17 Burst results for "Craig Cohen"

"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

06:15 min | 10 months ago

"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"I'm Craig Cohen. Good morning. Coming up. We continue our look back at 9 11 20 years later, with more memories from Houstonians Reflections from Houston area veterans of post 9 11 wars and the father of one of the flight 93 passengers who died that day. A memorial in Market Square Park is named for her. But first the U. S. Justice Department filed a lawsuit Thursday against the state of Texas challenging SP eight. The new ban on abortions after six weeks. Justice argues the new law runs afoul of the supremacy and equal protection clauses of the U. S Constitution to explain we're joined now by Seth Chandler, professor of law at the University of Houston Law Center. Good morning. Good morning, Craig first remind us what are the supremacy and equal protection clauses in the Constitution? The supremacy clause says that federal law trumps contrary state law. It's part of the original constitution. And the equal protection clauses contained in the 14th amendment. Uh, and it requires that states grant individuals equal protection. Of the law. How might this new law not meet those standards? Well, it's really more of the supremacy business, then the equal protection business. Um, the one of the arguments that is made Is that the statute is prohibits certain federal agencies that have duties to transport individuals for abortions, such as perhaps the Bureau of Prisons or the job Corps. It interferes with their activities. But the more fundamental problem is that it's contrary to the Constitution, the Supreme Court has ruled clearly. That states cannot just for the sake of it regulate abortions prior to the fetus being viable, which is roughly 22 weeks or so. And while there's some debate on the margins about that, nobody thinks that a Fetus is viable just as soon as the heartbeat can be heard. And so the main thrust of the Justice Department's lawsuit is that the Texas statute is contrary to the interpretation of the federal Constitution. Given by the Supreme Court in cases such as Roe versus Wade now, in announcing the lawsuit, Attorney General Merrick Garland said Texas lawmakers have engaged in a quote unprecedented scheme to protect it from the legal challenges that have struck down others so called heartbeat bills around the country by essentially outsourcing enforcement to private citizens. Garlands, warning that If this were to stand, states could use a similar approach to circumvent any other judicial precedent they disagree with. Will federal courts see it that way? Well, I hope so, because he's absolutely right. Um imagine, for example, New York establishing a $10,000 bounty if someone can find someone with a perfectly legitimate handgun for self defense in their home. Under the Texas If the Texas law stands the only way that individual would be able to challenge that gun owner would be able to challenge the law would be to have someone sue him. Perhaps hundreds of people sue him as permitted by the Texas law, and then go all over New York state trying to defend themselves against the completely bogus charge. And that's the fundamental one of the many fundamental problems with SB eight is that it really authorizes a scheme to, uh prevent people from exercising constitutional rights and if it's good for Texas It's good for New York. It's good for Florida. It's good for California. Assuming this challenge ends up in front of the Supreme Court couldn't what the attorney general characterizes. What you call a scheme ultimately be the reason That the five most conservative justices would use to uphold its constitutionality. Uh saying, Look, it's not a criminal penalty. It's a civil one and would still be up to a judge in a civil lawsuit to decide. Uh, the Supreme Court could decide this case very easily without resolving issues having to do with abortion itself. It could simply say that the state cannot insulate itself. From responsibility for unconstitutional laws by delegating enforcement to private citizens. And indeed, one might think the Supreme Court would be particularly wary of schemes that really expanded. The ability of people to sue who haven't been injured because under SB eight You could sue someone for an abortion past and performed in Amarillo, A person in Dumas up in the Panhandle could who never heard of the person could sue a doctor in Galveston for performing an abortion? It's a It's an unprecedented scheme, and that's why you've got this lawsuit. Could this also be a civil rights case, another equal protection challenge since the windows so small between when most people learn their pregnant and that six week deadline or when the heart beats detected and other Texas laws have led to fewer providers, which require multiple appointments more than 24 hours apart. You put all that together. It forces those seeking abortions to travel to miss work on short notice, which many can't or don't have money to do. Uh Then you throw an income disparities in Texas already seen along racial lines. Couldn't that create a circumstance where we're saying people of color seeking abortions are affected more than white people. Yes. Unfortunately, I don't think that's your best argument because the Supreme Court has ruled that, uh to statutory provisions that indirectly have an effect a differential effect based on race. Are not. By virtue of that unconstitutional. You've got to show an intent to discriminate on the basis of race or another protected characteristic. And so if I were litigating on behalf of the Department of Justice, that would not be my first argument, and in fact, you see very little. Of equal protection in the complaint, actually filed by the Department of Justice Seth Chandler argument is that simply it violates Roe versus Wade. Okay. Seth Chandler is a professor of law at the University of Houston Law Center said, Thank you very much. My pleasure and up Next more Houstonians.

Seth Chandler Craig Cohen $10,000 Market Square Park Bureau of Prisons Houston Dumas Galveston Thursday University of Houston Law Cent 22 weeks Craig U. S. Justice Department Department of Justice six week New York Justice Department Texas Amarillo Panhandle
"craig cohen" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

04:07 min | 10 months ago

"craig cohen" Discussed on Houston Matters

"Craig cohen good morning. Coming up houstonians. Memories of the attacks of september eleventh. Two thousand one. The occurred twenty years ago. Saturday we'll also hear how different generations of houston think about those attacks and their impact and will consider the lasting effects on american muslims. Through the lens of middle school. We start today though with an executive order. Houston mayor sylvester. Turner announced it wednesday city council meeting which requires city employees to be tested for covert nineteen twice a month until they are fully vaccinated effective october eighth as of tuesday three hundred forty two city of houston employees reported testing positive for the virus that includes one hundred twenty nine police officers with more. We're joined now by news. Eighty eight seven city hall reporter generous. Good morning john. Good morning craig. What reasons did the mayor give for. Establishing this requirement now. Well it's certainly not out of the blue. There was this interesting situation. Two weeks ago where. The mayor hinted at a city council meeting that he was planning to require city employees to get vaccinated. That's not what happened within hours of him. Simply mentioning that governor. Greg abbott put out an executive order banning local governments from requiring employees to get vaccinated so turner was considering that. That's not was able to do so. It seems like he's kind of reevaluated. That now he's going with a plan to require undocked -ployees to get tested every two weeks. He some of the reasons he said for that. You know a lot of city employees more than three hundred city employees. Actually have kobe right now. A lot of those are police officers and he said you know when these police officers are out with cove. They can't do their jobs and he's also concerned about them getting sick and dying. Does this apply to all city employees. Know if you are a city of houston employees in your vaccinated. You can report that in. This order won't apply to you. He's also carving out medical or religious exemptions as well oh and also elected officials and appointed officials who are with boards and commissions. They won't need to get tested either. Y. are elected and appointed officials exempt. That's a good question. I don't have an answer for that but it's definitely Something that i know has has you know perhaps raised eyebrows. What consequences might unvaccinated city employees. Face if they don't get and report regular testing yeah so the employees who do not comply or perhaps people who may consider reporting false information. They're going to be consequences for that It says disciplinary action and the mayor said You could end up. Losing your job will city residents know who's testing positive ruse vaccinated who who's exempt from all of this I'm not sure. But the mayor's been pretty transparent about how many c- employees have coveted so he's been regularly updating those numbers so i wouldn't be surprised if they did sort of. Give us a hint as to. How many are testing positive. But i. But i'm sure the exemption information and the testing information remain confidential and just be kept within the realm of hr. How will this work will testing go. Through harris county. Public health will be up to two various department. Heads due to keep track of employees need to be tested so for now. The mayor has said that employees will need to report the results. Hr what else did city council dig into wednesday. They did some some housing work. they they spent. They decided to allocate two million dollars of the federal money to go toward creating permanent housing for people who are experiencing homelessness right now related to the pandemic and also kind of looking out for an interesting item that is going to be on. Next week's agenda related to buying out flooded properties. Jen rice's news at eight seven city hall reporter. Jenn thank you very much. Thanks craig and up next week. Devote the remainder of the hour to remembering the attacks of september eleventh two thousand one including houston's memories of the day stay with.

Craig cohen mayor sylvester houston Greg abbott Turner city council Houston craig turner john harris county Jen rice Jenn
"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

05:30 min | 10 months ago

"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Are falling apart. Brandon. Do we think those issues will find their way to the four and upcoming elections as priorities for voters, or will it be something more like the abortion bill that was passed and and how that plays out? It's a really good question, Craig and I think that it depends on what constituency that we're concerned about. I think for Republicans, you know on your question earlier about what you know they lost in one. I think one thing the Republicans may have lost is the center. And although there aren't as many people in the center as there used to be, there are still significant number of swing votes that are available in a state like Texas if you can rally Democrats And you can get enough sort of independent and sort of leaning Republican support. You know, there's a case that you could be successful or certainly competitive and statewide level. So I think that these issues will rally certain groups. So I think you definitely see the abortion issue, you know, Rallying women. You certainly see it rallying independence. The data tell us you're also I think seeing the voting rights issues rallying Democrats so Although the Democrats don't have a candidate, and that's when big loss for them, I think from this is that despite all of this churn politically, there's not an announced candidate for governor. Um so I think that you know that's obviously step one for them. But I do think that it can as it is, these different issues are going to rally different constituents that they need somebody to unify that if they're going to have any chance of Taking on Greg Abbott. This is Houston matters. I'm Craig Cohen. We're talking with political analysts Nancy Sims and Brandon Rotting House, both from the University of Houston. We're talking through recent developments in politics. We do this every Wednesday. It's our weekly political roundup and let's turn our attention now to national politics, National and international. Actually, Nancy, what does the withdrawal from Afghanistan no matter how well or poorly it was handled. And that has been discussed quite a bit in the last few weeks. What does it signal may be about the future of the Biden administration's foreign policy. Well, that's that's a big question. Uh, obviously he stuck to the commitment to withdraw. I think in the long term people will view it differently than they have your The actual massive retreat that has that has left people just in awe of The scenes from the airport and that sort of thing I think in the long term people will probably appreciate the fact that we're no longer in Afghanistan. But he's taken a bruising and I would just say about President Biden. This has just been one of the worst months for him because of all the natural disasters between IDA And the wild fires and leaving Afghanistan and you know, just constant. It seems challenges thrown in his In his path. I want to come back to Ida in just a couple of minutes. But Brandon, I'm curious whether you look at the Afghanistan withdrawal the same way. I do largely, I think, ultimately that you know this is what the people wanted. And although obviously the implementation was poorly done. It's certainly the case that as a policy objective, that's what the by the administration wanted and what he assumed that most people wanted. I think question remains about what the Biden doctrine is, in terms of foreign policy. As of right now, it's been sort of undoing the trump doctrine so Will there be a definitive Biden doctrine from this? I think it's unknown. I mean, the very hint we have here there are slight Kim. Half here is that they're refocusing on a new world and exactly what that looks like. We don't quite know yet, but I do think that's one part of it. But I think the optics of this are problematic for the Biden administration. If they are unable to convince people that they can do the job successful they were hired to do that is to basically rewrite American politics to kind of solve problems and to pass legislation Then they can You know effectively, they can make that case to people. But if things continue to go wrong, and things aren't handled well, then it makes it look like they're not up to that task. And that's the problem for them in the midterms, for sure, But think about, you know, three years from now, when you know we're having the presidential election. As NPR reported Tuesday. President Biden speaking in stark terms about the reality of climate change, saying For decades, scientists have warned that extreme weather would be more extreme and climate change was here and he says what? We're living through it now. Those remarks came during a visit to the northeastern US After that deadly flooding and infrastructure damage from the remnants of Hurricane Ida. We tend to talk Nancy about politics. In terms of red versus blue, Republican versus Democrat Conservative versus liberal and, understandably so I do wonder if we should spend more time contemplating geographic politics and whether attitudes on something like climate change's impact might be different after a tropical storm batters the Northeast and it's suddenly not just seen as a Gulf states problem. I So agree with you correct. I always say if it happens in the Northeast and it you know, it's the worst thing that's ever happened and that you know that the coast both us and the West Coast, when things Are awful. It's just not as bad and that's because the center of our media universe is New York and also the population there and.

Nancy Greg Abbott Craig Cohen Nancy Sims New York Tuesday Craig Brandon NPR Democrats Republicans Ida Republican Kim University of Houston IDA Hurricane Ida Texas Afghanistan Houston
"craig cohen" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

08:10 min | 10 months ago

"craig cohen" Discussed on Houston Matters

"I is now a tropical storm that has left devastation in. its wake for our neighbors in louisiana. I'm craig cohen today on houston matters. What the storm did and what he stony and should take away from it and is houston takes in some louisiana residents who came here ahead of ida. We learn how the bayou cities helped some four legged louisiana's we also discuss. How dogs and cats can help us in times of crisis and learn about a houston. Isd program that offers just one example. Also this hour as the deadline looms for final withdrawal from afghanistan. We hear from a former combat interpreter. Now living in houston who has become an american citizen. His extended conversation with andrew. Schneider's ahead plus the houston astros head into the stretch run. Will there be one last long. Playoff ride for carlos correa. We'll start with a news update from npr news. Eighty eight seven stabilize. This is houston matters. I'm craig cohen good morning coming up the latest on ida and what the storm. That's devastated our neighbors in louisiana might remind us in particular in light of the ongoing pandemic. Also it's not just people but pets as well that have come to houston from louisiana plus as us forces scramble to evacuate americans afghan allies ahead of tuesday's troop withdrawal deadline. We hear from a houston. Ian was an interpreter for the us military. There we start though with now. Tropical storm ida. We're just now beginning to get a sense of the devastation. Wrought by the now downgraded storm which tore through new orleans and other communities in and around the louisiana gulf coast making landfall as a category four hurricane. Ida's left all of orleans. Parish without power same for many surrounding parishes outages in fact now stretch across louisiana mississippi. And it's believed some folks could be without electricity for weeks. Louisiana hospitals are relying on generators and they had to ride out the storm while at or near full capacity as hospitals across the south were unable to take in very many patients ahead of the storm as they've all been overwhelmed with covert nineteen cases underscoring the repercussions of low vaccination that double-whammy of kovic and eita was on houston mayor sylvester turner's mind sunday. This time the storm went to louisiana next time. The storm could come very much at texas and pacific this city. You don't want to wait and not be fascinated and then when something like this happens you know you. You're unprepared so Do everything we can to assist people coming from louisiana but at the same time they mean courage houstonians to take this as kind of a warning to Put your your hurricane together. Get fascinated and be prepared just in case the storm comes away next time houston mayor sylvester turner on sunday. Ida arrived four years after harvey and sixteen years after katrina. How does it compare. Let's talk through that now. With national weather service. Meteorologist dan riley. Hi dan good morning. I how strong was ida as it. Blew into and through louisiana over the last twenty four hours. I was a high and category four storm hundred and fifty miles per hour sustained winds. There was actually a ship. Observation of a wind gust of one hundred seventy five so This was one of the strongest storms to ever hit louisiana It ties laura from last year And then there was a storm back in the eighteen. Hundreds harvey was also a category for When it made landfall down the coast near rockport. And how does this compare to katrina. Since that's also so much in in people's minds sixteen years to the day katrina was the larger hurricane and was actually a five offshore But when it had made when it made landfall. It was a category three in terms of wind but because it was a larger hurricane it actually produced greater storm surge so You know certainly both devastating storms. There's been a lot of medication since katrina with the new flow protection system and By and large. I think it's job this time. Where is ida now. I didn't end Has gotten into the state of mississippi since southwest mississippi Maximum sustained winds forty five miles per hour so it is a weakening thankfully and forecast to Right now tracking to the north at eight miles per hour gonna take more of a northeast track as we go through the day and then pick up speed as go into tomorrow. Would ida have been as strong if it had tracked this way. I think so The the gulf waters are very warm. they were very warm near the louisiana coast and Equally as warm near the texas coast so all other things being equal It would not have been surprising at all to see Agrarian tensor cain. Had it come our way of course. In the days and weeks to come we're going to learn more about The the impact that has had in louisiana Let's leave it behind just for the moment though. Are there any other storms or storms and development. The that we should be aware of here. there is The hurricane center is looking down towards central america Kind of where. This storm developed There is a low chance of development down in that area over the next five days There's no strong signal. texas Type storm at this point but This time of year should something developed down there. We'll have to watch it carefully. And i guess i it is a good example of how quickly these things can develop. I mean it was. Maybe what is Late as wednesday when we were getting a sense of the seriousness of of this storm and the fact that it could very well track to the gulf coast. Not only that the track Early on with ida was very uncertain. Initially thinking was mexico and in texas and then finally When it became more clear it was going to be able to meet the anna storm as we got into wednesday and especially thursday so This time of year. You really have to stay tuned to the forecast. Almost every day we've known for for months. This was projected to be a more active than usual hurricane season yet. It was also awfully quiet from june through mid august. Should we anticipate more activity over the next month or two. Yes book quiet periods in july. Early august actually are not that uncommon Last year was busier during that period. We had hannah and others So but now that we're in too late august in september i would expect more storms. In fact there's i believe four systems out there now. Just most of them are in the open waters. So we really to get through the month of september To feel better about things here in texas usually the october storms and later have a tendency to track away. But you know not other question. We can october stormers. Well yeah we. We characterize hurricane season as june through november But always with a lot of focus on on august and into september and. I'm wondering if i is it your impression that the height the peak of hurricane season is may be shifting a little bit later than it was many years ago. No i think Late august and september are still Probably the peak for us here in texas now last year we did have a late. October storm That was pretty close. zeta Tracked a up toward mississippi. You know the northern gulf coast And we have had the hurricane jerry Many years ago. That was october fifteenth. So i guess. I haven't seen a tendency to shift The peak of the season four texas. But you.

louisiana houston craig cohen mayor sylvester turner katrina carlos correa npr news Tropical storm ida louisiana gulf coast kovic eita Ida dan riley hurricane texas houston astros Isd harvey mississippi
"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

06:18 min | 10 months ago

"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"From school. So why are we counting these numbers towards school? Hope thinks the mask mandate isn't needed. Kirsten, who's an outer, another parent, disagrees. Because of how nervous her kid is in class. I'm frantic every day and frankly, he had a very mild stomachache today, and I kept him home. Other parents are wondering how long a mask mandate will be in place for and if it will actually work. Keeping cases down. I'm shaven heard an in Fort Bend County One school in Fort Bend, I SD Pecan Elementary is already shutting down in person learning and switching to virtual a passenger on board. The Carnival Vista cruise ship that set sail out of Galveston back in July died of Covid 19 multiple outlets. Reports. The 77 year old woman who passed away was from Oklahoma. 27 people tested positive on that cruise, according to Carnival. This is the first reported covid deaths. Cruz has resumed out of Galveston back in June, and a GOP backed voting bill is again heading to the full Texas House for a vote. State representative John Bussey is one of the Democrats who opposes the bill, which would ban drive through voting and 24 hour voting, both of which originated in Harris County last year. Buc says the bill would also require early voting occur between six a.m. and 10 P.m.. And he asked Keith Ingraham with the Texas secretary of State's office. Why a cut off time is need Are there any security issues that you have with people Voting after 10 PM versus before 10 PM Does it change voter? I d. Does it change any of the process, The process should be the same, No matter whatever the day, people are voting. Democrats have repeatedly sought to block the bill, saying it will lead to voter suppression, while Republicans argue it will prevent voter fraud. Matt Harrop News 88 7. No, this is Houston matters and I'm Brenda Valdivia sitting in today for Craig Cohen. Good morning. Everyone coming up. Houston County Commissioner Tom Ramsey answers your questions. You can send them in now to talk at Houston. Matters dot org or get in line at 713440887. Oh, Plus local colleges and universities are going back to class these days, both virtually and in person. We learned what one of them is doing to accommodate nontraditional students and how a classic Western clashed with the anti communist fervor of the 19 fifties. But today, Houston City Council will consider, among other things, an agenda item to establish a women's Houston Women's Commission in their meeting today, and as we do so often with all things City Council, we turn to news 88 Sevens reporter Jen Rice, jen. Good morning. Welcome to the show. Hey, Brenda, It's great to hear you in the host chair. Oh, thank you so much. You know, you're my favorite person to, uh, spill the tea with on the City Council's Yes. So, um, what's going on today? What is the purpose of the Houston Women's Commission? Person has a lot of these different kinds of commissions. Um, there's the commission on Disabilities. There's an LGBTQ advisory board. There's the Millennial Advisory board, which I am not on and which seems rude. Um, and there's just the mayor's advisory council on New Americans. So there's all these different groups. So this would kind of add a Houston women's commission to that list. Um, and they'll be considering it. Tomorrow's We're giving kind of a look ahead for tomorrow. Um And, yeah, I'm kind of kind of interested to see what happens with this. It looks like it's being spearheaded by council member Abby came in. Um and I guess the goal is to sort of, um, you know, to to provide extra advisory oversight role for issues that affect women. So when we discuss these issues, uh, that affect women. Are we looking? Are they looking more at healthcare? Is it more the role in society? How? How, When you know women are 50% of the population. That's a lot of ground to cover. So what are they looking to do exactly with his commission? Yeah, Women definitely have, you know, oftentimes conflicting opinions on things, but, um, yeah, I think they're going to look at health care issues are going to look at wage and equity employment issues. Um, it's definitely interesting because the city you know what does the city do? They look at, you know, police and fire and flooding and drainage And so These issues are not. They're not looking at abortion. You know, they're not looking at, you know these issues that we typically directly associate with gender, But, um, I think you know you can make the argument that all issues are, you know, impacted by gender, and that the the city you know, should be considering that whenever you're doing anything That is true. Women were greatly affected by the pandemic view remain, Uh, largest, Um they experience some of the largest losses of income inequality during the past two years. Is this something that they're also addressing? Or is this more kind of the study of what's going on in the city? I think that my guess would be since it hasn't actually happened yet. But my guess would be that those sort of like an advisory role. You know, sort of a group that that the mayor and city counsellors can sort of consult with when they're you know, developing plans and ordinances for the future. Okay. And are there other commissions like this active throughout the city? What kind of work do they do? Yeah, There's you know, one group focused on disabilities. One that kind of looks at LGBT Q type issues like I said, the millennial one which you know I'm right here that can have me on the board. And my mom is right here. I know. One of you are listening. Come on. I'm a millennial. I'm not on it. There's the council on new Americans. So, yeah, it looks like they make an effort to sort of create these these groups to be able to advise on matters that affect um Different groups differently, Okay, And so there is a quite a bit of movement going around to the council will also be considering an ordinance will provide $15.5 million for affordable housing for seniors in the in district J. That's around the Bissonnette area on the West Side of Houston. What does that look like?.

Keith Ingraham Jen Rice Craig Cohen Brenda Valdivia Oklahoma Brenda Harris County John Bussey $15.5 million Galveston Kirsten Abby 27 people 713440887 June tomorrow 50% Fort Bend Houston City Council Tomorrow
"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"You can email us at talk at Houston matters dot org. This is really a question for both of you. But let me I'll start with you. What do you think is behind this Continued dramatic growth in this particular industry. Beer, Craig. Well, okay, That's my first guess. Um, honestly, you know, I legislative advances have helped, but I think honestly, it's um, kind of a breaking down of the stigma of beer. I mean, you know, I was kind of joking when I said beer, but it's true, I think People have over the years realize, more and more and more and more and honestly, something our founder new kind of at the beginning that breweries are incredible community. Gathering places, and I think as the years have gone by, that's become more and more evident that you know, when I even started at ST Journal in 2007, you'd say, You know, I'm taking my kids to a brewery. And people might recoil. Like what? You're taking your kids to a bar like, what is that? But I think the more people go, the more you see that honestly, it is more than just beer there that Yeah, There's beer, but there's things for kids. There's bands, there's lawn games and then you'll see. A grandma celebrating her 70th birthday party with her whole family around her at a brewery, And I think it's just over time that stigma has kind of fallen away. More and more and people realize that it's a great place just to go with the whole family and your friends. And, yeah, you might have a couple beers, but Over time. People aren't having 10 beers. It's more about the quality of the relationship with people and have one or two or three and gather and have a good time. I guess. Also the the lines between What constitutes a brewery, A microbrewery craft brewery and a bar and restaurant in a pub. And what? There are plenty that present all of that. Yeah. Yeah, And I I think you're right, though. Some of that has kind of blended together a little bit. You know, when Brock started Saint Arnold, we were just like a tap room. In a warehouse. And since then, over the years, we have added food and different kinds of beverages, too. I think that's the other thing is that, um you know, the Brewers Association. There's an economist that says, you know, you guys don't work. In the craft beer industry necessarily anymore. You work in the craft beverage industry, so we've added Cider over the years and certainly put our own spin on something like cider. We've added wine to the menu because we're legally able to do those sorts of things just to kind of make it more and more appealing and meet what the customers want. Um, but I think if your beer is bad one, then they're not going to come back. So you still have to have good beer. And if the experience is not what they want, they're not going to come back either. So even though breweries are popular, and people want to go to them, you still have to provide a really good tasting beverage and a good experience at the same time, there's always going to be somebody at the table like me who looks up from the menu and says You have anything besides beer? Yeah, absolutely. Well, let me give you this cider, this root beer or this. Walter or whatever else you know, That's what we would say. Dietrich. Lenny alluded to legislative changes through the years that have had an impact. And can you talk a little bit about that? What have we seen? Absolutely So. The Craft Brewers Guild has been very active since its foundation in pushing legislation to remove some of the distribution challenges, which have allowed more economic freedom and development for The craft brewers. Right, So if you're producing at a smaller scale, the opportunity for profits is a little bit less because of your market share. Well, I think, Lenny, look this the the Quality aspects benefit them. But that wasn't really realized until of course, the past 2017 Legislature, where you we were able to get beer to go and then some of the expansion and permissions with the pandemic as far as allowing, uh Your distributors and producers to, um sell products directly from their own facilities. And so those legislative changes have really opened the market again for people without teams of lawyers to go out and work with distributing contracts and large big box retailers to get their product out there. Dietrich. What else do you think? Maybe behind this? This continued dramatic growth in particular here in Houston. Several factors. One is, Of course, we've had an influx of population. Um, I'm not always happy with it because people don't know the left hand lane is for passing only, uh, as we bring individuals from other communities, people have realized the cost of living here. The lack of a state income tax right, So some of those people have brought their culture as well. Um San Diego major Major Craft Brewing centre, So as people come from California and say, Hey, this is a great place. They also bring that interest. There's also development in the real estate space and Of course, there's an appreciation for the local contributions, right. We're more conscious society. And so while wheat itself as a water intensive crop, and of course, the Ryan Heights Ca, but I would say, Okay, you can't have weed in there anyway. But, um well, some of these things are water intensive. The smaller breweries are community contributors that are active participants and again with production of seltzer with the inclusion of line There's a broader gathering space. There's a broader inclusion that provides space for individuals to collect. This is Houston matters. I'm Craig Cohen. We're discussing the growth of craft.

Craig Cohen California 2007 San Diego Lenny Dietrich Craig two both three ST Journal one Brock Ryan Heights Ca Craft Brewers Guild 70th birthday first guess One Saint Arnold 10 beers
"craig cohen" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"craig cohen" Discussed on Houston Matters

"You know they're thoughtful and what they're doing that's another piece and other ingredient. All this of course is the sauce. You dip it in Do you go for like a marin. Ara sauce or we do kind of our house tomato sauce that we we work on is. It's pretty much what goes into like our spaghetti and meatballs but not all things. We use multiple different tomatoes for different aspects of different dishes. Like we do a fresh kind of smaller local tomato that we just cook with chilies and crush in. That's something that i want with barada because it's higher and acid lower and sweetness and generally like when you get the cans san marzano's they carry more sweetness. Which is what we use for our base blend but then we also that with bianco tomatoes. So they're just the best. So it's it's one of these things like we use different tomatoes for different aspects but are our sauce also used for like spaghetti and the toasted ravioli is san marzano. that'd be uncle blend. Okay enough talk. It's time to try shepherds on toasted ravioli. He prize up a batch in his kitchen. Sprinkles a liberal helping to kinds of cheeses on top of the already very cheesy rectangular shape graphs and places them on a dish with red sauce. You just described when settling the dining area for my taste so instantly. I get that this does not. It's not over breaded which is one of those things that like you find lots of places they'll just like just take it with breading and then over fry it and the whole thing is kind of like really dense as a result yet. This is still still got a crisp but still got a little bit of a crunch too. But it's a little bit thinner which is much closer to what i'm used to in saint louis. The problem started looking for raviolis. Dumping these things in the i. Just it's like eating little bricks you know just to to to to some to in too dense and so it was like i still wanted to keep it like crispy but like it does. It is that. And i'm picking up the the different cheeses. Which which ones are in their carino parm and ricotta me. Take another bite here. Yeah you definitely pick up the mozzarella and especially the the record in terms of the consistency. That makes it a little different to I still like the beef ravioli. We started seeing a lot of families right. And that's not something that normally we've seen so they can get the kids in here like this is an immediate kid love and like dish and so everybody be we do It's funny like this is. The combo is toasted ravioli and fried calamari. Almost every table boom boom an essays. Those two things are what goes out the most. I still don't understand why this does not has not taken off in houston. Do you think maybe giving people the opportunity to to sample it. You think maybe another restaurant or two out. There might pick this up and tried out. You know it's it's super easy. So i mean you saw what we did and it doesn't it takes forty five seconds. You know on a busy night. And so the yeah. I would think so. Houston area chef. Chris shepherd at the latest iteration of his multiple restaurants. One concept one fifth now called one fifth red sauce italian. He's planning to continue with this pop up featuring toasted ravioli on the menu for at least the next few months. And that'll do it for today's show. The houston matters. Team includes michael hagerty. Joshua's inbred ruis and troy schultz. David pitman's our technical director on tomorrow's show a conversation with actor. Michael rosenbaum smallville. Lex luther in advance appearance at comic palooza. Plus our not expert panel weighs in on the good the bad and the ugly of the week. I'm craig cohen join us tomorrow for those and other houston.

barada san marzano bianco saint louis Chris shepherd houston michael hagerty ruis troy schultz David pitman Houston Lex luther Michael rosenbaum Joshua craig cohen
"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"This is Houston matters. I'm Craig Cohen. We continue now. Our discussion about day two of the Statehouse Democrats walk out from the special session as well as other developments in politics in this week's political roundup. Joining us today are Mark Jones, political science fellow at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy, and Brandon Rotting House professor of political science at the University of Houston and co host Of news 88 Sevens Party Politics Program, Gentlemen. Good morning. Morning, Gregory. Uh, so I suspect you were both listening in as we were talking with both representative wound Representative Middleton and also Dr Dixon about the Texas House Democrats walk out and I guess where I want to start with the two of you is. How does this end? Brandon. Any ideas it end. I think badly for probably both groups. This is made everybody look a little bit foolish. I think Republicans have hope to get a lot done. They may have bitten off more than they could chew, and now they're having to face these sorts of consequences for Democrats. They're going to get a lot of pushback from their district on these issues are going to get pressure to get back to work as a representative, Middleton said. So I think both sides are going to get a lot of slings and arrows on this. The way that these events in the past has been through a negotiated settlement. There's been enough goodwill in the chamber. To be able to encourage the way were members to come back. If sometimes it's about just the need to work and move through differences, or maybe their specific policy objectives that they can agree on. It sounds like there's a compromise that could be had here in our Republicans obviously have drawn a line in the sand Democrats or staying away until they get better news, But I think ultimately it's going to have to end with some kind of compromise Mark What do you think chance for compromise in this I think either compromise or a tacit surrender by Democrats and maybe perhaps in the middle there. So when Democrats gotten that they had several goals..

Mark Jones Craig Cohen Brandon Democrats Gregory Mark today Rice University two Baker Institute for Public Pol Republicans University of Houston both sides both groups this week both Houston Dixon Texas House Democrats Brandon Rotting
"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"I'm Craig Cohen. Good morning. We were just talking on this show Friday about how stressed Houstonians are and how they're not necessarily finding the best outlets to deal with it. Well, venting on our airwaves is appropriate and, frankly, might be the most necessary public service These days. We bring you another round of Houstonian Pet peeves. This our center gripes are way now to talk at Houston matters dot org. Also ahead. The Houston Astros have the best offense in baseball. One of the best records had a dramatic walk off win Sunday. But no Stroh's are taking the field for Tuesday's All Star game. We discuss why We start today with an active weekend for lawmakers in Austin as bills addressing voting and bail reform advanced out of the Legislature's a couple of legislative committees to tell us more. We're joined now by news 88 7 Politics and Government reporter Andrew Schneider. Good morning, Andrew. Hello. First overnight committee hearings were held on GOP voting bills in both the Texas House and Senate. What do those bills call for? Well, HB three in SP one call for a ban on drive thru in 24 hour voting, as well as widespread distribution of mail in ballots all steps Harris County took during the height of the pandemic ahead of last November's election. Also increased access for partisan poll watchers and limits on voting by mail, including new ID requirements for absentee voters that ban on distribution. It's of mail in ballot applications, right, right, right, right. Is this in essence, uh, similar to what did not get voted on during the regular session. Not entirely. I mean, I mean, it's it's similar, um, they dropped language that would have restricted Sunday morning early voting hours, so called souls to the polls voting. They also dropped language that would have made it Easier for a judge to overturn an election result. Everything else is is pretty much as it was before now. That bill during the regular session didn't pass because in the final hours, Democrats left the capital, leaving the Legislature without a quorum and therefore unable to pass anything. Should we expect something similar from Democrats now and over the coming month? It's hard to say Staging a walkout with an hour to go is very different from walking away for days or weeks. But Democrats have said that everything is on the table. Also this weekend, lawmakers passed identical bills in the House and Senate that would make it harder for people accused of violent or sexual crimes to bond out of jail. What, specifically to the Bills call for HB two and SB six, would bar a defendant from being released on a personal recognizance bond it charged with committing a violent or sexual crime or if charged with committing a crime were already out on bond. And what are the arguments for and against this, while proponents like Republican State Senator Joan Hoffman of Houston, who authored SB six say it's a direct response to an increase in repeat and violent offenders being released on personal recognizance Bonder Low cash bonds. Opponents say it discriminates against low income people by continuing to rely on cash bail and that it would effectively ban charitable bail organizations to the benefit of the bail bond industry. And what happens next with all of these bills. Well, they could be voted out of they could be voted on by the full chambers as early as this week news 88 7 Sandra Schneider, Thank you very much. Which you're welcome next, what we do and don't know about allegations of misconduct related to undercover operations by the Harris County Precinct One constable's Office News 88 Sevens. Lucio Vasquez joins us. Good Morning, Lucio Morning, Craig Last week you reported a lawyer representing four current and former female deputies. Accusing their superiors of sexual assault in a lawsuit filed in May says the FBI is investigating the office. What, precisely that attorney court acres say on Thursday? Yeah, he said his clients were cooperating with federal investigators in their investigation into the precinct, One human trafficking unit. And has the FBI confirmed the existence of this investigation. They did not. An FBI spokesperson declined to comment on whether federal investigators were looking into the case. So what is this all about? What does the lawsuit alleged? Heard? So four current and former female deputies accused their superiors of sexual assault during undercover operations by the Harris County Precinct one constable's Office human Trafficking Unit. The lawsuit alleges that the female deputies who had no experience in undercover operations, or choose to participate in bachelor party stings allegedly created by Assistant chief Chris Score. These things involve the women posing a sex workers and the male deputies posing as buyers and the operations became, according to the lawsuit, a booze filled opera or a booze filled playground for sexual exploitation. In which the women were sexually harassed and assaulted by their colleagues since the language used in the lawsuit, right, Yes. Yeah, who is named in the suit? You mentioned Assistant Chief Gore. I assume Yeah, along with Assistant Chief Chris Gore. It's Constable Alan Rosen. Lieutenant Shane rigged in and Harris County. The suit names Gore and rigging, as among those taking part in the actual bachelor party stings and characterizes Rosen and the county is complicit and what has the constable or the county had to say in response. Rosen's office hasn't responded to requests for comment regarding the FBI investigation. But Rosen said in a statement in May that the department's internal affairs unit had investigated the allegations. And that investigation found note violations. News 88 Sevens. Lucio Vasquez. Thank you, thank you. Houston Firefighters responded to a transformer fire at a center point substation in northwest Houston Friday morning, officials issued a shelter in place for neighborhoods west of the substation, which was lifted late that afternoon. What happened? Amy Pack represents District Day on the Houston City Council. This was in her District Council member. Welcome back to Houston matters. Good morning. Good morning. Thank you so much for having me Absolutely. What more can you tell us about Friday's fire? Well. Friday's fire, so a transformer caught on fire. They're still investigating exactly what happened there, but it caught on fire. You could see that fire from all over the city..

Amy Pack Craig Cohen Lucio Vasquez Andrew FBI Andrew Schneider Sunday Austin Sunday morning Thursday Last week Senate 24 hour Friday Lucio May last November today Tuesday Democrats
"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"What have you you had to start assessing you would have as an e commerce company. You would have to assess sales taxes to consumers in that state. So Amazon. That was the reason why Amazon went to Seattle early on instead of California, because it didn't want to have to set sales taxes in the biggest state in the country, and sort of see as long as it could out of a lot of big states maintain that tax advantage. Against brick and mortar retailers. We'll finally got to the point where the company was so big and and, uh, and getting so many orders and promising one and two day delivery, So it basically needed to be everywhere. So it goes into Ohio. Um finally 20,014 or 15. And manages as it does elsewhere to to extract just these huge subsidies from the state and local governments. And I focus a lot on on that in my Ohio chapters, the I managed to get a lot of the email traffic back and forth between the company and and city and state officials. Where do you see? Just think. Just this incredible pressure that the company puts on on officials to canned over these these tax subsidies. Um and and then this is real of secrets nous on the part of the officials their desperation to get these warehouses and there were warehouses and data centers and their willingness to give up the subsidies, even though They're Amazon's arrival, of course, is going to mean that there's going to be a much higher demand for for for public services, whether it's the the wear and tear on the roads from all the trucks or the all the calls are going to be coming to to the local empties to deal with. The all the injuries at the warehouses so nonetheless, that this state and local officials for cover these these giant subsidies as happens elsewhere, but it was just amazing to see it. See it sort of going in this back and forth. Email traffic that I managed to get from public records. Request also promises along with the The awarding of these big subsidies promises to keep it all secret. Amazon to me, is that you? That officials keep everything a secret as possible. Don't give up records unless it's absolutely necessary under the law in all these town officials one after another, promising to to to abide by that demand. One town official even apologized to Amazon and the email for having been quoted in a local newspaper story about coming warehouse. My guest is Alec MacGillis, a senior reporter for Propublica, who's written a book called Fulfillment, Winning and Losing in one Click America. You can join us by calling 1 809 335372. Yeah. Yeah. A pair of Houston area fundraising. Nonprofits are partnering to coordinate response to and recovery from future emergencies. But how much can philanthropy really do when disaster strikes? I'm Craig Cohen. We discuss on the next Houston matters. Nine A.m. weekdays. The Covid Variants are in the news from Delta, infecting over 100 local church camp attendees.

Amazon Craig Cohen Alec MacGillis 1 809 335372 Seattle 20,014 15 Nine A.m. California Ohio Houston America Propublica one Fulfillment, Winning and Losin over 100 local church camp Delta two day delivery One town Covid Variants
"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

09:21 min | 1 year ago

"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Craig Cohen. We're in the middle of this week's political roundup today with Rice University's Mark Jones and the University of Houston's Rene Cross Vice president Kamala Harris visited the Texas Mexico border late last week. Former President Trump and Governor Abbott are visiting the border today. This all comes mark as there's a new UT Texas Tribune poll out in recent days, suggesting immigration policy could be a real potential problem for Democrats in Texas. It is. It's a policy that Republicans have consistently used to their advantage since the days of Rick Perry. That is that there's a majority in Texas who want to secure border And as long as Republicans avoid rhetoric that's seen as racist or anti Latino. It can be a winning message. It also is a tricky issue for Democrats, especially the Biden administration because he leaves no one satisfied. In that he's not doing enough to block undocumented immigration as the case right now, but then for progress and then so conservatives are upset with them. But progressives feel that he's not doing enough to make it easier and more humane mean for people to migrate. And so it's a tricky issue. And you saw Kamala Harris In some ways avoid it should when she was going to the border so she could ever border photo op. She went to El Paso, which is about as far away as you can get from the real, where the action occurs in undocumented migration, which is down in the Rio Grande Valley, so she went to El Paso was there for about six or seven hours. Did some photo ops didn't even go to Fort Bliss where undocumented migrants are being held, And then she flew out because it is a touchy subject. She felt she had to go to the border, but she didn't really want to get involved with the border. It is safe to say, though, in terms of the the length of an appearance, we could see the same thing from former President Trump and Governor Abbott today, Renee. Oh, I think so. I think photo op is the appropriate word, regardless of who is visiting, whether it's El Paso or down in the Valley. Um You know again, Immigration reform is so huge and this is not something that's going to be taken care of, with a few visits down to the border, even if they were there for days or weeks. This is something that's going to take a while to tackle And you know, as far as a Biden administration goes five months in that's just not enough to do anything meaningful. Yeah, that said, I think this is a conversation, though we could have had in large measure 89 10 years ago and had been the same conversation. Right and that I mean, that's you know, there was a time. I think Teddy Kennedy back when we had the last true effort for bipartisan reform, made the statement that this is our last chance. You know, it's going going to get tougher and that was during the George W. Bush administration. And since that time period, things have just gotten worse, and both sides have become more intractable and we're seeing and One of the real issues is U. S immigration law isn't going to do anything to stop the push factors in places like El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala, where conditions are so bad locally that people are going to take any risks just to get out of there. And that's one thing that people often don't understand. You can build another mile of wall has governor Abbott proposes to do along the Over 1000 Mile long border. That's not going to really have any impact on discouraging people to migrate when they live in gang infested cities and Tegucigalpa's in Salvador, and also in deep endemic poverty. Rene. That same UT Texas Tribune poll included some questions about how Texans feel about Governor Abit. Uh and he remains, of course, quite popular with the GOP. But overall, there's kind of a split in terms of attitudes towards him are his priorities. Texas voters priorities I don't think so. Not overall because there's a number of issues where we've seen strong support, whether it's legalization of marijuana and small amounts. Medicaid expansion. Um, that is heavily favored by both Republicans and Democrats. And we can see those two issues in particular have went absolutely nowhere. So I think that Governor Abbott's priorities are the priorities of his most vehement supporters, the most conservative Republicans and that those most conservative Republicans are the ones that are most likely to vote in the upcoming primary. Mark. In the meantime, let's look at the state of Missouri for a second. They've got a new law there, uh, one of a number that we're seeing floated around in state legislatures, a sort of Second Amendment protection. Law imposes a fine on any state or local official who enforces federal gun law. That's not also a Missouri law. Can you do that? No, you can't. You can't do that violates the supremacy clause, And as a result, what we're going to see is Missouri that ST Louis and Kansas City is going to assume Missouri, which is pretty much everywhere else in the state. He's not wrong, Folks. I grew up in ST Louis. I went to school in Columbia, Missouri. Yeah, but grew up in ST Louis, Missouri. You're right on point. So, so they're going so city of ST Louis in ST Louis County in Missouri have already sued Missouri are there about two and so this will get blocked in the courts. It's purely more political theater than anything else, and we had similar legislation, albeit not this, I guess extreme passed here in Texas in terms of turning the state into a second amend. That sanctuary state, although that deals with future federal law, which hasn't been passed yet, But that law will also be deemed unconstitutional, at which time that the state tries to enforce it. Does this suggest Renee that maybe the state of Missouri and maybe some other states are more extreme when it comes to gun rights than even Texas? Despite The Lone Star State's reputation. Absolutely. In fact, Mark and I were talking about that before we came in that Missouri, um appears to have even more conservative Republicans within their party. Then we do here in Texas. And also larger majorities in the state Legislature as well. Renee, There is a new chair of the Harris County Democratic Party. What should we know about his name is Otis and I will say his last name very slowly because I am known to butcher names. Um Have a guru guru Otis of a guru. Here's a uhh alum NUS of, UM, political science department and he had served as the communications director for the Harris County Democratic Party before and is more recently been the chief of staff for state representative John Rosenthal. He's the first African American to serve as county chair. As well as the youngest. So, um Otis seems to be carrying on Judge held ago's legacy as far as being the first person of color being the youngest. Um, I think this is a good thing for the Democratic Party if they indie or trying to Recruit more, Um younger people and diverse the diverse population that we have in this area to get involved. Mark. Are we seeing a similar changing of the guard among Republicans? Not too much. I mean, that's actually one of the main issues that the Republican Party confronts is the fact that while the state is becoming more and more diverse, and the county is becoming more and more diverse 95% of the state legislator tours, for instance, and the Republicans are Anglo 5%. I mean, we can count there is one Latino, one African American. Uh, and, uh to Asian Americans. Lawsuit's been filed over an incident that I know if everybody recalls this. There was so much going on during the 2020 election, but you may remember there was an incident on a Texas highway where the Biden campaign or a Biden campaign bus. Was suddenly surrounded by a number of vehicles characterized as the Trump train. And there's been this question of whether or not that represented voter intimidation. Mark. What should we know about this? I mean, I think this is another type of political theater. This is it was a sense where you had supporters for trump sort of surrounding the bus. It wasn't a positive thing. Uh, but I also probably wouldn't characterize it is voter suppression in the sense that it was, uh, behavior you wouldn't like to see, but I don't think much is going to ever come out of it. Meantime, I mentioned earlier first lady Dr Jill Biden was in Houston last night along with the second gentleman, Douglas Emhoff. Uh, what sort of political impact can the first lady have that? Maybe we didn't see from previous first lady Melania Trump. Well, I think Dr Biden is much more engaged with the electorate..

Rick Perry El Salvador Douglas Emhoff Craig Cohen Guatemala Honduras Teddy Kennedy Democratic Party John Rosenthal Houston Rio Grande Valley Mark Jones Texas Otis Rice University Harris County Democratic Party ST Louis County Renee Republican Party El Paso
"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

07:38 min | 1 year ago

"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"On Craig Cohen. Good morning coming up this week's political roundup and neuroscientist Dr David Eagleman on how the pandemic may have been a good thing in at least one way for our brains, but first well data suggesting quite the opposite. Star test results are out. And while they're not being used to evaluate teachers or schools this year, they are instructive and show declines in both reading and math skills for third through eighth graders across Texas, a steep decline in math skills since 2019. What can Houston area schools do about it? Joining us now is Dr Robert Sanborn, president and CEO of the nonprofit Children at Risk. Bob Sanborn, Welcome back to Houston matters, Craig. Thanks for having me. The number of students who met math test expectations fell from 19 to 2021 by 32%. Almost a third reading expectations dropped about 9%. Also not good, obviously, but comparatively speaking, not as terrible safe to say the pandemic has had a profound impact here. Yes, And and actually, when you break these numbers down a little bit more. What you see is that especially in those districts that had remote learning, you saw even more significant drops. Those that had in school a little bit less and math is one of those things right that if parents are super engaged, it's a harder thing to teach. I think the other key thing around this Craig is that when we look at scores across the the academic lifespan of a child You look at pre K. You look at third grade reading, and then you look at algebra one and algebra. One had this huge drop right about a 19% drop in the numbers. And so that means that there's going to be a significant number of kids that are at risk, higher risk of dropping out so we may indeed have a 20% increase in the number of kids that drop out well and with math, specifically, maybe more than any other subject each subsequent less intends to build on the previous one. If there's an equation that you don't know Understand if there's a a plug and chug formula that just doesn't work for your brain. If you haven't figured it out yet, then that means you can't learn the next thing and then the next and then the next So you have groups of kids that are way far behind right? And so they may indeed be a year too far to behind in terms of their math skills. And what does that mean for economic development? Our workforce? It's not good, and so one of the things that we're really encouraging right across the state are for school districts to really be proactive around. This right? There's this temptation on the part of school districts to say We just want things to be back to normal and you'll hear parents say, Oh, yeah, We just want things to be back to normal. But when your kids are this far behind, as shown by these scores, we're going to need to do extraordinary things to get kids backed up to speed and I won't get to that. But, you know, you made mention of the fact that there is a distinction obviously, between schools that had a preponderance of remote learning versus those that had more in Personal instructions. Are there. Other distinctions? Are there other schools or districts or those with different kinds of resources or different areas of the Houston region in particular that fared better or worse yet, so when you look at this, I mean, it's sort of the haves and the have nots. Right. So those districts that have traditionally served low income families, those districts that had harder access to why fire for their kids to have access to high speed Internet Those are the ones under the big losers in all of this, right? You know, we may be struggled initially. What we want to get kids. To have WiFi and high speed Internet and we patted ourselves on the back. If after a couple months we got, you know a couple of WiFi spots, But the fact of the matter is during this whole time these kids were falling behind. And so we have to work to make sure that we could get these kids back up to speed because they're behind right now. The tests show there behind teachers, principals. Superintendents know that these kids are behind. There's no going back to normal, at least for the time being until we get these kids caught up and we've We've talked about this idea that park kids sort of got the short end of the stick in terms of this, and that's absolutely true, right? Those kids and we're talking about 60% of the kids in the state of Texas higher number right in the Houston area that are coming from low income families, those that's the majority of our future workforce. And these kids are really far behind. Well, you mentioned the workforce and that's another piece in all of this, Which is those parents of those kids. In many cases, they're working all day, and childcare was limited in in its possibility. Certainly those first months of the pandemic and really, in a way all the way through. Uh, this put those kids in a situation where maybe even if they had The access to WiFi and a laptop and the resources that you would say Well, that makes remote learning possible. That doesn't mean that there's anybody that's watching to see if they're paying attention. We're able to keep up and listen. We've all been in zoom calls where we just sort of lose track, right. If we're not the center of that attention, it's hard to keep track of. And so for a lot of kids being on these calls, they just sort of lost engagement right. Teachers tried really hard. But even teachers will tell you that if a kid wasn't Actively trying to be engaged. It was very tough to engage them. So what we found is that all across the state of Texas and certainly in Houston, there's large groups of kids that even if they checked in via zoom, it doesn't mean that they were really engaged. And in the end these test scores sort of show show this and a full I think about 15% of kids didn't even show up for the tests of terms of the student population. So what does it mean for those kids if they didn't even show up? I'm guessing that we have an even larger number of kids that are behind them. These tests are showing Yeah, and staying engaged on a zoom call. Think about just the challenge of keeping kids engaged all day long when it is in person when you are in a classroom setting and how how creative teachers have to be to to keep that going. You you have your limits. And we all learned over the course of the pandemic and heard repeatedly look, you can't just stare into that screen for hours on end. That's right. And this is no fault of teachers, no fault of principals and superintendents. This was really just a matter of the pandemic. The fault lies with the pandemic. We did our very best and you see teachers that were really working hard out there. But a lot of these kids, right? I mean, it's it's hard to be engaged via the zoom. And so I think that this is the beginning of us trying to do better. Uh and I think what what with all this new federal money that's come down if we indeed use the federal money for its intended purposes, which is to get our kids back up to speed. I think there's some hope, but it doesn't mean it's not going to be a struggle. Houston ASD has announced the plans to add 15 days. To the school year to supplement learning time lost during the pandemic. Will that make the difference? Well, it helps, right. I think when you look when you look at the research in terms of catching up it ill becomes part of time on task. How much academic time on task are you going to have and so adding more school days, Adding more school hours of academic time on task is a move in the right direction. Extra summer school. I think also sort of developing relationships with these high quality after school programs like boys and girls, clubs and others where there's where there's basically time on task going on, but in a sort of fun way, I think we're going to have to see school districts be much more intentional about developing those relationships rather than just assuming that they're going to be there. There's federal money for that as well for these after school programs, So I think it's going to take a village if you will a lot of groups focusing on this, but for for school districts. The addition of time on task is fantastic. There are going to be parents that don't like the idea of more school right every time the idea has introduced of your lung schooling, there's a group of parents to say No, I don't want that to happen..

Bob Sanborn 15 days Craig Cohen Craig Texas David Eagleman 20% Houston Robert Sanborn 32% 2021 2019 third first both this week this year about 9% first months each
"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"From the Trump Administration, pressuring him to overturn the election and having him at least look into some very well conspiracy theories. Even some of them talked about Italian satellites. Uh, being, uh, you know, messing with the election results. So you have that pressure. But those allegations were so out of bounds that even former President Trump's, uh, attorney general said We're not going to get ourselves into this mess, so It points out to the whole idea that this election was some. How, uh, stolen from President Trump. And what we're discovering right now is that that statement is extremely extremely extremely away from the truth. And then obviously you have new avenues from a G. Garland trying to tame out what we're seeing in all state legislatures are trying to limit people's right to vote, so it's right response or a response from the fell government. Trying to at least correct some of these changes that have been made to state level. This is Houston matters. I'm Craig Cohen. It's our weekly political roundup. We're talking with the University of Houston Surana, Mo Cortina and Nancy Sims about recent developments in politics. Nancy Vice President Kamala Harris has announced plans to host Texas Democrats who stopped controversial election but at least temporarily by walking out at the very end of the regular state legislative session. Course, that Bill could be taken up again during a special session in the coming months. What's the purpose of the meeting like this? Well, I think it's to discuss with them, uh, the reasons behind their walk out and also to showcase them as a group that really fought these As Karen much just mentioned these voting rights bills across the country, and so a good part of it is to thank them for what they did for voting rights. And to show other state legislatures. You can fight even if you don't have the majority. Former Texas Supreme Court Justice Eva Guzman has officially filed to run for Texas attorney general against incumbent Ken Paxton and the Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush. How much more crowded Geronimo! Could this Republican field get well, I don't know, but the race is on significantly, It's going to be a very interesting primary for the Republican Party. You have justice, because, man, As you know, one of the first Latinas running for this position from the Republican Party, she has style record in terms of her stance at the Supreme Court, the Texas Supreme Court And it's going to be extremely interesting to see how she's able to maneuver, right we have on the one hand attorney General Paxton, you know very, very far away on the right. You have Commissioner Bush somewhere on the right. We don't know where he stands particularly and then perhaps justice. This man is riding the needles Center, right? That has a lot of appeal to the General electorate. Hansen very simple, So the race is going to be extremely interesting to see. How that develops in the next upcoming months, and the real question will be who does Donald Trump endorsed indeed, because it is a Republican primary. Nancy Sims is a political analyst and lecturer in the University of Houston's political science Department. Geronimo Cortina is an associate professor of political science and associate director of the Center for Mexican American Studies at U. H. He also co hosts News 88 7th Party Politics program. Nancy Geronimo. Thank you very much. Thank you. Thank you. And just ahead tips.

Nancy Geronimo Donald Trump Geronimo Cortina Ken Paxton Craig Cohen Nancy Sims Republican Party Mo Cortina Karen Trump Administration Center for Mexican American St Kamala Harris Hansen President Trump Eva Guzman Republican Court Houston Bush Justice
"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

06:53 min | 1 year ago

"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Matters. I'm Craig Cohen this morning. President Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin are meeting face to face in Geneva, Switzerland, as NPR's been reporting, the summit stakes are high, but expectations are low. Just what will it accomplish to discuss That and other developments in politics? We're joined now in this week's political roundup by Nancy Sims, Political analyst and lecturer at the University of Houston's Political Science Department, and Geronimo Cortina, associate professor of political science and associate director of the Center for Mexican American Studies at U H and Co host of News 88. Sevens Party Politics Program. Nancy Geronimo. Good Morning, Morning Morning, Craig right to see you. Great to see you were excited to have guests back in studio again, and it's We all have to suddenly get used to wait a minute. I can't just sit there and you know, scratch where I shouldn't be scratching while I'm talking with these people. All right, So let's start with what's happening in Geneva. What are the issues that the Biden administration is hoping will be discussed? Nancy. Well, I think they want to talk about cyber attacks right off the bat. That's going to be one of the top topics of the day. Hopefully to to stem some of the high emotions between the US and Russia at the moment. And I think they'll talk about energy as well. As other trade issues. Alright, Geronimo. Anything else that you would add to that list? I understand a fairly extensive list. Yeah, I want to try to accomplish but China. I mean, that's the major player that is going to put them together. And I think that For the Biden administration and also for the Putin administration. China is the common denominator that unites them one way or the other. You also have talks about, you know, arms, proliferations and obviously a little bit about climate change that are going to be discussing but certainly is how we're going to tame down China, and I think that's the point that they're going to be mainly discussing that, said Nancy Again, Expectations have been very low NPR. Did a nice job of summarizing during morning edition this morning how some recent administrations have dealt with Russia and what President Biden hopes to get out of this, And it sounds like Probably not much other than he personally believes sitting down face to face is just the only way to get some things done and repair some relationships. I think he hopes to turn on that Biden Charm initiative. But it's gonna be tough. Putin was not a fan of Biden ever. And I think we don't have high expectations for this meeting today, and I used the phrase to repair relationships and that might apply more to our European Union allies, but not so much with Russia. Part of the issue here. Geronimo is that the last two administrations took vastly different tax right towards Russia in particular towards Putin, right And I think that you know Russia has a strategic goal and that is strategic goal is to regain control of Eastern Europe and increase their influence globally speaking So for the Biden administration is by using economic sanctions as a tool for foreign policy, how they're going to be able to I guess slow a little bit the rate of growth of Russia's influence without you know, poking the bear and creating a whole big mess. So it's going to be balancing act like, give and take carrot and stick and I think that if putting allows, it's allowed to move forward. The relationship is going to be a little bit more constructive. Nancy. The president has been using this overseas trip as well to re establish relationships with some of those European Union Union countries. Has he been successful in doing so, Thus far, he seems to have been very successful in that effort. And you can see the fondness between he and some of the other European leaders, so I think he has Taken the approach that America's here as your partner again, which seem to have drifted in the left last administration. Is it fondness? Or would we have seen this response? Regardless of who became president, other than Donald Trump. After After let's face it. It was not a pleasant experience, apparently for him or for other, uh, G seven leaders in any of those meetings. It didn't seem like anybody was particularly happy to be in the same room together. Ride, right, right. Well, one thing that we have to be fairies that president former President Trump Actually increased native support from other European countries that were lacking and and that's one of his biggest goals in in Paul, G seven and NATO. Relatively speaking, But I think that, uh, the whole idea Once again we go back to China, right. The European Union is also threatened by the economic might of China. And they're worried that if they don't stay united, they're going to have significant problems. So I think that the Biden administration and the Trump Administration had very similar goals very different routes to it right, but they sent at the end goal. But at the end, I think that everybody is happy to have a reset the relationship and see how they can move forward with all the economic and security agendas, and I just want to add to that. That we need to keep in mind that Biden knew many of these leaders from his time as vice president, so I do think there's a genuine fondness because they've worked with him in the past. Particularly people like Angela Merkel and Macron. They've dealt with him as a senior leader for the U. S. The U. S. Justice Department past and present has been in the news this week. I'll just roll through a few of the things have been happening. Attorney General Merrick Garland has in recent days voted vowed rather too. Defend voting rights even as a bill designed to do that seems to be stalled in the U. S. Senate. Previous Justice Department leadership we've learned was pressured to reverse the results of the last election. And is also being investigated about surveillance of lawmakers and journalists. Iran over what should we know about all of us? Well, we don't know so far a lot. What we know is said The House committee released around more than 200 pages of emails, and you know, from the White House to the newly appointment, attorney general..

Nancy Sims Angela Merkel Donald Trump Nancy Geronimo Cortina Macron Nancy Geronimo Craig Cohen NPR Geronimo Geneva U. S. Senate Putin European Union Craig White House NATO Trump Administration European Union Union Eastern Europe
"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"88 7. Thistles. Houston matters on Craig Cohen. Good morning one year ago today long time he Estonian George Floyd was killed during an arrest by Minneapolis Police. Floyd's dying words I can't breathe, became a rallying cry in a wave of protests against his killing. Calls for racial justice and equity efforts to end systemic racism and calls for sweeping police reform amid other incidents of police violence against blacks to mark the anniversary that George Floyd Foundation will host a commemorative concert in Floyd's honor on May 30th. That's a Sunday Event will take place at the Fountain of Praise. Church in Pair land. The same church where Floyd's memorial Service was held a year ago here to look back on the life of George Floyd and what his life and death have meant in the fight for social justice. Is pastor Mia right with the Fountain of Praise Church. Ansari to take cousin of George Floyd and the president of the George Floyd Foundation. Welcome both of you to Houston matters. Good morning. No, Craig. Good morning. Good morning, Cherita. There's lots for us to talk about. But on this, I'm sure very difficult anniversary of a horrific moment. I'd like to start not by talking about your cousin's death, but about his life. Can you tell me something that It may be I or or a lot of people don't know about George Floyd. Well, but when you asked me that question I've talked about him so much. I'm not really sure I can pull out any surprises at this point in terms of what you may not know about him, but I think Um, you know, one of things that we really enjoyed about him is that he had a great sense of humor, and he was Sort of a practical joking And, um, you know, we always knew that when he was around, he was good for making us never laughed. So, uh, that's one of things that I remember most about him too. Yeah. You grew up with George any any specific memories of your childhood time spent with him that kind of resonate with you today, in particular. For me. He was I was older cousin and so in a lot of ways and old and not just in chronologically, but I've been told of kind of an old soul so to me, um, I just remember Kind of chauffeuring him and his friends around to the Y or taken into different events when we were growing up. Because I was to drive. I had a car in that and he would always ask me if I could take him and his friends places to drop him off. So I remember being the designated driver for his friends. Asked to write. What did George Floyd meaning in life, and then sadly and death to your church community? Thank you, Craig. Well, let me start by saying that the bone praise someone said an introduction were in peril, and we're actually Houston. So we want to make sure people that want to come to the concert. Come to the right location. Sorry. That's okay. But you know, when we think about this man, he's a human human being. Who's right for denied as him part of humanity, and he his death speaks justice, too. His death should speak justice. It's an awakening in the world. It was an eye opener for so many people, not just within the church, but within people around the world to see something tragic like this happen and You know, I'm just thinking this morning on Cherita and George's family, his brothers, his daughter, All of those people who were really close to him, his friends, people who knew him personally and loved him. And you know how today is a day of just pain once again and how those those markers happened throughout the year birthday holidays, said this man, it's Ms Because of a senseless killing and taking of his life. And he represents so many people who leave the Earth may be too soon. Not by their own hands, but at the hands of others. But yet his name is a big name. And there's a scripture in proverbs that Thanks to a great name and ah name that is remembered. And in this case, George was part of the awakening that needed to happen in the world to see what is happening with our Policing system, how members have certain communities, particularly African Americans. Are not given the same rights. When it comes to their rights that they should receive upon arrest or a pawn in some interaction with the police system. And so when I think about what his impact Has been it's It's a major impact because it's This one is one that what the world up for some reason it was different from all the others, and there's so many other names. Of course, that could be Broken in this time. That and and many names that has happened since. George's death as well. But yet people remember this one. They saw it. They remember this? Well, that last point they saw it. That's that's something that when we look at what has happened with social justice movements The last several years in this something will get into more later in the hour. But how? How much of a difference has it made that after years and years of people saying these incidents occur to see them occurring? It changes things, doesn't it, Pastor? I believe it does it cause I would say some type of racial reckoning in many ways, because we saw on this last year. There were a lot of changes that happened monuments for toppled Many brands changed their names. It was an awakening to how we're retreating African Americans, Whatever our what our monuments and our spaces and are named things their memorials. What are landscapes teach people about who they are? And how do we continue to permeate the society of white supremacy in the United States and even globally, and I don't want to leave out the rest of the world because There is, you know similar things happening in many other countries as well. But I think that George's people seeing George's death Really touch humanity. And that heart of compassion just could not. Turn its head one more time. Serena, What has it been like over the last year to find your family and its grief also thrust into the center of this movement for racial equity and justice and an end to systemic racism and And the protests over wrongdoing by police. What? What has that been like? I think for the family, it's just in a true test of our faith. You know, It's something that I talked about a lot is something that other family members will speak on as well. Is that we are strong in our belief. And that God is in control of all things in our lives, And so when we were faced with this, we knew that if nothing else, we had him to help us along the journey, And so it's been a difficult one. But I think you know we know that with him. All things are possible so We've we've embarked on this. You know, It's not something that we sought out. We were chosen. George was chosen, and so we've accepted the challenge to say we're going to do what is necessary to make sure that death is not in vain. We're talking with Serena Tate. She.

Craig Cohen Cherita Floyd Craig May 30th Serena Tate Serena George United States Earth Minneapolis Police George Floyd Foundation George Floyd one year ago Estonian Mia Fountain of Praise Church last year Houston both
"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"craig cohen" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Craig Cohen. Our not expert panel weighs in on that and other developments in the news on the good The bad and the ugly on the next Houston matters. Tomorrow morning at nine. Support comes from our Lady of the Lake University, Houston campus, offering flexible undergraduate and graduate degrees designed to help balance life and school. More info at Houston dot Oh, l l u s a daddy to you. Oh, Lou. Your education. Higher purpose support also comes from members long human from pair land offering recreational and cultural amenities, including the fairly and recreation center and natatorium and the shadow Create sports complex more about living in Carolina, prepared to love it dot com and from Green broke TMS neural health treating depression and O C B that have not responded of medications and talk therapy. TMS therapy is non drug noninvasive and FDA cleared. Green Brook tms dot com. How many Robinson on the next ICU? As we approach the anniversary of George Boyd's death, we speak to a pastor who felt doubtful, speaking at the funeral. What should have white Mr say, George Ford's funeral, and they all had gave you the same answer. I'm not sure of life first not to be talking with that funeral, a candid conversation with Dr Steve Wells of South Main Baptists and Dr Marcus Cosby of Wheeler Avenue Baptist on the next I see that's coming your way. Saturday afternoon one and an encore Sunday night at 10. I'm ready, Medusa, and this is Town Square. We'll get back to our conversation about social justice and just a moment but first coming up on tomorrow's show and is a disclaimer. I did not write this. We're calling it the urn of ER saree. I have been lucky to have spent 25 wonderful years interviewing, producing and hosting a variety of programs at Houston Public media from weeknight addition to interviews to Manor speaking and now town square. Marked my 25th anniversary of the station. My producers have pulled together an hour long look back at my many radio and TV adventures and the celebrities I've interviewed along the way and we hope that you'll call in and join the party. After all, you're part of the Houston public media family, too. So that's tomorrow. You can also email us questions that town square talked out or gore tweet at town Square talk. But now back to our conversation at hand on social justice with Reverend Down Odom Jr and Reverend Dr Angela Raven Anderson of Wheeler.

"craig cohen" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

08:15 min | 3 years ago

"craig cohen" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Listening to the travel planners radio show and a place that we have visited albeit way too long ago and for way too short a time and that is St Paul Minnesota. Wow. And this time of the year. Kevin. I think is a great time. And we just got a press release from Nick, you sick, marketing and media relations manager about something. That's right up here. L E Kevin. And that's who beer. Welcome to the show. Nick, thanks for having me looking at this press release. I am genuinely impressed with the Kagan case market. That's a new food hall. That's one some accolades as I understand, tell us more. It's really only been open since the start of fall on this past year. So hasn't even been around that long, but people have been going crazy about it. Just because it's that special the relief, and I'll just kind of less than any other members of travel media know that it was in the competition for USA today. Ten best along with a lot of other notable, great new food halls around the country, and it took first place. And so that's why people have been raving about it. So say open because it is something very very special. Congratulations. That's great. Yeah. Sue mentioned I'm kinda the food year. And I'm a bit jaded when it comes to food markets because we have the nation's oldest market west of the Mississippi here sue lard market down in the south side of Saint Louis next destination unto itself to get there any day of the week anytime of the year. It's not unlike the great food markets of Europe. The guys are hawking their wares. And everything is just excitement and colorful. That's really what this looks like as well. Yeah. It is. I mean, it definitely I would say the destination in itself innocent looks. But the thing that maybe makes it a little different is a really intriguing because of the history of how this came to be and the name Kagan case, it's kind of a unique name, and that is because this is the former case warehouse of the historic Schmidt burry historic Schmidt brewery ground in Saint Paul no longer brew beer, you wouldn't know that driving by it's been well kept. Because most of the Berea was converted into artists loss in studio space, but this warehouse next door sat making an empty for a long long time pigeons flying around and bunch of garbage inside just not well taken care of. But Craig Cohen here say wrong. Digging for what could be and got the right partners involved and created a keg incase market. And the other thing that's interesting about it is although it took first place in this competition. I would say there's a chance that it might be one of the smaller ones on the list. It's not the biggest market, but it's just extremely high quality. So based on high-quality, there's plenty of pretending to spend a lot of time there, but it's not gonna take away all of your time. So it's one great stop that amount of time. But leave. For the rest of our great city here in Saint Paul's Saint Paul winters. I'm sure that the people really appreciate it. On average. There are twenty three businesses total in the marketplace. That includes the Mahler kind of counter service market style vendors in the space, but also the anchor tenants and some of the anchor tenants. We're obviously kind of key in this coming together with big notable restaurant named coming into play there. So that really kind of was the catalyst they think in terms of making sure this whole thing took off markets usually include a pretty broad spectrum of vendors. What else available at the taking case variety. Really? So the kind of anchor, and I was I was referring to there is they brought in well known chef Thomas steamer and his business partner. Nick grand. Call Thomas beamer is very well. No, not only around our community. But nationally, he's been on national television. He's done beat Bobby flay on the food network. All these kind of things he's opened up a number of restaurants around the twin cities the biggest one probably notice is revival and revival opened up as a small place in Minneapolis does really known for its southern cuisine fried chicken. They opened up a larger one in Saint Paul on Selby avenue that specialized in of barbecue menu. In addition to kind of the things they already known for. And then they signed on to be that first major anchor tenant in this marketplace, and they had two ideas one they opened up a counter, south service revival smoked meats that specializes in smoke meats, and they smoke all their stuff right there outside. But then they had this over the top crazy idea to open up. This new upscale dining restaurant experience that is called in bloom and the name kind of references, and the fact that they focus on kind of wild seasonal local reading something that in a large part reflects, Minnesota certain things like Denison. They have a whole kind of section benefits. But every single thing that they do and cook it in the restaurant is all cooked over open would flame in large hers in North America nicely done. You're going to see a little blue PT cruiser headed your way. Real shortly. I think. Wait until the weather change. Exactly. A lot of different styles of markets within the market, but I'm going to assume that with the farm-to-table type of atmosphere in the culinary world. Now, this is probably spawned. A few other restaurants around town and things says yes, really we have restaurants opening constantly and the Star Tribune newspaper surprise still to this day. We have two newspapers here in the twin cities starts covers kind of you know, a lot of state and metro, but there in Minneapolis Star Tribune newspaper in Minneapolis and Saint Paul the dining seemed to be at for two thousand eighteen last year. So we have had this influx of great new restaurants coming in we already had a great farmers market. This is helping an example even just within the space itself to collaboration. In bloom users, the vendors within the space, the letters that specialized force before they have a fruiting chamber tower that you can actually see them growing mushrooms there on site indoors today in a very unique atmosphere. I guess. There's another vendor that has been case D hive area where they produce their own Honey on site. So they use it some pieces from all the vendors around them for their restaurant. I'm really interested in how the heck do they make organic cotton candy. They raise the price. I don't know the science behind it other than maybe they're basing it with organic cane sugar. I'm not even sure the science behind it. I just know that it's really good. And it's really fun to watch them spend a wheel of it. So there's also local artists pottery makers in florist and the list goes on and on congratulations on your wards there and one find out more about not only visiting Kagan case market, but Saint Paul in general as far as a tourist destination. Yeah. Absolutely. You can always check out our website. Of course. Visit Saint Paul dot com. We spelled Saint out essay, I n t make sure do that follow us on social media. We are sharing a lot of great content. We use all user generated content. Our Instagram's you'll see actual pulse from actual people who are listening the marketplace. And we're expanding our whole. New section of the website. Market. Just you. It's been that talked about deserve that much attention. So you can definitely check out more of their. I think we will come up before it gets too warm, though, still cool out there that way I can go through everything in the market back at in the back and still drive home and not worry about it. Nick. Thank you very much for joining us. And we look forward to visiting state ball is my pleasure. Thank you. Appreciate it. Great city. It is in. Yes. I know I have a preference for the food aspect of any destination. But if you want to see what a city is like at how it lives go to city market. It's an amazing display of the culinary skills of the area. And it's always colorful, take your camera. What are you going to Seattle where they throw the the other? That's something to see or the stalls of a Parisian market street vendors that are associated with the market. It's an amazing sight. If you're going to your hometown market. It's usually a great deal because this is where the restaurant tours and the wholesalers at all go to buy their foods, and you will find it much cheaper. And usually fresher better quality than what you would find in a supermarket or the quick trip or wherever you buy your groceries. It's just an amazing thing to see. Again, we want to thank you for listening and invite you to check out our YouTube site, YouTube dot com forward slash.

Nick grand Kagan Saint Paul Minneapolis St Paul Minnesota Star Tribune Saint Paul dot com Saint Paul winters Kevin USA Bobby flay Craig Cohen Europe Saint Louis Mississippi YouTube