35 Burst results for "Cram"

Migrants smuggled through border fence before SUV crash in California

The Savage Nation with Michael Savage

00:48 sec | 1 d ago

Migrants smuggled through border fence before SUV crash in California

"Deadly crash along the US Mexico border this week entered the US through a hole in a fence along the border, The Border Patrol says a Ford expedition and Chevy Suburban drove through an opening in the border fence in Southern California. Suburban caught fire and the migrants have been inside were taken into custody by border patrol. The expedition, though continued on and ended up colliding with a big rig that was hauling two trailers. 25 people have been crammed inside the expedition. 13 people were killed in the crash. 10 of them were identified as Mexican citizens. Many of the others were injured and those injuries ranged, as did the ages. Of those who were inside the vehicle from 15 toe over 50. Border Patrol says this part of the fence they entered through was built before President Trump's wall was Jessica

Border Patrol Chevy Expedition United States Suburban Mexico Southern California Ford President Trump Jessica
13 killed in California crash allegedly breached Mexico fence, entered US illegally

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:37 sec | 1 d ago

13 killed in California crash allegedly breached Mexico fence, entered US illegally

"Hours and 19 minutes later, more than a dozen people killed in an SUV crash in California had just entered the U. S. The 13 people killed yesterday were apparently in the U. S illegally after the vehicle they were in enter the U. S from Mexico through a hole cut into a border fence. This, according to the Border Patrol. Surveillance video shows the Ford Expedition, which carried those who were killed, driving through the opening shortly before the fatal crash took place. Ah, second vehicle is Chevrolet Suburban also drove through both vehicles, believed to be part of a smuggling operation were crammed with people. The expedition with 25

U. Border Patrol California Mexico Expedition Ford Chevrolet Suburban
"cram" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

06:17 min | Last month

"cram" Discussed on Developer Tea

"And i try to answer questions Many of them recently have been about Game stop stocks. So i have to wear those but Won the came today was about The the problem of having a teacher that doesn't like you and specifically is overloading. You and the other students with work in the seems to be a problem. We face in school and it is a problem because this is a really bad way to learn. Research shows that That if you try to cram in a bunch of information it's going to go out as quickly as it came in. Now what's interesting is. We don't need recent research to kind of gain this insight in fact way back in the first century. Ad sinica said this. He said since the mind when distracted absorbs nothing deeply but rejects everything which is so to speak crammed into it. Think about offer. Second the mind when distracted absorbs nothing deeply but rejects everything which is crammed into it. When it's when we distracted would not going to absorb anything. We don't need research telesis. We can experienced this. Many of us already do experience this and yet for some reason. Our intuition tells us that we can cram things or a collision -nology to this not just cramming but we can multitask. We can try to do more than one thing at once. So there's two things going on here. I is the speed at which we are trying to put information in their minds and the second is the parallel of whatever. We're trying to do whatever trying to put in our minds as well and to be very clear when we say parallel we're not talking about switching from one task to another which has different type of overhead. We're talking about actually trying to do two things at once which is nearly impossible. Our brains are not good at this. We're very bad at trying to retain a lot of information all at once. So what is it exactly about this intuition. Where does it come from. Why we believe this. And what do we do about it. Well i it should be noted that the vast amount of information that we have available to us now is new. We haven't had this much information in our world in any generation before this of course we've always been in kind of increasing information levels but more recently the increase has been exponential. And for this reason. We don't really have an evolved state for understanding this vast array of information so instead resorting to that we have that may not necessarily represent what our brains are actually good at doing if you imagine what we evolved to do which is to make sense out of a limited amount of information and compare that to what we're having to do now is try to filter out the information. That doesn't matter. We still don't really know how to do that. And so filtering out information. That doesn't matter tends to look less logical and more emotional but getting back to the point of. Why are we believing that we can cram all this information. Part of that is because we've never been faced with this much information before and we evolved to be able to generally understand a very large relative share of information so in other words our group of people we all had about the same amount of information and most that information was the same information. We didn't have this highly heterogeneous mix of information that the internet has certainly provided to us and so we don't really know how to control what information we should or shouldn't be taking in because there's a fire hose of that information perhaps and this isn't necessarily proven it's just the theory. We are trying to respond to the fire hose by cramming all of that information and as quickly as we can. But here's my advice for you today in this friday refill. And as you go into your weekend. I want for you to number one except except that you will not be able to even come close not even a fraction of the available information. Will you be able to even lay is on much less evaluate and absorb and then secondly to change your environment. Change your habits. Change your physically. You could go into your phone and change the way that you receive information rather than that information being pushed at you and you having to face that information change that dynamic to where you are seeking out the information yourself. What does this do. It means that you are selectively filtering. What information comes to you one way to do this. Very practically speaking is a turn off your notifications and this achieves another goal. That's related to that original cynical quote. It helps us be less distracted. And when we're less distracted we can focus on the things that we really care about that filtering mechanism. We're talking about. We can find that filter again. Thank you so much for listening to this episode of friday refills. This is a part of developer. Tif you enjoy this conversation you would probably enjoy the rest of this podcast. You can subscribe in whatever podcasting app you're currently using. Thanks so much for listening in until next time. Enjoy your teeth..

today two things second Ad sinica Second one task more than one thing first century this one way once secondly Tif friday
Rape cases increasing at alarming rate in Seattle's King County this year

News, Traffic and Weather

02:55 min | Last month

Rape cases increasing at alarming rate in Seattle's King County this year

"Rape Investigation and South Seattle. It's part of a disturbing surge in sexual assault cases right now, police are at the Arab motel on the East Marginal way they're Boeing Field. Most droll Marino is there now with what police found Joel. Mm hmm. Mary Impression Officers arrived arrived to to find find a a naked naked woman woman at at this this motel motel behind behind me. me. They're They're still still searching searching for for the the man man who who attacked attacked her. her. Now Now you you take take a a look look back back here. here. There There is is a a patrol patrol unit unit still still behind behind the crime scene tape. But at one point, this parking lot was crammed full of police vehicles and investigators still out there gathering evidence really that one of those troubling things about all of this is the number of rapes being reported so far this year. Officers have swarmed this motel along East Marginal Way after witnesses called 911 in the sexual assault unit was mobilized. We got called here tonight for multiple 911 callers who reported that there was a naked woman who was holding a gun. Officers arrived and contacted the the woman woman and and we we are are now now investigating investigating a a possible possible rape. rape. This This crime crime comes comes on on the the heels heels of of another another rate rate from from earlier earlier this this week week that that began began at at a a bus bus stop stop in in the the center center of of the the junction. junction. Under Under the the main main business business district's in west Seattle. I'm surprised it happened right here. Yeah, I would say this is pretty bit brightly lit, and, um, you know, it's the junction so it does seem like it's surprising that right here but Investigators say a man started groping a person waiting at the bus stop. When the person tried to get away. The man chased after then raped the person in an alley before Cove in there would be the theater or the restaurants. And there were people around always probably because no one's around as much like There's not as many people around so you can get away with stuff easier. Officers did arrest the man near a Starbucks and prosecutors have since charged him. They say if the 20th rape case they have pursued in court so far this year, we're seeing a pretty concerning start to the year so far. It's not the trade that we want to see. Investigators are trying to figure out why rape and other assaults are on the rise. But they say each case has its own unique circumstances. It's hard to say if it's one thing or another. Now they're always looking at the numbers, and we've got somebody who runs just as to try to find those trends. Give me another live. Look here at the crime scene. Now. We asked if the woman here at the motel was holding a gun to defend herself after being sexually attacked. Police say they're still trying to piece it all together, and they're trying to track down that rapist. Back to you. Very disturbing, Joel. Thank you. Sexual assault and violent crime in general have been on the rise in King County. The attack in west Seattle is the 20th rape case filed by prosecutors. Just this year in 20 2187 rape cases were taken to court, though that number doesn't include the last few weeks of December. Still, it is more than in 2019 when 117 cases were filed in King

Arab Motel Mary Impression Boeing Field South Seattle Marino Joel Seattle Starbucks King County
Rape cases increasing at alarming rate in Seattle's King County this year

News, Traffic and Weather

02:29 min | Last month

Rape cases increasing at alarming rate in Seattle's King County this year

"Rape Rape Investigation Investigation and South and South Seattle. Seattle. It's part It's of a part disturbing of a disturbing surge surge in sexual in sexual assault assault cases cases right now, police right now, police are at the Arab are at the motel Arab motel on the East on Marginal the East Marginal way they're way Boeing they're Boeing Field. Field. Most droll Most Marino droll Marino is there is now there with now what with police what police found found Joel. Joel. Mm hmm. Mm hmm. Mary Mary Impression Impression Officers Officers arrived arrived to find to find a a naked naked woman woman at this at motel this motel behind behind me. me. They're still They're searching still searching for the man for the who man attacked who attacked her. Now her. Now you take you a take look a back look here. back here. There is There a is patrol a patrol unit still unit behind still behind the crime the scene crime tape. scene tape. But at one But point, at one this point, parking this parking lot was lot was crammed crammed full full of police of police vehicles vehicles and investigators and investigators still still out there out gathering there gathering evidence evidence really really that one of that those one troubling of those troubling things about things about all of all this of this is the number is the number of rapes of rapes being being reported reported so far so this far year. this year. Officers Officers have swarmed have swarmed this motel this motel along along East Marginal East Marginal Way after Way after witnesses witnesses called 911 called 911 in the sexual in the sexual assault assault unit unit was mobilized. was mobilized. We got called We got here called tonight here tonight for for multiple multiple 911 911 callers callers who reported who reported that there was that there a was a naked woman naked woman who was holding who was a holding gun. a gun. Officers Officers arrived arrived and contacted and contacted the woman the woman and we and are now we investigating are now investigating a possible a possible rape. rape. This crime This crime comes on comes the heels on the of heels another of another rate rate from earlier from earlier this week this week that began that began at a bus at a stop bus stop in the center in the center of the junction. of the junction. Under the main Under the main business business district's district's in west in Seattle. west Seattle. I'm surprised I'm surprised it happened it happened right here. right here. Yeah, I Yeah, would I say would this say this is is pretty bit pretty bit brightly brightly lit, lit, and, and, um, um, you know, it's you know, the it's junction the junction so it so does it seem does like seem it's like surprising it's surprising that right that here right but here but Investigators Investigators say a man say a started man started groping groping a person a person waiting waiting at the bus at the stop. bus stop. When the person When the person tried to tried get away. to get away. The man chased The man chased after after then raped then raped the person the person in an alley in an alley before before Cove Cove in in there would there be would the theater be the theater or or the restaurants. the restaurants. And there were And people there were people around around always always probably probably because because no one's no around one's as around much as much like like There's not as There's not many as many people people around so around you can so get you can get away with away stuff with stuff easier. easier. Officers Officers did arrest did arrest the man the near man a near Starbucks a Starbucks and prosecutors and prosecutors have since have charged since charged him. him. They say if They the say if 20th the 20th rape rape case they case have pursued they have pursued in court in court so far so this far year, this year, we're seeing we're seeing a pretty a concerning pretty concerning start to start the year to so the year far. so far. It's It's not the trade not that the trade we want that to we see. want to see. Investigators Investigators are trying are trying to figure to out figure why rape out why rape and other and assaults other assaults are on the are rise. on the rise. But they say But they say each case each case has its has own its own unique circumstances. unique circumstances. It's hard It's hard to say to say if it's if one it's one thing thing or or another. Now another. Now they're always they're looking always at looking at the numbers, the numbers, and and we've got we've somebody got who somebody who runs just runs just as to as try to to try find to find those trends. those trends. Give me another Give me live. another live. Look here Look at here the crime at the crime scene. scene. Now. Now. We asked We asked if the woman if the woman here at here the motel at the motel was was holding holding a gun a to gun defend to defend herself herself after after being being sexually sexually attacked. attacked. Police Police say they're say they're still still trying to trying piece to it piece all together, it all together, and and they're trying they're to track trying to down track that down rapist. that rapist.

Motel Arab Motel Marino Droll Marino Joel Boeing Field South Seattle Mary Mary Seattle Boeing Cove Cove West Seattle Starbucks Police Police
Los Angeles County outdoor dining returns with new COVID-19 rules

The John Phillips Show

05:11 min | Last month

Los Angeles County outdoor dining returns with new COVID-19 rules

"Okay, so you'll have to correct me if I'm wrong when I described this, But there was a skit I want to say in the nineties when Alec Baldwin used to guest host all the time. And the skit Woz. He was operating a dirty cake shop. And people would go in and they would try to buy all these various kinds of dirty cakes, and he would suggest a cake with a woman sitting on a toilet. And then the customer would be disgusted and they would leave and then the next one would come in and the sales pitch would be exactly the same. He would lead him in that direction. And every customer that came into the cake shop. Got that same pitch. Do you remember that's get Try to remember that one. I gotta look that one up. Yeah, that's worth checking out on YouTube. That character in that skit kind of reminds me of the L A times is wrong, Lynn because every question that he asked, is, Do you feel vindicated for setting all the restaurants down? He asked it to Barbara. For rare, He asked it to the mayor. In fact, let's listen. Let's listen to him. Ask that question to Barbara Ferrer. Our next question comes from the line of Ron Lynn. Ron, your line is open. Please go ahead. Hi doctors and supervisor Thanks so much for talking with us today really appreciate it. We have questions for you today. Dr Pereira and supervisor on whether you're vindicated in the public health strategy Project room key and when teachers will get vaccines, first doctor further, and Supervisor L. A county received criticism and lawsuits from some restaurant owners on the outdoor dining ban. County data shows that virus transmission rates started dropping around the same time as the outdoor dining ban and the safe ride home order were issued, which occurred a week ahead of the ST Stay at home order. Does the current good news vindicate your efforts to ban outdoor dining and imposing early, safer at home order? Okay. Now, let's get a completely different question. For l. A mayor Eric Garcetti. I'm deeply feel vindicated that you backed the public Health department here because you know, there's a lot of public criticism. You know about this, but In the end, the public health Department was right. That really bad circles coming on. I just want to know what you thought about that. Thank you. You should really work in a dirty cake shop. Joining us to talk about this and much, much more. Is Fox 11th Film Illusion. Bill Welcome. Hey, John. Thanks for having me, man. That's quite a Quite a variety of questions there. Yeah. You know what? Um, I heard the same thing I was listening in on the DPH pressure the other day. When I heard that question asked in my my job kind of hit the floor. I understand. Ron later explained that he was talking about That our number that health officials like to talk about you know how many people get infected by one single person, he says. That number got lower, but I mean, look at any chart after the outdoor dining band went into effect, our numbers shot up like a missile straight up right afterwards. And if you were we remember at the time supervisors Catherine Parker and Janice Hahn They voted against it. They were concerned that hey, if we shut down outdoor dining, where essentially going to be forcing people indoors, going into the fall going into the colder weather? We're worried people are going to congregate indoors more. And you know, people can debate the outdoor dining ban all they want, but the fact is In the months after it. We went into our worst surge ever, and we're still not out of it. Um, so I don't understand why it would be asked of health officials that they feel vindicated for that. Um, it was just bizarre from my perspective. Well in L. A doesn't operate in a vacuum. We have other cities and other states that air doing similar things and one of the reasons that the city of Chicago decided to reopen their bars and restaurants. I believe for not just outdoor, but indoor dining as well. Was because they realize that by shutting all of them down what they did was, they pushed everyone into crowded little apartments or Grandma's kitchen for Christmas or whatever, and that caused their numbers to explode. The same thing happened in Los Angeles. Yeah. And now they're taking another page out of the exact same playbook. They today they're letting outdoor dining reopen with the caveat that TVs have to be turned off s. Oh, So now the idea is, obviously they don't want people gathering at sports bars and restaurants to watch the Super Bowl next weekend, right? So what they haven't learned. What are people going to do now? Okay, so they don't want him watching it outside. They want to take the outdoor option away. What are people gonna do? Instead? They're gonna watch it indoors. They're going to go to private parties at home. They're gonna watch it. It have people over to watch the game. I would think health officials would want people outside in the fresh air at lower capacity. Rather than crammed inside of private homes. Um, but, hey, I'm not a health expert, but it just seems it just seems logical. So, yeah, they're reopening the outdoor dining today, but TV is has to be gone or turned off.

Barbara Ferrer Ron Lynn Dr Pereira Eric Garcetti Public Health Department Alec Baldwin Bill Welcome RON Catherine Parker Janice Hahn Lynn DPH Barbara Youtube FOX John Chicago Los Angeles Super Bowl
Axios CEO Jim VandeHei On Media Post-Trump

AdExchanger Talks

07:39 min | Last month

Axios CEO Jim VandeHei On Media Post-Trump

"A lot can happen in four years for years ago. Donald trump was being sworn in as our forty fifth president and also four years ago. Axios was founded and delighted to have jim van high co founder and. Ceo of axios with me here today. Great to be here. So and congratulations on your four year anniversary. Thank you we we started. We actually moved up our launch because we interview with donald trump so our first term matched up with his first term. We can leave it all of you to decide what better i show while. I wanna talk about the future of media in the airhead recording this the day after biden's inauguration actually has grown up under the trump presidency in our in this completely new political moment with the biden administration coming out of the first day of the new regime. What are you paying attention to. Yeah i mean we at axios. We cover a broad range of topics so politics technology media business and in the political sphere. Obviously we're spending a lot of time. Thinking about how joe biden the presidency will unfold but also how it will unfold in this kind of wild and wacky media environment where you've got you know roughly half the country that doesn't trust anything that the mainstream media produces and you have this rise in the number of people who believe things that aren't true and i don't think we've ever been here's a country where we've been the last couple years. We just have so much distrust in so much misinformation and so much propaganda in so much of a taking root with people that you and i would say other serious smart people and yet they don't believe the same things that we believe even if a to us they're fact base and that's a huge problem in that environment is going to be surrounding joe biden. And you can't extract politics or biden from media swish together. I think you make a big mistake if you try to understand politics without having a pretty good appreciation of modern media yeah in trump is leaving this legacy of distrust of the media and hatred of the media which he's kind of been able to spread to a broader set of followers. What do you think the long term effects of that negativity toward media will be. I mean i think it's to be determined. I think it's gonna take a long time to repair what is broken. When you have this many people you have a maybe half the country. It's deeply skeptical of media in general and kind of what we would define this truth. It makes it almost impossible to be a functioning society in that environment and i think for the incumbent brands. It's going to be really hard to win back. The trust the people who distrust or mistrust them now i think it creates new opportunities for companies like axios or companies at mina merge over the next couple of years ought to be able to maybe kindle rekindle a relationship with people who were skeptical of things about around for a long time. But it's a problem that has to be solved if we end up essentially de-coupling and what i mean by that is if we have half the country living in at different bubbles where it's not just the media you're consuming but it's the platforms that you're going on to share debate and think about The news that you're consuming. I really worry about that. Consensus essentially it. Truly is to america's it's not just sort of generically saying to america's like we would have to america's and we have to solve for that and we have to solve that while also figuring out how do we put rules around that big tech platforms that allow for people have freedom of speech but also be able to navigate the world without Mistrust in propaganda and nonsense in noise pulsing through the devices in the platforms. They're spending the vast majority of their time on and exit at axios takes a pretty a political approach which that feels like a good stance to take coming into the next four years and through what happened. In the trump administration was that something that you foresaw or in kind of taking a more neutral stance or was that something that you just kind of. We're going to do anyway and all of a sudden maybe you're seeing some positive effects yet. No we'd always planned being that way in. Our view is that world is anymore. Noise what the world needs is more clinical fact based reporting done by people who have expertise so that you can get people who might be skeptical of media to believe in beedi again and for people to stay better information to make better decisions and that's why we started. Axios is our thesis. The thesis was correct. Was people almost everyone. We knew their minds were just jammed and crammed with information and they had less time to actually think about information at a time where all of us need to know a lot more across more topics. It's really hard to do my job. Unity your job if you don't really understand politics or technology or social platforms or media or some business trends. Let's a lot. It's a lot to ask of you and ask of me and so if you can't bring more efficiency to that process if you can't bring more clarity to the information that people are consuming it's just gonna get too difficult for the end user the consumer And so even though i mean are even as i think. A lot of people are appreciating this kind of super brief approach to news. People are consuming so much news. I feel like in the past few years because there's just so much going on with trump and then out of course that the pandemic there's this idea of the trump bump that's driven a lot of subscriptions in really helps a lot of media publications at the same time that trump has kind of led to some of these negative effects that sustain. What do you think happens to. Some of the media publications that have benefited. Most from the trump bump my assumption was that the trump bump which fade people would stop paying so much attention to politics but just had so much craziness the corona virus. Getting worse. Not getting better. Obviously the mob at the capital still persistent fear that there could be more violence as a result of the election results. So we're not seeing that decrease yet though. I assume the decrease will come to be honest. I think it'd be really healthy for all of us. If if traffic to political coverage decrease tremendously. I honestly it might sound weird because people create create a politico and we obviously do a fair amount of political coverage here. But i think people gone nuts. I think people are consuming. Wait way way too much political content. I see in our traffic patterns. I see in my own family. We as a species were not meant to spend this much time thinking about talking about debating sharing opining on politics. It's not healthy. I always compare it to a doritos. Like into real nice. I love him in like if you have one once in a while. It's good but if you eat two or three bags at day you're going to be a fat slob and you're not going to be healthy and i worry that that's what we're all doing with politics is driving people crazy and i think the world would be better place if we all got a life outside of our phone and our and our websites

Donald Trump Jim Van High Biden Administration Joe Biden Biden Axios Mina Merge America
Seattle Small Business: How One Landlord and Her Tenants Survived the Pandemic

Bloomberg Best

05:02 min | Last month

Seattle Small Business: How One Landlord and Her Tenants Survived the Pandemic

"To say with the your head holds for the real estate industry and the many businesses that occupy the commercial real estate landscape, But I will say to him, this is one of the things that we have consistently and constantly talked about stories across the Bloomberg every day about what the future is of commercial and residential real estate. Yeah, there are a lot of unknowns. If we think back to what happened in 2020, it was a real surprise to see residents real estate bounce back so quickly in some Areas of the country and be left behind and other areas. So far, the pandemic hasn't triggered a real estate meltdown on Main Street. But his business week uncovered time is running out for one Seattle landlord and her tenants. Tim is a personal story that's being told over and over again to him around the country because of the pandemic, and we got more from the writer of it. Bloomberg News Finance reporter Nobu Higher He joined us along with Seattle landlord he wrote about this done. She's found her done, and Hobbes. It's a small business. Both were in Seattle. Noah starts off by talking about how he connected with the subject of this Story. Listen, I actually started catting several months ago. I think it was in April or may of last year for a project that I'm doing for business week following small businesses in one neighborhood here in Seattle through the covert crisis and Um, over the months in several conversations with clothes. I was just struck by All of the sort of financial in business bonds that she had created. And, um, developing this, really, uh Double properties on this really cool block and Seattle just how how cove it was, was really putting a lot of those relationships under strain, and what I wanted to do was tell a story about real estate and small business and all of these links between people. And how they got through the 1st 10 months of the pandemic and what it might take to get them through the next time. So, Liz, come on in on this. First of all, has your year been Oh, Clara. Um it's been pretty challenging. I am doing small scale real estate for about 20 years and I survived through a couple of previous Crazy for 9 11, and then you know the economic meltdown. It started in 2000 and eight. But boy, this takes the cake for sure, well, and to be fair, and what's interesting, and it's one of the things we've talked about. A lot less is, you know companies big and small had to learn to pivot like I feel like I've used that word a million times over the past 12 months. You did as well and you had some things going for you in terms of You know where your real estate was located? What kind of tenants you had Tell us a bit about that. Well, I kind of operate at a scale that, um, really caters to locally owned small business. And so I love to renovate old buildings and then cram a bunch is Dollar users kind of into one project where it can create a real critical mass of, um, you know, interested in terms of retail and restaurants for the for the customers, and we're in a really great neighborhood called Capitol Hill. It's kind of you know, the cool, funky alternative neighborhood and Seattle and and, um, but you know, the problem is that the fall Family owned businesses are super vulnerable, and Noah and I discussed of my 20 some customers facing businesses on this One block, you know, they were all impacted in various ways. Bye bye. Shut down. Or other aspects of the pandemic. So no as you were doing your reporting and talking with Liz and unfolding this story, what struck you? Well, a couple of things one is just how, um How much the businesses that attends that list property were able to pivot and just sort of do what they could to keep revenue in the door. Another thing was just listens. Willingness, Tonto. Do whatever she could to keep them afloat. So what that meant a lot last year was had to go out to negotiate with her banks. The folks who have mortgages on her property and It's some sort of relief there so she could turn around and pass. Um, basically give her tenants some wiggle room. Um, and I think that's like a hugely important and underappreciated Aspect of what's been going on here. And you know, from the outside of this crisis, you know, I spoke with one of lizards blenders, the CEO of Home Street Bank. Which is a regional bank here in Seattle, and that their willingness to work with lives over the last couple months has just been huge. But I think live and Home Street also thought that this pandemic would be over by now. A lot of us did and so really the point we're at in this crisis. Now everyone's having to come back to the table now and figure out what makes sense. For the next several months.

Seattle Bloomberg News Finance Nobu Higher Hobbes LIZ Noah TIM Clara Capitol Hill Home Street Bank
Guard troops head home after helping secure Biden inaugural

AP News Radio

00:59 sec | Last month

Guard troops head home after helping secure Biden inaugural

"With the inauguration over thousands of National Guard troops are leaving Washington DC and one senator is outraged by their treatment some twenty six thousand National Guard troops were deployed to the nation's capital for inauguration security tighter after the right at the U. S. capitol two weeks before the inauguration was mostly peaceful analysis district of Columbia mayor Muriel Bowser most of those are out of state guard and those guard are going back to their state Washington DC media are reporting hundreds of guard troops were abruptly forced out of the areas of the capital they've been using for rest breaks crammed into a commercial parking garage when senator Tammy Duckworth saw a picture of that the Iraq war veteran so she got on the phone to make sure that they were allowed back into the capitol complex because of travel logistics it could take days to get all the guard members back home Jackie Quinn Washington

National Guard U. S. Capitol Mayor Muriel Bowser Washington Dc Senator Tammy Duckworth Columbia Washington Iraq Jackie Quinn Washington
Senate Begins Biden Cabinet Confirmation Hearings

WTOP 24 Hour News

03:43 min | Last month

Senate Begins Biden Cabinet Confirmation Hearings

"Hearings on President elect Joe Biden's Cabinet Cabinet nominees, nominees, and and it it could could be be anything anything but but smooth smooth sailing sailing for for some some of of them. them. Which Which means means most most will will likely likely not not be be confirmed confirmed by by Inauguration Inauguration Day Day tomorrow. tomorrow. Joining Joining us us live live to to talk more about it. Washington Post National security reporter Karen Emergen Karen Great to have you here on w T o P, which nominees are getting hearings today? And why is this process so delayed? Well, you've got spiders, you said. So it's the nominee for director of National intelligence. Averil Han's secretary of state Tony Blinken, Defense secretary nominee Lloyd Austin, Treasury secretary nominee Janet Yellen and Homeland Security secretary nominee of 100 My carcass. Look, this is there's a huge number of reasons for why this is more delayed everything from the Georgia Senate races not making clear who was going to control the Senate to the right of the capital, creating delays to the upcoming the deal to work out the terms of the upcoming impeachment trial to your standard partisan gridlock that his, you know, infected all parts of DC for years now. And so what you've got is a situation where they're trying to cram in all these hearings before Inauguration Day in the hopes that maybe they can do all the procedural stuff that they have to do to actually get some of those confirmations through the floor. It's looking slimmer and slimmer like that. It's possible that any of these will actually happen on day one, even though the Haynes intelligence and yelling at Treasury nominations are really not contentious at all. I think that you may see some of them happening this week, but I think we already know that people like um, Lincoln's nomination I'm gonna pushed up to next week. Austin needs a waiver to actually be able to be defense secretary because he hasn't been out of uniform for the required seven years. So that's probably take a while. And there's um There's potentially going to be some objections from Republicans to the DHS secretary nominee, So it's you know, a gesture of moving forward and trying to hustle, but it's not necessarily gonna get them to the finish line. Um, by day one, which is standard really, for a president to have at least some of his national security team in place at the get Go. Sure, so so what can this mean for the Biden administration having these delays and not having the personnel in place? In the way that other administrations have with when they have started. What could this mean for him? You know, really getting his agenda going as early as he wants. Well, we're not talking about a delay of forever, and we're not talking about killing these nominations, so probably we're talking about adding, you know a delay of about a week ago at tops to some of these may be slightly more with with others. But just generally speaking, it's not the white the foot that they want to start out on its slows things down. There are competent career officials in places the acting secretaries for the duration it takes to actually get the people confirmed. But you know if I didn't want to come in to make a splash and and have this agenda that would say from day one he was going to correct so the ills of the Trump administration and he's slightly him strong and slightly delayed, So it's more of a You know, presuming nothing terrible happens in the next week, In which case it's a different story, right? But presuming that things are fairly common. The world. Um it's just a psychological impediment for getting going and and promising a new era, which is what he tracked do during the campaign, and they're after. But as we've seen the last few months have been hamstrung with all kinds of delays and slow down and and political arguments that have hampered that. So this is kind of just, you know, if you can't just snap your fingers and have everything change on Inauguration day, and this is more evidence of that. Karen, Thanks so much. We appreciate it. Thank you. Karen Emergent of the Washington Post. Let's get a look at Wall Street. Jeff Klee bomb

Cabinet Cabinet Sailing Sailing Washington Post National Karen Emergen Karen National Intelligence Averil Han Tony Blinken Lloyd Austin Janet Yellen Treasury Senate Joe Biden Biden Administration Georgia DHS Lincoln Trump Administration Austin Karen Emergent Karen
Strict Security Measures In Place In Washington DC Ahead Of Inauguration Day

AP 24 Hour News

00:56 sec | Last month

Strict Security Measures In Place In Washington DC Ahead Of Inauguration Day

"Will be pretty much locked down for Biden's inauguration. It's usually a festive event here in DC Americans arriving from all over and cramming the National Mall this year will be significantly different Police chief Robert Conti. The third city is essentially locked down. I made what the Secret Service is. Matt Miller calls a very concerning chatter online after the Capitol riot. We cannot allow a recurrence. Of the chaos in illegal activity. There will be roughly five times as many national Guard members here in D. C. As there are U. S troops in Iraq and Afghanistan combined, Most of the national mall is closed and the inauguration ceremony itself will be smaller than usual. That disappoints House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Obviously, we're excited about nominating a new president of the United States. But, she says, What will not be different is the oath. Joe Biden takes Soccer Megane Washington I'm

Robert Conti National Mall Biden Matt Miller Secret Service House Speaker Nancy Pelosi National Guard U. Afghanistan Iraq United States Joe Biden Soccer Washington
National Mall closed to public ahead of Biden inauguration

AP 24 Hour News

00:59 min | Last month

National Mall closed to public ahead of Biden inauguration

"Washington D. C will be close to shut down for Biden's inauguration because of last week's attack on the Capitol. AP Soccer Mahogany With more It's usually a festive event here in D. C. Americans arriving from all over and cramming the National Mall this year will be significantly different police chief Robert Conti. The third city is a sense We locked down. I made what the Secret Service is. Matt Miller calls a very concerning chatter online after the Capitol riot. We cannot allow a recurrence of the chaos in illegal activity. There will be roughly five times as many National Guard members here in D. C. As there are U. S troops in Iraq and Afghanistan combined, Most of the national mall is closed and the inauguration ceremony itself will be smaller than usual. That disappoints House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Obviously, we're excited about nominating a new president of the United States. But she says What will not be different is the oath. Joe Biden takes this is AP News.

Robert Conti Biden National Mall Matt Miller Soccer Secret Service Washington National Guard House Speaker Nancy Pelosi U. Afghanistan Iraq United States Joe Biden Ap News
Washington prepares for inauguration amid threats

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | Last month

Washington prepares for inauguration amid threats

"The nation's capital is nervously preparing for next week's inauguration amid heightened security fears it's usually a festive event here in DC Americans arriving from all over and cramming the national mall this year it will be significantly different police chief Robert Conti the third city is essentially locked down amid what the secret service's Matt Miller recalls a very concerning chatter online after the capital right we cannot allow a recurrence of the chaos in illegal activity there will be roughly five times as many National Guard members here in DC as there are you S. troops in Iraq and Afghanistan combined most of the national mall was closed and the inauguration ceremony itself will be smaller than usual that disappoints house speaker Nancy Pelosi obviously we're excited about nominating a new president of the United States but she says what will not be different is the Joe Biden takes Sager made ani Washington

Robert Conti National Mall DC Matt Miller National Guard Afghanistan Iraq Nancy Pelosi United States Joe Biden Sager Ani Washington
How COVID-19 Has Changed Science

Short Wave

05:33 min | 2 months ago

How COVID-19 Has Changed Science

"Twenty twenty was a year like no other especially for science during twenty twenty alone have been more papers written about covid nineteen than the have been on many other diseases that we've known about for a much longer time. Things like polio and ebola. And that astonishing ed young is a staff writer for the atlantic and in recent peace he explores the massive shift. The pandemic has caused in scientific research in a. We have only known about this disease for a year or so and yet it has totally consumed the attention of the world. Scientists many many scientists have pivoted from whatever they were previously focused on to study covid. Nineteen he says. Take jennifer dowden for example. She's twenty twenty nobel prize winner and a pioneer of crisper gene editing technology. And she told me about how in february she was on a plane headed to a conference crammed into the middle seat and she realized like this is. This is crazy. This doesn't feel safe and this is probably the last time on going to travel for a while like she had the sense for her life was about to change and change. It did the next month. Her university shutdown her son's school closed jennifer and her colleagues realized the wanted to switch focus so they started testing in their own institution to serve the local community because they realized that testing wasn't sufficient they developed new ways of diagnosing the virus using crisper. And this is a clear example. I think of a scientist moved to studying covid nineteen because she saw this massive pressing. Societal need for science to rise to the occasion but in view goodwill pivots like the one that down to made. Don't tell the whole story about what changed in twenty twenty scientists not just a march towards the greater good to very human endeavor and as a human endeavor it has both good and bad sides at its best. Scientists are self-correcting march towards greater knowledge for the betterment of humanity but at its worst it is a self interested pursuit of greater prestige at the cost of truth and rigor and both sides of science were very much on display this year so today on the show we talk with ed young about some of the ways cope with nineteen could change science forever. I'm mattie safai in this is short way from npr this message comes from npr sponsor. Bank of america. You finally decided to learn how to ice skate. So you ordered the essentials. Every ice skater needs a pair of blades. And you helmet and a good set of kneepads and you used your bank of america. Cash rewards credit card choosing to earn three percent cash back online shopping rewards that you put towards the cost of an essential piece of plo skating recovery. A heating pad visit bank of america dot com slash more warding to apply now copyright twenty twenty bank of america corporation. This message comes from. Npr sponsor ibm a smarter. Hybrid cloud approach with ibm telcos. Rollout innovations with watson. Ai without losing speed. The world going hybrid with ibm visit ibm dot com slash breed cloud. Okay so today. We're talking about how the pandemic changed scientific research. Let's let's start with one of the core foundations of science publishing data. Something that in my experience doesn't traditionally happen very quickly. Yeah so traditionally The process of publishing is often very slow. It takes a lot of time for scientists to write up the results for that results to then pass through gone through. The peer review process can take many months. Is ill suited to a crisis. That is as fast moving as the covy pandemic has been but for many years now. Biomedical researchers have pushed for innovations that will speed up the process of science so they have started increasingly using pre-printed servers where they can upload early drafts of the papers so that their peers can discuss and build upon those results even before it goes through the peer review. Gauntlets and it really took off in the middle of the pandemic p- reprints were a major part of how science was disseminated over the course of this year and i think for both good and they meant that as intended. The pace of science was much quicker but in an environment where the entire world was hungry for more information about this new disease. A lot of very bad reprints were also circulated very quickly gained international attention and led to the spreading of misleading information. That hindered the controller cove. Nineteen rather

Ed Young Jennifer Dowden Ebola IBM Mattie Safai Polio Bank Of America Twenty Twenty Bank Of America Atlantic Jennifer NPR Watson
U.K. Imposes Harsher Lockdown on London, Citing New Version of Virus

Michael Wallace

01:42 min | 2 months ago

U.K. Imposes Harsher Lockdown on London, Citing New Version of Virus

"Which is essentially shut great Britain down far faster than anyone anticipated has caused Gray's concern around the world. If the goal was to contain the rapid spread of the new strain of coronavirus than these travelers, crammed into one of London's train stations, desperate to get out of the city wasn't helping. Written has now ground to a halt. Just two days after it was revealed. The variant of covert 19 was spreading like wildfire. Hundreds of trucks at the busy Dover port now sit idle after France tightened its borders, raising real concerns over food shortages. The panic is now spreading across the globe with more than 40 nations suspending flights from Britain, although not the U. S. So far, Americans constituent travel from the UK to the United States without government restrictions, but with infections from the new strain of covert 19 still shooting through the roof and huge chunks of England southeast now under strict lockdown. It's an uphill battle. A new strain was first detected in September. It now accounts for nearly two thirds of all new transmissions across the UK infectious disease Experts say That's because it contains mutations, which make it up to 70% Maurin factious than other strains. Although it's causing greater pressure in the community as a whole, we haven't any evidence to suggest that is making the individual sicker. The World Health Organization insists the Corona virus is mutating at a much slower rate than seasonal influenza. But this latest crisis is like no other and it's now up to the British government to find a way out of it. India's time CBS views London

Britain Gray Dover London U. UK France United States England World Health Organization Influenza British Government India CBS
ICU Workers Are Quitting Due To Crushing Stress From COVID-19 Surge

Morning Edition

03:52 min | 2 months ago

ICU Workers Are Quitting Due To Crushing Stress From COVID-19 Surge

"Surge in Corona virus cases has left hospitals across the country in a very bad place. ICUs are filling up fast, which is putting more pressure on critical care teams, especially nurses as Jackie 40 of member station, KPCC reports. Summer quitting because of the stress for 10 months, June, Jaha has treated the sickest covert 19 patients in the ICU. He works at L. A county USC medical center, one of the county's largest public hospitals. Right now, the I feel crazy. He thought he'd seen the worst of the pandemic back in July, when cases spiked if it's so much worse than before. And it's taking a toll on the staff, John says. Every time he goes to work for another 12 hour shift, two or three other ICU nurses have taken time off. All the nurses is already started burning on You can't feel something in north of this depression. Burnout isn't the only reason for the staffing crisis during the first week of December, more than 1700 Healthcare workers across L. A county tested positive for the coronavirus. That was double the number from the week before. Like many healthcare workers who treat covert patients, Jonah has never been tested for the virus by his employer. He has to go to a free testing site on his days off, kinda using you. That's why we have so many nerves left. All right here. John has been an ICU nurse for more than 10 years, and he's proud of his work. But for the first time ever, he's thinking of quitting. Others already have. Like Chanel Rose crams. There eventually came a point where I told myself I have to find a different job because this stress from this is really making me physically sick. She started working as an overnight ICU nurse in February, right before the pandemic hit running between rooms, monitoring complicated medications and breathing equipment left her dripping in sweat. And afraid that she would contract the virus. Before each shift. She would sit outside the hospital in her parked car filled with dread. I would pray till I cried begging God, please not let me lose a patient tonight. I can't take it. I just need my patients to stay alive tonight. Calling patients families was also difficult, especially when she had to explain that there was nothing else the medical team could do to keep their loved one alive. You've already done the convalescent plasma and they've been getting decade, Ron and they've been getting rendez of here. They've been getting all the stuff and it just felt like ticking time bombs, and I didn't want to have to just sit and wait for all these people to pass away. After more than eight months in the ICU, she quit her job in October. Now. Rosecrans works as a surgical nurse for a plastic surgeon in Beverly Hills. But she still gets contacted by staffing agencies asking her to fill in at local ICUs. I don't see what the point of going right back would be because I feel like they're going to be operating in that crisis mode. Other nurses are quitting those high pressure jobs. Megan Bronson is a nurse in Dallas and a board member of the American Association of Critical Care Nurses. Brinson says Thies nurses sometimes need more support. When you have whole family's coming into a nice you many times, that's morally very distressing. You're taking care of the mom that that and the adult Children all in the same ICU, she recommends that hospitals take a page out of the military's playbook and have debriefs. We're nurses are encouraged to talk about what happened on their shift. It can help with the feelings of isolation and nurses everywhere are hurting. There's not a nurse, no matter what their specialty I see or not, who is not having Cove it in their face every single day for NPR news. I'm Jackie 48 in Los Angeles.

Kpcc Jaha Usc Medical Center ICU Chanel Rose Corona Jackie John Jonah Depression Megan Bronson American Association Of Critic Rosecrans RON Beverly Hills Brinson Thies Dallas Npr News Los Angeles
Riding with Farm Animals in Columbia, Taxi Accident in Rome, and Traveling in a Converted Van

Drive with Us Podcast

06:05 min | 3 months ago

Riding with Farm Animals in Columbia, Taxi Accident in Rome, and Traveling in a Converted Van

"I'm bob neat. And taraji and today's drivers are jewels and christine professional travelers content creators and podcasters. They've been on the road for over ten years exploring all the world has to offer and met while traveling impro- back in two thousand twelve working at a disaster relief nonprofit. They have been traveling together. Twenty four seven ever since along the way they started a travel blog called. Don't forget to move which over the years has become their fulltime job and now focuses on adventure travel and responsible tourism helping their audience. Experience the world in a more sustainable way. They also hosts a podcast nonstop bon voyage which is a comedic travel. Podcast where they talk about all things that can go wrong while on the road and today this shared with us some of those few things that went wrong while they were on the road such as having survived with farm animals in columbia and their adventures in their converted ban. Welcome deals and christine. Thanks so much for joining us today. Thank you so much for happiness having us so. I know you guys are big travelers. And i'm super excited to hear all your stories because i'm sure you have a really crazy ones from all the places you've been. Let's start with which one you think. Is the craziest driving story of them all. Oh we have definitely had a little crazy driving stories a lot of the time. It's not driving as self And the one that definitely comes to mind at the start would be al time. In northern colombia. Traveling at will play kabale. Bella which is pretty much a middle of norway pursuing. It's almost the northernmost point of south america and it's not a allowed to travelers go. They say it's kind of like the wild west of columbia so it's pretty far off the beaten track and even just to get it takes a bit of emission. He goes had couple of buses in a couple of different small mini vans. And then you finally get to a little place called arabia where you take you jump into a full and this is not your standard full by full. This is a four by four that has been so personally modified to have sate. Elise a dozen people in the back. Try like a pickup truck and the journey. There is four hours of bumping around in sloshing around in the mud depending on the season being crammed with about a dozen people into a full person seda and picking up a lot of livestock along the way like chickens and guards in all kinds of crazy things. So you are basically crammed in the back of this four by four with at least a dozen other people of course all locals. We were the only other travelers who went that far. I guess and then random animals start coming in so we had piglets on the floor. We had baby goats on the floor at a chicken on my lap at one stage. I think i had a baby on my lab. I wonder if we had a little baby. Sir whose baby was but there was a lot of south coming in and on our way back out was the same thing tons of livestock tons of animals just like feathers everywhere and we were leaving very early in the morning. It was maybe four. Am before it was even light out. And we were stopping at all of these farms in little houses along the way and we had some unexpected visitors strapped to the roof. We had three shoes. Desert tortoises will probably about six foot wide Honestly the biggest ever seen in my life and about five or six men were putting it on top of the roof. I don't know where it was going. The poll seeing but Yeah it was quite a wild ride. Yeah it was literally wild. Ride just filled with animals animal. The funny experience is that common for them to like four turtles or tortoise on the roof that he's definitely how i told us on the roof experienced but it is quite common for them to travel with livestock especially when you're traveling in rural areas in indigenous communities. Quite common for them to you. Know they got the coming from the local markets so they've got a chicken and it's tied up. They've got a guard or luke pig. Hug todd their fate name jumping the boss jump jumping the car and go back home. And that's fairly common. We they call it. Chicken buses in central america raisin. There's a lotta chickens on him. Where the animals with you for most of your trip or like how long were you with. The animals offset hotan. So this place. Here is is pretty oscillated. So this is a few rule. Sort of villages Affiliates little so to commune areas along the way but most of the people going from sort of point either point bay and they traveling with all that livestock eight a two they were bringing it back so yeah pretty much the whole four hours. We will sloshing around in the back of these full by four pickup truck with a whole bunch of animals and people just like one guy with a chicken. Walk it off but then one guy with tj can gets on so it's always balancing let made you choose to go there out of all the places since it's not a very typical worse destination executives and at that point we had spent probably Maybe a year in latin america. And we were just ready to get like pushed the boundaries. And get even far off the beaten track and just really wanted to go where we're not going to be surrounded by backpackers cause of knives and colombia and peru in those countries you kind of end up on the tourist trail and you just get stuck with me. No and it's great. You make a lot of friends that way. But you're kind of sick of just being surrounded by backpackers all the time. So we wanted to go somewhere where it's just all locals. We could really get to know the culture and just push boundaries basically and that seemed like the best option and it was an interesting experience. We're definitely the only travelers we saw their ended up sleeping in hammocks outside of this cabin thing in the wind and the rain and we just wayne in this hammocks is pretty intense but it was beautiful just super rugged pristine landscape out there right on the coast but still very desert and dry and yeah is really gorgeous and we'd heard that the junior was half the adventure and definitely was probably one of fiber journey stories that we tell because destination was out there. But you know we've been traveling for eight years ten years

Taraji Christine Kabale Columbia Colombia Luke Pig BOB Elise Bella South America Norway Arabia SIR Central America Todd Latin America Peru Wayne
"cram" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

08:00 min | 3 months ago

"cram" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Right. Jump the gun. We took an early break. But here's the deal if you want to study effectively They say that you know studying something twice as obviously the best way in even three times more is the best way to retain something really learn something but It gets even more specific. It's called the spacing effect. They say if you study some and then you go and take a break and do something else and then come back to studying that same thing. You're going to retain even more than if you just did it twice in a row. That's right so this is like really really important to remember because if you want to learn anything there's just a certain thing you have to do and that is not cram and like this kid even be i d. I didn't see anywhere like how far spaced out. It needs to be. But i got the impression that there's a sweet spot too far in it's basically like seeing the material like brand new again and you don't even remember the first time but to close and studies have shown that you actually Don't you don't see it differently than you did the time before. Like if you read a chapter and then go back and read the chapter again. You're not doing anything to help yourself. You want to space it out some and in doing that. You're they think you're encoding things differently. Yeah so if you something twice in a row at so familiar to you you're encoding it in the exact same way. If you take that little break you'll encoded differently and remember it longer and not only that but there are different ways to encode And they suggest like changing your like where you study like. If you'd sit down in your favourite fat chair in your office to study your thing take a little break go to a different room for the second take and that will just mix it up in your brain enough so you'll encoded more permanently. That's right So that's pretty cool. That's a that's a good good bit of advice and there's you know there's there's other reasons why they think this works really well another one. Is that like if you struggle to recall With whatever the information is for some reason you're that the exertion of brainpower makes you learn it more. And there's there's a pretty good example in this article from house to force where like if you meet somebody And you have to remember their name like thirty seconds later. That's great and you'll probably remember their name because it's right there in your working memory but the next day you're probably not going to remember it but if like you meet somebody and then an hour later you have to recall their name and you really try to recall it. You're probably going to remember it the next day because they think you're struggling with that recall you're exerting an effort with recall and it makes sense because you know if you like what's a person's name again and you don't even bother to try to recall You will you're not you're not gonna learn it or if even if you ask the person what their name is over and over again you're not just getting it in their You're never going to learn it either. So it makes sense struggled. Struggled to recall. Might help with this this learning thing. Yeah on the worst with names like that. And i've tried i've we both are. We tried all the things. I try to remember to think of pneumatic devices. Pneumonic devices pneumatic. And i just can't do it so you hear a lot of hey man outta me no offense i never forget a personality or face so so you're encoded just names. I think everyone should wear name tags But they've done plenty of studies about this There was one in two thousand nine from ucla. Dr nate cornell with a k. and found that spacing was more effective than cramming for ninety perc- ninety percent of participants. Which is i mean it is. There's your proof. Well yeah but the thing is they also surveyed those participants and found out that basically all of them still thought cramming. Yeah two and the reason why is because it is effective your desk. It's not effective for long term learning. So what they figured out. In addition to spacing That spacing is Well i guess in kind of in conjunction with spacing is another technique that really helps people learn and it's called interleaving. I think it should be called interweaving but whatever the weird it's where you take you know Let's say you have two hours to study math you're actually better off to study math for thirty minutes. Then go study. Say french or something else for another thirty minutes and leave it. Yeah right and then study Model airplane building for thirty minutes. And then go back to the math. You're gonna do better than you did if you spent two solid hours on math t even by breaking it up which is very counterintuitive because it seems like be distracted but hey man the studies don't lie yeah those Two thousand and fifteen that tested middle school kids With algebra and geometry two subjects at a very hard time with and after their lesson was complete The students who enter wove or inter. 'love scored twenty five percent better than students who got regular instruction. And then. Here's the real kicker a month later that interleaving group was up seventy six percent and that's kind of the whole point which is long term learning something right rather than just recalling something for a test right. Yeah that's there's your proof right there. Seventy six percent after a month is that's all i needed to hear so from now on it's moving and encoding And spacing for me. Yeah i try to do that. Because our job is sort of like taking a test and totally and i've gotten into an we both have our own sort of methods worked out now but I've gotten into a groove now. Where i will read stuff like on the laptop and then not look at it for a bit and then read and highlight the printed version. And then leave it for a bit. And then eventually. Underline the key parts on the highlighted printed version and that in addition to just general like you know videos and other ways of learning. That's kind of the sweet spot for me. Yeah because you're spacing it out and that's it works. Yeah no writing. Something down has always been a suggestion. Like if you write it out then you're more likely to remember it thing Oh yeah for sure. Like if there's a very difficult concept that we have to explain it's way easier to write it out. The i'm one hand you're like proving to yourself that you understand it but you're also definitely like rian coding in a different way and the other thing i find interesting is if you actually physically move to a different room or different location or something like that Just being surrounded by that different stuff or different sounds different. Smells different sites. Even when you're learning the exact same information your brain is encoding. It in a different way. I find that endlessly fascinating and it makes total sense to. Yeah and i've always seen over the years when you said across for me your signature Josh clark Three point chicken scratch handwriting. Visit no one else on. The planet can see without a magnifying glass or read the magnifying glass. Sometimes can't i'm like what does i. What did i say. But the point is it's not even to go back and reread. Almost never is if it is the make it super legible. It's just writing it out. Helped me remember. You know could stuff we ever tricks. Well let's it go forth and stop cramming everybody you will be a more well rounded happier smarter human being okay and since i said okay twice. It's the end of short stuff. Short stuff away. Stuff you should know is production of iheartradio's how stuff works for more podcasts. My heart radio. Visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows..

Dr nate cornell ucla Josh clark apple
Trump teases 2024 run at White House Christmas party

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 3 months ago

Trump teases 2024 run at White House Christmas party

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting president trump teases at a twenty twenty four election run at a White House holiday reception Tuesday night president Donald trump repeated his unproven allegations of election fraud while also hinting at a return to the campaign trail in twenty twenty four trump told attendees we're trying to do another four years otherwise I'll see you in four years video of the remarks was streamed live on Facebook by Pam Pollard was National Committee woman for the Oklahoma G. O. P. the video showed dozens of people many without masks crammed into the cross hall of the White House state for Mike Rossio Washington

Mike Rossi Donald Trump White House Pam Pollard Oklahoma G. O. P. National Committee Facebook Mike Rossio Washington
UN vital for peace and cooperation says Economic and Social Council head

UN News

04:15 min | 3 months ago

UN vital for peace and cooperation says Economic and Social Council head

"This is matt wells at un news. In a world facing famine major migration and conflict exacerbated by covid nineteen the un including its foundational body the economic and social council nanak is vital to promote global peace and cooperation. That's according to mugniyah cram pakistan's ambassador to the un who was elected ecosoc president in july. He said that urgent action needs to be taken out to meet the needs of developing countries. Otherwise we'll have a humanitarian disaster. On our hands he told you and uses lists graffiti but began the interview by explaining kazakhs overall role. The economic and social council is one of the three Principal organs are mentioned in the un charter. The general assembly the security council and the economic and social council. These are three made charter bodies and the concept of creating the economic and social council at the time of the birth of the united nations. Was that on the one side. The security council was conceived as an organ. Which would promote collective security and enforce peace in the world the economic and social council on the other hand was designed to promote peace through international economic cooperation. One of the framers of t. Un charter was the president of the united states. Mr roosevelt and his conception which voiced at the time was that economic instability was a disease and that if one country had it than others would be affected and that was the concept behind the creation of economic and social council to promote peace through international development cooperation so the charter says very clearly that the objective of the economic and social council is to promote better standards of living in larger freedoms. That is a quote from the un charter. And it's supposed to do that personally by addressing policy issues and secondly by promoting international cooperation and coordination among all international economic organizations that's the mandate and it's a mandate. Which is i believe. Just as important as the mandate of the un security comes. Can you share some examples. Cossacks work in new york that has had a global impact. Yes over the years. The economic and social council has been a place where the whole concept of development cooperation of helping developing countries to make progress and grow was conceived. So it was at the economic and social council that the first report which is called the pearson report on development cooperation was discussed and the whole idea of promoting economic and social development through mutual support between rich and poor countries was born here. Kazakh was the place where we conceive of what was then called the international development strategy. It is the place where the concept of official development assistance amounting to zero point. Seven percent of the gdp of developed countries to be provided to developing countries was born. It was an echo saw the concept of linking the creation of special drawing rights in the imf the quotas to link those quotas with development. Assistance these were all major ideas that were born india-kazakh and are now activist in major financial in international economic institutions. So it has been a central body for forward thinking and these are just some examples of what has been achieved in kazakh in the post.

UN Economic And Social Council Matt Wells Mugniyah Mr Roosevelt Nanak Security Council General Assembly Pakistan United States New York IMF India
"cram" Discussed on Late Night with Seth Meyers Podcast

Late Night with Seth Meyers Podcast

02:43 min | 4 months ago

"cram" Discussed on Late Night with Seth Meyers Podcast

"That is that if you're looking for a safe prediction, if you have like an election pool or something like that, or you want to win some money with some friends, that is the number one safest prediction that you can make once election is over and the dust settles Republicans will probably on Election Day probably before I think some of them are already pivoting in advance of elect they know. The outcome that's most likely that binds GONNA win comfortably. They're already telegraphing that they're gonNA suddenly rediscover their concerns about fiscal discipline and After years of profligate spending on the wealthiest people in the country on tax cuts and so forth. So that's going to happen. We know that's going to happen, and so they're not GonNa get Republican cooperation obviously and I hope the Democrats End Biden dispense of any fantastical notions that they'll suddenly be able to get Republicans to work with them because that's not going to happen. I think Biden has not come to that conclusion. But you do see him moving a little bit more towards the realization that they're not going to be a huge partners for him. I would say he said some stuff in the very beginning during the primaries that was worrying like a deeply worrying. Yes. Oh, look I got everything will go back to normal once they don't have this crazy. That's not the case I think we all need to get acquainted with the idea that. Trumpism as it currently exists is the beating heart of the Modern Republican Party like that's who the Republican. Party is. Now it may change at some point I don't know it's impossible to make these predictions, but he is very obviously in touch with what the core Republican identity is right now and the Republican Party and Fox News and the media apparatus that's built up around it. They're gonNA stay like that they're going to still be like that. So I think that's just Worth remembering like that's the Republican Party that we're dealing with, it's not going to return to suddenly being like a responsible governing party. It's not it's a deeply incompetent deeply irresponsible party that's incapable of governing, and that's what it will be like even after trump is no longer president. So it's just worth remembering that they're not going to suddenly be like, okay. Let's work with Joe Biden and the Democrats now right? All right. We're very close this election. Yeah, I'm feeling good but. Every day, there's something else me out. So yes, it's true. But then again, we're always freaked out especially now in this anarchists diction that's right. You have a lot to be freaked out about with all the chaos surrounding you I mean it is surprised we got through this safely. Sal, this has been a lovely talking to you. Yes. I did the same room with you for over six months. Yeah. Longer than that since March right? Well, maybe we'll talk again after the election these predictions are correct. Yeah. Okay. We will do that. Later..

Modern Republican Party Joe Biden trump Fox News Sal president
"cram" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

10:15 min | 1 year ago

"cram" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

"Out, here is again when we talk about this complexity of. Dealing with the managing cryptocurrency transactions for tax purposes. You know, you really have to look at it also the question is, is this for an individual or is this for a business? So we talked about some of that. But, you know, when we were moving up the scale from the most simple situation, rights and more complex, we were building up on it when it comes to individual. That's the most simple situations. All they really have to do for compliance is calculate the gains and losses and reporting on the related form. So eighty nine forty nine in a scheduled day where every other basically fill of assets goes, so that's it. You're done with that. You don't have to account for any of the business transactions or anything like that, like expenses like operational expenses. Now, if you if you got paid income, even as an individual that way, I mean, you may have to translate that, but that's easy to translate income US day, but my point is one going down the scale the complexity gets magnified significantly when you go from meeting to. Count for individuals transactions to accounting on the business side. I mean, we're talking you know, you get it goes up like four x five x ten x because individuals don't have to produce a profit and loss statement. Individuals don't have to produce a balance sheet, that's all the stuff that a business has to do, then you dealing with this systems, because right now, the tax off wears in don't really speak to the accounting systems. So then you got, you know, information different systems in you have to make all that stuff matchup because an individual doesn't have a balance sheet than it actually is quite easy to cock you late gains and you're on your way. So, like I said, the complexity skyrockets when you're dealing with the business, basically, the point of a balance sheet profit law says it's kinda like these financial statements they're all tied together, and they have to balance similarly to the way that we know that blocks are connected by hashes, any up statement of cash flow, sake would statement, equity all these different things are all tied into gather, actually they're not independence statements. They're all linked together through double-entry magic if you will. So there's no room for mistakes. It has to balance. That's turn out right. That's the point. So it sounds like you really need an in house accountant, who understands this, if you're going to be dealing with crypto currency as a business at all. Yes, it can be very complicated. And I'd say the more time that goes on. When you're trying to sort it out. He know the more difficult, it's going to be. And that's why a lot of businesses just don't touch cryptocurrencies. Right. Or they, they try their best to minimize their burden will, you know, I think the accounting and the finance functional is undervalued and his thought about as an afterthought, rather than, you know, being relied like everybody thinks, oh my God. I got a legal. Right. I gotta get legal advice along the way. I don't wanna step into quicksand and stuff like that. But that kind of same thinking doesn't really apply to accounting a lot of times. I've heard people say, oh, we got everything else covered now, ready to handle accounting. It's like I should've actually been in the beginning, not the end, right? Right. Systems rather than recovery. So Kirk, we have just a couple more quick questions for you. I don't even know if some of these have answers yet, but I figure it's worth asking since they're relatively interesting topics. You know, the lightning network is looking like it's going to be big by the end of this year, perhaps next year. What differences, like heavily even really started thinking about the tax consequences or treatment of transactions on the lightning network? Yeah. That is a great question. And if you Diskin carry the conversation from where we already talked about how complex, you know, accounting for these transactions is that could actually add another layer of complexity to. But I think at the same time what's going to happen is that you're gonna have advances and improvements in the tolls that are able to capture that. So as the lightning Achuar improves becomes more, usable things like that the tolls that are going to be available to deal with transactions are going to improve at the same time talking about the tools. So there's the lightning network, right? As kind of the broad Knepper concept. And then there's all the individual wallet software that people use to. Interact with the most people wasteful use to interact with the lightning network, you know, given them most of that is it a very, very early stage of development, or, you know, still even at the conceptual stage. What would you say to people who are developing wallet software for lightning, or for bitcoin, for that matter, moving forward, what features are really important for this sort of tax compliance, ease of use for end users to go into the software rather than doing, you know, this kind of recovery approach the talking about here after the fact, I don't know if they're consulting with accounting experts or CPA's or what have you? But if it's not happening, I don't think it has happened very much. That's what should happen because I'm still seeing there's new while it's getting put out there for use on the market, and they still are lacking into like, wow. It's really great like it has a great user interface in some other cool stuff. But like once again, you missed the boat on in the accounting value, some basic stuff that to me is, you know, in some cases, even like block explorers don't have a running balance. If you're gonna look at an address might not have a running balance or. There's just stuff like that. That's like basic accounting troubleshooting tools. So with token Lee, and with the let's nap before that we actually created to wallets and these were features that we talked about, I talked with you about a number of times, and they never made it in because we didn't really know what to do and be because there were so many other things we were trying to see if would even work that this was kind of a future concern. You know are there any standards out there? Or do you think that there should be standards out there? Here's a list of features that are very important for user compliance effectively with just their local tax laws that should be in every wallet to something like that exist. Or would you be interested in participating in an effort towards E S, a not aware of anything existing like that thought about a similar thing in and there was a need for that? Yeah. There should be something like that. You know, like I since there's the organization called open law. It might be through somehow filleted with the consensus. But and there may be other similar projects, but the. Dimension, not one because it's one I saw recently that's about creating I'm gonna say what appears to be layers in the stack for, you know standards and how legal contracts are going to be out with smart contracts. If you so it's like, oh, I saw like, well, there needs to be something like that, with accounting, and I'm sure there is some, some stuff being done with that. I mean, you got the ABC coming blockchain coalition things like that. But I don't know if it's to the level of, of what I'm talking about, like with open mall. Well, so I think it'd be really interesting if you're interested in, you know, in blurting more about this. We're getting involved just dropped me name adamant. Let's talk bitcoin dot com. See if there's a critical mass of interest here may be start putting together a list of these things because it really would be great to just kind of at least have, like, just if you don't know what to do, but you're building a wallet, and you wanna do it the right way. You're some things that you should make sure to at least think about including because they have real value for people who are gonna be then using it to try and be compliant. So another quick question this one's, really. Nishat actually. So when I make a bitcoin transaction two things happen, one I create a transaction and I sign it and then to broadcast to the network, which one of those triggers the tax Bill consequences, I think you would end up looking to the lock explorer for the time stamp on the transaction. Right. Because you could never broadcast it right? Yeah. That's what I'm saying is, like, if I sign, I kind of, you know, thinking about this question kind of makes me think of how a check works sign a check, but never put it into now. Right. All right. And so long as nobody else house, it's long as it. Never actually winds up at the Bank transaction ever happened is that kind of analogous here if I write a transaction, you know, sign it with my bitcoin keys, and then I basically just never transmitted anywhere. There's no tax consequences for that, right? Right. That's the way I say, yeah, you could have a transaction. I guess you never broadcast where you could also have it where you sign it and broadcast to get stuck in the mound pool for whatever reason may be zero transaction fees on there. So, yeah, just never did this floats around and Linda for. Whatever Tom, it's got she got execute whatever time stamp. You would see on that. Speaking of the paper check, you got the mailbox role which says, okay, literally up a check in the envelope. A went in the mailbox on the some of the thirty first know drop it in the mailbox and you know, it was received on January the six and the positive on January. The ninth cleared on January seventeen so for you as the party who put it in the mailbox that titles you to, I believe, you know, that, that's when you would be able to count as an expense, 'cause it left your hand in good, faith, so, yeah, then that, that is pretty analogous here. Basically, it's the transmission rule, ultimately, it's going to be like where does it end up either on a block? Explorer, where's it end up in the in the wallet software and the transaction last, what's that house that transaction end up in the wallet with a time stamp, when does it actually make its way into the network? And so that would be the very specific time stamp of when it actually was included in a block, but for the analogy we're talking about here. I think it works both ways. So that, that makes sense to me. So Kirk on our list of potential topics to talk about. You have a topic here, the deals with fat guy and far. Appliance incinerations. I gotta tell you. I don't know what the hell we're talking about. What are we talking about here? Right. This should be that breaking news thing that they have forgotten. I just got clarity on that share that in a second. But so f- barn Faca are kind of similar compliance, mechanisms, which basically, has to do with the squeezing interests that you have that are held informed, foreign financial institution. So again, this is, you know, I think the part of the US approach to wanna make sure to get a handle on, you know, Feroz of tax. Yeah. Terrorism and taxes, basically, having also having a high tax structure that incentivizes people to look to put their capital elsewhere for those lower tax rates and stuff like that, right? So it's really what it is the disclosure scheme, and it has nothing to do with reporting any any tax like there's no tax too, but the interesting thing is when it comes to informational disclosures that the penalties there are extreme very, very significantly different than where you reported tax. And if you'd like didn't pay the tax, you have penalties because it's informational. You can have very, very significant sometimes one hundred per se..

US Kirk CPA ABC accountant Lee Linda Tom
"cram" Discussed on The Takeout

The Takeout

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"cram" Discussed on The Takeout

"It's now I believe over sixty percent Asian American Latino population. And so it's just a totally different place than it was before here's the fundamental truth in the world of political analysis. We can often fall into traps, and I'm gonna make sure we don't fall into a trap on the topic of immigration because it plays differently. It resonate. Differently in different places. The caravan conversation is absorbed and people draw different motivations in places like Tennessee, Missouri Montana than they do in suburban California. They just do it. It's refracted differently in what they see what they perceive what their fear level is what their sense of knowledge about that issue is an orientation to whether it's a threat or not so immigration may be a base multiplier some places for the president. It could be a base tractor in other districts, correct? And especially in districts where people have a personal history with immigration and the issue, and they don't like you're in Trump's rhetoric on this. And you've also got again, the educated suburban women, and if they are going, what is their attitude? No bottom line. What is their attitude? Verdict about the first two years of the Trump administration. And are they gonna take take a stand and be unhappy with his rhetoric and vote for Democrats, even if they? Traditionally voted for Republicans in the past. And if you were to look at some governors races. We mentioned Georgia that's a race that a lot of people are watching not only because of what happened to the voter rolls. Their other governors races that you think are important to keep an eye on election night. Well, I think the governor's race is are enormously important because the the governor's make a lot of decisions that affect the everyday lives of Americans whether that's on issues of Medicaid expansion of abortion of voter access curator suppression. So these are really important races and gridlock. Washington by definition makes governor more important, right? And so right now, some states already taking over issues that Washington can't resolve environment medical marijuana in general. You said you mentioned abortion. Infrastructure governors are taking on more and more things as Washington sort of bogs down. Right. And so now you've got to set up where and deep red states like Georgia, Oklahoma, Kansas, you, have Democrats and closely oddly closely contested racist. And then meanwhile, you've got Charlie Baker in Massachusetts or Republican who's probably gonna win by more than thirty points and HOGAN and Maryland every HOGAN in Maryland, those are two main line, I mean, just predictably democratic states in orientation and ideology, and yet these two Republicans that are not even remotely household names that barely household names. And one of the ways that they've proven successful is not by being these sort of fire-breathing Republicans by just being common sense or or bipartisan yet dealmakers get things done and deliver their states. Yes. Correct. And so you're also another place to look is the mid west because Donald Trump. One largely because he got midwest voters. And now you've got potentially Scott Walker losing his seat in Wisconsin. Right. Could have a democratic governor Michigan could have a democratic governor Kim Reynolds's Republican running an Iowa is facing a much tighter race than we. We were thinking originally Minnesota. So lots of lots of the midwest states now seem like a pretty bad place to be Republican so politics is sometimes about title shifts. Sometimes they're large sometimes they're small, but tides move back and forth, and we feel as if we're in a precipice of some kind of title shift to be measured come election night midterm election, Kaelin Conan, thanks so much for being with this CBS. I made you get we have been at cafe deluxe. Anti is taking good care of us that combination on what I know you're curious very very saying for more from this week's conversation. Download the.

Donald Trump Washington governors Georgia Maryland president Minnesota Kaelin Conan Charlie Baker Scott Walker Kim Reynolds marijuana CBS Michigan Tennessee HOGAN Wisconsin California Massachusetts Iowa
"cram" Discussed on The Takeout

The Takeout

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"cram" Discussed on The Takeout

"And this question of immigration front and center, Texas, many other races. The president has clearly tried to define that issue. And talking about the caravan issue raise this week about birthright citizenship that seems to be base multiplier or he hopes meaning the president in this midterm cycle your evaluation of that. Yeah. I think that's absolutely right. Donald Trump thinks that this is a good issue for him. And he is talking about immigration in the final weeks as much as he can. Because he knows the economy much more than the economy. And he thinks this is the top issue for him and his base, and he is honing in on it does it in any way exposed the lack of progress on that agenda, though. I mean when you talk about immigration such harsh terms much of what he came to Washington. Hasn't been done. Not built. It's not even remotely funded. Right. No laws have been changed the lots of talk. But even with a Republican congress almost none of his intense agenda on immigration issues has actually come to to bear. And I think Donald Trump. I basically Trump in the Republicans were talking about his record of results and the first year what they've done. They were litigating. Whether the economy was doing great and saying, you know, if you want tax cuts good economy, low unemployment than vote for us and politicians for a long time have run on their record of results and Donald Trump has been doing doing that initially. I think now he is talking about what he will do. And he is making bold promises. Just like he did on the campaign trail, you know, him Petr than anyone else. And maybe I'm wrong gear on the road more than I am. But I don't hear a lot of his voters who have buyer's remorse because he hasn't built the wall yet. I think they just like healing him say. Question about and he's trying to offer. This is what we will do. And before it looking which neither the Democrats or they're public really are. And I think Trump realizes, you know, in order to get people to turn out. I need to talk about what I'm going to do what will be stopped. If another party is in charge now, it's results versus resist. So you all remember in one way or another favourably or unfavourably, you probably stayed up late on election night 2016 early into election day after to see the final result. Here's a prediction. You may have to stay up late next Tuesday into Wednesday morning, if you really really really care about power structures in Washington why because it is possible that some of the races that will decide this underlying question control, the house, maybe in California and make and because it's California and because it's on the west coast and three hours later coast. If you're living on the east coast and midwest state late, right? Because those those races are gonna come in late seven. How seats could be up for grabs. And I have talked to Republicans who are in various levels of panic about what could happen to those House Republican seats in California right in Orange County. You've got seven of the Republican districts of the twenty six Republican districts that Hillary Clinton one are located in California. And so people are really looking at the Orange County suburbs. And saying we think we can the Democrats think they can flip those seats and Ed Royce is a good example. He's retired congressman from the area. So that's now an open seat and the democrat the demographics of his district have changed enormously since he was first elected..

Donald Trump president California Washington Texas Hillary Clinton Ed Royce Orange County congress congressman Petr three hours
"cram" Discussed on The Takeout

The Takeout

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"cram" Discussed on The Takeout

"Right now tester is looking. Okay. I think he's done a good onto the democrat incumbent. Thank you. John tester. The democratic incumbent is has run on veterans issues. He seems to be holding ground in Montana, and then in Missouri. Got inordinately involved in that race. That's right because he blames fairly or unfairly Jackson, Jon tester who was the democrat at the top of the Democrats on the veterans committee for releasing negative information about Ronnie Jackson, the president's physician within the White House who was his nominee to lead the Veterans Administration that I'll collapsed the president says it's all because of Jon tester. There are lots of other Senate dynamics and lukewarm attitudes about Ronnie Jackson nomination that had as much to do with that as anything else. But the president clearly taking this personally. Yes, and his involving himself with travel and other things in that race in Montana. Right. And then he is also going to Missouri twice. I believe over. The course we there Thursday of this week. Yes, and Columbia, Missouri where my alma mater, the university of Missouri is planned to be back. Fintan president tells about Missouri, Missouri, you've got Claire mccaskill running against Josh Holly and McCracken coming Claire mccaskill you have them running of. A campaign that is largely focused on healthcare Claire mccaskill has been talking about healthcare since day one. And basically saying if you elect Josh Holly, he is going to take away your coverage for pre existing conditions, and that'll hurt you your loved ones people who are suffering. And so she has been largely focused on that. And Josh Holly who had signed a an ObamaCare lawsuit, basically saying we want to get rid of ObamaCare, which would include coverage for preexisting conditions sound the defense he says he would support a plan to just cover preexisting conditions. But this is an instance where healthcare so wanted top issues for voters. It's really dominated this race. And Republicans have tried to say they're willing to protect preexisting conditions. Even though the president and many of them have rhetorically supported a state law suit against a portion of the Affordable Care Act that provides exactly that conditions in. That has become a flash point not just in Missouri. Several other states all across the country. And Missouri is I think an important indicator on election night because the president wanted handily in twenty sixteen it has become an increasingly Republican leaning and reliably Republican state. I leaning now road reliably Republican the trend lines should be very much against Claire mccaskill the democrat incumbent. But again if democratic turnout exceeds expectations she could hold on. But if she doesn't that's going to be an indicator of Republicans may be either enjoying or not enjoying right and turn out was very low for Hillary Clinton and Saint Louis and twenty sixteen so they're hoping that they can get that up. There's snapback there though might be different result. We will be talking about that many more other political topics as we head toward the midterms. I major Garrett Kaelin hasn't eaten any of her breakfast that forced her to talk. I eat and talk all the time. She will note back for the next segment injustice. You're listening to the takeout. This election is going to decide future of immigration, Republicans and Democrats alike know that we've got to lead on immigration and yet Ted Cruz. His only Senator vote against moving forward with that conversation his to deport every single dreamer. He's selling paranoia and fear instead of solutions. I major Garrett. This is the take-up that's the voice of better or work. He's running as the democratic nominee if the United States Senate in Texas at racist. Drawn a lot of attention. Caitlyn Conan is our guest political director CBS news. So in Texas, a red state that Democrats have been working on as kind of a project for the last two or three years. Of course, this is sort of interesting for me because when I started my career not as a political reporter. But as a police reporter an emerald of Texas in nineteen Eighty-four reporting for six years ever got involved in politics, Texas in the mid eighties. It was making this transition, but it had been democratic state reliably democratic state by. Inclination by culture predilection. Just I'm a democrat. That's the way it is. And now it's gone to this huge Republican face up and down the state largely Houston, Dallas. And certainly other parts of the state closer to the Mexican border are different. But Ted Cruz is in a tough race or workers raised a ton of money..

Missouri Claire mccaskill president John tester Josh Holly Ted Cruz Texas Garrett Kaelin university of Missouri Montana Ronnie Jackson Caitlyn Conan Senate Columbia Hillary Clinton United States Senate reporter White House
"cram" Discussed on The Takeout

The Takeout

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"cram" Discussed on The Takeout

"And he has only committed to do it through this year through this congress. He hasn't ruled it out, but he. He's only committed through this year. Why is that important because he could have a situation where if Martha mcsally does lose and Krista cinema gets Jeff flake seat. They could appoint potentially Martha Sally to the Senate and January and you'd have to women. First time. So let's also look at the map and talk about the Senate big numbers. Fifty one forty nine very closely divided. Even if Republicans hold control or Democrats by some if there's a wave of any kind take control the Senate really does operate on a very narrow band of consent. And no one will have massive control of the Senate agenda because it will be nearly drawn either way. But Republicans definitely want to keep and retain control the Senate why because that puts them front and center in scheduling and moving forward confirmable Trump administration nominees. That's really what the Senate majority is about in the near term is it not absolutely. And especially because we're going to come out of this and talk of twenty twenty s going to start the morning after the midterm election says going to be very hard to get anything done in Washington. But that's something where they think they can make strides and happen able to in the past. What's what's a Senate race edition to Texas? Tennessee. Arizona. We've talked about Florida any others that you're looking at very closely. I think Indiana where Joe Donnelly is a democratic incumbent, and he is running against Mike Braun who ran as a Washington outsider. He's a businessman, and that's very very tight race in a state that Trump won. And you've got Joe Donnelly, basically running as an independent thinker who is going to work with the president when I agree with him. And when it's in hoosiers best interests, but stand up to the president when I disagree with him and race were cavenaugh has played exactly an important part of the conversation because Joe Donnelly's Senator voted to confirm one of three Democrats who did Neal Gorsuch, President Trump's first supreme court nominee but voted against Brett cabinet, right? But he is also one of the few democratic senators who's running ads with Donald Trump in them. Which is very interesting. One of them says we worked together to protect our borders and protect security, so he is really leaning into where. He has worked with the president. But then also as you said taking not voting for cabin on disagreed with him publicly Mike Pence dynamic there as well. Vice president from governor of Indiana, hugely involved cares about this race wants to see Republicans pick up a seat in his home state. Correct about Missouri and Montana the two big ams on the map, Missouri, Montana..

Senate President Trump Joe Donnelly president Vice president Washington Martha mcsally Martha Sally Indiana Mike Pence Jeff flake Brett cabinet Arizona Missouri twenty twenty Tennessee Montana Florida Krista cinema Mike Braun
"cram" Discussed on The Takeout

The Takeout

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"cram" Discussed on The Takeout

"You're listening to the takeout from CBS News Radio vote for Masha is really a vote for me. And everything that we stand for a vote four make America. Great again. That's what. Vote for Bredesen's is vote for Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi. And the real leader of the Democrats, Maxine Waters. President Trump Johnson city, Tennessee Tober, I one eighteen I major Garrett Kaelin Conan political director CBS news is with us. So Tennessee is interesting, and it just in the sense that a Marsha Blackburn. A member of the takeout hall of participants has been at this microphone before running ahead in that state. It's a red state the political terrain there favorable, generally speaking for President Trump and this agenda as he so describe it just a second ago. Phil Bredesen's a well-known political figure in Tennessee. Former mayor of Nashville governor of the state. Trying to do the standard March in most state politics may have a big city governor Senator that's the typical approach and that recent mattress, necessarily Abell weather, but it is one that the president has thrown is energy into and it is indicative of this overall trend line we have been discussing which is to take every race and make it a proxy for the for the Trump administration. The Trump agenda. And that feels like an inescapable truth of these midterm elections. And what what is there anything Kaelin that you look at in the data so far about for example? And we always cautiously Wade through this early vote does that tell us anything that we should either pay close attention to or not read too much into? I think for the early vote. You know, we'll see if young people are turning out kind of give us an indication of that. And then for what the Democrats are hoping that they'll get non white voters to turn out as well. Especially in some of these suburban districts. Are excited that Republicans seem to be showing up and what we learned in two thousand sixteen as you can have people show up early. Guess what that's not necessarily an indicator. You're gonna win. Exactly, we have to be very very cautious because anything can happen between now and election day and a lot of people vote on election day. And yes, but I think at twenty sixteen was almost thirty five percent early. And sometimes that means your banking. What was already guaranteed, which means you're not really moving the needle in terms of enthusiasm or turn out in a lot of Trump voters showed up on election day and decided late late deciders made a huge difference in two thousand sixteen and they will might in the mid-term combination on what I want to. Thank you any. But again to your point on Tennessee, this shows that Democrats think they can make a play and red states where you know, really really shouldn't even be considering on the map, especially with such a tough map for them as is this year. And it's also interesting you've got Bob corker that seats vacated because of him who has been pretty vocal critic. President President Trump. And then in Arizona, you look, and you had the same situation with Jeff flake, and that's a really interesting way race because that too is an open seed, the Democrats running with Kristen cinema, and she is running against Martha mcsally on the Republican side to women you'll have your first woman elected to their own a Senate, no matter what no matter who wins. But that's an area where the Democrats there and Tennessee think they have shot of picking up seats while they're trying to hold on so many seats. Correct. So we're really keeping an eye on that. And one thing that's also to to keep in mind in Arizona is that John Kyle has said he will only fill. John McCain seat appointed to fill the unexpired term of John McCain who died in office. So he's going to hold that seat and be a placeholder, but not seek that in any duration after right..

President President Trump Tennessee President Trump Johnson Phil Bredesen John McCain CBS president Masha Maxine Waters Bob corker Marsha Blackburn John Kyle America Arizona Chuck Schumer Garrett Kaelin Conan Nashville political director
"cram" Discussed on The Takeout

The Takeout

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"cram" Discussed on The Takeout

"I mean, they've got so much ground that they're trying to protect they know the historic winds are against them. They're just trying to hold onto control the house by one seat is fine. It would be considered a shattering victory for them to hold onto the house because the historic trends, I've talked about and the expectations that were so high for Democrats not so long ago. There were Democrats you could talk to in Washington, forty seats fifty seats, some sixty seats will who knows. But Republicans are definitely trying to hold serve. And they know they're going to lose seats question about that. Right. But one thing is question of magnitude exactly one thing is a matter of how many seats Democrats good because they they will need forty six seats. I believed to even match read the house. Of majority is now and not to take control not say control twenty three twenty three to take control racks. But it's the margins are there, and it's going to be hard for them to get anything done for guardless. So we've got a very contentious battle coming up and then looking ahead, especially in a presidential year. There's a question of what the the Republicans keep the house or the Democrats take it back. What exactly are these guys going to do? They're not really talking about it on the campaign trail. So just a little bit of history before we go to break here in nineteen eighty two Ronald Reagan's first midterm election. Republicans twenty six seats in the house nineteen ninety George Herbert Walker Bush's first midterm election. We lost eight seats. They were sort of attitude and aura of incumbency very much in the early nineties. Bill Clinton nineteen ninety four. I was there. I covered at that election night lost fifty four seats not just that. But what was thought to be a permanent House Democratic majority that lasted for forty years, George W Bush two thousand to a historical midterm election. After nine eleven Republicans actually gained seats very much a historical anomaly, two thousand six reelected, George W Bush's first midterm in the second term lost thirty seats and control the house and the Senate Brock Obama, his first midterm election loss, sixty three house seats, these can be withering times midterm election. We'll have more on that house. The Senate governors races. All with Caitlin Kona, political director CBS news major Garrett. This the takeout breakfast will be us..

George Herbert Walker Bush George W Bush Senate Ronald Reagan Bill Clinton Caitlin Kona Washington Brock Obama CBS political director Garrett forty years
"cram" Discussed on The Takeout

The Takeout

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"cram" Discussed on The Takeout

"He's speaking to them, and you don't see him as much in the suburbs on the coast where the house races are tending to play out right now for our viewing audience election night. Everyone is going to be trying to look at some early races in the mid Atlantic region and the east as possible indicators of what may or may not be happening. Are there any that come to your mind things that you're going to be watching early on as possible whether veins of the night to come? Well, I think Florida's a weather. You've got the Senate race there. And you also have democratic incumbent against Rick Scott, the sitting governor, correct? But again to the point where you know, politics can be local you just had the hurricane and that could have on the show the voting infrastructure in the panhandle of Florida along with so much other infrastructure, severely damaged it will be harder than normal for people to cast ballots. Just because the hurricane was so devastating. Exactly. And Scott, Rick, Scott, rather and Republican territory by large. And so we just don't have an answer yet on you know, governor Scott is. On the fact that the should be good for him. He came through as a competent governor. It was a moment for him to lead the state and try and unite people and bring them together during this travesty, but his base might not be able to vote as you said. And then there's also the governor's race in the backdrop where you have Ron to Santa's who ran very closely aligned with Trump very closely wins in primary crap resin got involved in that which president typically do not and that helps carry him over the line. He ran ads with his children, showing them building a wall together, very very Trumpian agenda that and very almost one hundred percent align not just the Trump agenda, but the Trump personnel and being very public about that. How about other any early house races to keep an eye on or states where house races weren't likely to come in slightly earlier in the evening, and that might be a an indicator we can look regionally you can look at Pennsylvania. You can look at New Jersey. And then when you get over to central time you've got Minnesota and Minnesota has two races and the suburbs outside Minneapolis and the twin cities where Republicans are trying to hold onto their seats. And the Democrats think they have a chance of flipping them. Jason Lewis is seed Erik Paulsen seat. So that's a place that both sides since day one. They've been consistent about anything democrat craft some Republicans think we'll probably have a good sense of how the night's gonna go by the time it gets Jimmy. But also being early Bill whether there are district in northern Virginia. Barbara Comstock, the sitting Republican her opponent, Jennifer, western has a what appears to be a lead. But there are other three other races in Virginia that are tight and could be also bellwethers of a tough night or. Split night for Republican Dave brat who outside at Eric cantor and twenty fourteen yet as so close it's really close, and that's another area where this could could flip and really for Republicans when it comes to house races. They're just trying to hold serve..

Rick Scott governor Scott Trump Florida Atlantic Barbara Comstock Senate Virginia Jason Lewis Minnesota Pennsylvania New Jersey Dave brat Eric cantor Minneapolis Jennifer Jimmy Bill
"cram" Discussed on The Takeout

The Takeout

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"cram" Discussed on The Takeout

"From CBS news. This is the takeout with major Garrett. This will be the election of the cavern and the caravans and law and order and tax cuts. And you know, what this will be at election, frankly of common sense, right? That's the president. I'd say Donald Trump Charlotte North Carolina October twenty seventh two thousand eighteen the Kavanagh's that's not a Netflix series. That's referenced thank you. Also heard about that to the Senate confirmation hearings bread Cava singular. We we didn't the Senate didn't confirm the Kavanagh's to the supreme court just one Brett. But he's they're very important. That felt like a ball of fire issue two weeks ago. It's kind of so many issues here in Washington during the Trump administration rise rapidly burned brightly, then kind of fall away like shooting star. The caravan is continuously part of the conversation as immigration will get into that. And more in a minute special guests this week Caitlyn Conan she is a political director CBS news in charge of helping us put together or midterm election night coverage. So I also wanna play another sound bite from the president because it's also part of this mid. Term conversation, Jaime. This is number two. This was October twenty ninth on the Laura Ingram show on FOX to me. I don't have to clarify means. I love the country means I'm fighting for the country. I look at two things lists and nationalist. I'm somebody that wants to take care of our country because for many many years, you know, this better than anybody. Our leaders have been more worried about the world, and they have about the United States, and they leave us a mess. That's president defending or at least trying to clarify saying he doesn't really have to what he means. When he says, I'm a nationalist. Look, you can look it up on the web all sorts of references to the history of nationalists in our country. It's an unsavory unpalatable history presents trying to redefine what he means. By that doesn't mean white nationalist doesn't mean supremacist just means someone who cares about the country and cares less about the global structure. He calls it of the post World War Two era. All of that is part of the sort of. Backbeat music of this midterm election. What the president means what he says what his agenda has done either positively or negatively for the country. Do you think there's going to be any race Caitlyn Conan? That's not going to be in part, if not entirely referendum on Donald Trump. I mean, do you think there are elections that have separated themselves from the Trumpian conversation? Look, I think all politics tends to be local at the end of the day. And whether you like the politician or not his running, and that's certainly what people which will get to later, but Beethoven work in Texas is banking on that he's running in deep red state. He's talking to every voter, and he has the same very liberal message to every voter in Texas. You've got Stacey Abrams doing the same thing. She's a democrat running for governor, George and Georgia, but it is very difficult because Donald Trump dominates the coverage. He dominate and if you're a democrat, you're asked about Trump initiatives, all the facts, and you can't I mean, not not not that many running away from Andrew gillum in Florida. The democratic. Mini African American historic in his own right runs aggressively ran aggressively against the Trump agenda to win the democratic primary to surprise a lot of Florida Democrats by doing so so it seems like in a lot of these so-called marquee races. Trump is a huge part of the conversation. In addition to whatever the particular political actor or actress on the on the palate brings. And especially in these Senate races. You see Donald Trump doubling down on messages that he considers to be winning one is cavenaugh as we listen to and Charlie cook. I heard him described this recently as a color having a color enhancement effect mix the reds, redder and the blues bluer, and that can really really help with enthusiasm again translating to turn out especially on the Republican side where you have ten Democrats who are trying to defend their seats and stays the Donald Trump one. So they are hoping and Donald Trump's travel schedule at guys this. He's going to states where he thinks these are his people. He's speaking..

Donald Trump president Caitlyn Conan Senate Trump CBS Jaime Charlie cook Brett Garrett Washington United States Laura Ingram Kavanagh Netflix Texas Stacey Abrams FOX political director
"cram" Discussed on The Takeout

The Takeout

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"cram" Discussed on The Takeout

"So any our waitress here at the table momentarily were here so early in the morning. I don't know if you saw it on CBS, but they were just mopping the floors behind us. Okay. They're just getting ready for the day. We're here that early. That's what I so. I'm just going to be taking in the coffee as rapidly as I possibly can. So you were talking a little bit about working within CBS people understand. We would have if they were not already deployed if you will not militarily, but just politically and O'Keefe an anti Cordis. They're going to be part of our team of correspondents all over the country. These decisions are months in the making part of that conversation, and we work with our producers for the shows for CBS this morning CBS any don't run away. Don't runaway. Please come to the table. It's early in the morning. We gotta get breakfast order. Okay. So the omelette you see the spinach tomato. Oh, and Fedor. And then the Hammond -gree gear gear that cheese with a G. Right. Put those two together for me. We're like that all those agreements in one being being Mr. man. I can't say that she's the begins with a G. So don't don't hold it against. I'll just two scrambled eggs, please. And a Turkey sausage cheese? Just to scrambled eggs in Turkey sausage. Yep. Thanks. So so we work with the producers, and we work with all the shows face the nation CBS morning evening, news, CBS, focus, right? CBS communication show. So it was big stories for us. I mean when big picture so tell the story Tuesday night, people are gonna watch CBS, I know you will be. So what race is big big picture races are kind of from your perspective indicative of either early trend lines or big stories. I think just looking at the early trend lines. You got a lot as you said on whether or not this is going to be a referendum on Donald Trump. Donald Trump has said that his name is on the ballot. He believes even though it is even though it isn't. But it is driving the conversation. We've seen that people are more engaged in politics. Now for better for worse. Our polling shows the people are having the same conversations we are at the table. They're talking about it. They're engaged and so big topic going into the midterms whether that enthusiasm will actually translate to turn out on turn out in the midterms as low it's historically historically low right on. So the Democrats especially same to have an edge in an enthusiasm gap. And they're hoping that they will have very high turn out that will help them to take over the house and potentially make gains in the Senate as well. You just sit a magic word of their many magic where we're gonna talk about turnout always one of enthusiasm. There's something very interesting about this midterm cycle. Folks. I want you to try to stick with me on. So usually when there's a mid-term the out party is more enthusiastic than the imparting meeting the presidential party. Why? Well, because they just lost most previous election. They wanna win some seats back the historical norm for midterm elections. Thanks any bringing the coffee is around twenty three to twenty four seats. If the president of the in-party is above fifty percent. It's can be up to thirty five percent historic thirty-five seats, rather, historically, if that president is under fifty Donald Trump's never been above fifty on any consistent polling metric since he was inaugurated, so Republicans by historical standards could be facing losses than the mid to low thirties excess. There's one interesting statistics enthusiasm for both parties is very high. Usually it runs in one direction for one party and the opposite direction for the other party. Now, we both have enthusiasm levels of higher than normal standards. Sixty seven percent of Democrats say they're enthusiastic watching this vote closely. Fifty nine percent of Republicans say that both above historic norms. That almost I in my experience in Washington. That's never happened before. Yeah..

CBS Donald Trump president presidential party O'Keefe Fedor Washington Senate Sixty seven percent thirty five percent Fifty nine percent fifty percent
"cram" Discussed on The Takeout

The Takeout

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"cram" Discussed on The Takeout

"It's a radio show in more than we'll nearly forty five radio stations around the country. And of course, on CBS n it is a much watched and much beloved digital television program three programs all in one. That's because we work hard and officiously here at the takeout. So maybe heard about it. There's a midterm election coming up. It's kind of been in the paper slightly on the television. Maybe a little bit. No, it's been like a story for the last three or four months, this this midterm election. Feels almost like a second presidential election just two years removed from the historic one of twenty sixteen the president the United States. Donald Trump says it's a referendum on him. Meaning every vote cast in this election. Is either supporting his agenda or in ultra opposing his agenda. The lines have been drawn incredibly sharply. And that means whatever happens next Tuesday, and in the days after if there are recounts or contested elections around this country, and there's a better than even chance. There will be power could shift here in Washington DC, what's up for grabs. Well, control the house of representatives possibly the United States Senate many governorships around the country. Let's talk about the house for a second. If that shifts power from Republican to democrat that means Democrats would have power to create legislation proposed to the president engage in oversight. Meaning look into things they say Republicans have not looked into possibly make life more difficult for this administration from an oversight point of view impeachment hangs in the air is that thing Democrats are gonna do if they take control the house. They say, maybe they. I say maybe not plenty of Democrats on this show at said, yes, it's an idea worth considering all of those things. Just in the house is up for grabs. The senate. Lots of Democrats are running for reelection. In Trump won states in two thousand sixteen is that going to see a reversal or continuation of the Trump tide of twenty sixteen. That's just here in Washington governor's races around the country ballot initiatives, we're not going to be able to touch all the bases. But we're gonna touch many of them and who's going to help us in that noble task Caitlyn Conan is going to do that. Now. This is kind of great full circle moment for the takeout. Why do I say that because this show got started when it wasn't on any radio stations? It was even on CBS n we had one really active cheerleader within CBS in Washington. Her name was Kayla comb because she was at that time head of communications for CBS in Washington bureau, and she would dutifully put together press releases about all of our great guests and the interviews with those guests so Caitlin is now no longer in charge of communications in DC. She. She's got a much much bigger job. Caitlyn Taylor audience. What your big John first of all thanks for having a major, and it's really fun being at the table at the ill. I'm the political director at CBS liberal director. Yes. Big title big job. So what does that mean for audience? What does that mean? What's that job? It means I work with people like you are correspondence are anchors. The worst part of the not at all the figuring out. What stories we're going to tell and how we're going to tell the story of the midterm election. What states we're going to be in? What voters we talked to what races we follow working with our polling unit. So basically just how we relate all of this information and break it down for viewers. So they can understand exactly what's going on. That's exactly right by the. We were a cafe deluxe place. We've been to before it's very very early on a Wednesday morning. It's like seven AM. Okay. Because I got a flight to catch in a very short period of time to go to Florida for a Trump rally there, then I fly into Missouri for another Trump out of the presents going to be on the road relentlessly up until mid-term election day again making. This referendum not just on his agenda, but very deeply about him his very deeply personal approach to politics..

CBS Donald Trump Washington senate president Kayla comb Caitlin Caitlyn Conan United States Caitlyn Taylor Missouri political director Florida John head of communications director
"cram" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"cram" Discussed on AP News

"Be sure to subscribe rate and review it that's the podcast ground game ap radio news i'm tim mcguire five people are dead to other slightly injured after a man andre the shotgun and smoke grenades attack a newspaper office and and atlas maryland and around a county deputy police chief william cram this was a targeted attack on the capital gazette cram says the suspect a white man in his thirties is from maryland this person was prepared today to comb in this person was prepared to shoot people police say the shooting followed social media threats against the newspaper today shooting appears to be one of the deadliest attacks on journalists in the nation's history first lady melania trump traveled the tucson arizona today to meet with children separated from their parents after crossing the border had to support you she also heard from veteran border patrol agent joy silva it is hurts to see the children they don't really know what's going on and so our main concern is to remove them from that element of the desert a dangerous element a federal judge has ordered a nine year old brazilian boy reunited with his mother the pair were separated after crossing the mexican border about a month ago and the woman applied for asylum he was sent to a shelter in chicago she has been with relatives in another part of the country for part of the time he was in isolation because he had contracted the chicken pox inside a senate office building in washington today some seven hundred fifty demonstrators arrested for staging a rally in the building demanding an end to president trump's immigration policies in was organized by two liberal groups women's march and the center for popular democracy the action lasted more than two hours before capitol police began their arrests there those taken into custody were processed and released this is ap radio news.

capitol police ap president senate tucson william cram atlas maryland andre tim mcguire trump washington chicago joy silva arizona maryland nine year two hours
"cram" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"cram" Discussed on AP News

"Ap radio news i'm tim mcguire five people are dead two others slightly injured after a man armed with a shotgun and smoke grenades attack a newspaper office and apple maryland and her onto county deputy police chief william cram this was a targeted attack on the capital gazette cram says the suspect a white man in his thirties is from maryland this person was prepared today to come in this person was prepared to shoot people police say the shooting followed social media threats against the newspaper today shooting appears to be one of the deadliest attacks on journalists in the nation's history first lady melania trump traveled the tucson arizona today to meet with children separated from their parents after crossing the border here to support you she also heard from veteran border patrol agent joy silva it is hurts to see the children they don't really know what's going on and so our main concern is to remove them from that element of the desert dangerous element a federal judge has ordered a nine year old brazilian boy reunited with his mother the pair were separated after crossing the mexican border about a month ago and the woman applied for asylum he was sent to a shelter in chicago she has been with relatives in another part of the country for part of the time he was in isolation because he had contracted the chicken pox inside a senate office building in washington today some seven hundred fifty demonstrators arrested for staging a rally in the building demanding an end to president trump's immigration policies sit in was organized by two liberal groups women's march and the center for popular democracy the action lasted more than two hours before capitol police began their arrests they those taken into custody were processed and released this is ap radio news.

tim mcguire apple maryland arizona joy silva chicago washington trump capitol police Ap william cram tucson senate president nine year two hours
"cram" Discussed on The MLB Show

The MLB Show

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"cram" Discussed on The MLB Show

"Sir earlier in the show i talked to zach cram about the first place team in the american league west now i'm expanding the focus of this show to the top two teams the al west standings and bring on a man who just recently wrote about the shocking seattle mariners spent lindbergh high mariner magic i know sodo mojo the people in seattle still say that i don't know if they should be saying that again if they aren't so we're we've got a serious you know set of serious questions to to ask about the mariners but i'll give you ten bucks if you can tell me what wade leblanc did to turn into two thousand or i i call them lefty twenty twelve kris medlen the other day yeah i recently read an article that attempted to figure out what wade leblanc did it i think the conclusion was just that we all know nothing about baseball because that's that's basically it i've been i think he is maybe justified his pitch mix and that sort of thing but it's not as if he is suddenly throwing an entirely new pitcher throwing way harder he's still kind of looks like wade leblanc except for all of his numbers so at every team in baseball seemingly has had him and given up on him at some point including the astros so whatever we missed everyone else missed so i guess that's some comfort so the title of your story sorta it's i think it it fits nicely with the way i feel about the mariners which is the mariners are first place flus and they deserve it and like this team's been really good but you can see all the obvious ways where as opposed to the astros just not to belabor that comparison but they are in direct competition for the division lead you could see the astros with their outstanding starting pitching one through five there the depth of their lineup which is just now waking up in the mariners you could see the seams and it's still happening and and they're fluky and all the familiar ways that the twenty was at the twenty fifteen rangers were flutie i think twenty twelve orioles jazz every few years there's one of these teams in reignites the debate about whether it's luck or timing or skill but yes they are the latest in that lineage so what you know what is how do they fit into that lineage because it's not you know it's not twenty twelve orioles bullpen it's not a i guess james paxson versus brandon webb might be a decent comparison but what are what are they doing that is is allowing them to keep pace with the with the astros yeah i mean they are a solid team i think putting all the luck in chance aside this isn't the two thousand seven diamondbacks who were outscored on the season and still somehow won ninety games and made the playoffs mariners are a pretty good team but they look like a great team because of all of the amazing mariner stats that i will rely right now so they're twenty three and ten in one run game so i think everyone knows that but they are thirty one and twelve in one or two run games that's a seven twenty one winning percentage that would be the best record in such games of all time so i don't wanna get into a debate about the definition of games over five hundred because that's a separate podcast but you'll know what i mean the mariners are nineteen games over five hundred in one or two run games and one game over five hundred in all other games the hair fourth in winning percentage in the majors this year and twelfth in run differential they've actually had a inferior run differential to the angels who are trailing them by eight games as we speak so none of this really make sense every way of accounting that we have for looking at teams and judging their record should be the parents are about a hundred points of winning percentage ahead of that so we know from those past examples that we just mentioned this isn't something that stays consistent that teams do season after season so it is largely luck and timing and clutch nece there's a fan graphs that called clutch that the mariners are leading on the offensive side and second overall on the pitching side so basically they've just been good in high leverage moments when.

zach cram