your momentum going, and then the other thing with acquisitions, and because aquisitions that I've done here. Locally didn't have a web presence. And I was lucky 'cause this is two years ago. I ramped up, but if I had a ramp something up from scratch right now or even an acquisition. I think the value of practice. Let's say let's let's say a practice six hundred under you have no web presence. I don't think purchase anything, you know. I mean, I think it's really has to be massively discounted. So now, I'm looking at web presence and reputation as a factor in an acquisition, you know. Whereas I I never paid a lot of attention to it. Because I knew I could handle that part. Well, now, it's it's changing. Right. And so there's been six scratched arts in Lexington in the past six months, okay? In in most amount of corporate when I'm is called hygiene express, not like. Ten minute Brophy. I mean, I don't even know what that is. You know? And so that feels frothy to me, you know, going back to Alice tres concept of you know, everything has a cycle to it. I it feels frothy. Okay. And so I was kind of just posting my general view of that in, you know, so people don't like that. Now the other component was expansion. So for the people who have been dialed into you and really have their ducks in a row there's opportunity in a slowdown. And and you know, I'm not predicting what this looks like. But I know it feels like to me, right? I think our our country is fundamentally more sound than two thousand eight. There were a lot of flaws in two thousand Nathan needed to be exposed. But there's a lot of debt and debt is always always enemy. Right. So so it's just been refreshing to. Listen to him. And you know, and you respect him so much is far as any there are cycles in business wing as entre preneurs in budding entrepreneurs young people we need to embrace it. And we need to prepare for storms, right? Totally. It's funny. He he's term a lot. I think and I'm tempted to replay his address from almost a year ago. It was at the last summit we're coming up on a summit in two months here. But you know, he warned and this is this one a really really good. And there's no there's no sign of a slowdown or any indication that this that the the market tear of eight years was going to be slowing down at all. So it wasn't a popular sediment that he was putting their, but I'm tempted to put it back out there because he really did. He nailed it. He said SS happening. I'm not going to be popular for saying this and what we're approaching is what he likes to call the late cycle. And when people jump in into the late cycle, which I did in the last global financial crisis, which is constantly reminding people that I am not judging, and I'm not telling anybody that that that I am an expert in any way, I'm just I'm just recounting my own. History. I got into the market late cycle last time about a bunch of raw land. And I was going to put some spec homes on there. And I was gonna flip them like everybody else was doing and doing great in the middle of that of of the real estate upswing last last last time. Just prior to the recession and I got in late cycle. I bought practices. I bought real estate bought businesses late cycle. And I paid the price. I didn't have to file for bankruptcy. Like a lot of my colleagues did. But but boy, did it stink took it took quite a bit of of patients, and and stomach acid and and money to to to to weather that storm, but you know, I could tell that this thing was was going to be replaying itself. This whole scenario is going to be replaying itself. So I've I've protected myself this time, I'm a lot more liquid than I was last time. I'm not an expansion mode right now not that I won't be time next year. Maybe even six months when everything's on sale. When if if this correction continues, but but it's just a matter of learning from your mistakes. And if you can't learn from your mistakes or even other people's mistakes than than you're destined to to pay a hefty price for. I really respect someone. That's as the courage to put that out there because it's not popular it's easy to cheerleader. It's it's not easy to say, you know, departing might be coming to an end. Let's be careful, you know. And that's my whole. That's my whole thing. I mean, I've got very long track record of encourage entrepreneur ship. But a lot of these students, especially the ones that taught I'm Kerry protecting them 'cause they become like kids to me. Right. I mean, I don't want that things to happen. And in that kind of part of my motivation to some of my so my comments for sure for sure, and the funny thing is that what you see is when people don't want here, they say things like, you know, it's been proven that. It's not smart to try to time the market, which is not to do. He's he's just he's just looking at trends. And he saying this is likely to happen. He's not trying to time in the market in any way. And the now that it's finally happening. And it looks like this correction is and this bear market is definitely upon us. People are now saying, yeah, we knew this was coming. This is this is this was to be expected. Even even even though they're naysayers eight months ago, it's interesting to see how people. All right. Great for your replayed on. I think a lot of value for sure time stamp it for sure for sure. So for those of the people that are listening to my voice, and and duct Larkin's voice that don't know. A DSM is DSS is a group of about fifty faculty members. And it is it is in response to all of these free, Facebook forums and a lot of negativity. That's happening on social media nowadays. It is a protected for them there. There are I don't know thirty five different rooms anywhere from oral systemic health, which is Dr Larkin's room to Perreault to oral surgery to implants to practice management, which is my room to Ortho to Pedo to facial aesthetics to IV sedation. Whatever you could possibly think of we have a faculty member for it. That's manning a room. And in addition to that, there is also a lot of resources for continuing education. Live and virtual. There is a preferred vendor element to it. So because we have nearly a billion dollars in combined revenue we get a lot of really great deals from from vendors. So. Yeah, that is what Dell success network is it is a paid membership. And that's the way we want to keep it because what happens in these free. Forums is that anybody can come in. This is only for doctors. And there's a lot of negativity that that happens in these free forms as you guys. I'm sure have all seen, and you know, even in dental town, which I think is is a great service and love Howard. He's a good friend of mine dental town, if you go on nowadays, just by nature, I mean because it's free. It is it is a bloodbath out there. Matt God forbid, you ask an honest question and want just a real answer from anybody. You just get slaughtered by people that are that have that don't even have their real names up there, you know, their user number. Whatever isn't you know, you can't even trace who it is. But. It's a free for all. I mean, and that's why conceptually new you told me about this. I loved it. The timing was absolutely perfect. You know, I was wanting to get somewhere safe in serious and know where people can speak truth, and there are some amazing accomplished young dachshund in this group. It's it's a very impressive group. Fun. It's fun to to to just kinda look down at my phone, and we have an app that's associated with it. And they'll be like twenty six posts to two hours into the day. And there's like twenty six posts, and they're all just great thoughtful questions, and and we have zero tolerance policy for negatively, and bullying, and we've kicked people out, and we've we've denied admittance for people that are known to be cyber bullies. In in our profession. So so it's protected, and you know, it gets real in there. But it's protected, and it's all it's all very very positive. So thank you for being a faculty there, it's an unpaid position. But but boy, you are you're good ones. You're one of the feel good there. And and you know, it's been amazing to watch the developments out. So here what am I commenting? I want to talk about his is how I became the chief world systemic advocate. Wasn't a position that I that. I saw it was it was more about my personal health. And I've really never told that story it to its completion. So I I saw Dr bail in two thousand thirteen in in betas. And here's this guy stage talking about cardiovascular prevention in how had never had a patient ever have heart attack, and they had a money back guarantee. And I thought man I was just so uncomfortable with his with you know, that whole concept of, you know, guarantee in this when I was intrigued at the same time. You know, I was I was not impressed. But impress right? So I tracked him down and and got to work up and became a patient. Okay. I had high risk high clinical staff in just just from bad lifestyle habits stuff. I never addressed it. So. So I've been in the program six years, I feel pretty assured in saying that if I had not met him that I would have have invent or at least be a full-blown diabetic, you know, with with the underlying risk factors that I have managed that often and in my health decent. So that's kinda how became an advocate for him. Because when I the more I got into this. I said, you know, what does this mean for Jetta street in what does it mean for my colleagues? So the first thing I want to talk about his colleague thing because I really back into this by accident. So I had a friend here. Locally position kinda wanted to be an entrepreneur couple years ago. And I told him about building a precept her ship, and he went. I said, you know, just open your eyes this cardiovascular prevention, and he was there about an hour any text that many. It was like dude, this is so obvious. And I was like really, well, it's good. If it's obvious to you than than, let's do something. So he took a little bit of time. And he put together a really interesting model, which was three components bio identical hormones bail Doni prevention and stem cell regenerative medicine any packaged in the under the brand of bluegrass preventative medicine. So he was launching. I was doing his launch for him last beginning last summer, and I had an idea that was a little bit different. I said instead of us blasting this out to the public. Why don't we do in event where we bring in doctors and dentists take him through the protocol medically in create, you know, create influencers right withstood a little bit different because every doctor's gonna touch, you know, potentially several thousand Haitians. And if we bring in fifteen docks that's a lot of that's a lot of touches. Right. So we did it. And I brought in Dr Gina pitcher who was the top failed. Owning practitioner she's been doing it since two thousand nine she's amazing. And so here's what the event looks like. So we got thirteen people to come and we had station set up. So we start off doing the blood draws. We did the fasting glucose tolerance tests in one station. We did the crowded see I m t arterial health screening, and then I had to high Genesis we did the biofilm DNA and the microscope exam and then the sleep apnea screening. So that's pretty much all of the inflammatory methodology. Right. So that's a half a day and got finished at noon, then I lectured for ninety minutes. Dr Pritchard lectured for ninety and then we had our QNA men about ten days later. We went over the labs with all of the patient the doctor patients resume, so Dr Pritchard me in. The patient, and and that was just one of those moments where you get Joe Bob's. So so she's going over Cleveland heartland panel, which is an inflammatory panel. And she would see a marker for inflammation. That was indicative of sleep issue. I think is nitrous oxide deal. She would say to me, Tom. What was your screening? And I would say, well, we didn't stop. It was high risk the Malan Patty or high risk this person needs a sleep study. So everything was like medically in densely corresponded. Okay. Then she would have a person that had an elevated Milo proxies, which is a which isn't implant Ori indicator. That's orally kind of oriented and then to say what appeared on packages look like in. I would say, well, you know, a was over threshold in high risk microscope Marbot everything was matching up, and I was like, I don't know if anybody's done this before I mean, it was just a it was just an amazing deal and the. Patients. I can tell you to a person the doctors were blown away the testimonials at we got remaining. And I don't wanna be pointing about this. But I am somebody to say this is an older doctor said you've changed my life. Okay. So all of a sudden, I'm like, this is pretty profound and we need to do this again. And we need to do. Kate this experience because it was just strictly experiments, right? So we're doing it again next month here, I wanna dial this ends of the DEA San campuses in Annapolis and treselle. Because I think anybody to me this is the new executive physical when I was a young person. Everybody went to Texas Cooper clinic and jumped on the treadmill while we now know that you can pass the treadmill heart attack next day because it's a story about that. Tom, not not to do real you. But my dad when I was a junior in high in dental school. My dad is now eighty three years old. So you know, that this story ends up with a happy ending. But when I was junior in dental school, my dad called me and used to run every single day, and you know, and still does and he's eighty three he's to run every day. Didn't have any genetic disposition to cardiovascular disease didn't have any risk factors. He doesn't drink. He doesn't smoke. He's not overweight and husand every time. I go for my Ron. I'm just feeling a little funny. And I want you to take a look at. One of my teeth because I'm getting this job pain and shoulder pain. And I said go to go to the emergency room right after he said, I'm fine. I'm fine. It's just this. This lingering joh- and shoulder pain. I said please go to the go to the ER right now while he goes to his primary care physician. They put him in an ambulance and take him to the. Take him to the to the OR, and he had a quadruple bypass and two weeks before that he had gotten just hit he'd taken a stress test. And they said he was in perfect health, and cardiovascular Lee, he was in perfect shape and two weeks later, he had a quadruple bypass. So that's how accurate the stress test is not at all accurate. Compelling story. So and so actually speaking of he would have had like the simple fast biomarkers, those biomarkers would have been just off the chart because that all of that was set up a ready, right? That would show shown up about chemically. And that's the whole thing about looking looking at with this methodology is that it's a real short term indicator so in Dr veil says that you have guaranteed what he's saying is this if you have no elevated biomarkers at all and all of your blood chemistries are in line, and you have no oral pathogens you have no. Risk and the street and hundreds of patients, they have not they have one patient out of fifteen years, heart attack, and and what's restaurants music that their methodology has gotten just zero traction it 'cause it should. I mean, I'm trusting I'm trusting my help to them, and it's it's very straightforward deal. So that was a that was a cool experience that happened. So then the other part of this in once again, this is about me really being dedicated to implementation kind of tired of the of the oral systemic conversation at thirty thousand feet, we got we need a doctor to do my friend didn't have the Kony's to go to a startup in and bring this to the street. So. Yeah. It's a really neat model the stem cell thing, I don't know a lot about but the other parts of the bio identical hormones in Vail donor, very compatible medically nine don't like I said, I don't know everything about that. But so the other the other path that I came down. And I think I was just getting started on this. When you were here like dentistry thing is is implementation on on the hygiene part because really, you know, the hygiene part, it's a third of your practice. It's where all this world systemic belongs. I mean, and so the other backstory than I never told you that back in the late eighties. I was a real innovator in prevention. And I, you know, I don't know how 'cause there wasn't an internet. But I ran into Paul is. And I transformed my practice into a preventative practice had multiple high. Genesis my production in collection in the. Top percentile in in in this model. Right. And we use the microscope with a real crew video monitor and it was an amazing mazing thing. Well, when I wanted to revise this a couple years ago, I had a technological barrier the microscope patted changed, and I just I spent a whole year buying every microscope online. There was just so much junk online, and I was about to quit. This is last December. And I found a guy had been in business for two years. And he said, what do you need? I gave him the price point told him that I needed. I said you got to have better technology, and he kind of built this thing for me right in. So that's the microscope that I've been able to now it's basically plug and play you can buy it. I don't have to. I don't have to do in office console. You buy your set it up. I can I can actually do the implementation over the internet, which I've been doing since this spring, and it's been amazing. You know? I mean, the bottom line to the whole thing is I'm telling people that I can save them. Ten minutes in a new patient. Visit okay because the conversation just immediately goes to the bacteria on the screen never talk about pockets. You know, all that conversation changes and it works. It works in all types of practices, the first practice identity was Bruce bears practice in most productive Dennen danced on earth. His hygienist that a high level. She went to I think the highest producing hygienists in the entire heartland network twelve hundred practices. Right. So that was the good practice. That's difficult to do this difficult. Take somebody good and make them better. But really the practices that I'm working in. Now, you know, I call him crash cart practices their acquisitions of just practices. They're almost Gad. And the thing that I've been able to accomplish is to create enthusiasm amongst high Genesis who really really love their job. So so what I've done and with the help of some some stuff that I've seen on San I've created a professional development track for hygienics where I can take them through the things of the oral systemic meaning teaching the micro biology. But what I did a couple months ago is I brought in one of the top as earlier. Easier certification trainers to train my local group here. So what I wanna do is. I'm going to create a track to bring to San where you end up with a fellowship from the economy of laser dentistry, because I think I think you will be extremely well rounded hygienist Aguirre have all those hours. Right. It's kinda like a, you know used to be like fellowship a GD. If you go through all that. You're you're pretty good Dennis. You have to be right. You've got hundreds of hundreds of hours to accomplish that. So I pretty much button is holding down. What that high Genesis gonna be she's going to be a person who's in demand because she's really really well trained, and when them the person who came here to do my seminar, she said, she said, Tom I have I haven't seen group like this before these these girls were on fire when they took the written exam collectively as a group they finished fifteen minutes ahead of time. She's in what are you doing? I said, you know, I'm Jim. Creating this path to empower them because the problem with dentist is we're not trained in dental school at all how do you lies ago? Hi, jason. I just got lucky that I just kind of figured it out. You know, I paid him super high. But they were using like crazy, right? And I I figured out there's a in there. And so now, I didn't know in the late eighties. Anything about oral systemic. I was just doing it because of the Perio right now. Now, the conversations are so much more compelling people need better don't help for overall health. Right. So so I've got that part zipped up in. I'm just super. I'm just super happy because I dislike I like seeing young people reach their maximum potential. And I hate people getting burned out in discouraged. And that happens a lot, you know, for sure. So how do you bring this story back around in a new patient exam? When people are they're expecting to. Talk about the health of their teeth and gums, and and you know, maybe I'll need a crown maybe have a couple of cavities and at a nowhere. You're talking about, you know, biomarkers for cardiovascular disease, and you're looking at things in a microscope. I also wanted to ask you how you obtain the samples to to look under the microscope. But how do you how do you bridge that gap between what they're expecting their expectation when they walk into a dental office to what you're actually the the primary focus of your presentation. Great question. Great rushing, just super simple. It uses a risk assessment model. Same model that that John choice teaches Bruce bear teaches it's a risk assessment model. So at the end, and in my practice, the genocide of patient person, I know in some practices be ball when the dockers I'm okay Versi their way. But at the end of the day when I want that new patients know that I have I have really awesome scripts and their short scripts. And basically, the gist of is what we're gonna do today is we're gonna look at the back jury. Oh, and I I use very intentional language, and I've learned a few. Thanks, Chris valves. I think Chris super interesting. So one of the scripts is included in your exam today. We're gonna take a look at the 'Bacterial your mouth included in your exam is very important because people when when you sit somebody down for the first time and kind of have that calculator headed you sit there, and you say we're going to do this. We're gonna take a panoramic, and we're gonna done it nursing. Oh, what's this going to cost? Right. So you even inferred that you're doing additional outside the box testing. They're gonna say, well how much is this? That's why how huge resistance to the DNA testing being presented new patients. It's to me. It's common sense because I work in like regular practices with regular people. Right. And I can't present a two hundred dollar cast them upfront. So my stuff is very very deliberate. So in. -cluded in your exam because the microscope exam twenty five cents and it just takes a couple of minutes. We're gonna look at your 'Bacterial, and I use language, I use linkage language. I said it's kind of like it's kind of like is really important term that comes out. Russell Brunson expert secrets breeding that book right now, it's not he loves he loves that term. It's kinda like it's kinda like your doctor, and they measure your cholesterol, if you have high cholesterol, you know, that you're at higher risk for heart problems. We now know that if you have certain bacteria in your mouth, you're at high risk for heart issues. He's Russell brunson's of verbiage with with Rachel walls, verba cheeses, we now know a lot. I like that. I like those both of those that together is very very key. It's killer. It's killer my scripture awesome. And so so we, and that's that's it. So they she goes. Okay. All right. So so then the sampling is very simple. Ask to be a subject sample under the gun line is that's the anaerobic. You don't wanna get any the material superjumbo because it's not going to show you what you need to see. Right. You go back through this Aloom overs because that's where people miss, and and it can be a mixed samples. You can go behind lower second molar on both sides on the hover. It would be a mixed with a probe. With with a cure at Erskine doesn't have to be -sarily big lava stuff sometimes it's barely enough to see. Okay. I've got all kinds of videos on my website. I got all the videos on how to do all this where people can go look. So. It takes about a minute to to mount everything, and we have a we haven't had with an with an half with educational half. The kind of explains this is all very intentional. So of you, there's a general explains Earls stemming it takes about a minute while the high Genesis putting it under the scope, the patient sees this video of bacteria under the gums traveling to lead street, and then the first thing they see after that is the screen with their 'Bacterial. Okay. And most people even Amit healthy deal when they see germs on the screen, or is this just this wide open. Okay. Some people, you know, the they think it's funny. Some people freaked out, you know, the most consistent thing that I that. I see is people say, you know, what are we about this? And when are we going to start no-one one other what other thing can you possibly do when someone to ask you for treatment right in? It's very very common with with the visual presentation, the 'Bacterial. So end of the appointment. This is what I want. And and it's very straightforward. I wanna risk assessment of low medium and high for carries and for Perry. Oh, okay. That's that's very conventional. Now, that's a kind of a camera thing from the carries in kind of my simplistic microscope thing. So I'm not in pockets, I have chart for medical legal reasons. Okay. But I have patients with no pockets that are at high risk, you consider biofilms is just screaming with packages Spira kids, white blood cells. Basically, what happened is I caught them significantly earlier before the damage, you know, our basic model is diagnosis acting the fat after the pocket after the bone loss. When you start looking at biofilm, you're gonna see a wet head side. So we may be only just putting them on a good anti microbial rance doing a laser disinfection, just a real basic one. And they're gonna be great. In a couple of three weeks. Right. So it's a little different approach, but it's much quicker, and it's much more concise. How? To grab the sample. Put it on a slide and show it to the. Maybe a couple of minutes, and has real you went the slightest stiff for ten or fifteen minutes, I tend to show in right away. If it's an active slide, I show it right away because I don't have to but it will reach its maximum activity in about ten or fifteen minutes. So even if the hygienist leaves there until the doctor comes in a book. Okay. So so here's here's the here's the scoop, I set up the whole opera, Tori, I want. I want the posters if the impo Braff IX about the oral systemic action on the womb. Hey, so I just want to create a wellness atmosphere that prompts conversation. Okay. So as the hygienist is doing her job, the talk over can be on any, you know, once I have I have a really specialized health history that helps points in directions. So if somebody has cardiovascular on their health history in the hygienists while they're doing their talk. Over all of the talk is about health right in. It's about you know, that you know, that there there's a risk in one of the reasons why we address these factories because there's party of asking risk or your reputation diabetic, you have the potential to use less insulin because the healthier your gums are it's kinda Viner actional the hygienist have to be trained up in in the cardiovascular the diabetic in all of these different scripts. But that's that's part of what my program is. And and they love it, you know, because now it's kind of elevated their self esteem, they're not to polishers anymore during during gauge in this thing of preventing not only Worrell disease, but suspending stuff, right? So. Question. Great question. So what what type of training? Do you offer is this is this via video or do? You have do trainers that go out into offices. I truly don't know how you spread the word you actually train hygiene teams so facing so basic grab Ben hurry successful. I've done stuff in office here. Regionally I've been able to do this successfully over online on with do. Okay. You know, I I have I have a digital provide my material digitally. I also San manuals hard copy because I have a lot of laminates stuff. It's just it's just a turnkey solution. And I I literally say I can change your trajectory of your hygiene department in today. I mean, it's you know, 'cause I'm not gonna I'm not talking about, you know, selecting scaler 's Cameron's stuff like this. This is this is more about doing risk assessment. You know, so I'm so you can still in theory, you risk assessment should always come before your restorative right in a perfect world. It's not always like that. You always have to address the primary concern they came over broken to you can't ignore that. Right. But, but that's kind of the gist of it. So so when I'm when I'm gonna do now through the certification. Is to create some staffer DSM where we can have a seminar to train the microscopy. Might my dream is this I wanna laser certification. It varies from state to state very very tricky some states, it's still illegal. Sup- especially when it comes to re like getting paid by the insurance company. I mean, it's forget about it. It's it's all over the place. Exactly. So what I wanna do is to be able for to create a scenario where the doctor could bring his high jenness to a two day Aban fan and get her certify base that she can do it. Get twelve to whatever. The number of hours vary, but they both get the micro biology. So they both learn how to do the sampling. We'll have the microscope there. How to do the world the a how to do all of these things? And then on the on the darker side get introduced into the into the laser stuff, whether whether it's you know, after the more the more advanced Perio treatments, right? Where you do get paid, right? I wanna package that into an oral systemic event. So that I can I can really accomplish a lot of banks. My whole goal is is Monday morning going back and been able to do the, but that's one of the problems with our education model is once again implementation, if I give you a tracker it's gonna take you six months year before you ever do anything. That's a tough sell if I can say, I'm gonna have you back. Monday morning sampling using laser doing this. That's a different that's a different deal that's going to get someone's attention. So help me out with some of the details about the equipment that we need to convert our hygiene departments into this type of department. What are we looking at as far as the the microscope? What are we looking at as far as the laser when we looking at training? So are you talking about cost wise? So the microscope is like forty seven hundred the diode laser that we used here was like seven thousand in. That's one of the things that the person came in here. Her name was Angie Walus. She's she's been doing this nineteen years. She's us every laser known to mankind, and she really kinda talked about some of the quote, unquote cheaper razors. 'cause 'cause I I'm not super knowledgeable on the on the technical. What's the difference between this one this one this one? So on the we trained on was a was a seven thousand dollars laser. Let's see what other whether rushing training the training for your department. Right. So thing that the module that I'm doing online is like twenty five hundred dollars. I mean, it's this is not it's not rocket science at all. I'm not. And I and I'm also starting to use her group on zoom where this is gonna be hygiene land, right? I went the hygienist to be able to go in there and on a monthly basis to just kind of talk about you know, what's working what's not working out. We improve this. You know, my goal is just to. Is to get this in the hands of many people as I can because because it works it. I'm telling you to person it works. This is great. I I'm really interested in tending one of those those Dr trainings as well for the cardio, vascular kind of screening that to me is fashionably my next one will be and I am, you know, I said I'm working with Addison on a lot of stuff that I'm wanting to to do. So it's yeah, we need to make you know. That's the whole thing is, you know, we it's kind of we need to be as healthy as we can, you know, because let me tell you about when other screening that we did we did we did one other event. I spoke at Fatone 'as laser symposium in September couple hundred docs, a mix of docs in dentis. And after I spoke, and I showed my health history. And I showed my crowded ultrasound. I showed reversal heart disease. We scream ninety four people that that weekend with the microscope. We did thirty five. Karate vulture sounds. I mean people lined up they were so compelled with me showing the method. How simple it was and one of the things Dr pictured asked me. She goes she said dentistry stressful. Now's like girlfriend hits hits on the. She says this is the most unhealthy operation people I've ever seen. He's an embassy. She's a nurse practitioner. Okay. Yeah. I was like, you know. And I just said, yeah, we we need to really we need to be healthy. We can be just like I talk about the Cooper clinic. That was the big. That was a big fat when I was young guy. Right. And this is, you know, infinitely in my opinion, more simple. It's it's a blood test ultrasound in some oral stuff, right? And you know, let's let's get this packaged up and help each other. Good stuff, Tom as we as we kind of ticked down our time together. This is just awesome as usual you brought some great value great tactical tips. But as we as we come to a close of this interview, I would love it. If you could share some of your contact information in ways that we could engage you for potential training, and and any other resources that you may have to share everything is on my website, which is Powell hygiene POW, hygiene dot com, and that stands for proactive or a wellness. You know, we need to get in front of these. As crisp says, are you proactive or reactive, so POW, hygiene dot com, the courses are there, the live events all of the world systemic research is there there's like sixty five articles if you're one of those people that doesn't believe in and she went to go get some research, and it's a pretty tons of videos. Yeah. It's it's a good week is worse as awesome. Well, I know that you guys out there can now tell why Tom is one of our esteemed faculty over a demo success network. So Tom, I can't thank you enough for taking the time to to spread the wisdom today. No, it's an honor. Thank you so much, Mark. All right. Ladies and gentlemen. Dr Tom Larkin. This episode is being sponsored in part by divergent dental divergent is my favorite new upstart dental company that I use for my automated business intelligent reports for all ten of my dental practices keeping a close eye on multiple practices difficult enough. And what I like about this service is that I receive a daily synopsis of performance metrics for each practice in a nice easy to read report. In addition, we use it to send out the morning huddle and unscheduled treatment plan. Call list to our office managers to take action on a daily basis. Imagine your treatment. Plan acceptance percentages your reappointment rate percentages your attrition rate percentages. That's the number of people that fall out of your practice on a monthly basis. In addition to the basic reports like adjusted production collections. New patients accounts receivable reports sent to my Email for your Email and to any key personnel. That you choose. I can't imagine running my practices with. This resource. Divergent dental was created by the super smart and talented, Kevin Rawson who runs a dental practice. Just like you and me so he understands how important it is to deliver accurate dental analytics in a super easy to read format. Nothing to log into no training needed at a super low price point. So go to divergent dental dot com for more information and to get your subscription going. You'll be glad you did divergent dental dot com. And that wraps it up for another episode of the dental podcast. Thank you so much for joining us this week. And we'll talk to you next week take. Thank you so much for joining us today on the dental for Noor podcast. Check out true dental success dot com for full recaps of every show a schedule of our live events free. Video tutorials and a whole host of practice building resources.

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WOM13   The Purgative and Illuminative Way  The Way of Mystery with Deacon James Keating   Discerning Hearts

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts

32:44 min | Last month

WOM13 The Purgative and Illuminative Way The Way of Mystery with Deacon James Keating Discerning Hearts

"DISCERNING HEARTS DOT COM in cooperation with the institute for Priestly. Formation presents the way of mystery. The Eucharist immoral living with Deacon James Katie. Deacon Keating is the Director of theological formation at the institute for Priestly. Formation located at Creighton University in Omaha Nebraska. He's the author of numerous books including remain in me holy orders prayer and ministry. Spell so prayer in the heart of the jacket. Taking heating has led more than four hundred workshops on moral theology and spirituality and regularly conducts retreats and Parish Missions The way of mystery Eucharist and moral living the Deacon James Kidding I'm your host Chris Mcgregor? When we talk about moral living, it really goes hand in hand with our spiritual life, doesn't it this without these spiritual life I, the moral life sometimes just becomes denigrated into liberalism, some gritting of teeth, pulling yourself up by your own bootstraps, whatever kind of metaphor we want to use without spirituality, the moral life simply becomes effort. Our affections because of original sin are wounded, and they more easily ten toward that which is pleasurable and immediate and gratifying very quickly. Because of original sin, our affections don't immediately say I will suffer for the good. That type of disposition has to be instilled within us, and it can be prepared. We can be prepared to receive that disposition by willing ourselves to avoid sin on by willing ourselves to avoid the near occasion of sin, but that's only preparation. For happiness, we are never happy until we have actually allowed the life, the breath of Christ to live in us and to instruct us from within. Because then his values become our values. His virtuous become our virtues, and that is authentic freedom up. Until that point, we are preparing ourselves. We are perhaps becoming more supple to received the Lord, but we have not completely it. Our stride in terms of I'm happy being good. I I enjoy the life of virtue until that time that Christ takes up residence and we are actually living. The breath of God from within ethics and morals can still be seen as obeying the law. The best scripture meditation on this is probably the story of the rich young man. where he comes to Jesus and says I have obeyed everything all the ten commandments, and I was wondering if you could tell me if that's it as wondered if you could tell me if that's all that life is about. Is Life just about my effort at being good, and in his question to Jesus, of course, he's already hinting at an answer that there's more. There's more to life than just willing yourself to not break laws. and Jesus begins to look at this man and see. I wonder if this man is ready to receive my mystery. And so Jesus asks him well I. See you want to be perfect. Would you sell all that you have and give it to the poor and come follow me. And of course, the man is startled by that to detach himself from everything that has given him an identity. To give all of that away, and then to reattach himself to Jesus. That's the next step. That's the thing that's beyond. Me Willing the good. That's the next step beyond me obeying the Ten Commandments. And sure. It hit him as absolutely ludicrous to detach and then to reattach to a person. That's what perfection is. Of course he couldn't do it. And the Scripture is tell us. Probably the most pathetic all lines in the New Testament. That, the rich young man went away sad. And they are crystallized for us is the human experience of anyone who would say no. To the invitation to allow Christ's spirit to breath within them. Because if we say no to that invitation, we have simply then thrown back upon our own efforts. Until we die to will the good. To will the good with effort. Because the wound of the original sin. Hasn't been abated or healed by the breath of God living within us. And so being good continues to be a struggle. With, the saints tell us is that being good can be your delight. And so ethics and morality. Without this interior communion with God. Is Good. But not sufficient. The saints have shown US specially. Those doctors who have written on mystical tradition of the church that the spiritual growth really comes in essence in three ways. Do you want to discuss the three ways? Yes, there traditionally framed us the the way of Gatien Illumination in Union. The perjorative way would be the way where we begin to take steps moving away from sin. And they call it purgatory because it has this purifying effect upon us. It's also heard. Have because there's some pain involved. There's some therapy involved in the initial stages of the spiritual life. You have to turn away and renounce. Loved and here we're at the point where probably most Americans are need to be tutored most specially, we have a sense that our actions and our behaviors are somehow neutral or innocuous that what I do is no big deal that I choose something and I can quickly choose. It's opposite if it's not working out for me. or I choose something and I can quickly choose. It's opposite of. It's not useful to me. As, if what I I chose. Is Somehow not real. What you? I chose. I chose to steal money for my boss or I chose to spend the day eating at the trough of American. You know a restaurants or something like that and gluttony. That was a real choice. That really came out of you. And because it was a free choice, it really went back into you and created you in some way. It further developed the type of character you're having. When we freely choose something and I will it and I know that I'm willing it. Excess eating for example that's what I've chosen, and when I make that choice. That choice returns to me. So to speak and creates me. There isn't such a thing as a neutral act according to our moral tradition and Catholicism. There are no neutral lacks when an act is freely chosen knowingly done. That act contributes to our character now. If over very many years you are living an unchaste life. Or are you living in envious, live or an angry live? Well those vices by way of your free choices have defined you now. Christ comes, and he says why don't you come? Follow me and by grace, unlike the rich young man, perhaps you respond, and you begin to take the initial steps of selling off in other words of separating yourselves from your idols in separating yourselves from your sins selling off all your goods so to speak. And all of a sudden, you begin to hit this pain. Wait a minute. I'm not sure so sure I want to separate myself. You know these are the patterns of life that I have lived in. These are the the ways that I've comforted myself. My sins of gluttony alien on chastity. These are the ways that I have coped life. Now he wants me to. Give them up. This is too hard. This is too difficult. I think I'll I'll go back to the comfort of my sins. Now unless we push against that temptation. We will never really enter the purgatory stage. The purgatory stage has to be entered by US pushing against the temptation to go back to our old ways, but remember were pushing against the temptation in grace. So it's not just a willful human effort. It's a cooperative communion with Jesus, so we push against our delight in our old sins, and the strong temptation to continue to find meaning and comfort in them. Jesus is assisting us from within his coaching us. You can do this. You can leave gluttony behind. You can leave envy behind. You can leave anger behind. You can leave lost behind. You can leave pride behind. You can do this. He's coaching. US is giving us inspiration literally the meaning right. He's breathing within us is exchanging his breath with our breath so that we have the life within us. To no longer will evil, but to begin to will the good, and so this whole stage of probation could be called a stage of struggle. But. It's absolutely necessary. Before we move on. To the aluminum stage. But both of these stages the illuminate of and the purgatory. Are In many many cases I would say most cases. They are into penetrating of one another. Because the only reason you're moving away from your sins. And you're actually embracing probation. Is because you have already begun to taste. The life of virtue, which is what the illuminated stages you're already. You're leaving something behind because you're already glimpsing. What the illuminated stages! And, so it may not be a successive stage, or I enter the purgatory tive stage fully, and then all. That's over and now go to the next day. It's more into penetrating where it's the very glimpse of the life of virtue that assist me. In undergoing the suffering I need to let go of my sins, and in the illuminated stage there are still some rough edges particularly in the memory. When we're in the aluminum stage, the memory of really works on us to drag us back to our sins, so there's more purification. Predation, that needs to happen even in the illuminate of stage. Let's talk more about the aluminum. help us understand exactly what that encompasses. Once. The person has decided that this struggle away from sin. Is Worth the effort. Grace comes to assist in grace comes to take the person deeper into what is the nascent the beginning of communion with Christ. And what that is is virtue. So with the aluminum stage we actually moving into that stage as I think. Jesus hoped the rich young man would have seen glimpsed, and that is. You can enter into these commandments, not because someone told you, but you can enter into them because you'll you love them, because you see that these commandments and all the moral laws are actually given to us as a gift as the fulfilment of our human identity. Is One thing the the Jews understood in the Old Testament that American Christian Catholics at least sometimes. Don't understand in that is. Every moral teaching given through the Church by God is a gift to us. We always see it as an intrusion. We see it as a burden. We. See it as interlopers. How dare these bishops? Tell me how to live my life. I? It's not the bishops telling us it's Christ gifting us with the truth. And the wonderful thing about many of the Jewish leaders in the Old Testament was that they were astounded. How Much God love them? Why because he deigned to guide them. It's a great sign of love when someone tries to give direction through life. And the Ten Commandments, that which is the culmination of the moral wisdom gleaned by the Jews, the ten commandments is the moral way of life. It's the moral guide of life given to them by God. Why can't we receive our moral teachings as a gift? And the the answer is of course because Satan can't stand that the demonic will not allow that, because once we come into a community where the moral teachings are received as liberation and more and more of us will headed into this aluminum stage, where we will want to be good, because goodness is what we were made for, and that's much harder for Satan to move a person from. It's much easier for Satan to move you away from an authoritarian legalistic understanding of ethics. He gets in there and and uses the contemporary jargon of political ideology. To help you see perhaps that you are. You're unjustly bound to the magic theory with the church. You don't WanNa do that. You're an American. You're about independence. You're about liberation. You're about being your own person and the demonic plays with those caricatures of the American spirit. Enters that American spirit in twists and begins to teach us in diabolical ways that your life, your happiness and your goodness. Are Only guaranteed to you if you disobey the moral teachings of the church. Now once. A person moves into the aluminum. Where goodness is seen as something that's. Constituent of their own happiness. Much harder for Satan. Tempt US away from that because we are more in line more faithful with what it means to be human. will return in just a moment to way of mystery with Deacon James Katie. Did. You know that you can obtain a free APP. which contains all your favorite discerning hearts programs? Father Timothy Gallagher Dr Anthony, Lewis Archbishop George Lucas, Father Meritas filthy and so many more including episodes from inside the patients can be obtained on the discerning hearts free APP this also includes all the no Vinas and devotional an prayers including the Holy Rosary and stations of the cross, the tablet is Saint Michael and the seven sorrows of Our Lady, all available on the discerning hearts, free half visit the I tunes and Google play APP stores to obtain your free discerning hearts APP today. Litany of humility. Oh Jesus Meek and humble of heart. Hear me. From the desire of being esteemed deliver meet Jesus from desire of being loved deliver meet Jesus from the desire of being extolled. From the desire of being honored. Jesus. From the desire of being praised. Meat. From the desire of being preferred to others don't ever meeting since. From the desire of being consulted, don't ever meet Jesus. From the desire of being approved. Deliver meet Jesus. From the fear of being humiliated, deliver me Jesus from the fear of being despised. Deliver me Jesus. From the fear of suffering rebukes, deliver me Jesus from the fear of being colonial. Deliver me Jesus. From the fear of being forgotten. Deliver me, Jesus. From the fear of being ridiculed, deliver me Jesus. From, the fear of being wrong delivery Jesus from the fear of being suspected. Deliver me Jesus. That others may be loved more than I. That others may be esteemed more than I. But in the opinion of the world others may increase and I may decrease. That others may be chosen. And I set aside. But others may be praised and I noticed. That others may be preferred to me in everything. That others may become holier than I provided that I become as holy as I should teases, grant me the grace to desire. Hello my name is Dino Mata Gutierrez, and I want to ask you to support this earning hearts and a special way we Chris McGregor the board and I all know the not everyone listening can help financially. We know we have listeners from all parts of the world, and we have made a commitment since the beginning to make the truth shared through turning hearts totally free. So, while you may not be able to contribute financially, which can do is certainly pray, but also give us positive reviews. Whatever platform you used to listen to us. If at I tunes Android Stitcher spotify. However, it is that you get these podcasts, or if you're on youtube and you like our videos, please give us a good rating and write a review. The more good ratings and reviews we get the higher profile in the more listeners will discover. US listeners who may have the means to contribute in the future? Please consider rating us in writing a positive review today. We now return to the way of mystery with Deacon James Katie. One of the great deceptions I think that has occurred not only in America, but perhaps throughout the whole world is this idea that somehow Jesus has been liberated from the Church that somehow the Jesus that I know is independent of the men who run a hierarchy has church authority so that when I choose to enter into the choices that I make whether it be gluttony, or if I justify a theft, or do you enter into illicit behavior? Jesus loves me and he understands me, and he will forgive me and what they're telling me over here at the church in this moral authority. That's not the Jesus I interact with. Roy because the caricature of the bishops were the pastor who's faithful to the teachings of the church. The the caricature is that they don't care about me because they're causing me pain. If they really understood human life. The great demonic caricature of all clerics is that they are disassociated from real life that somehow you can't trust a priest or bishop, because they don't know what real life is, and we love to throw that at them as if they're irrelevant to our interior spiritual guidance, you know you guys are so separated from the day to day life of the lay person you have nothing to say to. We'll make it up as we go along. Thank you and I think that this tendency to separate Jesus from the teaching. Authority of the church is the wedge that Truly Delights Satan. Truly delights. Because once he can get a true lover of Jesus separated from the Church and he can twist that subjective love of Jesus into self love much easier than the person who loves Jesus stays fully attached and in communion with the Sacramento life and the Cata chemical life, and also spiritual direction once he separates that person foam, the community can then better attack, and you just have a great analogy in nature right? A lot of the carnivores love to separate the antelope right this separate the corner the pack runs off or the heard runs off, and there's the isolated antelope that. That they can now devour, and that's what Satan uses on the popular American culture, I'm going to separate you from the church, because after all all the bishops are corrupt out of touch losers and the pastors. They're just kind of in this ministry for themselves, not really about Jesus and so we separate ourselves. Buy these rationalizations. Then we start saying well, then who will guide me in the moral teachings who will guide me well? I will guide myself, but that's not true. We never just guide ourselves. We begin to filling that vacuum, which has meant for the Majesty area. We begin to fill in that vacuum with well. I remember philosophy professor ahead at the university and I remember what a talk show host! And I remember what Ted told me when I was a kid, so you're already rushing to these arbitrary authorities. Wearing Christ did not promise his continued existence through that we have exchanged the promise for some type of baseless. That I can negotiate moral living separated. From the Church and Christ promises that he would be with church, and of course that means Peter and the apostles, and the descendants of them until the end of time. So, this is a crucial America temptation. And hopefully that people listening will inspect their own conscience and see if any of that type of ideology is present in them. And then to move away from it ever so slowly and reconnect themselves by way the catechism, by where the sacraments by way of spiritual direction by way of scripture reconnect themselves to where Christ promised the guidance would be the amazing thing about priestly guidances that even kind of idiots can still speak the truth. Is that subjective character level of the priests, but if he truly is a good priest, he will realize in discernment. This man has come to me and asked me a very serious moral question. What's the teaching of the Church? As priest I'm going to tell them the teaching of the church even through men that you think your personalities are flaky, or their character is a little less than noble. If the priest has head screwed on straight, he can still discern this guys. Come to me because he wants to know what the Church teaches and Christ will speak through their priest. This is the teaching of the Church so even character that a less than noble impressed many times he can still give good guidance now, of course, the opposite can happen to where the priests has himself gone so far into the ideological world of political liberalism, or even the the extremes of political conservativism, where some of the teachings of the church will be scandalous to him like like the teaching on capital punishment, or are welcoming of the stranger, even on the. Right side you can have priests that are so ideological that they've closed the door to the fullness of Catholic social teaching. And on the left side, they've closed the door to the fullness of Catholic moral teaching. And so all the traditional teachings, sexual ethics, healthcare ethics are up for grabs for them. These guys are so far gone. That they no longer have the discipline to be taught by Christ and Christ church. And they have given their minds over. To their ideological friends, and their ideological circles, and their Ideological Majesty area, and hopefully the holy, Spirit will quicken in us when we are in the presence of these men, and we will shake the dust from our feet. And we'll find true guides. The true priest who is struggling. To hold the become complex yet, beautiful expanse. Of the Calcutta teaching of the Church And offer it to as a great gift, the gift that it is. From the pulpit, and in his spiritual direction with individuals, so yes, never separate Jesus from the church, because he promised that through the church and its leaders, he would give us the truth what you just spoke of from even dreamed right or an extreme left position, ultimately even within the church is what I've heard Pope Benedict. Speak up when he talks of moral relativism. Moral relativism is school fought who want to call it that which says that there are no standards for making moral judgments. A relativist is not somebody who chooses to do anything he wants. He is someone who thinks there are no standards. He's decided that everything that a person judges is judged upon their own tastes. It's almost like you like apples I like oranges for the relativist. There's no way of adjudicating which one is right, which is the right fruit? There is no right fruit because there's no standards to judge, so the relativist looks like an an anarchist looks like an extreme hope type of liberal breaking all the rules. But in fact, the relativists thinks there is no rule because there's no standards. The mind can't reach truth in other words. relativists things the mind can't reach truth. Benedict Pope Benedict is the metrically opposed to that because he believes that the mind can reach truth, and that the mind can judge truth and that that truth. Is affirmed in the life and the person of Jesus Christ so in our moral teachings as a coalescing between our capacity for the mind to know judge truth. With the dwelling of the Holy Spirit of Jesus Christ. Who is the truth itself? As we started talking the beginning of the show, the interpenetration of the spiritual and the ethical. And so the relativist and the relativist position is very dangerous for Western world. And it should be. Fought against or pushed against by good argumentation that the mind can actually reached the truth inch judgment, otherwise what we have is some cartoonish understanding of the conscience. Conscience is only useful. If we really believe that the intellect can make a judgment about what is right and wrong. And the Catholic Church continues to think that can. That's why the church is always ostracized as being judgmental. We are living in an age where we think you can't make judgments. Because there's no standards against which to judge our behavior, the Catholic Church has never lost those standards against which to judge behavior, and so it is always appears to the popular American consciousness. At the church is Judge Mental? The judgmental, It loves the truth and it's trying to guide people into the full into the fulfillment of their human identity in light of faith, hope and love and I think that's why this is such an important part of this conversation, because again we're talking about growing in the spiritual life and the moral life, and if you're going as you indicated earlier, going to grow in through the progration into the aluminum, give or walk hand in hand. That predation will come from that entering into Christ in the church in what he teaches, and that's where we struggle the the question about the no the struggle. This is where we are left with. Some extent, the goodwill of every human being in our country. Will they surrender to the struggle and just rest in the ideologies that they think out, or will they enter into that battle? We are formed so well. We are very vulnerable as human beings. Our minds are very vulnerable. We hear ideas. We wrestle with ideas. Thoughts come into our minds. We pay attention to media. We pay attention to reading. We pay attention to entertainment. We pay attention to politics. All of these things are having affect on our mind. Ken We in the light of Christ recommit ourselves to break away from those sources that we might be listening to. That are simply keeping US hostage to this passing age, and can we begin to see that there are other? OF SOURCES! That will take us into. Eternity it will take us into union with God, and can we begin to make a commitment that? I will no longer waste my time. Having my mind feed. The junk food of this passing age. When what's at stake is my eternal life, and there's this grand gourmet meal that the Church continually inviting people to partake in. And just like the story of scripture. When the great banquet was set, and no one came. And the masters sent his slaves out and said grab anybody. Make, them come in? The Catholic Church has this incredible gourmet meal for the mind. Where we will find rest for our mind, we will find nourishment for our mind. and. We are continually feeding off the junk food of this passing a now. Who's really pathetic here? Is the church pathetic. It's continual invitation to look again at human dignity and look again at human virtue. Or as the American culture pathetic. In its relentless decision. To feed the mind Shung, which lacks any nourishment. To even begin to bring us to the truth. And keeps US enslaved to this passing age is Romans twelve one to to warn us about. You've been listening to the way of mystery. The Eucharist immoral living with Deacon James Katie to hear and or to download this conversation along with hundreds of others, spiritual formation programs visit discerning hearts dot com. This has been a of discerning hearts in cooperation with the institute for Priestly. Formation, I'm your host Chris McGregor. Help that if this has been helpful for you that you will. I pray for our mission. And if you feel as worthy, consider a charitable donation, which is fully tax deductible to help support our efforts, but most of all we pray that you tell a friend about discerning arts, DOT COM and join us next time for the way of mystery, the Eucharist immoral living with Deacon James.

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Coping with Financial Anxiety During COVID-19 with Bradley T. Klontz, PsyD, CFP

Speaking of Psychology

26:11 min | 4 months ago

Coping with Financial Anxiety During COVID-19 with Bradley T. Klontz, PsyD, CFP

"Unemployment applications have hit previously unimaginable highs. The stock market is in freefall. National Parks are closing and Broadway as dark. And that's just in this country. The Corona virus pandemic is global and. It's likely that we are only just beginning to see its economic impacts. So what can we do to cope? Are there strategies to help us whether this economic uncertainty? What should we be doing with our money if we still have any? Welcome to speaking of psychology. The flagship podcast of the American Psychological Association that explores how the Science of psychology affects everyday life. I'm your host. Ken Mills even. Before the corona virus struck many of us were prone to do on wise things with our money. What if anything will the pandemic due to that very human tendency? How can we work against our worst financial instincts while our lives are feeling so chaotic? Our guest today. Dr Brag is I hope going to help us better understand why we do what we do with money and how we can make some better decisions. Even as we deal with the rocky economy ahead Dr Clauses in award winning financial psychologist and a certified financial planner. He is also an associate professor of practice in financial psychology and behavioral finance at Creighton University in Omaha Nebraska doctor clones. Thank you for joining us. Thanks for having me. Let me start by asking the sixty four thousand dollar question. Where is the economy headed? Have we hit the bottom? Yes that that's a fabulous question and the uncertainty around that and basically not knowing that answer is part of what is making this such difficult experience for so many Americans and we don't really know that's just the bottom line but what we do know is that we have economic downturns like this periodically. And so we've had probably one of the longest growth periods in our economy in our history leading into this crisis situation with in terms of economy. And so we knew a correction was coming. I mean we knew this was going to happen. Actually thought it was going to happen much earlier. And what's interesting about these corrections is you have no idea what's going to spark it off. And obviously this time it was the virus. And so we've been through these before we will continue to go through these. But there's definitely a lot of uncertainty built into this experience as there is every time economic downturn occurs. Well what kinds of emotions are people experiencing right now from the impact of the corona virus. What Are you hearing yes? So it's the combination so one of the things that makes this unusual. Is the health concerns. So there's very real health concerns and concern about that. My health my children's Health. My family south so that that's part of it and I think that actually increases our level of anxiety and then of course people are really concerned about your investments. If you have a retirement savings or if you're being directly impacted by the loss of a Job. I mean these have a profound impact on people and so you know. We're not sure again if we're going to be back to work in a matter of months or take longer. What about these emotional effects I mean? How long should we expect them to last as we're going to have a kind of PTSD across the country and around the world? It's really interesting that you asked it. In that way. Back in two thousand and eight. We did a study of financial planners during the last big recession and yes we actually looked at post traumatic stress symptoms. And so yes. There's absolutely going to be post traumatic stress Lingers there was a study done in Greece to that looked at post traumatic stress within the entire country? Absolute impact. That that persisted for years. And if you think back to post traumatic stress in previous generations in these types of events I don't know about you can but Mike my grandparents were born bit of hoarders you know and they had gone through the Great Depression and they were significantly impacted by that. My grandfather lost all of his money when he went to the bank. One day and all of a sudden. The money's not there this led to a shift in beliefs around money and this is part of my story and learning my own psychology around money. But my my grandfather had lost money. Never put a dollar in the bank the rest of his life so he died in his ninety S. Never put dollars in the bank the rest of his life. You so traumatized by losing money. So where was the money? Was it in his mattress. Exactly it was in a locked box in the attic. And he kept getting his house kept getting broken into. Apparently the local criminals newer was but yes so lingering effect and you know my guess is we're going to have lingering effects associated with this now. I will say this to and and the research around post traumatic growth is very clear. There are all sorts of opportunities built into this to like. There's an e- perhaps you're spending more time with your family or your spouse or partner. Now you could use this experience to grow closer now. Some couples are actually growing further apart. So therein lies the crisis But there's an opportunity for for many of us to have deeper closer connections with our family. Perhaps you're spending more time with your children as an example. Perhaps you're looking at your finances. You've been sort of avoided. Look voiding looking at it and now all of a sudden you have some stress related to your finances and you want. It's a great time to actually look at where your spending habits of Ben and make adjustments along the way so lots of stress built into this. We're we're GONNA THIS IS GONNA be over. It's going to be over soon. It could be a matter months or even let's say a year from now. The virus situation is over. So we're GONNA get on US and so one of the things that I've been asking people to do that. I work with is picture themselves a year from now on the other side of this virus and looking back to yourself right now like Howard how do you wish you had thought about this? What do you wish you had done? What our opportunities do you wish you have capitalized on this. And this is not to diminish the stress. This is an incredibly stressful time for many many people on a very real level very real psychological level financial level so it's not to diminish that but there are opportunities here so you're sounding pretty optimistic and I'm looking at the numbers. Sixty six million Americans just filed for unemployment. Many of these people are hourly or blue collar workers. Their jobs may never come back. I don't understand what's going to happen to this country and maybe none of us can say right now but what happens to divide between the haves and the have nots. What are the psychological impacts as this divide widens as it may? Well do well absolutely and you know. People who are economically disadvantaged going into this experience are actually going to have imagined much sort of experience psychologically financially absolutely it is something that we're all going through together so this is impacting people on the entire socioeconomic spectrum so we're not alone in that sense and the virus doesn't discriminate. You know I mean so so your job might be a little bit more secure. If you're perhaps College Auburn I I. You know who knows? We're not really sure what's happening. A lot of people are losing jobs and having experiencing a financial crisis right now and it is regardless of your opinions about how the government is approaching this in those. Those vary widely. And you're welcome to them. It does give us some comfort to see that our government is taking this serious and looking for ways to try to help people out with these unprecedented stimulus packages and trying to find ways to support the average American through this crisis and I think that does give us a sense of some sense of security in a sense that our government is looking out for us at some level given what the markets are doing right now. If people haven't done anything to shelter their money is a too late or too precarious to move to cash right now for example. Yeah that's a great question and moving to cash right now. Is Historically the absolute worst possible thing you could do so We are wired to actually do great to survive a Predator chasing us you know. It's that fight flight. Freeze response it. It's all designed to protect us in save ourselves. We have these baked in instinct for survival and in when it comes to financial decisions however those instincts are absolutely the wrong thing to do at every possible level. And so the the classic mistakes people make an investing. Is We get really excited when things are going really well so so picture six months ago the stock market's at all-time highs people are if you're sitting back watching that you're thinking. Oh missing out on this. You feel a sense of anxiety like people are making all this money. I'm not making anything. So we have a natural tendency to want to jump on board and by when things are super expensive and then when things drop and we lose our stock loses thirty percent in value we have that fear response going the other way. It's sort of like imagine a herd of horses on on the plane and something scary and they all run in one direction and then they run back in another direction. This is what happens to human beings in terms of their finances and so we're wired to do the absolute wrong things which are buy and sell low and so that instinct to just understand this. Don't trust your instincts around money and if you if you if you sort of take that to heart it can really help you out financially so we should all be buying right now. Well it depends right. It sort of depends on what your portfolio looks like. I'm but but almost certainly if you look this is great to look back to two thousand eight and if you look back at charts on what happened. Two thousand eight took a huge hit bounced around a little bit and then it was just a steady path. Right on up so really depends on your frame of reference and one of the problems we have as human beings and when it comes to investing is. It's called a narrow frame of reference and so if for example if you pull up a chart of like the Dow industrial average or they s him p. Five hundred these are indexes that track the stock market. If you pulled up a chart that looked at the last month or or two or three. It's GonNa look like total catastrophe. It's you're going to see a bunch of red lines. It looks like our entire life fell off a cliff. So that's called a narrow frame of reference now if you look did a chart about five ten years out or even for fun look at one hundred year chart you're gonNA see. This is actually much more of a pothole when it comes to what's happening in the markets versus a cliff and so that wire frame of reference really can help settle that your emotional brain calm it down so you don't do the wrong thing. Isn't this highly unusual? I mean I can't think of any other time in history where the markets have done quite what they're doing right now. I mean even if you look back to to the Great Depression nobody's working. I mean we're all sitting at home right now which is highly unusual and if we're expecting unemployment to hit thirty percents which is one of the projections. Do we really have any experience like this? That we I mean. Two thousand eight may not be the right comparison. You're making a fabulous point camp. And the fact is it's always something new so back in two thousand and eight and if you can sort of imagine back to two thousand eight and this is a really helpful. Exercise chances are if you were around and paying attention back. Then you've had some catastrophic thinking going on. It was like there was deep deep. Fear that we're experiencing culturally. I'M GONNA lose all my money. The markets may never recover this time. It's different. This is the same type of thoughts that frankly I have. You know as I'm drifting off to sleep at night in my anxieties kicking in. But it's the exact same catastrophic thinking we had then it's the exact same catastrophic thinking we had back in two thousand and I really can't go beyond that but but I hear it was the same one we had back in eighty seven and and on and on. So this is this is built. It is absolutely totally different. We're not sure. And that's the one thing that's consistent about. These economic collapses is that uncertainty catastrophic thinking those intense emotions of fear. And so I sort of rest with with some confidence that you know that we are going to manage to get through this just like we have in all the other ones that this one. It is totally different for example. Like what's totally different. Well Kim in the last couple recessions it was more of a drop off. I mean it took months and months or even years to find a bottom where this one might have happened in the matter of a month or two and again. We're not sure if there's more to go we're not sure if two or three months from now it's great news and the switch gets turned back on and everyone's back to work. We have no idea and that sort of gets built into our anxiety and frankly sets us up to to be self destructive around money. So you've done a lot of research into how people manage their their money. The emotions that go into it in psychological construct. That you've been describing. You've looked at concepts like overconfidence bias. Where people have have to narrow frame of reference that they don't look at markets over the long term which is what we're talking about an anchoring bias. You talk about some of these concepts and how they might play into what's happening right now. Sure well I think if you had an overconfidence by us. Chances are it's shaken up a little bit. Which is probably good for you. And this is sort of our natural tendency to to believe that we're much better at things than we actually are And certainly that was the case in the months preceding this drop again stock markets. Were going crazy. All sorts of amateur investors doing lots of trading having incredible experiences Believing that this related to them when you know statistically you could have a monkey throwing darts at a dartboard and picking winning stocks in the years leading up to this so that sort of gets the baked into the cake around that and so hopefully frankly if you frankly I want you to be much less confident in what you think you know to be true about. Investments in about markets. That's actually really really healthy for you. They've actually done studies on gender differences here and it turns out that women are less confident. In what is a good stock? And where's IT GONNA go And it turns out that they actually are better at investing as a result so they actually have better returns by having less confidence. I'm in knowing exactly what's going to happen in the future starting with less money and lower wages so we've got that disadvantage ABS- absolutely but you're also better investors. So and research bears that out. I'm so I think a little bit of a lack of confidence is is a really healthy thing when it comes to financial markets And then of course anchoring bias builds into and it creates your anxiety also because the anchor is basically the price at which you think this thing should cost you know so you see this with a house you bought you see this with a stocky by you. Know if it's like. Oh you bought it at one hundred then you could be really stuck on that point. And if it's if the stock is now worth seventy five bucks it's actually not worth one hundred. This is where that anchoring bias comes in. It's actually now we're seventy five dollars and and so that's just the reality and so not being stuck on the past related to that is actually pretty healthy. And you'll notice a pattern here. Flexibility in thinking is is really really helpful when it comes to your relationship with money because times do change circumstances change and we're stuck on a rigid belief about how the world works like for example. My grandfather believing that you can't trust banks with your money and I get why he got that belief but but when it's rigidly held that's when it gets us into trouble. Are there exercises? That people might be able to go through to help themselves get past some of these. These constructs these mental constructs that are not helpful. Yeah so I'll give you one that I have been using with clients and frankly myself that I used back in two thousand and eight to and it's really helpful And it's called the worst case scenario and so it it sort of an exposure techniques so if you went to see a psychologist because you had a fear of dogs You know your sadistic psychologists would eventually want you to pet a dog. I mean that would be built into the into the process. We would watch expose you to that fear. And yes maybe he got bit by a really nasty dog so we wouldn't get a nasty dog that we wanted you to pet but we want to imagine petting the dog. We'd want you to think about it. 'cause we'd want to cure this this this phobia you have. And so the worst case scenario exercises sort of built into this too because your brain is looking at what's happening in the economy as a life or death situation okay It's sort of an honor off. Switch here in terms of our anxiety. It's like everything's fine or I'm GONNA to die. Those are the two. That's where our brain goes and so chances are if you live in the United States now chances are that this financial situation is not life threatening. Now I say chances are because it could be for you and so I don't WanNa diminish that but for the majority of Americans when you see unemployment coming in and some of these other supports. I'm chances are it's not life-threatening. For you it's really important to know that your financial stress could kill you and there's been a lot of studies done on this that First of all the American Psychological Association stress in America survey consistently has shown since two thousand seven that money is one of the biggest sources of stress in lives of Americans round three out of four. And when when times are great right This is a stressful thing. Financial stress can kill you so the worst case scenario exercise is sort of built into helping you really look at. Is this really a life threatening situation and so so basically you know it goes like that. So let's say you're worried about losing your job so if you lost your job then what would happen? Well then I wouldn't be able to pay my mortgage wealthy could pay your mortgage. Then what would happen while I might lose my house okay? So let's say you lost your house. What would you do that? Well then I'd have to go live with my parents or my sibling. Okay so that would be pretty rough. What would that be like? See you see what I'm saying? You you just kind of go keep going down the path and for for many people what you realize is incredibly uncomfortable. Perhaps quite painful lot of stress involved. But it's probably not gonNA kill you and as a matter of fact you could probably picture yourself getting back up on your feet back on your feet moving forward and frankly a lot of people back in two thousand eight had to do something like that so they were. They were hit really hard. They lost a house. They had to do that. And it took them a few years to recover but anyway useful exercise sort of expose you to some of that that thinking and those fears and really sort of evaluate your catastrophic thinking whether or not. It's true a lot of us are defined by our jobs and also by the amount of money that we have with earning and this gives us a sense of identity a feeling of security and purpose in life so as people lose their jobs or lose their livelihood. What is going to happen to them? Psychologically yes and so great question retirement. Sounds like a great idea. Right for many people who actually end up doing it. It can become a mental health crisis. And it's getting to some of what you're asking there. It's like do depending on the degree to which your self esteem and your self worth built into your job or your role for example You know when that is gone. It creates a crisis for many people. Like how do I get this? This need to feel productive. This need to feel like I'm doing something good in the world. That's my social needs to Matt. My connection it's Matt and a challenging time because many of us are losing that our ability to to engage. Well you know socially like we're actually being told not to socialize and that's something that makes this crisis very different too because the typically psychologists would be telling you in moments like this you need to get together with people you love. You need to spend time with people. Don't socially obviously literally we tell people don't socially isolate and yet we're we're being told we need to do this. This is something we need to do. and so again a crisis. I also do think there's an opportunity built in here too so you're GonNa be stuck at home perhaps Stuck with home with people that you love you know and so for me on a very personal level. I've been putting more time into you. Know How rival waiting myself as a as a husband with my wife and as a father and I've just been paying more attention to those roles and frankly I'm better father now than I was two months ago because I'm starting to see my kids in a different way and you know just for example. My son the other day it was like hey can I help with the dishes. He seven and I realized in the past have been like now buddy. Don't worry about it you do that. I'll just finish this up now. I'm like WHOA. This is an opportunity for me to to connect with him and mentor him and teach him something. And so frankly I've I've been really focused more on. How can I be a better husband? A better father and build up roles which are really really important to me and frankly when we know when. I'm at the office working really hard. Those those roles aren't getting as much attention so there are opportunities built in here. So you sound for the most part pretty optimistic through it all. I guess you've got some good endorphins going up there in the brain that you're able to carry on and not focus on the negative but I'm hearing that that's pretty much the bottom line of what what it is that you are advising people right now to to look on the bright side to hang on and not to lose hope through all this. Is that an accurate summary. I would say so it but I'm also not trying to diminish the fear and the anxiety and I've actually spoken about my own fear anxiety and it's going to emerge in. It's going to happen. It's absolutely going to happen. And if you don't have some of that you're sort of in denial about what's happening but I don't but I don't feel like there's a ton of value in lingering there stay there as long as you need to To process for example loss like loss of income. Maybe that income has led to you having to Not enjoy some of the things you're able to enjoy or you know. Many people literally have lost vacations. You know or they've lost their ability to produce. These are very very real things and so I think that that grieving. Those is really important and thinking about a plan for after this super important. Do that worst case scenario exercise dive into the pain of everything bad that can happen but I also feel like it's there are other things happening right now and it what you pay attention to bigger and so if you're staying in that in that too long frankly it becomes dysfunctional and not very helpful and so I I believe that there are. There are two sides of reality here in one is very painful and the other is is. There's tons of opportunity so I don't think it's rose colored glasses But I do think it's important to to look for those opportunities. I mean you have. You probably have some time at home. I demand. I think it's a useful exercise for people who feel like they need professional help particularly around money. Anxiety are there special places where they should go whether particular types of psychologists who are better at helping than others? Well I think that psychologists back in two thousand and eight and this is anecdotal but they I think maybe even for the first time as a profession we really started to take seriously this whole idea financial anxiety and people struggling with money frankly because most of our clients were struggling with that so that was being brought into the therapy room and so I think psychologists are actually extremely well equipped to help people things I and and most of the decisions we make around money or most of the things we need to do around money. We kind of already know what we need to do. So like for example. Most of most Americans have problems with money. Because we're spending too much or not saving enough and I've yet to find somebody who doesn't know they shouldn't do that so I think a lot of our struggles with in finances aren't technical so it's not like you actually need a psychologist to tell you which stock to buy. That's not what a psychologist would do. And that's really not your issue and I think psychologists are really well equipped to help people deal with the anxiety And the other opportunity. That's happening here too is more and more telehealth. Opportunities are being presented and so. That's something that I hope. Lingers at the end of this is you know people are doing more online therapy. Phone therapy and that kind of thing. So there's an opportunity perhaps for people who weren't really engaged in therapy before to be engaged in it now as a result that's definitely becoming much more available and we had been working hard to make that more available to people. Well Dr Cohn. C- you've been extremely helpful. I really appreciate your joining with us today. If you have any final advice words you'd like to impart please do well. I think it's really important to know that you're not alone. You're certainly not alone and we're all going through this together and we're all going to get through this together. Humanity has been faced with this type of thing. You know every time you take your kid into get shots. When they're a baby each one of those shots represents a pandemic that has happened like this that has had a profound effect on humanity. We've dealt with this over time. We're going to get on the other side of this and so think about on the other side of this looking back to your who you are right now and what you're doing right now and I'm just trying to build into their. How would you feel really good about how you went through this? And of course you're going to have bumps in the road you're going to be stressed. You'RE GONNA have down days absolutely and then the second thing I would say is yes. We need to socially isolate. But don't actually do that. I mean there are other ways to connect with people. And so you know whether it's facetime or skype or phone calls find ways to connect with people that you love people. We need to do this this something very important to us so make an effort to do that. Great well thank you again. Dr Brad clots bipolar so for our listeners. If you have any comments or ideas you'd like to share about our podcast. Send an email to speaking of psychology. A P A dot org. That's speaking of psychology. All one word at APA dot org you can find previous episodes of speaking of psychology on Apple Stitcher spotify or wherever you get your podcast. You can also go to our website and download all episodes at. Www dot speaking of psychology dot org. Thank you again for listening for the American Psychological Association. I'm Kim Mills

American Psychological Associa US government Kim Mills Nebraska Science of psychology PTSD Dr Brag Ken Mills associate professor Matt Creighton University Greece partner Ben
Behavioral Ecology (REPRODUCTIVE TRADEOFFS) with Amy Worthington

Ologies

51:59 min | 1 year ago

Behavioral Ecology (REPRODUCTIVE TRADEOFFS) with Amy Worthington

"I need to talk to you about something. Can I talk to you about constipation and ab- domino pain, and also bloating, if these are symptoms that come back again, and again, in, you don't know why and you don't have anyone to talk to you about it. It may be time to seek help go to own my gut dot info slash podcast where you can learn more about your symptoms, and you can access a doctor online. They were like would you do it ad for this, and I was like, I will because I know a lot of people very close to me, who have issues of this. That's my gut dot info slash podcast, help you. And other sponsor is key Rico key projects are designed to spark creativity entangling and learning and kids of all ages. And as you will hear our guest today would've loved these, when she was a kid. They make learning about steam fund, they're on a mission to empower kids. Not just make a project to make a difference. So Kiko is offering all Ogies listeners the chance to try them for free to redeem this offer and learn more about their awesome projects for kids all ages. Visit Kiwi co dot com slash allergies. Oh, hi. It's that guy in third period, who's always drawing in a notepad, but never lets anyone see it. Allie ward back with another episode of allergies. So behavioral ecology letting that well, it's why animals such as worms and bugs and your cousin do what they do. And what's a better window into this world, then the steamy porthole of cricket boning? So before we get to that sexiness, though, a few, thank You's. So first of all, thank you to patrons at patriotair dot com slash Gs for all the support to make the podcast since day one, you allowed me to take a trip through the midwest in April gathering episodes as I went. So this would not exist without your donations this episode donation start at twenty five cents an episode. If you want to join in on that party also, thank you to everyone who has subscribed, who's rated or especially who's reviewing the podcast, y'all know I read you reviews on dark and stormy nights. And then I pluck a fresh. Out in gratitude such as for example, lugubrious disposition, says Bob sagging used here as an expletive, alley ward will crawl into your sweet little ear canal. And before she leaves prepare you a veritable feast of fascinating material on your eardrums table. Don't resist letter make brain dinner in your head. Thank you, Guber ES disposition for that. I hope you're uncomfortably bloated with information. Okay. So behavioral ecology was going to do it. So the word behavioral comes from a root for possession. And a college is the science of the relationship of living things to their environment. And it comes from the Greek waco's, meaning house or dwelling, so being possessed with behavior in relation to your environment. Why are we do what we do where we do it? So this episode was such a lucky fluke. It was just a gift from space and time I was driving through the midwest and I had a cancellation in an interview. So I had one extra hour in Omaha. So I tweeted, okay. So I happen to have. Have the day open in Omaha, any all adjusts out there or should I just go to Omaha zoo and lurk around with my and this all just tweeted back or you could just come lurk around. Creighton university, visit my lab and learn all about cricket six and the nasty little horsehair worms that manipulate their hosts behavior and physiology my response. I'll be there in fifteen minutes. So I think she had to postpone a ten year review for this, which is enduring in very punk rock. But I ran into her building. Dashed into her office, and we had a breakneck fast interview about her amazing work. So he sat down at her desk, and had just a scintillating chat about what puts crickets in the mood. What kind of people behavioral ecologists are why she likes converting pre meds to crooked, folks? Some nightmarish parasites inbreeding that puts game of thrones to shame and why crickets and other animals such as humans might delay making babies in favor of more pressing concerns. So put your stubby wings together, and make some noise for assistant professor at Creighton university and behavioral ecologist Dr Amy or Binghamton. Any worthington? Okay. There we go. Dr Worthington, of course. And so here we are were in Omaha. I have just completely bulldozed into your work day. So sorry, the right ways. Thank you so much for being on Twitter and available to like, just bust into your university. Well, thanks for being responsive to my fan tweeting, you and trying to bully you into coming to Creighton instead of the Omaha zoo. Well, I am very obviously familiar with what you do, because you're Twitter banner is to crickets in tender intimate moment. They are having. And so now you study cricket sex, but in a wider outlook, it's reproductive physiology behavioral ecology, tell me about what you do. Yes. So a lot of the research that we do in my lab is, we focus on the concept that there are what we call life history trade offs. Again, life history, trade-offs, everyone from crickets to squirrels to you has to make trade offs. So there's kind of every organism has a limited amount of resources in terms of energy that they can allocate towards different physiological processes. And if you over invested in one, it means that one of those other theological processes doesn't have the energy needed to fuel it. So our big trade off that we look at is the trade off between the immune response and reproduction. These are two of the most energetically costly processes any individuals. So for some individual animals, it comes down to remaining alive or having shorties, but sometimes. Guess animals can't decide should I mate and die should literally fuck off and die, or live fast, die, hard or should I stay alive and maybe not reproduced as much. Yeah. And postpone reproduction until you're healthy. And you've recovered from some type of illness, or parasite, absolutely are like finishing school. I dunno. PS speaking of which Amy got a bachelor's and master's in biology, at the university of South Dakota and a PHD in ecology, and Volusia Balaji from Iowa State University, and she says she grew up obsessed with Bill Nye. Hey and her dad always said a science projects like rockets and paper lanterns and chemistry experiments. And she says, as a kid, she would hold up in her room, sometimes taking notes on organisms, in her animal encyclopedia, which is such adorable darkness I want a time machine. I wanna go back and babysitter. And she said, she wanted to be a science educator, but didn't realize that she was going to be a researcher until after getting her master's, so she moved onto her PHD and so. Now, you're doing this kind of under the model of crickets. Yes. Did you always like crickets? Or are they like a really fast reproducing like a good species to study? Yes to all of the above. Okay. So crickets, didn't grow up loving insects. I was like most people. Terrified of them. I worked in a pet store for a long time. And curriculum reminders, insect that I had an intimate relationship with them in to get them to feed their or their animals. Yeah. So I became really familiar with them then. And when I started my PHD, there was a project in a lab at Iowa State working on crickets and they're just fabulous organisms. There's a surprisingly large research group of that focuses on researching crickets, especially in the context of evolution and mating and reproduction and immune response. And so they're perfect. They reproduce really quickly. You can have a web population of them. So you kind of always have access to them, and they're easy to handle their easy to rear their cheap defead. They eat special Katy cat food from WalMart. They do. I didn't know that. And so they're just fabulous organisms to work with and each lady. Cricket can have over two hundred children, which smokes the birth rate of both of my Catholic grandma's. I asked Amy if her labs subjects ever serenade her of the male sing. Oh, yes. Okay. So the males rub. Their wings together, not their legs, which is a common misconception. Yeah. That's flimflam right there. Yeah. Yes. So they rub their, the males rub their wings together, and it's a mechanism to track females. So they have several different calls both ones that attract females from a long ways away. And then when females get close change into a different type of song that essentially displays has sexy. They are you are so frigging sexy right now at what point did you start to really like embrace the cricket and get excited about doing research with them. Yes. So when I first started my PHD I my first year my PHD. Out in the field and collective crickets. And one of the things that will always stick with me is collecting these crickets in the wild is insane. Really? Because you're out at night in a field, and you're trying to collect these crickets and find them and half the time when you think you find cricket you get close, and you see one and about two inches away. There is a spider or scorpion. Some type of predator. That's just about ready to. Oh, and so you start realizing that there are a lot of issues at play in terms of these males that are calling. And they're drawing attention to themselves because they're sending out this large auditory cue to the environment, so predators can find them easily and on the flip side. You've got these females that are out wandering aimlessly trying to find these males and they have to travel fairly long distances to find males and in the process. They're encountering predators themselves, and parasites and all sorts of different pathogens. And it just is amazing that they can be as numerous, as they are when they have so many challenges that are kind of hindering their ability to reproduce. Yeah. And so, what are the biggest challenges that you've encountered? Or how do you study that in the lab? 'cause I'm gonna guess at your lab doesn't have like scorpions and spiders everywhere, like an obstacle course, I know like a Halloween horror house for the cricket. That would be fabulous. But we actually study the effects of this long lived parasites called a horsehair worm moon and they are fairly large parasites that infect crickets, as one of their hosts they also affect cockroaches and pragmatists and things like that. All right. So one of the factors of immunity is do yoga parasites. And we're just gonna put our blinky blinker on. We're going to merge real quick onto a sidestreet about horsehair worms because they are bananas in there. More nightmarish than any Sifi CGI, and crickets, have to contend with them. But first off, how rare are these things? The number of people have had come up to me and be like, okay, I have a question I stepped on a creek at the other day, and then I say and a giant worm came out and they're like. Yes. My yoga teacher. Did that to me? And she was surprised that I knew what was coming, because she thought it was the most bizarre, and I wasn't going to believe that happened yet. And I'm like, well, that's what I studied, my God. So they're actually fairly common. I mean, they're in those streams that you're you're driving over and that you're kind of ignoring. And so they're, they're everywhere. I had no idea. I thought they were super rare because it's there it's disgusting eared. So I was like, oh, this has got to be like one in a million like finding a finding Pearl oysters nothing. So how are crickets, getting these have they've been cursed by a witch? Did they anger a magic troll, but they essentially get eaten in a cyst form? Why the crickets and then these cysts develop inside of these hosts for a month and sometimes more. And they when they emerge can be, you know, twenty times longer than the length of their host are, so it's actually pretty impressive. I brought one. In just as these horsehair worms like, like she just produced a vial from her blazer pocket and. This like good. Dr. Thing this looks like my hair all over like car seats and in the shower. But it's a Fiqh. It's like a thick wiry. How long is this? They. I mean, my guess is that one's probably about nine to twelve inches long Coon? It came out of a, like a one inch cricket. How does it happen? This looks like something that, if you found it in your omelet, you would definitely sue the diner. This is early. So how do they grow so much bigger? And what's the difference in mass? Yes. So this is what's kind of crazy. Isn't it? These parasites grow from something that you have to basically see under a microscope. Yes. You a worm this large. They do it over about the course of a month, which is a significant portion of the crickets life. Yeah. Right. Crickets, generally live from maybe two to three months in the wild, and that's it. So for half to a third of Chris life, they have this terrible parasite, that's growing, like crazy inside them. And the only thing that these parasites can rely on for their own growth is essentially eating up fat reserves of their host. No, so quick, not only that, but certain species consume before, by the hosts brain, making them seek water fling themselves in and drown so that the horsehair worm can make a graceful exit out of its dead anus to go make more babies in the water and just as I was relishing in the. Of not being cricket. I did stumble upon a paper in a scientific journal about a few people in Japan who have been infected with horsehair worms. And now I have to bleach, my eyeballs anyway, behavioral ecology life history trade offs. So getting back into what I generally study in terms of these life history trade-offs, obviously, in this case, the host cricket potentially would like to have an immune response in mountain immune response against these parasites to kill them off. And we've been trying to figure out how it is that the parasites actually avoid being detected by the Niners onto the cricket. And then on top of that, being that it looks like the crickets aren't necessarily able to mountain of response against them. But one of the, the drawbacks to that, is that these parasites now actively eat and take up all of the fat reserves of the cricket which otherwise these crickets are trying to build up for their own reproductive purposes. They're using that fat in order to grow larger, they're investing that fat in those energy resources into creating very large testes. You may not know this, but crickets, have some of the largest testes per body size animal in the NFL think, I'm really their giant large why, and it's because they have a lot of sex. God, they do so much sex. So on average some, some recent studies have shown that individuals mate up to like seven or eight times per night, hope, boy, with the same cricket or just like a usually it can be the same and they also will go out and. Actively find other other partners tonight with why are they so horny? So he get a lot of. Benefit out of it. So obviously, for males the more they mate, the more tickets in the lottery, so to speak, they have preventing sperm to fertilize, the female's eggs and for females some of my PHD, work extra showed that females that may early and often actually have higher fecundity. So they're able to lay more eggs and have more offspring themselves like use it or lose it kind of thing. Yeah. So both males and females made at high rates in they get fitness benefits from doing so. Oh my God. So then is this also like we're going to need more baby. Crickets out there, if we're going to have scorpions trying to hunt us when we're out doing our songs like is this also strengthened numbers. Yeah. It's a bit of that, you know, like animals in the wild. Their main goal is to produce the maximum amount of offspring as possible and individuals that can produce more offspring than other individuals of their same species have higher fitness. They pass on more of their genes, and in terms of evolutionary time periods. They have a bigger effect in terms of which genes are a part. Of that, that pool, so provided they have the resources themselves to survive animals are typically wired to pass along more of themselves, but even Charles Darwin was like, why though he wrote in eighteen sixty two we do not even in the least know the final cause of sexuality, why new beings should be produced by the union of the two sexual elements. The whole subject is as yet hidden in darkness. A study published in nature twenty fifteen shown a light on it, and it dealt with flour beetles, and essentially inbred them for several generations, kind of, like royalty until they could no longer go on and survive in the study found that it was pretty key for the males to compete for reproduction and females to choose. And the authors wrote, quote our findings reveal that sexual selection, improves population, viability in the face of genetic stress. So I suppose just know the chew. You're you are today, the better off our entire species tomorrow. So keep swiping. And so with your research, are you looking at how often the crickets are made ING what resources they need? What have you been able to determine from that? And does it apply to any other bugs or any other species? Oh, yes. So we've got some pretty crazy evidence from my PHD. And this is actually one of the coolest things that I came across and why I am now. Like so unbelievably passionate about crickets, is that during my PHD we were trying to look at okay? Well why what benefits do females get for mating? We know that if they make more they lay more eggs in they have more offspring, but males don't provide anything. They give this teeny tiny little format for which is just a capsule containing sperm. Manson some seminal fluids. And then they're off. There's no parental care. They don't give anything to the females. In fact, sometimes they can injure the females panegyrics. The females are having more babies when they make more. And so we started looking at what exactly's in that's Permana Foreside from sperm, and one trend that had been building, not only in crickets, but across variety of different tax are the females that mate more or the have made it have stronger immune systems. Oh my God. Which there's a lot of explanations for that. But when you get down to these crickets, that are basically just passing seminal fluid, and that's it. We don't really know why they would have a stronger immune response and essentially have increased survival. And so for my work, I ended up looking into that and phone that there are particular chemicals that are passed on in that seminal, fluid that are both major modulators of female reproduction. So something in the sperm capsule what is in the sperm capsule is pixie dust is to do drop of. Red bull. So as males provide the prostate gland ins as meals provide process, it helps females produce more eggs in it stimulates them to lay more eggs. But this chemicals also one of the major modulators of the immune response. Oh, so if you are out there, you're getting more cricket tail and your lady, does that mean that you're less likely to get like a horsehair worm potentially? Okay. Definitely seems like you're less likely to die from some of the other diseases, such as like bacterial infections, you might also be able to fight off echo, parasites more. Yeah. Men. So there's all of these things that, that go together in terms of, you know. As individuals made, they gain fitness, and they can lay more eggs and have more offspring. But it also seems, you know, we generally think of okay if you over invest in reproduction will now you don't have as much energy to invest in immune response, which would make sense, because making other beings is expensive and more. So when you're not a cricket, and you can't just bury a hundred of your babies and loose soil and be like Moore by good luck gonna go find some new dads, but how does it affect crickets yet? Here we are finding females that are having increased fitness and Langmore babies and also having a stronger immune response. So it goes against the ideas of these trade offs that kind of in neatly think exist that what about the males? Do they lose anything by mating more, or are they gaining anything other than a better chances of having we're biz? But are they gaining anything from an immune standpoint, all know? And that's one of the things that I was trying to look at, and I never quite got to answer this question yet. Okay. But if males are providing this process, Landon than help females lay eggs, and help them survive better potentially until they've lay their eggs, is that taking away prosecution that males need to modulate their immune response up. Regulate that. And so that's something that is a current question that we have, and that we're still interested in looking into so not only do males compete to be like on the base. Trust me, look how hard I will sing for you. I will find a scorpion, but also female crickets can be choosy not just at the time of the bunking. So during mating males insert this spermatic for into a female's reproductive track and a drains into her for the next forty or so minutes. But there's also something called fertilization bias or directional post mating, female mate choice. This is also called cryptic because it's like it's going on in there. And in some species certain sperm may not be stored. So she's like thinks it was so fun. Then this can protect the species from inbreeding now in a study titled female crickets, assess relatedness during mate guarding, and bias storage of sperm toward unrelated males this boiling hot tea was spilled. Okay. So it says that while sperm or being transferred from their sperm outta for to the female's, reproductive tract, the mated male remains with and guards the female because females often attempt to leave unattractive meals. Go remove the spur Madda fours before the sperm, drips in and has been transferred and then the guarding males try to prevent the females from doing so, so the guarding can represent a period of sexual conflict over insemination males attempt to subvert the female mate choice, decision do. They're like, no keep mine. Keep it came it in the females. Like I don't even like you that much interesting to you ever apply any of your current knowledge to your own love life or your. Friends love life. In terms of this. When I give this research talk, I do make it clear that prosecution and is a component of seminal fluids across all animals, and it's was originally, given its name because it was found in the human prostate. Oh, so prostate, Landon, mediates reproductive physiology in humans, and immuno physiology in humans as well. So it has kind of conserved functions from crickets all the way up to humans in his easier to study it kind of, in a model with crickets, and then perhaps other going on up the food chain. It'll be looked at in a different way because of what you can kind of prove or detecting crickets. Yeah. Absolutely. So what we learn in crickets is very basic model, but they're super easy and incredibly cheap to work with. And so we can learn a lot about them, and we can do a lot of manipulations experimentally that are. Unethical. When you get to kind of these higher order animals. So the second something has a backbone all of a sudden, it's more likely to feel pain, especially more intensely. And so there's a lot more restrictions there in terms of not only what you can do, but what you feel comfortable doing as well. Yeah. What are your experiments look like are their cages of different crickets, and they're checking each other out, like how do you sex, cricket? What is lab work? Look like yes. So when we are doing mating type trials, which is something we'll be doing a lot of this summer to look at the effects of these ridiculous horsehair worms on, whether they make males unsexy two. Females. Can you imagine watching the bachelorette and a dude is eliminated for having a giant, eighteen foot long worm coming out of his ass? I can I can imagine it in. It's riveting but we essentially go into this very warm, humid dark room and we turn on the red lights. And here crickets together and watch them have sex. What kind of notes? Do you have to make on a clipboard? Like are you like how long it lasts like how many partners like? Yeah. How long it took of so how long it took females to mount their males. How long goes? Yeah. Oh, that's another really cool thing about. Crickets is a lot of animals. You find males get a lot out of mating. They have a really high reproductive capacity. So the more females they mate with higher their fitness. And that's generally not the rule with females females can mate with lots of males but they generally don't can't ever obtain as high of fitnesses males meetings. They have a limited number of well, a lot of animals will meals will coerce females intimating, essentially, that's like the non anthropomorphic way to say that they raped them. Yeah. Science, sometimes pretty awful and by science, I mean, life and male. Can't do that. Oh, so males have to call to females females have to accept them as a mate, and females have to mount them in order for meals to transfer their jacket seat. Ready? Oh, and so that gives to why are females mating so frequently if they don't necessarily have to there's nothing forcing them to do it. So there's obviously some benefit for that. Do you think there's anything in nightly that they can sense themselves getting stronger because of their immune response? Yes. So there's definitely going to be different propensities to remake and that might be dependent on previous mate experiences. So if you've made before and your previous may was kind of low quality. He probably have a higher propensity to mate again, also condition. So depending on, if you have a lot of resources in a lot of eggs, available, you're probably likely to mate to make sure you have enough sperm to fertilize them. Whereas, if you're kind of in the process of producing eggs, and there's nothing to lay you might avoid it because mating is pretty costly. The females frequently get injured. They lose exit sexually transmitted diseases, making babies pretty costly in so many ways. So one of the more common ones are there are these little mimic, does that essentially kind of get passed around, and so they can hide up, by the genitalia, and they can get passed from one cricket to the next Jenny worms of the word. Just the worst. I wonder if they're Tinder bios have to be like, PS. I have Johnny worms. It's not a big deal. So when you're watching them, how do you know which female is which are they wearing different colored vests? What's the oh, if we have multiple females that we're watching we just used little paint markers. So we can Mark their promote them, por notams, and they can have different little colors associated with them or we keep them in different deli cups. So those things that you bring all your leftovers home. Yeah. The restaurant. That's what we do get meetings in. Do you put one on one together at a time or do you like put several together and see what happens? Yeah. Usually, if we're trying to actually do behavioral acid as we will put one male one female together. So hetero. Normative poor crickets, just another reason to be glad. You're not a cricket, and you can be who you wanna be loved. You wanna love you get snow cones and ride in fast trains, staring at the horizon, and your lifespan is longer than three months. And then. How do you know if that couple mates? And then they're like, okay, I'm onto the next one. Like I'm ready to oh, it's actually really easy. So if you say, look away, and you write a note, and the quick do it, you can check because males when they transfer their kindness from outta for its retained externally. So it kind of gets glued on it gets, like threaded into the female genital tract. And then they like glue it on. And so it sticks out, and you can see this tiny little hardened white capsule sticking out of the rear end of the female. Yep. I look this up in it's like a big old white buck glob, kind of, like if you're wearing a clear fanny pack full of mayonnaise and then to she kind of absorb. Yeah. Yeah. So she'll essentially like pump per abdomen. So she'll use her muscles to kind of start sucking, that out and move that seminal fluid and sperm from this metaphor into her for Masika, which is her sperm, storage, organ, and then how long does she store that she can store for quite a long time? I haven't done tests to see exactly how long it stays in there. But there's evidence that she can use the sperm contained in this firm Athena, for at least two weeks, potentially a little bit longer. Give me food night. Does she get to choose? Like, okay. This is heralds. This is, you know, Jeffrey's, like does, she know who's, we don't really have evidence of that in crickets, because their sperm Athena's like one large balloon. So all the sperm goes into this one large area. And then it kind of gets mixed. So it's more of, you know, who has more sperm there. They get a fertilized that proportion of the eggs. But yeah. Things like dung flies. Have a variety of different sperm, storage organs, and they can store sperm in different. Compartments my gosh. So yes, in crickets, once it's in Hurley balloon, perhaps, it's fair game, but she may get pop it out. I like spitting some grisly meat into a napkin at dinner, but other insects have internal dad pockets and they can mix and match depending on who they dig the most. What a beautiful thing. Now. Speaking of beautiful things each week, we donate to a charity of the largest choosing and this week, Dr Worthington chose Fontanella forest. It's one of Nebraska's oldest conservation organizations and one of the largest private nature centers in the nation. They say it's a place where people can experience and enjoy the quiet wild of nature in. It's located in Bellevue Nebraska, just south of Omaha. So thank you, Amy for choosing that. And there will be a link in the show notes to find out more about them, and thank you to our sponsors this week for making these donations possible. Now a few words kind words about those sponsors. Do you travel because I do. And let me tell you something away, offers very high quality luggage at much lower prices by cutting out the middlemen. They sell directly to you. Here's the deal with away luggage, number one. It's awesome. You can choose from nine colors and four sizes. They have three hundred sixty degrees. Spinner wheels is just like smooth investable both sizes of the. The on suitcase are able to charge anything. That's powered by USB cord. You can try it for a hundred days if at any point, you decide it's not for you. You return it for a full refund. No questions asked. Not that that's going to happen because they're awesome suitcases. So I personally travel constantly, and I have been googly eyed at away, suitcases for like a year. 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I don't have a good answer for that. Okay. So I look this up in apparently crickets, love molasses, who knew so you can set out a bowl with a few teaspoons of molasses covered in a Cup or two of water and they'll be like. Lassus a no common hop in and I'm guessing that they die in bliss. I don't know what you do about the ant infestation you might get afterward. Maybe you like ants more than crickets. I dunno. You could also make sure to seal all your windows and doors with caulking, or you could adopt a free range gecko that lives in your house in eats them. But don't let the gecko out Earls people will be asking me how to control their gecko populations. So another option is just to love the crickets and consider them tiny roommates, who only get to live for few months. Amy understands your plate. I also have them keep me up at night more. So for me because when I hear them calling it reminds me of all the research, I have to go do you ever take some home in your backpack and be like, how'd you beat out? I frequently have empty deli cups, that I carry around in case, I come across crickets in the wild that I need to catch. And then yeah. When we're doing collections out in the field. I frequently will accidentally have. Crickets that like somehow we're in a Cup and they got stuck in the bottom of my back path pack, and then I'll come across them a couple of days later, and they're just hungry. And I it's, it's very surprising when that happens to be like, Hello. Is there a particular species that you tend to do your research with? Yes. So I mostly work with species from the southern half of the United States. So currently we're working on gorillas firmness, which is a sand cricket. But I've also worked on the field. Cricket, which is the, the Texas field. Cricket, so guerrillas Texas. Well, I want to ask how you feel about eating them, but someone may have already. They're fabulous. I actually have some suckers up there with crickets on them if you'd like one case for more on this see the entomology anthropology episode, which saw all about bug eating as a sustainable protein source harp. Hope. Morocco shin wants to know. I'm really interested in getting into behavioral ecology, what should I expect with school and jobs in the next few years. Yes. So actually, there's a lot of opportunities in terms of the field of behavioral ecology. And it's really just about finding your interest. Oh, you know, going out there, reading papers figuring out what really peaks your interest, and then digging in and contacting those labs. Okay. If you really love behavioral ecology, the more you get into it. The more passionate you become and so it everything just generally kind of falls into place like feel. On top of that, you know, like the field of behavioral ecology that people who are part of this field are awesome. Also, there's a really strong community and people are very pretty they're accepting and they're very friendly, the ROY laid back. So the conferences that you go to behavioral colleges rather than everybody dressing up in these suits and ties, you got Qian's with socks underneath, and everybody's wearing a Hawaiian print T shirt. So it's, it's a very friendly field. I think. Oh, so. Yes, yes. To behavioral ecology? Oh, it's fabulous. PS behavioral colleges can stay all kinds of things from why birds fly information to why mere cats pop up, while cute to parental care in penguins, to frog calls, so much more. It's a study of why do you do that? And how does it help in its red now? Less read to some people is the appearance of a certain type of cricket long wispy legs like if slender men had been turned into a bug. Let's unpack. It Sydney Brown wants to know why or cave crickets. So frightening to so many people. Yeah. I would they're a bizarre shape. I think they're pretty spindly SO. I think that, that does a lot. I think anything unfamiliar is, is hard for people, especially when it comes to insects, the more spindly, an insect is the more fear, generally in kinda creepy crawlies it instills, but the Jerusalem cricket is his roly-poly. Boop. Dupe. What they're huge bulbous. And again, they're, they're larger than people want to look, I love them in city Brown. Also asked what's the most common parasite of crickets? Oh, I would say that. That's probably. I imagine most crickets. There's, there's a lot of different types of parasites, depending on what type. Or what Spezia create you're looking at ACTA parasites are very common. So there's kind of these large red parasites that kind of stick onto the soft parts on the outside crickets. But then there's also nemo toads are fairly common. PS nematode is how you formerly address around worm, like MS Nina toad. No. Please. Call me round dopes. Gregory means are another type of kind of intestinal parasite. Those are incredibly communists. Well, we're currently finding out that hair worms are more and more common. So crisper wants to know do crickets, have a meeting chirp, and obviously, that's yes, the males do. And it's different species. Species. Yeah. Yeah. So and a lot of cases, there's kind of overlapping species nearby, and they are able to identify their mates using their particular calls. Oh, well, yeah, so they're very species specific, and it helps prevent hybridization in closely related species that overlap in geographic area. Can you tell the difference of different Chirps or is that like a completely different field? I have not spent a lotta time comparing one species to the next. I can definitely tell the difference between the species like the ground crickets that we have in the area versus Mike. My field crickets that I work on. They have very different calls. They're different pitches in their kind of different frequencies. And so the ones nearby go really kinda fast in high. They also were calling during the day. What and microcosm generally are calling either immediately after dusk, or right before dawn. Oh, so they're Kripa skier flew in. That's is that when they are out, just feeding in general, or is that what their mating time? That's generally, when they're trying to attract mates, is that because it says safer time for them or impart? Yes. So there's not as many birds out in about which are major predators. Although they're definitely starting to get up and moving as well because they rely on acoustic calls, they don't have to have light available in order to attract mates. And so that makes it a little easier for them to make use of those nighttime hours. Oh, that's so smart. This next question is one that's on all of our minds. Probably all the time. Unethically wants to know what behavioral ecology principles are as true with humans as animals. Oh, goodness. You know, so I will say that, like in terms of what I study, I studied these life history, trade-offs and my lab gets together. And we read all these papers together and kind of look through them. And at the beginning of this semester. We read a paper about these life history, trade-offs in humans, and how they're straight off within the between the immune response, and these different reproductive hormones and other processes of the body. And so we have those same principles that are at play with us, the idea that you only have a limited amount of resources. And we generally think that, well, most of us are, you know, well off enough to be able to go out and buy more food, if we need it, but the problem is, is that they're still constraints within our own bodies. We still have a limited amount of proteins that are able to shuttle different nutrients around our body, and therefore in a lot of cases. We still are seeing the same exact types of trade offs between the immune system and growth and health and reproduction as any other animal that lives out their birth rates in the US side note, how peak in two thousand seven just before the recession hit, and they've been dropping for ten years, which is maybe not a coup Winky Dink. And do you notice trends may be with people waiting to have kids until they're older until they have more money to pay for the kids college? Or is there anything trend wise that you look at where like you see millennials aren't having as many children in you're, like, oh, economy or like? Yeah. Absolutely. I mean, you think about the amount of debt that millennials have nowadays in terms of college or trying to buy a house, or pretty much anything and earning potentials way down. And so, yeah, there's just fewer resources. And so I think that cultural changes have allowed for there to be a shift away from this immediate kind of push to, to reproduce early and fast. And so that has contributed to this, but there's also resource trade-offs and as humans, one of those resources is money. It's not just a of fact that we have available or the math, we have available and so. Yeah, absolutely. We just have to kind of extend these principles into that monetary realm to understand some of the things that we're seeing that are currying today, inciting. And what about with second in third? Wave feminism, perhaps, with, like women being like no, I'd like to have a job and not just make bibs are is that behavioral ecology as well. I, I mean yes, in, in a respect, right? So it's hero colleges kind of the study of individuals in how they interact with their environments. And so, yeah, there's, there's going to be different pushes in terms of when to reproduce in how much to reproduce but yeah, it gets a little tricky. It's not as easy to kind of directly, relate everything to humans at least not as easy as we want to be. Yeah, exactly. But it is a good thing to start talking about if an aunt or grandma asks you when you're gonna start having children. You can just go into a whole big reproductive physiology behavioral, ecology ran. Just for her. I'm not asking and are there any movies about crickets, any any characters that your do you see things like Jimmy cricket, and you're like, stop rubbing your likes together number one Jiminy, cricket. If you're if you see a cricket cartoon calling essentially, that's a cricket with a Boehner being like anyone out there. Yes. Yes. So no, there's I will have to say, like Disney does a fabulous job of getting the biology right in a lot of respects and a lot of those other animated films. So I'm still completely in love with a bug's life. You know all the things that those individuals do are just awesome. And I just I love seeing real science in the films, especially for young kids, especially now that I have I have a two year old daughter at home and just watching her learn and pick up on these things for movies makes me realize how important it is to have everything. Right. Because kids learn from there. Yeah, they're picking it up. I mean, stop with the male bees for, you know what I might gosh. The movie just kills me. Can't do it. I know how dare they and even even in ant man it was like a male aunt. I think that in your like visit basic co this is such an easy, get just a side note, y'all could a named her Antonia so easy. My God is long. I'm pissed let's just stay negative for a second. What is the shittiest thing about crickets or about your job? What's the suckiest thing? Well dead. Crickets, smell worse than. Rotten potatoes. I don't have any metric Moroccan potato don't ever forget, one in the bottom of your pantry. No dead. Crickets are terrible and they're juicy and they're just disgusting. So that's the worst is when you're cleaning out, cricket pins. And you accidentally touch one that just like explodes in your hand. But other than that, I mean they're great. They rarely bite, so you don't have to really worry about that. But they do by they can buy. Yeah. They can draw. But normally you'd have to be doing something to deserve it. Okay. Like you're trying to like knock them out and give them an injection or on their testes or something like that. They you like, well played. Yeah. I deserve this mine. What about the best thing about your job or crickets? I say the best thing about my job is I get to do work with a bunch of undergraduate researchers and the vast majority of them come into my lab saying, you know, they wanted to go into pre health professions. So they want to go into be a dentistry, or to be come a medical doctor. And then they're doing research on crickets, which they obviously, don't have interest in and getting to watch their love for these insects grow, you know, watching them the first time they interact with the cricket, and how kind of jumpy lesnar and tentative and then by the time my students leave the lab. They, they're very proud that they work with crickets. It's a bit of a badge of honor that they can they can pick them up and just throw them when we're whatever bins, they need to, there's, you know, they're not using gloves. They're fine using their hands. Now. I mean it's really fun. And then watching them explain their research, in the most engaging, an amazing way. So I, I should say this because my. Current. One of my current students is giving her first oral presentation on her research, in over the horsehair woman. Crickets name's Emily Haarder's, and she would kill me if I didn't mention her on those. She is your biggest. Oh, hey, shut out to at Emily harder on Twitter. You can follow her. For more. Ghastly information on horsehair worms. It's really a sight to behold. We still screaming glee when we allow the horsehair worms to emerge from the crickets and you just watch as like three or four of these emerged from a single hook it, and it is still like you're in the movie alien you. I can't believe it. It's real. It's amazing. It's like watch out Dr pimple Popper because that's pretty cathartic so much better. Yes, this has been so informative I'm never going to hear crickets on quite the same. Essentially, like anyway, I want. That is absolutely my goal. Thank you so much. Yes, thank you. So to follow Dr Amy Worthington. Find her on Twitter at Worthington lab. Or you can check out her blog Amy 'em. Worthington dot WordPress dot com to find allergies were at all Ogies on Twitter and Instagram comes a Hello. I'm at Ali ward with one L on both in to submit questions. We pay trian join up for as little as one dollar a month. My heart is very cheap. And usually I get to ask way, more questions in say way, more names, but this was so rushed to San. Okay for all Ogies merch Goto all Ogies, merch dot com, and you can tag, your pictures allergies merch on Instagram, so I can post you on merchandise. Thank you shouldn't felt us and bunny Dutch for managing all that. And thank you. Erin, Talbert and Hannah Lippo for admitting he Facebook allergies podcast group, which is a great place for curious non jerks assistant, editing was done by Jarrett, sleeper of mine, jam media, who hosts to podcasts fight stuff. About combat sports so funny and my good bad brain about mental health. And thank you, as always to Stephen remorse for stitching, these episodes together, and for more on him, you can listen to his podcast, the per cast about kitties or see Jurassic rate, which is about dinosaurs. The theme song was written in performed by Nick Thorburn of the band islands. Now, if you stick around to the end, the episode, you know, tell secrets and this week secret is that I saw so hard this week in a WalMart after losing my wallet, and it's still missing unless to stay spit a rough week ghettos, but I have canceled my cards, and I have blocked off date in the next few weeks to go to the desert and just air space. So maybe that'll fix me anyway, delete, you wanna do keep singing in hopping around. Pachyderms college on the outlet does, gene. Meteorology. Before we go. If you're trying to remember the name, the crate that sends awesome science projects to your kids. It's Kiwi co they're designed to spark creativity in tinkering learning kids of all ages. I love hearing about what y'all are getting. I'm seeing pictures of kaleidoscopes and robot kits and chemistry sets in slime. So Kiko is offering all jobs that chance to try them for free. You can redeem the offer and learn more about their projects for kids of all ages. Go to Kiko dot com slash Allah. Geez. It's Kiko dot com slash all. I earnestly think you're gonna love it. Okay. By royals. Sales.

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WOM17  Mystical Experience and Consoling Prayer  The Way of Mystery with Deacon James Keating  Discerning Hearts

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts

30:37 min | 3 weeks ago

WOM17 Mystical Experience and Consoling Prayer The Way of Mystery with Deacon James Keating Discerning Hearts

"DISCERNING HEARTS DOT COM in cooperation with the institute for Priestly. Formation presents the way of mystery. The Eucharist immoral living with Deacon James Katie. Deacon Keating is the Director of theological formation at the institute for Priestly, Formation Located at Creighton University in Omaha Nebraska. He's the author of numerous books including remain in me holy orders prayer and ministry. Spell so prayer in the heart of the jacket. Taking, heating has led more than four hundred workshops on moral theology and spirituality and regularly conducts retreats and parish missions. The way of mystery Eucharist and moral living the Deacon James Kidding I'm your host Chris Mcgregor? Welcome back peaking, kidding you in our previous discussions, we've talked about the basics of the spiritual life and Growth that leads towards union with God essentially step one for lack of a better way of terming it a step one. The PERGA- of way. Then, we discussed the lumine of way, and how they really are steps that are joined together and work interaction. And then we talked about the unitive way, and now I'd like to approach what you've termed experiences that people of had that may be considered more low level or mystical experiences that are possibly more recognizable by individuals as they are entering into this union, and one of those is consoling prayer. God wants us to. Live in union with him. And as all people who persons share love. There's going to be the necessary affection that is felt. And I don't think this is any difference between the human being and God because it's affection. That is the glue for the relationship. If our affections are dried up then it's very easy for us to descend into a relationship where perhaps we will ignore each other or become indifferent toward each other. So I. Truly believe that God wants that affection to be felt by us from his love. But, not always in the way that we would say The saints experienced in such drama like in Mystical Ecstasy. The normal way that God stirs the affections for. Our relationship with him. would be in. Ordinary prayer experiences that I'm sure so many of us have memories of. And the first type of prayer experience that I labeled I called it consoling prayer. And this prayer would be. A sense that when you enter into prayer whether you're in your local church or you're sitting in your living room or you're driving in your car. When you enter into prayer you actually like it. You have peaceful feelings of content. You look forward pray. And in looking forward to praying, you look forward to the intimacy that you'll have with God and God wants to lavish you with constellation. He wants you to know that. his touched you in some way. And this can happen. In all sorts of ordinary circumstances. But it's marked mostly by. A desire to want to pray. It's a place. That you have with God. Which you actually like you look forward to. It's not a struggle anymore. It's not like. Oh I, have to say my prayers. Because well I'm Catholic and so Blida Tori. When you're in this type of union with God. Prayer is earnestly desired by you. And it's met by God, stirring the affections. And you rest a little bit with God. And it may last a couple of seconds or two may last longer. But the hallmark of it is always the sense. That God has drawn near. And as a result of God drawing near, he deepens the desire that you have for him. And so prayer become something that you delighted. And that's what's consoling about it. Is that when you literally choose to be with God? you feel his presence, and you delight in his presence, and so you want to go back, and you want to pray again. You may not always feel this every time you begin to pray. Is that true? That's true and there are some. Experiences of prayer that might be more or less void of affection. But. No for people who progress in the spiritual life. That's less and less. The rule. More and more. The rule is you do feel something. and. And You're feeling. This union with God because you have. Passed through probation. You have been faithful in many ways to. The Law of God the Ten Commandments. You've been faithful to worship. You've been faithful in your vocation. You've been faithful in acts of charity toward neighbors who? In. Our desire to forgive. In each one of these realities and more. You are becoming open to God more and more vulnerable. If you are follow the way of God then God will. Take you into his way. God will find a way. To come to you? And this will be the normal. Experience of the Christian. You will feel God's presence. And if you stay with prayer long enough. I would say it's almost guaranteed. That after you mature in the faith, especially by the repudiation of mortal sin. As you mature in the faith. you will have this deeper deeper. That, you feel for God in God will unleash is feelings within you. As we stay with prayer. Again It might be rare that if you say a quick prayer or you spend a minute with God that you're. You're flooded with some affection at a very deep. But if you spend fifteen twenty minutes in prayer half hour in prayer. I would almost say. It's the norm that you're going to be consoled by God. So just to reiterate for one who is entering in and wants to have this in desires to have this relationship with God that in those beginning stages that discipline of reaching out, impre are essential. Roy Moore and the repudiation of that which blocks the repudiation of that, which blocks are intimacy with God, so are are more serious than. And the penance that follows from our conversion from the sins. That's prepares us. To be open to be vulnerable to receive the Constellation of God. it's not to say that God cannot console someone in the in the U.. Part of their in the early part of their conversion from San of course is how great centers are converted that something happens that they no longer find satisfaction in the sin that they're engaged in and the Senate self, the affections that calmer the constellation that comes from their sin. Is Somehow dried up. And in the early stages of conversion from serious and what you're feeling is no longer feeling the satisfaction of the sin, and you're wondering what's going on. Why aren't getting my consolation from the Sin Anymore. Is feels very strange, and you're beginning to awaken to the fact that the Constellation is coming from another goal or another origin. Coming from God and so you begin to slowly move God, even though you perhaps sometimes struggle in the beginning. So there may be a a consolation at the beginning of our moral conversions, but it's quickly followed by confusion. What what about my past life? should I go back to that past life past life of Sin I'm talking about, but there's this something else. That's calling me. As we suffer through that conversion. As we repudiate, and as you said as we disciplined ourselves. To be more older toward God. Then we're at the stage and who knows how long this takes personal with everybody, but then we're at the stage where I think. Prayer becomes the Constellation that. We were looking for no longer. We Find Constellation in sin, but we now find consolation, and we find the affection of God, and we find our place of rest, no longer in the choices to sin, but in our prayer. And this is what I mean by being. This we should expect to feel constellation. We pray after we've made this transition from serious sin to the desire to be to be good and to holy. Another sign or another level of that union with God is that prayer that comes upon a believer. Can you elaborate on that? Yes, once we've made this transition I. think that it's not known to a lot of Christians. that. They will be busy about their day. And there will be some stimuli within their day whether something from nature, something beautiful about creation. Perhaps. It's a gazing upon someone whom they love. perhaps it's just. Something that comes upon them from within at the desk that they work on. And All the sudden. If they welcome it. God has alighted upon them. God comes upon the believer in the normal course of the day. And we want God to visit us like this. And their way, we know we want God to visit us like this. We welcome it without delay. So when we feel the interior affections moving toward God. From the catechism definition when our minds and our hearts are raised to God. Which is what prairies? We! Welcome it without delay. And this is a particular delightful grace that you're not saying well. This is my morning prayer time at eight am more at lunchtime now I'm going to visit Christ in the blessed sacrament and visit this church. It's nothing like that. It's in the normal course of your. Day God comes upon you gotTa Lights upon you and you welcome it. Without delay. The. The human analog to that would be a phone, call or visit to your workplace by your spouse for example. and. It would delight you. and and you would welcome it because it's out of the ordinary, and it's a proof of love or proof of affection. Proof. The spouse has been thinking about you. And this is the same type of experience. We have with this type of prayer that we want to welcome this type of prayer because we want Christ to visit us again. And we wanted to become aware that this is his will as well that Christ does not contain himself to formal prayer. Because he loves US so much Christ love overflows into the ordinariness of the day, and and we want that to continue on. We want to delight in that. will return in just a moment to the way of mystery with Deacon James Katie. Did you know that you can obtain a free APP which contains all your favorite discerning hearts programs? Father Timothy Gallagher Dr. Anthony Lewis Archbishop George Lucas father meets his filthy and so many more including episodes from inside the pages can be obtained on the discerning hearts free APP this also includes the no Vinas and devotional and prayers, including the holy, Rosary, and stations of the cross the tablet is Saint Michael, and the seven sorrows of Lady, all available on the discerning hearts, free half visit the I tunes and Google play APP stores to obtain your free discerning hearts, APP Today. Litany of humility. Oh Jesus Meek and humble of heart. Hear me. From desire of being esteemed deliver, meet Jesus from the desire of being loved deliver meet Jesus from the desire of being extolled. From the desire of being honored. Not. From the desire of being praised. From the desire of being preferred to others. Jesus? From the desire of being consulted. Jesus. From the desire of being approved. Delivery ever meet Jesus. From the fear of being humiliated, deliver me Jesus from the fear of being despised. Deliver me Jesus from the fear of suffering rebukes. Deliver me Jesus from the fear of being colonial. Deliver me Jesus. From the fear of being forgotten, deliver me Jesus. From the fear of being ridiculed, deliver me Jesus. From the fear of being wrong. Deliver me Jesus from the fear of being suspected. Deliver me Jesus. That others may be loved more than I. That others may be esteemed more than I. But in the opinion of the world, others may increase, and I may decrease. That others may be chosen and I set aside. But others may be praised and I noticed. That others may be preferred to me in everything. That others may become holier than I provided that I become his holiest should. Jesus grant me the grace to desire. Hello My name is Deacon Gutierrez and I want to ask you to support this winning hearts in a special way. We Chris McGregor the board. Ono know the not everyone listening can help financially. We know we have listeners from all parts of the world, and we have made a commitment since the beginning to make the truth shared through discerning hearts totally free. So, while you may not be able to contribute financially, which you can do is certainly pray, but also give us positive reviews on whatever platform you used to listen to us, if at I tunes Android Stitcher spotify over it is that you get these podcasts, or if you're on youtube and you like our videos, please give us a good rating and write a review. The more good ratings and reviews we get the higher profile. The more listeners will discover us. Listeners who may have the means to contribute in the future. Please consider rating us in writing positive review today. We now return to the way of mystery with Deacon James Katie. There's also the union known through a Sacramento encounters and. I think sometimes we take for granted that that is an opportunity for us, but we don't truly appreciate exactly what it is that we are encountering the first two experiences of prayer that I mentioned consoling prayer or a prayer that comes upon a believer. are spontaneously. The measure of these prayers are both faith and affection. But in the Sacramento life, which of course is a a a life of union? It is an encounter with faith. But it may not always be accompanied by affection. And this true. This is true, but again I don't necessarily think this is what's normal or ought to be normal. Mass there should be some stirring of affection. But even if there isn't, we can know by faith that we are in union with Christ, and this itself is somewhat of a consolation that even if I don't feel anything. The Paschal mystery truly has come into me to make it home in me. Whether I'm feeling something or not. This is a form of union with God. And we can get no closer. To the mystery. We can get no closer to Christ then through the sacraments. And and we meet his real presence in the sacraments. This is the authentic guarantee of union. So we have affections in the consoling prayer, and we have affections in the prayer. The comes upon US spontaneously. An but we have the real presence in the sacrament. which I think over time. Should always be accompanied by some stirring of consolation or affection. But that's not necessary. It's a faith itself. That tells us. We are in union with God when we're celebrating the sacraments. A union. Comes from our actions that when we. Act on the judgments of our conscience. In that is really something that I mean we are physically and emotionally responding to what we've just experience in the judgment of the mind to choose what is true. When we are finished with our moral discernment. And the conscience is dictating. That the behavior that is before me is true or the behavior that is before me is evil. When we get to that point of human judgment. And, hopefully we choose the judgment that is true, not evil. This is a very vital experience of union with God. To. Follow your conscience to the truth. is a behavior that embodies. Our love of the truth. And since Christ is truth, we are in union with Christ when we choose the good. And this can be accompanied by feelings as well but. A lot of time, ironically to choose the good out of conscience. is to then experience very quickly. the feeling of suffering. Because obviously in this culture when we choose the good a lot of times, we're not reward for it where we could be punished for. It could be ostracized for it. But even though there are negative, affections or negative, feelings are even suffering physical suffering emotional suffering. We know in faith that if we have discerned correctly. And the mind has judged our behavior to be true. And we follow that truth. We know we are in union with God. This is why the Church teaches in the catechism that you ought never disobey your conscience. Of, course, it's assuming correct formation of that conscience. But we ought never disobey the moral truth. If we do disobey the moral truth, of course, it's a extensively disobeying God, and we are objectively not in union with God. The key is knowing the truth is Christ. In today's culture so often truth has become a relative thing. We defined our own truce. In essence are truth becomes ourselves, and that's the danger, isn't it? That's why the importance of formation you have to be formed in the truth to recognize the truth. Sometimes we miss the beauty of the truth. Because we have lived so long in opposition. To the beauty of the truth, we don't even recognize. What is good, true and beautiful because? We have for so long imbibed. A shadow of that of A mask imitation. Fed to us by the popular culture other political culture. And so when the truth comes upon us. In the judgment of the mind a lot of times we need guidance because that doesn't immediately attract are will. Because, we have not held the good in our minds for so long that we don't recognize it is good. And so we need to pray very strongly for the a consciousness to recognize the good and the true. Which is Christ? and to seek out reliable guides for the formation of conscience and by reliable, we mean other people. Who Love the truth more than we do. And to to seek guidance from them when we make our moral decisions. To connect this with what we've been talking about in this growth in the spiritual life through the purgatory. And Unit of way we can see that in the progressive way, To recognize what truth is because we begin to recognize Christ. And? That's where the struggle is isn't it in recognizing Christ. We do recognize the truth, but. It is. That's struggle to be purified. The purification has the struggle. Because? Our affections have wandered for so long. away from Christ. In the affections wandering from Christ. We've lost that. Sense or that desire. To attach our will to him. No matter what the cost! And are real a grace, the real grace that we receive. is to reverse that so that someday we can attach our affections to Christ and our will to Christ no matter what the cost with this this will take. The efforts of purification and again this is not mysterious what we've been talking about all along the repudiation of sin. It's a close relationship with the sacraments of the church it's spiritual direction. It's doing penance for what we have done wrong. It's a establishing good friends in Christ fellowship. It's reading spiritual books that are a noble into to us. It's entering into relationships of direct work with those in need. And if we if we live a life such as Then, our affections will change. and. They will be ordered to the good and will be ordered to. Christ, and then we will love what is good rather than resisted. And in a very real way everything you just mentioned all of those activities. Can ultimately be found in the Eucharist. In every aspect of that will liturgical work of the people we do that in a way. In our celebration of the Eucharist, Again this is. Our conversions are as close as our parish. We will not. Make this complex. And that's what frightens us. Writings us because we want it to be esoteric, we wanted to be complex. We wanted to be a some long journey away from where we are now. A salvation is as close as the disciplines of your. And as close as the beatitudes. And as close as the spiritual and corporal works of mercy. It is incredibly simple. The difficulty of course is wanting it wanting to be a saint. The difficulty is to stop rationalizing immoral behavior, which at this present moment is consoling us for some reason. But to pray for the courage to break the bonds of the Constellation of sin. And to seek the Constellation of grace. This is the difficult part. everything is at our disposal. As close as our parishes. Battle within. The battle is within our will and our minds. The Christ who loves US WANTS TO BREAK? The hold that this age has on us. Just surrender to that, but let him break the hold. It becomes a lot easier if we let him. He'll the affection that we have for this age. So that's why we want to enter into this prayer and asked him very directly. Lord. I know that I'm not happy. I know that I'm putting up a front when I'm with my colleagues and my friends. I know that I argue for things that the depths of my heart I. don't even believe will make me happy. Please! Help me to stop the charade. Helped me to come into the light. Helped me to come to you. You break the bonds of affection that I have a rationalization. For Sin. For hiding from you. You Block. You break. Excuse me, you break these bonds Lord. 'cause I can't. And just to reiterate once again something you've said. As you walked us through that participation in the liturgy of the Eucharist, when we come with that disposition in our hearts, wanting to break that and be transformed. That's truly full and active participation in the liturgy into the work of the people and of grace, being allowed to enter into our hearts. participation has some how taken on a theatrical mode where somehow we have to see activity happening. we're human, and of course we're embodied, and so activity is good, and activity is good in worship. but We can dance around and we can jump around a lot at worship. And just like workaholics can escape from the pain in as they go into their their work. Jumping around and doing a lot of external activity in worship can also be an escape from God, even if we're right in the very presence of God. But it's interior artie, that is crucial. What's happening in your heart? Are you turning and surrendering. Is your body. Whether you're processing down the aisle whether you're doing liturgical dance whether you're standing up sitting down kneeling all the movements of our body. Is the body truly expressing the turn. That should be happening within. If there's no turn within. The, all of the external movements we make just theater. And that turning to can be turned termed as conversion, can it? I mean are continuing ongoing conversion. Is that turning most definitely in the presence of the of the Lord at the Eucharist this is the place no to behold the lamb of God. To truly behold him in his beauty is truth is power his promises. And this is the place of conversion because his reality is what makes us convert? What. What compels US right. The love of God compels us. To be our best self to to start again. See I make all things new. Most especially though God is making, his people knew. And the place of refreshment in the place of conversion and the place of newness. is at the mass. As we collectively gather as believers, and as we collectively surrender. Our hearts to him. You've been listening to the way of mystery. The Eucharist immoral living with Deacon James Katie the here and our to download this conversation along with hundreds of others, spiritual formation programs visit discerning hearts dot com. This has been a production of discerning hearts in cooperation with the institute for Priestly Formation I'm your host Chris Mcgregor? You help that. If this has been helpful for you that you will I pray for our mission, and if you feel worthy, consider a charitable donation, which is fully tax deductible to help support our efforts, but most of all we pray that you will tell a friend about discerning arts. Dot Com and join US next time for the way of mystery the Eucharist immoral living with Deacon James Scheme.

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833: Booked Solid

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

14:08 min | 6 months ago

833: Booked Solid

"Episode is being brought to you by our friends over there compassionate finance. Did you know that the average American mix less than forty five thousand dollars per year. It has less than two thousand dollars in savings that is the typical consumer that we are presenting both simple and complex dental treatment. If you look around consumers are buying everything from cell phones two. TV's two cars and houses with monthly payments. Just think about how many more cases you could close and how much more same day treatment. You'd be able to complete if you had a fast and easy way to accept easy monthly payments from your patients. Well that's where compassionate finance comes comes in. Forget everything that you've heard or experienced about internal financing compassionate finance takes all of the guesswork end investigation out of the equation and is able to legally charge interest to your patients which offsets the risks and allows you to fill all of your open concerto go to compassionate finance dot com forward slash Kostas to find out more and to get our podcast communities discount of twenty percent off. Get More yeses and fill more chair time without any additional administration time visit compassionate finance dot com forward Slash Kostas that C. O. S. T. E.. Yes the dental for Noor. PODCAST asked okay doctor. It's time to put down that hand piece. You're listening to the show dedicated to helping dentists get their lives back. It's time to decrease your stress increase. Increase your ability and regain your passion now introducing your host Dr Mark Kostas. Hello Hello everyone and welcome to another episode of the PODCAST. I'm your host Dr Marcus's catching up with some old friends. Here at the podcasters lounge. VOD Twenty twenty. My my voice is just about this. I have three more to do but Yeah it's been an incredible incredible event. Take you guys so much for being our signature sponsor. Bonsor you guys just gave away a forty five hundred dollars crews and a five hundred dollar gift card really really cool stuff. We had a blast. We had A. We had a rock paper for scissors tournaments and the winner of the tournament. Got A cruise from local MED unbelievable. And here he is. Here's the winner of the cruise. Ron what's up guys awesome relations man. Thanks guys yeah. I'm super stoked. Then speech do you have some words of failing fehlinger still unreal your mom and dad vein. I mean I think costs and hacks podcasts for putting on the conference and tasks that it's been incredible and thank you so much guys for sponsoring and giving us the opportunity. So who new skills would come in handy. My Gosh travel between Idaho. Oh Minnesota planet with my four siblings skills. Oh my gosh so friend bacteria you guys know him from the podcast. In years past you are or a d three D Two d three. You're a D three at creighton university lows. UK University of Kentucky. Like I said that's good for a second there my other my other best friend. That's a d three to grady. I'll be happy well. Congratulations juices man. We'll have to hook up here before you leave. Thanks so much guys have fun guy so reflections on the weekend just a lot a lot of energy a lot of great people. We were here last year at kicked off phenomenal year for us in two thousand nineteen. He started the year off right and we started the year off right again and and we're already excited about the summit but we'll get to that just yet but just an amazing group of people a lot of energy and a lot of learning a lot of fun on stuff happening. Yeah just a really unique energy right and you and I we all three of us were. We're kind of part of this. Travelling Circus you end up in lots of different venues lots of different hotels lots of different convention halls together for different events that that we are part of and there's just certain ones ones that stand out in your mind as just a little bit different. Yeah and it's not just the venue. It's not just the format it's the people that got certain events attract and I just love of this event so much just because the people that come to this are are just open minded fun fun loving people that are are looking looking for community and and they founded in this weird podcasting world. There is a lot of fun I really like it. So what do you guys think what what about what what is new you on the horizon for two thousand twenty for local well we're growing Consistently so that's going to be a lot of fun this year. We thousand seventeen. You went from three hundred to twelve thousand. That's pretty good thousand. Wow Yeah we're talking about the travelling circus last year. We were at twenty eight events this year. We're already scheduled for sixty two so mind place all the time while happily as you met you. It's not just me and Vanessa and ghost any more humid. Emily Joe Michael be there too so we've got a little bit bigger group more really good people fund people they will fit in perfectly with with a group like this because they're just good people and when we say good people. They're good in so many different ways. They love what they do. They're passionate about it. They like to help people. And they're very intelligent. And they know how to help people. And when you can collaborate with people I had probably a half a dozen conversations with business owners podcasters. They had not met before. And now we've got this relationship that started and it's going to be a win win just like all of the relationships we created last year. So I mean I want to give all the credits you guys going from three hundred to twelve thousand and a huge part of that is the fact that you guys are great at creating relationships but it just you can't sustain that kind of growth. You can't have that kind of meteoric explosion unless you have a good product too so tell us tell us about the software so AH the product is still so far ahead of anything else. That's on the market right now. Most everything else is a request whereas local men allows the patient to book a fully. We scheduled appointment online just like booking a flight online and from the practices perspective. You're still in complete control of everything that's happening in the schedule. Just like like the airline is when you're booking a flight sure it's super easy to set up takes a fifteen minute phone call because we're already integrated with the practice management systems and then you're on your way we do all the work on the front end. customizing the solution around your unique roles. And then you're off your filling the open slots last two years. We've measured it. It's a it's an average of a forty four to one return on investment. So it's pretty cool and if you're doing some marketing and some other things you're you're gonna be ahead of that curve so so tell us tell us about like the on boarding process what is it. What is it exactly? Does it take your tech team reaches out to our tech team name or can the doctor do it himself or office manager. Who who does it a lot of times? It's the office manager but it can be anybody that has access to the schedule. Actually we like it. If it's the person who knows the scheduling the Scheduler yes. Okay and then. It's just a usually a fifteen minute phone call. Let us know what type of Appointments They WanNa have on wine because not everybody wants to start with crowns and a lot of these other more difficult things. They'll start with just the hygiene just the the consoles and the emergencies and it's literally fifteen minutes. Let's go back tested out. And then we send the widget codes to the practice and now they're putting them up on their website. Their facebook page instagram page. Judge on missing something Vanessa. What am I missing any anywhere you on a control so ads little ads facebook ads? Repulse reminders. Here's emails I mean you include anything that you can bet the widget on their patient might be trying to Fulvio right. It'd be a call to action. Sure so if somebody calls after hours you can say you can just say on the voice mail makes you you go to our website where you can schedule an appointment today right now exactly so that multiple edible insurance partners to exclusive relationships with them. Will they'll put our widget or your widget on their directory. Metlife Humana Guardian Indian United Concordia and United Concordia puts US anybody's local mad customer. They go to the top of their directory. So imagine that for your practice. How many people? So you're just GONNA get referrals from there so all of those things combined to make it kind of no brainer along with the fact that it's month to month we're not asking the sign up for three years or care. Yeah Yeah so you can test it out. It's it's it's not expensive and again with the forty four to one even if it was it wouldn't matter but it's going to happen and if if for some some unknown reason why it doesn't you can stop it in a month. You're not locked in for a year or two years or anything. Yeah so as that cost based on the number of providers or or is it based on location it's basically it's a location based A pricing model. Where it's nine ninety to set it up at each location and then it's two hundred word in forty nine dollars a month now? Of course we'll run. Promotions like every other company might even hear voices of Dentistry. We gave US special. Yeah so if you're if you're with us specific buying group like the DSM when you're going to get a better price so become part of the San because it's a great organization great partner to US obviously Love partnering with you on that Awesome Awesome. Well guys I mean you guys are just a regular fixture. I could talk for hours about how about your company and your style or something special about you know when you guys are in town and there's usually there's usually a cluster of activity in your corner. Yeah you guys always have cool themes you. You're very very creative. Ghosts is is a great mascot. He's a great energy and spirit animal to have around it. There's something very special about the the culture that you guys have built within local medicine. It's not surprising to me that you have experienced that kind of growth and Jeez the company so lucky to have both of you guys in we appreciate everything you do for us because we know what to reach you have and how much influence you have to be partners and even better friends with you has really made a difference for us so thank you for that. Can you imagine a world where you didn't have like friends friends like we like. We are together on the road. It would make life so miserable if drudgery if we had to travel and then never see a familiar face on the road or just not make relationships. I just I just value guy so much. I can't thank you enough for everything. Well thank you okay. We'll have a wonderful day. Yes you to you go ahead and announce who you are. Because I never so exhausted. I didn't even say anybody who I had on the podcast yard yard he like. I don't even know what's your name again. That's what he knows a good time. Because you don't have your tiredness maybe it's all the fireball three shots right now. But that's nothing anyway. So I'm Vanessa talion. Oh I'm a director of business development just flat out Tom. Brown Brown Noah Brown and I am the VP of sales and marketing for local man. Awesome all right guys have a wonderful full day. You and I hopefully will have dinner or something. We'll see at least glass of wine here in a few minutes. After my last three podcasts. Okay Wonderful Day. We'll talk. Thanks bye-bye this episode is being brought to you by Abella another company founded by the legendary author speaker sure and dental poor. Dr Bruce Baird as you may know Dr. Bruce also founded compassionate finance a company that has taken the dental profession by storm over. The last decade. Abella is a completely automated accounts. Receivable solution that integrates into your practice management software and contacts patients with account balances say goodbye to ineffective collection phone calls in our cake. Physical statements that take significant it financial investment to print stuff and send only to be tossed in the trash by your patients for just one hundred ninety nine dollars per month. You could automate the whole process and actually get paid. What's owed to you visit? Compassionate Finance Dot Com forward slash Costas and get that monthly cost decreased to just one hundred fifty nine dollars per month. Isn't it time you got your accounts. RECEIVABLES UNDER CONTROL COMPASSIONATE FINANCE DOT com forward Slash Costas that C. O. S. T. S.. And that wraps it up for another episode of the Dental podcast look forward to reconnecting on the next episode. Thank you so much for joining us today on the dental for Noor podcast checkout true dental success dot com for full recaps every show a schedule of our live events free video tutorials stories and a whole host of practice billy resources.

Vanessa talion Dr Mark Kostas US Abella facebook Noor VOD Twenty twenty office manager Dr Bruce Baird Idaho Costas Dr Marcus creighton university UK University of Kentucky Ron grady Dr. Bruce Minnesota Emily Joe Michael
WOM7  The Liturgy of the Word pt. 1  The Way of Mystery with Deacon James Keating  Discerning Hearts Podcast

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts

28:54 min | 4 months ago

WOM7 The Liturgy of the Word pt. 1 The Way of Mystery with Deacon James Keating Discerning Hearts Podcast

"Discerning HEARTS DOT COM in cooperation with the institute for Priestly Formation Presents. The way of mystery the Eucharist Immoral Living With Deacon James Katy Deacon Keating is the Director of theological formation at the institute for Priestly Formation Located at Creighton University in Omaha Nebraska. He's the author of numerous books including remain in me. Holy Orders Prayer and ministry spell so prayer in the heart of the jacket. Taking heating has led more than four hundred workshops on moral theology and spirituality and regularly conducts retreats and parish missions. The way of Mystery Eucharist and Moral Living Deacon James Kidding. I'm your host Chris McGregor. We're at the point in the Eucharist where we enter in to it. True opportunity for conscience formation. And we call that the liturgy of the word the conscience as So beautifully understood by our Catholic church is A location of incredible strength but according to Our will could also be the location of incredible confusion and weakness really. The church is very simple in how understands the conscience? It is the mind. It's the soul but the mind or the soul is disposed to discern right or wrong. It's the mind when the mind is trying to discern right or wrong so it's not a separate faculty in the human being. It's not A. It's not a bundle of emotions. It's the mind it's so important to remember that because We want the mind to alight upon the truth. And we want the the truth to enter the mind. And that's all the conscience is the conscience is just are rational faculty. Of course it's a rational faculty imbued with love. Love is never separated from the mind. What we love. We love enters into our deliberations about right and wrong. So there's an effective component to the mind pure rationality or just logic logical thinking or it's got affect imbued in it what we love who we love affects how we think so most crucial for us to understand that there's nothing magical about the conscience. It's just our mind thinking about truth or about our temptation toward evil. All in the context of who we love and this conscience is definitely malleable. And it's Malleable too many external factors and sources. The Conscience in other words is even probably consider the dream world. I mean the consciencious running twenty four hours a day. It's open to be affected all the time. This makes it incredibly important to discern what we allow our mind to pay attention to because if the the mind is a place where we make decisions of right and wrong. The only way. We're going to understand what is right or wrong is if we have sources that are worthy of our dignity and these source that it is certainly worthy of our dignity that we present in the mass is the liturgy of the word where the very word of God is going to enter into the formation of our conscience as hopefully one of the key elements of US recognizing what is true. And what is good wing? You speak in that way about the word. The word is more than just the transmittal of An actual pages on a script but the word becomes something that's very life giving because the word is the person Godwin. The Liturgy of the word is the encounter of the person of Christ as Christ wants to enter us by way of language in the Liturgy of the Eucharist. He's entering us by way of the fullness of his presence is fullness of being at the Liturgy of the of the word he's entering US mostly by the medium of language he certainly fully present a not in a unique way that he is in his body and blood but he's fully present in the liturgy of the word and he's entering through language now language of course is what the mind recognizes. So when we hear you know this is a reading from now. Paul's letter to the Romans. The mind is recognizing that language and wants to in a way. Sit Up and take notice. Here comes some information at least generally on the on the level of the intellect of the brain. Here comes some information that I can Assume INTO ME. But the information is ordered more toward an encounter. It's not it's not ordered toward data. You don't leave church saying well. Wasn't that interesting. What we learned about you know the time that Paul lived and wasn't that interesting about what he said about city life at the time that he lived. I mean that'd be kind of a ludicrous response to the liturgy of the word and Sometimes In preaching those who have been only exposed to the historical critical method of scripture. Sometimes you'll get scriptures that excuse me homilies that border on our church history class or a class that is just trying to define terms you know. What's the difference between a pharisee necessity and those types of homilies but it's not about data it's about transformation it's about whether the mind was open to receive the Holy Spirit and the spirit literally convicting the participants of the Liturgy of the word convicting them with truth. And and and having that intimacy with the person who is conversing about the truth having intimacy with that person grow as a result of the liturgy of the word. It's probably best to imagine the liturgy of the word something similar to Jesus talking to the woman at the well and that whole dialogue that they had is analogical to the liturgy of the word. If you only knew who was speaking to if you only knew the gift that was being offered to you you would ask for more. You would ask for living water you would ask. You would ask this person. Jesus Christ to give you his his very being. That's the liturgy of the word and that sharing of the gift of his very self with us is what fires and transform the mind so that we're no longer happy. Just being capitalist no longer happy being Republicans Democratic Um fact these things become almost superficial to our identity when we let this transformation happen by rap listening to the liturgy the word our is fastened upon the eternal. Of course this happens over time maybe decades but our mind becomes riveted and fascinated with the eternal not with that which is passing and therefore we begin to take on a conscience that is Catholic because the whole church mediates the liturgy of the word and we take on a mind that is Catholic and therefore we begin to rest in our identities Catholics when looking here and there and try to win the approval of neighbors or friends or those with power. In fact the holier would become the more we become repulsed at tried to curry favor by people who have power in this world in fact from the perspective of the Liturgy of the word and being formed in the liturgy were to do so makes us look ridiculous to care about what people with power think of US personally of course we have to maintain relationships with everyone in charity. But we're not deriving our identity externally anymore we're deriving from that rap listening that occurs when the liturgy of the word is proclaimed and I am attentive and in my attention I I receive an encounter by way of the encounter. I'm changed from within and my mind now searches only to alight upon the word that I heard it mass and I only begin to recognize the word that I heard it mass as the only word worthy of being housed in my mind. What do I care what? Cnn thinks or what do I care what other media outlets things I? The word housed in my mind. What do I care that what my professors thank university? I have the word house in my mind. And this is not a solid. Cystic individualistic movement towards objectivism. Because I'm receiving this word in the context of the church receiving this word in the context of a whole living breathing community from both benedict to the bishop to the priests that. Serve Me to the saints that live around me. They're all receiving this word to shun these other authorities. As worthy of forming. My unconscious Is Not to shun community. It's not to become isolated. Those people who no longer listen to our university professors are politicians. We no longer listen to some naive stance anyway. They become jealous. And they like to call us an individualistic or don't become too subjective. I don't think that the words going to guide you from within. That's dangerous will. The word has not come from within. The word has come from without. The word has come from the community of the Church and what I let that word in mass it has taken up residence in my heart and I have now become one who has guided from within. Yes but the word did not take its origin from in me. The word was given to me by the church. It's the very opposite of isolation the very opposite of objectivism comes from the community. And then it lodges in me and then I have the strength to make decisions of moral living out of my conscience conscience that has been given over to Christ in crisis now taken up residence within it and I've left the passing age behind so to speak in other words. What the Liturgy of the word does view is it makes you. Free no underway. Say thanks be to God praise to you? Lord Jesus Christ it is something as you describe it that we almost consume not just here at almost is like parallel to what we consume in the liturgy of the Eucharist. Isn't it by those analogies of the meal the Liturgy of the word the We're nourished by it and we adjusted. Those are good analogies because what that does is it makes us think that this word is entering us. It's not just a an idea doesn't impact us this This literally the word is impacting US entering us and it also reminds me of how we eat and we share our meals as Americans and of course today. Because we're busy lifestyles. A lot of our meals are very rushed. And we don't want that to happen to the liturgy of the word and one of the ways that we We prevent that from happening. Is that if we can begin to look at the word of God before the Mass at our homes and this is an age old suggestion but the reason that we keep suggesting it is because so few of US commit ourselves to do it and that is during the week to look at the word of God and I know here sometimes on the radio station that you actually look at the weekly readings which is so helpful to the community because it helps us prepare to receive Christ in the liturgy. The aggressed Through the familiarity with the with the word for that week but at home. It's good to open the word of God and sit with it perhaps as parents to read it out loud to our children so that they recognize the liturgy of the word. I wouldn't proclaimed at mass. It won't be new to them the other thing. That's important is that if we don't read it beforehand if we don't read it before the mass begins a lot of times. When you hear those words you know the word of the Lord Or- praised who Jesus Christ after we say the Gospel of the Lord a lot of times. We'll say what did he say. What did she just read It went in one ear out the other. It's almost like your airport and you. You think you hear. An announcement in announcement is gone. And you say what did they say? Where are we supposed to go? What are we supposed to be at only here at once and if you only hear it once it never really penetrated and so to wait for Sunday mass to have your conscience formed by the word of God is very risky because it may just pass in one ear and out the other a sound. It won't be an encounter. It won't be a language that changes our language. That motivates us to change. It'll just be sound so it's crucial to be familiar with the readings so that when they are proclaimed they actually nest in us. They actually take up this this residents in us in a way that's deep and long and prolonged and we don't say what did he just say. Or what did she just read? Because those readings have been with us all week. And we're used to them and we're just now celebrating. They're coming at a new depth and of course wherever two or more gathered in the name of the Lord that his presence is stronger and more efficient particularly here the proclamation of his word the liturgy of the word. There is a unique presence. And there's a strength of presence and if we have prepared to receive that word all week long than Christ will come with that power return in just a moment to the way of mystery with Deacon James Katie. Did you know that you can obtain a free APP? Which contains all your favorite discerning hearts programs Father Timothy Gallagher? Dr Anthony Lola's Archbishop George. Lucas father marites his filthy and so many more including episodes from inside the pages can be obtained on the discerning hearts free APP this also includes Albano Venus and devotional and prayers including the Holy Rosary and stations of the Cross. The tablet of Saint Michael and the seven sorrows of our lady all available on the discerning hearts free visit the I tunes and Google play APP stores to obtain your free discerning hearts APP today. Litany of humility. Oh Jesus Meek and humble of heart hear me from the desire of being esteemed deliver me. Jesus from the desire of being loved deliver meet. Jesus from the desire of being extolled Jesus from the desire of being honored deliver. Jesus from the desire of being praised from the desire of being preferred to others. Don't ever meet Jesus from the desire of being consulted. They'll ever meet Jesus from the desire of being approved deliver me. Jesus from the fear of being humiliated deliver me. Jesus from the fear of being despised. Deliver me Jesus from the fear of suffering rebukes deliver me. Jesus from the fear of being calumniates deliver me. Jesus from the fear of being forgotten deliver me. Jesus from the fear of being ridiculed deliver me Jesus from the fear of being wronged deliver me. Jesus from the fear of being suspected delivery that others may be loved more than I that others may be esteemed more than I but in the opening of the world others may increase and I may decrease that others may be chosen and I set aside that others may be praised and I noticed that others may be preferred to me in everything that others may become holier than I provided that I become his holy as I should. Jesus grant me the grace to desire. Hello my name is Deakin Omar Gutierrez and I WANNA ask you to support this. Winning hearts especial way. We Chris McGregor the board and I all know that not. Everyone listening can help financially. We know we have listeners. From all parts of the world and we have made a commitment since the beginning to make the truth shared through turning hearts totally free so while you may not be able to contribute financially which you can do is certainly pray but also give us positive reviews whatever platform you used to listen to us if at I tunes Android Stitcher spotify over. It is that you get these podcasts. Or if you're on youtube and you like our videos please give us a good rating and write a review. The more good ratings and reviews we get. The higher profile in the more listeners will discover US listeners who may have the means to contribute future. Please consider rating us in writing a positive review. Today we now return to the way of mystery with he can James Katie when we hear the liturgy of the word. If we don't take that time to pray with it all week to sit with it and to allow it to come into us. It could seem as though they are just three separate readings from scripture. And we could miss the tie that the church is trying to make by bringing these three readings Along with the Psalm together. At this moment there is an integrity to the proclamation and this integrity is correctly ordered by the church itself so that we are encountering the fullness of revelation the fullness of the Bible in the The Old Testament and the psalms in the New Testament both the words of Jesus and then also from the apostles and the followers of Jesus such as the letters of Paul. So we're getting totally immersed in the Bible that the liturgy of the word and there are themes that usually resonate one from the old into the New Testament. The singing of the psalms and a lot of that helps us to hold onto a common thread but at another level also there is a particular relation of the liturgy of the word. You have a common. Were that's going out. And this of course a lot of times is what's commented upon by the by the homeless but then there is this particular liturgy of the word that is happening within you and so there might be a reading from the Gospel. It might be something to do with perhaps Christ's resurrection for example and the homeless is going to be speaking about resurrection and new life and all these themes but there was a particular ization that the Holy Spirit was aiming at you that no harmless could ever know and it was perhaps about a sinuous struggling with or a doubt or a disappointment that you were experiencing an unless we open ourselves at this very depth of conscience to be affected by the word in a particularized way by the Holy Spirit. Then it will almost seem as if we went to a lecture class. It almost seem as if we went to a public lecture but we did not meet a friend. We got information which is clever and interesting but it did not move us feel perhaps a part of a relationship and that turn to allow the Holy Spirit to particularize. The Liturgy of the word is the place where all conversion occurs. If we don't allow the Holy Spirit to particularize it until literally listen for language such as Jim. You have to pay more attention to your children or Mary. You have to be kinder to Helen at work. And this is what's resonating within you in your heart during the homily during the liturgy of the word unless you capture the particularly given to you by the Holy Spirit about the readings that will never be a moment of conversion. It'll just simply be interesting information about Jesus or interesting information about the church and the goal is to listen to the word of God on both these levels on a general level calling all of us to a certain awareness but then at this particularized level as well so there's an integrity to the scriptures thematically but then there's this incredible alighting upon us by the gift of the Holy Spirit to particularize the liturgy of the word unto our own transformation and this is the level of the the conviction of conscience. Sometimes I've heard the liturgy of the word referred to as a opportunity to hear our stories which is an aspect of the liturgy of the word but then again it it puts us back as an audience as a storyteller telling us something as opposed to someone who's in a position of prayer taking in that gift from God is that it am I over stating that the key with with the especially your introduction of the word prayer I met a man once who who literally didn't know the Mass was prayer. He was a middle-aged man. Just astounded me to think that he didn't know the mass was a prayer. I don't know what he thought he was doing there. All the years of he attended mass ritual or or even a family tradition that type of level a gathering of a community. But he didn't know it was a prayer and so I think I think to emphasize the word prayer as you're doing these crucial. Obviously IT'S A. It's a telling of stories. The problem with using the word story sometimes is that it brings to mind fiction and Just brings to mind fiction. Obviously that's pretty impotent. Way of understanding the liturgy of the word There are story aspects there and there are analogous ways that we could look at the liturgy. The word you know the the father telling the the traditions of his family to children or grandchildren. Could you go that route But it's not it's not a reminder. It's not a remembering of of old stories. It's not nostalgia. In other words lived through the word is not nostalgia for Jesus. The Liturgy of the word is welcoming. Jesus is knows there's no sense here of nostalgia as if wasn't a great when we all knew Jesus ten twenty thirty years ago. This is a moment when the door is opening a Jesus walking in and then our our challenge do we want to receive him as he's literally present all around us as the second. Vatican Council taught all the depths and levels of presents. The Jesus is at the mass. Do we want to welcome this presence? Do we want to come this presence at the level of the formation that the whole church receiving and do we want to welcome this presence at the level that you are receiving individually by that particular nation? Dangerous Frightening for some people. They don't want to review the scriptures before the mass because they don't want the scriptures to affect them they wanted to be like that airport announcement. Where they they were present. They heard some sound but they didn't want to get up and change their gate they. They didn't want to move. That didn't want it to affect them. So it's stories but that's to NNAEMEKA vision really. It's the encounter. It's the challenge. Do you want to be hospitable to God? And the Liturgy of the word do you want him to come in and come so deeply that at the end of the liturgy that word the end of the homily you might actually make a promise to change some aspect of your life because the the word of God the Bible has convicted you of a sin informed your conscience in a new way. That's the that's the power of the mass. Of course we can all do Rationalizations Defense mechanisms to keep Christ coming that close which is why so many people have so many blank looks on their face during this. They're not quite sure what they're doing. They're they're not quite sure that they want Christ to come close and so what they end up. Doing is criticizing the priest's homily or saying their father zones says better mass than father selling so staying on this level of keeping Christ away or wasn't that long mass or wasn't that music horrible keeping Christ away. We loved linger on that level of superficiality. Viz if we go any deeper I might cry for Goni deeper. I might change for going deeper. It's going to cost me if I go with. The Liturgy of the word leads me. I may have to hear the words of John Chapter Eleven. Come let us die with him. I don't WanNa do that. I JUST WANNA put in my time at worship. I don't actually want to meet Christ who's going to name. Truth asked me to come with him not bargaining for that. So it's more than stories much more. Thank you so much Deacon James Keating. You've been listening to the way of mystery the Eucharist immoral living with Deacon James Katie. To hear and or to download this conversation along with hundreds of others spiritual formation programs visit discerning hearts dot com. This has been a production of discerning hearts in cooperation with the institute for Priestly Formation. I'm your host Chris McGregor. We help that. If this has been helpful for you that you will I pray for our mission and if you feel as worthy considering charitable donation which is fully tax deductible to help support our efforts but most of all we pray that you will tell a friend about discerning arts DOT COM and join us next time for the way of mystery the Eucharist and moral living with Deacon James Keenan?

Jesus Meek US Jesus Christ Chris McGregor Holy Spirit James Katie Priestly Formation Paul James Katy Deacon Keating James Kidding Nebraska Director of theological Cnn Timothy Gallagher Creighton University Godwin youtube James Keenan James Keating Republicans
Cattle Current PodcastOct. 25, 2019

Cattle Current Market Update with Wes Ishmael

07:03 min | 10 months ago

Cattle Current PodcastOct. 25, 2019

"Cash Fed cattle trade. One dollars higher. You're in the southern plains. On Thursday at one hundred ten dollars carcass weights continue wider year-over-year. Coming up plan your Kelkar. Market update was as West Ishmael old. Aw How did all this is West Ishmael with your Kelkar market update for Thursday night and Friday morning the twenty fifth October negotiated cast fit cattle title trade developed in the Southern Plains on Thursday with live sales at one hundred and ten dollars a hundredweight compared to the previous week that was a dollar higher in Kansas and see dollars higher in the Texas panhandle although too few to trend there were also some early dress sales in the north at one hundred seventy four to one hundred and seventy five dollars which it was a dollar higher than the low end of last week's range cattle feature soften to touch part of the pressure might have been defense ahead of Friday's USDA monthly honestly cattle on feed report except for twenty two cents higher in spot. October live cattle futures closed an average of thirty three cents lower except for twenty cents entire in spot October. Fear cattle futures closed an average of sixty four cents Lore wholesale beef values were sharply higher on choice again and steady Eddie on select with fairly good demand in modern offerings. According to the Agricultural Marketing Service choice box beef cut out. Value was two dollars and thirty four cents higher Thursday afternoon at two hundred and twenty five dollars and sixty two cents one hundred weight select was fifteen cents higher at one ninety nine oh nine although although increasing seasonally dressed fed cal carcass weights. Continue to be lighter year over year according to USDA's weekly actual slaughter enter Federal Inspection Inspection report the address steer weight of nine hundred one pounds for the week ending October. Twelfth was to pounds heavier than the previous week but two pounds slider than the same week last year. The average stressed heffer wait of eight hundred. Twenty eight pounds was four pounds heavier than the prior week. But three pounds lighter than a year earlier corn futures closed mostly penny lower while soybean futures closed fractionally lower to a penny lower in the front three contracts and then fractionally higher are two five cents higher. Here's a sampling of price trends from the weekly Thursday auctions monitored by Calcutta fierce dear soul steady two or lower at Woodward Livestock Auction Oklahoma. Fear Heffer sold unevenly steady. There are forty five hundred. Twenty one hit on offer at Valentine lifestock in Nebraska with thirty seven hundred ten hit on hand steers. Four fifty to six fifty nine sold unevenly like steady to five dollars higher while heifers wind four and a half to five hundred pound salt evenly steady further north at Moberg livestock exchange in south South Dakota Steer Caz four and a half to six hundred pounds sold mostly steady with instances of two dollars higher at five hundred to five hundred and fifty pounds steers. One six zero one. Two seven hundred pounds traded three to five dollars lower with instances of update dollars lower at six fifty to seven hundred. Pounds Heifer calves wine five hundred to six hundred pounds sold mostly steady. There were twenty nine hundred and six head. Higher undertones were noted for feeder steers at Napoleon. Livestock auction the North Dakota where there were twenty six hundred sixty nine head likewise trends were mostly higher for feeder heifers at two Ulli stock in Texas fear Steersman have resold fully steady with eighteen hundred fifty two on hand feeder steer sold with a higher undertow at winter livestock in Pratt. Kansas where there are seventeen. Nine hundred thirty two hit a higher undertone was also noted for a narrow test of comparable weight steer cash finally fear steers weighing less than five hundred. Pounds sold Even at Centennial Livestock Auction and Fort Collins Colorado Steers Wayne. Five hundred to six hundred pounds sold five to six dollars higher and then to seven dollars is lower at heavier weights. Fear heifers Wayne less than seven hundred pounds soul to seven dollars higher and then steady at heavier weight. There are eleven hundred and thirty six head offer major. US financialengines is closed narrowly mixed Thursday. Although corporate quarterly earnings reports folks continue mostly positive investors remain uncertain about economic growth the Dow Jones industrial average. Close Twenty eight points lower the S. and p. five hundred closed five points higher and the Nasdaq was up sixty six points. The closely watched rural main St Index from Creighton University rose above growth neutral this month but rural bankers economic expectations fell to the lowest level in two years specifically the index increased to fifty one point four in October from fifty point one and September although still week it was the highest level since June and marked the third time in the past four months that the overall index rose above growth neutral. The Rural Main Street index covers tin regional state focusing on approximately two hundred rural communities with an average population of thirteen hundred. It represents an early snapshot of the the Economy of rural portions of the nation that are dependent on agriculture and energy. According to Ernie Gos- the Jackie mcallister chair in regional economics onyx at Creighton. University's Hydra College of business. Federal Agriculture Crop Support Payments and somewhat higher grain prices boosted the index. But he adds that seventy three percent of bank. CEO's reported continuing negative impacts from the trade war in the Associated Confidence Index expectations the bank CEO's for the economy six months out slumped to thirty six point five from September forty two point nine. That's the lowest economic economic confidence recorded in two years says Goss who explained the trade war with China and the lack of passage of the trade pact replace Nafta are driving confidence and growth lower for most

Pounds Southern Plains Texas Kansas CEO Kelkar Woodward Livestock Auction Okl Associated Confidence Index USDA Kelkar Centennial Livestock Auction Creighton University North Dakota Heffer Eddie Agricultural Marketing Service Moberg Hydra College of business Valentine lifestock US
Show 1139: Will Supplements Keep Your Bones Strong?

People's Pharmacy

58:14 min | 1 year ago

Show 1139: Will Supplements Keep Your Bones Strong?

"The people's pharmacy podcast is sponsored by the brain gauge developed by neuroscientist at the university of North Carolina to study brain function across a wide range of applications, including aging and traumatic brain injury. The brain gauge translates stood of the art neuroscience into easy to use methods that let you take control of your brain health now available with a low cost subscription model for the home. Find out more at gauge your brain dot com. Osteoperosis can be devastating in this condition, weak bones break easily will taking supplements, keep them strong. This is the people's pharmacy with Terry and Joe Graydon. For decades. We've been advised to take calcium tablets to make sure we have enough to keep our bones healthy and strong. How well does that work? Is it better to try to get the calcium you need from your diet? Vitamin d is another nutrient critical for bone health, but there are questions about how effective vitamin d supplements may be for preventing osteoporosis and fractures. What does the research tell us coming up on the people's pharmacy? Find out if calcium and vitamin d. pills can keep your bones strong. First, this news. In the people's pharmacy health headlines, a strange polio like you'll notice is spreading around the country at last count more than one hundred twenty suspected cases have been reported in at least twenty two states this condition acute flaccid. My lightest first appeared in California in two thousand twelve a cluster of children with weakness or paralysis of their limbs, and neurological changes in their spinal cords had physicians, puzzled, they were tested for polio and West Nile virus, but the tests were negative. Since then cases have been cropping up in many other states, doctors are still puzzled about this mysterious illness, some children recover. Well, while others remained paralysed scientists, suspect a virus triggers the nerve damage, but so far, no one has identified the coporate. There's no treatment and no vaccine. Although the CDC states that the condition is extremely rare, the symptoms. Consequences appear similar to polio. As a result. Parents are getting worried by the increasing number of cases. CDC will be issuing weekly updates. There have been rumors that turmeric the yellow spice in curry might help protect people from dementia. A placebo controlled study suggests that there may be something to this idea. Researchers at UCLA recruited older people with mild memory problems. They randomly assign these volunteers to take her cumin, the active ingredient in turmeric or a look alike. Placebo capsule they took the pills twice a day for a year and a half periodically over the eighteen months. All the subjects were tested for cognitive function. Brain scans were conducted to detect signs of the plaques and tangles that characterize Alzheimer's disease. According to the authors daily use of thera- cairn seems to improve memory and attention and decreases. Amyloid plaques and tangles in the brain. They also note that people taking curcumin had improved mood. By the end of the study, rose, Asia is a skin condition in which the skin flushes are Redden's easily and may stay red chronically. People may also develop pimple like bumps on the skin people with Rosetta often advised to avoid potential triggers, including hot beverages such as coffee. Now, data from the nurses hill study suggests that women who drink coffee, have a lower risk of rose Asia. The study followed more than eighty thousand women for fifteen years. During that time, nearly five thousand of them were diagnosed with rose Asia compared to women who drank coffee less than once a month. Those who drank four or more cups, daily, twenty three percent less likely to develop the condition. Decaf coffee was not protective. If you watch television, you cannot miss prescription. Commercials, there are ads for drugs to treat diabetes, breast cancer allergies, memory problems, atrial fibrillation. End psoriasis to name just a few. These commercials make the medicine seem miraculously, but they're often very expensive. Now, the head of health and human services has announced a plan that would force drug companies to include price information in direct to consumer prescription drug commercials. The goal of price transparency is to put pressure on the companies to price their medications more affordably. The pharmaceutical industry is not enthusiastic about this proposed rule. The president of pharma says that listing prices would be quote, very confusing. Misleading lacks appropriate context and isn't what patients want or need. Instead drug companies have offered to post prices on their websites. Aleksei Sar, secretary of HHS said place. Information on a website is not the same as putting it right in add results from a study of more than twenty. Six hundred older Americans suggests that fish and shellfish may help people stay healthy as they age. The study started in nineteen ninety two and lasted until two thousand fifteen blood levels of omega three fatty were measured at the beginning of the study after six years. And at thirteen years people with the highest levels of a seafood derived. Fats were significantly less likely to develop chronic diseases or cognitive or physical impairment as an observational study. This doesn't prove that omega three fatty protective, but these data are certainly suggestive and that's the health news from the people. Sperm ac- this. Welcome to the people's pharmacy. I'm Terry Graydon Joe Graydon today were talking about how you can keep your bones strong for decades. People have been told to take calcium pills to ward off osteopor- Neha or osteoperosis more recently, they've been told they need vitamin d supplements as well. Just alle. Well, this such supplements work a study published in JAMA at the end of two thousand seventeen indicated there not affective. What do the experts think about this research to find out? We turn to Dr Robert recor O'Brien, professor of medicine and chief of the division of endocrinology at Creighton University School of medicine. He directs the osteoperosis research center Dr Robert recor welcome to the people's pharmacy proud to be with you. Dr wrecker you have studied bone and preventing osteoporosis for much of your profession. Career you are if I'm not mistaken endocrinologist by trade, tell us a little bit about your perspective on vitamin d and calcium and other minerals. We know that they're absolutely essential for bone strength, but this study that was published in JAMA, not too very long ago, challenged a lot of people's thinking, especially with regard to dietary supplements like calcium vitamin d, it was a meta analysis. They reviewed a number of randomized clinical trials and concluded the taking supplements, don't do anything to prevent fractures compared to placebo. Why do you challenge that. Well, a challenge that on the basis of first of all, it's analysis and I, in general, I have skepticism about the because they tend to be biased to the null and this particular study examined a very large number of meta analyses. I can't even remember the number, but it was in in the range of something like forty or fifty, and they were hugely different in their study designs. And so I really don't accept it. Meta analyses are a problem because the study designs, they're always different in in the different studies that are included in the case of nutritional studies. It's particularly problem because the studies are all double blind placebo controlled trials. Well, that's the design that pharmaceutical companies used to test drugs for for us. And efficacy and safety. But in the case of the pharmaceutical agent, the placebo group has none of pharmacy tickle agent on board. But on the case, in the case of nutritional supplements, everybody has some of the nutritional supplement in question on board or they'd be diseased. You can't make him disease right. Right through their diet. In other words, we're all getting calcium and we're getting some vitamin d either from sun or from food, right? And so you don't have a zero placebo, and you can't expect to be a linear benefit for something like this and prevention of fractions from the lowest to the highest levels in the blood and some of the some of the studies. For example, in this in this particular meta-analysis didn't even have measurements of serum vitamin d levels done all over the place. In other words, some of them didn't have baseline ones and some of them didn't have treated once you know. So it's one of the problems of nutritional studies in double blind placebo controlled trial. They're just not good well, but we understand doctor Eker that the double blind placebo controlled trial is the gold standard. There are people who won't believe anything else. It's a mistake. My mentor. Who just about less than a year ago, died at the age of eighty. Eight was brilliant investigator who in the last years of his career wrote several articles on the problem of double blind prosciutto controlled nutrition trials. And basically you gotta have a different design or you got to create the design which will get around this problem. And one of the things that we've tried to do is when we do nutrition trials vitamin d, calcium and his to treat to target. That means we measure everybody's twenty five drug CD before they the study. And then we treat everybody individually to get a ceremony level at least a certain level and and that's one way you can kinda get around it. But the double blind perceive a controlled trial has been inappropriately applied to nutrition research as far as I'm concerned. Now, one of the things that I guess. A lot of people are confused about when they saw all of the headlines regarding the JAMA. Meta analysis was well, I guess I should stop taking my calcium. I should probably stop taking my vitamin d is not worth what I'm paying for. It is not doing anything for me. Your thoughts about that. Vet statement in that article or by whomever made it is going to cause a bunch of fractures though, otherwise would not occur. That's what I feel about it. Why is there such a excitement about calcium and vitamin d supplements, and and and bone strength anyway, what is the role of vitamin d and calcium in determining bone strength? And let's not forget some of those other minerals like magnesium. Yes. They're also start called trae because they are necessarily, but only very, very small quantities. And that's not true for calcium calcium is a very large volume mineral in in the body in the bone. There's something like five thousand milligrams or more and also calcium is extremely important in the circulation. Because if it's meant that'll is not maintained, you get seizures and swimming die because you gotta have it, maintain it, and bone calcium turns over quite rapidly. It turns over at a rate of something like five hundred milligrams a day are more between the bone and the circulation. And then on top of all that there is an advocate loss of calcium that you cannot control. It occurs in free areas. One is in the year, you can't shut it off there. The other is in the bible because in the digest. Foods, you lose calcium in the bible. And the third one is in the sweat. If you sweat a lot, you'll lose calcium in your switch and you have to replace that or it comes out of the bone, and you can only absorb about twenty five or twenty six percent of your oral calcium. So it's very important in an adult to be sure that you replace those and that you get enough so that your absorption of calcium replace it. And that's one of the big reasons why it's very important, low calcium intake if carried off long enough, we'll give you fragile bones. So would our listeners to make the confusion. Because on the one hand, they read headlines that say, taking extra calcium and vitamin d, you know, not going to lead to bone strength. It's not gonna prevent fractures, and now you come along and you say, we'll, we'll wait just a minute. If you stop taking your calcium in your vitamin d, it's going to increase your risk of a fracture how much. Vitamin d, how much calcium, how much magnesium and what should people be doing in order to prevent osteoporosis and fractures? Well, in the case of calcium, the hard to get too much of it or poisoning yourself with calcium. It just doesn't happen because you're got, doesn't over absorb it. If for example, if you take calcium bullets at a meal of five hundred milligrams, you will absorb about twenty five percent of it. On the other hand, if you take fifteen hundred or two thousand milligrams in in a dose, your absorption fraction goes way down so you don't hyper absorb it. That's in the case of calcium. So you're gonna have a self protection mechanism there. And in the case of vitamin d, vitamin d is involved in just about every system in the body. And so every system in the body also requires a variable amount of vitamin d. And so what's happened? Nature is made vitamin d a very. -able nutrient in other words, not everybody who takes the same vitamin d, we'll have the same vitamin d in their blood, but it's very safe. And in both cases, it's very safe. And so you can't go to the to the population and check everybody's efficiency and calcium absorption, and everybody's ability to convert vitamin d to its metabolite. So it's okay to give on an amount that will be more than necessary for some people and all always that equipped for everybody. If you give enough, that's the way to look at it. Amount that you recommend where I start off with through thousand international units vitamin d day. There's also a caveat there because not all vitamin d products have the same amount of women DM. And so you gotta be measuring your blood level of vitamin d to see what the results of your steady state calcium or vitamin d rather supplement is doing to your blood vitamin d, I should you twenty five hydroxy vitamin d b. I electric to forty nanograms per milliliter now. That's if it were actually forty nanograms per milliliter within I would say that's a little more than you need. On the other hand, the measurements vitamin d are imprecise in that in order to get at least what you really need, which would be like thirty nanograms per milliliter. You gotta give it a measure at a level a little higher than that, and you don't have to worry about in precision of measurement. What about calcium? How much do you recommend. I recommend five hundred or six hundred milligrams twice daily each time with a meal with a limited number of different supplement products that because again, those are not all products are not absorbed as they should be. Do you have like if you were going to prescribe one calcium supplement, two different ones. So we're not too well. I can tell you precisely at times our trade, Tom so couching. Okay. Uh-huh. What about other things like strontium or vitamin k people are looking for other ways to own. Darb the data on those are weak. You need them, but you get them easily without trying. But I haven't. You'll be depend on supplements. And what about exercise? What do you recommend? Oh, I recommend that everybody have an exercise program because weight bearing is what stimulates the bone to maintain its mass and strength, and you get wake bearing with exercise. You don't get it was sitting around Daska in your home. Abbott record. Thank you so much for talking with us on the people's pharmacy today. You're welcome. You've been listening to Dr Robert wrecker as you heard, we had him switch to a different telephone partway through the interview. He's the O'Brien professor of medicine and chief of the division of endocrinology at Creighton University School of medicine. He also directs the osteoporosis research center there. He's a former editor of the journal bone and past president of the national osteoporosis foundation. He's also past president of the American society for bone and mineral research. After the break, we'll talk with nutrition expert. Walter Willett about the research on vitamin d and calcium will find out whether people should be taking calcium supplements too much calcium from pills might be counterproductive. You're listening to the people's pharmacy with Joe and Terry Graydon if you like the information you hear when you listen to the people's pharmacy, you may also enjoy our book published by National Geographic. It's the people's pharmacy quicken handy home remedies available online at people's pharmacy dot com. Or at your favorite bookstore. Welcome back to the people's pharmacy. I'm Terry Graydon and I'm Joe Graydon. If you would like to purchase a CD of this show, you can call eight hundred seven three two two, three, three four today show is one thousand one hundred thirty nine. The number again eight hundred seven three to twenty three thirty four or you can find it on the website, people's pharmacy dot com. You can also download the free podcast from itunes. People's pharmacy is brought to you in part by brain gauge develop by neuroscientists at the university of North Carolina to track brain health available for home research and clinical applications online at gauge your brain dot com. Today were talking about keeping bones strong and healthy, what nutritional interventions can help. Should you be taking calcium pills or do you need to be drinking lots of milk? What about vitamin d supplements? How well do they work to prevent osteoporosis, I guess, is Dr Walter Willett. He's professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard t h Chan school of public health and he's professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. His book is eat drink and be healthy. The Harvard Medical School guide to healthy eating, updated and expanded, welcome back to the people's firm. Assi Dr. Walter Willett, it's so nice to have you back on our air. Oh, thank you and good to be back with you. Dr. Willett a. We saw a study last year that was published in the journal of the American Medical Association, which was a met analogy. Of thirty three clinical trials. They looked at supplements of calcium and vitamin d and whether or not that kept people from breaking bones. They concluded did not make any difference which your take on this research. Please. Well, this year yet of calcium vitamin d in bone. Health is really a complicated area, and I think this meta-analysis didn't really help sort out the complexity. And as far from the final answer on this topic, there were several issues, but one very important issue is that the amount of vitamin d and the form in which are the way in which bite him in d. is administered can make a very big difference in results that this studied lumped together, randomized trials vitamin d that gave the vitamin d in different ways, including giving it in one injection for a whole year, very large amount or sometimes. So once every month and especially when given once a year in very large amount, there is pretty strong evidence from large trial that that actually can increase risk of fractures. That's Chris. Very unnatural way of giving vitamin d traditionally recording son and get a little bit every day, much more sort of steady form of administration, and we don't totally understand why giving a huge amount all at once can be bad for you, but there's some reasonable hypotheses by that could be a problem. Any evidence suggests that it is if you do look at the studies that gave a reasonable dose more than the old die of four hundred international units and gave it in a more constantly. Those do show some benefits of vitamin d on bone fracture risk. Another problem with this limitation of this analysis was excluded studies that were done on institutionalized individuals like people living in assisted living or nursing homes, and those people too. It's true that their levels of vitamin d may be on average lower because he may not get out in the sun. Is much, but in those kinds of studies, the clogged study can actually be higher because you have a better chance of making sure people received their dose on a regular basis and some of the trials that were included in that meta-analysis. There was a large loss to participation or people not taking their vitamin d. So men analyses have become almost a plague basically that anybody where the who can connect with the internet basically can do in a meta analysis and you religious piling up with meta analyses are really, I think misleading a good bit of news is that there will be several quite large, and I think pretty well done studies that look at vitamin d that will become they've finished already. In fact a few months ago, they're actively analyzing their data and so hopefully within the next year we'll have quite a bit more evidence on this important topic. Now, doctor will let you have been involved in. Literally hundreds of research studies over decades and a lot of your work has been in in the field of nutrition. And I've I've long wondered why it is that some investigators think that they should treat nutrients like drugs. And so you know, you've mentioned these very large injectable doses of vitamin d, fifty thousand one hundred thousand units, and and then they, they look in amazement when they go, well, that wasn't helpful or maybe it was even counterproductive and you say, well, mother nature never intended us to get this gigantic amount of vitamin d all at once rather than the way it was supposed to be, which is small amount every day. So why do you think that even design those studies that way. Well, a good question. I think maybe it's a little naive in some ways. It's I wouldn't criticize people too harshly for doing those studies. It's just that they need to be very careful about the conclusions vitamin d is stored. And if you could get the benefits from a single dose once a year, that would be very nice. But I think the issue it turns out that doesn't look like you're Kenan. There could actually be some harm, but it's just if we generalize the findings from those kinds of very abnormal kind of trials to conclude that vitamin d isn't in general beneficial. That's that's the real problem. The other nutrient that was included in this meta analysis was calcium and you and we have talked about calcium supplements in the past, but not all of our listeners have heard your ideas about calcium supplements. So please tell us, should we all be taking calcium supplements to keep our bones strong. Another good question. And again, this is complicated because we know that vitamin the calcium is absolutely essential plays many functions, including keeping our heart rhythm. Orderly is a critical part of bone composition, and so we have to get some calcium. So the issue is how much and we also know that like most essential nutrients. If you get too much, you actually can cause harm. So it's finding that sweet spot. That's our real aim and the amounts of calcium that we need are. I think not totally clear at this point in time, but the way the amount of calcium requirement to set in the United States is on the basis of very short term study that lasts just two or three weeks basically looking at how much calcium can we sort of force into the bone during a period of just a few weeks and that. Almost surely will give us a misleading answer because we know that you get some short term changes in bone density that do not reflect what happens in the long run that's very well established. And so we have requirements that are set on these very short term studies, and you'll get results saying we need for over fifty, twelve hundred milligrams a day, which means almost for sure you need to be taking a couple of servings day of dairy products to get up to that level. Whereas the World Health Organization has step back and look at the bigger global picture, and they noticed what is actually been known for quite a few decades that the countries that consume the most dairy and have the highest calcium intakes actually have the highest fracturing in the world that's northern Europe in the United States and countries that do not consume dairy and have a much lower calcium intakes. They still are getting some calcium. They have the lowest fracture rates. So. So we, I think we can't conclude from that kind of study that calcium causes fractures. But it does say pretty clearly that we don't need to have these very high intake calcium in dairy to to be able to have low rates of fractures. The UK looked at the evidence and they came up with seven hundred milligrams of calcium instead of the five hundred milligrams the World Health Organization sued was adequate far below the US number. So whether we need five hundred, seven hundred, I think is that's probably closer to the correct answer, not the twelve hundred milligrams. And of course, if we need seven hundred, you can get to that with if you have a good diet without any dairy products at all. But one serving of Derry would be fine. And I think if you're concerned about calcium five hundred milligram day dose would be pretty good dose, it will easily given that we all pick up some calcium from. Lots of different foods that well easily get us to seven or eight hundred milligrams a day. Dr Willett if my memory serves me correctly, you grew up on a dairy farm in the mid west, and I grew up on a dairy farm in Pennsylvania. So I'm very fun of dairy products. I'm curious as to whether you think we have kind of a dotted, the pharmaceutical concept of just taking a pill. That's the solution because Americans love pills and they're somewhat less enthusiastic about food is dairy, still healthful. And should we be looking to get most of our calcium from our diet. Well, dairy. Again, this is a complicated story. It's not like soda, which you know is there's no nutritional value. It's all bad. Dairy definitely has nutritional value, and I find it just truly amazing that you can have nothing but milk your mother's milk for a almost a year. And that gives you all the nutrition you need to grow in developed. Well, dairy milk comes along with a lot of nutrition, but it also comes along with a lot of growth factors as well hormones, and combinations of, you know, as-as that accelerate growth because that's what milk is supposed to do. But one of the questions is, do you really wanna be accelerating growth and cell multiplication all your life and from cancer standpoint, that's actually pretty worrisome. And there are some suggestions at this high dairy consumption keeping sort of that growth accelerated to floor. All your life from cancer standpoint isn't necessarily the best thing to do. So part. This is again, not just Darius or no, but is there an amount that might be giving us some benefits and not producing harms? And that's what a lot about research has been named ad. I think the the bottom line is that this sort of three servings per day that's been pushed and is at the core of dietary guidelines is not only necessary, but I, there are some some negatives. There are some positives to with dairy consumption, but I think on balance it all the data's put together suggest it's not necessarily, and if we're going to have some dairy, probably a more modest intake would be best. There has been some research to suggest that too much calcium, especially from from dietary supplement from a pill must be counterproductive, possibly calcification, maybe even heart disease. What's your thinking. Questions have been raised in sort of little tempting to say, you know calcium in your diet and then calcium in your blood vessels drizzly connected. That's probably over simplistic and they're there. I think that literature isn't settled on that topic. There are some suggestions that there might be some problems with calcification with high dose, calcium supplements thousand milligrams a day or more, but we've looked into this. We don't see it in our day. And I think the overall evidence suggests that that's not a direct connection, but that relationship isn't a totally settled. There's I think pretty good evidence that I- intakes of calcium from supplements to increase kidney stone risk. That's perhaps not surprising because that calcium does come out in the urine. Excess calcium does come out in the urine and can contribute to stone formation. So I think putting this together suggests that there are with high intakes. Some has. Words that are interesting this, this new meta-analysis really showed what we reported earlier that high doses of calcium without vitamin d seem to increase fracture risk wasn't quite significant. In this meta analysis. We would want included some more studies than what we looked at a few years ago with Dr Heke Bischoff. We did see increased risk of bone fractures with higher. I dose calcium. Supplements win. Vitamin d was not included, and there's some good reasons to think that calcium may be binding too much calcium baby binding phosphorus in the inside of the inside of intestine. And we know that we do need adequate phosphorus for fracture prevention so we can get into trouble with that too much. Probably specially with supplements, I think, do we need supplements for calcium? And if item in d. vitamin d is really sort of an exception that. Naturally, there's not very much vitamin d and foods except for fish, and you really have to take a lot of a lot of fish. You got it must be a seal to get enough vitamin d from just fish, but are natural main source of courses sunlight. And we've created an environmental lifestyle that really cuts us off from the sun and so many different ways we put on clothes, we work inside and when we go out, we often put on sunscreen for some good reason, I think. And so the vitamin d levels of many Americans are far below what we see in populations that live in a more natural environment. Where would be a reasonable daily dose of vitamin d supplement? Do you think. I think that issue isn't settled by giving all the evidence of for many different sources. I think thousand international units day is a reasonable amount. It's world below what the evidence is where there's evidence of suggestion of too much and it will bring the levels of blood levels for most people up to a reasonable range for people with dark skin or who are not out in the sun much at all. It may well be that a higher amount of vitamin d is needed. I would just mentioned that one area where there's, I think very strong evidence of a benefit of enough might have been d- just getting enough again, getting us out of this low range is provincial colorectal cancer. There are many studies now that show that people with below average levels of vitamin d in their blood, have elevated risk of colorectal cancer and people with above average levels have lower risk of color. Rectal cancer compared to people with average levels. So I think again, more date of come in over the years, but the evidence is really quite strong that you probably don't want to have a low level of vitamin d from the FM standpoint of cancer risk. You're listening to Dr Walter Willett professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard's t h chance school of public health Dr will. It is also a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. He's co, author of eat drink and be healthy. The Harvard Medical School guide to healthy eating, updated and expanded your. I find it so fascinating that Dr Willett mentions the this one year dose. This Wapping dose of vitamin d was not helpful, and maybe even counterproductive. It's not the way the body normally absorbs vitamin d quite a few studies have used that sort of infrequent dosing. However. Yeah, quite frequently. It's once a month injections, but again, not very natural. Definitely not natural, and there are a lot of studies, Joe showing that low levels of vitamin d in the body are harmful. There are relatively few studies showing that supplements can be helpful. I also find it kind of interesting that you know everyone says, don't go out in the sun, especially dermatologist protect yourself where your sunscreen, and we spent a whole lot of time indoors, especially our children, but you know, getting vitamin d the old fashioned way, which is a little sun exposure, maybe fifteen twenty thirty minutes might make a difference. You just an old fashioned guy. That's true. After the break, we're going to compare vitamin d from supplements and from some exposure. How is it possible that supplements don't live up to expect -tations? How do you find foods rich in calcium? Is that feasible for people who can't have dairy products. What's the importance of magnesium or other minerals for bone health? We'll also discuss how processed foods affect your health. You're listening to the people's pharmacy with Joe and Terry Graydon. If you've, I'll you the health information you get when you listen to the people's pharmacy, consider subscribing to our Email newsletter, you'll get the latest health news and information on upcoming podcasts delivered to your inbox twice a week, look for the link at people's pharmacy dot com. Welcome back to the people's pharmacy. I'm Terry Graydon I'm Joe Graydon to purchase a CD of today's show or any people's pharmacy broadcast. You can call eight hundred seven three two two, three, three four today show is one thousand one hundred thirty nine. That number again eight hundred seven three to twenty three thirty four online at people's pharmacy dot com. You can also download the free podcasts from I tunes or from our web store. We invite you to consider writing a review if people's pharmacy is brought to you in part by brain gauge developed by neuroscientists at the university of North Carolina to track brain health available for home research and clinical applications online at gauge your brain dot com. Today we're discussing the nutritional foundation for strong bones. What supplements might you need to prevent osteoporosis or are supplements a waste of time? And. Money. Our guest is Dr Walter Willett professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard's t h Chan school of public health. Dr. Willett is also professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. He's co, author of eat drink and be healthy. The Harvard Medical School guide to healthy eating, updated and expanded. Dr willett. The vitamin d story is so fascinating to me because the epidemic policy and you are sort of in some respects, you know the father of epidemiology in the twenty first century. I mean you've been guiding so many of your medical students and your colleagues in this field. The epidemiology suggests that vitamin d is essential for so many things. And yet some of the randomized double blind placebo controlled trials suggests that just adding vitamin d may not be producing the benefits that we expect. And there are a bunch of studies that are in process right now. So we'll have to wait to see the results, but if taking vitamin d doesn't lead to the outcomes that we would hope for, what does this say about sort of the natural process of actually getting sun exposure to boost your vitamin d. Levels, it'll drive the dermatologist crazy, but is it possible that the supplements won't live up to expectations. Get certainly possible that supplements won't do what we think they might do based on blood levels at more reflect sunlight exposure. But there are made your problems with randomized trials when it comes to studying nutrition and this applies to some other areas as well. But probably first and foremost that when we look at cancer, this is a process that develops over many decades and most randomized trials go on for just three or four or five years and for looking at cancer cardiovascular disease. That's just a little tiny window in an process that goes on for for many decades and it's easily possible that we will miss some benefits there. And just as one example that most of the randomized trials have not showing that vitamin supplements benefit cardiovascular disease, but. On the physicians health study. This was one study that went on for twelve years in a little bit longer for some people. There was a significantly lower risk of total cancer incidents with taking a multiple vitamin supplement in that study. Looking in that steady if it only going on for eight years that would not have been seen. It was a modest benefit, but still an eight or ten percent reduction tour cancer incidences actually pretty important, and I, it would have been missed in every other study that's been done just simply on the basis of not being long enough. So I think many of the trials are naive. One of the problems is of course that in many of the trials, even by four or five years, many people are not no longer taking supplements. So you're really not testing the hypothesis that people get tired of it. You need a lot of commitment, and the physician self study was people who are really very committed. They were physicians, new long-term studies were important, and so they long-term study was. Possible. Also, there's the issue that when we give a nutritional supplement, I, it's not like a new drug where the people getting placebo are not getting any of that drug. But in the context of nutritional study, almost everybody's getting some of the nutrients that we're testing. And so many people already may have sufficient intake of that nutrient and adding more producers. We expect benefit if they already have enough, but it may be that there's twenty or thirty percent or even ten percent who are not getting enough and would benefit for more and that would be missed. Almost every study that's been done because there's not enough statistical power to pick up a benefits in even though fairly substantial subset. So all these problems of derision of the study compliance or adherence to taking the supplement. And then the fact that in the background, many people are already getting an. Enough of what's being tested. All those factors go together to make it really difficult to do is strong studies in giving a supplement in a randomized trial context. Will it? It's clear that cancer development is a long term process. The development of heart disease can take place over many years. Osteoporosis is also something that doesn't happen overnight it, it builds up gradually. We recently like yesterday, I think got an Email from a woman named Mary who said that she has been diagnosed with osteoperosis. She broke her shoulder and that's what led them to the diagnosis. She's seventy nine years old. Her vitamin d three level is sixty three. She says, I'm assuming she actually means her twenty five hydroxy vitamin d and she says, I can't take the bis phosphates that my doctor has prescribed. They just make me sick. What can I do to improve my bones? Well, it's really hard to be specific about any specific guy nickel situation. Of course, we'd want to know a lot more about a person that low blood level that's nanograms per deciliter is pretty good vitamin d level, and it's teams probably unlikely that more vitamin d is going to be beneficial. And of course calcium intake, his necessary. One would want to know if a person is getting adequate calcium from their diet. And if Matt a modest supplement night, be good or changing the diet, there's another possibility, and if we're going to have some dairy yet, there's a lot of evidence suggesting that yogurts are pretty good form to get the dairy. Some of these drugs do have Texas and can't be tolerated. But I think when would really need to look at the overall picture about one factor that is absolutely important and comes through in every study, is that. Michael activity helps spilled up bones and reduced fracturous get reduces fractures both by reducing the risk of falling through improving muscle strength, and also bones respond to the mile, stresses a physical activity by essential getting stronger. So the one thing that surely should be part of the package for everybody is to incorporate physical activity, and but it's important to remember that it's really stressing the bones so that walking around or jogging are jumping will help your legs and help prevent hip fractures, but that won't help the upper arms the upper body in the arms. So it's important as as we get older to include resistance training, that gives a little bit of a workout to all the bones in our body, and you can do that with some rubber band kind of simple exercises. You don't need to even go to a gym to do that, but with some but simple string. Building is has lots of benefits and fracture reduction is clearly one of those and often ignored. You pointed out that it's important to get enough calcium in your diet, and you mentioned the benefits of yogurt. But what about people who don't tolerate milk even yogurt? They may be lactose intolerant. Perhaps they're allergic. There's there's quite a few of them. Now, where else in the diet do they get their calcium. Ridiculous him through a lot of different foods, but sort of green leafy vegetables are particularly good source. Hold greens, have a modest amount with a hey diet that what we think is sort of healthy Mediterranean diet with all grains, fruits and vegetables, a maybe a little bit of cheese or yogurt to if you Cal. If you're like intolerance, you usually ten have some teasing modest amounts which is an option, but you can get quite a bit of calcium without any dairy products. However, if you're concerned, modest calcium does, I think is reasonable. His supplement like five hundred milligrams a day to. Add to background died that was usually get people up to strong eight hundred milligrams a day of calcium and the calcium is absorbed. I think supplements are a reasonable way of calcium is really the focus and compared to dairy. There's no calories. There's no saturated fat, and it costs a whole lot less. So I do think for some people, modest calcium does is is a reasonable thing. Dr will at a lot of people focus on vitamin d and calcium, and we never hear a word about magnesium that met analysis in JAMA, not a word, how important is magnesium and other minerals to bone strength and also vitamin k, I think people forget about two. So there's a lot of evidence that magnesium and vitamin k and probably some other aspects of our diet are important in bone health. Again, if you're do follow the sort of healthy Mediterranean type diet. That lot of greed is a pretty good way to start. You should be getting adequate amounts of magnesium and vitamin k. But of course, the reality is that if you national surveys less than five percent of Americans meet the dietary guidelines, those are extra that's actually pretty low bar Mediterranean diet. Please give us a quick summary of what it entails. People think pasta, but that's not the just the also think salmon. So if they have salmon and broccoli for some reason that now they're following a Mediterranean diet, and I'd like to point out that there are a lot of countries that could be considered around the Mediterranean. So it's Greece. It's Italy, it's Spain, Lebanon, Syria. Yeah. So what what are we talking about when we say follow a Mediterranean diet? Right, really good question. And you say a lot of people think it means not just pasta, but a lot of meatballs and a two. And that's really not what we. I think we probably should use it, say traditional Mediterranean diet. But even then the point is well taken that there lots of countries around the Mediterranean, and there was some variance. But at the core of it, these diets were primarily plant based. Most of them were not vegetarian but had modest amounts of animal protein, almost all of them and I should mention that sort of paradigm has been best studied is the Mediterranean diet of creating and agrees. And so that's sort of our starting point and they're red meat with an occasional food and small amounts for special events. Dairy intake was present, definitely as cheese and yogurt, but still in modest amounts. Importantly, the primary fats will is olive oil. Probably the single most characteristic part of the Mediterranean diet, but we know that most plant oils actually seemed to have similar benefits as olive oil. Maybe not quite as much, and that's a topic for some further research. But most plant oils have pretty similar health effects. It seem as level and then lots of fruits and vegetables and the traditional Mediterranean diet. The greens were coarsely ground whole grains. So put all those pieces together, healthy fats, healthy sources of protein, which should mentioned instead of red meat. A lot of the protein came from legumes, and some fish and most places as well. So healthy forms of fat carbohydrates. Protein had plenty of vegetables and plant also source of fat, and that's not complicated, but that's basically the Mediterranean dietary pattern. Dr will at the idea of food and health and the connection because over the last several decades in the United States, particularly. But all across the world, we have seen the concept of processed food in, in other words, you know the manufacturing of food to appeal to our taste buds, and we've seen obesity on the rise all across the world. And so I guess I'm kind of interested in your research in trying to establish the idea that what we eat has a profound impact on our overall health. I don't know if Adele Davis was correct in saying we are what we eat, but you've been following this and where's that taking you. Well, it's taken us in some very interesting direction so that I didn't anticipate on. We started this research back in the nineteen seventies at that time. We were primarily thinking that heart disease was the main disease that was affected by diet and heart disease was, and still around the world isn't number one cause of death. So that was a primary focus. And the main thought was it was the type of fat in the diet. And for a while, we got a sort of mainstream attrition got off on a detour that was not so good where it was really focused on all that being bad. But in fact that they've never supported that it was really the, the type of fat was really important. But we've also come to realize that many other aspects of diet are important, the positive benefits of fruits and vegetables, the quality of the carbohydrates in our diet, the special benefits of some nuts and some other. Sources of plant proteins. And so the fat, it's just one part of a much bigger picture. And then we've also seen that it's a diet is influencing not just heart disease, but virtually every organ in our body. And that's maybe not too surprising. Maybe three shouldn't have been so surprise, but because all of these every organ has a lot in common in terms of basic metabolism in response to external influences. So we've seen the diet is important for some forms of cancer. It's important for diabetes for kidney disease vision in many different ways. Not just vitamin getting enough item in a, and now we're looking at cognitive function, which is turning out to really interesting because it appears that the influences of diet are strongly related to the degree to which we maintain our mental capacity later in life. So. Really been an exciting journey that's taken us in many different directions that we weren't even thinking about back in the nineteen seventies deca, Walter Willett. Thank you so much for talking with us on the people Spar Masih today. It's been really great to talk to you. Again, you've been listening to Dr Walter Willett. He's professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard's t h Chan school of public health, and he's professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. His book is eat drink and be healthy. The Harvard Medical School guide to healthy eating updated and expanded earlier in the show you heard from Dr Robert recor O'Brien, professor of medicine and chief of the division of endocrinology at Creighton University School of medicine. He's also director of the GIO prosise research center there, and a former editor of the journal bone. Doctor wrecker is past president of the national osteoporosis foundation. And of the American society for bone and mineral research. Loon Seagal produced today show our Dr ski engineered Dave Graydon at it's our interviews that people sperm see is produced at the studios of North Carolina. Public radio w. UNC the people's pharmacy theme music is by BJ Liederman. The people's pharmacy is brought to you in part by brain gauge developed by neuro scientists at the university of North Carolina to track brain health available for home research and clinical applications online at gauge your brain dot com to buy a CD of today's show or any other people's pharmacy broadcast. You can call eight hundred seven three two, two, three, three, four. Today's show is one thousand one hundred thirty nine. That number again eight hundred seven thirty to twenty three thirty four online at people's pharmacy dot com. And when you visit our site, you can share your thoughts. About today's show. Do you take supplements? What do you hope they'll do for you? How are you trying to keep your bones strong? Please share your story in the comment section for today's show at people's pharmacy dot com, you'll find links to the study. We discussed today and two other research on supplementation bone loss. You can also sign up for our free online newsletter or subscribe to the free podcast of the show. When you sign up for the newsletter, you'll get our free guide to favourite home remedies, endure them, North Carolina. I'm Joe Graydon. I'm Terry Graydon please join us again. Next. We hope you enjoyed this podcast. If so, please consider taking a minute to write a review on items and thanks for listening to the people's pharmacy.

osteoporosis Terry Graydon Joe Graydon Dr. Walter Willett UNC Joe Graydon professor of medicine Harvard Medical School JAMA heart disease Creighton University School of president diabetes professor Dr Robert wrecker Dr Robert recor O'Brien CDC
WOM4  Introductory Rite and the Liturgy of the Word  The Way of Mystery with Deacon James Keating  Discerning Hearts Podcast

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts

32:45 min | 5 months ago

WOM4 Introductory Rite and the Liturgy of the Word The Way of Mystery with Deacon James Keating Discerning Hearts Podcast

"Discerning HEARTS DOT COM in cooperation with the institute for Priestly Formation Presents. The way of mystery the Eucharist Immoral Living With Deacon James Katy Deacon Keating is the Director of theological formation at the institute for Priestly Formation Located at Creighton University in Omaha Nebraska. He's the author of numerous books including remain in me. Holy Orders Prayer and ministry spell so prayer in the heart of the jacket. Taking heating has led more than four hundred workshops on moral theology and spirituality and regularly conducts retreats and parish missions. The way of Mystery Eucharist and Moral Living Deacon James Kidding. I'm your host Chris. Mcgregor the Eucharist. Is that entire celebration that we enter into and it has a beginning as Catholics. That beginning we understand as the introductory rites of the Church. It's not just a standing up and singing but it's so much more than that isn't it so much of it. The transition that we need to make like when you come into a room you are aware of many things in a room and it may even take you some moments to be aware of the persons in the room and you have to make some type of internal shift where you are totally focused on on the human being that you present with they may be distracting elements in the furniture or the decor and the human being that you're in the presence of May not actually come into focus the introductory rites help. Christ come into focus. We all just you know trudged in from the parking lot. Maybe we have lots of things to do after mass. Maybe we just had terrible things happen to us before mass and so the church in its wisdom says we need transitional or an introductory type of experience so that people can begin to see. Christ come into focus. This is a different event. This is a different mode of reality. In my day I am turning toward God the father I am adoring I am praising God. I need this chance to make a transition. It's usually done by song or it's done by some type of procession but there is the need for transition there is also that moment in that introductory right where we are preparing ourselves and taking an examination of our conscience. And what are we bringing to the table that day once we are in this mode of of of transition and we realize or coming to our realization that I am in the holy building. I am a church building Their sacred music or their sacred symbols around me. There are brothers and sisters that have gathered to my left into my right then. The church asks us to go even deeper not just to be aware that we are going to worship God but to be aware of our state before God and this is usually called the penitential right and it has various modes to it but the end of the of the whole penitential rite is for us to be aware of Christ's mercy and for us to be aware that Christ wants to give his mercy and most importantly to be aware that we need his mercy in the penitential right there needs to be some sense of an appropriation of our sins that we don't just have a general awareness but that some of our sins may actually come to mind and this of course depends on the the priest who's presiding there should be some elongated silence here not disproportionately Lengthy but enough for us to gather our thoughts and to be able to say I am envious or I'm slothful or struggled with anger this week. A real Intentional naming of our sins so that we can offer that up to Christ mercy and received that mercy So we become aware of the sacred surrounding as we become aware of the sacred surrounding. We've become aware of our position and our relationship to the sacred and the church gives us the penitential right and we should welcome this awareness It's good to know that there is the holy and that we have no right to the holy. A God is All holy. We are not. And if we're ever going to have deep communion with God we need to pass through this purifying moment where I say Lord I am not worthy. I am not worthy to have communion with you but I know your nature and I receive your nature is love and I'm grateful to you and I praise you for the love that you have given me and for your desire to cure me to heal me. I know I have no right to participate in the holy but you for some mysterious reason want to share the holy with me you want to share it with the entire community and so we receive your desire to love us and we ask for forgiveness of the sins. That would block that love. This is a crucially important. Moment of the mass. Now pragmatically what happens? A lot of times is just think it's A wrote prayer after this mass soon. We'll get to sit down and listen to the readings. We need to stand in our sin a little longer. We need to stand there and we need to to enter more deeply into this awareness that we have no right to be there. We have no right to participate in holiness and yet holiness has come to call us then we are given a great gift and it's the liturgy of the word. It's really an opportunity to enter into that entirety of salvation history. That whole living part of the Paschal mystery isn't the life of the Community of believers all of salvation. History is open to us in the liturgy of the word and we are bid by the church to again. Prepare to receive that word by possibly looking at the meetings throughout the week. This is a very simple act of devotion but many Catholics. Find it incredibly difficult to be so disciplined as to take the readings of the week and to read them But we want to keep it. Just that simple. I think that's the best advice that we could receive from the church. If we want to be taken up into the history of God coming close to us to heal us the best way to do it is just find on the internet or subscribe to some magazine like magnificant some other and have the readings before you each week to meditate on them then when they're proclaimed from the embryo the familiar to us. We don't hear them as as new we hear them. As resounding in our hearts we recognize the truth in the words words that we have already pondered throughout the week themes and realities that we have already received an a personal level. So that Christ's could enter and he'll us at a deeper level and so a lot of times when we come in cold to the mass and the first reading is done and we start the psalm. A lot of times we might say what was that first reading about. And I don't even remember what what the theme was. But if they have resounded in our hearts for a week we won't lose them that quickly and we WANNA Reverend Scott in that way that God wants to give us the readings which proclaim his heart and we wanna take his heart and we want to receive it in our own and we wanna do honor to God so find a simple way and Again this is the best way just to have the liturgy of the word as your spiritual food for the whole week before the mass and then the next week you move to the next Sunday readings if we try that then I think will become habitual again if you miss a week or or so. You don't beat yourself up you just hunger again to live in that word and you gently return to the habit or the custom of looking at the ratings for the week now as a deacon and a minister of the word. I'm going to pose to you a question that I think. We all as faithful have to ask ourselves the difference between the demands. We make of the homily to help. Break that open for us and the expectation that we should have concerning the homily all the men who preach a bring different gifts in the church. Ordains men with With certain strengths and certain weaknesses. And obviously we know whether one's a deacon or ones that Certain priests or deacons have the gift of preaching those same deacons and priests who may preach very well. They might not be very good as counselors or they might not have much energy in terms of outreach to those in need or not to excuse people. These are areas that we have to develop and work on. If you're excellent in the counseling room or your excellent working in the the bread line or the food kitchens around the city's you're also called to beef up whatever skills and competencies you might have in the NBA. But with all that said we cannot put too much weight on missing the readings simply because there may be a preacher. Who's inept or boring or too long or you know what some people say. Well those you know. He gave three good homilies today. there's lots of weaknesses. The word is coming to us. And it's this is. What's so beautiful about meditating on the word before the mass it's the Holy Spirit. Who's GonNa Stare in your heart? What you need to remember. And the preacher will be able to point in a general way but it's always the Holy Spirit who particularize is the word of God for your own situation. No harmless can do that. No harmless can particularize it. People always say to the homeless Meggett relevant make it relevant negative about our real lives and there will be priests and deacons who are two or the`real who are too theoretical and they possibly should bring examples into their preaching from real life so to speak but at the same time you cannot ask the impossible of a man it's only the Holy Spirit who particularize is the readings of the day for you and it's our obligation to make ourselves available to hear the interior movements of the Holy Spirit by reading the readings of Sunday a week before or even showing up at mass a few minutes earlier and sitting in the Pew an opening up the missile let there and reading the readings before mass begins even that movement of affection for the word of God will stir the Holy Spirit in you and the Holy Spirit will then teach you and prompt you to though to make changes in those areas of your life that need changes so yes all homeless must be competent all homeless just pray their way through their homilies so that as best they can the spirits speaking through them but no homeless can particularize your own burdens and the healing that's needed that's where you have to listen a two levels we have listened to the word proclaimed and you have to listen to the interior movements of the spirit those two coalescing together we'll give you the power of the Liturgy of the word on liturgy at its as ruined isn't the performance for the people it is the work of the people isn't it and that's where a lot of the activity needs to be a focused people will say well the mass is boring. It's the same every Sunday. I actually there are a lot of changes in the in the liturgy of the Eucharist in terms of prayers even terms of music in terms of investor in terms of movement. Sometimes so there are changes but yes. The emphasis is the work of our interior work. That we bring to the Eucharist. There are lots of times that Christ wants to get close to us in the Eucharist. But we haven't done the interior work to make it to enable that communion to happen and by interior work. I mean prayer by interior work. I mean simple movements of the heart. Lord. I want to attend your mass today. Help me to receive. Its Truth Lord. I am afraid of all the things happening in my marriage. Give me wisdom from this mass to know how to be present to my husband to my children Lord. I am afraid incompetent as a husband or as a worker or as a wife. Give me the wisdom at this mass to know how to become more competent in my roles and in my vocation in the silence before the mass in the silence after the homily in the silence after receiving communion little interior prayers like that open up our entire soul to God and of course God desires to rush in. That's all God does God gives God away. That's all God does. And the only way goddess stopped from giving God away is by our Chris. Spitted hearts are hardened hearts which will not smooth their soften his entry. Because we refuse to speak the truth to him if we speak the truth to him in our hearts we are doing the work of the liturgy. We cannot place it all upon the priests as an entertainer. It's not an entertainer is the one who cries chosen to pray. His mass. In without the priest we have no access to the mystery of salvation. Not Entertainment. I was at a mega church recently. Then I think they see seated thirteen thousand people and their church basically was an auditorium and their emphasis was on drama and music and acting in plays which of course can break open the human heart in his emotions very deep levels but that's accidental. The emotion is accidental to the mass. What's essential to the mass? Is this availability in the depths and the core the heart of our heart as John of the cross would say we have to let Christ into the very heart of our heart. The very core of our heart with these very simple prayers. Don't expect too much entertainment from the mass. Expect to be changed by the mask. Don't expect the mass to be lively in a sense of distracting like. Oh isn't this interesting? The mass is not interesting to the affections. The mass is the place where we are so open and so willing to be opened by Christ that he comes in through the Brad through the wine transformed into his own body and blood. He comes into our hearts of hearts and others the one word that will all longing to hear. I love you. You are mine I will never leave you. You are saved and you are healed. Now go and give this good news to others and then we are sent by that same law too enters us. We are sent by him to enter the lives of others. The mass is not entertainment. Don't put a lot of weight on that. The masses about God changing us. Do you want to be changed or do you want to be entertained? We'll return in just a moment to the way of mystery with Deacon James Skinny. Did you know that you can obtain a free APP? Which contains all your favorite discerning hearts programs Father Timothy Gallagher? Dr Anthony Lewis Archbishop George. Lucas Father Meritas filthy and so many more including episodes from inside the pages can be obtained on the discerning hearts free APP. This also includes Albano Vinas and devotional and prayers including the Holy Rosary Stations of the Cross. The tablet is Saint Michael and the seven sorrows of our lady. All available on the discerning hearts free APP visit the itunes and Google play APP stores to obtain your free discerning hearts APP today. Litany of humility. Oh Jesus Meek and humble of heart hear me from the desire of being esteemed deliver meet. Jesus from the desire of being loved deliver meet Jesus from the desire of being extolled. Jesus from the desire of being honored deliver me. Jesus from the desire of being praised cheeses from the desire of being preferred to others deliver meet. Jesus from the desire of being consulted. Jesus from the desire of being approved deliver meet. Jesus from the fear of being humiliated. Deliver me Jesus from the fear of being despised deliver me. Jesus from the fear of suffering rebukes deliver me. Jesus from the fear of being calumniates deliver me Jesus from the fear of being forgotten. Deliver me Jesus from the fear of being ridiculed deliver me. Jesus from the fear of being wrong deliver me. Jesus from the fear of being suspected deliver meats cheeses that others may be loved more than I that others may be esteemed more than I but in the opinion of the world others may increase and I may decrease that others may be chosen and I set aside but others may be praised and I noticed that others may be preferred to me in everything that others may become holier than I provided that I become is holiest. I should tease. Grant means a grace to desire. Hello My name is Deacon Omar Gutierez and I want to ask you to support this winning hearts and a special way. We Chris McGregor the board and I all know the not. Everyone listening can help financially. We know we have listeners. From all parts of the world and we have made a commitment since the beginning to make the truth shared through discerning hearts totally free so while you may not be able to contribute financially which you can do certainly pray but also give us positive reviews on whatever platform. You used to listen to us if at I tunes Android Stitcher spotify however it is that you get these podcasts. Or if you're on youtube and you like our videos please give us a good rating and write a review the mortgage good ratings and reviews we get the higher profile and the more listeners will discover US listeners. Who may have the means to contribute in the future? Please consider rating us in writing a positive review. Today we now return to the way of mystery with Deacon James Katie. There are many Catholics who have experienced the services of the Protestant brothers and sisters and came away saying I really experienced fellowship. Something I haven't experienced in the Catholic Church and yet I find that a very sad statement because what you just talked about and our relationship with Christ in the experience of the Eucharist. That's true fellowship. Isn't it the fruit of that communion or the fruit of that intimacy with Christ if it is to be real has to be expressed in communion with our brothers and Sisters Again Teresa of Avila. Right her famous saying as we noted before I think that the only way to tell a true mystic the only way to tell if someone has truly had this encounter that I'm speaking about in our heart is if that person is now a one who is more charitable towards others. That's all the fruit of the mass is charity toward others. We have to admit that in our Catholic Culture. We are missing something that so many. Protestants experienced to their great delight. Enter the great benefit many Protestant churches have not lost Sunday as a place of Christian community. They've established huge churches where their community goes and spends the entire morning and some well into the afternoon were food is provided where entertainment for the children is provided where they delight and they rest in in one another's company as fellow Christians. It is to be admitted that in our Catholic parishes to the great frustration of many Catholic leaders that so many of our people when the mass is ended they run from the campus of the Church and they go into very secular events or affairs and and have no real fellowship with with other Catholics. And this is a a weakness. This is in anemia. In Our church we have the strength of the priesthood. We have the strength of the real presence. We have the strength of the mass itself. All the sacraments but those sacraments are not to be celebrated and then sort of pushed aside the sacraments to be internalized and when they are internalized Christ always pushes us out to our brothers and sisters next to us he always says now go have fellowship with them in some parishes. This might be occurring not saying that universal but for those parishes that have a dearth of fellowship. We have to think again about. How do we get Catholics to delight in the presence of one? Another as the fruit of receiving the Eucharist. Because only when we delight in the presence of one another will the fullness of the EUCHARISTIC power come to be seen in culture We can only say to one another. Well you're a doctor to or you're a lawyer too or your mechanic to how do you in stand. Hit the mass. How do you make them ask fulfilled in your work or in your home if Catholics never talk at that level and if we have no fellowship with each other obviously there's no talking but if we never talk with each other without level than the mass will remain impotent or will remain not remained? Excuse me it will be It will become simply a private devotion. It cannot remain impotent and it was never meant to be a private devotion and if we have fellowship with each other out of the power of the mass then the fullness of the communal understanding of the mass will come to pass and the transformation of culture will also come to pass that the second Vatican Council hoped for so whatever we can do and I know architecture. We're trying to do this. Change the way. Our churches are gathering spaces. Communal spaces may be more spaces for adult faith formation maybe more and more useful spaces for fellowship for meals together. Whatever we can do to stay to remain with each other not just for Chitchat but to remain with each other and to then meditate and to share with one another about what we just received the mass will go a long way and making the Catholic presence in culture more articulate and more powerful. The Catholic Church has the sacraments. We were given the word of God back with great energy and life at the second Vatican Council but we still have a lot to learn from our Protestant brothers and sisters on how to be a true and authentic fellowship As a result of what we have received in the word and in the sacrament. The real onus isn't it on the disciples it's on us the baptize to have received Christ to seek out that fellowship. I think sometimes we think it's the pastors responsibility while he hasn't created a welcoming community in yet we're the ones who would be doing the welcoming. Why aren't we taking the initiative? We would be doing the welcoming and the pastor to some extent if we use the fatherhood symbol when I see my children spontaneously speaking to one another when they linger over the dinner table and I didn't make them do it when they are Freely choosing to play with each other and speak with each other as a father. I sit back or I stand in the corner of the room and I just I just did light for a few moments in that they say look at how children are enjoying one. Another and I didn't really do much to do that. It happened because a created an environment. Perhaps where that could happen spontaneously and I think the father of our parish. The pastor has the same type of delight he tries to create the Environment. Where is children? The children of God will want to stay with each other in anticipation of Heaven in anticipation of Eternal Fellowship. And he'll delight when they do and so it's not his problem that we don't WanNa stay together. He's trying to create the environment. Our problem is that we think we have better things to do. We think we have more important things to do. And perhaps even to be more important people and this implicity of the saints tell us there is no more important thing to do and there is no more important place to be than to have your family in the midst of other families who believe that. Jesus is the Lord and the Savior and is saving us right now at this mass and in this parish. There's no more important place to be. This is what we have spoken about before when we said that there were other factions of our culture trying to give us our identity and so the economic and the political the cultural the popular cultural in a lot of ways. These dispensers of our identity have one because many Catholics believed that there is a better place to go than the parish on Sunday morning. And there are better people to be with then those who also believe that Jesus is the savior. And if there's work to be done it's the work to change that type of consciousness that This parish is a great gift because it's the beginning of heaven for US despite its flaws and its faults at the individual annoyances of our fellow Catholics. These people that we are are beginning To know now are the people that we will be with forever in Christ in heaven. So let's delight in one another's company. Let's help the priest in any way we can is he. Tries to facilitate are being fellows with one another and out of the mystery that we have just participated in the self offering of Christ upon the cross. Let's enter that mystery together in conversation in adult faith formation in mutual private prayer together spontaneous personal prayer a showing up at the church during the week for perhaps a small group to pray before the blessed sacrament or enter into. Bible study which will all bear fruit in US responding to the needs of the poor. Everything you have just said. I think I've experienced in such wonderfully positive ways and I've been very blessed specially in our particular archdiocese of Omaha because in some communities we have had that ability to be able to share to either gather for a donut in a social hall with other families or to be able to gather to learn more about our religion and our faith and in that sharing it builds up. Because we're we live in our neighborhoods now where we have our garage door openers. And we go directly into our garage door house and then. We have our backyards with their privacy fences. We are so isolated that in many cases. We don't even know the person across the street. If we did not have our faith believing community we would have no fellowship. We would have no opportunities together with like minded people. Let think again. It's not a numbers game. There are small groups that gather throughout the archdiocesan around the country in every parish. It's the it really is in the beginning. It's a desire for equality of conversation about faith. I've seen in some parishes where they might have started a sharing session or adult faith formation with five or six people in this blossomed into one hundred it may have taken a few years to get to one hundred people to want to stay on the parish. Campus after mass to stay for substantive conversation but begin small but begin and don't lose heart if it takes years to build up a significant proportion of the parish who wants to linger around the mystery and share that mystery in conversation and friendship it ultimately helps us in our journey. Doesn't it towards that beatific vision? We are called to share the wherever two or more gathered in my name. I'm there in the midst so the more that we have fellow Catholics around us. The more heightened is our consciousness of Christ own presence. He promised that when we were together in faith he would be there and so it certainly does help us and remember. Our goal is to respond to his invitation to holiness and one of the key Motivators to become a saint is to be around those who also loved the idea of sanctity. And and that would be our fellow Catholics. So it's going to be a great help for us to leave this passing world behind and to embrace the way of holiness if we keep company with those who have the same vision the vision that has been gifted to them by Christ. Thank you very much taken. You're welcome thank you. You've been listening to the way of mystery the Eucharist immoral living with Deacon James Katie. The here and or to download this conversation along with hundreds of others spiritual formation programs visit discerning hearts dot com. This has been a production of discerning hearts in cooperation with the institute for Priestly Formation. I'm your host. Chris McGregor you help that if this has been helpful for you that you will. I PRAY FOR OUR MISSION. And if you feel as worthy consider a charitable donation which is fully tax deductible to help support our efforts but most of all we pray that you will tell a friend about discerning arts. Dot Com and join US next time for the way of mystery the Eucharist and moral living with Deacon James Keating.

Chris McGregor Holy Spirit US Priestly Formation James Katy Deacon Keating Catholic Church James Katie Jesus Meek James Kidding Nebraska NBA Director of theological Deacon Omar Gutierez Timothy Gallagher Vatican Council Creighton University youtube Reverend Scott Lucas Father Meritas
497: The Path to Practice Ownership with Grady Gores

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

09:30 min | 1 year ago

497: The Path to Practice Ownership with Grady Gores

"Dental preneurs have you been to a state regional or national dental conference lately can you say snooze fest nearly empty lecture halls tired, boring content and people attending just to punch their card and get their mandatory seat will the dental success summit is a hundred eighty degrees. The exact opposite of these obsolete and dying events for the last seven years. We here at the dental success institute created the most entertaining and content. Rich anti converts for the dental profession. Come mix mingle and learn from our world class lineup of speakers. And more importantly, hang out with dentists that are leading the profession in revenue culture and innovation say goodbye to the Walking Dead. The negativity that exists in our great profession and surround yourself with inspirational positive and successful dental professionals who've redefined what success looks like. Do not delay. Come to the beautiful j w Marriott in Scottsdale on March twenty eighth and twenty ninth two thousand nineteen and join this revolution. This event will sell out, and it has for the last four straight years and hotel rooms will definitely sell out. Go to dental success summit dot com to register and get forty percent off of the registration while seats remain dental. Success summit dot com. The dental for newer podcast. Okay. Doctor. It's time to put down that hand piece. You're listening to the show dedicated to helping dentists get their lives back. It's time to decrease your stress increase your ability and regain your passion. Now. Introducing your host, Dr Mark Kostas. Wrong. Or some little takeover of dental podcast today. I'm I you down student Akron university, I met Dr Koss is about a year ago. When I went down to resign a- to entering for him at each for about Johnny more about that. We talk about it in depth on absurd to ninety one. So you can check that out about two months ago, I interviewed Dr CASA's or article in contra magazine, titled defining your pests practice ownership Dan show. I'm going to redo that article spree. Sure, I asked him four quick questions, and I'm going to be reading the whole thing. So I go back and forth between Mike Russians and Dr CASA's. But I'll let you guys know when I do along the way. So without further ado here is. Dr Mike has a wealth of experience in leadership in practice management, having more than fifteen practices employed, hundreds of people throughout his career in group practices, a consulting company in the Dow success institute, what qualifies most to coach having been all them stakes in the book is you're just students to learn from his experiences. Immersing cells all the priests of education resources out there and get out of the conference. First question, you've mentioned that you made mistakes writer, what were some of those mistakes in how you corrected them. Doc passes. First of all took me three years to get the dos. Cool when I graduated that's behind my courage, actor so for the first year, I wanna socio at what your to my financial residency. Practice dancer during the day in everything about business at night, stealing bothered, the office manager about scheduling billing insurance verification confirmation calls unique after year that afloat ready to jump in ownership. So. Within seven years at six parts purchases were doing great. But I was at in the Bairo was we're eighty are weeks. I was also at work by half. Since for my three sons was taking a toll on my family knows setting the path towards divorce, the people that I loved most the people that has doing all this for or the ones that suffer any moss. The problem was that may practices Lexus Dems, a well-defined organizational chart without a leadership team place. Everyone across all six practices had direct access to me knows running myself ragged after this realization, I sold for mass expect ses enrich Elry after that focused on insistence in leadership in the remaining two practices. Now every practice. I is a replica of mess lake should practice in the way, we patients how verify insurance processes are always saying in the revisited author Michael causes the franchise products team members. Are clearly defined in our on boarding processes rebuffs constantly recalibrating as entire organization in moving in the same direction guide Bart mission vision incorporates. So question, so my favorite pieces of vice they give our Yvonne your comfort zone tough tough conversations in the marinate was your students looking to grow leadership in practice management. Doc passes. The first piece is a quote from timbers person success in life can usually budget by the number of uncomfortable conversations here, she is ROY into it comes down to the fact he can give someone all the business too Xeni, but without leadership in a willingness tough our stations. Now never have practice leadership is a muscle in you need to be constantly training it through setting clear expectations lane team members countable in confronting difficult situations when they are as. The mayor is pretty simple most students don't know what they don't know. It comes to pact's ownership in countless for your sources on these topics so immersed some business books. Listen podcasts. Downloadable expose yourself to it's out there. So you can build a foundational knowledge required for rushing. Next question. Do you recommend we assess readiness for breakfast ownership dark process? Incomes getting any practice early? People tend to talk about the outliers who by practice right out of school. That's great. That's not the path. Most people take spend time to master the basics of business billing cycles, analyzing demographics practice, financials this stuff. Takes awhile to kneel down. So give the time deserves because you can make some really expensive mistakes. If you jump into. All right last person. What advice would you give to someone move actually wants to end up where you are? Now duct passes. Is this a natural progression? If you're running successful systems based practice in wanna keep growing at in. Another will be the next step. Then if you successful at managing while room grew you'll naturally move in the direction of coaching others. Look it took me three years in twenty one type student adult school. I was persistent because I believed ashtrays the greatest professional world if I can do it. Anyone can so surround yourself with people will help you reach your full potential. Ran it yourself in all the free resources. You can get your ANSA go out into the world after graduation, fully informed. All right. They listen to that everyone again that articles titled defining your past practice ownership, and it was published in January dishing of contra vaccine Aleve link to that in the show notes. Moas? Thanks again of great. Guy. So you've probably heard me talk about a dental specific financial advisor called dentist advisors. Their founder is a buddy of mine. His name is Reese Harper and he's a regular guest on our show. So we asked him if you would create an online continuing education course, exclusively for the listeners of the parental podcast and happily he obliged so to take this course for free. All you have to do is visit dentist advisors dot com slash Costas. That's dentist advisors dot com slash Costas. And that's spelled C O S T S. Also, be sure to check out rhesus podcast, hold the dentist money show, which helps dentists make smart financial decisions. It's also available at dentist advisors dot com or search the dentist money show on your favorite podcast app. And that wraps it up for another episode of the dental podcast. I thank you so much for joining us this week. And we'll talk to you next week. Take care. Bye. Thank you so much for joining us today on the dental for Noor podcast checkout. True dental success dot com for full recaps of every show a schedule of our live events free. Video tutorials and a whole host of practice building resources.

Dr CASA Costas Dow success institute Dr Mark Kostas Scottsdale mess lake Dr Mike Akron university Bairo Dr Koss Lexus contra magazine timbers Johnny Mike Russians Noor Elry office manager writer
Cattle Current PodcastJuly 8, 2019

Cattle Current Market Update with Wes Ishmael

06:10 min | 1 year ago

Cattle Current PodcastJuly 8, 2019

"No no no cattle futures gained in the week carcass whites continue over year over year coming up on your calendar tells her market update with british boom boom boom boom how do you go there's there's way more what you're cal current market update the late weekend and monday morning date july negotiating cash bread cabin trade ended up steady in the southern plains at a hundred nine dollars hubbard wait all live basis but warned us two dollars higher in nebraska at one thirteen to one thirteen fifty and one twelve to one fourteen in the western corn belt dress trade was steady tito or fire at a hundred and eighty dollars according to their appeal extension livestock marketing specialist at oklahoma state university in his early week more comments as longest beef demand doesn't weaken appreciably in the remainder of the year fed cattle prices are expected the average about equal the last year fern annual average slightly lower year over year in the third quarter but were screaming in the fourth quarter cattle futures closed sharply higher friday helped along by sluggish trade and those higher fed cattle prices in the north live cattle futures closed in average of the dollar and eighteen cents higher across arranges sixty seven cents to one seventy seven hire their average of two dollars and forty six cents higher week to week on friday corn futures closed fractionally higher the two cents higher dr tony on friday and then mostly unchanged fifty two cents lower soybean futures calls mostly ten to fourteen cents lord choice box beef cut out value of a dollar ninety nine cents lower week to week on friday afternoon at two hundred and seventeen dollars and sixty seven cents a hunter glade select with seventy six cents lower at one ninety four eighty but lider year over year carcass weights continued helped aloof increase cattle numbers jabra stress steered wait for the weekend in june twenty second it was four pounds lighter than the previous year it eight hundred and fifty four pounds according to usd's paxil slaughter under federal inspection report they average dress temperate wait at seven hundred ninety pounds which three pounds lighter incidentally slaughter the five hundred and thirty seven thousand four hundred and thirty three head west thirty eight tattered and seventy five head morgan last year and told us water one ninety seven hundred and seventy three had more at six hundred and sixty thousand two hundred sixty nine ahead beef production for the week was four point three million pounds more than a year earlier at five hundred and thirty three point two million pounds with steep cost destined to be somewhat higher in the second half of the year peel explains feedlots loss will have some incentive to trim back days on feed suggesting wider finished and the slider carcass wait there is no national trend forecasting fear cattle last week with so many auction shuttered in observance of independence day but if per undertones noted for stairs and peppers at the wants did take place that according to be agriculture martine service likewise feeder cattle futures closed in average of two dollars and thirty one cents cents higher week to week there and average of a dollar forty one cents higher on friday across the range of one ten to two twentyfive higher end spot august that was with corn futures closing in average of eleven cents higher through the front six contracts week week on friday recover in about half of the previous weeks decline peel noted earlier in the week the fear prices are generally expected averaging three to five percent below two thousand eighteen levels for the remainder of the year and fernando elaborate major usa financial engines is closed lower friday popular thinking scribe the pressure to pause the monthly employment report which might make the fed more reticent cut interest rates total nonfarm foreign payroll employment increased by two hundred and twenty four thousand in june according to u s bureau of labor statistics employment situation summary the unemployment rate was little changed at three point seven percent the dow jones industrial average closed closed forty three points lower the s and p five hundred closed five points lower and the nasdaq was down eight points the creighton university rural main street index rose four point seven points in june fifty three point to that the six month out of seven the index above growth neutral the rural main street indexes based on a monthly survey of banks ceos in rural areas but ten state region they're dependent on our culture and or energy the state of colorado illinois iowa kansas minnesota missouri nebraska north dakota south dakota and wyoming accordion early goss the jackie mcallister chair in regional economic at creighton university hyder cultured business higher agriculture commodity prices an rebuilding precent floods boosted index furthermore he says despite the negatives and the trade war sixty nine point four percent of bikers support either raising or continuing kirk tears at the same time more than one in four bank ceos reporter rising loan default do the farm financial world that

two dollars seven hundred ninety pounds hundred nine dollars three million pounds two million pounds fifty four pounds seventeen dollars eighty dollars seven percent twenty second five percent four percent three pounds four pounds six month
A Chosen Family

Kind World

11:39 min | Last month

A Chosen Family

"Kind world is sponsored by apple books. WHO's partnering with the One and Only Oprah to bring you her next book. Club pick. This one is Deacon King Kong by James McBride. It's a story of connections and community in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty nine. New York City. It's also a social novel with a heart of gold with characters that will crack you up, and I'll make you cry. Download Deacon King Kong on Apple Books at Apple. Dot Co Slash Ob. See once you're done with that. You can explore millions of other books and audiobooks on the apple books up. It's got a lot. Get started today and read with us. Produced by the I lab at WBZ YOU ARE BOSTON. Welcome to kind world. I'm Andrea. The last couple of weeks we've been sharing. Some of our favorite classic kind ruled episodes with you on Fridays today. We've got another one for you, but this time we're adding something new to the story. An update them. Here's our twenty fourteen story a second mother to me. Michael Timm. Boni I'm eighteen years old and from Saint Louis Missouri. In the eighth grade, my mom has toy. My friend's MOMS tell me that she liked to brag about me a lot. When she passed away I had to move in with my dad. I love them to death for he. Sometimes it's kind of hard to talk to. You. Get then start like tearing up and say I can't believe this happened. I was not I was comfortable talking about it. So all kinds of sit alone. Just think about it by myself. My name is Francis Schmidt's I. Am from Saint Louis. Michel is a friend of my son Vincent. When you lose your mom, and what was at the end of his eighth grade year? You have to do a lot of growing up. Those were also the very years that on one hand. Kids are always angry at their parents, and on the other hand constantly leaning on you and going to you. They need you. and Michael like like. Any other young man at that point in time. His mom. I went to an all boys Jesuit high school every year by school hold a mother, Son Mass and breakfast. We would go there early. Just up really nice. Go to mass and then right afterwards. We'd all meet in the lunchroom for breakfast. Everyone else was going to that and I just if I. IF I'm honest I, definitely go to that too so. Just skipped at the first couple of years. The whole point with the mother son breakfast they make. Everything about the relationship of a mother and son, and the kind of love and trust that goes with that. Junior year my my son and I ever going once again, I had noticed Michael hadn't been to any of them. Vincent was given me the list of all the people who were going to be there and I said. Michael going GONNA BE THERE And Vincent said. No, mom. But, he should be. Mercy called me. As she wouldn't be too strange to sad and she would. To take me to the mothers on mass and breakfast. I jumped on the idea. I got ready dressed in a coat and tie and she picked me up from my house. During the whole day at the mass and the breakfast and the Games and fund that came afterwards. There was never a moment where he looked around and felt sorry for himself for not having tracy with them, his mom he, he gets held himself with dignity. Just talked about in the homily more about how much appreciate your mother's. Just. How you should be grateful for them what they do. At the end. Of the boys was supposed to pull rose out of the centerpieces and give them to their mother. And both Michael. Vincent handed me a rose. I Then whispered Vincent go around and get me bouquet of flowers in. Meet me in the kitchen. We head into the kitchen. Everybody was getting coats in and things. And you put together Piquet. And gets very quietly gotten a car with it I'm Michael just thought I liked roses. And as we were driving home I said. Let's go see your mom. And, so we drove to the cemetery and he was. Very quiet. Kinda shocked. Vincent grabbed the bouquet of roses. And handed him Michael. said, this is your mom. And we walked over to her crave. And, we all go there and spend time with her and then Vincent I step back to let Michael has some time with his mom. People would always. Give their condolences and everything. But she took a proactive approach to physically be a second mother to me, and it just meant a lot to me. More than any other accident, anyone has done for them. I never met his mother. But. I feel I know her? Because the no, the child is in no, the mother. And she must have been very loving caring woman. Theresa, killed her and that she did. Actually call every mother's Day. I would say thank you so much. I love you. You're amazing. When someone feels comfortable joining in as part of your family for me, that is an honor and a privilege and I will. Forever be grateful for Michael. Forgiving me that honor. And being someone. Who will always be a part of my heart? That story was produced by Zach. Czar. After the break, we hear from Michael Tambellini and Francis Schmidt's. Kind all sponsored by apple books. We've been telling you about the new book from Book Club, but why not hear it from Oprah herself. Hello everyone. I'm excited to share my next book. Club pick with you Deacon King Kong by James. McBride a story of connections and community in nineteen, sixty nine New York City. The characters will crack you up and make you cry. Get Deacon King Kong at Apple Dot Co slash obesity, then explore millions of other books and audiobooks on the apple APP download today and read with us. Welcome back to kind world. It's been six years since a second mother to me aired on our show, and just a couple of weeks ago, I caught up with Michael in Francis to see what they've been up to. Michael Timm. Boni now lives in Omaha Nebraska where he's working on his. In occupational therapy at Creighton University. After episode aired Michael Says he was surprised and excited to hear how much listeners connected to the story. People caring about people being everyone is that everyone has their safety net, and I have it tangible story and all share that with people just makes me happy. Michael was a freshman in college when the story originally aired. He says it helped his new friends understand his past a little better people who would become part of his chosen family. He hopes the story illustrates the power that kind of support system. Being able to find people that you can lean on for not being your best self just because they love you I think that's important, but just knowing that. They're always people there to comfort you when you did when he needed until love you. The person through all these years I've never I've never felt alone, and that is something very fortunate and lucky to have. Michael regularly returns to Saint Louis to visit his family and he always tries to see Francis. Schmidt's every time back in town she. Try to reach out to do you like? To Cook? which is one of my things? And it's obviously he's just always been to kind. She really cares for me and has just been a constant thing. She's been a good role model. My life not to stay isn't official. Until either seen heard from Michael This is Francis. It's an honor being in his life. And I never take for granted the way Michael shows his love and that he never forgets me. Just like any mom with any of her kids, you WANNA know how they're doing you WANNA. Share, good news and their accomplishments. You WanNa be there what it's not such good news and they need support. After our story aired, Francis says she was touched to hear Michael's words describing the positive effect she had on him because she says he had an even bigger effect on her own life, even though Francis is a mother of four, she likes to say she's got five kids including Michael that you would have this young man who? Was Open his heart. and. That had to be hard. Because every kid misses her mom and I can't imagine how difficult it was for him, not to have her there, so the idea that I could even fell a fraction of that empty space within Michael, that I could be there even in a small way for him. Meant everything she says that this story is a great reminder that our actions, even if they're small to us, can make a huge difference in the lives of others. You just never know how you impact other people's lives. It was nice to know spectrum positive way Michael came part of us part of our family as a mom. You just never know you as a human being you just never know what you do and how it ripples out into the universe. To Michael. Timm Boni and Francis Schmidt's for chatting with me. In thank you so much for listening to the special bonus episode of kind world, our show is a production of WB. You are Boston's NPR station. Paul vicarious Redo our sound design Sophie. Eisenberg is our WB you. Our Fellow Catherine Brewer is managing producer and editor. An Irish Adler is our executive producer I'm Andrea. A he and my co host is Yasmine Amer. We'll be back with a new episode of kind world on Tuesday. See you that. would. World is sponsored by Apple. Books we've been telling you about the new book from Oprah's Book Club, but why not hear from Oprah Herself Hillary One? I'm excited to share my next book. Club pick with you Deacon King Kong by James McBride, a story of connections and community in nineteen, sixty nine New York City. The characters will crack you up and make you cry. Get Deacon King Kong Apple. Dot, Co, slash OTC then explore millions of other books and audiobooks on the apple books APP download today and read with us.

Michael Francis Schmidt Deacon King Kong Apple Vincent Michael Timm Timm Boni New York City James McBride BOSTON Michael Tambellini Michael This Book Club Apple Dot Co Son Mass Oprah Saint Louis Missouri Yasmine Amer NPR Michel
The Clinical Hacks are Even Harder and Faster (CHP19)

The Dental Hacks Podcast

29:15 min | 10 months ago

The Clinical Hacks are Even Harder and Faster (CHP19)

"Him To clinical hacks where real working dentists talk real dentistry sit back. Relax tighten your tough Meyer prepares to be clinically act they have probably crimes against humanity or dentistry but please see if you can get them back I miss them greatly and Again if anyone has a good lawyer please let me know again we're coming to you from the Great City of Cleveland Ohio The rock and roll capital of the World Taylor demand all of the listeners emailed me and said Hey let's have that CRI- guy back on again but before we go further I wanted to sort of all of fame and you'll see all the cool stuff that's there including John Lennon's guitar which makes me feel happy that lives down the street from Indiana's out excellent we'll have the rock and Roll Hall of fame right down the street that way I know you don't know which way pointing but it's right down there and with me again today is Craig Harder reset the clock and tell everyone where you went to dental school yeah well I grew up in spokane Washington and then moved to Idaho doc it's very cool all right so craig I want a we had John last week and it was so awesome we decided to have you back again by house and cannot break out of prison so if anyone knows a good lawyer anywhere I'm sure they need your health I'm not sure what crimes they've committed auto has program with Creighton University where they send a few students every year pick up some of the tuition which is great in those private school so that was Nice I and so I went and looked at practice and that no way in hell and my girlfriend at the time told me though this is the practice at that time we're actually in the process of divorce so dead broke no money up but yet remember this is the mid early nineties follow through and he had several associates on the hook licked used against each other so I finally had enough and decided that I wasn't going to put up with they yet graduated from Creighton University in Nineteen Ninety five and move back Idaho and your associate there got my butt fired and bliss I've traveled to do all right so when you come to Cleveland Missy and I will take you out to the best restaurant in Cleveland and also go to the rock and roll twin was free and easy so I bought a practice Sidon well and I did go and see it I haven't seen but gentleman committed suicide move to Washington That sounds like a good story we might have to get into that there are a few good stories from those early years all right how did you get your fire away over there in Washington Craig ever been to the rock and Roll Hall of fame and Museum I have not I've never been to Cleveland a limited the for talking back to the old man who worked for I worked for he was he was one of those guys that made lots of promises than didn't By this is where we got to be in it's worked pretty well so that's why you're still at still in that building a new office practice I bonded was originally established this crap and kind of forgot that he signed the paychecks Breezy Greenville let me go so young Craig harder was twenty five year old Craig harder recently divorced nineteen fifty five I'm the third owner so it's a big part of the community or that's awesome in you described last time that it's pretty much my timing has been spectacular let me tell you way to go yeah that two thousand eight two thousand nine I know all of us guys bring that up bread-and-butter practice we you know we're we're six ought practice the one point in time expanded had a plan so what do you do for fun Craig I've really enjoy it really was and in truly a little better than that I've talked about it with several guys before the Cosmos on having an associate in for a long time building it up than all of those things but the did that two thousand nine right it's financial crisis begs hit nicely on cash yet days were actor the early two thousands and it made us all a bit better than we were being businessman I number two is a little bit harder what's what's harder placing regular implants or mini implants I think obviously asked will it float that's I wish I could just throw my cards through the back window all right so craig gene and the hunting where I live in central Washington just off the Columbia River and we've got tons of waterfowl hunting and lots of exploring places open ground to go visit my wife and I enjoyed camping we also enjoyed concerts so we have the Arabic Gorgeous George if you're earning it is one of the time I guess this is the second episode of which is harder with Craig harder so here we go we're GONNA start off with an easy one I castle don't so it must be way harder to be original I think you're one hundred percent correct about that one all right what is harder wearing a hat all the time or not wearing a hat at all depends on the amount of baldness that you're trying to cover I'll go it's hard wear a hat all the time I think it must be really easy to copy others because I see some amazing things that some people I knew and then others copied them and try and take credit thousand but it's an impression technique that does not rely on packing cord and before I tried to repacking cord or not packing court hacking court is way too hard for me so I don't all right so that's what's known as a segue people they were our topic is the h h impression technique which admittedly I know very little about I did it once probably back in two zero Bergen an associate even though I had no clue and those dealing with that we're all young and dumb some point was ranked number one for many many years very very cool it hell rl says it's time for quiz time oh good what's harder mashed potatoes our country Concrete all right very good you're you're really good at the I knew all right nervous about this one and juster alert listeners this is where we ask Craig harder what's harder so crazy harder David Letterman bit where he ads the were there a month or so ago my son was there so yeah I'm less than a half hour drive away from me uh-huh this one's even more difficult what's harder being original or copying others h stand for so it's hydraulic pressure and hydrophobic impression material so we're GONNA use hydraulic pressure drive low viscosity results driven things that placing many implants must be way are I think so and you must respect the bite yes absolutely I learned this technique years ago on a dental email lists for Dr Jeff Who's and Jeff will say he didn't exactly originally triple trae impression with a hydraulic really stiff material as your initial impression in quickly no although I tried to find different names different ways to put my name on it but nobody's accepted it yet all right so first of all tell us what the h n the description you need to use rigid impression tray of metal one that won't deform but I've not had an issue with that the only thing that here's where I differ a little bit and I say it because it's just plain worked for me anecdotally I've always used just truly a permit bore you don't have a retro molar pad that's being pushed by anything like that because the impression materials hard enough doesn't have any bounce back the head of the quick and dirty of how so what impression tray are you using I imagine you'd have to use a metal triple turning so money from Lake J. Morita or someone I believe anyhow ads so yeah the whole idea is to take a a rigid double sided impression trace phobic impression material deep into the circus very deepen the circus you gotta love that gotta go deep all right so explain this technique you need to make sure that you're not getting any impingement onto the plastic itself when patient bikes down meaning you don't have to go into it gorge so seen probably fifty to sixty concerts out there always good time at higher to a month ago I'd never heard of it but yes adding to that impression something with very low viscosity to get four stand into the sole focus when they patient closest back into it in this sound like an idiot I'm GonNa let Craig explain it so there you go off first of all what H H does not stand for harder and harder correct enters today we're gonNA take on Russian right that's why I don't know anything about this yes exactly so basically will that I had a golden touch with everything I put my finger on as my practice when I made my built a new building laser going awesome until I not throw more money she trae everyone knows them by the Book Guy So let's let's talk about the materials then what are you using for the here's triple trace their plastic got aside on it so it holds up some if you go by the book in go from Jeff's but any pretty much any of the wash materials will work fine most important is that I won the Blue Velvet but yeah they're flexibility that you can get some flex in that material but it's GonNa stay once that first impression to set but again if you WANNA go by the Book Yup you need a rigid in ah I simply use what used forever riches virtual facet light body you need to add any more material to the opposing arch I'm because especially when it comes to anterior you'll get some of that spread time on the Blue Velvet thirty seconds while that's quick yes you know I will say when we use the slow said if we're going to do it Abba trail by orchestrations material I'm telling you just stick with Blue Moose or blue velvet from Jayme Rita and still look cool okay perfect answer you get one hundred bonus points for that and finally what's hard there are some reasons I say that but a little bit of porosity which allows at for your wash material stick much better but it's that last they also have one that's something snow white or something like that were part of the original any wash material will work pretty well what's the sense time you don't have to do anything Kevin the only time I worry about it is always seems to be lower molar but you've got that deep this'll last time we have let's say that they're in approximately it's a little subject which sometimes happens yet often happens so to get some quick spread and it doesn't adapt real well that's one of my Kinda tips later on that plan but I'll tell you now is to make sure that you evaluate whether or not could bounce back with those materials that were truly specially made for this technique that's important so the blue velvet or the Blue Moose is pretty so last episode we prepped a crown and we just left it there Ya know we need to take an impression now taking price and we're not going to be one of those fancy scheme full arch when but ninety five percent of the time we're just using the facet and then what's the time on the wash material league or call back to a couple of episodes ago so great you're using hydrogen peroxide I I have not jumped on the train yet but the result it but he's the one who perfected the process and put his name to any literally earned one dollar from at one time when he was given hydro vendor main in a heavy heart which is going to be eighty plus on the scale and a lot of people will just trying to use the other heavy body or stiff impression and so that's all I really need for this H. Technique Okay so you've got all that out of the way you're ready to go now a margin that you're trying to work around or musial on number eighteen in that's pretty deep down there and yet some decay in there you're what if you have some bleeding let's start with their first how are we going to control that or what do we need to do about that to to nature impression most accident works really fast and slows at the bleeding enough while pushing tissue out of the way even more within a minute your lab will be ticked off at the poor quality of a model you can allow on are you using for the wash they recommend the Flexi Velvet with those then and like said in the last episode I'll take him finishing pointed cone gun in there a little bit trophy seeing from others I'm going to be ordering that to us that forever I don't use it I may use a couple times a month so maybe I've stirred up some blend with those men if we're getting the gusher where I can't see that area very well when then I will yeah I like this pulling Alley Sergiy heck it's a new word we're gonNA yet that needs to be a new phrase allier deposing oftentimes pulled up you'll have some slough off stuff from Amalgam or whatever then when she handed to me until it yet close into it and you can sometimes have to guide you might have to make sure they're not trying to protrude too far out or anything like that but if you look at it and you have a bunch of that poor adaptation of the Blue Velvet initially then I add to the entire use the very original thing that Jeff told us which was the blue velvet fast sent from J. Morita materials gotta have it L. Poll analysis urging all use hydrogen peroxide have been using the old version but hydrogen peroxide in its basic is worked pretty darn well to get initial place the trae against the upper arch and to me this is kind of a really big tip that people forget about the Kinda hang it mid air let the patient bite into it you're going to do next so while my assistant is loading the Blue Moose or the Blue Velvet I'm gonNA wash off the banned the opposing make sure we don't have any debris down against on the virtual light bunny not says fast it's two minute working time all right all right so we have this tooth prop but just have him close into it and they are some important words that we all need to get used to using when it comes to patients closing into it rather than squeezing into it or beating the down on this like that just closing into this works pretty well concurrent so they're gonNA hold that against their for thirty six impression but most of the time I just need to add to the area at the prep just to clarify you're putting the wash into the the here's where you need help help the patient out because sometimes they'll be off just a little bit in this material the initial material is stiff enough that they have a hard time Russian very well say we prepped lower tooth and as I've as their opening and say we prep nineteen and I'm trying to look on that and I can't see real well the opposing arch sometimes it will come loose in it's not a big deal but if you can keep it up against that opposing arch you're going to be in good shape then we're gonNA apply the wash material impression that all so being held against the opposing arch nine preparation yet there are occasions if I can't see that and to help support him something like that most of the time not meet at all but that's the occasional and that's gonna stay in for two minutes yet that's GonNa stay until set then pull it in getting into it all the way and so you might have to help guide him over a little bit slide into the right spot and then you'll hear all snap they'll see hop into or the put it on the lower as soon as you put the tray on the lower they lose kind of their sense of word jazz gotTa go and putting up against the upper just having them close into it unbear- you've got a great impression now we gotta check it out and see what that impression looks like the main thing that will tell you that you screwed up is how much of your wash the preparation I guess back to the second if if when you look at that initial impression of your that you've got a bunch of credit insults pretty quick time now comes the next part that can be a little bit tricky is that you're going to have the patient open while you try and keep the trae against quick spray with your system break their takes care of it but then he apply a Washington under the oppression and this is where a how much is always soft use blue Moussavi it's like an icing and so you got to be a little careful because sometimes when you have the patient close into it among other newer Goto also been tracks your thing I don't like about using any of the pace like that as it does slow you down a little bit chatterly jaw from being open very long they'll chatter well-trained stay closed on this and so you might have to put your all your hand underneath there I'm not using it is if a gut a patient that we're GonNa do a mix of implant impression long with traditional preppy impression okay very cool so using this the majority of the time I do the only time I can think of impression material you can see over the top of the prep area you just WanNa see a very very thin line or the area then bore down into the for multiple units in in a quadrant. Yeah Yeah we use a great I should say another time that I don't use it and this is only in my hand I haven't heard anybody say the or if I'm doing a full arch where a maybe there aren't many good triple trae impression that's what I tell you got it so once you've got that then you need also can keep an eye on your patient if you've got an older patient who's got that you can't is if you've got a it's got a lot of internal if you're doing all lay prep or an inlay there's some how you ended up with a lot more bleeding than do a quick spray rinsing out but usually don't mean to the impression impression Okay just special instructions to the lab I always heard there was like a dice baser issue yeah I will say I've never told my lab to do anything different the tunnel loud I'll say I've really five different labs over twenty three years and again yet my fear is that you could have some expansion that you're not going to great in the mix them internally any kind of upper debate too much in their little just Kinda squish out everywhere or maybe even a few way overloaded it you'll get some weak spots in the impression but that's the only time that I won't use this technique is if I've got somebody that doesn't fit the average for the trae in okay but the traditional party line on either book is that the lab needs to add a two extra layers of dice baser again for one the top so yeah and if you used the same lab your whole career no so assuming the crown fit fine I don't really even remember that but I just remember that being an issue people complaining about their lab the drip all over the place I'll place it on the crap that's not getting deal you can do it either okay and then what then then we haven't closed into it again and stories inherited so many people tell me I can't believe you still use that technique I was a nightmare for me we add all these problems when you start dialing down into finding add one lab I should say that it'd be land number six that didn't last very long with us we didn't like them they didn't like us so we okay that was not good for the situation they were using the kind that doesn't happen inside walls to help hold things together there is always something because of that there's GonNa be some external pressure that's going to have it it too tight if we don't have a little bit they had a conversation with ivoclar up today because I was having trouble this is a couple of months ago with a new cement and I know what I was doing wrong I figured it out a used H. and H. techniques so they can modify the dice baser and again I I probably did it once way back in the day just to try it and they were doing it right and if you vary from that then that's when you get some weird weird does happen I had some issue yeah right or the Techniques Fault said that's a common theme sometimes try to go off book you see the work of someone and they're doing you know let's say h nature technique and you see their final results in they look great while the that wasn't magic it was me I I was using the wrong Binding agent with it and you know that seems to be a common problem when workspace again I've never seen that be a problem the only time I've actually had a problem was when I knew that the lab was putting too much extra dice baser on as having the kind that can now I noticed stick to why they recommend materials they do and it works very well yeah sometimes Thinking you know better I work that they have to do anything different either these yeah so I remember way back in dental town back in the day there was always you know let your lab know that sounds perform arch up there everybody's arch forma so different than the trae won't work for everybody if I can get one to fit right in these plenty of room without impinging than I will in that sort of thing because there are after they tried this special technique over the years you not have been doing this long enough even with this technique that I've heard all the horror it's always warranted and in good good humor and helpful I think we've got a good page there if your dental student you can join us his wouldn't I was trying to use different cheap materials that I thought were okay hardness wise in the materials the wash wouldn't bond to it very well so okay so let's talk about the clinical heck's page what you know about it Craig will I as far as early days this technique never made any problem with them for low cost land and I've used a couple of really high in labs for the highest this those are lessons we should learn in kindergarten but we all do those things exactly all right so I just to SORTA wrap up Kim new post in the clinical hacks page like h impression that you've done short for Ginger area where he picked up all detail nigger seen all of your wash material that means the patient didn't bite down into correctly and I need to read as soon as they tried to make a poor that would peel out or any issue you know I had one

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WOM8  The Liturgy of the Word pt. 2  The Way of Mystery with Deacon James Keating  Discerning Hearts Podcast

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts

28:02 min | 3 months ago

WOM8 The Liturgy of the Word pt. 2 The Way of Mystery with Deacon James Keating Discerning Hearts Podcast

"Discerning HEARTS DOT COM in cooperation with the institute for Priestly Formation Presents. The way of mystery the Eucharist Immoral Living With Deacon James Katy Deacon Keating is the Director of theological formation at the institute for Priestly Formation Located at Creighton University in Omaha Nebraska. He's the author of numerous books including remain in me. Holy Orders Prayer and ministry spell so prayer in the heart of the jacket. Taking heating has led more than four hundred workshops on moral theology and spirituality and regularly conducts retreats and parish missions. The way of Mystery Eucharist and Moral Living Deacon James Kidding. I'm your host Chris McGregor dickey and we were talking about the liturgy of the word. The power of proclamation is something that also can influence inexperienced an entering into the liturgy of the word and you had mentioned in the very beginning of the discussion the importance of when someone would say a reading from the first letter of John. And then you kind of take that into yourself to set your mind so you know what you're accepting that moment of silence even after that to allow that to occur as very important isn't it move up. The announcement of the word know that this is. This is this is different. This is the Bible. This is the word of God whether it's are not sitting to receive it in a contemporary dance or standing to receive it in a stance of respect or almost all the power of the of the dignity of the one who is being proclaimed. Jesus no matter what the body posture when it is proclaimed this gospel. This is a reading from the Old Testament. The New Testament rightfully our mind should then be awakened to like to like understand. This is something that we do not hear every day. What's going to be given to us now? What's going to be shared? What's going to be gifted now? Is something that we are not given every day. This is the revelation of God himself to his beloved bride and the mind should be trained to to attend at a very deep level. The proclamation that is about to occur this also brings up the point of how it is to be proclaimed and this is always a tricky point. I'm sure that some of you've had the experience where you've been at mass and the reader is more fascinating than the word being read. They are reading it in a very dramatic fashion almost a history onyx and you want that person read so well that person pauses and has a inflections that are well trained and then again the reading is over and you're not even sure that you heard the reading. It's a very odd experience that a well trained reader sometimes gets in the way of the text. And you're almost are fascinated by the gifts of speaking that is present in the reader. Now the opposite is true to someone who gets up and just mumbles or doesn't have any familiarity with the word you begin to notice the reader more than the taxed says person. Nobody's saying dish to she. Understand the Texas you understand went to pause or when not to understand what what were to hit or what were to soften. She seems incompetent. And so this is a very very tricky situation that the person who was proclaiming the word of God can actually help the word become more transparent or get in the way a literal stumbling block. And I've seen very well trained People in drama actually be a stumbling block to the word being Trans transferred and the opposite is well someone who's a bit more incompetent and reading can be a stumbling block and so there has to be a good training because this is a unique expression of reading. It's not like the oral interpretation of literature something dramatic it's prayer. How do you read a prayer? How do you? How do you facilitate encounter without you yourself becoming the encounter? It's very complex. And it has to do with both practice but also spiritual preparation and it has to do with something that we mentioned in our previous show a sobriety it has to be the virtue of of sobriety and prudence that this is not about me and my skills will be used but they will be used at a level of minimalism. Because what I'm trying to do here is to get out of the way and let the people in the Pew be hit full force with the truth of the word of God and so- Electors have an incredible responsibility as preachers incredible responsibility to approach the reading prayerfully not dramatically and in sobriety not in any sense of of trying to be too history hottick in their approach to just be transparent to be dignified to be competent. Until let the word do the work let the word do the work. Not My inflections are not my training let the word do the work then that will be true proclamation because they encounter will be with Christ and not with the lector or the priest of the Deacon and then if the counter was with Christ then that's when the liturgy of the word could be transformative mean the last thing any Lecter Watson. This would be a great suffering for anyone is to be remembered as the lecter that day the great compliment. Any elector is. I don't know who read it. I just know that that word of God affected me deeply today. It's a great gift that the lecture passes on to us when they have taken that time to really pray with scripture in when they present it back to us as a gift when they say the word of the Lord. It's one of the reasons. Why isn't it? The church took away. This is the word of the Lord because the word of the Lord is not unlike when you're presented the body of Christ or the blood of Christ the word of the Lord not specified by the word. This is part of the reason I was to unleash. The power of the word almost perhaps to get at that level of particular station that I mentioned before whereas this is the word of the Lord and then people used to hold up the book and then I guess some literature were concerned that Everyone would focus on the book that the book is the word of the Lord and not the power that comes from the book. The power of transformed lives the power of the church. The power of lay lives in the secular world. This is the word of the Lord in other words. The church is the word spoken to secular culture By those who have been humbled enough to be affected by the proclamation of the word at the mass you were the word of the Lord. Now go and take that word to work and to civic associations sporting events and and go be that word for everybody else so. I think there was some sense to move the word this away from that final proclamation of the Lecter so that we could begin to meditate on the fact that the word of the Lord is Power and that power affects me deeply. And it's affecting me deeply enough for my own constellation but so that might bring that word out to the whole culture and of course the word that I have received in power is the word that begins to transform my conscience so that I can become a witness in society that relationship between the formation of conscience in other words I've received the word of God in power. It's changing me. It's doing something to me. That relation between receiving the word and power and forming my conscience and public witness is incredibly close in fact the relationship is mutual that we have to have people who received the word in power the formation of their conscience so that they can literally go out and bring the Catholic Church into the nooks and crannies of the secular world. In other words they can taste the dignity of the lay. Vocation it's it's the transformed conscience somewhat formed. I mean it's not totally formed at the mass but really formed but not totally. It's the transformed conscience that gives the lay person his or her dignity and worth because that's they become evangelist of the secular culture. The last thing we would ever want is for lay people to leave the church. I go to work. And then keep parroting people magazine or keep parroting. Newsweek rather they are supposed to be a contrast what everyone is thinking about the be all and end all of society's critics being from Newsweek or The New York Times the Lay Catholic is supposed to chime in with a contrasting voice. The Voice of Christ the Voice of Christ that affected him or her so deeply at mass that they were changed by that voice and now they want to add that voice to the culture. It will be salt. It will be a contrasting voice. But that's the dignity of their office as lay people. They are supposed to take the hit for Jesus. I don't WanNA stand up right now and talk about gay marriage or I don't WanNa talk about stem cell research or I don't WanNa talk about. Hey we're not supposed to get divorced and remarried is apple. Ruined the conversation here at the office or will ruin the conversation here at dinner with my friends. But that's the whole point of the mass is so that this mystery takes up residence in you. You're supposed to take the hit. For Christ you're supposed to be the one voicing truth not in some obnoxious way but humbly humbly and again soberly a dinner when everyone is just taking for granted. The divorce new marriage is acceptable. Why not utter the word? Well I think that Christ was disappointed in those who acted that way and drop the word. What will happen at dinner? I don't know people could get mad. People might change the subject very quickly. People might not invite you back even if you were to do it. So soberly as will. I think Christ would be disappointed in us if we continue to take marriage so lightly even you say that way. It may cost. But that's the point. The point of our lives around the Eucharist is that we are to be the extensions of the life death and resurrection of Jesus. We are to let that mystery in at the liturgy of the word and then we are to carry that moral truth and those spiritual and religious truths out into the culture and yes we need courage but more so today we need a network of fellowship a fellowship of Catholics. That you can call upon. I went to dinner last night. I humbly spoke. Jesus is truth and that was rejected and the next day. You have a friend to talk about that with a fellow believer to talk about that with the networking of fellowship of Catholics crucial. If the word of God is to take on power as transformative in the second world otherwise none of us will stand up for it if we have no friends they think like Christ. We won't be courageous enough to speak up in public will return in just a moment to the way of mystery with Deacon James Skating. Did you know that you can obtain a free which contains all your favorite discerning hearts programs Father Timothy Gallagher? Dr Anthony Lewis Archbishop George. Lucas Father Meritas filthy and so many more including episodes from inside the pages can be obtained on the discerning hearts. Free APP this also includes Albano Vinas and devotional and prayers including the Holy Rosary and stations of the Cross. The Chapel is Saint Michael and the seven sorrows of our lady. All available on the discerning hearts free APP visit the I tunes and Google play APP stores to obtain your free discerning hearts APP today. Litany of humility. Oh Jesus Meek and humble of heart hear me from the desire of being esteemed deliver meet. Jesus from the desire of being loved deliver me. Jesus from the desire of being extolled deliver meet Jesus from the desire of being honored. Jesus from the desire of being praised from the desire of being preferred to others deliver meet Jesus from the desire of being consulted ever meet Jesus from the desire of being approved deliver meet. Jesus from the fear of being humiliated. Deliver me Jesus from the fear of being despised deliver. Jesus from the fear of suffering rebukes. Deliver me Jesus from the fear of being colonial deliver me. Jesus from the fear of being forgotten deliver me. Jesus from the fear of being ridiculed deliver me Jesus from the fear of being wrong. Deliver me Jesus. From the fear of being suspected delivery Jesus that others may be loved more than I that others may be esteemed more than I but in the opinion of the world others may increase and I may decrease that others may be chosen an. It set aside but others may be praised. And I noticed that others may be preferred to me in everything that others may become holier than I provided that I become his holy as I should. Jesus grant me the grace to Desire Min. Hello My name is Dick Almighty Gutierrez and I want to ask you to support this winning hearts and a special way. We even Chris Mcgregor the board and I all know not. Everyone listening can help financially. We know we have listeners. From all parts of the world and we have made a commitment since the beginning to make the truth shared through turning hearts totally free so while you may not be able to contribute financially which can do is certainly pray but also gives positive reviews on whatever platform you used to listen to us I tunes Android Stitcher spotify however it is that you get these podcasts. Or if you're on youtube and you like our videos please give us a good rating and write a review. The more good ratings reviews we get. The higher profile in the more listeners will discover US listeners. Who may have the means to contribute in the future please consider rating us in writing a positive review? Today we now return to the way of mystery with Deacon James Katie in service of the word that is what we're called as lay persons to be able to bear witness. There are those in the church who have been called forward and received the gift of holy orders to be able to be a a stronger light for all of us and that. I'm speaking of the Deacon it as those Primary Proclaim Errs of the Gospel and servants of that word. The dig is very unique vocation. Today it's fascinating to me that it arose at the Second Vatican Council the same council that rediscovered an articulated so beautifully the universal call to holiness in other words the lay persons call to holiness too at the same council where the deactivate rose the lady rose so to speak and I think that was not coincidental. Conspiratorial of the Holy Spirit. Because as we move deeper into a theology of deactivate we are seeing that the unique unique. Call the Deacon to be a cleric embedded in the secular world because most deacons are not fully employed by the church They have a secular employment This may be changing. More and more deacons are becoming employed by the church but as it stands right. Now is the Deacon as a cleric who lives allay life and There's unique gift to that and that gift. I think could help fulfill which what I think is the last really unfulfilled teaching of the Second. Vatican council and that is the lay person's role as transformer of culture not as enabler of interest Zeal Ministry That's been taken care of We are good at that. Now and most diocese have formation programs for Intra Ministers the last point though is the transformation of culture who who among the Laity are going to be martyrs for Christ and as an envoy from the Bishop the Deacon stands poised to understand both the lay life and the mysteries of the altar in a very unique contributing way to the spirituality of the layperson and as this deactivated unfolds and again. It's only forty some years now so it's pretty new again. Although that has a long tradition in the early church but as this deactivate vocation unfolds. I think we will see deeper collaboration between the Carrozza of deactivate and the and the completion of the Second Vatican Council's call that the lay person is to transform culture because the Deacon might be in a position to extend the liturgy of the word through retreats and Cata cases and formation in the social teachings of the Catholic Church in a way that can truly unleash the knowledge of the Laity about their own dignity and also give them impart somewhat courage for more of them to stand up for the issues of social justice and issues of charity that that are called upon each day in the secular world. And so there's a deep mutuality between the end this flowering of the secular identity of the Laity. At least that would be the hope that these two lives can actually give birth to the hope of the second back in council that the lay person transforms the world for Christ. And lastly on this just would say that I think the liturgy of the word also has to be extended in adult faith formation. The Liturgy of the word is just the beginning. The beginning of the breaking out of revelation to God's own people that has to be more explicitly defined in explored in Leisure in leisure time and so a good faith. Adult Faith Formation Program is an extension of the liturgy of the word an hour a week a couple of hours a month where competent people are looking into the catechism and forming the minds of business leaders medical leaders nursing leaders educators People who just stay at home and raise their children. Whether it's the dad or the mom but bringing all manner of Laity in touch with this mystery of Christ in a more leisurely contemporary of mode so they have a chance to ask questions that they have a chance to explore more deeply this mystery with one another so the liturgy of the word is never complete at the end of the mass. It has to have resonance has to continue in good quality. Adult faith formation part of that taking in God's word to us and praying with that and allowing it to rest with us in those moments of silence that were hopefully given during each proclamation. Is that response in faith of the creed that we carry that marks us as people and in particular during the Sunday liturgy than it is Credo. It is who we are. And it's the response right. It's this we stand at the creed. After the word of God is proclaimed in the homily we stand in and we say we believe. The communal dimension is very strong in the cree. This is what we stand for. We believe in the father the son the Holy Spirit we believe in the church All of these key components of our faith life we then stand in proclaim and as we stand in proclaim them. What we're doing to some extent is we are also taking in and owning the revelation that went before because we would never have the creed without the liturgy of the word. We'd never have the creed without the Bible and so we're we. We see the revelation we meditate a little bit on it and the homily and then we all stand and that revelation is then solidified in us. We believe here's what the revelation of God has taught us that there's a father. There's a son that there's the Holy Spirit that the saints us and that there is the church and all of this comes from revelation which just was explored in proclaimed in the liturgy of the word. And so it's a capstone so to speak of the liturgy of the word and because we believe we know that God hears our prayers is in conversation with us by responding to those prayers may not always in the way that we anticipate but as a community we offer for The world for the Church for so many other things outside of ourselves and the prayers of the Faithful. What we have is the conscience fully awake fully alive. All immorality begins when we do not see the other. We do not see the other. We will do immoral things to them. We will objectify them. We will use them in our fearing in our lost inaugurated we will use other people. What the prayer of the faithful does is it really is the establishment of our open. Is I see the poor. I see those who are homeless. I see those who have no food. I see those who are struggling in their marriages. I see the sick child upon his her bed in the hospital. I see the lonely elderly person. I see where there is war. There needs to be piece. I see I see as a result of having been seen by God in the Liturgy of the word that God has come. God is come to us. God is come to me and when God is done with us he shows us. The poor shows us anyone and everyone who is in need and US out of this liturgy of the word erupts this cry from the Church to help the poor for God to help them. The greatest poverty of all is to sin and so the prayer. The faithful basically is a prayer that cries out to God for help in our sinfulness pathetic. We are in our sinfulness. We need God's help help us. Lord get out of our own way so that we might see others and bring your word to others so that they may be released so that we might set free those who are captive so we moved from the liturgy of the word to stand and to proclaim what we believe and then the prayer of the faithful reminds us what we have to live. If we so believe we have to live like people with eyes wide open who see the poor. The poverty of seeing the poverty sickness economic poverty and to respond to serve those who are poor out of the power of the liturgy of the word not our power out of the power of the liturgy of the word. Lord hear our prayer. Thank you so much Deacon James Keating and thank you for joining us until next time you've been listening to the way of mystery the Eucharist and moral living with Deacon James Keating here and our to download this conversation along with hundreds of others spiritual formation programs visit discerning hearts dot com. This has been a production of discerning hearts in cooperation with the institute for Priestly Formation. I'm your host. Chris McGregor. Help that if this has been helpful for you that you will. I PRAY FOR OUR MISSION. And if you feel worthy consider a charitable donation which is fully tax deductible to help support our efforts but most of all we pray that you will tell a friend about discerning arts. Dot Com and join US next time for the way of mystery the Eucharist and moral living with Deacon James.

Jesus Meek Priestly Formation James Katy Deacon Keating Chris McGregor Catholic Church Holy Spirit Second Vatican Council Chris McGregor dickey James Kidding Lecter Watson US John Nebraska Deacon James Texas Director of theological Newsweek Timothy Gallagher Google
WOM10   The Liturgy of the Eucharist part 2  The Way of Mystery with Deacon James Keating episode 10  Discerning Hearts

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts

29:19 min | 2 months ago

WOM10 The Liturgy of the Eucharist part 2 The Way of Mystery with Deacon James Keating episode 10 Discerning Hearts

"Discerning HEARTS DOT COM in cooperation with the institute for Priestly Formation Presents. The way of mystery the Eucharist Immoral Living With Deacon James Katy Deacon Keating is the Director of theological formation at the institute for Priestly Formation Located at Creighton University in Omaha Nebraska. He's the author of numerous books including remain in me. Holy Orders Prayer and ministry spell so prayer in the heart of the jacket. Taking heating has led more than four hundred workshops on moral theology and spirituality and regularly conducts retreats and parish missions. The way of Mystery Eucharist and Moral Living Deacon James Kidding. I'm your host Chris McGregor. It is very important. Isn't it for us? Who are sitting in the Pew and we are watching observing. What's happening at the altar for us to truly have that. Understanding of who is offering the prayers were about to hear yes that is crucial for our religious imagination and in for our conversion as well. It's very easy for all of us to fall into the trap of saying. Oh I went to father. Smith's mass and Father Smith has idiosyncrasies. I don't agree with our. You knows homilies which long or too short or whatever and we politicize the mass and we personalize it Mass THE WAY. He does it or the way his actions are and we forget the whole sacramental imagination which is the whole mass is the action of Christ and it takes them spiritual and religious disciplined to actually see into that mystery that this is the actions of Christ again following them. What we said previously this is the great dignity of the priesthood. That Christ has called this individual man called him so he could be week before the mystery of the life death and resurrection of Jesus and allow that mystery to be uttered in his life as priest. Christ called him so that Christ could act in him and We reduce the mass to You know on the surface. A repetitive ritualistic boring ceremony. If we think it's bother smits mass or we put so much weight on father to be entertaining or to be witty or to you know to to make us laugh or it has nothing to do with this man. Father Smith this is the action of Christ of the same would be true of baptism when the water is being poured. It's Christ pouring the water when when the prayers of reconciliation or said in the sacrament of reconciliation. It's Christ saying the prayers Christ reconciling you two the father and so I think our participation in the mass and are rendering ourselves available to be taken by Christ into his mystery. We'll go much easier if we begin to practice the simple little mental discipline of perhaps saying as the mass begins. Everything that now transpires is the action of Christ. It's the action of Christ. Now if it's just something simple like that. So we take the pressure off of Father Smith not to be the leader of this This ritual that will make us feel good about ourselves or whatever we're looking for in a human level but no this is the action of Christ I I wish to be taken up into the action of Christ as well And Christ is using this priest as a of for all of us to enter the action of Christ. The prayer that's offered the eucharistic prayer is such an important of event. Such an important thing for us to participate in even though we may not be saying the actual words but we are called to be a part of it aren't we yes again participation. Does it mean talking to? You can participate very deeply in silence in the movies. Just take a a media example. People are are very active in the movies. They're they're engaged in the movies In you know walking down the you know the park lane you know holding hands with your wife or your husband. There's no words transpiring. You're very engaged you deeply participating in the event of walking together. Even though there's no words that are transpiring so we the people in the Pew. We're not saying anything during the EUCHARISTIC prayer Outwardly or Orly audibly. I mean But we are deeply participating in this. This is This is the time when we surrender ourselves the very depths of our being. This is the time when we offer ourselves when we entrust ourselves to this mystery. This mystery of having our whole lives taken up into the life death and resurrection of Jesus. So that whether I'm rich or poor sick or healthy I can never be separated from this mystery I'm surrendering to this mystery here as it's unfolding before me and to some extent. I thank God. We don't talk during Because we would perhaps get taken up into the words that were uttering similar in the early parts the mass perhaps when we all say the creed together and sometimes it just it just comes tripping off the tongue in a way. That is superficial here. We are silenced. In Christ takes over so to speak the words of Christ. This is my body. This is my blood. We are silence before his actions in his words and we entrust ourselves to his actions and his words eucharistic prayer is is our time to do that to entrust ourselves to Christ actions and Christ words now these prayers and the priests have many options. Repaying the EUCHARISTIC prayer. We're most familiar with the perhaps the eucharistic prayer number a number two which is said normally in a daily mass and then perhaps eucharistic prayer number. Three which is choice of a lot of priests for the Sunday Mass Eucharistic prayer number. Three BEGINS FATHER. Your holy indeed and all creation right the gift you praise We hear the EUCHARISTIC prayer number one and that one begins. We come to you father and a lot of times when people hear that when they you know he chose the long run you know. Why did it choose a long one? We've come to you father with praise and Thanksgiving. Because we're still in that mode of American pragmatism and it's all about getting in getting out getting the job done and getting on with our life so we hear the first eucharistic prayer a lot of times. We grown well. How did he choose that long? One we like you stick prayer number two. That's the shortest that means father's likes us. And he's going to get in and get us out and that pragmatism Is probably one of the first things we should bring to the mass to be cured to be healed. Nobody wants to. It's like when you go to the hospital. Visit someone very quickly. You're in you're out and the person feels like it was just a duty done. It was no real attempt on this person to sit with me to even have compassion to suffer with me somewhat. CaN'T WE HAVE SOME COMPASSION FOR CHRIST. And can't we linger with him in his mystery? Can't we have some compassion with Christ linger with him at the foot of the cross? We always have to be Americans in Arosh in out quick on with whatever next event we're going to When you're sick and in the hospital and some does that you you feel slighted you feel like an object. You feel like you were just something to check off on the on the list of what to do today and Analogically I think we can think of this with the with the mass as well Let's have some compassion for Christ. Let's linger with him as he suffers on the cross. Let's linger with him as he offers himself to us so that he and his great mystery of life may take up residence at us. Let's let's not be too in a hurry to miss this opportunity of surrender to salvation itself. Were you going? What's more important than surrendering to the mystery of salvation? Because obviously if we don't enter into salvation every other value of the day is relatively heist into meaninglessness. This is the pinnacle. This is the apex of the day of the week of the year of our lives. You going lie in such a hurry data to leave the presence of Christ so no matter. What eucharistic prayer the priests chooses. Let's rejoice in the fact that we have one. Let's rejoice in the fact that we have a priest who will actually offer salvation. I would just say that in in light of the theme of our our conversations here about moral living in the Eucharist. I would just say that. Perhaps you want to linger over the first eucharistic prayer for masses of reconciliation. Though this when you may hear sometimes in lent or or you may hear it. Special OCCASIONS ON RETREATS. I would encourage priests perhaps to pray more often. I think it's one of the more beautifully written of the eucharistic prayers in the preface of the of the EUCHARISTIC prayer number. One the mass for reconciliation. It says this time and time again we broke your covenant but you did not abandon US instead through your son Jesus our Lord you bound yourself even more closely to the human family by a bond that never can be broken. Now is the time for people to turn back to you and to be renewed in Christ or some beautiful that is in terms of our old our own anthropological nature. Right time and time again. We broke your covenant. Know anybody else. Any of the human would have given up. How many times can someone be unfaithful to you before you? Just get tired of the whole thing and humans. Seven Times seventy time then. God doesn't does not abandoned us. Time and time again we broke your covenant here were taking a whole suite of salvation history from the beginning in Genesis until the time that we are living in now. Our history with God is a history of infidelity. And God's response is always to never abandon us but instead to do something outrageous to join us in this life the second person of the blessed trinity taking on flesh coming down and joining us in this life so that the bond will absolutely be solidified and our imaginations will be fired with the love of God see how Christ has loved us see how God has loved us he is. He has become one with us. He didn't get mad after we broke the covenant again and again and still do. He didn't take all his toys and go home. He did something outrageous. You became one of us so that the bond could even be more deeply solidified so that we could adhere to him even more deeply. He became a human being very powerful preface. The other of implication in the mass of reconciliation in prayer number one is found in this very beautiful section which again brings to mind the importance of the connection between the Eucharist and moral conversion. When we were lost and could not find a way to you. You loved us more than ever the power of that when we were lost obviously talking here about sin when we were lost and could not find a way to you. You loved US more than ever again. Notice the contrast between what you would say a common human response and the divine response. This is why we begin this whole section of the mass with Holy Holy Holy. We're talking about a human being here with human responses we're talking about the divine mind the human responser. You're lost again. The implication of sin you've turned away from me or you're so lost forget it but here's the beauty when we were lost when we could not find our way to God. God loved us more. He didn't hate us. He didn't ignore us. He didn't leave us to our own devices. You can even hear parental claims. You made your own bed lion. That's not God's mind when we are lost when we cannot find your way. God doesn't abandon us. God loves us even more. There's enough truth in there to silence us for a long time of meditation. It goes on to say Jesus your son innocent and without sin gave himself up into our hands and was nailed to the Cross. So we were lost. We couldn't find our way. God loved us even more. He sent us the one without sin. And of course we send against the one without sin. That's great pathology. That's how pathetic we are that when the love comes to us we kill love when our salvation comes near we rejected and we don't think we need to savor and we don't think that we're sick and we don't think that we're pathetic all the help. Cain books all the self affirmation books piled high. The ceiling could never cover over the fact of the deep abiding wound within the human. That when help comes a lot of times we hate help and that is where we need the savior because the savior stands his ground even as he is spat upon and whipped a nail. To across. I love you even more outrageous. It goes on yet. Before he stretched out his arms between heaven and earth in the everlasting sign of your covenant desire to celebrate the Paschal Feast in the company of his disciples and then it moves into those famous words of Jesus. This is my body. This is my blood before he gave up his life. He wanted what he was about to offer to become indelibly marked upon the bride itself. You want it. The mystery to be indelibly marked so he was going to leave the mystery with us his love so great that his love for us was not just to be a memory to be recollected. He didn't want his love to be nostalgic. You wanted his love to be always present. It's a big difference in the way many people think of the Eucharist has nostalgia you. What are you doing at the mass? Well we're remembering the last supper. He wanted the exact opposite of that he didn't want us to enter into a nostalgia about what he did for us. He wanted us to enter what he did for us. He wants us to enter what he's doing for us. And that is that whole question of time at the baths which we've lost a sense of that. We really are at different time. Eternity is coming to meet us in. Pick US up and take us into this everlasting moment of God's divine love in Jesus. I'm going to give you myself and I'm going to give you myself for always and forever and here is the place where you can always have access to this giving. This is my body. This is my thought. And if you are a sinner if you know you're lost and if you know you could not find your way back and if you know that you wandered for many years please no. I love you more than ever. I'm not mad at you. I'm not your your weak and struggling parents God I can't do anything but love so you're no longer lost? You found your way back because I have come and search to out with my cross with my love in the form of bread wine in priesthood. So the EUCHARISTIC prayer we receive in silence. Could it be any other way? We'll return in just a moment to the way of mystery with Deacon James Skinny. Did you know that you can obtain a free APP? Which contains all your favorite discerning hearts programs Father Timothy Gallagher? Dr Anthony Lewis Archbishop George. Lucas Father Meritas filthy and so many more including episodes from inside the pages can be obtained on the discerning hearts free APP. This also includes all the no VINAS and devotional and prayers including the Holy Rosary and stations of the Cross. The tablet is Saint Michael and the seven hours of our lady. All available on the discerning hearts free APP visit the I tunes and Google play APP stores to obtain your free discerning hearts APP today. Litany of humility Jesus Meek and humble of heart hear me from the desire being esteemed deliver meet Jesus from the desire of being love. Deliver me Jesus from the desire of being extolled still ever meet. Jesus from the desire of being honored from the desire of being praised from the desire of being preferred to others. Don't ever meet Jesus from the desire of being consulted. Jesus from the desire of being approved deliver meet. Jesus from the fear of being humiliated. Deliver me Jesus from the fear of being despised deliver me. Jesus from the fear of suffering rebukes liver me Jesus from the fear of being colonial deliver Jesus from the fear of being forgotten. Deliver me Jesus from the fear of being ridiculed deliver me Jesus from the fear of being wrong deliver me. Jesus from the fear of being suspected deliver me. Jesus that others may be loved than I that others maybe esteemed more than I but in the opinion of the world others may increase and I may decrease that others may be chosen an. It set aside but others may be praised. And I noticed that others may be preferred to me in everything that others may become holier than I provided that I become his holy as I should. Jesus grant me grace to desire it all men. Hello My name is Dick Motta Gutierrez and I want to ask you to support this winning hearts in a special way. We even Chris Mcgregor the board and I all know the not. Everyone listening can help financially. We know we have listeners. From all parts of the world and we have made a commitment since the beginning to make the truth shared through discerning hearts. Totally free so while you may not be able to contribute financially which can do is certainly pray but also gives positive reviews on whatever platform you used to listen to us if at I tunes Android Stitcher spotify however it is that you get these podcasts. Or if you're on youtube and you like our videos please give us a good rating and write a review. The more good ratings and reviews we get. The higher profile in the more listeners will discover US LISTENERS. Who may have the means to contribute in the future? Please consider rating us in writing a positive review. Today we now return to the way of mystery the Deacon James It really is an onus upon us when the church calls us to full and active participation to take the time to enter into the profundity of the words that are being said the sentiments that are being offered the prayer that is being lifted up And not to be audience like in our pews sitting back. I mean it really. This is a mystical encounter. Isn't it my we don't want we don't want to be passive? See that the thing that we battle against. All the time is the crush of our own limitations. Crush of our own body the crush of the Pew was too hard. Or I've got an ache and my back now or I've got a headache or or the lights to Brighton. This church or this is real time that this great gift is being given to us within so we all struggle with. What's really happening? What what gift is really being given. And we can be distracted so easily. Why for many people leave. Essential Element of the mass is recollection before the mass and we touched upon this briefly in another show. I think but so important to underscore that as a pastor. Perhaps the pastor wants to come out before mass and say. Let's prepare for this mass by now. All being silent 'cause we got into this habit of using the sanctuary as a place to visit and those who might think otherwise are usually salted today. What you don't think the is about friendship and Community of course it. You can't even talk about silence in some communities today because it's always seen as an attack upon community if you don't have silence if you don't recollect it to receive this mystery then the very power to love the person sitting next to you the very power that you need to love the person sitting next to you will never be received because you'll miss it because you're not participated you just showing up. Silence is not in some sense that which separates us from each other as a Catholic community. Silences the glue that here's one each to teach to the other because if I don't receive the mystery of Christ loving his church despite our sinfulness. How am I ever going to truly love you? The personal lives down the block to me from me at my parish as you definitely will sin against me unless these people think. Catholic community is just a superficial veneer of friendliness or niceness and if they think Catholic community can exist. As superficial veneer friendless or niceness and of course they have no idea. What real communion is I can only love you in the power of Christ and you can only love me in the power of Christ and if I don't receive the power of Christ at Matt's because I missed it because I wasn't recollected because it didn't take time to enter into the mystery enveloped in silence. I will never love you. I'll be nice to you but I'll never truly will your good will. Your good is a power. That's beyond me a gift. I receive from participation in the Eucharist. So this the power of this section of the mass were. The actual gift is bestowed an all time stops. This has to be welcomed at a much deeper level than we normally welcome. The rush of the daily routine will miss it. Or we'll say that massive boring stupid or a waste of my time because it's the same thing every time I go if I'm not if I don't understand that I'm receiving at a much deeper level receiving. Ah being a much deeper level so that I can gift my being to you. Otherwise what's important is the donuts after the mass or something like that. That's that's helpful. That's nice but did the donuts after the mass. Empower me to love you. If you harm me in some way in my business you insult my wife. The power of the DONUTS. Give me some strength to actually will your good despite the fact that you heard me no. It's a ludicrous example. But this is the point. Christian community is much. Deeper than the superficial niceness willing the good for another can cost but willing the good truly bears. Christian community as carries us and we received the capacity to will the good to one another only if we have recollected ourselves to truly receive the mystery of the EUCHARISTIC prayer the Gift of Christ. His life is death in his resurrection kidding. You've been listening to the way of mystery the Eucharist and moral living with Deacon James Katie here and or to download this conversation along with hundreds of others spiritual formation programs visit discerning hearts dot com. This has been a production of discerning hearts in cooperation with the institute for Priestly Formation. I'm your host. Chris McGregor you help that. If this has been helpful for you that you will I pray for mission and if you feel as worthy consider a charitable donation fully text deductible to help support our efforts but most of all we pray that you will tell a friend about discerning arts DOT COM and join us next time for the way of mystery the Eucharist and moral living with he can James Keenan?

Jesus Meek Christ US Chris McGregor Father Smith Priestly Formation James Katy Deacon Keating James Kidding Nebraska DONUTS Director of theological Lucas Father Meritas Timothy Gallagher James Keenan Google Arosh youtube James Katie