19 Burst results for "Craig Venter"

"craig venter" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

03:16 min | 4 months ago

"craig venter" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"And it took a massive U.S. taxpayer funded effort called the human genome project. In collaboration with the private sector, namely Craig Venter's solera. To sequence the draft human genome. So we actually had a road map and that was published in draft form in the year 2001. And what that allowed us to do was set up genome centers world that would take samples from people with a wide variety of diseases and sift through their genetic makeup and compare them to people without those diseases. So very simple comparisons. But that sort of decade plus long distributed academic effort populated what are called variant databases. And so now you can go online and type in, for example, the human mutational database H GMD. And on your computer, literally look at the world's catalog of mutations in the genome that cause a myriad number of diseases. Now, we didn't stop there as a community. Thereafter, we said, well, gee, what good is it in a database? We need to build the national and global infrastructure to be able to take a sample from a new person out there who's suffering signs and symptoms of a disease. And identify which mutation is driving their disease and get that information back to them. And that led to several exciting companies out in the marketplace that can take a cheek swab test you and send the information back. And the companies that I think are doing in this in a rigorous way are folks like in vitae. And gardened the first is for called germline diseases. The others are for cancers. So that's how we arrived at today. And new bases, the capstone on that body of work, where we now are drugging genes directly in the genome to nip them in the bud before they cause diseases. And this is where I really started to have questions because I looked at the website, I really tried to understand exactly what was going on here. But you're talking about developing drugs that the drug itself is almost a in this is where you'll have to just correct me. Appears to be like a nucleic acid analog. It's not necessarily really even a nucleic acid though, but it's a binds with affinity to specific DNA bases or RNA in a very specific way. And that's what it appears to be. So if you have a disease lesion in a gene because of and we'll talk about a couple of examples in a minute. If you have a polymorphism which lends itself to disease, these small drugs kind of silence those mutations. It appears at least from, you know, what I could what I could glean from this. So why don't you tell me about what the technology is and how this really can apply to solve a problem such as a small polymorphism? Yeah, Kevin, it's such a great question. And to preface my answer, so we started by saying every human disease is genetic. Yet almost all drugs that are on the market target downstream proteins..

Craig Venter human genome project U.S. cancers Kevin
"craig venter" Discussed on DNA Today

DNA Today

03:21 min | 5 months ago

"craig venter" Discussed on DNA Today

"So let's turn our minds back to the human genome project as a whole. So after 13 years, I think nearly $3 billion if I'm getting that right, the first draft of the human genome project was completed in 2003, which has confused some people with the recent announcement this month in April 2022 that we've now completed the human genome sequence. People are like, wait, what's that a headline like 19 years ago? So can you clarify for our audience, like what exactly that means? I'm happy to do that. And you even used a word that I'll slightly correct the history because you used the word draft. And it's understandable that people would be confused because there's some nuances associated with this. And part of it is because we are so proud of what we produced. We love to announce our progress along the way. But of course, that means that we've had multiple announcements, but in part because it reflects multiple milestone stages of achievement in human genomics. So the first announcement people heard, which was the famous announcement that took place now 21 years ago. Last year was commemorating the 20th anniversary of that famous announcement when Bill Clinton stood between Francis Collins and Craig Venter to announce that both celer genomics and the human genome project had generated a draft sequence of the human genome..

Francis Collins celer genomics Craig Venter Bill Clinton human genome project
"craig venter" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

05:22 min | 7 months ago

"craig venter" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"She follows up on a number of different approaches, including like Anthony itala, 3D printing organs. But the one that's most amazing we talk about in the book is she partners with Craig Venter on the notion that pig organs are the same size as human organs, a pig heart, liver, lung, kidney, is roughly the size for an adult man. And she said, what if we can humanize those pig organs? Change the surface antigens go in there and get rid of the endogenous retroviruses that are in there. And so she said on this mission, probably about 6, 7 years ago. And just recently demonstrated transplanting a modified pig heart into the first human recipient. And so this is the potential for a near infinite supply of organs. The second hero is a guy named dean kamen, who I love, he's one of the most brilliant scientists on the planet. Of course, dean came in and Martin both know each other very well. So dean is most brilliant engineer on the planet 1500 patents. The creator of the robotic Luke arm, the segue, the insulin infusion pump, he about two years ago, get to contract from the government to build a machine that can manufacture any organ. So I want you to imagine this. He gets about a $150 million worth of capital. He pulls together a 150 or so partner organizations, universities, companies, and they set out on the vision and the notion that what if you could take induced pluripotent stem cells, IPS cells, converting your skin cell as we talked about earlier in the show into induced pluripotent stem cells, put that in one end of the machine. The machine then expands the stem cell line and then differentiates those stem cells into particular types of tissues and then begins to 3D print an organ. And the idea is, well, what dean has done already is actually go from these pluripotent stem cells to a bone ligament bone construct that can be used for knee or ankle.

Anthony itala Craig Venter Luke arm dean dean kamen lung Martin
"craig venter" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

06:20 min | 7 months ago

"craig venter" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"We're heading towards a organ abundance. So today, there are hundreds of thousands of people on an organ donor list. A lot for kidneys, which is the number one needed, and then heart and liver and lung. You know, I once wrote a screenplay about a guy whose wife is dying and he has to go harvest the organs of bad guys. That's great to work her up the UNOS list. That's crazy. So right now, if you need an organ transplant, you're hoping that someone with an HLA match in other words, a match to your surface antigens dies and is an organ donor. So I'm an organ donor, I think that's the right thing to do. I checked it on the form. Encourage others to consider as well. I hope not to die anytime soon, but just, you know, just putting that out there and you're waiting for that and then the transplants, if you're in good enough shape and the organ's good enough shape but we're transplanting a fraction of the list. But imagine a future in which you have a backup set of organs on hold for you, right? Like in the deep freeze, ready to go. So there are two approaches going on right now. One by an incredible entrepreneur, Martin rothblatt, who you know. Martin is brilliant. I've known her for 40 years. Martin is on her 7th moonshot right now. Wow. She used to be Martin. And when she was Martin, she was the cofounder of XM radio and Sirius radio. She was an FCC regulatory lawyer and an aerospace engineer and amazing brilliant person, not done much. Not her life. And she had a sex change operation remain married to Bina whose brilliant, a number of kids, one of her, one of her kids, one of Martin's nano Martin. One of Martin's kids, by the name of genesis, when Martin was now still in XM radio and serious radio is discovered to have a fatal disease. Called pulmonary fibrosis. And what is Martine do? She quits her job. She sells her shares, and sets out to cure her daughter's disease. With no background in biology. Starts with a high school biology book and camps out the medical library and is reading everything on pulmonary fibrosis. And is tracking down and talking to the doctors and just maniacally I love this Joseph Campbell quote a man whose hair is on fire seeks water. Isn't that a great quote? It's so good. Yeah. And it goes after that. And tracks down a potential drug that could stay the course of pulmonary fibrosis for her daughter. It was only a couple years of life left. And the drug company refuses to provide a tour. And so Martin goes and grabs a whole bunch of great scientists and advisers and brings it into her orbit and they go and they lobby and they finally get the drug company to agree to give them access to that orphan drug, which they had no intention to develop, but didn't want the risk. And what Martin gets is a little baggy of white powder. Wow. And she has to go from there to a manufacturable drug to trials. And lo and behold, it works. And it saves her daughter's life. Wow. And in the course of that, she builds a back then $6 billion company called united Therapeutics that she's the chairwoman and CEO. Now it doesn't stop there. Because Martin realizes that this drug will stay the course of pulmonary fibrosis, but it doesn't cure permanently or fibrosis. And now the question is, how do I manufacture lungs? And so she sets out on three different approaches to manufacture replacement lungs. And her primary one, she hooks up with Craig Venter I'm very proud to have made that connection. And the idea is, can you take a pig that happens to have the same size heart kidney lungs as humans? And can you modify the surface proteins of that pig to humanize it, make it human like? So crazy. And then engineer out, it's got endogenous retroviruses that if you put that pig organ into a human, the retroviruses can pop out and in fact the person. So it's a zap all the retroviruses modify ten surface genes on that pig and it was done, and how do they modify the genes, CRISPR CRISPR? This is insane. Totally insane. And now what happens next? They modified it about 6 months ago when we're getting ready to publish and doing last minute changes in the book, ask Martin. So when is this likely that she happens, says, well, by the time your book is coming out, it's going to be real, right on cue, they do a kidney transplant into as the first one into a man who was on life support, but their family allowed them to do this as a test. And it went great. And then just recently, I think about two months ago, they did a heart transplant into a recipient who's doing well. And so we have taken pig organs. Yes. Humanize them. And for people that don't know what CRISPR cas 9 is, you basically go in and edit the DNA. Yes. Insert something else? Do you give it the bit of DNA to insert?.

Martin pulmonary fibrosis liver and lung Martin rothblatt XM radio Sirius radio nano Martin fatal disease UNOS Bina united Therapeutics Martine Joseph Campbell FCC Craig Venter fibrosis
"craig venter" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

06:40 min | 7 months ago

"craig venter" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"Enter the hospital and your sequence. It's like check your BP sequence you see what's going on. It is. So how targeted are things getting now? In terms of taking that sequencing, actually knowing something from it and targeting the whether it's still early days. Still early days, where it's having an impact is in cancer therapies. So being able to sequence the cancer that someone biopsies and saying, okay, this cancer is going to be only radiation affected by radiation therapy. This one can take a chemotherapy or more importantly, we're going to create a specific gene therapy or CRISPR therapy or vaccine therapy against that cancer. Has anybody running AI against so when you have this simple mutations where it's like this disease is related to this gene and that's it. There's no complex interactions. But as we go beyond those things and get into the more complex things, is anybody running AI to start assessing it's actually these 72 different gene interactions that cause whatever. That's the dream. That is the dream. But nobody's doing that yet. Well, it's being done human longevity when it was bob hurried Craig Venter and I put that company together and you know that. The vision was large scale genome sequencing and at the same time, large scale phenotype assessment, full body MRI, all of that information. And then sorry, so that people that don't know phenotype, phenotype is the way that your genes express. So I look at you and what I see that's your phenotype. Yes. So you're trying to get a correlation. You're trying to get a correlation between everyone with these active these genes and this environmental impact ended up with this kind of a cancer or everyone more importantly who had these genes eating this kind of diet lived longer or so how do your genes impact your workout, your diet, all of those things. And what we're learning is that genes are not your destiny. It's very important to know and you know this from your own personal work in weight loss, diet, and mindset. It's your obsession. That you can your epigenome will get into that epi from the Greek word above, your epigenome is which genes are on and which genes are off. You can think about your 3.2 billion genes or 3.2 billion nucleotides, letters in your DNA alphabet, which is tens of thousands of genes as those genes are sort of the keys on a piano. I was going to ask you. And the piano player is your epigenome. Okay, so let me just push on that for a minute. I have my DNA. It's got these four letters. They repeat over and over and over. Those groupings of letters, which are revealed through methylation, which we'll get into in a minute. But what is revealed in my very complexly wrapped DNA will determine what that cell becomes because my DNA strand contains all the genes, all of the genes together, well so all of the genes have to be broken up into, in this place, play this note to go with your piano. Analogy. But over here, so in the eye, play the I notes in the knee, play the knee notes in the brain, play the brain notes. And so you've got this long ass string of DNA, because it for most people, I'll assume because it for me, this is how it is that you get the concept of DNA, you get the concept of genes, but you don't really know how they relate. So let me break it down. Your 3.2 billion letters are broken up into 23 chromosomes. And we sort of remember that from our high school biology, right? And those chromosomes are super tightly wrapped in compact. If you stretched out the DNA from a chromosome, it would be meters long, but it's raveled together. And it's so compact and raveled in the structure and using these proteins called histones. The DNA becomes very difficult to read. Now, what do you mean read the DNA? So the DNA a gene has a start in an end and typically it is red with a transcription process that turns from your DNA to a messenger RNA and from a messenger RNA to a protein, a protein can be an enzyme, it can be actinomycin from muscle. It can be all kinds of things. Proteins are sort of the structural building blocks. They're the major operating carrier of operations in the body. And so if your DNA is so tightly wound that you can't actually read it, then it inert. And so the DNA needs to be opened up in certain points to be read to have an appropriate translation into proteins. And in the beginning, when life begins, we have a pluripotent stem cell. So a stem cell and pluripotent means it can become anything that stem cell can become heart liver lung kidney skin, brain, whatever it might be, cell. And it's super specialized. And it's super specialized because like you said, the part of the DNA that codes for keratin or whatever the right protein is in hair and skin. Is revealed, but the other parts that might make a nerve cell are bound up in hidden. So that process of which genes are turned on and which genes are turned off is called the epigenome. Now it gets interesting to our age reversal conversation in which I think we'll sort of dominate our conversation here. Is if I said to you, Tom, you've got the exact same genes at birth at 20 at 40 at when you're 80. So why do you look different?.

cancer Craig Venter bob heart liver lung kidney skin Tom
"craig venter" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

08:43 min | 7 months ago

"craig venter" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"Someone who passes away, but reperfusion, get them functional again and these she designed and built machines that could reperfuse the lungs to get them back to a status that they were transplantable. She then set out on a mission with the gentleman by the name of Craig Venter, who sequenced the first genome with the notion, turns out that pig organs are the same size as human organs. A pig heart liver lung kidney. It looks very much like that of a human. And the only people that knew that by the way are the carnivore diet enthusiast listening in. Absolutely. So but the problem is if you took a pig lung or kidney and you transplanted it, your immune system would destroy it as a foreign body, but also in the genome of pigs are these endogenous retroviruses. These viruses that pop out and then infect the rest of your body. So they knocked out the retroviruses. They modified ten genes in the pig genome to make it sort of a humanized pig. And just recently, Martin's company transplanted the first kidney and also the first heart into a human subject. So this is the potential to have in your infinite supply of organs and bacon at the same time. I mean, it's pretty extraordinary coming down the pike. Yeah, and I mean, not only is it crazy that she comes from a background in tech knowing nothing about this winds up taking an orphan drug and turning into an effective treatment for pulmonary fibrosis and saving her daughter, but then figures out how to make actual human friendly organs from pigs. And you know something, it's going beyond that now as Peter will share with you, but like Tony a towel, Anthony a towel at wake forest university has been, you know, the DoD has been funding him for more than 14 years. He has an approach of spraying on a scaffolding your own stem cells, building an organ for 12 years. He's had people with bladders in them that are perfect because they don't get rejected. And baking them over 30 or 40 days to build these, and now he's not in the book we give an examples like soldiers. Their ears blown off. And he just regrows a new year with their own exact stem cells, and now share with them Peter about what's happening now with what I call almost like the Ford approach to building organs. Yeah, I'll just mention quickly on Martin. The other thing she's doing is she's looking at 3D printing organs where she's 3D printing using human connective tissue to create the skeleton of the lung and then putting it into a bath of stem cells and having lung cells effectively differentiate on that lung tissue. Right, you bet you're basically the skeleton you have the scaffolding. You got the stem cells, same reason that Tony was able to basically regrow his tissue from the snowboarding accident, and they're using that same technology just basically build a lung or build a heart. Now, what's miraculous, even compared to all that, is another hero of the book. And one of the things that Tony and I truly enjoyed and Tony's such a masterful storyteller comes through. So beautifully, is telling these hero stories. Another hero is a name of dean kamen, most of you might know him as the creator of the Segway, which is the unfortunate side because he's much more famous than that. He created that implantable insulin pumps and the Luke arm for people who have lost their arm robotic arms and robotic. Well, hold on, we just established that one of the common Internet myths has now been debunked. The guy who invented the Segway did not commit suicide by writing a segue up the cliff. You know, that's a thing. I've never heard that story. Yeah, that's the myth. Okay, so this guy's still alive. He's still doing cool stuff. We got a real breakthrough from this book. Now, didn't we? Yeah. If the book does nothing else, you got that going for you. Dean is alive and kicking and thriving. So anyway, dean's rockstar 1500 patents he's extraordinary. And about two, three years ago, he ends up getting a grant from the Defense Department. With the audacious mission of can you build a machine that can manufacture any human organ? I want you to think about this. What he's built and we went out to New Hampshire to the advanced regenerative manufacturing institute. And I saw this on my own eyes. It's about 40 feet long. In one end, you put tissue samples, it can be skin cells or other cells you want to donate. It's converted to what's called an induced pluripotent stem cell. So your cells in your body, your heart cells, liver cells, bone cells, your brain cells are all differentiated. They're super specialized. But if you treat those cells in a very specific fashion, you can get them back to an embryonic state where they can re specialize into some other cells. So you can go from skin to these pluripotent stem cells and then from the pluton stem cells to heart tissue, for example. So you put the pluripotent stem cells in one end of the machine. And depending on what you're building, they were from 45 to 90 days later out the other end of the machine comes your human organ that's been matched to your exact DNA. So they've done this with bone ligament bone segments that you could use for repairing your knee or your ankle. And the next mission that they're focused on is pediatric hearts. So you never think about it, but child needs a heart transplant, whereas he or she going to get it from. It's not a good situation, but imagine if you could actually 3D print a heart ready for transplant. That's what they're working on right now with the target of the next year. And by the way, listen, as the target of the next year, when you first hear this, you think this is such BS, but we're talking to Martin if she is saying I'm saying, okay, when do these pig part's going to be able to be installed, and we're both Peter and I think in 5 years, three years, 6 years. 20 by the time your book comes out, it'll be happening. And she texted me a couple of weeks ago when they first did the first implant where it was in person who actually died. They were just keeping me alive and then of course just a few weeks ago, they did the first heart implant. I'm a big art implant of a live person like literally exactly on time. Martin's great gift is to take giant moonshots and break them into something that's truly solvable in chunks, like one year chunks, what's gonna get done and she thinks that way and she solves things that level. She's even, you know, she's so conscious. She doesn't want to just send these body parts on little learjets that use all that fuel. So she built the first electric helicopter that Coney distances and funded it, got the thing done. I mean, this is the level of creativity that's there. So imagine, you know, your car is old, but you put in new tires, you put in a new engine, you do a new paint job, you didn't do interior. That's basically what we're going to be able to do with our bodies. And we're talking about not 30 years in the future. We're talking about with kids, perhaps a year or two with their heart. We're talking 5 years, 6 years, 7 years, ten at the outside. I mean, this is, you gotta take care of yourself. So you can take advantage of these things. Yeah, I'm definitely looking forward to a decade from now when I can head down to Safeway to get pickles and yogurt and grab a spleen along with them. You know, you briefly alluded to bio splice. And I brought up Osman as another very inspirational individual within the book. I have a lot of listeners who are kind of, they're seeing the light at the end of the tunnel or whatever you want to call it, you know, super active exercise enthusiasts, you know, reaching 40, 50, 60, the joints are starting to hurt and at the back of their heads, they're starting to wonder what's going to be available for things like connective tissue regeneration or helping to fix joints. I know bio splice does a lot more than that, but tell me about Osman and bio splicing what they're doing. Well, Osman is got a really unique history. He's a math genius. And he was from turkey and his entire company is made up of the basis of it on these four leaders that all got in this special school in order to get in, you have to be the best and the best in Europe. He won the European math competitions. He went out and won the World Series of poker and did so well, but he got bored and moved on because your idea. And so he a variety of things in his background, but one of his dear Friends from back in this Turkish high school made for the best of the best, became one of the top lawyers on Wall Street. Another one of his buddies there became, you know, with a top people, a medical science, you brought them all together when he came up with this idea of this ability to recreate by understanding the Wnt pathway. The Wnt pathway Wnt.

Tony heart liver lung kidney Martin Craig Venter Peter advanced regenerative manufact pulmonary fibrosis wake forest university dean kamen lung tissue DoD Anthony Defense Department Ford New Hampshire Dean dean Osman Safeway
"craig venter" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"craig venter" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"To authors and speakers directly to ask questions at the end of the show today is a returning podcast guest and a friend and a major investor in longevity and aging and now a new author of a very Very cool book about aging. It is called believe it or not the science and technology of growing young at. That's kind of funny. 'cause sergei young is our guest so he named the book after himself which is the world's biggest dad jokes or gate. Was that your intent when you named burt yes The truth comes out. Well welcome back. And we are airing this on the date. That your new book comes out and actually hits. The shelves have the advanced reviewer's copy and in pre sales though. You're kind of killing it right now. How's the book doing before it's even out. Yeah it's it's gonna interesting. We'll read done Number one yearly lease on amazon in three categories like preventive medicine aging and longevity and we even competing between number one and number two bestseller even before book assault with some of the existing books in preventive medicine. Some very happy. Like i mean you know. It's better than anyone in every book is like baby and this is my first. Yeah baby book. And i'm very excited. It's getting well and It obviously it comes down to support. I received from you and a lot of people in the now failed. But let's let's forward is by peter de by peter demandn ray kurzweil So kind of some big names. And there's some quotes on the back from a tony robbins and some other some other big names. When when relatively small guy on there on the back is dave asprey guy but basic as i have endorsed the book And i'm so many other leaders in the field because sergei's spent years connecting with the world's anti aging research leaders. That's how we met years ago and he believes that we can live to two hundred years old and beyond that it's inevitable not as possible and that makes me very angry because my numbers one eighty in. I'm going to do twenty years more than you. And so the surviving was. Was this an intentional slight. Yeah i think what we what we see now. Field is is this a certain inflation of of life expectancy and lifespan targets. I know one guy from china. He won't sleep two three years. I think he's just got typical Chinese stuff you better bigger longer At sarah but otherwise. I i do think it's obviously well beyond the sound barrier of huntington twenty two years the maximum lifespan On the record and all of the technologists and scientific breakthroughs the we expecting the next fifteen years within the near horizon of longevity will give us an opportunity to break the sound barrier leave beyond huntington ninety two years while well up to huntington fifty or even two hundred years. Well i i agree with you. One hundred percent in. It's our mutual friends. aubrey degray. Who's been on the show. He's ten thousand years and like no one ever. that can grow a beard like aubrey. So we just know that he can be like the merlin of anti-aging. So yeah i'm good with. I just come close to that. It's okay now you're uniquely credible because you run the longevity vision fund so you've putting one hundred million dollars work. Accelerating life extension technology and making it affordable for all of us which is a big theme in your book big theme in my aging book. As well okay. It starts with the crazy people wanting to spend more money like enough money to go to space. Now i'm gonna spend it on hacking myself. But that's what enables it to be much more affordable if years later so it kind of it just evolves that way like phones dead and you've also managed the two billion dollar private fund at you and i are in the longevity are the x prize Donor thing where we helped to select create x prizes. You did the longevity x prize. I did the carbon capture. One that elon. Musk ended up funding which was pretty cool. So like we we care. But you've been in this for a long time. Which is why. I wanted to dig in on your take on the science and the technology so that our listeners and our upgrade collective members can ask questions and just learn. How real is it. And what are they going to have to do that. That's the scary thing i don't know. Should i go plant. Based should i fast. Should i inject stem cells or should i do what You know some of the like craig venter's as have pizza and beer while we wait for more data like there's a lot of options here he ask so Let me start with you. You mentioned it's possible of the two hundred years. Have you stake number for yourself. It seems like every day. Someone's asking me about cb so i've done a lot of the.

sergei young peter de peter demandn dave asprey huntington ray kurzweil burt tony robbins aubrey degray sergei amazon aubrey sarah china elon Musk craig venter
"craig venter" Discussed on Science Salon

Science Salon

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"craig venter" Discussed on Science Salon

"Is the this idea that if god is so far advanced to be omniscient omnipotent Than they can do any it could do anything. Like create life well You know this is probably just an engineering problem over close to being able to do this ourselves. I mean j. Craig venter you know. One of the The two decoders of the human genome has created some primitive life forms with a kind of grew dna type structure. And and that's just after half a century of research on Genetics since crick and watson fifty three. So if we're able to do that just half a century how about instead of fifty sixty seventy years. It was five thousand years of technological development or fifty thousand years or five hundred thousand years. But this is my point if we're gonna counter extraterrestrial intelligences. They're not going to be just ahead of us principal. They won't be behind this because we just achieved. We just cheap space travel. So they're gonna if we're if they're coming here we're gonna encounter them here. They're going to be more advanced than us in. It's not going to be just like five years or ten years ahead of his like this roswell story here. I held at this issue of skeptic The conspiracy theory behind it is that aliens brought to us Basically silicon chip technology. We were using backyard tubes for the crudest earliest computers in and they. The aliens gave us this technology. That was roughly ten years ahead of Where we were. They're not going to be ten years ahead of us okay. They're going to be ten thousand years ahead of his ten million years ahead of this is the chances of finding them anywhere so slim. Chances of another sentient being being perfect evolutionary parallel timeframe with us is pretty much zero. So they're going to be way ahead of his or way behind us if they're way behind we'd have encountered them by going someplace tough encounter. I'm here than they have to be way..

Craig venter crick watson
"craig venter" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"craig venter" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"Is maybe something that tells you something over the course of years but over the course of weeks or months my only point there is that it's very sensitive to what's happening in the moment right and so when when i look at a lot of these ageing clocks and i look at the inputs i think to myself. These are very easy to manipulate. What was your vitamin d. Level on this day what was your glucose level at the moment of that blood test. I mean these things are so easy to manipulate. And they have so much volatility. Over time. That i don't find them to be clinically. Quite useful wild. They may never turn out to be clinically useful. Because it may be that they're integrating things over a timescale that's not clinically meaningful. I think the likelihood that we're going to find something in the proteome in the matab alone is is is higher. I mean something. That's that's that's therapeutically useful. Just because those things really change rapidly you know and and if we want to know if you fast six hours you fast twelve hours. I think what you're going to look for. There is changes in gene activity. And that's going to be in the proto or in the metabolism. The thing is going to be computational early complex now we have all these tools for doing computational complex things but but they're not cheap tools and so i don't know how long before they'll be in the clinic where we can afford to do this and people among us if i were czar for a day and could marshal the resources for the manhattan project on longevity. This would be one of the departments right like this would be if you had a billion dollars to put towards a manhattan project of longevity. I feel like a quarter of. It would go into this problem because it again. If if we're interested in longevity presumably were interested in human longevity and if we're interested in human longevity we don't have a hundred years to come up with the answer so we have to come up with with markers that are better well and now. We have the tools to do that every year. The tools the computational tools the analytic tools you know if you if you can detect you know three thousand different proteins and your blood. Then you're much more likely to affect to tax something that's really really meaningful and so those things are all happening. Of course they could happen more. There were more money invested in them. I think that's the big issue. Steve personally i think this is not commercially. Interesting enough and i think that that's why it hasn't gotten the attention. I mean i think the diagnostics space is a lousy space right. Like if you're a venture capitalist and someone comes up to you and says. I've got a new diagnostic test. I mean that's nowhere near as interesting as i have a new therapeutic model. And that's why i feel like this could only really occur in kind of a manhattan project or a heavily funded government project. But i i. Just don't i use the term manhattan project meaning an entity that is so large commercially. That they understand that. This is an important tool that needs to be developed in research to foster the development of molecules down the line. Yeah it's it's an interesting you know. I mean craig venter tried to do that. And that corporation company went. No way i have not. I can't share public but you're right. I mean i think the key the keys got to be there. This is not magic. You know there's stuff going on in the body. I think the blood because it courses through everything in the body is going to have clues to what's going on everywhere once we'd learn how to read those clues and i think part of the problem is that we're not you know there's a very small group of people that are interested in making other people live longer but most of the time it's trying to prevent them from getting specific disease. There's a lot more money that goes into obesity. I think then that goes into longevity and it's hard to say that it's not well-spent money because obesity is a huge problem..

Steve craig venter manhattan obesity
"craig venter" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

09:47 min | 1 year ago

"craig venter" Discussed on From Scratch

"When i was on the howard stern show he remembered it but it just goes to show but he was saying was not incorrect but my vision for serious was pay radio and his whole the whole paradigm of regular radio was commercial advertiser support radios an entire paradigm shift. That had to be promoted. What else surprised about launching a service like serious was it. The regulatory hurdles or i expected there to be regulatory hurdles. That process always involves taking the radio frequencies away from somebody else so there's always an adversarial process involved but what has surprised me was serious to this day i would say more people come up to me and thank me for providing a howard stern and other content to them via serious than people come up to me and thanked me for saving their children with the medicines that we produce it united therapeutics. What does that say. I think it says that information is very very important in fact. There's a quotation of heard that says information is the necessary if not sufficient basis for development. You left serious and you found yourself in another industry. The pharmaceutical industry and i purposely use the passive Because it didn't seem like an active decision to go into the pharmaceutical industry. Just on the face of it You have a daughter genesis Whom you discovered has a disease pulmonary hypertension disease and she's the one who came up with the idea that you launch. This company is correct. That is correct. it's true that my first love and actually most lasting love is space technology satellite communications. If i could snap my fingers and sort of like you know reimagined the whole universe would be right back running either sirius. Xm or probably even like a elon. Musk spacex type of company but The fact of the matter is that i I love my children and my youngest daughter who is just a beautiful simple child. Gets diagnosed with life threatening disease pulmonary hypertension. There are no medicines available so it was. It wasn't a matter of thinking about it. I just went to the library and began doing research. Now you mention you went to the library but it was you and she who would go to the library together. that's true. Seven year old genesis. We would together. She was very very helpful. And i would say to her. I know there was an article by dr rich. And she would say wait a second and this is steward rich a physician in illinois and she looked through the pile of of xerox copies of articles. And say here's the doctor rich article. You launched united therapeutics with your own capital from serious the drug which later got fda approval. was developed by gentleman. James crowe correct. There was a gentleman. Dr crow At glaxosmithkline who had a solution for pulmonary hypertension a new medicine but glaxo would not let him develop it because the patient population was too small and glaxosmithkline had recently purchased the berles. Welcome company burroughs. Wellcome was very old line pharmaceutical company. And they would develop things whether they were profitable or not so smithkline. Glaxo bought them and when they bought them the first thing they said is we are not pursuing any more of these You know fairytale dreams. We have a a filter. We will only pursued drugs. Said promise a billion dollars or more in revenues which are called blockbusters. You got hold of dr Crows telephone number and called him just cold called. And what was his posture toward you. Originally a great scepticism. How is somebody who is a satellite. Ceo gonna develop medicine. How are you going to get it out of a pharmaceutical company. I'm very sorry about your daughter. But there's nothing. I can do to help you. Mar martine roth blat upon hearing nazi. Probably just put my more fire under your belly. It did i was actually. He did me a great favor of by doing that. Because i was pretty much Back to the marteen. Who has galvanized by the dream of uniting the world where satellite communications and i said now you know what I did something like that. I can do this. I can do this. And coincidentally at the very same timeframe people sent me to movies. To watch one was lorenzo's oil. There was a story of a father trying to save his son by doing things that pharmaceutical companies wouldn't and another was the to me the the art typical entrepreneur movie called tucker about this man who invented the seat belt. The parabolic headlight lens for cars. Shatterproof glass for windows who after world war two tried to create a new type of automobile called the tucker and was beaten down by the big. Three automakers in michigan united therapeutics is public. You became the highest paid female. Ceo in america upon fda approval the stock price went up exponentially. And how do you navigate that. What does that mean exactly. So that really means is that My compensation is tar tar stock price so this was as of two thousand thirteen. And you're not somebody who really revels in the public light. What were your reactions when media was coming to you because of this fact that happened almost accidentally so it's it's Basically a kind of embarrassment at least in my own personality. I don't try to be the center of attention. But i do realize as a public company sikio every element of my compensation is publicly disclosed and by the way when when i i read that fact to end the fact that you were previously a man i thought seriously the highest paid female. Ceo of course has to have had been a man. I feel that that's unfair too. I agree with you. I tell the truth i have exactly the same feeling and but i do know in other years. The highest paid female. Ceo had always been a female. So i'm sort of like the exception that proves the rule. United therapeutics is public and your annual reports. They think unconventional you. Tell me about them. So our annual reports are different. One of our annual reports was in the form of graphic novel that told the story of a new employees Another of the annual reports was in the form of a children's book it was patterned after goodnight moon. It was called good year. Uthr that our ticker symbol. Another of the annual reports is in the form will be call a periodic tablecloth of you. Tell them it's so. We make an annual report. Because that's something that's legally create a required but there's no rule that says your annual report be a children's book. The company now is extending beyond Just hypertension and i'm intrigued by your focus on Zeno transplantation Which is basically taking animal organs and Surgically putting them into human beings correct. Correct the although the real trick. There is to first genetically modified the animal oregon so that will not be rejected. When it's put into the human being and we formed a joint partnership with craig venter's company the man who decoded the human genome Called synthetic genomics is the name of his company. Life focus on a pig versus another animal. So it's an odd quirk of nature that of all the animals in the animal kingdom the animal whose organized match the size and shape of humans better than any others is the pig even better than chimpanzees by the way now. This is somebody who grew up in an observant jewish household. Were there any even rational just reactions that you might have had when you first discovered this. You know the good thing about All religions judaism islam. christianity is. They really are very rational within their own. Belief system so judaism like islam like christianity. Kindu believed that. The the sanctity of life rises above all other things. By the way i did my phd thesis on zeno transplantation interviewed Rabbis imams people from all the different religions And it turned out that all of them said we accept the transplantation of animal organs pig organs in particular into bodies. So it's kosher it's allow it's okay. It's being done to save a human's life. you have a pig farm in vermont. Can you tell me a little bit about it. All right so the name of the pig farm. It's called river what's Grown there are pigs already have Several genes knocked out. We now be having modified the first few genes of the pig our organs when they're placed into a person last from months to as long as over a year now at the nih in fact my mantra to the company is inspired by jfk's macho. When he said. I want to land a man on the moon and safely. Return them to the earth before the end of the decade. I tell people in our company that we want to transplant a zeno long into a patient and we turn that patients safely to health before the end of this decade. Your helicopter pilot. Is there any connection between wanting to get your helicopter license. And.

united therapeutics glaxosmithkline disease pulmonary hypertension life threatening disease pulmo dr rich steward rich howard James crowe Dr crow dr Crows Mar martine roth marteen fda Musk smithkline pulmonary hypertension Wellcome xerox United therapeutics burroughs
"craig venter" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

05:58 min | 2 years ago

"craig venter" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"They don't have the money or the possibility of bringing him back here next year, so they're pretty much The one in black, her junior likely in Pittsburgh this year, so saying that he might be motivated to have that big here, go get cashed out at the end of the year. I love the make a Fitzpatrick trade on. I don't know how it played out in Pittsburgh, but I beat out here when I saw it. I said this is This is a a win and a big win for Pittsburgh, and I look at their secondary with him and I look at I look. Att Joe Hayden, who I still think has gas left in the tank. I really do. But the Steelers have had trouble with that secondary. Oh, throughout the course of the last seven years. I mean, they've been rotating guys in and out Ever since Paul Amato left, they look like they've been looking for a leader back there. I tend to think That this is settled down a bit. Now that's from the outside. Looking in your on the inside, is it? Is it better? Yeah, absolutely. I mean, you're looking at five years of absolute disaster where they didn't know who was going to be out there, let alone Whoever was out there wasn't very good. One they did of a border trying go hate when the Browns Who knows why the Browns cut him. I mean, brows kind of three years ago, they picked him up. They're able to get even felt last. Nobody much knows about him. But, yes, stellar state he's allowed here. Me and numbers right up there with some of the best corner the league and I'm talking. You know Stefan Gilmore's intraday via white type of guys, and then you make a Fitzpatrick and what he got traded here last year. 50 people were A majority of the moor up step because they thought the feelers we're going to a 14 and they were throwing away a potential cornerback like to our orginal thorough, so it took a couple games for people to finally get on board with Mika. But he was able to, you know, galvanized that back into the very smart individual and Craig Venter filled her type of guy, so I think the least part of their worries. Is the secondary Now. I mean, might want to look inside, guys say Okay, good. But who else But that defense is pretty good for the party. I mean, you got people walked by the freeze back. You got it. All that secondary bag got Devon Bush had a great year. They were two. It's that me if they could just match last here, which is because they have or exactly 35 turnovers. They Mak that in at your office going to slip into that? That's why there's so much Not with the Steelers might have a pretty decent you know, this year, Michael Ball, leave the Steelers. Ah vite writer for the athletic dot com Our guest here on 700 wlw. Can you think of Amore quarterback centric division than the A F C North with Jackson may feel Roethlisberger and Joe Burro. I can't think of another division. That has that kind of talent. That position, can you? Ah, No, I'm not. Not now. Maybe we go back. If you know, maybe late eighties. If the D A. That point telling Dan Marino's type of player but not now, not comparing these guys to whole families, but definitely go one All Famer and rough burger. You and M v p in labarre. Baker, who could be good. Could not be good in borough of attraction of the season. You had another few. One thing you have to say about him is how around around him. A lot of playmakers Sure is going to help them. I like it. Big question now is the office of Mine there gave protect for him. But, yeah, I mean, there's three housing trophy winner right there in the division and potentially the whole. The whole Famer is not hide from you. Don't you don't see that. There's no market Bali athletic dot com. You can read him right now. It is, in my opinion, the best investment in sports journalism. Listen, Mark. Thank you so much will catch you up in the season. How about that? Like in any time. You know, The other thing that the Steelers did in the off season is they addressed tight end and I don't know if this is flying below the radar appear in the fantasy football. It certainly isn't. But they went with Vance McDonald for what? 34 years and there was nothing there. They went outside Eric Ebron. What this guy I want to say in his career at Indianapolis. Like 27 touchdown catches. And he runs just really these precision routes. And I've been reading at least the comments of Mike Tomlin say he's just he's just he's been a bear to cover for their defense in training camp. Now again, all of this is against other Steelers. It's not against other teams. It's like the Bangles everything. They're doing all the platitudes that air coming out of training camp. It's against other players on their team, so we're not really going to know. Until we get to this Thursday night, and then next Sunday, whether or not all of this that we're hearing is true. We'll finally get to find out but I look at their offense, and I think Schuster has got I I'm not convinced that guy as a number one Bonified flat out, Justus Cobolli said. A guy that you look at and say, Wow, what do we do with him? I think he was largely a product of what Antonio Brown did when he was there, but we'll see. We'll see. And as I said they address wide receiver in the draft this year to Ebron could be the real X factor there in a team that has always Always employed the tight end. Ah, lot in its offense will find out I'd say Well, I can't wait for Thursday night. I really can't You probably can't either. It's coming up on 11 20 news radio 700 wlw. Assisting you.

Steelers Pittsburgh Fitzpatrick Browns Joe Hayden Paul Amato Craig Venter Dan Marino Antonio Brown Mike Tomlin Stefan Gilmore Famer Mika Ebron Devon Bush writer Indianapolis labarre Eric Ebron Schuster
"craig venter" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

05:27 min | 2 years ago

"craig venter" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"That's the best thing a politician could possibly doing. And often they get to say this and Cost will become in the election cycle after next, so I don't even have to worry about that. I just got all the applause on your vote, and then we'll worry about having to pay for it later. All right, So let's talk about Rials. Solutions and solutions. It seems to me. I mean, I was a big proponent of the hydrogen car. You can run nuclear power plants all day long while everybody's up and then use that dip a night to make hydrogen. They had a way to distributed it with. I've driven the car. It was great. I'm four fracking, more natural gas, not less natural gas. But every time there's something that looks like would be a help. Or a piece of a solution. It's shut down. So what are the things that we could do that that environmentalist will agree to? Because they don't seem very Interested in anything once we get going Glenn. I think the rial realization is to recognize that most big problems in the world have never been solved by telling people I'm sorry. Can you do less of that? Can you feel less joyful? Can you have less welfare and prosperity? That's just not gonna work. So pick back in the 19 fifties and Los Angeles. It was terribly polluted. Mostly from cars. The standard environmental approach would be to tell people I'm sorry. Could you drive a little less or maybe stop driving at all? Of course, that was not actually on the agenda, and you wouldn't be able to get people on board with that. What? Pick salt A very large part of the air pollution problem Essentials, Mr Catalytic converter. It was an innovation that you put on your car and then basically it deletes a lot less now it has a cost. But it's an okay cost compared to the immense benefit you get. The trick here is to recognize if we can innovate. The price of green energy down below fossil fuels. We can solve global warming. But as long as we keep telling everyone and especially China and India, Africa I'm sorry. You just got to be poor because we can't actually make you rich. While you don't admit a lot more to back, never goingto work. What we need to do is to invest a lot more in innovation to get green energy to be cheaper than fossil fuels. Once we reach that everyone will switch not just rich, well meaning Americans but also Latin America, Africa Everybody else and so you point To the hydrogen car that may very well be the solution. Remember there Lots of people out there who believe that they know what is going to power the rest of 21st century and all of them are still too expensive Hydrogen car included. But the point is, we should invest a lot more in the research of those because we just need one or a few of those technologies. And those are the ones in power. The 20%. I mean, everything changes when we can get the right battery. Everything changes on DH. We should be working. We should be spending all of our money on research in batteries and then looking for things like hydrogen cars. That could be coupled with those batteries. And then the problem is is solved. I I don't understand how people can Ah, block every single thing. And then Teo say wind power, which is so far away from reality. The land alone that it would take just to build enough wind windmills for a third of our energy need would be a third of the country. Almost. It's ridiculous. And I mean, you're so full of common sense. If this was the green energy movement. What use talk about here was the green energy movement. We would all be in lock step, but I gotta believe that You have been called a climate denier in science denier every step of the way as well, Even though you're not disagreeing with any of their science. Oh, of course, A lot of people find it a lot easier to argue by just called me names and actually engaged in this conversation. And, of course, the real surprise is, if you really, really worried about global warming. Why would you be proposing the same solutions have failed the last 30 years. If you really think this is the end of the world is not a smart move off course you need to find better ways to fix us. I would probably be a little bit more technology agnostic than you are because obviously, some people believe very much in batteries. Some people believe very much in hydrogen cars. Other people like Craig Venter, the guy who cracked the human genome back in 2000. He's arguing that we should put out the algae on the ocean surface that grow oil from sunlight and few to how cool would that be. We basically be able to keep our entire fossil fuel economy, but we power it with oil that we just produced and has BC to neutral again their lot to be here. All of them are not cost effective right now, which is why they haven't taken over the world. But the point is research and development can make that difference, and it just needs to make it difference. For one of these many technologies most more fail, that's fine. We just need one or a few of them to come through, and that's why I think we need to challenge people who are very, very worried and tell us we're going to spend trillions of your money. Ineffective solutions..

Africa Rials Craig Venter Los Angeles Mr Catalytic Glenn China Teo BC Latin America India
"craig venter" Discussed on Health Care Rounds

Health Care Rounds

09:09 min | 2 years ago

"craig venter" Discussed on Health Care Rounds

"And. That's all the way from things like Brca mutations which we knew for a long time. But until just recently had been able to target patients with Bracken ARP inhibitors. And also other mutations that are relatively rare but are truly transformative such as entrance fusions. I was involved in the phase one, but also the New England journal Phase to and kind of. Paper. That was pivotal nor the studies that were pivotal in the approval of colour threatening, which is the first intrigue fusion inhibitor. And what's unique about this approval was that it was approved across all tumor types. irregardless of the type of cancer you had as long as you had entered fusion and so this was really the second type of that was approved What's call independent of histology or tumor type? The I was actually was called. pendulism have won the immunotherapy checkpoint inhibitors in a subset of tumors call MSI high. I'm coining this phrase but I I'm sure if you talk with other experts would say it truly is kind of this golden era of oncology drug development that we haven't seen for a while. So that that personalization that you're talking about I had a I was at a conference in their two doctors one that was. Really strong on clinical pathway development and the other one that was speaking about more the precision medicine, and it was really interesting to see these two different perspectives that they're mutually exclusive. But seeing these these two physicians talk about the advantages of. Ver- either standardization or personalization what are your thoughts on that I agree with you they're not mutually exclusive and I'm both of them are valuable in in many ways I think they will intersect as we become more personalized. So imprecise therapy I think one of the the reason that this is happening more and more is because actually know profiling molecular profiling tumors have become much much cheaper I remember when I was in resident in I think it was Around two thousand, two Francis Collins? Think Bill. Clinton and. Craig venter made an announcement that they was on national. TV. That they had done some Then this incredible, a- profiling of a human, a whole Xm sequencing or whole genomic sequencing of a person's whole genome right and I remember the reporter saying that it was a mere two billion dollars to to make this happen right? In what what they didn't really full tell it was they hadn't done i. think it was only the Exxon's I I may be in criteria, but they hadn't really fully profiled everything. It was they had profiled the vast majority of the genome. In and that technology has gotten increasingly better and cheaper than even silicon chips. You know there's that Moore's law. And you can get online now and you can get your whole xm sequence or a whole genome sequence for like under a thousand bucks. and. So that technology has just incredibly evolved to the point where we are. You know routinely getting that and all of our patients here in the Anderson. Recently made that announcement that they would pay for the mutational profile in there have been some incredible examples like the Lehrer tracking. Of example, that I mentioned to you that truly has shown that the advantages of kind of profiling tumors etcetera. The are still skeptics a the skeptics would argue that only a percentage of the patients were maybe even a small percentage of those patients actually benefit from personalize therapy, but that's an assumption that that's assuming the current technology and. The current drugs will stay the same and obviously that in my opinion is short-sighted, we will develop new drugs and they're all V more knowledge imitations that personalized therapy approach. I suspect will be much more a approach that we can follow, and this is being or out particular lung cancer or lung cancer for example, is really been being sliced into smaller pies as suit targeted therapy. So it's important to note that that that trend in technology impresses will continue and I suspect that. You know five years from now there will be many more targeted therapies, many more patients who may benefit from personalized therapy than than they are right now the vast majority of patients are still Kinda using standard you know chemotherapy in for example, the NC, guidelines are a very good guideline as to how we treat patients all the way from early stage later stage. So they're not necessarily mutually exclusive. I helped develop a something called a pourquoi protocol green tea constitutes member home that's actually a combination targeted therapy plus chemotherapy. Regimen that we we identified high activity and benefit in patients would be Rafi six, hundred, eighty colorectal cancer that has been now incorporated into the guidelines for colorectal cancer, and that is a pathway which on colleges used to make determinations as to how to treat patients. So these aren't mutually exclusive pathways. I suspect though that you know not just five years from now ten years or even further down line there may be even more nuance ways more complex ways in which we. Live pathways, personalized pathways. Whether it's using a guy right and use it utilizing things like whole genome profiling identified drugs that may cause too much Choksi or may Ashley and also benefit. The data that we use in the context of profiling tumors or using a profiling patients is really determine which patients may actually. Benefit rather than which patients may Ashley Gain Toxicity. So all of that is going to be incorporated in the future to make maybe even personalized pathways. So there may be really a convergence of the both of those. Processes. Interesting. I. Noticed. You're actually published MD Anderson actually publishes all of your pathways on on the website. Why find that's remarkable is as part of our research into different institutions I often run into people who I don't know if the word is proprietary, maybe it's third they're secretive about their pathways within their organization which I don't understand. Why that would be the case when certainly MD Anderson is. As I said publishing them for the world. So ahead, a an a recent conversation with another academic institution where many of their docks their careers advancing through research publishing and sometimes. At least according to this person, they struggle to get them to spend time with patients. Obviously MD Anderson is known for world class care as well as being renowned research institution. Do you find it difficult to do both wealthy face the same kind of challenges with your researchers. Yeah, I think I think that's that's an increasing challenge given the current reimbursement environment. But you know if you look at the vast majority of revenue and what you need to kind of cover operating costs think eighty five to ninety percent of that. Still comes from clinical revenue. Don't don't quote me on I. Don't think I know the exact number, but it's around there. Right. So the other like seven percent I think is like is research NCI. I'd sponsors, it's address the other three percent is philanthropy. We know the most academic centers recognize. Where their bread is being buttered Sir they you know continuing push academic. Departments and chairs ensure that they meet their clinical revenues targets, but as a academic institution and in order to attract people are interested in research..

MD Anderson cancer New England journal Phase Bracken ARP Craig venter Francis Collins Exxon reporter NCI Bill Clinton Lehrer NC Ashley Moore Rafi
"craig venter" Discussed on The Disruptors

The Disruptors

07:27 min | 2 years ago

"craig venter" Discussed on The Disruptors

"Been exposed to business and business development in and industry as much as my as much as a academia so that that's a rare position not every academic has worked for a large company any for example. And then I've most of my my my day to day work is in communications in storytelling. And kind of visiting the future. So this this is a really odd intersection. Be An I. It's hard to define what I do but my but my core interest has been. We've got this. This incredible notable tool now that we call synthetic biology. which at if you strip all the the jargon away what that essentially means is we have the ability to write the genetic material new literally synthesized? DNA that's out of the core of synthetic biology and that gives us the ability now to use digital tools to essentially start to design At or modify fi the metabolism of a cell or or if the tools are powerful enough to actually design and build construct from it from scratch the genome of an organism and this is a really new technology the I heard the term synthetic synthetic biology probably around two thousand and two two thousand three so this is a relatively new field in over. The last fifteen years has blossomed into into a an exploration of using these tools for important research and commercial development. But you know this is. This is my interest here is is one what. What do those tools look like? What are the capabilities of those tools today? And what are the high value applications that are within reach of the of the current tool set. So I didn't I didn't start out to you know to really say oh. I'm going to go engineer viruses but my my thinking is I like to start bottom up and and most of the groups that I've met in the early days of synthetic biology were starting to essentially add new programs to bacteria Syria Taking bacterial cell. which is a very complex machine and an add a new process to the bacterium's metabolism awesome? So it could make a high value compound whether that was a drug or whether that was a biofuel or or a a new structural materials. Something like bioplastic that was what a Lotta the field was focusing on and I said well. That's really good and it makes for awesome great stories. But what if I was building a genome from scratch. What what could I build today? And at the time when I was looking at this assist was around two thousand five two thousand six. The tools really only allowed the construction of a synthetic virus like A to design and build a virus genome from scratch. So this is not surprising because if you look at the world of reading DNA we didn't go and read the human genome. I we we kind of we started with the smallest genomes which were the genomes of viruses and then we moved to bacterial genomes genomes sequenced the first bacterial cells and an emmy kind of moved up the the evolutionary tree from they're granted the Human Genome Project lit a fire under the entire sequencing raw so with synthetic biology. I was like okay. Well if I'm going to start and build a genome I'm from scratch. What what can I do? Viruses were were within reach Only one scientific group in the world has written a aback. Tibial Gino Craig venter's team and it's taken an international effort about seven years to to write the synthetic yeast genome which is a eukaryotic organism much more advanced than bacteria. So right now well given. The current state of the tools viruses are just are the low hanging fruit. What can you do with viruses? Let's explain that a bit. Yeah so well first of all I just WanNa that'd be clear. Most people typically think of viruses as being universally negative agents said that just caused disease. And that's kind of A. There's certainly some truth to that. These these are our as essentially opportunistic agents that route that that infect cells takeover herself metabolism often just to make more virus particles as they were beautifully described by by one scientist Eckard. Wimmer is chemicals goals with a life cycle but viruses are also incredibly powerful tools in in in the life science lab because their natural actual job is to take genetic material and put it into a cell and they do this in a very specific way like viruses are are essentially evolved to only in fact certain cell types and and to deliver their material the genetic material inside the viruses arison sometimes very specific ways so the way I like to describe viruses. They're essentially a USB stick no able to load a program into a cell and if you have the ability to write a virus from scratch that you get to load the programs on the USB stick so they don't have to be just nefarious so they're used in research To again do gene delivery. They're used they're probably saved. More lives than any other biological agents because viruses Sir are the essentially the foundation of most vaccines you build. What's either a a dead virus that in prime the immune system for when the live virus comes along or you build a weakened virus that has essentially the same form and function of of of the full strength virus but but but is easily defeated by your body? So it doesn't make you sick but it's still primes your immune system's that's vaccines and then also the basis of gene therapies. Where where you're actually delivering code to a cell to either repair it or reprogramming in some ways so so? They're incredibly useful tools but a- as I started to do the research on synthetic viruses quite a while back now the first one was made in two thousand and two so sixteen years ago since that time less than thirty synthetic viruses have been made thirty different types different species of viruses essentially and Given that there's probably hundreds of millions if not billions of viruses. You know you can see that. It's just a drop in the bucket. We're just getting started. I don't know about you but I do all my best work coffee shops. And that's why I'm excited to tell you guys about today's show sponsor tunnel bear if you WANNA protect your data while you're on public Qui- fight you. Don't want people stealing your passwords.

Gino Craig venter Syria engineer Wimmer scientist
"craig venter" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

09:48 min | 2 years ago

"craig venter" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"Have Now arrived at your destination. Somehow I couldn't be more excited to have you on the show. I have many great things from David. Carrot he told me many a wonderful anecdote but thank you so much for joining me. Stay summit will thank you for having me. I followed a little bit of your work and it's very impressive. So it's my pleasure with is very very kind of you. I he goes is a wonderful thing. So thank you for that but I would love to say a little bit uneasy. Tell me how did you make your way into the world adventure and come to find one of the leading thumbs the last decade and Khosla. It's a complete accident accident so I was working on the genome projects with Craig venter in the late nineties. So at this point I was in graduate school. I heard Craig talk and and I and I was still doing. DNA sequence the old fashioned way with radioactive isotopes and developing my own film. And he was talking about these magical machines that could sequence a human genome mm-hmm and I ended up leaving with a master's went to go work for them and I soon moved up to actually running the largest group at the genetic research without a PhD which was Super Fun. And we we sequenced the first plant to ever be sequence which was Robert Opposite Stagliano and the way to think about why is it even relevant this little mustard seed. Plant is to think about it. As the reason we study the mice and rats is because they are somewhat of a proxy for human and a Rabbit Office similarly somewhat of a proxy for Corn Wheat Soybeans and other higher level crop. I was doing that and at some point Craig and I both thought the right thing to do go to business school and he had moved on to salina which was a public company. That was the private effort to sequence the human genome and my goal was to go to business. School chose Harvard Comeback and work for Craig at Selena on one day. Maybe run the company instead soon. After I started business Craig got fired without options. Didn't exist anymore. I to figure out what I wanted to do. I thought that maybe then from HP s go work at an Amgen Genentech and worked for twenty twenty years probably make it to a vice president level. And if I was lucky they tapped me to go a little bit more senior and at that time at Harvard Gordon binder was CEO of Amgen. Dan and Rachel Martin was CEO of Merck and so I had the fortune. Hbo Salam's meet with both of them and they were super impressive. Big Jobs important company but not my. They were just too big or too disconnected from the day to day and I heard new bar fan. Who's the founder of flagship? Give talk and I approached him after and we met and he gave me an internship and that was it so I got to work with new flagship for four years and while I was at flagship I learned a lot new still very close friend and was a mentor to me and I helped start. Four companies of which Vinod has invested in three of them and when vinod left Kleiner Perkins and decided after some time off to start Khosla ventures. He asked me. And my other other partner David Widen to join him in starting the firm together and this was in towards the end of two thousand five entry perspective and I couldn't agree with you more in times of being the the big company man so to speak but I do want to because you've now been mentioned for seventeen a one big thing for me is. I've never seen the boom and bust something that you have seen when we discussed it with Joshua I John. He said the bus made him more conservatives. How does seeing the boom and bust impact your investing mindset? Do you think Sammy. Josh is an excellent investor. And I'm a big fan of his. I tend tend to disagree. I think in this business being conservative is a real problem because we're in the business of returning twenty percent or greater net irr to our investors offers and we don't get judged by how many companies succeed out of the number company that we invest in. We get judged by what is our return and all things. I've learned really early from vinod the other thing is you never want to sell your winners too soon. Because you just don't know which one's going to be a winner and when you get one you gotta ride it to the the highest possible number and you can only lose one times your money but the upside is completely uncapped. And we've seen that you know across our funds as well. We've seen some really super super successes so I think if you start to become more conservative you really start to not take the type of risks and the radical technical risk especially in our shop that you the need to to get the returns and I think you also limit the volatility and as such. You won't get the outside returns and you won't get the kind of returns that people invest in our asset class to get. The only thing I'd say is that you know you get these booms and bus. I've lived through two. I've lived through the DOT com boom. And the Oh eight boom bust and what what what tends to happen. Ah The companies and the investors that get hurt most are usually the ones that are in. These like overheated areas where somebody's valuations just got control and I think one of the things we love about our firm firm though. We do invest half or more in traditional venture areas. We also spend about a third or so of our allocation in areas that have yet to be disrupted by technology. Don't venture there and so that we don't really have these outsized cost bases evaluation so they tend to be less affected by these massive boom and bought the first you mentioned about that kind of piling into the winners and absolutely it made me think in terms of that first investment decision making process than the reinvestment decision making process. How does it look for? Your car is led if initial buses ran as well. It depends on the size. So if it's a seed fund kind of investments a million or two million bucks then we look to you do invest in and we call it option value investing is that we make that investment. Because we have a thesis that this could be a billion dollar opportunity but we I need to see something. Can they recruit the right team. Can they address some binary technical risk or something along those lines well. The market developed the way that we think we do but we wanted then being a position where we have an informed and early opinion on that company when it comes for a series or series B. At that point if it's not going to be a billion dollar company pretty probably doesn't make sense to put a lot more money and time into it if we think it's GonNa be a big big kind of wind and we wanNA leave the next route so then we'll come in and do a lot of diligence and we should have a front row seat to lead the round because we're already in the company and we already own some of the companies so in terms of tour delusion to the founder of. That's less for them and so that's probably treat the seed he'd company investments says it's really option value investing. We want to be in a position to really lead the next round and would that seed money some of the key risks which will help us decide whether or not this is a multibillion dollar potential opportunity or for the traditional venture investing. You know the way I look at. It is at our firm. We have four managing directors we rate eight the companies as a one to four and a one means absolutely. This is awesome. We should absolutely pile money and do it and a four is well. Well I wouldn't do it. I don't think you should do it but you know in the end. It's your call in my seventeen years being here. I can't remember veto. We don't really even have a number for veto. And the reason is it's so hard to tell when you make these early investments that seeds we day theory sometimes evening seriously what the outcome is going to be and if you present at a partner meeting and is not the company that I'm sponsoring I'm getting about a couple of hours of exposure tour. Virtually one of my partners getting dozens and dozens of hours. If I don't trust my partner's judgment judgment they shouldn't be my partner and I think when you don't veto you actually have more of a licensed to give really tough critical feedback and so that the partner earn question can go home and sleep on it and then look in the mirror and decide whether he or she really wants to do the investment but they know that they can and there's nowhere to hide like. Oh Oh well. Samir vetoed that and guess what that company was it was AIRBNB. You know they have to really look at themselves big okay. Here's the feedback I got to. I really want to do this but in the end it's your responsibility ability in your decision and it allows for much more honest dialogue and other places where you have a veto you see a lot of politicking vote from ideal vote for yours people. Don't I wanna say what they think they don't want to make someone feel bad and be to their company just kinda transcends our firm this notion of people get a lot of rope were incredibly brutally honest and transparent with them totally agree and I love that in terms of they have in terms of the reinvestment. What does not let light then? Yeah they're gonNA get to look. I think of it as hey if you and I made a bet at the beginning of the Super Bowl and I said hey you can change your Harry at halftime. Of course you would do that. You have more information so to me. I think pro rata is a total a cop out I think when a company comes for reinvestment. We need to have a strong opinion on it. We should do redoing all of our diligent and seeing if the key risks have been addressed and what we think of the team and what we think of the prospects and what we think of the competition but we should make a decision. I mean the only time we should do. PIRATA is if that's the maximum allocation we can get or we think that the company is worth continuing and we don't want more exposure but we don't do are pro Outta the round falls apart other than that we should do more than parameter or much less two zero of two because we get to change our bet at. If you don't change your bet and the house is against right and blackjack every hand you have the odds you're GONNA lose are greater than the hand you're GonNa win so if you get something where you can double down or split you gotta push all your chips to the table because if you just make the same bet on every hand you're gonNA lose just math and sustain thing adventure. The odds of one of our initial investments being successful is lower than fifty percent. Sometimes it's ten percent and so when you get a signal that it might be better you gotta Oughta really push your chips to the table. The courage to Seiji Stat right in the company's kind of quickly and then allocate capital accordingly. What is azure granular decision? Making I don't think we stack rank them but we definitely look at our company every quarter and say you know where are the ones where we think we can make a very good return not only could make a very good return but our involvement would help drive that to a better outcome. But there's some companies that are just doing great and our involvement isn't going to be that consequential so you know we can help recruit or something like that but it doesn't make sense for us to allocate more time to them but there are company you'll discover that if.

partner Craig venter Vinod David Widen founder Khosla CEO of Amgen Rabbit Office Robert Opposite Stagliano HP Khosla ventures Kleiner Perkins Harvard Gordon salina Amgen Genentech Merck Sammy Joshua
"craig venter" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

09:48 min | 2 years ago

"craig venter" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"Have Now arrived at your destination. Somehow I couldn't be more excited to have you on the show. I have many great things from David. Carrot he told me many a wonderful anecdote but thank you so much for joining me. Stay summit will thank you for having me. I followed a little bit of your work and it's very impressive. So it's my pleasure with is very very kind of you. I he goes is a wonderful thing. So thank you for that but I would love to say a little bit uneasy. Tell me how did you make your way into the world adventure and come to find one of the leading thumbs the last decade and Khosla. It's a complete accident accident so I was working on the genome projects with Craig venter in the late nineties. So at this point I was in graduate school. I heard Craig talk and and I and I was still doing. DNA sequence the old fashioned way with radioactive isotopes and developing my own film. And he was talking about these magical machines that could sequence a human genome mm-hmm and I ended up leaving with a master's went to go work for them and I soon moved up to actually running the largest group at the genetic research without a PhD which was Super Fun. And we we sequenced the first plant to ever be sequence which was Robert Opposite Stagliano and the way to think about why is it even relevant this little mustard seed. Plant is to think about it. As the reason we study the mice and rats is because they are somewhat of a proxy for human and a Rabbit Office similarly somewhat of a proxy for Corn Wheat Soybeans and other higher level crop. I was doing that and at some point Craig and I both thought the right thing to do go to business school and he had moved on to salina which was a public company. That was the private effort to sequence the human genome and my goal was to go to business. School chose Harvard Comeback and work for Craig at Selena on one day. Maybe run the company instead soon. After I started business Craig got fired without options. Didn't exist anymore. I to figure out what I wanted to do. I thought that maybe then from HP s go work at an Amgen Genentech and worked for twenty twenty years probably make it to a vice president level. And if I was lucky they tapped me to go a little bit more senior and at that time at Harvard Gordon binder was CEO of Amgen. Dan and Rachel Martin was CEO of Merck and so I had the fortune. Hbo Salam's meet with both of them and they were super impressive. Big Jobs important company but not my. They were just too big or too disconnected from the day to day and I heard new bar fan. Who's the founder of flagship? Give talk and I approached him after and we met and he gave me an internship and that was it so I got to work with new flagship for four years and while I was at flagship I learned a lot new still very close friend and was a mentor to me and I helped start. Four companies of which Vinod has invested in three of them and when vinod left Kleiner Perkins and decided after some time off to start Khosla ventures. He asked me. And my other other partner David Widen to join him in starting the firm together and this was in towards the end of two thousand five entry perspective and I couldn't agree with you more in times of being the the big company man so to speak but I do want to because you've now been mentioned for seventeen a one big thing for me is. I've never seen the boom and bust something that you have seen when we discussed it with Joshua I John. He said the bus made him more conservatives. How does seeing the boom and bust impact your investing mindset? Do you think Sammy. Josh is an excellent investor. And I'm a big fan of his. I tend tend to disagree. I think in this business being conservative is a real problem because we're in the business of returning twenty percent or greater net irr to our investors offers and we don't get judged by how many companies succeed out of the number company that we invest in. We get judged by what is our return and all things. I've learned really early from vinod the other thing is you never want to sell your winners too soon. Because you just don't know which one's going to be a winner and when you get one you gotta ride it to the the highest possible number and you can only lose one times your money but the upside is completely uncapped. And we've seen that you know across our funds as well. We've seen some really super super successes so I think if you start to become more conservative you really start to not take the type of risks and the radical technical risk especially in our shop that you the need to to get the returns and I think you also limit the volatility and as such. You won't get the outside returns and you won't get the kind of returns that people invest in our asset class to get. The only thing I'd say is that you know you get these booms and bus. I've lived through two. I've lived through the DOT com boom. And the Oh eight boom bust and what what what tends to happen. Ah The companies and the investors that get hurt most are usually the ones that are in. These like overheated areas where somebody's valuations just got control and I think one of the things we love about our firm firm though. We do invest half or more in traditional venture areas. We also spend about a third or so of our allocation in areas that have yet to be disrupted by technology. Don't venture there and so that we don't really have these outsized cost bases evaluation so they tend to be less affected by these massive boom and bought the first you mentioned about that kind of piling into the winners and absolutely it made me think in terms of that first investment decision making process than the reinvestment decision making process. How does it look for? Your car is led if initial buses ran as well. It depends on the size. So if it's a seed fund kind of investments a million or two million bucks then we look to you do invest in and we call it option value investing is that we make that investment. Because we have a thesis that this could be a billion dollar opportunity but we I need to see something. Can they recruit the right team. Can they address some binary technical risk or something along those lines well. The market developed the way that we think we do but we wanted then being a position where we have an informed and early opinion on that company when it comes for a series or series B. At that point if it's not going to be a billion dollar company pretty probably doesn't make sense to put a lot more money and time into it if we think it's GonNa be a big big kind of wind and we wanNA leave the next route so then we'll come in and do a lot of diligence and we should have a front row seat to lead the round because we're already in the company and we already own some of the companies so in terms of tour delusion to the founder of. That's less for them and so that's probably treat the seed he'd company investments says it's really option value investing. We want to be in a position to really lead the next round and would that seed money some of the key risks which will help us decide whether or not this is a multibillion dollar potential opportunity or for the traditional venture investing. You know the way I look at. It is at our firm. We have four managing directors we rate eight the companies as a one to four and a one means absolutely. This is awesome. We should absolutely pile money and do it and a four is well. Well I wouldn't do it. I don't think you should do it but you know in the end. It's your call in my seventeen years being here. I can't remember veto. We don't really even have a number for veto. And the reason is it's so hard to tell when you make these early investments that seeds we day theory sometimes evening seriously what the outcome is going to be and if you present at a partner meeting and is not the company that I'm sponsoring I'm getting about a couple of hours of exposure tour. Virtually one of my partners getting dozens and dozens of hours. If I don't trust my partner's judgment judgment they shouldn't be my partner and I think when you don't veto you actually have more of a licensed to give really tough critical feedback and so that the partner earn question can go home and sleep on it and then look in the mirror and decide whether he or she really wants to do the investment but they know that they can and there's nowhere to hide like. Oh Oh well. Samir vetoed that and guess what that company was it was AIRBNB. You know they have to really look at themselves big okay. Here's the feedback I got to. I really want to do this but in the end it's your responsibility ability in your decision and it allows for much more honest dialogue and other places where you have a veto you see a lot of politicking vote from ideal vote for yours people. Don't I wanna say what they think they don't want to make someone feel bad and be to their company just kinda transcends our firm this notion of people get a lot of rope were incredibly brutally honest and transparent with them totally agree and I love that in terms of they have in terms of the reinvestment. What does not let light then? Yeah they're gonNA get to look. I think of it as hey if you and I made a bet at the beginning of the Super Bowl and I said hey you can change your Harry at halftime. Of course you would do that. You have more information so to me. I think pro rata is a total a cop out I think when a company comes for reinvestment. We need to have a strong opinion on it. We should do redoing all of our diligent and seeing if the key risks have been addressed and what we think of the team and what we think of the prospects and what we think of the competition but we should make a decision. I mean the only time we should do. PIRATA is if that's the maximum allocation we can get or we think that the company is worth continuing and we don't want more exposure but we don't do are pro Outta the round falls apart other than that we should do more than parameter or much less two zero of two because we get to change our bet at. If you don't change your bet and the house is against right and blackjack every hand you have the odds you're GONNA lose are greater than the hand you're GonNa win so if you get something where you can double down or split you gotta push all your chips to the table because if you just make the same bet on every hand you're gonNA lose just math and sustain thing adventure. The odds of one of our initial investments being successful is lower than fifty percent. Sometimes it's ten percent and so when you get a signal that it might be better you gotta Oughta really push your chips to the table. The courage to Seiji Stat right in the company's kind of quickly and then allocate capital accordingly. What is azure granular decision? Making I don't think we stack rank them but we definitely look at our company every quarter and say you know where are the ones where we think we can make a very good return not only could make a very good return but our involvement would help drive that to a better outcome. But there's some companies that are just doing great and our involvement isn't going to be that consequential so you know we can help recruit or something like that but it doesn't make sense for us to allocate more time to them but there are company you'll discover that if.

partner Craig venter Vinod David Widen founder Khosla CEO of Amgen Rabbit Office Robert Opposite Stagliano HP Khosla ventures Kleiner Perkins Harvard Gordon salina Amgen Genentech Merck Sammy Joshua
"craig venter" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"craig venter" Discussed on KGO 810

"UCSF health care don't kick off you to use. the forty Niners at. by downloading the forty Niners after. KGO eight. second down and thirteen for Winston out of the shot gun empty center comes up what's my green lawn a quick rotors. for now the pregame Leri Krueger sit next to Dennis brown and John long here in the studios of Key geo will be at the kicking mule and downtown Danville for post game today hopefully celebrating a niner victory next segment Matty mail goes going to join us from from Cincinnati what is the name of the bangles stadium to know the name of the bangles stadium off it out I've got I've taught my head outside right you know I don't know where the Bengals play but we'll we'll look at at a call the jungle I know that Paul Brown stadium. around city may I have a sense of the world when she's about to a quick shout out this dude gets up at five thirty in mourning his five year old will come up Michael McVey is in San Clemente place you know well there and he is a listening via the apps so he says I fiber look me up at five thirty AM up listening on the tune in and from San Clemente listen you guys all the time and Dennis you rock Niners why Craig venter so if you're gonna get up this early awesome well I'm not you know we don't do a ton a shout outs on the show why not and he's got a big niner flag that he they took a picture of two and and re tweeted so rough that you get up this early like their electricity and you don't have to be up and get you set a five year old and a five year old demos that. Michael Mann yeah I always get up early Sunday I can't wait to sleep.

bangles stadium Dennis brown Michael McVey San Clemente Craig venter Matty mail UCSF Leri Krueger Paul Brown Michael Mann Key geo Winston Cincinnati Danville Bengals John five year
JK Craig Venter Institute, Cormon and Cindy Burkey discussed on First Light

First Light

01:31 min | 4 years ago

JK Craig Venter Institute, Cormon and Cindy Burkey discussed on First Light

"The islands arts community get back on. Its feet, after hurricane Maria, Rhonda says he'll donate all of the profits from his Broadway hit on its performed in Puerto Rico. In January I five included dance school and a theater company fault ever Rodriguez. CBS news Maybe Cormon. Killed police looking for answers I'm Cindy Burkey that's one of the stories. We're following on AM seven sixty a twenty four year old woman shot to death in oceanside apartment complex has been identified as. Devan right out a Camp. Pendleton navy, Cormon police arrested twenty five year old Eduardo are you'll look on suspicion of murder the to live in the same, complex but police say there's no known connection between the suspect and the victim A. Man suspected of stealing a car from a dealership was arrested around noontime Sunday. After leading police. On a chase. From current Mesa into Miramar the thirty minute high speed chase happened on highway fifty two and up the fifteen freeway an. Influential San Diego genetic researcher is under fire as the institute. Bearing his, name faces a lawsuit the union Tribune reports human longevity of LA Hoya is suing the JK Craig Venter institute for allegedly. Stealing trade secrets AM seven sixty k. FM be talk and breaking news Good morning and welcome to first light from Westwood.

Jk Craig Venter Institute Cormon Cindy Burkey Hurricane Maria Oceanside Apartment Union Tribune Puerto Rico La Hoya Pendleton Navy Devan CBS Rhonda Rodriguez Miramar Westwood San Diego Eduardo Researcher Murder A. Man
Human Longevity sues J. Craig Venter Institute, alleging theft of trade secrets

John Jastremski

00:35 sec | 4 years ago

Human Longevity sues J. Craig Venter Institute, alleging theft of trade secrets

"For the coast a for profit genetic research center is suing a San Diego nonprofit named, for j, Craig Venter a researcher, whose work sped the sequencing of the human genome the union, Tribune reports, human longevity of LA Hoya, is, alleging that the j Craig Venter institute. Benefited from secrets stolen from the. Company laptop good. Times had by all this weekend at comic con international at about one hundred and thirty thousand fans. Attended in sports Padres follow the Phillies five. Zero partly cloudy and seventy five degrees AM seven sixty k..

J Craig Venter Institute Craig Venter Phillies Tribune San Diego Researcher Seventy Five Degrees Seven Sixty K