18 Burst results for "Create Studio"

"create studio" Discussed on The Bancroft Brothers Animation Podcast

The Bancroft Brothers Animation Podcast

02:33 min | 5 months ago

"create studio" Discussed on The Bancroft Brothers Animation Podcast

"Again, everything kind of evolved from the initial projection on how we're going to get involved. I mean, I had my team and we had to know how on character creation. That's what we were doing already. And that's how we started. We even had an animator that we started doing as far as we started doing animation tests. Working with Alberto, and eventually things evolved in a way that Alberto took on on that and work alert. You correct me if I'm wrong or if some things are in a specific, but he has started to work with also with Marco Regina in a bunch of amazing amazing animators and that's the part that Alberto took on as well. So we started at the end eventually like the whole animation supervision in production just landed on the right side. And then the final renders and all of that went through your studio, Alberto. I mean, listen, I think it's a little bit unfair to say at this point. Who did what? As I say, Leo Sanchez and Pinkman TV, they exist because we needed to create studios in order to finance and put some order. But in a way, it was way more organic than that. And it was definitely like a fusion in any case. Because we were also working remotely and other pioneer kind of thing here. We were actually working under the same roof. We were actually all working in the same server. And as a director, I was very much supervising everything. But I could never say that, okay, this is just layers studio. This is just ping man. This is I think it was way more organic than that. At the end of the day, it's almost like two guys working in a living room, having a bunch of collaborators, and then later in order of make things more clear, we needed to separate tasks, I mean, we could ask a lot of the times this question probably, other people working on this ambitious short films that we do on our own. You need to follow at the end to this organic process because it's true that you can have it very defined in trying to do it by the book. But 15 minutes, short animated short with this, it is level of complexities and all of that..

Alberto Marco Regina Leo Sanchez
"create studio" Discussed on Louder With Crowder

Louder With Crowder

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"create studio" Discussed on Louder With Crowder

"The view was putting on a built bar sketch. Yeah no Jimmy kimmel has live in the name and it stayed at like three pm. Well here's the thing about live. People don't realize like when we switched over from You know went to kind of this live show at this link. Yeah i would get out of here and just be like exhausted because the entire time you are there is no cut. There isn't like hey. Let's that from the top again. Hey let's let's. I forgot the fact that i was about to quote can we. Can we go back and insert something right. There is none of that. You just have to be on a and to give you an idea hours. People like well am radio Let me give an example. Someone who's one of the best to ever rush limbaugh rush limbaugh never had to go more than twenty minutes without at least five minute break. Yeah wow you look at the radio. Yeah now that makes sense. What are the radio breaks. They're they're the short break. Is i want to say five minutes and we would have some seven eight minute breaks on the hour you know and it was about sixteen minutes of commercials in any given and that's not just it doesn't matter how big your audience is breath. Local businesses have to run those commercials. So i tell you this doing two hours like this is way more difficult than when it's exhausting radio. It's far far more content. If you're doing three hours am radio. You're actually doing about an hour. Twenty yeah with a lotta breaks but we love doing it because we had these conversations that were just so much. Fun me you in dave and in your dad and quarterback everybody in this room. And we're like how do you capture. That kind of energy had new hampshire that kind of fun just sitting around listening to us talk and sometimes you may be like whatever he's talking about sports at soccer who cares right but then another time a random joke comes up that if it was a program that was scheduled and rick prerecorded would probably never have come up now. This hilarious moment happens just naturally and you let it. It's yeah it's it's it's a lot of fun and also learning on. I didn't know that much. I didn't hear anything i smelt. I just knew that whole statement. They were poor swimmers and we need to accommodate them a lot of these guys today. Doing radio aren't they. Isn't there podcast. Just the same thing really the audio podcast radio show. Yeah yeah just packed different. There's nothing there's nothing wrong with that. It's just not what we do now. The amount of preparation is very different. And it's it's been Look it's been a lot of to to try and be ahead of the curve and to try and make sure that we can still have these conversations with you. And i will say it's a pretty cool community. I honestly don't have as much touch with you as as some of the other folks here because I just don't have as much time. And so i don't get real. That's kind of nice. yeah. I hate airports. The costumes are great but quarterback this this environment you created studios pretty good nice. It is tremendous in its health scape alike resemblance to well. That's been schrool appropriation month again. Stay tuned set your notifications on if you're on the blaze here too because there will be a lot of long form content going on this month july will not be live. We'll be back to first week of august with new not ticker ribcage. Four might take cage..

rush limbaugh Jimmy kimmel new hampshire dave soccer rick
"create studio" Discussed on LifePix Relationships With ST

LifePix Relationships With ST

08:02 min | 1 year ago

"create studio" Discussed on LifePix Relationships With ST

"My room. I was joking with someone yesterday. That my room was a sea of sparkle's is growing up. I was Was still like sparkles or beads or are paints or something you know and and so i was. I was Doing that and that was the case. All through school. Like except that. When i went but i also had a very strong interest because i had a great district in an academic parents And so so. What happened was that i wound up going. My did my first degree in history and the are scared me. Actually a lot of ways like it was like i thought i'd be dude lackey or different or something and then i realized that was kind of that was not exactly i liked i his history degree and using it. It's been a wonderful thing But art was really. I said you know history was where my head was that artless where my heart was and though So that's what happened. I wind up teaching and teaching. I got a job working in ontario housing. Which is kind of low income housing with different immigrant groups per summer. And i realized i loved it and so went into teaching and so i went into teaching and that rear was amazing. But i knew it's pointed. Come back to the arch. And i did when i retired a happened and i'm doing on it. Seems the starting. Be taking off now. Which is lovely wonderful. Yeah so wonderful. Is this piece behind you yours. Yes yes yes. I was noticing when we first arrived so beautiful ponting. Also there's like one on the floor or lower down only. it's not like netflix. You don't need in progress in progress on site needs a little work. Anyway so myra my roots are and to being an artist writer is much more. Tortuous dan much slower. So i start off when i was in high school. I was very good at math. And science and i went into University studying engineering and One of the toughest decisions lifeless to drop out of that program on student has top student in that program the dropout onto something inside me told me this is not right for me. This side Sold celebrate your inner wisdom and you're listening to that inner voice i just point point celebrated thinking. Oh my god. There's something wrong with by totally by did knows. My genuine south was somewhere else in actually teaching saved me. After i went for science. I went back into science. Did a master's program dropped out about to even have been well and i had twice. It happened that i realized. Oh my something about me. That must be crying for attention by real salt by genuine south whenever that was so luckily out when all that happened is just horrible because the good students embarrassing actually and my family and my friends who had probably been wondering. What's going on this guy. So what i did. I did a little bit of teaching in a lab in him. And when i was teaching likely once said to me one day he said you know. You're really helping this cars. You're you're good at explaining since the one person who need that one comment. And i can't remember who his name or anything but that changed everything i went into teaching and likely stance You know over. Twenty years teaching. And i ended up teaching economics. Which sprayed is. It's actually very people. Thank you slots in politics. Sociology economics business current events news so it's very messy subject which is great. I really enjoyed it. I time in coach cross country running around that and i started feeling more comfortable myself So my artistic side sir. Commoditised writing that novel about ten years. Who has a teacher can get it published. But that's not surprising enough. It's tough to crack into that market stuff. Since i left it on hold in i think serendipity hit too because Genetic engineering now is very very on top of mind. Subject more than what's crisper genetic engineering also self publishing much easier now so I was able to sell always just a few weeks ago and it worked out. I also art Around trying not as much as lynn. But i've been credit a he actually paint. He's very prolific when he does anything mark when mark does anything he does the town like. He's absolutely completely and utterly like into it and you know he so yeah. I'm a little bit into any. He's healthly created about one hundred and quite large paintings. Not know that we have you know so. It's not like he's not just started anyway but later on at friendliness. Oh helpful because She she helped me a little bit with the novel. She's a lot more. Because it's a great you have to share. Its studio down in this whole Factors cotton factory now over higher years alternate sir about created studios for artists and saloon. I have space next right next to each other. And lena's color expert. She really knows what's in car cohen. That people paint colors. I'm always asking for a guided eddie. Details okay what should i have. You guys really work together. We and mr good with a little detail. So i mc whole picture I tend to see whole picture can and then when it gets down to detail i start the breathing a lot so so i almost get pants and so so i can. I can map out very quickly but but it gets to the detail part sometimes and i also think the second half my life is about sort of figuring out that detail side like appreciating how each of you are appreciating each other and your your gifts in your skills and your naming. What the other person does that. Maybe you're challenged by the ways that they support you and inspire you and just really feeling the Not only are you good. At collaboration and teamwork. But you're also really such a sweet valuing and acknowledging of each other in this space. I'm sure overflows into other spaces too. If you can notice this strongly here. I have to say that One of the things Mark street good at a lot of things. He's you know he's obviously very intelligent. And and you know it's it's one of the things. He was very good at math and science. I wasn't quite as good in math and science. Like i could always understand it but again the details i press a calculator iraq or something like that and and And one of the things. That i i noticed was that originally. When he started taking up art. I was a little that he i like. Oh you're getting space and.

myra netflix ontario mark lynn lena cohen eddie iraq
"create studio" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"create studio" Discussed on WTOP

"Rondo County why YMCA employee has been arrested accused of sexually abusing a child 23 year old Vincent Dominic was a childcare associate at the Y M C. A on Ritchie highway. Police say they have surveillance footage showing him sitting on the floor with a child on his lap, engaging an unwanted sexual contact. He's charged with 1/4 degree sex offense and a Rondo County police are looking for other potential victims, asking anyone with information to contact them. The PSA says it will resume defense training for airline employees. Help is on the way for airline workers dealing with a growing number of unruly passengers. Federal officials say they will resume offering self defense training to airline flight attendants and pilots, The PSA said. The classes, which were stopped due to Covid 19 will begin again in early July end their optional this week, the FAA said. Airlines have reported more than 3000 incidents involving unruly passengers. Since January 1st. And while the agency hasn't tracked these reports in the past, a spokesman said it was safe to assume the 2021 numbers are the highest ever. It's a P correspondent Shelley Adler. Have you ever been to the Garden LX in Alexandria, Virginia. The event space hosts growing pride in the garden. Tomorrow. The garden is our event space, and we kind of came up with this idea that we're growing pride. Programmer and marketer Emma Quinn presents Arts and crafts from 15. L G b T Q. Plus makers and allies we've got Bradshaw sauces, clover and maple woodworking. Delray Metal works do good soaps, handmade jewelry, pottery. You can also Find plenty of activities for the family. Washington's women's football team, the D. C. Divas will be their kids create studio. They're going to be popping up hands on kids activities. The event is free, but $5 donations are recommended to benefit safe space. Nova Combating bullying of LGBT Q. Plus youth Jason Fraley, deputy of the news If you've ever listened to punk rock, you've no doubt heard music recorded in an Arlington studio. And now it's the end of an era for inner ear studio. It's evolution, Everybody.

Jason Fraley Shelley Adler Emma Quinn $5 Vincent Dominic YMCA FAA 2021 PSA early July 23 year old Rondo County Tomorrow Alexandria, Virginia January 1st more than 3000 incidents Arlington this week Ritchie highway D. C. Divas
"create studio" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"create studio" Discussed on WTOP

"81 in Washington, D C at 1 50. The T S a says it will resume defense training for airline employees. Help is on the way for airline workers dealing with a growing number of unruly passengers. Federal officials say they will resume offering self defense training to airline flight attendants and pilots, the they said The classes, which were stopped due to Covid 19 will begin again in early July, and they're optional this week, the FAA said. Airlines have reported more than 3000 incidents involving unruly passengers. It's January 1st. And while the agency hasn't tracked these reports in the past, a spokesman said it was safe to assume the 2021 numbers are the highest ever. It's a P correspondent Shelley Adler. A long awaited report from the federal government on UFOs makes at least one thing clear the objects are still unidentified. Investigators did not find extraterrestrial links in sightings of aircraft or other devices flying at mysterious speeds or trajectories. They drew a few other conclusions and instead highlighted the need for better data collection about what's increasingly seen by Democrats and Republicans as a national security concern, a task force examined more than 140 sightings of mysterious flying objects over the past two decades. Investigators found no evidence that the encounters most of which will buy US Navy pilots represented extra terrestrial life, but it does acknowledge that remains a possible explanation. It's BBC reporter Sophie Long, Scientists have announced that a massive fossilized skull at least 140,000 years old is a new species of ancient human. The New York Times reports the skull was found inside an abandoned well Researchers gave it the name Dragon Man for the Dragon River region of northeast China, where the skull was discovered. The team said that it not that Neanderthals was the extinct human species most closely related to our own. If confirmed, that could significantly change our view of how our even where our species homo SAPIENs evolved. Have you ever been to the Garden LX in Alexandria, Virginia. The events base hosts growing pride in the garden. Tomorrow. The garden is our event space, and we kind of came up with this idea that we're growing Pride program. Marie Marketer Emma Quinn presents Arts and crafts from 15 LGBTQ, plus makers and allies. We've got Bradshaw sauces, clover and maple woodworking. Delray Metal works do good soaps, handmade jewelry pottery. You can also find plenty of activities for the family. Washington's Women's football team. The D. C. Divas will be their kids create studio. They're going to be popping up hands on kids activities. The event is free, but $5 donations are recommended to benefit safe space. Nova Combating bullying of LGBT Q. Plus youth Jason Fraley wtlv News. Be glad you're not in Portland or Seattle unless you're like, really hot weather. Pacific Northwest is sweltering is a historic heat wave hit Washington and Oregon, with temperatures in many areas expected to top out 25 to 30 degrees above normal in the coming days. Seattle was expected to edge above 100 over the weekend and in Portland, Oregon, forecasters say the thermometer could sort to 108 degrees on Sunday, breaking an all time record. Heat wave shock to region accustomed to mild summers were many don't even have air conditioning. Just ahead in money news. Now that you're heading back time to look for a new job. I'm Jeff Global. It's 1 53. One of the reasons the MP 1 80 clients succeed is the personalized one on one coaching. Here's one of their coaches. I'm Kurt, one of the health coaches at the MP 1 80. Sometimes we men become a little complacent about how we look, I know because that's where I was £70 ago. Weight loss and being healthy doesn't have to be hard. We have a saying of the MP. We meet you where you are. If you've got some unhealthy habits that you think are impossible to give up. We work with you don't make small changes that will lead to big results..

Shelley Adler Jason Fraley Portland $5 Sophie Long Emma Quinn Seattle January 1st Marie Marketer Kurt 108 degrees BBC 25 US Navy FAA Washington Democrats Republicans Washington, D C Oregon
"create studio" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

06:51 min | 1 year ago

"create studio" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"The idea came around when the elections of two thousand sixteen happened for me was really striking. The fact that there could be someone winning and election with this curse of hate to our country's so big and then i realized a lot of things so first of all. Is that when this person won the election. I realized two very important things first of all that. The only possibility of at the scores like these to permeate nine able to be agreed on these a lack of nollet a lack of understanding of the situation. I always when i find something so problematic. I always try to find something productive to do with this. I learned for my dad. He always had assigned in his office. Saying if you come with problem and you don't bring us lucien you still part of it. So for me is not bringing a solution. Bill is doing something. No it's being proactive about it. And so i started thinking with friends and colleagues in mexico that world complaining on the situation what to do we got together and we said that they were three ways of dealing with the situation. The first one was thinking on the professional level how we could start bringing projects to the table to open up. Opportunities or tackle issues of people having to migrate knows on the understanding of migration and how migration has shaped places and cds. No and how we could create possibilities are in on. Those communities are on those realities second novel. We said okay. We could also work individually with our social political agenda. No each of us could decide. What is your social political agenda involving yourself in produce or maybe being more insistent with politicians attended and the third one we said it was a productive line of work was the academia. I'm interested though because in many ways it doesn't seem like an architectural project or design project. It seems well. It seems like a study almost in sociology or politics. I mean what is this. Tell me well. I believe architecture social it should be way more thought from the social from the human point of view but it is definitely architecture. He's about space is about physical ground any about their geographical relationship of these two countries and the construction of the social within space. And i think that one of the important issues for me was that in any school any given school in both sides of the were there we have been really lacking the opportunity of understanding the subjects in deep completely by overlooking the history the development of the history of european architecture or ent like texture. No and these missing these regarding they history of the creation of these two countries as a reference. I mean when i was growing up i barely knew who frank lloyd. Wright was literally. I'm not kidding. And this is why. I did thirteen studios to make it a point. You know like of really the importance of the understanding of creating studios that would promote the idea of understanding their existence in these two countries not and they relations because it's truly instrumentally has become symbiotic in all other aspects of life nor the us won't exist without the relationship that has built with mexico. Mexico one exist is without their relationship that has built with the us. So i invited friends that i know untold limp guys. Do you want to join this idea. And you could develop any type of relief to work with your students but in needs to tackle any issues regarding their relationship between mexico and the us so this is where really arising topics because they're million topics infinite possibilities of really tackling of understanding what can space enable or these able within these and their historical issues geographical issues economical issues. Culturally shas religious. I mean you name it one of the things. I found super interesting from the book. And this is going quite micro and obviously the book and the project spans out. Looks very specific. Things was this idea of remittance houses. You know where people go to collect money from relatives. Perhaps who are in the us and sending money home which is a big source of income for lots of people in mexico and just how that has affected the urban landscape how these buildings of really helped construct urban areas. it was fascinating thing to look at their remittance. Has this is sorta huge topic because there are many angles on which to see them. And they are shaping the full landscape. Nope you've said before. You may even have said to me once architects kahn. Save the world. But i'm sure you hope. Expect this project and now this book will make some difference. Just tell us to what difference you hope it will make. I don't think i can do any change. Or as i said i don't think architecture contains the world but i think certainly we could build platforms for anyone to produce change and we do that all of us then. We're able to do a lot. So i always have decided to start and to put a foot out there and i hope that this book is something like that. My thanks to architect tatyana bilbao. She was speaking to monaco's ed stock to sell to the border reimagining. The region is published by school of architecture and laws mile publishers. And it's available for purchase. Now and that's all for this way if you're eager for more design stories. Listen to our full length. Program airing on tuesdays eight pm. London time. Today's episode was produced by mainly evans. I'm nick mesa. Thank you for listening and kabar..

tatyana bilbao frank lloyd evans mexico nick mesa two countries Wright Today Bill both sides third one tuesdays eight pm second novel one first one each first lucien thirteen studios two very important things
"create studio" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"create studio" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

"It's so much harder for you so apparently trying to unionize i graduate since mike many universities across the us and that's very large part of it. We don't have a say in our contracts in the expectations in how much we get paid are how many hours were supposed to be working. Leave no safeguards for an advisor. Wants us to work hundred twenty hour weeks. We really don't have a way to combat batman so that's a large part of our unionization efforts is really just trying to take back some agency in our working conditions and really be recognized for the value that we have and the way that we contribute to stem and to the against I gross. we're always trying to redefine success. And i'm so curious. How has that changed for you at or when did it change. Why did it change. I think as i've grown in my advocacy and then my involvement is placed much value on my communities and addressing. The needs of others is like a selfish brat. Before but i think i find myself thinking about my community and people that i may or may not know but that i can help by stack shins that i can take and so i think chimi success is doing good friday people for me whether it's doing science and learning something that the world of know before or that is a helpful clinical use for example like a pharmaceutical or if it's educating on disability discrimination and there's so much you can do that really reaches beyond you and your immediate community can be such a wide definition are all doing good his success to me. Well emily this was such a pleasure. Oh my god. I've had so many. I opening moments and and i really really appreciate everything that you've done in of your work even personally and even in academia. You're always trying to figure out a way to do good and it's such a good reminder that could be your north star. I really really appreciate that. Yeah thank you so much for having me. If you wanna learn more about emily's work you can check out. Emily ackerman dot com. And if you learn more about folks with disabilities and disability rights you can check out the disability visibility project dot com pro boss. Radio is a production of i. Love created studio. Original music composed by this episode was produced by juliana clark the mining leonard christopher nolan and courtney. Cossack engineering was done by stephanie lar- with help from venus shah. Our editorial director is clermont's special. Thanks to taylor nor agency and kaley until next tuesday..

stephanie lar taylor juliana clark kaley Emily ackerman courtney hundred next tuesday emily dot com friday leonard christopher nolan twenty hour agency venus shah clermont chimi Love
"create studio" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"create studio" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Same old cheese, but okay, bye. Must ease with no cheese. No deals, No G's no wheels and no mobiles and me because I can finally afford to provide my family with those two. Gotta create studio with assault on the tracks at the golf collect hanging up in the office in back of the house like you think it might freeze, please about I think talking three you think brought you the oldies ice cubes. A deal's a deal Dodgy and the police If you take for the public good you want to go to the doctor Told you to go See? Nobody listened closely. You see that for a reason, right thinking? No, y'all don't like me. Nowadays, everybody wanna talk like they got something to say. But it comes out on the declaration that they forgot about grace. What do you say Somebody You hate anyone trying to bring some with away one of his old days and wait one day I was walking by walking on when a guy gives you know what Don't do not harder than me trying to park right next to you won't be talking around trying to walk it off. You walking only address next down house. Start the day. It's a new shop into a hot oven instead of babies these days with the brain does when it goes up to the mate. He's sorry, Doc. But I'm being crazy, isn't me. It's okay. Go with Haley. Days, everybody.

"create studio" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

Habits and Hustle

05:55 min | 2 years ago

"create studio" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

"Owe It is coming back with another season and we are no. Yeah. Kobe's wearing everything through you know across or including its uniqueness filming. Can you fill budgets are so many things happening right now? So but I think that's you accepted you doubt and whatever the next new providence. What is your daily life like? Day in the life of of Evie. Now, with your like, what do you do when you wake up? What time give me your day to day routine my daming teasingly our daily routine day. Usually wake up around six hundred seven. Grand fluctuate but is usually between six and seven. I wake up right away and I always chain her ray I changing out from working at home unchain Ali shoes in the house when her morphine like I really kind of shifting work mobile the first thing I do is. I. Get Myself Out of the House right away. So I go to starbucks or Dunkin donuts vices, nominee obligated rings the or some kind of beverage I do drive go outside immediately after vice. Brought to use your. Dunkin. Like I go on the House but in Sweden I wouldn't allow sugar. That's where. Issue but I go out. Crazy. Crazy I go out I come home immediately go into work mode. So I'm a day my shoes will sit in my office because now roll-call mid on kangaroo. On but I did adapt like created studio at home. So I did certain things to embrace situation out and sometimes they'll have to travel. It's rare. Now sometimes, I'll have to go out usually doing my work from home on from my Home Office pending what I have in the around I'll get myself in twenty minutes thirty minute lunch break while completely check out a simple way for myself in an alley without watch something entertaining. Let my. That's just a have to myself a great than I go back into it in around six or seven like today. Around, seven PM have Jitsu. So once I said that go on, I'm done I. Go into my nineteen might routines. Do most of my Straw outside of work soda routine is some kind of workout. So today's going to be Jitsu. Tomorrow might be running the day after might be working out in my garage, but every day do something physical..

Home Office Dunkin donuts Dunkin Kobe starbucks providence morphine Ali Sweden
A new TV network aims to lure a generation brought up on video games

The Esports Minute

00:55 sec | 2 years ago

A new TV network aims to lure a generation brought up on video games

"Presented by e sports network you might have seen then it's the latest attempt at making Studio Gaming Shows Twenty, four, seven cable TV, and it's backed by some pretty big people among the founding partners are area horn the mastermind behind League of legends broadcast saw dragon descend into the bird's nest a feat that won him sports. Emmy. Twenty eighteen. On launched, the premier show seems to be the download five hosts including former cheddar host Aaron Ashley Simon Bring on celebrities to talk gaming. Other shows include guesthouse gray area and then arcade live premium gaming TV content is making a comeback. Then is one notable example but vice sports also announced a partnership today with the Gaming Agency to create studio shows and g four the longtime leader in this space is making a comeback in

Gaming Agency Aaron Ashley Simon League Of Legends
"create studio" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

05:55 min | 2 years ago

"create studio" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"It's anything dot com I'm your host, Jennifer Viola, and I'm really pleased to be welcoming the folks from vital space is we have a Hana Yo column Who's the program director, and Jonathan Boyd, the executive director. Welcome Thank you. So bios. Bases is a fairly new organization. You can tell us a little bit about how you all started the organization you your mission is to sustain and enhance Santa Fe DS cultural vibrancy by creating affordable spaces, artists working in all kinds of media. And so, Jonathan, How did the organization come to be? Sure I a long time ago, had a background, doing some real estate investment and then became a furniture maker and my experience as a sort of coming on to the scene and being a furniture maker and realizing how accessible downtown market sort of spaces downtown are, too young and upstart businesses and arts really made me aware of that, and that just post with all the vacancies that I constantly saw, rotating through a downtown This as 90 years. Well, we are in arts destination. Why isn't something taking advantage of these vacant spaces and bringing the sort of young and vibrant energy that Santa Fe wants to show its tourists to our city and that's sort of the seed that started and grew over time and Through talking to clients through talking to other organizations on the big steps that the problem at the trajectory of vital spaces took was connecting with Anita Durst, who runs an organization in New York. That's basically Our model. I mean, she has been doing it for 25 years and she's flown out here and I threw out there. We used her model of engaging with temporarily spaces to create studios, and she helped us really get moving quickly. Sure, Yeah. So you do do you to create studios as well as exhibition spaces? It certainly started in my mind as more of an exhibition space because that's where I was in my thinking, But as soon as we got our first building on Otero Street The immediate need from the community Wass studio space, and I was envisioning this large exhibition space for artist showing their work and everybody just said, We don't have a space to create our work. We need a space tow have studios and so the project Being young and nimble, quickly responded to that and shifted our focus to creating mostly affordable studios. Well right now, that has to be really important for folks because I mean things have there were empty spaces before the pandemic. I can only imagine What is going Tio continue to be like during this, You know, really rough period of times. That's a great thing that you all are doing. How many different exhibitions have you have? Hannah? You're the program director. Tell us a little bit a little bit about your role in the organization. Yeah, I came on in October, so I haven't been with the organization too long. But my role as weapons and leaves have been adapting to what's needed. So the switch from exhibition to studio. I think Jonathan then hopes that artists would just use the space and do their own work. We're realizing that we needed more. Public facing projects as well. So I helped organize exhibitions and workshops and events. And so we've had. We have Ah. When we could we used to have open studios. A number of one person shows in a storefront on state makes on band. We have multiple exhibitions planned, but of course, are waiting until we're allowed to be open. The windows on the future, which we get to shortly but is exhibitions installations in Windows across Albuquerque, Santa Fe and House in partnership with the physio Project 5 16 Arts and that was a way to get Old money out to the artistic community because we're paying artist a statement for these installations and to also get work out invisible while our exhibition spaces are closed. Well, it's that's why I ended up calling you. Well. I saw one of the installations that is on Yana Street. And it's Janet Bosnians and use their name. Yeah, and that was just so incredible to see. And she has thes mannequins is sort of like a mix of Passion and color as well as they're all wearing masks. And, you know, the kids have masks on that. Even the dog has a mask on and I thought that was really interesting. And so that's part of a larger exhibition that you're doing, right? Yeah. So, Yeah, That's a great plan. It's really the tongue in cheek. Her idea was that high fashion would quickly catch up with the future in wit. We have to wear, not just masks that has not suits right. And so it looks light hearted but also fairly postapocalyptic. And then that's one. Uh, 20 Windows today, So that's a lot of windows. So are they. Is there an official opening for Windows on the future? I mean, official opening date. It opened July 1st. Okay. So is open on and the windows will be open through at least a month of July. It depends on the spaces were hoping some of them can stay open after that. Right Mass on our website at vital spaces dot order that lists all of the installations and have addresses so you could go find the great, That's great..

Jonathan Boyd program director Santa Fe Anita Durst Jennifer Viola executive director official New York Hannah Albuquerque House
"create studio" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

05:53 min | 2 years ago

"create studio" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"I'm your host, Jennifer Viola, and I'm really pleased to be welcoming the folks from vital space is we have a Hana Yo Holim, Who's the program director and Chalk and Boyd, the executive director. Welcome Thank you. So bios. Bases is a fairly new organization. You can tell us a little bit about how you all started the organization you your mission is to sustain and enhance Santa Fe DS cultural vibrancy by creating affordable spaces, artists working in all kinds of media. And so, Jonathan, How did the organization come to be? Sure I a long time ago, had a background, doing some real estate investment and then became a furniture maker and my experience as a sort of coming on to the scene and being a furniture maker and realizing how accessible downtown in market sort of spaces downtown are too young and upstart businesses and arts really made me aware of that. And that just post with all the vacancies that I constantly saw, rotating through a downtown This as 90 years. Well, we are in arts destination. Why isn't something taking advantage of these vacant spaces and bringing the sort of young and vibrant energy that Santa Fe wants to show its tourists to our city and that sort of seed that started and grew over time and Through talking to clients through talking to other organizations on the big steps that the problem at the trajectory of vital spaces took was connecting with Anita Durst, who runs an organization in New York that is basically Our model. I mean, she has been doing it for 25 years and she's flown out here and I threw out there. We used her model of engaging with temporarily spaces to create studios, and she helped us really get moving quickly. Yeah. So you do do you to create studios as well as exhibition spaces? It certainly started in my mind as more of an exhibition space because that's where I was in my thinking, But as soon as we got our first building on Otero Street The immediate need from the community Wass studio space, and I was envisioning this large exhibition space for artist showing their work and everybody just said, We don't have a space to create our work. We need a space tow have studios and so the project Being young and nimble, quickly responded to that and shifted our focus to creating mostly affordable studios. Well right now, that has to be really important for folks because I mean things have there were empty spaces before the pandemic. I can only imagine What is going Tio continue to be like during this, You know, really rough period of time. So it's a great thing that you all are doing. How many different exhibitions have you have handed her? The program director? Tell us a little bit a little bit about your role in the organization. Yeah, I came on in October, so I haven't been with the organization too long. But my role as weapons and weeds have been adapting to what's needed. So the switch from exhibition to studio. I think Jonathan then hopes that artists would just use the space and do their own work. We're realizing that we needed more. Public facing projects as well. So I helped organize exhibitions and workshops and events. And so we've had. We have Ah. When we could we usedto have opened studios. A number of one person shows in a storefront on state makes Andi We have multiple exhibitions planned, but of course, are waiting until we're allowed to be open. The windows on the future, which we get to shortly but is exhibitions installations in Windows across Albuquerque, Santa Fe and House in partnership with the physio project and by 16 arts, and that was a way to get Old money out to the artistic community because we're paying artist a statement for these installations and to also get work out invisible while our exhibition spaces are closed. Well, it's that's why I ended up calling you. Well. I saw one of the installations that is on Yana Street. And it's Janet both knees and use their name. Yeah, and that was just so incredible to see. And she has thes mannequins is sort of like a mix of Passion and color as well as they're all wearing masks. And you know, the kids have masks on that. Even the dog has a mask on and I thought that was really interesting. And so that's part of a larger exhibition that you're doing right? Yeah, So, Yeah, that's a great one. It's really the tongue in cheek. Her idea was that high fashion would quickly catch up with a future in which case we have to wear, not just masks that has not suits right. And so it looks light hearted but also fairly post about electric. And then that's one. Uh, 20 Windows today, So that's a lot of windows. So are they. Is there an official opening for Windows on the future? I mean, official opening date. It opened July 1st. Okay. So is open on and the windows will be open through at least a month of July. It depends on the spaces were hoping some of them can stay open after that. Right Mass on our Web site at vital spaces dot order that list all of the installations and have addresses so you could go find the great, That's great. So if you're just.

program director Jonathan Santa Fe Anita Durst Jennifer Viola executive director official Chalk New York Boyd Janet Albuquerque House
"create studio" Discussed on The Dr. Susan Block Show

The Dr. Susan Block Show

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"create studio" Discussed on The Dr. Susan Block Show

"Just spit me. <Speech_Music_Male> Fit <Speech_Music_Male> facebook <Speech_Music_Male> instagram twitter. <Speech_Male> An equal I <Speech_Male> take a whole lot. <Speech_Male> Talk live in the building. <Speech_Music_Male> They talked <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> build. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Okay and Justin <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> jocks. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> You're on. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Where do we find <Speech_Music_Male> you? <Speech_Music_Male> Oh <Speech_Male> you can go to chuck's <Speech_Male> leather DOT COM <Speech_Male> or Drexel E. J. O. X. <SpeakerChange> L. I. <Speech_Music_Male> on twitter and <Speech_Music_Male> other days. <Speech_Music_Male> Hey did you like <Speech_Male> the magazine. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> You Got Phenomenal magazine. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Not only <Speech_Male> because you took <Speech_Male> a picture <Speech_Male> and some other <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> but it is a phenomenal <Speech_Male> magazine and we <Speech_Female> will be celebrating <Speech_Male> the magazine. <Speech_Male> The Birth <Speech_Male> of this new <Speech_Female> print magazine. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I'm <Speech_Male> the launch <Speech_Male> of speakeasy <Speech_Male> journal this <Speech_Male> coming Saturday. <Speech_Female> June nine <Speech_Female> if you tuned in <Speech_Female> live <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> you know splashing <Speech_Female> art baby <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> we'll also <Speech_Female> be celebrating. <SpeakerChange> Somebody's <Speech_Music_Male> birthday <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Male> where's <Speech_Male> Dave <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> he's creating studio <Speech_Music_Female> yeah right? He's <Speech_Female> doing his <Speech_Female> so <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Anyway We're <Speech_Female> we're going to go <Speech_Male> in a moment <Speech_Female> <hes> but <Speech_Female> <hes> <Speech_Male> check out the <Speech_Male> blog. <hes> <Speech_Male> the Bonobo way at <Speech_Male> Dom Khan <Speech_Male> L. A. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> support your local <Speech_Male> whore <Speech_Female> and <SpeakerChange> your international <Speech_Female> hor <Speech_Female> all divorce <Speech_Female> be supported <Speech_Male> whether you're John <Speech_Male> or Jane <Speech_Male> or <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Female> know it's <Speech_Female> it's time <Speech_Male> it's time <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> make <Speech_Female> like Bonobos <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> not babboons <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> make love <Speech_Female> not <Speech_Female> war <Speech_Female> make love to someone <Speech_Female> you love tonight <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> even <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that someone is <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> you. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Don't forget the American <Speech_Male> Express. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Well <Speech_Male> maybe you <Speech_Male> don't charge yourself <Speech_Female> but if you WanNa talk to <Speech_Female> an you <Speech_Female> need that so <Speech_Female> anyway I love <Speech_Music_Male> you <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> bye. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Talk <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> Talk <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> Talk about <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> can talk to. <Music> <Advertisement> I <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> took <Music> <Advertisement> it <Music> <Advertisement> but

"create studio" Discussed on Posts – Imagely

Posts – Imagely

07:49 min | 2 years ago

"create studio" Discussed on Posts – Imagely

"Welcome to the wordpress photography. podcast the PODCAST for photographers. Who Want to learn how to get the most out of wordpress to grow their photography business. You don't need to be a key to understand. wordpress settled back. And listen as we show you how. Now here's your host Scott Widen Kipah wits. Welcome to episode ninety five. This is Scott. When give wit's end today we're going to continue with the topic on Instagram. And I have one goal with this with this episode of the podcast and it is to show you that if your photographer with under ten thousand followers on instagram you. You can actually do a swipe up feature in your instagram stories. You have to do is sort of a hack work around in order to make it happen. Yeah you can't just do it like somebody who actually has ten thousand followers can do it where it's built in you have to do do a workaround so I'm gonNA show you using facebook's crater studio if you are not using crater studio. I recommend it especially to upload your instagram Graham Stories. Anything you make on your computer that you want to upload to your instagram you can actually post to your feet and to your TV. Which which? You're GONNA need as well by connecting your Creator Studio on Facebook to your instagram account. Now all this does if you go to business dot facebook dot com mm slash creator studio and Create Studio being one word in that. You are L.. Then you can then connect your instagram account. You Graham Account and your facebook page and you then have access to edit modify and also post to your instagram feed your instagram stories and your ide- TV so what you would do once. You're all set up with that. Is You. Make sure you're in the INSTAGRAM TAB. Go to create post choose. I G. T. V. Instagram TV. And you'RE GONNA go ahead and you're going to create a new post to your instagram accounts. And yes as you just saw. If you're watching this episode then you probably saw that you can actually connect multiple pages and multiple interim accounts to the Creator Studio that Israeli Nice. Then you will go hand you upload the file you can import it from your facebook page age. If you have stories that create our facebook page and you want to utilize or you can actually go to file. So I create all my stories inside of final Caprio and So I do it. Just upload that file that created there you can also upload a custom image if you want and of course has to be a vertical image but you can upload a custom image you then they're gonNA and create your title so this is my amazing title. That is the title. I'm going to use the sample title and then I have these emojis that I use that that I include include I haven't many apple note and just copy and paste them here and you can see that there's too if you're again watching this episode. I have a down Arrow and a mouse click. There is no touch Like tap phone emoji. I wish there was but I can't find that really works. Well so basically is saying you. You can Tap to look down and then the description. Here's where the fun hack comes into play in the description of I g ATV you can put a euro and that you are. Ill is click -able on the phone right whereas if you were using an instagram degrom post normal in your feed and you put a url is taxed. They don't make it tap applicable on the phone. Which means that. If you're sharing a blog post host in you WANNA say go to this blog post and you type it in and you have to say or visit my Lincoln Bio in click the link in the bio and that's annoying so the work around is saying saying okay. Here's the link to the blog posts. Right you put in your your L. to the blog post and any description. This is my amazing description. And you put that in for the. Id TV episode the TV TV episode. You're making and then you hit publish or you can actually schedule schedule. It you can schedule your TV and also your feed all INCR- studio. It's really nice to do on the desktop. Now I mean I use buffer as you saw in the last episode I actually buffer for episodes ago. I use a buffer to schedule my instagram posts but for stories and ID TV. I'd do it all in Creator. Studio could just so much easier Whenever I have one that I've created on the computer not on my phone. I I mean okay so you po you publish that right you have all done next thing to do is actually go and create an instagram story. So we're going to go ahead and create a story story. I'm GonNa say this is my story and say swipe up now of course you. Can you could add in Buchanan sticker song to add a swipe up sticker and obviously the colors ingrates. I'M GONNA change the color ever go. This is my story. Swipe up and now what you're GONNA do. And there's a link icon. You're going to click that link icon and choose the I G ATV video that you just created Nigga hit done. And now what's going to happen. Is that in your in your story. There's going to be for people. Watching coaching is going to be that. Swipe up a feature and when they swipe up it's actually going to take them to the story so when they swipe up they're gonNA see this. They're gonNA see the Youtube TV episode. You created you can see the title will have the Emoji which is more visible and when they go to click it. It's going to bring down the description without link and then they can click the link and they can get to the page you want them to get to it. Is that simple. But it's still a hack that you have to do unfortunately only if you don't have the right amount of of of subscribers if you don't have ten thousand which is not your fault. I mean it it it. It happened and not everybody has a goal of getting to ten thousand followers. Not Everybody needs to get to ten thousand followers for their photography business. If you're not there you have a way to do a swipe up with a little bit of extra work rather than swiping up and going right to the oral that you're saying there swiping up and they're going to you wouldn't do TV which then will then send them to the link. You want them to go to so there you go. That is episode ninety five. I can't believe leave worry episode ninety five. I hope you're enjoying this sort of multi part series on instagram. What would be really cool if I can get to episode ninety nine all on Instagram. That is my goal and that way episode. One hundred will be something super special. I don't know what it would be but but I'm still working on it I'm if you think that'd be cool to have Matt Molin Wig. Come on the world. Press photography PODCASTS. Matt Mullah Wag is the the original creator of wordpress please just ping us on twitter instagram. Wherever it is Facebook Ping US and just say I want. I want you to get Matt on episode one hundred. Thank you for watching. Thank you for listening. Check out the show not imminently dot com slash. podcast slash ninety. The in the next exit was it. You've been listening to the word. Press Photography podcast to listen to other episodes and subscribe to the podcast by. I tuned Stitcher pitcher. Google play and more. Please visit image Lee Dot Com forward slash podcast..

facebook instagram Create Studio wordpress Scott Google Caprio Matt Youtube Matt Mullah Wag Matt Molin apple G. T. Buchanan twitter
"create studio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:20 min | 3 years ago

"create studio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"With gusty winds along the coast will continue through the weekend in northern California the National Weather sense of service as temperatures will remain below normal at least through Monday sitting in for Terry gross imagine what it would look like if a rhino a leopard a grizzly bear an ostrich a wart hog an alligator a double headed turtle a giant clam awardee pig a striped tree frog and thousands of other animals came to a photo studio to sit for their portraits that's never going to happen. so Joel Sartori does the next best thing he creates a version of a portrait studio wherever the animals are. Sartori is a National Geographic contributing photographer and fellow. in addition to his assignments in the wild he's taken on the project of documenting the world's animal species that are currently under human care in other words a representative of each animal species in zoos wildlife rehab centers and aquariums. these are animals who are on the verge of extinction or are endangered or may soon be his goal is to document them before they disappear. he hopes the by taking beautiful photos of them more people will care about these animals and ensure that they have a future for the benefit of the animals humans and earth's ecosystem. his project is called the photo arc and when Terry gross spoke to him in twenty seventeen he'd already photographed sixty five hundred different species and published an accompanying photo book since then he's published two more photo work books the latest called vanishing the world's most vulnerable animals came out this month. Jill so Terry welcome to fresh air so why did you decide to do animals who are under human care as opposed to animals in the wild because a lot of animals in the wild that aren't going to be represented in your art projects sure there's millions of species in the wild and there's you know about twelve thousand maybe thirteen thousand animals in captivity the reason is because I've never been able to talk a tiger into walking out of the way and I sat and posing just can't do it you're not very good at this hour you know I'm not I'm not a. fact I haven't even tried so the reality is that the animals that are in captivity around the world they are they're they're used to people they've been around people their whole lives born raised and so it's it's it's just much easier to convince them to get to come into a room and most time we shift animals into a room that's been prepped with black and white either paint or cloth or paper and then we feed them during the shoot it takes a few minutes then there then they leave you know so most time they just think they're coming in to get lunch by the time I get there well I love that you photograph them in the studio typeset setting you basically create studios in the zoo or the wildlife center by setting up a white background and floor or that black background and floor right so what do you want to photograph them in that kind of setting as opposed to like in there in a setting that they live in in sure and sure in whatever you know either cage or wildlife sending. they have in their refuge yours who were the right well I mean I I did that for a long time I I I've been a National Geographic photographer for twenty six years some like that twenty seven and I photographed the first fifteen years or so out no while doing stories of different conservation stories story on walls on grizzly bears on quality all in the wild and can I say that move the needle enough to stop the extinction crisis now no it did not so I just figured maybe very simple portraits lit exquisitely seeing see the beauty in the color looking animals directly in the eye with no distractions would be the way to do it and also on these black and white backgrounds with no nothing to have is a size comparison amounts is every bit as glorious as an elephant and a tiger beetle is every bit as big and important as a tiger so it's it's a great equalizer and the majority the animals that are in the photo work are not are not guerillas rhinos in polar bears they're they're mice and their toads in their sparrows in their their animals that will never have their voices heard before they go away before they're before their lead off to extinction. so I feel it's a big responsibility to show them all equally and give them equal care and give them an equal voice no it's funny it's like the animals are making eye contact with you because you photograph them looking into the lens right there looking into my eyes when I look at the photo that's right because of the kind of studio setting that you create reminds me a little bit of like if the animals had like graduation photos. send them to the studio to get the photos that then can be framed and put on the wall. yeah that's right I mean it is it is a series of pictures pictures like that just exactly like that we we just want to show the animals looking their best and to get people drawn in into the tent of conservation to realize that all of these animals are important and valuable and in worth preserving I mean after all. really we will stand to lose about half of all species by the turn of the next century twenty one hundred and it's really folly to think that we can do half of everything else to extinction but that people will be just fine I mean we we have to have pollinating insects to to bring us fruits and vegetables few one thing selfishly so we have to have healthy intact rainforest to help not only regulate climate but but to make sure our rainfall stays stabilized in and predictable and consistent in places like Nebraska where I live where we grow crops to feed the world so really as these creatures go so do we I love seeing the photos of animals that I'm familiar with like you know a leopard rhino but there's a lot of animals in your book that I'm really not familiar with including the Bengal slow Larus. the little baby Laura say that you have yeah so the Larson's in hand like a customer right so many holding it just for scale I guess because right tiny nice it's a big round eyes in the select adorable fuzzy hair perfectly round face right like tiny little creature how old was the Larson what is a Bengal slow loris well he's just he's just a little primate and I believe that was photographed with that photographed in Vietnam perhaps our wildlife rehab center. they have you know that a lot of these rehab centers have animals that have been confiscated from the pet trade the mothers have been killed in their sold in the pet trade and and so you're looking at something just a few weeks old in it and it's a primate that needs a abundant attention and care which is which of the places I work at and so you seem a little baby there that needs all the help in the world to make it to adulthood then at we have centers you know the grown back up the condition and live in the wild how to find the right food and off they go again so big fan of wildlife rehab centers in general. so there's a lot of animals there must be really easy to get to pose like the little baby Larus that fits in the palm of the hand but then you've got a bison and people tell you you're not gonna be able to get a bison to pose for right or to to even go into little studio tent that you set up so what do I have to do to get the bison photo right well I should explain to folks like for small animals we work with animals that again the the the institution knows that the animal will tolerate going into a little crate or kennel they're trained and they they let him go out back out into into a little tent but for an animal like a bison there's no tent big enough that's a good way to get her to so so what they did is they paint this is that the Oklahoma City zoo and they painted an offer exhibit space black then we waited a day we painted it white and we let her in there were using mulberry leaves they could literally Parker on a dime using mulberry leaves they had a herd of bison they were named after the characters on Gilligan's island. she was Marianne and they they just put it right there on the diamond they didn't think that she would do it but we put the lights up in the ceiling so she couldn't get into armor or reform down the chords are all tied up against the ceiling up in the beams and then they just put they just put right there right there and she'd stand there all day long is really remarkable. the yeah now she knows just she's standing on on a painted backdrop in a painted floor and then they would give her mulberry leaves and when she finished the last leaf and look up at me and say Hey Marianna should look at me and and then the I get a picture and then they'd feeders more leaves to keep her there and she just you know she was just having lunch because she was used as a backdrop so it's very nice that way so there's a lot of advance work that goes into these pictures obviously months of work to go to one zero just in the prep. I'll tell you what when we take a short break here and then we'll talk some more about the animals that you photographed for your ark series and the me reintroduce you here my guess is Joel Sartori and he's a photographer contributing photographer for National Geographic news trying to document all of the animals under human care in zoos and aquariums and the photos are really beautiful we'll be right back this is fresh AIR. this is fresh air and if you're just joining us my guess is Joe also Tory he is a contributing photographer for National Geographic and the project he's been working on for over ten years is the photo arc project and is goes a photos of all of the animals under human care in zoos in animal rehab centers and aquariums and he's gotten over six thousand of those photos done already in other words over six thousand animals he's documented. we're talking about like. doing big animals and small animals so another big animal that you did was a grizzly bear and so yep yeah I mean Grizzlies can be very dangerous which I'm sure you've learned the hard way in the wild. guess you photograph them in both places but I have been doing the grizzly bear and in the zoo was the grizzly bear pretty accustomed to humans did you have to do anything to protect yourself you know we if it's a big animal like that were always working behind a protective barrier some sort you know usually wire metal but in this case you know again the this space is prepped it's paid for a big animals practice painted white and painted black and that was at the center county zoo in Wichita Kansas they get the space ready the bears used to come in there to have lunch will offer exhibit space and exit the pictures are taken while he's eating when every looks up in between tidbits I think was raw meat he looks up we get his picture looks like he's smiling any goes back to it and then the photo shoots over when the we usually when the animal gets full that's it for the photo shoot a lot of food motivation there so that so no no danger at all and I listen to what the staff of the zoo says in terms of how close together just never a problem so compare the experience of photographing a grizzly in these controlled circumstances for your army series to photographing a grizzly in the wild well tell yeah it's a it's a lot easier photograph them in captivity and you don't get charged. I did an entire story and Grizzlies for the geographic years ago and I remember getting charged on day three of the assignment because you know if your pictures aren't good enough you're not close enough the old saying goes and so. got too close to a mother with her cubs in Alaska and I just remembered her charging at me it looks like she was just looked like she was shot out of a cannon she moved so quickly and I couldn't run away if I'd wanted to my my feet I didn't even know I had legs to move I just stood there with my mouth open and she didn't touch me but it I thought what is gonna be a long assignment at eight weeks ago so. it's just a it's a lot better working with animals that that have been around people their whole lives you know lot lot better hold on hold on I don't think you finish the story she came at you like a cannon you couldn't move and then what and then what then she stopped I don't know she stop close enough to me that I could smell her breath when she snorted at me. and I stood there and I mean it was just seconds and then she kind of turned around and try to back to a cubs they were feeding on salmon at at in cat my national park in Alaska.

Joel Sartori Terry gross Grizzlies Alaska California representative Wichita Joe Jill Kansas twenty six years fifteen years eight weeks ten years
"create studio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:02 min | 3 years ago

"create studio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Editor of the website T. V. worth watching sitting in for Terry gross imagine what it would look like if a rhino leopard a grizzly bear an ostrich a wart hog an alligator a double headed turtle a giant clam awardee pig a striped tree frog and thousands of other animals came to a photo studio to sit for their portraits that's never going to happen. so Joel Sartori does the next best thing he creates a version of a portrait studio wherever the animals are. Sartori is a National Geographic contributing photographer and fellow. in addition to his assignment in the wild he's taken on the project of documenting the world's animal species that are currently under human care in other words a representative of each animal species in zoos wildlife rehab centers and aquariums. these are animals who are on the verge of extinction or are endangered or may soon be his goal is to document them before they disappear. he helps the by taking beautiful photos of them more people will care about these animals and ensure that they have a future for the benefit of the animals humans and earth's ecosystem. his project is called the photo arc and when Terry gross spoke to him in twenty seventeen he already photographed sixty five hundred different species and published an accompanying photo book since then he's published two more photo work books the latest called vanishing the world's most vulnerable animals came out this month. Jill so Terry welcome to fresh air so why did you decide to do animals who are under human care as opposed to animals in the wild because a lot of animals in the wild that aren't going to be represented in your art projects sure there's millions of species in the wild and there's you know about twelve thousand maybe thirteen thousand animals in captivity the reason is because I've never been able to talk a tiger into walking out of the way my sense imposing just can't do it you're not very good at this hour you know I'm not I'm not a. fact I haven't even tried so the reality is that the animals that are in captivity around the world they are they're they're used to people they've been around people their whole lives born raised and so it's it's it's just much easier to convince them to get to come into a room and most time we shift animals into a room that's been prepped with black and white either paint or cloth or paper and then we feed them during the shoot it takes a few minutes then there then they leave you know so most time they just think they're coming in to get lunch by the time I get there well I love that you photograph them in the studio typeset setting you basically create studios in the zoo where the wildlife center by setting up a white background and floor or that black background and floor right so what do you want to photograph them in that kind of setting as opposed to like in there in a setting that they live it in certain sure in whatever you know either cage or wildlife sending. they have in their refuge yours do or the right well I mean I I did that for a long time I I I've been a National Geographic photographer for twenty six years some like that twenty seven and I photographed the first fifteen years or so out in a while doing stories of different conservation stories story on walls on grizzly bears on quality all in the wild and can I say that move the needle enough to stop the extinction crisis now no it did not so I just figured maybe very simple portraits lit exquisitely seeing see the beauty in the color looking animals directly in the eye with no distractions would be the way to do it and also on these black and white backgrounds with no nothing to have is a size comparison amounts is every bit as glorious as an elephant Anna a tiger beetle is every bit as big and important as a tiger so it's it's a great equalizer and the majority the animals that are in the photo work are not are not guerillas rhinos in polar bears they're they're mice and their toads in their sparrows in their their animals that will never have their voices heard before they go away before they're before their lead off to extinction. so I feel it's a big responsibility to show them all equally and give them equal care and give them an equal voice no it's funny it's like the animals are making eye contact with you because you photograph them looking into the lens right there looking into my eyes when I look at the photo that's right because of the kind of studio setting that you create reminds me a little bit of like of the animals had like graduation photos. there is some of them to the studio to get the photos and then can be framed and put on the wall. yeah that's right I mean it is it is a series of pictures pictures like that just exactly like that we we just want to show the animals looking their best and it to get people drawn in into the tent of conservation to realize that all of these animals are important and valuable and in worth preserving I mean after all. really with will stand to lose about half of all species by the turn of the next century by twenty one hundred and it's really folly to think that we can do half of everything else to extinction but the people be just fine I mean we we have to have pollinating insects to to bring us fruits and vegetables you want think of it selfishly so we have to have healthy intact rainforest to help not only regulate climate but but to make sure our rainfall stays stabilized in and predictable and consistent in places like Nebraska where I live where we grow crops to feed the world so really as these creatures go so do we I love seeing the photos of animals that I'm familiar with like you know a leopard rhino but there's a lot of animals in your book that I'm really not familiar with including the Bengal slow Larus this is a little baby Laura say that you have. civil arses in hand like it was my right so many holding it just for scale I guess because right tiny devices I ground armies in the select adorable fuzzy hair perfectly round face right it's like tiny little creature how old was the Larson what is a Bengal slow loris well he's just he's just a little primate I believe that was photographed with that photographed in Vietnam perhaps our wildlife rehab center. may have you know that a lot of these rehab centers have animals that have been confiscated from the pet trade the mothers have been killed in their sold in the pet trade and and so you're looking at something just a few weeks old in it and it's a primate that needs a abundant attention and care which is which of the places I work at and so you're seeing a little baby there that needs all the help in the world to make it to adulthood then at rehab centers you know the growing back up they condition and live in the wild how to find the right food and off they go again so big fan of wildlife rehab centers in general. so there's a lot of animals and must be really easy to get to pose like the little baby Larus that fits in the palm of the hand but then you've got a bison and people tell you you're not gonna be able to get a bison to pose for regular to achieve and go into little studio tent that you set up so what do I have to do to get the bison photo right well I should explain to folks like for small animals we work with animals that again the the the institution knows that the animal will tolerate going into a little crate or kennel they're trained and they they let him go out back out into into a little tent but for an animal like a bison there's no tent big enough that's a good way to get her to so so what they did is they paint this was at the Oklahoma City zoo and they painted an offer exhibit space black then we waited a day we painted it white and we let her in there were using mulberry leaves they could literally Parker on a dime using mulberry leaves the had a herd of bison they were named after the characters on Gilligan's island. she was Marianne and they they just put it right there on the diamond they didn't think that she would do it but we put the lights up in the ceiling so she couldn't get into armor or rhythm down the chords are all tied up against the ceiling up in the beams and then they just put they just put right there right there and she'd stand there all day long is really remarkable. the yeah now she knows just she's standing on on a painted backdrop in a painted floor and then they would give her mulberry leaves and when she finished the last leaf and look up at me and say Hey Marianna should look at me and and then the I get a picture and then they'd feeders more leaves to keep her there and she just you know she was just having lunch because she was used as a backdrop so it's very nice that way so there's a lot of advance work that goes into these pictures obviously months of work to go to one zero just in the prep. I'll tell you what when we take a short break here and then we'll talk some more about the animals that you photographed for your ark series and the me reintroduce you here my guess is Joel Sartori and he is a photographer contributing photographer for National Geographic news trying to document all of the animals under human care in zoos and aquariums and the photos are really beautiful we'll be right back this is fresh AIR. this is fresh air and if you're just joining us my guess is Joe also Tory he is a contributing photographer for National Geographic and the project he's been working on for over ten years is the photo arc project and is goes a photos of all of the animals under human care in zoos in animal rehab centers and aquariums and he's gotten over six thousand of those photos done already in other words are six thousand animals he's documented. we're talking about like. doing big animals and small animals so another big animal that you did was a grizzly bear and so yep yep I mean Grizzlies can be very dangerous which I'm sure you've learned the hard way in the wild. guess you photograph them in both places but I have been doing the grizzly bear and in the zoo was the grizzly bear pretty accustomed to humans did you have to do anything to protect yourself you know we if it's a big animal like that were always working behind a protective barrier some sort you know usually wire metal but in this case you know again the this space is prepped it's paid for a big animals practice painted white and painted black and that was it the Sedgwick county zoo in Wichita Kansas they get the space ready the bears used to come in there to have lunch little off exhibit space the back zip the pictures are taken while he's eating when every looks up in between tidbits I think was raw meat he looks up we get his picture looks like he's smiling any goes back to it and then the photo shoots over when the we usually when the animal gets full that's it for the photo shoot that a lot of food motivation there so that so no no danger at all and I listen to what the staff of the zoo says in terms of how close together just never a problem so compare the experience of photographing the grisly in these controlled circumstances for your army series to photographing a grizzly in the wild well tell yeah it's a it's a lot easier photograph them in captivity and you don't get charged. I did an entire story and Grizzlies for the geographic years ago.

Joel Sartori Terry gross Grizzlies Editor representative Sedgwick county zoo Wichita Kansas Jill Joe twenty six years fifteen years ten years
"create studio" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"create studio" Discussed on WSB-AM

"On business here on WSB presented by Georgia colleges. Jay, Whitney bunting college of business. I'm guest host John Waterhouse and this week we're chatting with Michael to Vanni founder of Switzerland's downtown club a startup hub right here in Atlanta. Now, Michael let's talk a little bit about switch yard studios. What does that all about? Yes. So we. I saw a ton of founders that you know, they might have been two weeks into their idea. They quit their job. They're about to invest a bunch of money and spend the next year of their life trying to make something birth something into the world. And we saw a lot of those founders making common mistakes. Right. So they were acting too slow. They were spending too much money building their product they weren't getting enough test out they weren't validating in early on with an MVP. And so we created studios to kinda help these founders because there's a lot of like, I say, it's art and science. There's there is science to to to startups thought all science, but there's some science to it. That's just been done time and time again. And so ultimately, we created kind of a founder happy places. What we call it where founders can can accelerate their learnings on things that have happened a million times before so getting a landing page up getting an MVP up getting the first version of the app up and not spending too many cycles in too much money on the things that don't really matter. That's why we created studios folks, marketing matters and lens. Knows marketing from brand strategy to advertising digital marketing public relations. Thanks smart. Thank creative thank lens. Learn more at L E N Z marketing dot com, and you're listening to lens on business here on WSB presented by Georgia colleges. Jay, Whitney bunting college of business. I'm guest hosts John Waterhouse talking here with Michael to Vanni founder of switch yards downtown club. Michael can you share with us some of the best success stories that come out of switch yards?.

WSB Whitney bunting college of bus founder Michael John Waterhouse MVP Jay Georgia Switzerland Atlanta two weeks
"create studio" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

03:09 min | 3 years ago

"create studio" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Brutus well compete did a series of contests for the best does show the blue ribbon. How about that? That was Betty white announcing that by. Car was Popeye. He'd have that stat Kansas spinach. By the way, the spin it whole spinach thing Popeye with his day kind of kind of weird accent? Yeah. The the forearms resembling. Mark the voice guys forearms you. Spinach to great effect sort of sort of an anti kryptonite gave him his strength, perhaps his distinctive speaking style. But why do you ask why did Popeye eat so much spinach? What was the reason for his obsession? Well, the first batch was given to them for free in the early liked it. And so they made them pay a little more for the second batch. And before you knew it. He was hooked that. Was it never looked back. That's right. Spinach gateway vegetable truth begins more than fifty years earlier back in eighteen seventy Aaron von wolf. Wolf Eric actually on wolf Eric von wolf, German chemist examine the amount of iron within spinach. You see? Among many other green vegetables as you mentioned the gateway to the other green vegetables in recording his findings von wolf accidentally misplaced a decimal point when transcript. On wall came in here. I want to see a in it. If you miss. Misplaced places decimal. Well, gee, boss shock. Not really familiar with Dewi sorry, recording his findings von wolf accidentally misplaced the decimal point when transcribing data from his notebook changing the iron content in spinach by an order of magnitude while they are actually only three point five milligrams of iron in a one hundred gram serving of spinach. The accepted fact became thirty five milligrams. To put this in perspective. They say if the calculation were correct with each with one hundred gram serving would be like eating a small piece of paper clip. I don't know. I don't know. But that's what they say. I'd rather have the spinach I think now I'd rather read the paper clip versus versus Brussels sprouts. I'd rather eat the paper clip and just me. Now, what if they had kale's choice? Paper clip wants it's incorrect number was printed. Spinach is nutritional value became legendary. So when Popeye was created studio executives recommended he eats spinach for his strength due to its vaunted health properties. So Popeye then apparently helped American consumption of spinach by a third.

Eric von wolf Popeye Wolf Eric Betty white Brutus Mark Kansas Brussels Dewi Aaron one hundred gram fifty years