12 Burst results for "Craig Barnes"

"craig barnes" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"craig barnes" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"The guy from the sentinel for the love of god craig. Barnes barnes was a colonel. That's right you're doing it. The colonel as a military rank. I legitimately thought it was like a corncob worst both ways while this is just. This is just arriving to you. It's even you didn't mean to go for the hominum the wa hominy grits is more like it. Oh my god thank you. Thank you sir. Like the word to dan as various uses of. There's the number t wwl then. There's t o if you're gonna write a letter then there's t o also thank you. Billy what i'm here for aids may also what makes the american english language so difficult to learn because hominum really existed. Places is that right. English is the only way i spoken to. I've spoken to people that have learned english as a third language. And they're like man hominem. Well it's unfair. How do you explain to somebody in a second language. Look here's the deal there's then and then there's then and they're spelled differently and they mean different things that don't check twitter because they still don't get it right there and there and then there's there with an apostrophe there's your and your and those are the same but there's a funny little piece of punctuation in the middle of one them what button but it's good ones do rats it is the ut it's it.

Barnes barnes craig dan Billy aids twitter
"craig barnes" Discussed on Jay Bird Watching

Jay Bird Watching

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"craig barnes" Discussed on Jay Bird Watching

"So after you wrap this up our normal champ. The best. Way. Doing. Let's go. Blue Jays. Let's go. Blue, Jays fans. If you have not heard Brennan Panic car I myself Craig Barnes John. Jaybird. Watching and you WanNa start something on your own. You can join us right here on the Anchor Dot FM family and jump right in with whatever podcasting pleasures you want with a wonderfully free platform and Brennan.

"craig barnes" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

07:22 min | 2 years ago

"craig barnes" Discussed on WSB-AM

"He is ordained in the cooperative Baptist fellowship thanks for being with us again happy to be here Peter last week you told us about your faculty role at Princeton theological seminary give us a sense of the history of that landmark seminarian helps expressing a leadership role in the faith today an old cemetery it's been there for a long time it's history is varied and super interesting there's great books about it and part of where we are right now is to imagine how do we serve the the with the wider church the goddess called the sister of the seminary right now is as diverse as it's ever been forty percent of our students are students of color or international students men and women are both educated they're all kinds of denominations all kinds of traditions and that's a hard balance to draw how can you bring together this diversity of ideas these diversities of theologies but my conviction and I hope it's a conviction of a seminary I think it is that the best education happens when the person sitting to your left and your right does not share the same assumptions that so we share Jesus mmhm but how we get there and how we worship and how we read is very different and that in itself is an educational moment for us in preparation for for the best kind of ministry Dr Craig Barnes is priest on day one in the past is the president of the seminary coming from a church background how is his leadership it's it's really important I think there because he comes from the church and he's got a foot in the academy as well he gets that line that Princeton is trying to walk on that it's a place that's committed to the best of academics and the best of the church at the same time so that depth of experience in both worlds makes all the difference and and above all he's got a love for the church in that I think colors and shapes all the leading that he does I'm really glad to be at a seminary he's leading as an academic you are of course a prolific writer in addition to numerous articles you've co authored a book with Michael chan called exploring the Bible how do you suggest we do that I'm part of what that book encourages people to do is to realize that our stories our experiences are identities are not obstacles on the way to reading the Bible the really important part of how god speaks to us through the scriptures so the I think the first time for memory the first line of the book says he never read the Bible by yourself so even if you go on a long hike and read the Bible even if you lock yourself in a closet somewhere and read the Bible there's always this this wealth of tradition and experience with you so how do we best listen to god in the midst of that identity instead of trying to put it away put it aside for the moment and bring your full self to the Texas scripture and know that you need the help of your neighbor to read the Bible as well so that's a in a in short with the book is about if you're working on a book or two as well you have to working on two books one is about the theology of ethnicity in acts so it grapples some with the the stuff we talked about last week in Pentecost so how does god view our differences also read a book about that if if the book it was one sentence they would say god loves our differences in the second book is a book about Paul and Paul's letters especially thing about Paul and belonging so what if we imagine that Paul's letters are less about getting our theology right in our doctrine right and it's also about imagining what it means to live in a in a diverse community in light of what god has done for us serve god raised Jesus from the dead what does that mean for how I relate to you Peter I relate to a stranger or this community that god has drawn together the only thing we have in common is that we all love Jesus what if the letters are primarily about that and about the sense of belonging so yeah I'm excited to do this work you've taught it historically Methodist Lutheran and Presbyterian seminary miss but you were ordained in the cooperative Baptist fellowship how did you experience your call to the ministry I was sixteen years old and I was at a at a Baptist camp summer camp and I felt god speaking got calling to me saying this is were I want you to go out one wanted to pursue a call to ministry but when I was sixteen I didn't know that seminaries existed so I assume that you went to a Christian college and then you got a church after after graduation so when I discovered that there is as wide world of theological education of seminaries and doctoral programs it took me awhile but I think I finally realized that god called me to ministry and I had a narrow idea what that would look like and god constantly is expanding with the possibility so now I get to teach people we're gonna be standing behind those pulpits that that I thought I wouldn't have it every Sunday god knew what god was doing for the very first it just took me awhile to catch up a common occurrence yes well this Sunday is the church observes Trinity Sunday or sermon draws from the first book of the Bible genesis would you read a portion of genesis one into force we have to in the beginning when god created the heavens and the earth the earth was a formless void and darkness covered the face of the deep while the wind from god swept over the face of the waters then god said let there be light and there was light and god saw the light was good and god separated the light from the darkness god called the light day and the darkness god called night and there was evening and there was morning the first day thank god said let us make humankind in our image according to our likeness and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the air and over the cattle and over all the wild animals of the earth and over every creeping thing that creeps upon the earth so god created humankind in god's image in the image of god god created them male and female god created them god bless them and god said to them be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth and subdue it and have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the air and over every living thing that moves upon the earth god said see I have given you every plant yielding seed that is upon the face of all the earth and every tree with seed in its fruit you shall have them for food and to every beast of the earth and to every bird of the air and everything that creeps on the earth everything that has breath of life I have given every green plant for food and it was so god saw everything that god had made and indeed it was very good and there was evening and there was morning the six day thus the heavens and the earth were finished and all the multitude and on the seventh day god finished the work they got it done and god rested on the seventh day from all the work that god had done so god blessed the seventh day and hallowed it because on it god rested from all the work that god had done in creation these are the generations of the heavens and the earth when they were created Eric your sermon is entitled in the beginning and in the end thanks for being with us thanks Peter and if you like to listen again to today's program.

Peter cooperative Baptist Princeton theological seminary
"craig barnes" Discussed on Rhythm and Pixels Video Game Music Podcast

Rhythm and Pixels Video Game Music Podcast

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"craig barnes" Discussed on Rhythm and Pixels Video Game Music Podcast

"Back over you enjoyed which you just listened to that being ghetto Libretto from the game streets of rogue composed by Craig Barnes and. It's funny because every time I say that I think about Jay Jay Walker from good times tougher little get to brexit soave move. Meanwhile I mean ghetto Lebron so this track. I think it's pretty. I had three tracks. The Matt does a deep cut is get. Yeah also that could have been dame wage from a living color. I Ha. That's another deep okay. So this game. Why would I pick this as one of my favorites from the year? Well trees have rogue is a rogue like but it doesn't feel like your average rogue lake in the sense of what we typically think which is a rogue like is go into a dungeon beat a bunch of enemies because the next Florida and while this game does still have you progressing from floor to floor for You choose from a variety of character classes and each class has his own goal objectives for beating floor so yeah. The floors are randomly generated rated but they're randomly generated to create city blocks and you have to fulfil the goal of your particular character amongst amongst other goals to complete the floor so a simple thing cleve might be associated with the guys to create a recycling program all right and then another guy is just to increase people's interest in voting in the next season. You joke there's probably care. Thank you do this. Well go ahead character where your goal is to convince five people to vote for you in the next election back could be your character and that could be his goal and the map is generated in a way set. There may be specific people that you could influence but to influence and yet to complete a series of objectives that prevents you from getting to those people and the game's called the streets of rogues. I'm assuming it's beating them up. Well you guys you certainly can be lining up the streets in clean them while you're kinda cleanups because I think the overall all goal for any character that the ultimate goal is you're trying to overthrow the just generic term. It's calm the overlord of the city. Gotcha so so. It's a generally good game in the sense that every time you come you can choose a different character which means now your goals objectives are going to change as you play this Raleigh Gun. Yeah the changes up rather than like you change your class so suddenly like how you place different. This is like no the way you play the way you're approaching. Each game is different. I like that might be a character. There were you're all about bringing your whole goals to beat up all the cars and the town that's unique. Yeah unique game it gets its quality in this game. I wish more people had talked about over the couple of months but as we discussed earlier. There's just so frigging Myers. There's a lot out there. There's a lot to keep track up. Well if if you would like to help us keep track on the show. I forget where I was going in this anyway. If you want more information on the go to our website rhythm in pixels dot com we'll have links to like actually for almost all these artists. We're GONNA have links to their band band camp pages and other places where you can download the music and by the music and support all of these artists. A lot of these games are indie titles So a lot of these composers are not like they're going to have official tease out there. That you can purchase funniness own right to help rethink about how just the fact that like you said. These are all mostly in almost gives you a direct impression of light where a lot of our gaming time goes or in your case your your dream gaming time tree..

Jay Jay Walker Craig Barnes Florida cleve official Myers
"craig barnes" Discussed on The BBQ Central Show

The BBQ Central Show

13:15 min | 2 years ago

"craig barnes" Discussed on The BBQ Central Show

"And we have the better correspondence right here. We get back to my agenda here urgence right so let's talk about something that is live and late breaking John. You WanNa make the announcement or the yield the forty you all right here. We barbeque twice in the same show exclusive because he more exclusive face grumpy. BE IN CLEVELAND. Ohio from the breaking news desk once again and I'm here to give you a bit of information after some game planning between the executive producer Sir and by South as it relates to the best moments of the Barbecue Central Show in ten minutes or less in deep discussion through no Oh input from anybody else. Strictly John and mind decision alone mostly John's and then my decision alone again through no input. We didn't take any emails on this. We've heard no feedback. Anything generated by listeners members of this panel or anything starting starting the first Friday in January. Correct John Yes. We will go to the best minute to the the best moments of the barbecues central show in ten minutes or less and it will be ten minutes or less. That's it no the double ten minutes or less so twenty minutes or fourteen minutes. I know everybody was a big fan of the old format I said to my so you know I wanna make ticket good for the listener here. Where the title is actually matching? What the show is about so it's going to be one singular piece released on Friday and ten minutes or less and John has agreed that this is a format that we should look at? We looked at it from all sides. We had now going into year three as we make the year. Turn and after two years of the best minutes are the best moments of the barbecues undertone ten minutes or less where we had two interviews or two portions Russians I said. Hey let's just knock it down to ten minutes or less and see what happens. John What did you think of that. I think it's a great idea I think it will. We'll take away a lot of the negativity surrounding the title because there is some out there in the interwebs. I never heard it. You know. I've heard it the best seventeen seventeen minutes of the Barbecue Central Show in twenty four minutes or plus but full disclosure the segment itself is going to be ten minutes or less. It's ten minutes or less tax. I'm the tax. I still have to introduce it. I still have to get us out of it. So the segment itself will be ten minutes or less going forward all right We quickly go around the panel for initial thoughts. We go to Steve Ray from Tennessee your thoughts on a best moments of ten minutes or less with some tax. It sounds like it's going to be the sea the sea we're going. We're going from seventeen minutes to food. It's going to be the best of the Barbecue Central Show in ten minutes or less. Give or take four minutes. I like to make a new logo. August now look Steve. I know that you struggle with production every single day for every single second of the day. But you understand where the idea is here that the lion's share the most important part of the show is the ten minutes or less part and then there's production value around but it's not an hour of production. I I enjoy both parts. I don't know why just don't call it the best of the Barbecue Central Show and do twenty minutes. I enjoy twenty minutes. Yeah but it's not. It's the ten ten minutes or less John in minutes dropped ten minutes. Why why are you? Why are you pigeonhole yourself in the ten minutes? But that's the concept concept of the show is ten minutes or less you have so for instance. John is going through a show. And here's this. Swiss Steve Please please so for the folks that don't know that's ten minutes here and ten minutes of there but that's it it doesn't have to be. What if there isn't twenty minutes of that one interview? That are the best for for whatever. John has a lot of responsibility on the shoulder to go through and find Tan of the best or minutes or less of a particular interview and You know that was the the concept of of the show so I think ten minutes. This is a nice consumable time. It might actually make you go. You know what I think I would like to hear a little bit more. I would rather leave the the pallid wanting then over satiate. I was just getting ready to say that may want people wanting moon may make people want more and if people write in and and say boy we'd really love an additional ten minutes then when the new year comes up maybe we go to You know a two times a week. Who knows what's going to go on? We're always evolving and pushing them. Doug your thoughts. Well I. My first thought was just making approximately twenty minutes or something like that but I like the two segments so it does this mean that. Now we're going to have to releases of ten minutes or less so doug I hate to say this but obviously you're not actively listening because I just said that if people write in and say hey we would love to have more time than you know next year we can look at a potential of dropping the two releases but I think that point that that that becomes You know from a production standpoint. I think that becomes to me. That would seem to be a little bit more involved than having John. Just do the way that it currently a setup so I mean he's certainly a an engineering magician Russian. I don't think that he couldn't do it but I certainly don't want to bog it down into something other than it should be and I think this new ten minutes or less is really gonna hit the mark plus I think it also allows John To. I don't want to speak for you John but this. Does this. Allow you to to look at the previous catalog log in in a little bit different way where you can get a lot more in the can or are ready to roll if you will. Yeah I think it does and I think it's GonNa actually force the show. Oh to be a little better if I can be totally candid about that You know the ten the ten minutes or less one segment is going to have to be just absolutely stellar for every single time. There's no margin for air And I'M GONNA make I'M GONNA do my best to keep it under a total of ten minutes anyway. I just WANNA have that latitude to have the tax ax. I think there's a lot of great things out there to still still yet to find. It opens up a lot of the existing shows that we've already done shows in how listen to the show and there might be three or four for ten minutes segments in there. That are good and over time we can bring those the white man absolutely fabulous. So that's why they have to or like youtube or like a pair of same sex parents who have a two year old side on the thing you bet a two year old for two years. And you can't name the damn thing Steve and I want to point out the fact that the name of the show and the third year in a row is going to stay the same the best moments barbecue central show in ten minutes. Again you're wrong again. You're wrong I mean it's a boy. I'm judy no absolutely not boy named sue by the way and and PAT it. Nothing is nothing is changing with this baby has been named. This baby is walking. It was just recently potty trained at the starting to turn three two years old. This thing is a full live breathing kid and it's ready to go just getting a little bit more efficient to to listen to that's it. Yeah this babies in therapy and four years old. Well I guess why we all right now. Let's go to Steve Ray because You know one of the the coolest things that happened in the year. Two Thousand Nineteen was freaking Popeye's chicken sandwich and we have some other clips and so forth. That will be probably getting into. At least I do that. I'll bringing forth and listening audience but Steve has made. I don't know if we can call it a friendship or a business relationship or whatever the hell we can call it with the guy that is single handedly trying to take down big chicken. And it's a stronghold over the consuming public specifically Popeye's and while his Suit going to trial as you heard right here on the barbecue central. Show the guy by the name of Craig Bar is also a movie maker and while perhaps perhaps many of you scoffed at the movie and the whole whatever. His jobs are things that he's into Steve. You can account for the fact that Craig Mike is a one hundred percent motivated movie producer. In fact he is using the midnight oil's facility as as part part and parcel of the first day at work or whatever that movie title the First Day on the job. I think it was right right because because I'm good at naming things we it Craig and I become interested. Wrong quences All right so give me the run-up because I'm I'm undying Lee interested to hear how you guys put this together and then what it was actually like. I think he was supposed to be out there that the last week or last night. So give me the whole run-up because I'm just just captivated by Craig. Barnes offer to you know. My guess taste us for his movie in exchange for him appearing on your show when he did any. We worked at dill out so a couple all about four weeks ago. He said his girlfriend out who is very attractive by the way she has. Has this huge personality. I mean big time big personalities tax. Yes she's full of enthusiasm interesting. She's a she's a pro she's she's no Johnny come lately. She's a pro. She had her camera out there. She had these boards. I think she was taking pictures. Working on board saints movies and Greg texted me last Monday in said that everything was ago it he wanted to come out Tuesday night to the gas station and and Film and interview people that he had coming out. There even offered me a bit part in the film where I actually. I'm the manager of the gas station and I hand the keys to another person. Well last Tuesday I hear instead. It was raining and cold and he could do it and so so. He texted me on Wednesday and he said he had to cancel the shoe. The weather it was really cold and it I mean it was bad and waiting to hear back from him. Because because quite frankly here in Chattanooga weather stumped last week it every overnight has been we've had frost and Frost and or Ray we even had one day of of Snow a little bit of accumulation already which is unusual so but he. I've got no doubt in my mind. He's GonNa use the station and he's welcomed to use it. He's he's a he's a legitimate guy really is had you have. You met him in person yet. No not yet. Okay yeah just his girlfriend All right And is the is the scene or the timeframe of the movie such that it's relative to the time of the year that we're in now or is he trying signed to set up something different now. He hasn't told me that I don't know I don't know you know he's already. He's shot this film once on some sort of a thirty five millimeter Peter. Whatever they think about anything about film format but he it's it's Onfield now is going to a bigger a bigger format? Whatever that means so well I would imagine the doctor about yeah? I think he's talking about shooting on digital and getting it out of that original media because digital's much easier ear to edit and then obviously you can send it across various different distribution channels much easier than shipping a box of tape. That people are gonNA I mean. Can you imagine I mean it really. Isn't that long ago. I used to work in a movie theater house and they would send movies in cans multiple cans the Ed to put on these big trays splice. splice things together and you would hit a button thing would start rolling around. I mean inevitably when I was working a shift that once or twice a movie reel would actually split at at the splice in the you would have to run back and do it. All the people are pissed off because they've paid all this money to watch their modem in Now anymore you just download it in a way it goes so digital format. Matt seems to be a little bit here. So there's no doubt in your mind that Craig Bar. The guy that is suing Popeye's is going to be at the midnight oil shooting first day on on the job which ironically is the last day on the job too. I believe he match. No No. I've no doubt in my mind. I wonder if he may have gotten a the settlement. From Papa's already got the little cash wait a second twitter's robot central show exclusive.

John Steve Ray Popeye Craig Bar John Yes CLEVELAND John What Ohio John To Craig executive producer youtube Doug twitter Craig Mike Chattanooga Matt judy Papa Tennessee
"craig barnes" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:01 min | 3 years ago

"craig barnes" Discussed on KCRW

"Market dot com it's a twenty two this is morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin and I'm David green okay here's a fact more than half of American children now own a smartphone by the age of eleven that is according to a new national survey of kids media years so what are the implications of that will in pairs on your cabinets covers education kids intact and she's been digging into these numbers and joins me high on yeah hi David am I wrong to be a little shocked by this eleven years old more than half of American kids have smartphones what would tell me the survey it's really interesting to you so I if you look around you at it may not be that surprising but at the survey was conducted by common sense media and they've been looking into you kids in media you since two thousand three and yes we are seeing that a majority of kids are getting the first phones younger and younger so in twenty fifteen the last time they did this survey most kids had a phone by age fourteen and now it's just over half have their first phone by age eleven and about one in five they've have one by the age of eight years old eight years old I mean that what is not even tell us about children now well it you know we could be a lot of different things in a truly depend on the family here some not necessarily hitting the panic button like sometimes a kid might need to go between dad doesn't mom's house right and they need the phone for communication sure obviously a phone you know is a connection to you inappropriate content cyber bullying a lot of scary stuff and some researchers say you know there could be a silver lining in that if your kid starts out with the phone earlier as long as there's a strong parental hand guiding them and looking over their shoulder in taking the phone away you know certainly at that time and other designated times maybe they give you longer to model healthy habits instead of kind of throwing them the phone eight fifteen let's say where they're really not listening to mom and dad okay so beyond a safety necessity and in some cases like that did you learn about what kids are actually doing online when they have these things so one piece of good news is we're actually not seen kids spend a lot more time with media overall compared with twenty fifteen we have seen is there watching less TV there watching more videos online they're also spending more time using screens for homework and that's a real challenge and given that you know dangers and multi tasking which which is not great for the brain but so does the survey break it down in terms of which kids might have phones in which might not yeah and there's actually some really interesting points there for example ownership of phones is very very high across the board and the lowest income young people reported spending almost two hours per day more easing screen media and that is a really big difference compared to the most affluent youth and first of all this is a sign that the digital vied has a very different definition than it might have just five years ago and there's so much that we don't know I mean are they spending more time and supervise where they actually doing on the phones and the big one is is this a positive or negative right this this class divide we don't know but the other devices that the kind of struck you well you might not be surprised if boys play more video games girls enjoy listening to music and reading more than boys here they also say that they like social media a lot more and they use it more often and another really intriguing area is racial and ethnic divides so black and Hispanic teens report that they spend much more time on social media they like social media more and that's an expected at but it's also really intriguing because there's other research that suggests that young people people of color as a group or more likely to value social media and possibly even use it as a bridge to civic engagement so there's a lot more to dig into here such interesting stuff and predication for Annika minutes thanks on yeah thanks David how to compensate for America's original sin the issue of reparations has made its way into the democratic primary and into the broader culture several of the presidential candidates say they would support a commission to study the matter into Protestant seminaries this fall announced plans to create reparations funds in recognition of their own ties to slavery and here's Tom Jones says the schools that train clergy see it as a confession of past sins Princeton theological seminary in New Jersey was founded in part by people who use slave labor or profited from it the seminary president Craig Barnes says in consideration of that history the school will spend more than a million dollars a year through a reparations fund about half of that's going to scholarships also curricular changes fully funding a center for black church studies also this fall Virginia theological seminary in Alexandria announced its own somewhat smaller reparations initiative some of the money would go to descendants of the slaves who actually built the school the idea of reparations does remain somewhat controversial however at least as exemplified in these cases the southern Baptist theological seminary in Louisville last spring rejected a petition from some Baptist ministers and former faculty calling for a reparations fund that's because president Albert Mohler says of an institution just sets aside scholarships for African American students it's not really paying reparations you're taking a percentage of your own fun and then you are designating that scholarship assistance to be paid to your own institution Moller says a seminary in that case is simply prioritizing black students for scholarship assistance this seminary last year acknowledged its own extensive connections to slavery partly to make up for that legacy it's now giving financial assistance to African American students in its doctoral program not unlike the assistance other institutions are offering their black students it just doesn't call it reparations at Princeton president Barnes says terminology can be a bit of a hang up we're not afraid of the word reparation but we prefer repair like how do we repair the legacy that we've inherited a broader question is whether the legacy of slavery can be addressed by individual institutions taking steps on their own the case by case approach can't encompass the full range of effects of slavery and producing racial inequality in the United States William diritti as a professor of public policy in African American studies at Duke University he has written extensively on reparations a focus on individual perpetrators an individual victims diritti says obscures how slavery in the United States was officially authorized and so I'm convinced that what we have to do is treat the federal government as the culpable party culpable because laws and court decisions provided a legal framework for slavery segregation and racial injustice generally but also because of its implicit approval of these kinds of practices by its failure to intervene at Princeton seminary president Barnes says an institution's establishment of a reparations fund is no substitute for a national program the country needs to have a conversation about this he says and he says.

"craig barnes" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:05 min | 3 years ago

"craig barnes" Discussed on KCRW

"Dawdle it's six twenty two this is morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin and I'm David green okay here's a fact more than half of American children now own a smartphone by the age of eleven that is according to a new national survey of kids media use so what are the implications of that will in pairs on your cabinets covers education kids intact and she's been digging into these numbers and joins me high on yeah hi David am I wrong to be a little shocked by this eleven years old more than half of American kids have smartphones what would tell me the survey it's really interesting you you so I if you look around you at it may not be that surprising but at the survey was conducted by common sense media and they've been looking into you kids in media you since two thousand three and yes we are seeing that a majority of kids are getting the first phones younger and younger so in twenty fifteen the last time they did this survey most kids had a phone by age fourteen and now it's just over half have their first phone by age eleven and about one in five they've have one by the age of eight years old eight years old I mean that what is not even tell us about children now well it you know we could be a lot of different things in a truly depend on the family here so I'm not necessarily hitting the panic button like sometimes a kid might need to go between dad doesn't mom's house right and they need the phone for communication sure obviously a phone you know is a connection to you inappropriate content cyber bullying a lot of scary stuff and some researchers say you know there could be a silver lining in that if your kid starts out with the phone earlier as long as there's a strong parental hand guiding them and looking over their shoulder and taking the phone away you know certainly at that time and other designated times maybe they give you longer to model healthy habits instead of kind of throwing them the phone eight fifteen let's say where they're really not listening to mom and dad okay so beyond a safety necessity and in some cases like that did you learn about what kids are actually doing online when they have these things so one piece of good news is we're actually not seen kids spend a lot more time with media overall compared with twenty fifteen we have seen is there watching less TV they're watching more videos online they're also spending more time using screens for homework and that's a real challenge I'm given that you know dangers and multi tasking which which is not great for the brain since it is a server break it down in terms of which kids might have phones in which might not yeah and there's actually some really interesting points there for example ownership of phones is very very high across the board and the lowest income young people reported spending almost two hours per day more easing screen media and that is a really big difference compared to the most affluent youth and first of all this is a sign that the digital vied has a very different definition than it might have just five years ago and there's so much that we don't know I mean are they spending more time and supervise where they actually doing on the phones and the big one is is this a positive or negative right this this class divide we don't know but the other devices that the kind of struck you well you might not be surprised if boys play more video games girls enjoy listening to music and reading more than boys here they also say that they like social media a lot more and they use it more often and another really intriguing area is racial and ethnic divides so black and Hispanic teens report that they spend much more time on social media they like social media more and that's an expected at but it's also really intriguing because there's other research that suggests that young people people of color as a group or more likely to value social media and possibly even use it as a bridge to civic engagement so there's a lot more to dig into here such interesting stuff and predicates reporter on cabinets thanks on yeah thanks David how to compensate for America's original sin the issue of reparations has made its way into the democratic primary and into the broader culture several of the presidential candidates say they would support a commission to study the matter into Protestant seminaries this fall announced plans to create reparations funds in recognition of their own ties to slavery and yours Tom Jones says the schools that train clergy see it as a can Russian of past sins Princeton theological seminary in New Jersey was founded in part by people who used slave labor or profited from it the seminary president Craig Barnes says in consideration of that history the school will spend more than a million dollars a year through a reparations fund about half of its going to scholarships also curricular changes fully funding a center for black church studies also this fall Virginia theological seminary in Alexandria announced its own somewhat smaller reparations initiative some of the money would go to descendants of the slaves who actually built the school the idea of reparations does remain somewhat controversial however at least as exemplified in these cases the southern Baptist theological seminary in Louisville last spring rejected a petition from some Baptist ministers and former faculty calling for a reparations fund that's because president Albert Mohler says of an institution just sets aside scholarships for African American students it's not really paying reparations you're taking a percentage of your own fun and then you are designating that scholarship assistance to be paid to your own institution Moller says a seminary in that case is simply prioritizing black students for scholarship assistance his seminary last year acknowledged its own extensive connections to slavery partly to make up for that legacy it's now giving financial assistance to African American students in its doctoral program not unlike the assistance other institutions are offering their black students it just doesn't call it reparations at Princeton president Barnes says terminology can be a bit of a hang up we're not afraid of the word reparation but we prefer repair like how do we repair the legacy that we've inherited a broader question is whether the legacy of slavery can be addressed by individual institutions taking steps on their own the case by case of Roach can't encompass the full range of effects of slavery and producing racial inequality in the United States William diritti as a professor of public policy in African American studies at Duke University he has written extensively on reparations a focus on individual perpetrators an individual victims diritti says obscures how slavery in the United States was officially authorized and so I'm convinced that what we have to do is treat the federal government as the culpable party culpable because laws and court decisions provided a legal framework for slavery segregation and racial injustice generally but also because of its implicit approval of these kinds of practices by its failure to intervene at Princeton seminary president Barnes says an institution's establishment of a reparations fund is no substitute for a national program the country needs to have a conversation about this he says and he says.

"craig barnes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"craig barnes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"How to compensate for America's original sin the issue of reparations has made its way into the democratic primary and into the broader culture several of the presidential candidates say they would support a commission to study the matter into Protestant seminaries this fall announced plans to create reparations funds in recognition of their own ties to slavery and yours Tom Jones says the schools that train clergy see it as a confession of past sins Princeton theological seminary in New Jersey was founded in part by people who use slave labor or profited from it the seminary president Craig Barnes says in consideration of that history the school will spend more than a million dollars a year through a reparations fund about half of its going to scholarships also curricular changes fully funding a center for black church studies also this fall Virginia theological seminary in Alexandria announced its own somewhat smaller reparations initiative some of the money would go to descendants of the slaves who actually built the school the idea of reparations does remain somewhat controversial however at least as exemplified in these cases the southern Baptist theological seminary in Louisville last spring rejected a petition from some Baptist ministers and former faculty calling for a reparations fund that school's president Albert Mohler says of an institution just sets aside scholarships for African American students it's not really paying reparations you're taking a percentage of your own fun and then you are designating that scholarship assistance to be paid to your own institution Moller says a seminary in that case is simply prioritizing black students for scholarship assistance his seminary last year acknowledged its own extensive connections to slavery partly to make up for that legacy it's now giving financial assistance to African American students in its doctoral pro I am not unlike the assistance other institutions are offering their black students it just doesn't call it reparations at Princeton present Barnes says terminology can be a bit of a hang up we're not afraid of the word reparation but we prefer repair like how do we repair the legacy that we've inherited a broader question is whether the legacy of slavery can be addressed by individual institutions taking steps on their own the case by case approach can't encompass the full range of effects of slavery and producing racial inequality in the United States William diritti is a professor of public policy in African American studies at Duke University he has written extensively on reparations a focus on individual perpetrators an individual victims diritti says obscures how slavery in the United States was officially authorized and so I'm convinced that what we have to do is treat the federal government as the culpable party culpable because laws and court decisions provided a legal framework for slavery segregation and racial injustice generally but also because of its implicit approval of these kinds of practices by its failure to intervene at Princeton seminary president Barnes says an institution's establishment of a reparations fund is no substitute for a national program the country needs to have a conversation about this he says and he says his school is happy to participate in it Tom Chilton NPR news this is NPR news support for W. NYC comes from slung working to help bring data to every question decision.

"craig barnes" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:53 min | 3 years ago

"craig barnes" Discussed on KCRW

"And I'm David green okay here's a fact more than half of American children now own a smartphone by the age of eleven that is according to a new national survey of kids media years so what are the implications of that will endure as on your cabinets covers education kids in tech and she's been digging into these numbers and joins me high on yeah hi David am I wrong to be a little shocked by this eleven years old more than half of American kids have smartphones what would tell me the survey it's really interesting to you so I if you look around you at it may not be that surprising but at the survey was conducted by common sense media and they've been looking into you kids in media you since two thousand three and yes we are seeing that a majority of kids are getting the first phones younger and younger so in twenty fifteen the last time they did this survey most kids had a phone by age fourteen and now it's just over half have their first round by age eleven and about one in five have won by the age of eight years old eight years old I mean that what is not even tell us about children now well it you know we could be a lot of different things in a truly depend on the family here some not necessarily hitting the panic button like sometimes a kid might need to go between dad doesn't mom's house right and they need the phone for communication sure obviously a phone you know is a connection to you inappropriate content cyber bullying a lot of scary stuff and some researchers say you know there could be a silver lining in that if your kid starts out with the phone earlier as long as there's a strong parental hand guiding them and looking over their shoulder and taking the phone away you know certainly at that time and other designated times maybe they give you longer to model healthy habits instead of kind of throwing them the phone eight fifteen let's say where they're really not listening to mom and dad okay so beyond a safety necessity and in some cases like that did you learn about what kids are actually doing online when they have these things so one piece of good news is we're actually not seen kids spend a lot more time with media overall compared with twenty fifteen we have seen is there watching less TV they're watching more videos online they're also spending more time using screens for homework and that's a real challenge and given that you know dangers and multi tasking which which is not great for the brain since it is a server break it down in terms of which kids might have phones in which might not yeah and there's actually some really interesting points there for example the ownership of phones is very very high across the board and the lowest income young people reported spending almost two hours per day more easing screen media and that is a really big difference compared to the most affluent youth and first of all this is a sign that the digital vied has a very different definition than it might have just five years ago and there's so much that we don't know I mean are they spending more time and supervise where they actually doing on the phones and the big one is is this a positive or negative right this this class divide we don't know but the other devices that the kind of struck you well you might not be surprised the boys play more video games girls enjoy listening to music and reading more than boys here they also say that they like social media a lot more and they use it more often and another really intriguing area is racial and ethnic divides so black and Hispanic teens report that they spend much more time on social media they like social media more and that's an expected at but it's also really intriguing because there's other research that suggests that young people people of color as a group or more likely to value social media and possibly even use it as a bridge to civic engagement so there's a lot more to dig into here such interesting stuff and poor education reporter Annika minutes thanks on yeah thanks David how to compensate for America's original sin the issue of reparations has made its way into the democratic primary and into the broader culture several of the presidential candidates say they would support a commission to study the matter into Protestant seminaries this fall announced plans to create reparations funds in recognition of their own ties to slavery and yours Tom Jones says the schools that train clergy see it as a confession of past sins Princeton theological seminary in New Jersey was found and in part by people who use slave labor or profited from it the seminary president Craig Barnes says in consideration of that history the school will spend more than a million dollars a year through a reparations fund about half of its going to scholarships also curricular changes fully funding a center for black church studies also this fall Virginia theological seminary in Alexandria announced its own somewhat smaller reparations initiative some of the money would go to descendants of the slaves who actually built the school the idea of reparations does remain somewhat controversial however at least as exemplified in these cases the southern Baptist theological seminary in Louisville last spring rejected a petition from some Baptist ministers and former faculty calling for a reparations fund that's because president Albert Mohler says of an institution just sets aside scholarships for African American students it's not really paying reparations you're taking a percentage of your own fun and then you are designating that scholarship assistance to be paid to your own institution Moller says a seminary in that case is simply prioritizing black students for scholarship assistance this seminary last year acknowledged its own extensive connections to slavery partly to make up for that legacy it's now giving financial assistance to African American students in its doctoral program not unlike the assistance other institutions are offering their black students it just doesn't call it reparations at Princeton president Barnes says terminology can be a bit of a hang up we're not afraid of the word reparation but we prefer repair like how do we repair the legacy that we've inherited a broader question is whether the legacy of slavery can be addressed by individual institutions taking steps on their own the case by case approach can't encompass the full range of effects of slavery and for using racial inequality in the United States William Daugherty is a professor of public policy in African American studies at Duke University he has written extensively on reparations a focus on individual perpetrators an individual victims diritti says obscures how slavery in the United States was officially authorized and so I'm convinced that what we have to do is treat the federal government as the culpable party culpable because laws and court decisions provided a legal framework for slavery segregation and racial injustice generally but also because of its implicit approval of these kinds of practices by its failure to intervene at Princeton seminary president Barnes says an institution's establishment of a reparations fund is no substitute for a national program the country needs to have a conversation about this he says and he says his school.

"craig barnes" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:51 min | 3 years ago

"craig barnes" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A fact more than half of American children now own a smartphone by the age of eleven that is according to a new national survey of kids media use so what are the implications of that will in pairs on your cabinets covers education kids intact and she's been digging into these numbers and joins me Hyannis hi David am I wrong to be a little shocked by this eleven years old more than half of American kids have smartphones what would tell me the survey it's really interesting to you so I if you look around you at it may not be that surprising but at the survey was conducted by common sense media and they've been looking into you kids in media you since two thousand three and yes we are seeing that a majority of kids are getting the first phones younger and younger so in twenty fifteen the last time they did this survey most kids had a phone by age fourteen and now it's just over half have their first phone by age eleven and about one in five youth have one by the age of eight years old eight years old I mean that what is not even tell us about children now well it you know we could be a lot of different things in a truly depend on the family here some not necessarily hitting the panic button like sometimes a kid might need to go between dad doesn't mom's house right and they need the phone for communication sure obviously a phone you know is a connection to you inappropriate content cyber bullying a lot of scary stuff and some researchers say you know there could be a silver lining in that if your kid starts out with the phone earlier as long as there's a strong parental hand guiding them and looking over their shoulder and taking the phone away you know certainly at that time and other designated times maybe that gives you longer to model healthy habits instead of kind of throwing them the phone eight fifteen let's say where they're really not listening to mom and dad okay so beyond a safety necessity and in some cases like that did you learn about what kids are actually doing online when they have these things so one piece of good news is we're actually not seen kids spend a lot more time with media overall compared with twenty fifteen we have seen is there watching less TV they're watching more videos online they're also spending more time using screens for homework and that's a real challenge and given that you know dangers of multi tasking which which is not great for the brain but so does the survey break it down in terms of which kids might have phones in which might not yeah and there's actually some really interesting points there for example ownership of phones is very very high across the board and the lowest income young people reported spending almost two hours per day more easing screen media and that is a really big difference compared to the most affluent youth and first of all this is a sign that the digital vied has a very different definition and that it might have just five years ago and there's so much that we don't know I mean are they spending more time and supervise where they actually doing on the phones and the big one is is this a positive or negative right this this class divide we don't know but the other devices that the kind of struck you well you might not be surprised if boys play more video games girls enjoy listening to music and reading more than boys here they also say that they like social media a lot more and they use it more often and another really intriguing area is racial and ethnic divides so black and Hispanic teens report that they spend much more time on social media they like social media more and that's an expected at but it's also really intriguing because there's other research that suggests that young people people of color as a group or more likely to value social media and possibly even use it as a bridge to civic engagement so there's a lot more to take into here such interesting stuff and predication for Annika minutes thanks on yeah thanks David how to compensate for America's original sin the issue of reparations has made its way into the democratic primary and into the broader culture several of the presidential candidates say they would support a commission to study the matter into Protestant seminaries this fall announced plans to create reparations funds in recognition of their own ties to slavery and yours Tom Jones says the schools that train clergy see it as a confession of past sins Princeton theological seminary in New Jersey was found it in part by people who use slave labor or profited from it the seminary president Craig Barnes says in consideration of that history the school will spend more than a million dollars a year through a reparations fund about half of its going to scholarships also curricular changes fully funding a center for black church studies also this fall Virginia theological seminary in Alexandria announced its own somewhat smaller reparations initiative some of the money would go to descendants of the slaves who actually built the school the idea of reparations does remain somewhat controversial however at least as exemplified in these cases the southern Baptist theological seminary in Louisville last spring rejected a petition from some Baptist ministers and former faculty calling for a reparations fund that's because president Albert Mohler says if an institution just sets aside scholarships for African American students it's not really paying reparations you're taking a percentage of your own fun and then you are designating that scholarship assistance to be paid to your own institution Moller says a seminary in that case is simply prioritizing black students for scholarship assistance his seminary last year acknowledged its own extensive connections to slavery partly to make up for that legacy it's now giving financial assistance to African American students in its doctoral program not unlike the assistance other institutions are offering their black students it just doesn't call it reparations at Princeton president Barnes says terminology can be a bit of a hang up we're not afraid of the word reparation but we prefer repair like how do we repair the legacy that we've inherited a broader question is whether the legacy of slavery can be addressed by individual institutions taking steps on their own the case by case approach can't encompass the full range of effects of slavery and using racial inequality in the United States William jerit is a professor of public policy in African American studies at Duke University he has written extensively on reparations a focus on individual perpetrators an individual victims Verity says obscures how slavery in the United States was officially authorized and so I'm convinced that what we have to do is three the federal government as the culpable party culpable because laws and court decisions provided a legal framework for slavery segregation and racial injustice generally but also because of its implicit approval of these kinds of practices by its failure to intervene at Princeton seminary president Barnes says an institution's establishment of a reparations fund is no substitute for a national program the country needs to have a conversation about this he says and.

"craig barnes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:12 min | 3 years ago

"craig barnes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin and I'm David green okay here's a fact more than half of American children now own a smartphone by the age of eleven that is according to a new national survey of kids media years so what are the implications of that will endure as on the cabinets covers education kids in tech and she's been digging into these numbers and joins me high on yeah hi David am I wrong to be a little shocked by this eleven years old more than half of American kids have smartphones what would tell me the survey it's really interesting you so I if you look around you at it may not be that surprising but at the survey was conducted by common sense media and they've been looking into you kids in media you since two thousand three and yes we are seeing that a majority of kids are getting the first phones younger and younger so in twenty fifteen the last time they did this survey most kids had a phone by age fourteen and now it's just over half have their first phone by age eleven and about one in five they've have one by the age of eight years old eight years old I mean that what is not even tell us about children now well it you know we could be a lot of different things in a truly depend on the family here some not necessarily hitting the panic button like sometimes a kid might need to go between dad doesn't mom's house right and they need the phone for communication sure obviously a phone you know is a connection to you inappropriate content cyber bullying a lot of scary stuff and some researchers say you know there could be a silver lining in that if your kid starts out with the phone earlier as long as there's a strong parental hand guiding them and looking over their shoulder and taking the phone away you know certainly at that time and other designated times maybe they give you longer to model healthy habits instead of kind of throwing them the phone eight fifteen let's say where they're really not listening to mom and dad okay so beyond a safety necessity and in some cases like that did you learn about what kids are actually doing online when they have these things so one piece of good news is we're actually not seen kids spend a lot more time with media overall compared with twenty fifteen we have seen is there watching less TV they're watching more videos online they're also spending more time using screens for homework and that's a real challenge and given that you know dangers of multi tasking which which is not great for the brain since it is a server break it down in terms of which kids might have phones in which might not yeah and there's actually some really interesting points there for example ownership of phones is very very high across the board and the lowest income young people reported spending almost two hours per day more using screen media and that is a really big difference compared to the most affluent youth and first of all this is a sign that the digital vied has a very different definition than it might have just five years ago and there's so much that we don't know I mean are they spending more time and supervise where they actually doing on the phones and the big one is is this a positive or negative right this this class divide we don't know but the other devices that the kind of struck you well you might not be surprised the boys play more video games girls enjoy listening to music and reading more than boys here they also say that they like social media a lot more and they use it more often and another really intriguing area is racial and ethnic divides so black and Hispanic teens report that they spend much more time on social media they like social media more and that's an expected at but it's also really intriguing because there's other research that suggests that young people people of color as a group or more likely to value social media and possibly even use it as a bridge to civic engagement so there's a lot more to take into here such interesting stuff and predicates reporter on it can minutes thanks on yeah thanks David how to compensate for America's original sin the issue of reparations heads has made its way into the democratic primary and into the broader culture several of the presidential candidates say they would support a commission to study the matter into Protestant seminaries this fall announced plans to create reparations funds in recognition of their own ties to slavery and yours Tom Jones says the schools that train clergy see it as a confession of past sins Princeton theological seminary in New Jersey was founded in part by people who used slave labor or profited from it the seminary president Craig Barnes says in consideration of that history the school will spend more than a million dollars a year through a reparations fund about half of its going to scholarships all slopes curricular changes fully funding a center for black church studies also this fall Virginia theological seminary in Alexandria announced its own somewhat smaller reparations initiative some of the money would go to descendants of the slaves who actually built the school the idea of reparations does remain somewhat controversial however at least as exemplified in these cases the southern Baptist theological seminary in Louisville last spring rejected a petition from some Baptist ministers and former faculty calling for a reparations fund that school's president Albert Mohler says of an institution just sets aside scholarships for African American students it's not really paying reparations you're taking a percentage of your own fun and then you are designating that scholarship assistance to be paid to your own institution Moller says a seminary in that case is simply prioritizing black students for scholarship assistance this seminary last year acknowledged its own extensive connections to slavery partly to make up for that legacy it's now giving financial assistance to African American students in its doctoral program not unlike the assistance other institutions are offering their black students it just doesn't call it reparations at Princeton present Barnes says terminology can be a bit of a hang up we're not afraid of the word reparation but we prefer repair like how do we repair the legacy that we've inherited a broader question is whether the legacy of slavery can be addressed by individual institutions taking steps on their own the case by case approach can't encompass the full range of effects of slavery in and producing racial inequality in the United States William diritti as a professor of public policy in African American studies at Duke University he has written extensively on reparations a focus on individual perpetrators an individual victims diritti says obscures how slavery in the United States was officially authorized and so I'm convinced that what we have to do is treat the federal government as the culpable party culpable because laws and court decisions provided a legal framework for slavery segregation and racial injustice generally but also because of its implicit approval of these kinds of practices by its failure to intervene at Princeton seminary president Barnes says an institution's establishment of a reparations fund is no substitute for a national program the country needs to have a conversation about this he says and he says his school is happy to participate in it Tom Chilton NPR news this is NPR news and this is WNYC in New York it's morning edition I'm Richard.

"craig barnes" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

04:49 min | 3 years ago

"craig barnes" Discussed on KTRH

"She first struck in sugar land on Friday and surveillance video spotted her early yesterday near greenway plaza Alabama's governor apologizing for appearing in a skit decades ago where she appeared in black face Kay Ivey says her past actions don't reflect the person she is today more these stories right now okay tear each dot com coming up here at the bottom of the hour I live in Katy your best ways are round Houston next on the ten nine seven forty K. T. R. A.'s the picture of the ways from nineteen sixty seven you know just to try to put it in some sort of perspective nineteen sixty seven five twenty three now your news radio some forty KJRH all right well we've been going kind of full blown conspiracy theory on the story all week long those chicken sandwiches Popeyes can keep women kit can keep them in the house they're just trying to get all this free publicity it's an artificial shortage I've heard that gonna well it's interesting a does listen Michael berry yesterday and some of his listeners for raiding the chicken sandwiches it's actually cause people to it's been great for business for fast food chicken people think the whole now the good chick fillet the go to Popeyes the go to a whole bunch of other places try my other than the rate of I'm all right the chicken sandwiches while we killed burgers imperil an they're they're gonna start sort of a chicken sandwich to they can see what's going on out there people go crazy for check it we need a chicken sandwich so they're gonna have a ever Greiner was on fox yesterday no I actually think he was on CNN I think about it he is he's got he's a food critic he follows the food wars he follows fast food he doesn't think that Popeye's did this on purpose as far as having a shortage of chicken sandwiches and he has an interesting take on who should take the credit for this big run on all those Popeye's chicken for is there's a lot of people who think this is a bit of a marketing conspiracy of manufactured scarcity it's called in the industry where you make a lot more you know make a big Hey of how much easily you run out of stuff in this case I do think it was just it they didn't see this coming they didn't see a chicken sandwich of all things being something that would become an absolute phenomenon and sell two months worth of product in two weeks so you do not think brilliant marketing ploy you think massive screw up I think it's somewhere in between I think if they did their best to try to kind of ride this wave there were no ads behind this they did a little bit to kind of go sit in social media but the credit really belongs to black Twitter the really actively engaged to a community of people of color on Twitter who really made this a cultural conversation they're huge cultural driver a when it comes to social justice to means to just about everything I think they deserve the credit for really making this it's such a huge thing and the the change just kind of did their best black Twitter there's black Twitter I didn't didn't know I thought there was just Twitter didn't know those black Twitter what is he saying that the it's a it's a run on chicken because black people like chicken sounds a little racial to me up the aisle I I'd like to get as much as well no I don't get it this frenzy and now you know a guy filing a lawsuit against Popeye's did you see that I did not what I need to tell you about that okay I pulled Popeye's being sued after running out of their popular chicken salad chooses Craig Barnes Eastridge Tennessee he's gonna hold the fast food chain accountable because he says who runs out of chicken I have a right constitutional right the checker he's filing a yeah he even tried to buy it a sandwich on Craigslist someone claiming to know how he could get one he was going to pay twenty four Bucks for it and that fell through he took his complaint to Cordy filed suit against Popeye's for false advertising and deceptive business practices in Tennessee I mean you know we've got the call the report that came out and nobody can talk about that because we're taught to talking about people who can't get their sandwiches we will now I mean I don't get it I got a lost it on this one and realize the chicken was covered in the declaration of independence of the pursuit of happiness article one deceptive advertising saying you offer these chicken sandwiches and then you can't deliver day all right that's the basis of his lawsuit I don't know what his pain and suffering is so that you know what she's asking for it is pretty painful to go with a fried chicken five twenty seven year newsradio seven forty K. Terry's time take a look at your money cordon off again today's.

greenway plaza Alabama Kay Ivey five twenty seven year ten nine seven forty K seven forty K two months two weeks