35 Burst results for "Craftsman"

World in much better place to fight desert locust scourge  UNs FAO

UN News

07:50 min | 5 d ago

World in much better place to fight desert locust scourge UNs FAO

"It's been described as a biological time bomb the worst upsurge in decades this time last year. Swans of desert locusts started to spread across countries in the horn of africa devastating crops and people's livelihoods. Fa yours emergency campaign appealed for urgent action to avoid a looming locust plague and humanitarian crisis. Now one year on. I'll we winning the fight. I put that question to senior locust. Forecasting officer keith pressman case when we spoke a year ago or it was just as the desert locust swarms with starting to invade the horn of africa. Could you briefly sum up the events of the last you well. A lot has happened in the past year. The last time we spoke a year ago swarms or just invading kenya in the horn of africa. They're spreading through other countries in the region. And since that time now there has been several generations a breeding. So what that means is that the locust numbers had just increased further and this is mainly due to exceptionally good weather. Conditions for the locus. The the problem did not remain only in the horn of africa but last summer there is a very important threat to west africa. Fortunately that did not occur but there was an additional extension of the current upsurge in southwest asia so in countries like iran pakistan and india. Fortunately the end of the summer. I very intensive efforts of those countries. The app surge was brought under control there but it still remains in the greater horn of africa. So that means them. Kenya's mali ethiopia dan and yemen. And that's that's what we're facing now again this year. And it's very interesting because you know when we last spoke a year ago. I mentioned swarms invading kenya. Well that's what they're doing again now and they started invading kenya from the north from eastern ethiopia from central somalia. I'm just before christmas and this was predicted so similarly to what happened last year again is not a surprise. We were expecting this and are we in a better position now. Are we better place to fight the desert lucasville. Much much better. You know last year at this time. We're in a very very precarious situation. We had you know. Huge numbers of locust swarms had developed and were moving in invading countries. That had not seen logos for seventy years. You know such as kenya other countries. That was a worse situation and more than a quarter of a century. They just simply were not prepared to respond to such a large scale invasion. They weren't trained. They had no resources. I'm no vehicles no spray equipment. No pesticides no aircraft. You know no logisticians. You know all of the elements components that you need in order to invoke control campaign so we were really. Let's say trying to catch up very quickly. We had no funding you know. Let's say desperate collectively desperate. I should say and the country's nfl. We're obviously we're scrambling doing the best. We could have that time but it was not enough we had to really really upscale and that's what's been achieved so now here we are in january twenty twenty one. It means we have everything in place. Yes we do have shortages of funding to keep those operations going in. This is extremely critical. But at least we're not at the stage of having to look for aircraft or having having to order equipment from abroad and wait for it to be delivered. All of the countries have those Elements in place. The faa ledge. Emergency response has seen incredible. International support including the mobilization of funds to tackle the small towns and prevent a humanitarian crisis always succeeding in the fight against desert. Lucas that show. We are succeeding. Yes if we had not been what we've been doing for the past year we would have seen a play by now. You know swarms from west africa to india from the equator to the mediterranean. We don't see that so. I think that that's confirmation that we are succeeding. We have probably less locust swarms than we did a year ago. A doesn't mean that you know we can sit back and relax but you know. There's a lot of work to do but i think the response as you mentioned from the international community has been exceptionally good globally. A more than two point. Eight million hectares retreated and twenty twenty. And that's an extraordinary achievement. These efforts of course they've saved enormous amounts of crop production an estimated two point seven million tons of crops or save last year. That's enough you know to feed eighteen million people for an entire year. The cost of that That was saved is something around eight hundred million dollars and you put that into balance with you. Know what did it costs to save that production we received last year. One hundred and ninety four million dollars so with that investment were able to save you know eight hundred million dollars or the food in additional able to to protect and safeguard one point two million households their livelihood. It's so you know our desert. Locusts extremely devastating. Obviously the response in the pasture has been exceptionally good. And of course you have to remember. We're competing against other emergencies. Such as covid nineteen indeed twenty twenty was a particularly challenging year. What can we expect for the will. The current upsurge continuing the problem. Is that the weather. Continues to favor the locus and you know. In the past locus upsurges lukas plagues they collapse because of two factors on because of the human intervention. You know the control operations everything that. We're trying to do to reduce locus numbers and a failure in the weather at and so far we're saying the former i'm we see those upskilled control operations working very well. I mean more than twenty one aircraft or an operation in eastern africa. But we haven't seen the break in the weather. We had again an extraordinary event last month in the horn of africa. Right exactly where the locust were we had a cyclone in december. Cyclones don't occur in the horn of africa december. But this is the second year in a row where we've had that so until we see you know kind of a break in the weather. And what does that mean. It means a failure of seasonal rains essentially or very unusually cold temperatures or strange wins that might carry all the locus into the ocean and where they would paris but until we see that we still have the challenge to to manage. This locus upsurge and try to to reduce impacts on food security and people's livelihood so for this year twenty twenty one and basically from now until summertime. We need eighty million dollars and the majority of this would be spent on maintaining those essential control operations by air and by ground as well as protecting the livelihoods. That was cave craftsman. Faa's seniors locust forrcasting.

Kenya Africa Keith Pressman Ethiopia West Africa Southwest Asia Mali India Yemen Somalia Pakistan Iran FAA NFL Lucas Mediterranean
Where to Invest First by Derick Van Ness

Optimal Finance Daily

04:17 min | 2 weeks ago

Where to Invest First by Derick Van Ness

"Where to invest i by derek. Van ness of big life financial dot com. What i'm about to say is controversial. So-called pundits don't want you to know this in eliminates reliance on them they become obsolete su. Here's the unspoken but important truth. Nothing is more vital than investing in yourself. You are the key to everything in your life without you know doors open. No opportunities are unlocked if you are worthless hopeless and helpless than your results will be the same your finances. Your relationships your health without these. What is life were yet. You'll know that you suck that can be crippling and you playing small. You can't let it. You were the only one who can choose nobody else chooses. This verdict or can take action for you. So what do you do. Becoming strong is the answer. Now so you can bulldoze or take advantage of others the complete opposite strength to become so valuable that others don't wanna live without you and what you've created. You know you've accomplished us when it's as if you've become a great lover in their life without you there existence doesn't taste nearly as delicious. You are creating the music they dance to. At that point they will do whatever it takes to keep you around. You have become the soil where they want to lay their seeds and grow their life. This is the goal. It may start slow but it doesn't have to quantum leaps exist but you'll need to suspend your current beliefs to see them. He needs to paint from a blank canvas. Not the one with your current picture of life. It sounds scary. But that's why it's a leap as you get. Better sodas your life. It's a simple equation. And you are the key variable the multiplier that expands everything in your path ambitious. This means becoming indispensable the key asset strive to become the wheel rather than a cog in the wheel. Someone whose value is so powerful that you're not dependent on outside circumstances for your success. This is non-negotiable if you want freedom your primary business or income will dictate the lion share of your financial standing. This is your foundation the rock upon which will build your kingdom. You must master your craft so that you can access resources without proper resources. It's difficult to become your best self. Your financial success will go a long way and paving the smooth road for your relationships in health. Money isn't the answer. But it's far better than poverty if you want true success if your goal is to be a contribution to the world when you invest in yourself. The possible returns are unlimited literally. Where else can you invest five thousand dollars and make six figures. I did it you can too. I spent sixty thousand dollars learning to invest in real estate and it has made me several million dollars. I've spent six figures in seminars trainings in self-improvement and business courses they returned triple digit returns. Even better they continue to earn for me each day. More business income better relationships healthier and happier lifestyle. More intimacy with my creator. So this is your warning. Success isn't somewhere out there. It's an here invest in your human capacity. Your skills and your business you are the craftsmen who will scope the picture of your life. So focus on being the best crossman. Possible once you're performing at a high level and the money is flowing then we can talk about the framework to take you. Even higher optimize cashflow build assets save taxes as you become more successful. You'll need better systems for saving growing and protecting your assets. Until so then dropped the distractions focus on the most important thing developing yourself and your business live the life you were meant to live pursue. Excellence and all you do. The world's will reward you with a rich life and not just financially. You'll experience more love appreciation and gratitude. Best of all. You'll sleep better knowing the world is better because you existed

Van Ness Derek
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

05:14 min | Last month

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"It feels like old youtube. I remember when i was watching youtube in like two thousand nine or two thousand eight or earlier. And i remember when the first atp popped up on youtube and i remember thinking like this is the end of an era. What a sad day. This amazing platform is now so annoying. Yada yada well as it turned out. That was actually a good thing. Because from that moment on a lot of creators were incentivized to make content that they otherwise would not have done so turns out it was a good move but at the time i remember being bombed well now for a few dollars a month you can kind of have the best of both worlds because you get all the great content. You know that were that we get in this day and age. But you don't have to spend a single minute or second watching these ridiculous ads. So i really recommend it. And it's good for the creators. Also because youtube still pays a portion of the fee. I can't remember. But i think that youtube people make more money from premium members than they do from just a regular if you watch the ad so if you're worried about if you watch the ads and suffer through them like i want support a bomb or jimmy carter perkins brothers or whoever you're watching and i it's worth it well. You don't need to feel that way if you become a youtube premium member. You're probably going to support them even more or essential craftsman for that matter. If you're not in a position to do that. I my dad and i have kind of decided that we are going to manually reduce the number of ads. They do give you the option when you're a creator to place ads exactly where you want. It's just time consuming and it's not the kind of thing we really worried about. But i think we are going to start doing that. Because honestly is wrecking for people. And i feel i. I feel very proud of a lot of our big videos. And i know there's people who were giving up and not watching them because of the ads and i don't blame them and so we're we might kind of dial that back and take control but point number one consider youtube premium. I think it's probably the best online entertainment platform out there. It's better than net flicks or disney or any of those other things because you get all of the the educational content from youtube. You're you're all of these things and you once you kind of get used to it. I don't think i'll ever be able to go back to watching it with ads again. So few dollars a month. It's not that bad. All right next topic is about our plans for twenty twenty one. And i'm gonna just give you this big picture but most asking for feedback because we've got we're going to have some We're going to be at a crossroads really in the summertime. Once the spouses done we will be at a point where we can decide what type of content and what type of project we want to take on at that point and it would be nice to know if there was one real clear interest from the audience What that would be. So if you have an opinion on that put in in an email but the plan is to finish the house in the summer and have some open houses which will probably amount to a saturday where the doors are open all day long and all make sure my dad's there and we'll let people come in and tour and hang out and say hi. I don't think we're going to try to do anything formal in terms of be here this time for some sort of activity or anything like that. I think it'll be very much. Come and go sort of sort of thing but there are still some are. There is still opportunity for something so if you have an idea on that let me know. I was considering during this time when the house is finished but not yet sold an opportunity to do some fun. Collaboration videos and i may request help from you. As the audience to help plan those slightly. And what. I'm thinking of as an example. It would be fun. I think it'd be neat. If a cooking expert with a youtube channel or some some sort of cooking person came into our kitchen at the spec house and made a video or some type of piece of content with the kitchen being put to work. I would love that. It'd be so fun to see it be used in that way and if you know of a person who would be able to do something like that preferably someone who had a an audience or channel of their own that would help you That would help. Essential craftsman grow Let me know who you think that person might be who'd be a good fit or it could be interior design. It could be. I don't know even someone who wanted to film something in southern oregon here. There's a lot of outdoors. There's wineries there's fishing and if someone had a audience who was interested in that it it just might be a nice opportunity to collaborate with them staying at the house or basing their their thing out of the house. So if you know a content creator or if you are a person who you think might be able to overlap creative way Let us know it would be nice way to put this spec house project in front of a different audience who otherwise might not see it but who would probably enjoy it or learn a thing or two from it..

youtube jimmy carter perkins disney oregon
How Your Attachment Style Affects Your Mental and Financial Health in a Relationship

The Mental Health and Wealth Show

04:04 min | Last month

How Your Attachment Style Affects Your Mental and Financial Health in a Relationship

"I am interviewing ginger dean psychotherapist and founder of loving me after we her specialty is helping women overcome heartbreak. Increased self love and confidence after toxic relationship so they can become the best version of themselves. Love it thank you show. Thank you for having me. Melania it yeah. I'm so excited that you're here. You know we've gone way back for a while in the personal finance base. And i love what you're doing with loving me after we. I love your instagram. Your facebook group in everything that you're doing so you know before we jump into the questions i'd love for you to just tar audience a little bit about what you do and the community that you've started all right so my name is ginger dean and as you said i am the founder of loving the after we and that's where i help women healing after toxic relationships increase their confidence so they can become the best version of themselves so that might mean we cover a lot of topics around codependency toxic relationships childhood trauma attachment issues of course topics around narcissistic abuse. Do come up. But it's probably not my central focus but those are pretty much essential issues that we cover over loving me after way. It is such a helpful community. And i have to say that you know. I went through an incredibly devastating up three years ago. I ended my nine year relationship. That was probably the hardest thing i ever did. I didn't realize it was codependent. Until afterwards and you know. Because i had all of this these feelings of like why do i feel like my life has ended. And why is everything so hard. And then i got into really toxic. Rebound where i was always wanting more and he was always stand offish in that really how i kind of got turned onto this book called attached which was completely life-changing eye-opening. I feel like i read attached and suddenly everything made sense. I was like oh. This is why is behave. The way behaved in everyone relationship like a classic love anxious not not proud of it but it was good for me to realize that. Oh this is actually thing and as a love anxious person. I've attracted a avoid types and you know just like magnets and we just can't give each other what they want so new. That really just completely changed my life. And i just dug into the research really gave me insight into why behave the way. Behave my own relationships Happy to report that. I'm in a new relationship with a securely. Attached person in my own behavior has changed. And i've done so much healing in the past three years. So can you explain to our audience a little bit about attachment styles and how they affect relationships. Because to be quite honest i never even knew about them until after this break up rebound when i was like why am i in such a mess and you know it just opened up my eyes. So can you share that with our audience. Our craftsman styles are developed based on. You know how we were raised for example. Our caregivers are source. Figures to like teachers coaches mentors grandparents. Aunts and guest also our parents and so what can happen is depending on how we were raised. The weekend ended up being either secure anxious. Fearful avoiding or dismissive avoidance and so with the anxious types. You'll find that they're very overly concerned about whether or not their partners loved them. They will often. You know audition performance relationships. They're very hypersensitive to abandonment issues whether thoughts or just the perception around abandonment and rejection until they're often preoccupied with abandonment. However because they haven't really learned how to become secure because that was never really modeled for them. They tend to go after the partners that modeled how their parents were growing up. So if you're a parent was you know for example. And it doesn't have to be that it was. They were deliberately emotionally neglectful.

Ginger Dean Melania Facebook
Interview With Shawn Van Dyke

Essential Craftsman Podcast

07:57 min | Last month

Interview With Shawn Van Dyke

"John thanks for taking the time to come and chat with us today. How's it. How's it going on doing great man. Thanks for having me. will you give us. I read your bio on your website. But will you give me in the audience of big picture of your background and kind of have to where you are now in. kind of. Give us the backstory. Yeah sir so by education and training or by just sending a lot of tuition money to the university of tennessee. I eventually ended up with a couple of engineering degrees. So i started my career in construction even though that might offend some people when this always used to be an engineer i make fun of engineers used to be one but i got a degree in civil engineering and then a master's in structural engineering and then went out and did the engineering thing for several years and then realized i don't really know how to build anything and i wanted to get out on the job site so transition from i'd say transition from engineering into construction. I really got laid off from the engineering firm. Heart was working for In went and joined project management team for large commercial contractor that. Put me out on large commercial sites Building all sorts of seven are really really like that Did that for a few years than my way. Up working for some architects and then for real estate developer Doing construction management so. I ended up traveling around the country building commercial real estate projects. You know big stores in the out lot developing out lots and all of that kind of stuff in that for several years. And by this time i was married had five kids now so the second kid was on the way my wife was like. I'm glad you're enjoying your job but You gotta stick around mean. I was on the road three or four days a week wherever the projects were so. That was my first business. Started back in. Two thousand five was a construction management and real estate development company. I'm here in knoxville tennessee. So as doing that work here locally then two thousand eight hit and banks were not lending money to real estate developers anymore So i transitioned from there and started a remodeling in general contracting business People these days called a pivot. I didn't realize pivoting at the time. I just time. I had four kids. Three four came back them So put the tool belt on and started a small construction company. Built it up from there and then one of my subcontractors might trim and melwork subcontractor young guy. We went to church together. His business was blowing up because he got into the high end. Trim and melwork work Market here in our area and typical difficult construction business owner great craftsmen horrible business person and he approached me one day and said man. Your i like the way that you run your construction business and everything's always organized I wanna talk to you about how to run a better business. So we met up for lunch and was talking to him about that and giving them some tips and tricks. And and i didn't know he was interviewing me at the time he said. Okay well i think. I need to hire somebody to run my construction business. Much mill work company and He's an acid yeah. I think you should do that. Because you're a horrible business person but you're an awesome. You're awesome craftsmen in great with the guys out in the field and the work was just unbelievable and he just said okay. I want you to do it. And so i thought i was like i got my own thing going on. I'm okay and he's a great salesman and he's like listen. You have a small construction company is gonna take you twenty years to get where you want to be. I'm already in those projects as a subcontractor we've landed some really high end stuff but this business that we just acquired meaning that the projects coming up he said it's gonna put me out of business doing these projects because i don't know what i'm doing and He he so he said I want you to come and run the business. And i thought i bluff bluffing okay. The only way. I'm going to run your business that you let me run the business. You run the field our on the business. But i'm i'm in charge of the business side of it. And he said no problem and he literally pulled out of manila folder with the entire business and it just random paper. Here's the business slid across the table and said you run it and went home talked to my wife and said this is a crazy idea. This is really stupid but my friends gonna suffer and he was right. It was an opportunity to get on some really into high level projects high end projects that i'd already always been wanting to do in such kind of step back and said all right. Maybe we should do this and So bit the bullet went on went. Joined that team as a as the chief operating officer and at the time we had six guys out in the field in within eighteen months we were at twenty two guys in. He was in debt and not making any money. And we kinda turn that around and and that wasn't all me. We had great team a great owner. That had a really good vision and i was just the execute and putting systems in place. Oh did that for about four years and then got another crazy idea saying. Hey what i've done with my businesses and now with this treadmill work business. I think i see the problem here. Within an industry. I can help a lot more business. Owners with systems. All i know construction. It's all i've ever done so after about four years of being the executive there. I left that that job and started writing books and and speaking at industry events and now it's four years later and i've been doing coaching and consulting work strictly for construction business owners since those back in twenty sixteen. So yeah right up for years. We've been doing this Before we move on but are you recommending to your kids. They go to college. You spend a lotta time in college. You said a master's in engineering of some type so talk about that for a second. Are you gonna man. You're gonna make mom hears this. He's gonna get offended. And it. Every time i say but m. i. encouraging my kids to go to college no not specifically i'm encouraging my kids to develop skills in areas that interest them and figuring out how they can make money at it now. Some of those things that some of my kids are interested in now will require them to go to college. But especially as we're seeing in twenty twenty man colleges change. They're still the same tuition rate but they're not allowing you to go on campus and all of the other things that higher said that here's where value is. Now they're saying nope can't come to campus. We're going to do all virtually. So i think the whole world has changed so but to answer your question. No i don't encourage my kids to go to 'cause. I don't discourage them from going to college. The i feel like it's my job as a parent when you're out on your own which i got four boys in a baby girl. I say baby girl. she's five. She's always going to be my baby girl. The boys they're on their own at eighteen. You better figure out how you're gonna make money at eighteen and if that means you're going to college then you know what i took me. I was on the five year plan to get my undergraduate now. Four year plan right but i worked the entire time and paid for most of my most of my college through work. They can do the same thing so And it looked statistically it takes most people at least six years to get an undergraduate degree and only forty percent of incoming freshman even graduate with a degree at all. So yeah do. I encourage them to go that path. Only if it interests them. Only only if that's that's where their future light. Hey you know. One of my kids wants to be a doctor yet. You probably better go to college. I have several of them that are interested in computer stuff in graphic design and other things and got my fourteen year old son this year to start working for a contractor and over the summer and he came home with more money and more cash in his pocket. And said yeah. That's what happens when you go work. And that's what happened with skill so

Melwork University Of Tennessee Knoxville Tennessee John Manila
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

04:03 min | Last month

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"Kind of intuitive and since you know all the other machines yeah intuitive thing you can understand what you what you have to do But i'll a self taught on the shaper. You know. So i i never had anybody like dad showed me how to run a shaffer and the first time you start running a shaper. You're gonna make some mistakes and you're gonna learn what not to do again. Gotta be careful that you don't crash it you you got this You know you got this big round. That's just going back and forth. And so you know if you gotta work be sticking up here in the way you know have it positioned right this rams gonna come out and just hit it crash. She knows so. Yeah it's going to break. Something will certainly break when that happens. Man and it's usually not the inside of the machine. It's something else you know. you're gonna i nothing else. They're going to be parts flying around on your shop floor and it'll be bad. Yeah so that's really cool. Well you mentioned a few minutes ago that you're doing all this work and you like to find time to do your own machining. But you're making it sound like this is. Is there anything you do besides machining and making videos you have any other hobbies that you're filling the the extra thirty minutes of the clock in with or is this just all you need. Is your your your shop. Well there's a there's there's one other aspect of what it is. I like to do to a lot of my audience knows this i loved barbecue. I love the smoke and Am barbecue and and so typically. If i'm not in my shop working. I'm usually out on my patio With my girls are smokers busy out there. Cooking some debtor. That's the other count. That i really really enjoy man. That's sweet awesome. Here's off topic question about smokers than this is definitely not any kind of ad but do you use a traeger at curiosity smoker grill. You know i don't have any. I don't have any of those types of grills and smokers. The okay Electric style you're really think of wood a wood pellet one. Yeah yeah ok well. We'll have to learn more about it but someone was like explain it in a way as skeptical about that it was. It could do everything but nothing really popular in this day and age that because it's It's one of those types of grills that they developed it's kind of like a no-brainer and yeah forget it so you put your food in there. You meet whatever it is. You're cooking and you have a dial that you you you set the temperature that you want to run out. It's like an oven temperature. I think you have another Setting where you can set how much smoke you want to put into. It just runs itself and you come back when it's done. So here's here's what we're talking about. Boys is a cnc barbecue right. We don't have time for a cnc barbecue. We are manual. Barbecue is right okay. That's what you do your barbecue guy. Manual machines yeah. I have a lot of people that you know. There's a lot of discussion out there like that. And and scott you. You'll understand this. I'm getting into Stick burning which. I have an offset smoker. Now i'm using just would. oh yeah. Yeah so there's a bit of art and craftsmanship that goes into this that you have to learn and master also because easily moisture and stuff. Yeah yeah fire. Management fire management heat management smoke management in. That's that's part of what it is that i love to learn about right now in an i read books about it. I god there every week. I'm after multiple times day out there. not just with the big smoker but met with my girls as well. That's kinda tell. I have a little passion for you. Do you make any videos about it yet. Oh yeah. I've made a lot of videos. It's it's all of my cooking. My cooking videos goes over on my second channel which is a bomb adventures. Okay anything that's Travel related or cooking related goes onto that second channel. So if anybody's interested they go check it out Always.

shaffer scott
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

08:31 min | 2 months ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"Ten i ki- was knocking off so you could buy a brand new one for one hundred and fifty bucks was the real thing but so people were happy with that and all the sudden the market dropped out of some of these original things that that were once so expensive. I think that partially explains it. But i think you know just a lot of factors involved in. Yeah it's it's tough to really get my arms around because on the one hand it's not it takes more time and money to make things beautiful and with nice material and it does today and it also did then and it's not like those people were so much wealthier that they had extra time to make it and yet they did so it's just like it seems like a contradiction like these people who you know. They were their lives. Were also you know. They were paying the bills and we. I know people criticize a consumer culture correctly but people of always had to consume to live and so but for some reason the priority has just flipped and back then. I don't like you said the cars. The furniture the buildings all of it is just forward-looking and it just seems like there was more time taken into the quality and aesthetic as opposed today. I i don't know what it is. I absolutely people. A- bank would hire a great architect to design that would make people wanna go into it or things. That's a beautiful building as well. What a successful company that is. They built that beautiful builder or worship boulevard that was then and then when we started strip malls and everything on the cheap and people were just less concerned with noticing their environment. They just sort of acquiesced and said okay. I'm okay with the strip mall in as long as they've got the starbucks and shops that i wanna go to. I don't really care what it looks like. I just wanted to function now. That's when i think that was part of that that that turn and also the the materials as far as ships are concern in the fifties and even up into the sixties they had this beautiful woodwork on ships. It wasn't it was veneers but it was put on top of a plywood and it would be veneers from africa if the ship sailed to africa. Veneers to howard. Beautiful sycamore They had that but fire. Regulations change. so you can no word on ships imitation wood and that was really ugly in seventies. You know fake would in the seventies was horrible. They got better at it now. You go on ship. Cwm to which has fake would just painted version. Basically very printed on a computer basically of grain looks like you're in the elevator in the to gushes beautiful burrowed maple but it's not really an eye resolution photograph at borough maple. That's basically stencilled onto the ply. Because it's fireproof and are your proof. Fire is a big. That's the worst thing that can happen at sea you think. oh why. why would you worry about fire when you're on a ship you're surrounded by water. Basically no fire is horrible when people die a terrible is. They're stuck on ship. That's you know a raging yet. Will this morning. I saw a news article ship off the coast of africa. I don't if you saw this but one hundred forty people. I think hundred forty people died. This just happened. It was like a Not a transport. I can't remember some type of fairy and this came up a little. African fair is probably and i i was i was reading. I knew we would be speaking. And i was thinking about ships and i and occurred to me like how are people drowning. Or what's going on. And then it. The article said like a fire broke out. And you're out you're all by. There's no there's no get away from it. I guess when you're on a ship right off the light. The life books are disabled. You're doomed you know. The ships are they have fire safety compartments on the newer on. Oh probably. I don't know this. This latest news incident. It might be some old poorly maintained ferry yeah overcrowded and it caught on fire. The that happens a lot in countries where they don't have lot of safety laws but again. I'm sort of out of tournament. Yeah well the last point on this topic. I wanna move on but i i was thinking about. Just homes even in terms of valuing beauty and aesthetic and how. I was in real estate for several years and an appraisal on real estate is almost entirely based on the size. They're not allowed to take into account how it looks and i ran into a few situations where sure house may have been smaller but it was the the intangible the beauty like the just the aesthetic was was made it so much more valuable than maybe like a built in two thousand and one tract style. Home that was bigger but the appraisal. And i argue with him about this. But they're like sorry. It's not only worth x. And and they are incapable of attributing value for some of those Intangible and they're not intangible they are tangible but maybe they're just a. I don't know you know the things that can't be measured. You know the the beauty. I guess it's harder to measure beauty. So they they don't they have to put them all you know. They have to use the same standard. I guess for every single house so if about where is it. Located in fire zone is does it have a view. How big is you know in. All the things like what's inside or there might be a creek running bhai or something that makes it more appealing. Yeah i guess. They can't consider that stuff have worked. Easily changeable beautiful. What you think is beautiful. The guy next door probably thinks you know get something more modern. You know what who wants. Yeah but there are places like with these ships when you put the some of these old liners against the modern one and anybody can look at those and just you know. You don't have to be an expert to identify that so let's talk about. This might be the saddest part of our conversation and it's just so hard for me to to still grasp but the there comes a point where the highest value of. These old liners is scrap. And it there's really no other options on no no way to turn them into hotels or hospitals and nothing else. Well a really great way to lose money. Just ask the operators of the queen. Mary is too yeah. That's an old ocean liner becoming a floating hotel museum The problem is you think okay. It's made of steel is invincible. Right or certainly no steel rusts and over mon period of time. If the ship is in say salt water queen. Mary the poor thing. She hasn't been drydocks since one thousand nine hundred sixty seven. They coated her special paint. And they they go down and check and they make sure everything's okay but it would be so nice if they could just get into a proper drydock but a that would be a fortune and be. There is no drydock anymore. Long beach they brought it along beach. They had the naval shipyard and they use that will fill that in so the nearest drydock would be in. San diego and the ship has been compromised. They cut out so much of the infrastructure. That are hall is not strong enough to support the ship being towed out to sea so they rebuild our infrastructure. It gets very very complicated bazaar. matt you've got plumbing. Plumbing goes bad and that these systems on most cruise especially now an entire deck is operating on the same system so if one pipe gets clogged. That's screws the next ten cavs down from that one cabin. So now awful. They have to tear up paneling and repair it. Repair you know old plumbing and wiring sold as well and again you have to go back into the infrastructure. The ship in order to make those repairs. That's engine-rooms that need to be upgraded or modified old engines. If they're running constantly they need new parts new so it becomes very very expensive so you look into safety issues like you said if if a if a old ship is more likely to burn. That's doesn't work these days thankfully well. The in two thousand ten was was the last grey Exodus.

africa Mary starbucks borough maple howard San diego
Turning Your Passion Into Sustainable Work with Zachariah Moreno

Cafe con Pam Podcast

04:33 min | 2 months ago

Turning Your Passion Into Sustainable Work with Zachariah Moreno

"Hello welcome to go bam good morning. We're actually doing this during coffee. Time my favorite time of day. Thank you for having me. Thank you for coming on so zach. Tell us who you are. What's your heritage where you come from. I'm a mexican. American here in california oakland more specifically from the central valley of california grew up can actually west sacramento. You know went to school. They're pretty normal. Giant mexican family in california and Always had a love for creativity and art and different forms of expressing the that creativity so throughout my journey. That has come to life in a couple of different. Mediums started in kind of ink on paper transition to acrylic on canvas. art shows. Some awards wanted to do that professionally struggled to find a way to actually passion into sustainable work. Glad i saw that problem as early as i did. But then you know it always had an affinity for technology because of my my father's background been privileged to To be exposed to some technology pretty pretty early on and then i realized i could combine those two things together and make artwork and creativity with technology with squad. Cast is kind of the most recent body of that and that's actually another level of helping others be creative and connect and be creative with each other with their guests to record podcast interviews. That sound awesome from anywhere in the world. They do okay. So we're gonna pack all that story because this is what we do. So you're mexican american. Are you first generation. Second third generation. Right hey do how is that. I'm i yeah. I've actually thought about you know. My grandparents were barely born in the united states. A believe their family crossed the border into texas when they were like. I think my grandpa was actually. My grandmother was actually pregnant with him. when she came to america and i believe my grandma was a little girl when they crossed over into texas so work their way over to california and my grandpa was very fortunate to have an uncle who owned some farmland essentially in in the central valley here in in yolo county. They were farmworkers. The added bonus that he had is that his uncle rufus. I've never really gotten this full story. But he was able to own his own farm so he of course worked with farmworkers. They were out there in the field with them every day. My grandma grandpa learned to drive was he was super young was driving people back and forth from the fields and he's got gnarly scars all over his legs from like being out in in the different agricultural environments and walking around out there all day you know really exposed to that lifestyle and then became a sheriff's officer and later most of his career. He was a one of the best saw filers on the west coast. That's not a job really anymore. What is it at the time. These giant lumber companies would need these giant saw blades to take the raw number that they would bring in kind of millet down into usable lumber. So my grandpa started out in the yard stacking green lumber which is full of water. So it's incredibly woods heavy anyway but when it's fresh like that it's incredibly heavy so i'm sure he was pretty ripped back then he still is. He's in his nineties now. He's my favorite person and worked his way up to I guess it's kind of an apprentice situation where studied under somebody. He can take a piece of metal and make a giant saab laid out of it and Make that saw blade last for a very long time. And i guess there's very few people who can do that. He was very skilled skilled craftsman still to this day. Does a lot of woodworking and he's ninety nine only has he taught you how to make a late. He's taught me like on paper and shown me. He has a workshop that i helped build and we built in his backyard woodworking shop. And so does my dad. So this is what i mean about like creativity and craftsmanship. I think it goes very deep like my grandpa's. He's not a like a graphic artist. He's a very skilled technical drawing kind of pre autocad so he was What i would say is the first generation and my grandma you know to. That's how they match. She was one of the farm workers on his uncle's farm.

California Central Valley Zach Oakland Sacramento Texas United States Yolo County Rufus Scars The West Coast
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

07:42 min | 2 months ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"Just in video but how it fits together in a comprehensive marketing team in two thousand twenty when video work is more important than ever. So i hope you enjoy. Brian's a great guy. My dad's here. Let's get right to it. Thanks for coming. Brian and right off the bat. I want to ask you as someone who knew the essential craftsman in his prime in vegas what that was like and if you have any specific memories are anecdotes of this guy in the day hall. Yeah i mean how. How old were we when we moved to las vegas. I think in nineteen ninety. My family so i was eight or nine We met you guys pretty pretty immediately in the year. Yeah so and. I was thirty three at the time. That's wild here. Five years younger than nine. So thirty three with four kids the oldest being probably ten or so and the youngest being two or three or something. So basically the pri the prime crossers of dad hood yet and working productivity hood. Yeah and my parents had five kids. I'm right in the middle. You and i are nearly the same age couple months apart. Our brothers just younger than us or the same age and our youngest browser brothers. Yeah same age so there were a lot a lot of friendships and it. It just kinda worked for mattress. Ebi friends yeah match set match set. But back to your question. The there's there's two things member now. The las vegas scott wadsworth and one of them is a mustache. Bigalow bushy moustache. You had and and the trombone. Oh yeah those are the two first things that come to mind but neither of which are really a part of a central class trombone needs to get in on a yeah. I mean i remember having Pity wadsworth family music nights we have almost just like music recitals where we practice our own thing and you and my dad would be playing trombone piano. And that. and then i. I remember The second spec house you were building over there. I do 'cause you guys were on the same street as fissile. Yeah we're we're that second one was yeah. Sorry member nate nine. Maybe third or fourth grade and we'd be playing after school and go down there and you'd be carrying lumber and hang nails all that stuff and it just it just as even as a kid. I mean my see her spec house but even more so as a little kid he's belting an actual. He's building a house and it was a nice house. We thought we would be living there. I if you would've asked me. Then i would have told you. I would be living there when i was sixty two. I thought it was always a spec house. No the first one i was. I was building t to turn on. You know but the second one. I decided nope this is it until we adjusted the floor plan from the first one and Stretched it and that was going to be and what maybe two years ago. I was in vegas and i to the neighborhood drank. I texted. i took a picture each of the houses and sent it over to you. I think you told me that. Vegas looked mighty finding the rear view mirror. So yeah those are. Those are some of the things that you did you bill. Those like nights and weekends those houses. You're working fulltime. Yeah the first one from breaking ground to moving in with sixty days. And i was running a a. I was piecework. Stacking with the four-man stacking crew at the same time sixty days. So how how is it that you did that. I'm guessing you in a piece work crew for every thing besides the framing. Or how's that. Even though i did the same thing i did i set up the slab and then brought in a crew port and then framed it complete. And then turn it over to subs and then Trimmed it out. But las vegas has an intense construction mentality and we weren't making videos at the time when a lot. Sixty days is one thing but sixty days. It of nights and weekends is another right. I mean if you were working day job in the days. I think i think there was one. There was like a week or ten days. Stretch in there where we were in between releases i was. I was stacking. Roasted crystal bay was attract. I think that i was stacking. And then and i think there was like a week or ten days between releases of phases and so the guys that i was using stack. And i think i brought over but mostly it was just us all the daylight. Yeah you know and it went. Good and i was. It was a simpler a much simpler house but it was too story and it'd have three foot overhangs by the way but they were different so that was the first house a second one took longer. Wow sixty days. that's pretty. That's pretty impressive. Although i'm guessing the record is much much lower like couple of weeks or something like like a week. Yeah yeah yeah yeah. That's pretty neat. I this is off topic. But i'm reminded of i heard about the people could buy homes out of the sears catalog kit homes. I guess where you could buy a kit and everything kind of comes and assemble it. That would be a quick way to go. I think larry haunted one of those may. I'm not sure he talked about him and his book how that was a about a good option or what but yeah yeah all right any other memories of of that before we move on their of that guy there. I mean a lot of the same type of memory. I remember scott was always the any still is a i mean. I'm i'm a fan of the channel. You know i. It's it's weird being being in this podcast but just listening to the videos and the teacher. I remember that as a kid to really. Yeah just kinda going over and listening to scott talk interesting to hear the way with words and camera. He's got a camera on them. Yeah surely somebody's got a camera. Yeah that's pretty cool. All right well I mentioned this in the introduction. But let's get to it now. We we started making videos and it. It's going to be a little bit inside baseball for you listeners. And we're gonna be talking about essential craftsman as a you know a business a little bit so if you're not interested in that this is your fair warning but we started making these videos without any experience or training. Like with your iphone right. Yeah yeah and they worked out pretty well and when you first. Kind of paid attention to him brian. I want you to walk through what you can remember. We were doing good and also what was happening. That you're kinda like as a professional could be you gotta to stop doing that right away. Any side of them told us at the time. So you're not gonna hurt our feelings. We'll no. I mean. I kind of want to give it. Just a teeny. Bit of back story guy. We'd mentioned that. We were childhood friends in las vegas. I don't know you guys left vegas before us. I don't remember was like ninety. Three or ninety four ninety four we blasted off. So you guys left vegas and ninety four. Our family left in ninety six or ninety seven. But after that nate night. That's kind of where our friendship ended on. I know you and kelly and my parents remained friends inside shutters still every few years up until now but so anyway that there's that it's nate was a childhood friend and then it was. I think it was in twenty seventeen in the spring. Think your mom. And i became facebook friends an Kind of catch up a little bit and she had posted. I don't remember which video was posted on..

vegas nate scott wadsworth Brian Vegas Ebi facebook baseball kelly larry
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

02:47 min | 2 months ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"Welcome to another episode of the essential craftsman. Podcast i'm nate and this interview is a little different. And let me kind of set the table for you before we get started this discussion with my dad and an old family friend. Brian pit now. Brian is more than a family friend. He has been a invaluable consultant for us at essential craftsman over the last several years. Brian has a really deep background in video production and we have no background in video production so shortly after we started brian reached out and has been advising and giving us tips and and a lot of times really very detailed training for me so especially on on how to make these videos so a lot of this discussion revolves around video production and video work and some of the things that we learned. That may be interesting if you have. Any interest in making videos are online content of any sort. The other part of the discussion and this may be more interesting for those of you. Who are regular watchers. Brian new my dad when he started when he was nine years old. Maybe eight and has some interesting and fun memories and insight to what it was like as a kid seeing the essential craftsman and nineteen ninety in one thousand nine hundred ninety one whatever year whatever years those were and they talk a bit about some of the those fun memories what it was like living in vegas that time as neighbors and the reason i think you may enjoy this is because you're gonna get to see a side of my dad you haven't seen before or at least aside that doesn't come through in our how to and very specific videos because he's talking to a very beloved family friend here someone who's helped us out and someone that he's cared about since was a little boy and it was just a lot of fun and i can't thank brian enough now. He his background in video. Let me be a little more specific. He started in video in high school as a as a hobby. You filming his brother skateboarding and making kind of videos for fun and never set the down and has created a a really amazing career for himself in video work. It's really a testament to if you pursue something that you love and you're passionate about then. It can really pay off big and brian now. Works for a a banking institution. He's one of the higher up heads in their entire video team and he is the real deal he's he's got a great insight not.

Brian pit nate consultant vegas
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

07:17 min | 2 months ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"Know. A bumper sticker doesn't always suffice and watts times. A bumper sticker is all we get so. I really hope you enjoyed this discussion without any further ado. Dr drew dr drew. Thank you so much for joining us. I've really been looking forward to this for a long time. And i got a big list of questions about economics for but before we go there. I'd love to hear you. I'm sure you didn't come out of the womb as a fully trained economists. I'd love to hear you give us some background. And how you got to where you are now Asking the question what most people enjoyed talking about myself. I was born into a working class family in new orleans in nineteen fifty eight. My dad dropped out of school in sixth grade. News bus when i was orange but most of his career pipe fitter shipyard and my family i wasn't interested in anything anything condemning at all as interested in football beer girls and my family. I was at generation where finally everyone was expecting to try college and so a mom said go to college for one year terribly high school so i've gotten to the college no one ever heard of nicholls state universities in the swamps of south louisiana. When i thought i'd go a chase girls drink beer did both catch any girls drink beer though and i came back from a christmas actually float the class. Because i didn't care my dad and momma said it's not for me up and you go for a whole year. So we re jiggled the deal and i went to school monday wednesday friday and worked at the shipyard tuesdays and thursdays so i had any classes at mental here monday wednesday and friday and i got into this question in the water was call economics but admit monday and wednesday on so i mean like ashes to satisfy. My mom is economics. It any good fortune to grow up in the nineteen seventies because in the nineteen seventies the awful decade they will energy shortages all the the automobile. I waited countless times to buy gasoline in the wall. Line and i mean this economics class and they had a great teacher She died a few years ago michel francois. She said she said look what happens. When the government controls the price of gasoline government prevents the price of gasoline from responding to the forces of supply and demand you get shortages and she looked as she says you remember those gasoline lines waiting back in in nineteen thirty three and i thought yes. And just the dame's january seventeenth nineteen seventy seven considered to be the first day of my life. I just came of my chair. I was just stunned. That how beautiful. This economic theory was. And i cannot make that moment and within a few months as i want to get a graduate degree in stuff. She wants after that one. Phd than annual. Want to devote my life studying economics teaching economics it was. It was a really accessible road to damascus moment for me. What's that been like as a and we'll maybe we'll stay about your career little bit but being around a shipyard and a working class family as a professor and academic now are are you. Do you still work with tools or have a workbench hobby on the side or is that been it was an easy change to make can't imagine shipyards or the most fun but for some of us i don't know your people are just gonna call to work with their hands at times. What what's what's happened. Mike for you so i i didn't work at the shipyard full-time my first jobs ahead. Summer jobs at the shipyard but they office jobs i remember one. Is this a summer in south louisiana. So hellishly hot and yeah and remember one summer. Seventy eight seventy nine. Maybe ahead moped was driving around looking for lost pieces of steel should be incredibly nessim placed over and i saw my father addressed out in full thick dental because he's welding song and i realized then how hard that man worked to make a ninety degree hundred percent humidity weather son of my dad worked. Medina was a An amateur carpenter is very good at it was his father. So too was my mother's father So i i grew up around. I learned to do a little bit of it. It never spoke to me very much but fortunately not. Fortunately for my saw it skipped a generation. So my son who's studying physics. He loves carpentry and so he's all building stuff on furniture just. He was home a few weeks ago and he spent the week when he was home building. A beautiful picnic table four. Some of his friends insurer and so he gets that from my father in his other grandfather. But has i'm sorry say is tokyo. I have skills tools and a corkscrew. Let's talk about economics and maybe to start. I know it's a social science. And i always think of social sciences fuzzier and less certain than physics biology or something. But maybe you can speak to their little bit are there are economic laws debated hotly or are there parts of it that are as reliable as physics in that way or how. How does it fall on as a science. And how should we think about it. A real question. There are debates among professional economists of about that very issue my opinion is an opinion shared by a large number if not unanimously mullen among economists and that is of it is a science and now it's not a it's not a. It's not a physical science in the sense that you can control easily all the variables. The variables are or are simple. My studies astronomy. And so you you know there. Are you know the we know how many stars excuse many planets orbiting solar system they have fairly terminable of laws societies really complex in order to understand. This is we need to think about rationally. Needed to be him. Our minds trained to look for and So is very difficult in In social science to conduct control experiments. So that's one way that it differs from from fizzles or chemistry. I is a science in the sense that.

south louisiana Dr drew dr michel francois new orleans football momma professor damascus Medina Mike tokyo
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

06:57 min | 2 months ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"Everything and you know you look at manufacturers now. To Milwaukee Bosh Dewalt matab oh PT everybody is developing. Cordless tools and they're trying to expand their cordless tool options because that technology they're they're not even the say they haven't even tapped all of the. The potential out of it. So with Nike Ad. NYC had Battery Technology is very limited in what you could get the amount of power you get them on a runtime you could get you know there was a lot of issues with you know with weather with climate and be in its reaction to cold and hot but with lithium technology lithium ion technology, those limitations aren't there certainly not to the degree compared to nine cad and then compared now that at that add to that now. The the motors that they're creating brushless motor technology. So The the tools you get now the the hybrid. Hi, I forget what they're called but you know you guys love sidewinders out there. No worm drive, the worm drive. Sorry I'm sorry. I just sacrilege. Sorry. What are we doing better you? Guys, love you guys love the worm drive out there Blade left saws their cordless now, and they're not a worm drive but they have a motor in them and with the batteries you can use them. People are framing houses completely cordless now awesome framers, Tim, you're his crew they frame. Exclusively. Cordless with the exception of probably their nail guns but everything else is completely cordless and you know we haven't gotten there. We've gotten we've gotten to a place with pretty much every tool where you can replace the corded version of it and not notice the difference MITER SAWS Easily like you don't need a cord, Meyer saw on a job site. Quote Cordless Table Saws. You know they're they're perfect like they're they work and the the good thing about them in this is something I've heard from pros who use cordless tools regularly on job sites is you know they take away the the safety issue of cords running around you know there's no trip hazard anymore You know there's there's a lot of benefit to them and run time. Is it showing up like you can? Yeah it's rare that depending on what the tool using, but it's rare that you can out. Run the m than battery on your impact driver. Yeah. You'll. You'll have you've a battery near back driver. You have another one on the charger like you're never gonNA Outrun, those two batteries you just not you it's not going to happen. so to me. And now now, with Milwaukee Milwaukee just launched this this new I forget the I forget what they call it but They have. Breakers like size cordless generator. I mean you run I remember building a house in the in the dead of winter and upstate New York it was the most miserable winter in my life and we. We had generator power and it was like is noisy it. We're always fighting the generator in the morning and running you know if you if you didn't plan ahead, you ran out of kerosene or whatever like. Diesel it just it's it was miserable no on it. That's doesn't exist anymore that as a generator running is torture. Drains you. So does it Soda Yeah Yeah Yeah I it never occurred to me but you're right with cordless tools just turn it off. Yeah. Off, yes. So I feel like. I I don't think that it's necessary to run out and buy the latest whatever. It particularly, if it's the first generation of something you know there there's been plenty manufacturers who've been the first to market with a certain tool, a certain categories tool and. You know sometimes they hit it out of the park right away and sometimes you know it needs a needs a rework in needs needs. So I I tend towards holding back in I used to get really excited about stuff when it came out but now I'm a lot more. Tried to be more balanced and skeptical. I had the hand tool rescue eric on a couple of weeks ago, and he was he restores old tools and he was explaining some old tools that guys invented that you'd is her like what in the world where they thinking? But what they were thinking is what you just illustrated that you you kinda tried you you test it and obviously. That ration-, they're like, okay we gotta try something different. That trial and error process of. Our dear development, whatever is just a part of part of the. You're never going get those like superstar classic tool without some number of Kinda you know half flops and then you'll get one the just bang. You know one of the one of the real winners every once in a while though but then there's Mark Martinez who who, who, who, who, it just occurred to me because I'm thinking about he he used instagram to get feedback on his prototypes as he was developing that that square rafter square and he you know he's constantly improving all the stopped doing but his. Remember when he when he first told me about you know he's like. Chris. We gotta talk this great new hammer and I was like mark come on a CA- you've. Created this Stiletto there's no way you're like you did not beat the like come on man. Strike. Twice, there's no way and then he then he showed me, he showed it to me in there were folks out in the he'd shown it to a bunch of people on the Pacific northwest already Outta jail see at the time tools of the trade and He was telling me about people's reaction and I just. It was hard. I had a hard time getting my minor on many showed everything to me. Showed me the way the know the head comes off the hand on. The. The grip and everything out like this is awesome. This is so awesome. So yeah, you know and he continues to he continues to push push the. Yeah. He he's innovator he isn't. It's like Oh this mindset of. everything can be improved. As opposed to if it ain't broke, don't fix it. You know it's like those are both true love like the mindset behind both.

Milwaukee Mark Martinez Battery Technology Nike NYC New York Blade Meyer Tim Pacific Chris CA
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

07:17 min | 2 months ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"Podcast I'm nate I've got a great discussion for you here with Chris Irby's Chris is an editor at this old house and he's a really well rounded and interesting guy with a lot of experience in the industry both as a tradesman and a contractor as well as working for you know places like this Old House Journal of Light Construction Fine homebuilding magazine. He's put a lot of content online and as a lot of insight about tools and just all sorts of things and it was really a fun and interesting conversation I learned a lot at hope you enjoy it. Let's get right to it. Chris. Welcome. Welcome to the show. Thanks so much nate. It's a real pleasure to be here. I'm a huge fan of a central craftsman and been following you guys since the beginning I think. Oh well, that's great. Now, I want to start by talking about this old house and I almost hate to admit it but I haven't watched much this old house in my life. I know the basics I know Tom Silva and Norway and I've seen a handful. But I I'm not one of the guys who can say I grew up watching this old house. So I'm hoping you can. Speak as if there's other people like me and bring me and everyone else up to speed on this old house, maybe give us the overview. How happy to have retailer. In I I hear you no worries. So we we started. The brand started nineteen, seventy nine and it really launched the home improvement TV genre. So we started as A. we follow the renovation of how of a couple projects a season and back then in Nineteen seventy-nine they bought a house I think and then and then did the renovation and Russ Morass shoe who spearheaded the whole thing and had the the visionary He set the groundwork for where we are today It's IT's maintained its authenticity. It's It's it's it's. Trust with the audience over the years is forty one years because we're so rooted in having pros are experts are actually real contractors like like your dad like they. They've been doing this their their for their careers is what they do day in and day out. So like you mentioned, Tom Silva is general contractor he he's been on the show for. Almost forty one years I think may be thirty, five years thirty, six years rich richer theory who's who's the are plumber plumbing and heating expert he started I'm pretty sure since day one So You know in, of course, norm, Abram who's been? Around since the beginning as well and launch new Yankee Workshop after after several years I on this old house. So we've been, we've been doing the the home renovation. Since then since nineteen, seventy nine and it's It's A. It's a family oriented show I. Mean I grew up watching it when I was a kid with my dad my dad was a weekend warrior news constantly working on her house and I would go to the hardware store with him on Saturdays and you know I, I really got into it. I loved it and we hear that a lot from folks you know. There there there are fans who've been fans multi generations. You know so So it's fun to be part of that. You know I feel really grateful to be part of that and you know like I said, our experts are are they're the real deal there? There is no. One's pretending to be doing anything everybody that is represented on our show you know Jeff's Weiner Gender Wada. Silva roster I mean I can go through the villa's along less now of. We've what we've done over the years is we've we've expanded our trades and brought in more experts into the T. H. Universe. People who've been working on those jobs in on those job sites more on you know Charlie Selah. So. It's been around for a long time. TV Show still a TV show every we do two projects a season Really follow the renovation like real. No frills not trying no tricks. No TV tricks nothing like that. Happening I. It's it's actual job sites and we follow the renovation of of two projects a season over the course of I think twelve twelve episodes each and the goal is just to to educate our our viewers and entertain them hopefully and and really just serve their interests in and empower them. So our tagline is like bilger dream. Do It do it? Right? You know so so we've we've. We've always. been about doing everything. As far as renovations maintenance anything how to like the right way and yeah from our experts you know they're they're trusted because like I said, they've been doing it. So there's something about and that's what you're speaking to. But hearing something from the expert meaning someone who's done it for decades verses someone who could deliver the exact same information but when you See Them. You know like you've never done that before. What is it? Why is that? So it's like intangible. Don't know why it matters but it it does. It's everything right? So true it's so true and that's one of the reasons why your you know your dad resonates with so many people. Yeah. Just he just he's like he's got that magic delivers like like a Sunday sermon Yeah and The confidence and there's something like. I I think especially for guys in the trades but even for anyone else making a living where you see someone who you know has spent the those same sleepless nights and stressful jobs and like has been in the trenches and even if they're not like for example Larry Hawn is another person and like when you're watching him make those videos you know it's not like some high pressure thing the way it is on lots of, but you know he's been there and there's something about that. That just makes you connect like this person understands you know whatever a fourteen hour day and having like a worn out boots you know after month or something so it's it's just like it's It's simultaneously intangible, but it's also it's everything that's like it's the foundation almost of being trust, right? Yeah. Yeah. No absolutely absolutely I think part of it is. Like Larry Hawn is such a great example he..

Tom Silva Old House Journal of Light Con Chris Irby Larry Hawn nate editor Charlie Selah Abram Norway T. H. Universe Jeff Weiner
What is Natural Moral Law? with Dr. Ross Inman

Knowing Faith

06:03 min | 3 months ago

What is Natural Moral Law? with Dr. Ross Inman

"So here's the big question what is natural moral law and what does it have to do with genesis? Excellent question was I see it I go conception of natural moral law. Entails at least the following to commitments. So the first commitment would be something like this. That God has built into the natural created order a moral dimension. So just as you might think, a piece of wood has sort of natural grain to it that. So to the moral realm has a natural grain too it that's grounded in God's creation intentional purposes. So, that would be the first tenant which all impact here in a second, and then the second thing would be that God has so created human beings with unique capacity to both know and live in accordance with this moral grain for the sake of living well I think one passage that's absolutely insightful in biblically rich which I wish we had more time to unpack is proverbs eight, twenty to thirty six. You might be asking what is proverbs eight, twenty to thirty, six with Genesis wanted to help to show you. So. If you permit me, let me just read very quickly a twenty to thirty six proverbs chapter eight. So this is what twenty two says. The Lord possessed me at the beginning of his work, the first of his acts of all ages ago. I. Was set up at the first before the beginning of the Earth when there were no depths, I was brought forth when there were no springs abounding with water before the mountains have been shaped before the hills I was brought forth before he had made the earth with its fields or the first of the dust of the world when. He established the heavens there when he drew a circle on the face of the deep when he made firm the skies above when he established the fountains of the deep when he assigned to the sea, its limit so that the waters might not transgress his command when he marked out the foundations of the Earth then I was beside him like a master workman and I was daily his delight rejoicing before him always rejoicing in his inhabited world and delighting in the children, of ma'am. And now it was sons listen to me blessed are those who keep my waves here instruction and be wise and do not neglect it less. It is the one who listens to me watching daily at my gates waiting beside my doors for whoever finds me finds life and obtains favor from the Lord but he fails to find mean injures himself. So a proverbs aid is is a wonderful passage that a uses a literary device here with respect to the personification of wisdom. So the idea your calls that we have a god has this intimate companion here. From the first act of creation onwards in in its denoting the fact that all of God's creative acts from the creation of the starry expanse to the separation of male and female there founded on and patterned after God's wisdom. So God. In proverbs eight here is is depicted as an expert craftsman master Workman's beautiful picture really So he's sort sort of starts with this meticulous plan. Any sort of skillfully fashions out of an unstructured pile of material something with strength. And Integrity it's actually really interesting here in proverbs eight, we have in a mere eight verses, a span of eight from twenty to thirty. There are eleven verbs here that denote God's conferral of order structure and pattern on creation. This is what I was referencing here a natural grain to the cosmic order. So for example, God's set up. He brought forth. He shaped he made he established he drew a circle very interesting sort of craftsmanship. Pictures. Here he made firm he assigned a limit any marked out the boundaries of his creation with skillful precision. And Care. So you have you have these. Images that portray God is the master workmanship in you just can't read proverbs eight Kyle without without your mind going back to genesis one through two. So it was beautiful about proverbs eight is just naturally points back to the original creation account were I think God's skillful craftsmanship in creation is on full display. In particular, we see in Genesis a genesis chapter one God will separating things apart and he's binding them together again, his craftsmanship on full display here. So for example, in Genesis, one, God separating light from darkness, he's separating the waters above from the waters below the expanse he's separating day from night he's separating see from land dwelling creatures sue separating. From the rest of the creation, he separating male from female, and he's separating of the seventh day of rest from the rest of the six days of his pre more. So you see him not only separating apart, but you actually see him interestingly enough uniting things together as well. And I think there are three important ways your kyle in in which we see God his master craftsmanship on display in binding things together and giving them natural integrity in strength. So first of all we have genesis one, twenty, seven. When God Unites Himself to human beings by making them in his divine image were made to reflect the radiance in the purposes of God. So there's something about the way that we are constructed Kyle. that. That makes the case that God is our final ultimate end. He is our greatest. Good. Were made in the image and likeness of this being who is a relational through and through and that nothing else can satisfy but union with God's

Genesis Kyle Earth Master Workman Kyle.
Why Lionel Messi Wants Out of FC Barcelona

ESPN Daily

03:05 min | 5 months ago

Why Lionel Messi Wants Out of FC Barcelona

"Sam borden six years ago we were in Brazil together and my facial hair situation was not good. I mean that isn't what stands out for me Pablo but. I think I. Think we all have different memories of experiences. SAMBORN is a global sports correspondent for ESPN and kind enough to forget the unfortunate beard I grew for five weeks while we were covering the two thousand fourteen World Cup it's actually kind of funny right I mean now World Cup in Brazil Lionel Messi was a big part of the story there and obviously is a big part of the story today to. We got to see Leo Messi in a World Cup final Sam and you fast forward six years and I bring you here today because Messi announced last week that he wants to leave F c Barcelona after a nearly seventeen year stint. Tell me why this is a big deal. The obvious answer is that Messi is the most famous athlete on the planet may be one of the most famous people in the entire world. He is not just a generational star he is a star that defines a sport. When you talk about people that are known all over the world for being absolute craftsmen absolute artisans at what they do messy is that guy? Governor. From the magical. Curiel who knows? He's a little guy from Argentina, who is an absolute wizard with a soccer ball? Hey, just tonsure. RIP UP OF REASON A perennial. He's magical. He's calculating. He's one of the most creative players with sport has ever seen. I said. I think one of the things that has always made him even bigger than just. As, see and other sports these his diminutive stature, he's not a giant he's not the one of these massive bodies. I've been in front of him several times and I'm five ten and I looked down on him quite a bit. To me that's what makes him during and beloved by so many people is that he kind of Rome's among giants and somehow finds a way to succeed in a way that no other player ever has coming up with gold medal messy. He made Barcelona. The juggernaut that it is today and him moving on that say massive seismic shift, not just in soccer but in sports.

Lionel Messi Curiel Sam Borden Barcelona Brazil Soccer Facial Hair Espn Gold Medal Pablo Rome Argentina
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

03:05 min | 5 months ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"Before, you panic too hard and unsubscribe with this new information. My top goal is always going to be to have my dad here as a a Co host and every chance that he can get away and sit and have the types of conversations and and where we can mine him for his own experience in his his you know just instinctual sort of. It's not philosophy. He's just such a teacher you know an and I think sometimes. It just comes out of him. You know I don't sometimes you don't even know what what? Sometimes. I can't even predict what you know. Really Helpful Nugget. He's GonNa pull out of his pocket but. We gotta get him sitting here talking in order to make that happen. So that is still goal number one. So don't think that I'm kicking him off the show or that he's that were were heading different directions is nothing like that I wanNA have regular content it's good for our business and as you certainly know by now, essential craftsman is a business for us. We've been full-time my both my dad and I now for a few years, it is unbelievably satisfying and. and. Fun and fulfilling in every single way we feel like the luckiest man alive. So this is the direction that were kind of heading with this. I'm going to fill the gaps. In the show there's weeks without my dad's sitting down here or other guests, I'm GonNa, fill it with things that might not be your I. Might not be what you expect from an essential craftsman. podcast or youtube video. But I give you my word. It's going to be the most valuable and interesting and helpful and positive and clean content that we can that we can create no matter what it's about and and I do think there's a lot of interesting topics out there that that I know very little about and if you're curious person if you have any amount of instinct for absorbing and growing and if you're busy like most of US podcast, really are one of the place to to absorb I'm going to. Try to make the content that I personally would enjoy listening to myself. So as always, you can leave feedback in the comments on Youtube we pay attention there, and if there's strong sentiment, one way or the other we can always adjust. But if you have an idea for a guest or a topic that might be interesting in fact, guests will be the most helpful because sometimes just locating individuals is half the battle and we've received a few in fact, I someone sent a recommendation for a geologist months ago we were talking. We were talking about how little we knew about geology and someone shared a professor who who could. Who could be brought on and that's exactly the kind of thing I'm excited and interested in doing more of love we will catch him next time. Have a great week everybody enjoy the end of summer and we'll catch you next time..

Youtube US geologist professor
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

09:15 min | 5 months ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"And the reason is this is going to be a solo episode by me. It's the first time I've ever done this. And it's not going to give you the best taste of what this show is like on a regular basis. Normally my dad's here or another guest, and that's not the case today but we've got some items of business. I think you will enjoy it especially if you're a fan of youtube videos and a regular listener of the podcast, let's get right into. A week ago my family, and I went to the coast. It's an hour and a half drive, and while we were there, I met this guy on the beach who owns a sawmill. And by Sawmill I mean really a huge lumber business. He's he started it when he was younger I think maybe twenty or thirty or forty years ago. And if you've listened to any of our lumber and forestry and logging videos with my dad, you probably heard him say that back in the day there was like two or three or four hundred sawmills in Douglas County and now today there might be like ten and this guy's mill is one of those. And I asked him last weekend what to what he attributed. His ability, you know his mills ability to withstand all of the fluctuations and changes and that have happened in the timber industry when so many of the other mills, the vast majority were not able to and went out of business and they his his mill is alive and well, and doing better than ever, and he said that they had to remake themselves. I think he said dozens but I kind of understood him to mean maybe like fifteen or twenty. But by remake I mean they had to completely change their business, the customer that type of product they were making, and he said in most cases they had to completely rework and reassemble and reinvent their tooling and the saws and how they were even making the product and he said it's basically it has basically been. A regular thing over the decades that every so long everything changes and they have to kind of adapt and adjust accordingly I bring the story up because I wanNA relate it to some of the decisions we've been making in central craftsman recently, and before you worry you're panic a little bit. Now we're not making any big changes to the channel or the type of content we release on essential craftsman we really are. In a good groove with that to be honest now that we've kind of have a a system for putting out these SPEC house videos, we have a growing backlog of tools to review pro tip videos to make and a pretty big list of sort of philosophy of work blogs that my dad would like to make. So we're in really good shape and I have no interest and neither does my dad I, don't think. I won't speak. For him but. I I certainly have no interest in changing the way that that channel and that content works we're just really feel like we've got lightning in a bottle there and there's no need to adjust it. But and. Where the change and the re invention is going to be happening is here on the second channel and the podcast and please allow me to explain. The reason that we started the podcast over a year ago, the first the main reason was to I. I, wanted to practice speaking into a microphone and looking in a camera and making videos. It just felt like a skill that can only be developed through practice and the only way to practice is to actually do it. And what I have, what is even more important than actual practicing At least video work I found is then actually sharing it and. Posting it and being done with it I I'm the type of person Yvonne. I'm texting who will rewrite a text fourteen times. Still it's perfect and you can't have that have a habit with video work because you'll just never be satisfied. So I feel like that it's been helpful in that way but the the trouble that we're running into. Is You know it's been two weeks maybe maybe three since we recorded our last podcast, which was the interview with John Brand who if you didn't listen to that by the way and you're a fan of my dad and you know a lot about him I think you should I think you'd really enjoy it be if you WANNA learn more about my dad, it really fills. A gap in of an important time of his life that we have never talked about. And if you listen to that interview, I think that might be the last piece of the puzzle you to kind of understand who he is and how he got to be the the man he is kind of, is the missing link of how is it that this carbon? So comfortable speaking teaching and presenting it really kind of brings it into focus. I hope you hope you caught that and John was terrific by the way that guy was really fun and I I could have just sat there for a couple more hours and and listened to him talk about music, and hopefully he'll come back. anyways that was a few weeks ago and it has been it has been hard to get my dad back over here to record another podcast because he is a busy guy, he's building the SPEC house. He's. With all of the subs he is he has family in church responsibilities like all of us and we recorded at my house, which is on the other side of town. And He has a higher priorities than this podcast like our our regular content which I think you'd be amazed if you knew how much time went into even just from me editing and kind of working at the computer, but he spends a lot of time an enormous amount of time reviewing the drafts and critiquing things that didn't come out quite right and of course, recording the voice over narration. So the point being that. For him recording podcasts is not quite as high on his list of priorities, but it is on mine and I would like to do more of it, and so what's going to happen I going forward with this podcast And I hope that you stick with it. I'm going to kind of expand the the the range of topics that we cover. And I don't really have an interest in doing a lot of these solo episodes in and talking and sharing my own thoughts and feelings I I'm much more interested in an interview based show I. There's a lot of. There's a lot of areas of just kind of human. Experience that I feel like our so interesting that I know so little about and I feel like I have a developing a good instinct for asking the types of questions that other people like me might have about. Topics like. Science and Culture and history, for example. politics to an extent although that's there's enough of that out there and I think we all get enough of that just beat into our heads from just from being alive these days. So I don't I don't think that'll be a big part of it but. I'm giving you a fair warning that I'm going to bring on some more guests, covering more topics outside of work, bench, Hobby craft, and the trades there. There will be more of that. For example, I've got an interview lining up I hope it's not set in stone with the fellow who makes electric guitars. That's a neat kind of. Baby step out of our work bench hobby world because that is still craft, it's very much a A trade I guess and I don't know much about it. But I'm interested in it and I hope that you will stick with me as I kind of hopefully get better and learn more myself ask some questions that I don't know and. Expand My base of general knowledge and understanding. So that's what I wanted to talk about and share. I should mention to other things while we're talking about this as as fair warning and that is. And I hate to admit it but it's the truth and that is my own. Interest and where I have a feeling a a large portion of these interviews, conversations will head is. In small. Business and entrepreneurship. And everything that had entails, which is really vast and I I don't WanNa say like self help because that's really a turnoff race even for me especially for me. But I still still what I'm interested in what I pay attention to it's what I think about and so I have a feeling that to some extent, those types of guests and conversations will be. predictable on our podcast going forward..

John Brand youtube Douglas County Yvonne
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

01:40 min | 5 months ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

05:24 min | 6 months ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"Feel like he's reminded me that even with the central craftsman now does garden video and we mentioned that we gardening's not our thing. But I mean I don't know what to say. Sometimes you gotta try new things. What that garden video was. I think people enjoyed it, and it certainly is a Nice Garden but i. don't know that kind of that hits all of those. Things, also, we are Testing videos and and you know I think we'll probably maybe do a little more gardening type of content here and there because I. It was nice to do something different to be honest. I I kind of enjoyed. Just talking about something different, and and as it turns out, I'm not surprised, but there's decent amount of expertise among the audience on this, so that's a take takeaway from me. You know we fairly recently did that video about that pressure vessel and my? System in the shop and then. This garden video just absolutely confirms what I have long suspected that there's just this huge database out there of people that are watching our channel that really know some stuff. At a deeper and deeper and deeper levels in it, it feels like a luxury to me to be tapped into my own personal encyclopedia. It's better than ask. Google, because because it's just like real world experience that people are bringing. Yeah, and I have I have a feeling, only a very very small sliver of people actually leave comments and contribute in that way. I don't on I'm watching you too and. So it's probably like a tip of the iceberg thing in other words. If there's some really bright people shown up in the comments, there's probably some really freak show. Bright people who are paying attention and in fact we've. We've received emails from people who like that are kind of like listen. Here's what you need to know and yeah, there's there's a real it's a real neat. You know group it's. It's an unbelievably neat group and I. Don't know if there will ever be a time when. We or anybody else? Needs or is able to really fully utilize the the knowledge base. It's just percolating here in this. In this group of people that are that are watching this channel, but. Kind of Harkening back to win. When Nick Pelletier and Evelyn had that overwhelming problem in the response of the channel, then in that one particular way that that young. Family, needing help I don't know, but it feels to me like it. It puts a resource in our hands of information and knowledge and. and. I don't know we'll see if there comes a time when it's actually important, but for now it's you know it's not just essential craftsmen, either and this has been on the Internet for a long time. These forums and collections of people in Niche hobbies, really really solving and helping each other on these complex technical issues in whatever. Topic, they're in. But. Even comments sections on youtube art like this garden video has all of a sudden brought all this really helpful gardening information you think about how much trial and error humanity had to had to do even just a few years ago. We'd be like trying to work. That doesn't work and now how much time and money is saved by just getting like the the actual solution to the thing without having test all these things I mean. Twenty years ago, you might have just tested adding a bucket full of sand or not or keep. All this testing could have resulted in several years of wrecked gardens. Trite, you know in fact in that happened does have well. What didn't happen to your side or something, so this is the confusing thing is re years ago I took. Or two three a bagel trailer, load silo, my leaf Mulch, and so I took a load up there that wasn't very decomposed and dumped it out, and he put on his garden, and for whatever combination of reasons that year his garden failed like like he couldn't make anything grow except the garlic while and so he it he abandoned that site and moved up and put some raise box gardens up by his house, and he's not asking me for anymore leaf Mulch I can tell you that. Wow and I'm not sure that it's I don't. You know people have commented what those trees been sprayed with. There may have been some herbicides sprayed on some of those leaves I. Don't know if there was some of that and when I took cy, but that's just what you're speaking of. The trial and error necessarily include error. Whatever so what happened is he still abandoned that? That's garden site is still garden site has a little fence around it in the cows walk in and out in grays on. On the weeds and that's it. Everybody commented like get the soil tested. How how do you actually test soil? Where do you take it I know I get you to take a bucket, but Tony Extension Office down at the courthouse Osu Oregon State. University has a county extension officer and I have flirted with doing that and haven't done it but I'm going to do it now. Boys I'm going to do it now and see what's really going on. Be careful not to just draw out of the MULCH on the top to get down in there where the roots are, and then that's I guess that's where the we that's where the roots are going so there. That is what he says. The top dressing I put on mostly for weed suppression. Bam, it just kills weeds and keep some moisture in, but I really appreciate the information well. Thanks for listening everybody if you have questions. Put Him on our. Comments on Youtube. We appreciate you chiming in. You can send questions to us in this way on our website at essential craftsman dot com slash podcast and we will can next time..

youtube Google Nick Pelletier Tony Extension cy Osu Oregon State officer Evelyn
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

05:18 min | 6 months ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"Of the essential craftsmen podcast. This might be the most meaningful show we've done yet. And before we dig in I. Want to set the table a little bit to give some context to this interview. Most of our listeners and viewers are familiar with Larry Hawn Larry is probably one of the top five most famous carpenters in the world. And he's. He's passed away as of nine or ten years ago and Neela. Who you'll meet later is his wife or his widow. Now, she only lives a couple of hours I. Guess an hour and a half from Roseburg where we are, so it was a relatively short drive for some of us, probably many of us. Larry is a bit of an icon. He is the ultimate carpenter builder. He doesn't fit the. As A. kind of rough and tumble construction guy. He's eloquent. He's intelligent. He's thoughtful. He's clean. He's. Athletic although deceptively, so because he at least in the videos as we all see him, he doesn't appear to be some sort of superhuman, but his grace and his technique really shine a when you when we all watched him frame that house. So and for me and my dad in particular now that we are sort of in the video if not business just the video world, we feel an extra level of connection to Larry because of his skills as a video presenter and A. Creative. Content maker just from the previous generation before we start. Let me give a little background about Larry. Just so when we start this discussion with meal. If you are familiar with him, you'll know the basics Larry was born in Nebraska. He grew up in a home with no power freezing cold. He found his way to California. In the fifties. I I should say he was in the military before that. He found his way to California in the fifties where he. Started building, and helped developed, and was a part of a very serious construction boom that lasted decades. Larry developed his skills as carbon working with his brother, framing houses, just lightning fast and assemble these skills and techniques later in his life into a book, the very efficient carpenter, which as far as I understand. It is still sort of the Bible for production. Carpentry and how to. Framing! Is Really Great. You can buy on Amazon right now and we've got a copy of it. It's been fun to flip through. And as a matter of fact, my dad and I are working on a video well. My Dad's working on kind of putting some of his thoughts together about the things. He's learned from Larry in his book. That made the biggest impact. It's a big list, but you can expect that video coming out soon. Aside from being the ultimate carpenter Larry wrote a lot. He contributed articles that were published in fine home building. He wrote his book very efficient carpenter. He wrote a memoir later in his life. And, probably more things that I'm. I'm not really even aware of, but it's his writing to me is one of the additional thing that just sets him apart as a unique. Tradesmen, not not every tradesman is writing in their spare time, so that should give you an idea if if you are not familiar with them, I would direct you after this interview to go to Youtube and type in Larry Hawn, because he's probably most well known for his video series. He did I believe. It's three parts about framing a house, and it's very much how to it's. It's just really incredibly well done. Larry narrates displays all of the techniques in his book in framing this House which we mentioned in this interview we find out. It was built for his sister. So hopefully that gives you an idea who larry is if you didn't know already this conversation with meal and meals, daughter Cerita joins partway through the interview as well and they were both just. Just really lovely people and I. I just really enjoyed it tremendously as you can imagine, this conversation was not super easy for me La and CERITA because it's. They Miss Larry tremendously in in ways that the only family can, and so I. I really appreciate them. Having this conversation and helping to perpetuate the legacy that we feel of Larry and hopefully it reminds them of the parts of him that you know we're not familiar with I should say for me in particular. This concept of legacy and families especially fresh be my wife's father just passed away, and so we're just kind of finishing the funeral, and the the thoughts around legacy and the. The aspect of a of a man's life. What is? Learned and remains in it's it's just really important and special, and I'm I feel privileged.

Larry Hawn Larry Larry Hawn Roseburg Youtube CERITA Amazon La California A. Creative Nebraska Cerita
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

06:42 min | 7 months ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"Probably, fifteen or twenty feet, from the and it Kinda, landed on a stump and whipped in a certain way that the short end the the stump log just cut off. Kickback and came sideways and hit him in the knee, and he had a compound fracture right at the top of this pork mu boom broke his leg hard and one or two of Mona Genre, sticking out right at the top of the boom and man. He was hurt. Okay welcome to another episode of the essential craftsmen podcast I'm Nate I've got my dad here the essential craftsman. How're you doing? I guys doing good. We're doing a voicemail discussion today. We've got a handful of really good questions. If you want to submit a question for us to answer, you can do that on our website. At essential craftsman dot com slash podcast. Let's jump right in. High Central Craftsman team. A My name's Callum I'm a carpenter joiner in Scotland, and after working for a company for about seven years is that? Recently start up my own business. It just in January there. And already I had trouble getting payments of two clients, not through the quality of work, but more the clients trying to haggle prices after the fact, and after agreements were made. It's not something you can speak to any advice. On how to deal with that without ruining relationships are reputation. Okay so that the first of all? I am partially Scottish. My Maternal Great Grandmother, my paternal Great Grandmother, was. Elizabeth Mc Gregor and she came from Calgary Canada and I have solar, and so that so I mean it's you to write that. I've learned that there was essentially a genocide declared on the McGregor clan. Way Back when by the crown and they were run out a lot of them emigrated to Canada where they could stay alive and. And so I love your Brogue Man I. Love the way that Scottish brogue it I mean it resonates so and I love the name column. It is hard to recover from non payment, so the whole idea of entering into an agreement and getting a contract and getting your deposits and getting to the end, and then have somebody not want to pay you the full price, even though you did good work. That just indicates a character flaw in that person that you have to learn to recognize before you sign the agreement, but you just started as a contractor in January. See Haven't learned that yet. And maybe some of these people are family or friends, and and that speaks to your concern about relationships and reputation. So the impossible, but best way through that, when when those people come along in that happens is to give away what you can give away and take their name out of your contact list and never worked for them again. But the real answer is is spent some time vetting. Those clients dude the reason. Big Construction Company succeed is because they have credit departments. They thoroughly vet into a credit history research project on anyone. They give a price, too. because. When you give them a price, you're committing to a contract and you're going to be held to that, and you're expecting the other party to hold to it also, but if they have a reputation for slow pay or non payment, it doesn't matter how great that job looks. You gotta run away. How do you do? That is a new car contractor when you just desperately need work, I can't answer that. But. The concept is right the other. There's a couple other things you've got to learn right away that. Trouble is a general contractor will come from twenty percent of your clients, and so you need to identify that twenty percent early and cross them off your list. Refer them to a competitor that you do not think highly of and let your twenty percent be his problem. And you have to handle your deposits so that by the end of the job. They're not ahead of you so if they completely flake on the on the On the retainer for some reason, at least you've satisfied your costs. there was another point which I forgotten. Nate, what have you got? What do you got to tell you about this I thought when I is. You're worried about someone ruining their reputation, and certainly these people are doing that. Yeah, first and foremost. someone's reputation getting ruined when this happens, try and secondly when I've hired contractors. Very often they'll ask for a big, not a down payment, but a payment towards the thing as much as half of the whole cost of the job and on a big job like that big block fence I did I. Think I gave the Guy like twenty or thirty thousand dollars I had met him a week before I, did as much homework as I could, but. Hopefully you're doing that. Because if the person is not willing to give you X. amount of dollars, you know right off the bat or they're. They're worried about that. Than doubt might be a red flag that they are going to give you trouble later on also, and that's them extending some trust, and if they're worried about that, that's fair, but that that could be a slight indicator that the person doesn't like handing money over so. Seems like most good contractors I've worked with are collecting money. Right off the bat before they give up any time. Labor materials anything like that and the way you defend that so because there are crooked contractors, it will take big deposits and disappear, but the way you defend that asking for money before you've done work is to let them know that you have to buy material and once that material is committed. Committed and used on job. The money cannot be retrieved and so maybe maybe they're. Deposit is made out to you and the the vendor or the supplier. Maybe you find some other way. Maybe you do the demolition I without getting a deposit, and soon as demolition has done, and material is ordered wham. You get a big chunk of money, but the takeaway is. You have to understand the people better somehow. So that, you're not surprised at the end by this disreputable behaviour that they're bringing to the table and the other thing is I would tell every young contractor. You have to stop thinking about the value of your work in terms of what you would be willing to pay, because that has no bearing on what you should be willing to charge. What that means is you have to raise your prices. Because if you do not? If you do not receive enough money for your work to pay your overhead and some amount of profit in a very short period of time, you will have starved out. You'll be working for somebody else. That's treating you poorly, and those people won't be able to call you back for your next for the next project that they want you to do for them because you. You won't be in business, so raise your prices..

High Central Craftsman Big Construction Company Elizabeth Mc Gregor Canada Callum Scotland Nate McGregor Calgary Canada
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

08:24 min | 8 months ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"Man I was blown away that the Comanche essentially once they weaponized the horse. Ruled the plains. There's a list in there. I think two dozen tribes they. Drove to extinction or drove completely off the plane. Welcome to another episode. The essential craftsman podcast I'm Nate I've got my dad here with me. How you doing good man I, guys. This is our official First Book Review Episode, and we couldn't have a better book on hand to review. We've talked and thought a lot about how we want to do this because if we review the book to. Thoroughly that kind of spoils it. We don't want to at the same time. Not Talk about it because especially this book it's there's a lot here and so. This story has been around a long time and we're not going to spoil anything. Don't don't let that discourage. If you've ever read. Louis l'amour book you've probably Kinda got a spoiler on the Comanche is anyhow a little bit, so we advocate. Yeah and the book is Empire of the summer moon by S Gwen. Quantum Parker and the rise and fall of the Comanche is the most powerful Indian tribe in American history, and what we thought we would do with this one, and probably with most of our book reviews is. Each take a turn. Make three points or thoughts or Ideas that came to us, either before or after reading talk about those more than the the story of the book, so we're going to bounce around is what I'm saying. And maybe I will give you a quick overview is this is a this is the true or this is a nonfiction. Story of. The Comanche, Indians and their rise and fall and their empire. And it focuses on several characters both American settlers. Some specific as several specific comanche Indians. Politicians the state of Texas. Just it's kind of a real beautiful patchwork of American history and characters and country of Texas the country of Texas yeah. So. Yeah, it's a fabulous book and. First of all so. I. Don't know if you've ever done a book review, but I've never done a book. Review. Hi Elementary School Yeah was a book report yeah. I've done book reports. Book reviews. Yeah, so we know nothing of this, but we know a good book when we read it, and this has been just a just a real captivating thing going into this I have to sort of sheepishly admit that I knew basically nothing of the actual history of the settlers and the Indians besides. Watching Paul Hannah's. Watching dances with wolves. And the the folklore of the Indians that was you know that's just part of our. Culture and so. I mentioned that because. Dances with wolves, as movie is one of my all time favorites. I love it and honestly I felt like this. Book was a really great companion to that movie. It's almost like. They took a lot of themes from. True history. You know with the. The Indians kidnapping or taking white. Settler children and incorporating them into the tribe I didn't realize that was a true thing that happened, but in any case that that movie paints a really beautiful picture of the. Of the plains, Indians and I think in that movie. Those Indians were Su Pawni. Yeah, who show up in the story a little bit. Yeah! The sued Duke sort of. parenthetically, as sort of being. Sort of a counterbalance to the comanche, but not quite nobody really was but. The. Cheyenne occupied similar space farther north, and they were. They were horse, Indian or Indians who figured out horses, although nobody figured horses out the way the comanche did nobody weaponized them like the Comanche, did they? They were tribes were eating them and trading them, but the comanche were. Killing from them, oh! Yeah another be so we'll. We'll talk about that as we dive in, but but the fact is comanche took horse culture further than any of the other horse culture tribes. The thing that rocked me as I. I thought I. knew quite a bit about Indians as a kid. I grew up absolutely seduced by the story of the for trade and the story of of stories of cattle, drives and Indians and. You. Know interaction between Indians and the Iroquois nation and you know Henry Joseph out. Schiller wrote a the Henry ware series that I just devoured when I was nine ten eleven. I couldn't get enough and of course Louis. l'amour and And none nothing was as Compelling to me, as the journals of Lewis and Clark which I didn't discover, until I was probably forty five years old, so I loved that whole thing but I was shocked at how little I appreciate it a really understood the comanche. What were some of your thoughts? Initially while you were kind of moving through the book well, the first thing was and I've become sort of sensitive to this. Through my forties and fifties and now sixties that I love a book that includes footnotes I just love the fact and I don't check all the footnotes, but occasionally I looked through them to see if anything jumps out as an inconsistency or somebody trying to blow some smoke and what I've learned. Is that an author who takes time to put the footnotes in there to sort of substantiate his research and his claims is probably someone that I can then I can let my. With a little bit. Yeah, you know. And this book has footnotes. Here's a guy writing what purports to be and I think is in fact a pretty objective Historical piece about something that. That just was so compelling to me. Because so much of it was new. It's a challenging thing to be a writer, and he would occasionally quote words of the soldiers of the Indians that we do have written record. Yeah, but the amount that he was able to I and I would say correctly extrapolate from their words, and then sometimes you insert a little bit of not fiction, but say something like the the pride on the Indians face. As he walked back into town, was with compare dumping. That's fair and really helps paint the picture, but I remember the time thinking like. Since you're reading nonfiction like well, how do we know he looked? You're out in. Yeah, yeah, so the point is this book is? Super easy to read because it reads like an original novel. Yes, it does it like a darn good because you're reading things like that. Like the he you know. He was sadder than he had ever been kind of like. Okay. Yeah, it makes sense Oh. Yeah tough job to be an author footnote document everything. And also make it fun to read and connect the dots and lead the viewer through these steps, and I thought he did a really beautiful job of that. Yeah, so in the. Movie Lonesome Dove I think it's Gus. Gus is the guy that yeah. I think it's Gus. At some point I remember some little clip where somebody start shooting at him there Indians are hostels, and when he looks at him I m going command cheese with a tone of real, if not anxiety, because gus never showed anxiety, right, but sort of resignation, and why better really lace up my boots because they're comanche, I thought You know all the books I've read. Comanche is just kind of. They receive sort of a byline sort of a of a emphasis. Man I was blown away that the comanche. Essentially once they weaponized, the Horse ruled the plains. There's a list in there. I think two dozen tribes that they either drove to extinction or drove completely off the planes. Yeah, they were just utterly unstoppable they it sounded like. They, use the horse as effectively as the Mongols. Yet I wasn't in the boys. I was thinking the whole time like that's the same advantage that the Mongols had over everybody else..

Gus Texas Louis l'amour official Hi Elementary School Su Pawni kidnapping Quantum Parker S Gwen Paul Hannah Louis. l'amour Henry Joseph Cheyenne Duke Schiller writer Lewis Clark
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

11:51 min | 9 months ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"But we have several different kinds of pine trees here. Ponderosa Pine White Pine Sugar Pine just got to the end of my expertise on pine. We have white. Would that is grand. For quite for logical finding their thought of another pine Sol Pine Sol Pine. Sol is a big commodity. He welcome to another episode of the essential craftsman. Podcast I'm nate. I got my dad here. The essential craftsman. How're you doing guys doing good? We're going to be talking about logging. Forestry Timber Lumber we are in the at least at one time would have been considered the timber capitol of the world is at right. The ROSEBURG's motto was Timber Capitol of the nation was a model sorry a motto that was like printed places and kind of generally known. Yeah it was on the low citi logo. It was on the the sign at the entrance to the town. It was We were proud of it. Some portion of that was because of Roseburg lumber which was the the company who was also the big dog in the industry is at right yeah. I'm Roseburg lumber company was built by Kenneth Ford between. I'M GONNA make this up a little bit but I think he his first. Paychecks were issued during the Great Depression. Wow and only three grocery stores in town would catch them for about eighty cents on the dollar. Wow and he ended up building. It Rose Glen largest solely owned lumber business in the world. Wow how many meals do you think we're in so let's put a timeline on this? Let's we want to talk about lumber and timber kind of in your lifetime. Yeah what I know a ban. Maybe we'll start the discussion with when you were a kid and kind of growing up you were born in in Roseburg. Yeah how many mills existed in the county or in town when you were a kid and and coming of age so so twelve to sixteen years before I was born. There were two hundred and forty four sawmills operating Douglas County. They were everywhere. Little Mills every place medium size meals a few big mills. It was the beginning of the industrialization of West Coast Softwood. And now today I just Kinda did a rough count five minutes ago and there are probably twelve mills operating in Douglas County. So I would guess when I was in high school there were might have been thirty forty. Perhaps because they'd gotten big in the big guys at squish the little guys and they were still there were lots and lots of mills operating and there are empty mills everywhere right now. You drive most places and you'll PASA. Yeah an empty mill and some of them are are almost archaeological sites. I mean old empty meals and some of them are reset. Is You know two years ago to where they're just being scrapped in. The buildings torn down and the auction has already happened and at various times they've been killed so a lot of our listeners may not be familiar with how the timber industry works. But let me explain me. Explain it as I understand it. And then you correct me where it needs to be corrected. loggers were forced workers or men with chainsaws loggers dig out in the woods. Cut The trees down low buckum to the correct length. Put Him on a truck and bring him to the mill and sell them to the mill and the mill pays them for the logs they deliver his at is at phase one. Yeah there it. Used to be entirely the loggers the men with chainsaws before that the men with cross cut saws who would cut the trees down and get them to market now. It's a lot of it is much more mechanized and that with fellow bunchers and where the actual cutting of the trees and the taking the limbs off and cutting them to length happens with big equipment on the ground in yeah moments but there's still plenty of hand logging in that way that goes on but you're right. The the logger is typically an employee of a large logging concern. Sometimes it's a subsidiary of the Sawmill Corporation itself Sometimes it's an independent lager. A judo logger as they're termed where all they do is log Sometimes it's a landowner. You own private timber the ranches in down in down in the lowland lower lands and in the coast Rangers lots of privately held Timberland and so the owner perhaps has a a cat a bulldozer. You know with the blade winch. Canopy setup to log and and he on a small basis takes logs off his own property cut. Some length enters into a purchase agreement with sawmill to sell his logs to a mill and arranges the trucking it's hauled to the mail and he sells as the individual so sometimes it's a logging company logging public or private timber. Sometimes it's a landowner himself logging and sometimes it's a branch of the lumber corporation logging their own property and or public property sometimes and selling the logs or sawing them so in the case of a landowner do they enter into an agreement to sell the the mill their logs kind of before they show up with the first load so basically a landowner would pick a mill or maybe price out a different mills and walk in and say this is what I have had that work so it it depends on what the market is at the moment because log lumbers commodity logs or commodity and lumbers a separate commodity actually log. Prices are tied. Dilemma prices Lumber prices are tied to the open market for lumber and so that price trickles back down. It's like gasoline prices and crude oil prices right an so ranchers or people who own land kind of watched the log market and find out what prices are and try to decide when they're going to harvest and typically log prices are higher in the winter. Because it's hard to get logs out in the winter and their lower in the summer because everybody can log in the summer so they they rise and fall seasonally but Landowner will call log buyer. Which is the person at the mill? Who's responsible for making the deals with whoever selling logs and they log buyer of? It's a lot of logs will come out and look at his stand. Walk through the stand. See what percentage of what grade of logs he has and say we'll pay you what's known as a camp run price. That is all of the footage of the board footage that we buy from. You will pay this amount per thousand. Yeah fluffy a flat fee or depending on the stand and the species. It might be a great log sale where we'll pay you this much for Three peelers this much for select mills this much for number one meals and number two males and select calls and each different grade of log commands a different price And so that deal will be made beforehand and kind of agreed upon yet. That's the deal and then the okay. Bring your bring your logs anytime after Friday and wheel. That's it we'll pay you that's it. There are taxes that pertain also. There's a severance tax in Oregon where the state gets a percentage of the value of logs when they're sold and so all of these things are determined before the trees hit the ground. Ideally and then it's just it. It's a purchase order that you get with the buyer and the terms of that purchase order. Carry through until the mill decides. Were done paying like that. We WanNA renegotiate or the property owner. Says I found a better deal or I'm done. And then that's that deal sunsets and if they sell again next year they get a re up another purchase order usually in the case of a private landowner. And maybe it's different today than it was forty years ago. But do you have to get a permit in order to cut your own trees down and you basically just sell it. Kinda like it was firewood it. It's called the cutting permit that the state. The state wants to be notified in part of the reason for that is is because Doug here and Douglas County. Douglas Forest Protective Association Provides Fire Protection. And they have some responsibility to help put out fires if they get started and so since they have that responsibility and that authority. They want to know when you're gonNA start logging when you start operations and they also have the authority to make sure that you comply with fire code fire regulations when fire season starts so that you're not operating in a way that's likely to set the whole county on fire and so that's all part of the process of beginning to log. So what does that? What does that mean for the lager? Like having a fire extinguisher like attached to every saw and great. What what are they need to get there? There are a lot of regulations and I. I can get out of my depth here a little bit because I've been pretty much just in construction for the last twenty years here. Yeah well maybe speak to it from when you're logging last so in in general terms a cutter when you're on the ground falling you in this in fire season you have to have a lit. Fire extinguish fire extinguisher with you. Is that one behind That some version of one. Yeah and so a cutter will carry something about like that or even a little smaller dangling from his belt in his with his other tools so that if a spark from his saw or maybe he's filling gas canister bill some gas and it gets its on them boom. He's got a fire and it's in the middle of the summer when the whole world is up just a pile of tinder around here. Yeah he's got something he can just hit it with and put it out. Yeah down on the landing. The the center of operations where the logged described the landing real quick just in terms of lay of the land. A A landing is a space hopefully somewhat level where trucks can back either. Pull through or back into where your log loader? Whatever you're using to put the logs on the truck can operate or whatever you're using to pull the logs down whether it's a yarder or a cat or skinner or processor can bring the logs to and put them in a stack. There'll be one or two guys working on the landing you know bumping knots and making sure they're cut to length and facilitating loading of the truck. So sometimes a landing particularly in this era of self-loading log trucks. Sometimes a landing is nothing more than a spot alongside a road where a truck can stop. The loader is on the truck he throws a log essentially out of the ditch up onto his truck and goes on down the road but historically the bigger and flatter and more open your landing is a safer it is and the easiest rates kind of like the home base. The home where they parked their truck. That's right himself and the landing moves as as as the unit as the hillside is cleaned off. The landing moves to follow the logs. You don't have to skip them too far and so to your original question. There needs to be a fire truck or a fire trailer and the regulations have just changed to where now Oregon. It needs to be a truck self contained unit. Has I think thousand gallons of water and a pump that will discharged through a minimum one inch line at a certain rate. So that if a fire does start you have a chance of knocking it down before. It's a problem so these landings are built I. They don't exist before. The loggers show up. And that's one of the first things that the cat does. I'm guessing is punch in a road and figure out where should we? How close can we get our trucks and and build a landing? Which if you're from the area or not but logging roads around here are a kind of a part of the topography. It's these roads that are they're not forest service roads. They're not always gravelled but they're all over the place and I guess that's why they they were just punching him in as needed now up on National Forest Forest Service. They're they're they're pretty sophisticated. They're graded and drained and their gravelled and a lot of them are locked off now. Yeah but down in in private on private ground. They are everywhere and they're sometimes rough but interesting thing that when the cutters go into start cutting. They have their eyes open because in almost every case they're not the first guys to ever cut down trees there and it's not the first time the site's been logged on. And you can generally look around and see where the skid roads were and where the landings were and then you fall. The timber oriented in the right direction..

ROSEBURG Douglas County Sol Pine Sol Pine Forestry Timber Lumber Oregon Little Mills Sol citi National Forest Forest Service Douglas Forest Protective Asso Kenneth Ford West Coast Softwood Sawmill Corporation Timberland Doug
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

10:31 min | 10 months ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"Well it's springtime and I have grandkids in the community and my wife has long loved. We had chickens when we were in Wyoming. Okay we had fifty Rhode Island Red Hands until one of the neighbor. Dogs came over one night and wipe them out in the Great Christmas Day. Chicken massacre and so this just seemed like a real good time to get back into the chicken business. Welcome to another episode of the essential craftsman. Podcast I'm native. Got My dad here. The essential craftsman Harry doing just great. I hate to do it. But we're gonNA talk about quarantine. I think. This is the only thing I've talked about for at least a week now with almost everybody. I've talked to so sorry everybody. I'm sure it's the same for you but you know you're subject anyway. That's a good thing right. I don't know how you can talk about anything else. This has never. I've never even imagined this and I've met imagined all sorts of like the world scenarios but not not a stay at home. Don't leave the House. Because of a disease quarantine this when everything else was fine when the power's on and the grocery stores are still stock but we stay at home because of a disease which in our area really hasn't manifested itself here once. Douglas County has one case as far as we know as far as as far as we know. Yeah the testing really is not to go into the virus. That definitely is like a weakness and all of this. We just don't know yeah man. It is just crazy and so in Oregon. We are to stay at home. Ninety central businesses are to shut down the closed doors. Lock what I. I didn't actually read the order. What does that mean non essential? I know? That's like gyms but rushing hitters in restaurants and schools schools churches. You know no gatherings of it before. It was gatherings over ten. Now it is everybody. Stay home unless you're part of it either. You are either needing essential services or you're part of an essential service provider. Yeah fortunately the saw mills. The lumber industry around here is designated essential service provider and to the limited. The information that I've received construction is also essential service. You know I'm GonNa ride that horse in a way. I saw that. Also that construction is considered essential. I think saw it in a An email from home depot actually can. They're they're staying up. Yeah so and I feel like that is definitely essential repair or a hot water heater. Exploding or like a doctor's office plumbing water heater goes down. You know or a faucet blows up you got to be able to fix it. Well we want to talk about is kind of what we're up to. This is more of just an update about saying Oh craftsman than any type of real valuable information and so we want to kind of just let you guys know what is it. We're up to. It might be interesting to you and what we are going to be up to over the next. Let's say I don't know how long this will last but at least six or eight weeks? I think right. Let's say six. Let's put a happy face on it and say six okay. So why don't you start? What have you been up to the last week since? We've kind of been in lockdown well. It's springtime and I have grandkids in the community and my wife has long loved. We had chickens and we are in Wyoming. Okay we had fifty Rhode Island Red Hands until one of the neighbor. Dogs came over one night and wipe them out in the Great Christmas Day. Chicken massacre and so this just seemed like a real good time to get back into the chicken business. So I've I've taken out one wall on one of the wings of the shop. It's it's nothing that you've ever seen in the videos but I have a lean to on one side of the shop opening that up and I'm putting a little chicken coop under the roof of the existing shop so that I can open up a trap door and look at the nesting boxes. And then I'm going to put up a little fenced yard just on the outside of that set up maybe twenty hands and day after tomorrow. Kelly's going to go to coastal farm. Which is Great Farm? Supply store here in Roseburg. And it's part of their spring. Chick days is coastal and essential service store. Then I guess They're open I think so. They sell livestock feed and animals have to have their groceries right like the rest of US grocery store just dot for humans. So they're having their spring chick days and once or twice a week they get you know so anyhow we're going into the chicken business in a small way that's one thing we're doing. That's pretty neat. I have we haven't discussed this but have you been filming that. I just couldn't make yourself do it. It's really hard and it was rainy to right. So you got the camera and it was I just. I haven't part of it if you guys have ever tried to make an a video and a work video. It is so hard to do both. There's like these two completely UN congruent incongruent activities yet. It's really hard to kind of get get anything done and film so I don't I don't blame Ya but also you need to film I will So for me. The last week I did last week my I live. Qna on this channel on the second channel. I think went pretty. Well I do too and that's GonNa be something going forward that we're going to do more of we're actually kinda worried about our business in general For lots of reasons. Things are just changing so fast. We don't know what the impact will be on on Google and Youtube. And all of the advertiser companies who spend their money there. I don't know the one thing that is in our control. It feels like is to put out more content and try to make better videos. And so we're GONNA try to do that. We have hesitated to even use the word business in conjunction with the with our social media thing because we started out doing it. Just strictly for love. And then it got to where you're doing something for Love full-time there has to be some sort of a business component and so it has more to that and so it does make us nervous now because back to the chicken metaphor. We've got most of at least I have most of my eggs pretty much. All my eggs right now are in this basket and so we'll just see. See what that means you you you made those good moves in Arizona and you've got that storage project and other property those other two properties down there three so so you're diversified but smart. They're exposed also my. I have a vacation. Rental Derek. Vr B. O. Little Condo and I had a guest booked for a month. It was like A. I think it's like a three thousand dollar a rental agreement and they they split Yeah yeah and that's just like this small potatoes. Compared to what other people are losing in the losses that are happening. So don't I get it's like it's not that much but it's a lot for me and my family and and Yeah we don't know and even the storage business I've had one tenant move out and we I think we'll fill it up pretty quickly but there's GonNa be some some friction and some bumpiness and every one of you. Listening to this is having a either are having or no people very close to you her having experiences so we don't consider ourselves at all picked on or picked out or isolated in this. It's it's everywhere. Yes so the one thing that I feel like we can do like I mentioned is put out additional content. So I'M GONNA do. I think I'M GONNA. I didn't tell you this year. I think I'm GONNA do a livestream every week on Wednesday kind of like the last one Acuna. I don't know how valuable or entertaining it will be. But I'm going to do just for the practice of my own skill set and ability to speak to a camera and develop a skill. So if you want to subject yourself to watching the battle up the learning curve you can but I'm kind of I'm GonNa Kinda take this as an opportunity to plan ahead and try to develop some skills in that way so I'm GonNa do on Wednesdays I think and and I mentioned this in the last one but We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA. Have you try one of those as well if you want? Yeah probably from your computer so you can see it a little easier. We're going to do if you can if we can work around my tek no limitations and we can figure that out. We're going to put all of this content on the second channel because we don't have any interest in changing the type of content. That goes on her main channel. We WanNA and we've tried to always keep the quality consistent and the feed consistent in fact that's one of the reasons why live streaming has never really been attractive to us. When every time we try them we look back and the kind of look and sound terrible. And it's they're not real focused and compared to our other videos which we were kind of proud of it always felt like. Oh man nothing you would wanna waste your time. Yeah Yeah but we'll waste your time on the second channel. Yeah all right so what about? You got any blacksmith thing happening are you. Are you doing much of that? Maybe after the I've got that I've got I've been filming a sword. I've been making a sword for Terra Vincent. And she's about to come home from England early and she's been on a mission over there and The the pandemic has got a lot of missionaries coming home. But I had promised her dad years ago that if anyway I'll give you the details on that when you see the video on the sword but it is without question the nicest Damascus I've ever made and I'm just trying to muster the courage up to the last step I've got an etch that thing and then assemble it and I've got cold feet. I've kind of psyched myself out about what can happen with etching that well if it's if it's uneven or or yeah and Owen and I've got a little a little bend in the end of the blade that I would like to take out with. Some light hammer blows at some point. I've got a final Polish and then I've got etch and so is just the final steps where disaster is can be global disaster. Yeah and so. I've about talked myself into taking the plunge job. I'll be filming that one other thing. One other thing I just got the coolest old Coal forge it's one of those cast top buffalo forge ironworks from whenever they were in business. And IT IS FACTORY. It's the factory blower the factory pipe factory cast Ford factory legs. All of it straight intact rusty needs to be restored. So that'll be coming up. But that just got off loaded in the shop and I'm excited about that. Let's talk about the SPEC house a little bit and what effect this quarantine might have on that now. As we've mentioned a couple times now. Construction is permitted to proceed. So we're going to be able to work on it but do you foresee any impact on back. All getting started again. Or what are your thoughts there? There could be. I'm having the the windows were delivered last week. They're they're leaned up inside the house. The siding and the tram is going to be delivered Monday next and then we'll start installing that on Tuesday..

Rhode Island Wyoming Harry Douglas County buffalo forge ironworks Roseburg US Ford Oregon Google Kelly Ya Arizona Terra Vincent
The Monster Movie Hall of Fame and 'The Invisible Man'

The Big Picture

13:11 min | 11 months ago

The Monster Movie Hall of Fame and 'The Invisible Man'

"Later in the show. I'll have an interview with Lebron L. The writer director of the new updated edition of the invisible man. A movie that shifts the perspective of the classic horror movie to the victim in this case played by the Amazing Elizabeth Moss when Elsa Clever Jonah craftsman and we had a fun chat about how he's reinventing the work of the historic universal monster movies and some of his aides filmaker. Heroes like James Cameron and Paul Hogan and John Carpenter but I I am joined by ringer contributor and one of the best film minds around Adam Neiman. Thanks for joining me Adam. Thanks for having me Adam. We're here to build another wing in the movie hall of fame. Today we said post and beam on the monster movie hall of fame. Now you know monster. Movies are tricky because there are two distinctions between them. One is your classical scare movie that enrapture audiences but maybe doesn't really mean very much and then. The other is the load-bearing bearing metaphorical monster that communicate something to the world about maybe it's ills or human psychology or things of that nature I assume that you are more fan of the latter. But May maybe that's not the case. I think I'm a fan of the ladder when it's less calculated You know the the joke I liked to tell his one day. Someone's GonNa make really good specific movie about a social problem like documentary and then at a press conference the director. She's going to be like this movie's a metaphor for zombies and just waiting for someone to do but I mean I think that in the last couple years because you have some like Jordan. Peele who has spoken not in terms of monster movies but in terms of horror movies. He's talked about you. Know his office for those social thrillers or Social Horror Movies and the metaphorical dimension to them. And so you know because monsters are a subset of horror movies as you say a delivery device for for scares those streams often do cross but yeah. I think some of the best monster movies of all time are definitely ones where monsters represent something whether it's something inside or outside society or something inside or outside people but I'm also just a a big fan of movies. Where like spooky things jump out at people in eat them? So it's a IT'S A. It's a fine balance before we get started on constructing this this list that we've put together here. Do you remember your first monster movie experience at the movie. That felt like a monster movie to me and I mean it it is a monster is when Pinocchio gets swallowed by the whale. Oh yeah which is. Obviously you know I mean there's a biblical reference there to to Joan in the whale and it's You know like for for for kids. Who Who who see Pinocchio? That whale is just nightmarish and terrifying and and gigantic. I mean my dad. I think that's the first movie he ever told you to. Took me to it. Just absolutely scared the hell out of me that and the giant squid in Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea. Same thing oh great both Some Disney spun con there. Well done by in and and you. Well I'm thinking about Pinocchio as you say it and the thing that scared me more than the whale is the sequence in which the boys turn into donkeys boys which is just absolutely disturbing and also kind of metaphorical in its way Not to put too fine a parasite point on it I'm trying to think of my first true scary movie experience. I feel like what I got two young Frankenstein before I got to Frankenstein in. It's funny. How when something like that happens how it can obscure your relationship to movies and I think it actually made me Not so much scared movie theaters but just just sort of happy and smiling and laughing. I tend to laugh at horror movies and monster movies because I get kind of perverse thrill out of them and I so I if young Frankenstein. Ken Count that would be. That would be my number one. I mean obviously. I saw a bunch movies that we'll talk about here on this list that a very young age. And maybe that's an opportunity to just go right into it. So here's what we're going to do. We'RE GOING TO GO CHRONOLOGICALLY. So there's a long history. I would say monster. Movies are essentially as old as movies themselves. So we're going to try to walk through. Essentially I don't know eighty ninety years of movie history and try to capture. What are the absolute most representative interesting compelling fascinating monster movies ever made and the monsters? I think the conversation should really be about the monsters inside of the movies and why they're so effective as devices for either sending those messages or just scaring the shit out of us. So you chosen five. I've chosen five. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA Ariffin vamp little bit. Why don't you give me your first pick going all the way back to the nineteen thirties? Sure and you know it's interesting because now when we've got it arranged chronologically we've got this this interesting blindspot which. Kinda be filled in as we go along. Which is we've both bypassed. The true initial cohort of Universal Monster. Movies right the very late twenties very early thirties because the first movie on my list is King Kong. So I have bypassed Dracula Frankenstein you know bride of Frankenstein Which are all these enduring literary properties that have been made and remade for a long time and I think the thing about King Kong. It just feels like the primal scene for me of monster as spectacle because he's not human sized right. He's not an actor costume he's not You know someone doing an accent or wearing makeup. He's a special effects creation and the thing about the original King Kong. Every time I watch it is. It is just so spectacular visually. In an analog era. You know the the integration of those stop motion special effects into old sets and the exaggerated camera angles on the actors and just the the surrealism of it. I've read that. The actual surrealists the the practicing artists within that within that movement re huge fans of King Kong for one thing. 'cause monster just keeps changing size. You know it's inconsistent it's inconsistent but it's also just stunning because from scene to scene you know when he's just represented by giant hander giants foot or the close ups on the is and then you can also still cut backing these establishing shots and seeing him in these different environments and. I think it's the way also that it goes from this primal island to this urban city. The monster in his home context. And then sort of you know thrashing around in the middle of maternity causing chaos. It's just like the deepest the deepest core horror fantasy. You know that that that I can think of I. I just think it's absolutely astonishing and I never tire of watching it. It's funny I think a lot of the monsters on our list Get repeated and reused and re contextualize over and over again the thing with King Kong is is the actual character of King Kong comes up over and over and over and over again. We're getting another King Kong movie this year. And for whatever reason I would say between King Kong and Godzilla. Those are really the only two significant monsters that we never tire of somehow. That don't don't expire. You know I think that the idea behind what King Kong represents and there's obviously been an extraordinary amount of both academic critical just fun writing about What happens when colonialists enter a less developed world and attempt to steal things from it But in addition to that it is this grand spectacle and we talk a lot on the show about is. It doesn't move. You have a reason to be seen in a movie theater. Then I feel like the original King. Kong is is one of the landmark achievements and you have to see this on a giant screen. There's nowhere else for to be seen. We'll for sure. I maybe just in terms of bridging King Kong with those other brand name monsters of the period he in genders the same kind of complex sympathy. That you have with Boris. Karloff Frankenstein. Right I mean you even have a rhyme in those two movies wherein Frankenstein. He picks the little girl up by the river without doing what he's doing. And you know drowns her accidentally and certainly king kongs intentions towards Aren't violent. They're they're in his sort of chivalrous or desirous or somewhere in between there. I think the reason he endures an even the point that God's Zilla as a character eventually got bent in King kongs direction because the original godzillas dot anthropomorphized sympathetic at all. And then over the years. And they made Godzilla more like King Kong. I think being inside that sort of like destructive force but you're also misunderstood and you're more a victim of circumstance than anything else that's a really appealing escapist fantasy for filmgoers even thinking the original King Kong as terrifying as it is and as brutal as the violences like a people have never seen it. He smush is people into Goo on screen. You know You're still with him and I think that that's a really great monster. Movie needs on some kinds of great monster movies that you need that possible level of identification or sympathy. So it's not just purely a nightmare. I think the original King Kong does that just just amazingly well. So you're next pick actually doesn't do the former thing that you were just describing which is there's no crushing there's no Gu. There's no absolute violence of a kind in your next week. What's your next movie? The next movie I have is is cap. People which is part of a cycle of really low key atmospheric horror movies produced in the mostly in the nineteen forties. Bhai guy named Val Luton and I would say that if you get a chance to see Ken. Jones documentary thou loot man in the shadows. I think it's the best documentary I've ever seen about a filmmaker at particularly about how Luton changed horror movies by using the lack of a budget. And the lack of franchise -able characters. You Know He. He didn't have the roster that universal was working with all these all star. You know horror icons so he made it less more. It's the it's the the the the cinema of of of suggestion and scary around the edges. But it's also movie about people transforming into cats I. It's a booby that plays the the ambiguity of is this or isn't this real up. You know for for a long time but it really does give over to the idea that the main character the heroin does when stimulated or afraid you know actually transform into A cat due to this this this Eastern European mysticism and it's also a movie. I'm sure they'll come later. That gets remade in the eighties and completely liberalised because instead of just talking with someone turning into a cat or remembering someone turning into a cat you actually see it on screen with with special effects and it's It's less effective to me. Do you do you like the Paul schrader version that you're describing the eighties version. I like the Paul schrader version. Because it's wild acid trippy. Paul schrader horror movie. And it's it's glory and it's actually not as full-on like latex hydraulic special effects. His other movies from the period. But I I love the original are you are you. Are you fond of the delude films directed by Jacques Turner? Who did a bunch of the other ones is it a? Is it a a a source of Phantom for you it is? I saw cat people and the Leopard men in a couple of them many many years ago and then actually over Halloween this year my wife and I were looking and you know as I get older Halloween. Getting more and more difficult to program. If we're not gonNA rewatch something. But we watched a couple movies. We watched The criterion collection had the ghost ship which I had never seen which I thought had. It has a very similar approach to kind of What's happening in the shadows? Which is most of his films are using that strategy of not showing the thing and then I watched by myself. The body snatcher and both of them. I thought were pretty great. I mean I this is also a case where I I. I probably saw Kent Jones's documentary before seeing any of the films and while that was a great thing for my film education it also kind of warped perception of the movie because I was seeing it as a kind of intellectual exercise in a way where I understood technique as opposed to some of these other movies that we're GonNa talk about here where I just happened to be nine years old when I saw it in a completely reorganized my brain chemistry in a way but I do like his movies. And especially this one that you've chosen well and then also just the last thing to say but it may be that because it's not special effects and spectacle it anticipates where horror movies would go in the sixties with the idea of the monster within right. I mean here. It's not a an invading apor vampire. It's the idea of a woman who's subconscious and her inner life motivates this transformations client about the link between monstrous and desire and monstrous and repression. Which is why it tends to be. You Know Pretty Beloved Academically but I mean by the sixties. Neither US talk about these movies. But you start having the idea of the human monster in movies like psycho or whatever else and you can kind of trace aligned from the way cat. People stages horror towards that stuff. I think I think that's right. And I think it's probably a capitals nifty double feature with the peg for this film the invisible man because that movie is also as much about.

King Kong Dracula Frankenstein Pinocchio Adam Neiman Paul Schrader Kent Jones King Kongs Ken Count Elizabeth Moss Godzilla James Cameron Lebron L. Director United States Disney Karloff Frankenstein Peele John Carpenter Joan
Demolition Mistake Leads To Wrong Home Being Torn Down In Historic Dallas Neighborhood

Larry Kudlow

00:18 sec | 11 months ago

Demolition Mistake Leads To Wrong Home Being Torn Down In Historic Dallas Neighborhood

"Maker and Irving based demolition company says it will make things right after tearing down the wrong house in Dallas Vickery place neighborhood a pale pink craftsman style home have been purchased by the friend of a friend who suddenly passed away last year Jamie weniger who lives in California was doing work on the home and eventually

Irving Jamie Weniger California Dallas Vickery
The European Drinker

Big Book Podcast

09:53 min | 11 months ago

The European Drinker

"Welcome back my friends to the big book podcast. My name is Howard and I'm an alcoholic sober since nineteen eighty eight one day at a time in this episode the third story in the personal story section of the first edition of alcoholics anonymous published in nineteen thirty nine. It's entitled the European Drinker. The story was also published in the second and third editions of the Big Book but does not appear in the fourth edition and now the European Drinker Preface. Beer and wine were not the answer. I was born in Europe in house to be exact shortly after it had become German and practically grew up with good Rhine wine of song and story. My parents had some vague ideas of making a priest out of me and for some years I attended the Francis in school at Basel Switzerland just across the border about six miles from my home but although I was a good Catholic. The monastic life had little appeal for me very early. I became apprentice to harness. Making an acquired considerable knowledge of upholstering. My daily consumption of wine was about a quart but that was common where I lived. Everybody drank wine and it is true that there was no great amount of drunkenness. But I can remember in my teens that there were a few characters who caused the village heads to nod pityingly and sometimes an anger as they pause to say that sought on Ray or said Pavel. Israel's who drank too much they were undoubtedly. The alcoholics of our village military service was compulsory. And I did my stretch with the class of my age goose-stepping German barracks and taking part in the boxer rebellion in China. My first time at any great distance from home informed parts many a soldier who has been abstemious at home learns to use new and potent drinks so I indulge with my comrades and everything the Faris had to offer I cannot say however that I acquired any craving for hard liquor as a result when I got back to Germany. I settled down to finish my apprenticeship. Drinking the wine of the country as usual many friends of my family had emigrated to America so at Twenty Four. I decided that the United States offered me the opportunity. I was never likely to find in my native land. I came directly to a growing industrial city in the Middle West where I have lived practically ever since I was warmly welcomed by friends of my youth who had preceded me for weeks. After my arrival I was faded and entertained in the already large colony Alsatians in the city among the Germans in their saloons and clubs. I early decided that the wine of America was very inferior stuff and took up beer instead. I soon found work at my trade in harness making. It was still an age of horses but I discovered that harness and saddle making in America was different than anything I had known. Every man in the shop was a specialist and instead of having a variety of jobs to do every day I was compelled to sit all day long at a bench. Doing the same thing and Leslie. I found it very monotonous and wanting a change I found it when I got work as an upholsterer. In a large furniture store fond of singing I joined German singing society which had good club headquarters. There I sat in the evenings enjoying with my friends. Our memories of the old country singing the old songs. We all knew playing simple card games for drinks and consuming great quantities of beer. At that time I could go into any saloon. Have One or two beers walk out and forget about it. I had no desire whatever to sit down at a table and stale whole morning or afternoon drinking certainly at that time. I was one of those who can take it or leave it alone. There had never been any drunkards in my family. I came of good stock of men and women who drank wine all lives as a beverage and while the occasionally got drunk at special celebrations. They were up in about their business the next day prohibition came having regard for the law of the land. I resigned myself to the will of the national legislators and quit drinking altogether not because I had founded harmful. But because I couldn't get what I was accustomed to drink. You can all remember that in the first few months after the change. A great many men who had formerly been used to a few beers every day or an occasional drink of. Whiskey simply quit all alcoholic drinks for the great majority of US however that condition. Didn't last we saw very early. That prohibition wasn't going to work it wasn't very long before home. Brewing was an institution and men began to search fervor shortly for all the recipe books on wine-making but I hardly tasted anything for two years and started in business for myself founding a mattress factory. Which is today an important industrial enterprise in our city. I was doing very well with that. And General upholstering work and there was every indication that I would be financially independent by the time I reached Middle Age. By this time I was married and was paying for a home like most immigrants. I wanted to be somebody and have something and I was very happy and contented as felt success crown my efforts. I miss the old social times of course but had no definite craving even for beer. Successful home brewers among my friends began to invite me to their homes. I decided that if these could make it I would try it myself and so I did. It wasn't very long until I had developed a pretty good brew with uniformity and plenty of authority. I knew the stuff I was making was a lot stronger than I had been used to. But never suspected that steady drinking of it might develop a taste for something even stronger. It wasn't long before the bootlegger wasn't established institution this as in other towns. I was doing well and business and in going around town. I was frequently invited to have a drink in speakeasy. I condone my domestic brewing and the bootleggers and their business. More and more. I form the habit of doing some of my business in the speakeasy and after a time did not need that as an excuse. The speaks usually sold Whiskey. Beer was too bulky and it couldn't be kept in a jug under the counter ready to be dumped when John Law would come around. I was now forming an entirely new drinking technique before long I had a definite taste for hard liquor new nausea and headaches. I had never known before but as in the old days I suffered them out gradually however I suffered so much that I simply had to have the morning after drink. I became what is called a periodical drinker. I was eased out of the business. I had founded and was reduced to doing general upholstery in a small shop. At the back of my house my wife upgraded me often and plenty when she saw that my periodical were gradually losing me. What business I could get. I began to bring bottles in. I had them hidden away in the House and all over my shop and careful concealment. I had all the usual experiences of the alcoholic for I was certainly one by this time sometimes after sobering up after about of several weeks. I would righteously resolved to quit with a great deal of I would throw out full pines. Pour them out and smash the bottles firmly resolved never to take another drink of the stuff. I was going to straighten up in four or five days. I would be hunting all over the place at home and in my workshop for the bottles I had destroyed cursing myself for being damned fool. My periodicals became more frequent until I reached the point where I wanted to devote all my time to drinking working as little as possible and then only when the necessity of my family demanded as soon as I had satisfied. That what I earned as an upholsterer went for liquor I would promise to have jobs done and never do them. My customers lost confidence in me to the point where I retained what business I had only because I was a well trained reputedly fine craftsman best in the business when he's sober. My customers would say and I still had a following who had given me work though. They deplored my habits because they knew the job would be well done when they eventually got it. I had always been a good Catholic possibly not so devoted as I should have been but fairly regular in my attendance at services I had never doubted the existence of the supreme being but now I began to absent myself from the church where I had formerly been a member of the choir. Unfortunately I had no desire to consult my priest about my drinking. In fact I was scared to talk to him about it for. I feared the kind of talk. He would give me unlike many other. Catholics who frequently take pledges for definite periods a year two years or for good. I never had any desire to take a pledge before the priest

America Basel Switzerland Europe Middle West Howard German Barracks Israel United States China Germany Faris RAY Leslie Nausea John Law
Canvas & Hyde: Making Handbags in Brooklyn

American Fashion Podcast

08:44 min | 1 year ago

Canvas & Hyde: Making Handbags in Brooklyn

"Hi Lisa Hi CIA. So you are. You are making handbags in Brooklyn and Italy Iam. You're making handbags in Brooklyn. This is cool. You're doing leather handbags in Brooklyn that's unusual Can you tell us a little bit about how you got to do that? A. K. Well I am when I started this business. I was looking for manufacturer and finding a great skilled craftsmen who can make beautiful bags is like women finding a fabulous hair colorist. It's impossible but once you find one you hold onto them and in fact we've become great friends and I my offices in his factory so I'm really hands on with everything that we make. I'm there on the spot. I'm able to watch an oversee everything from the edge painting to cutting the skins and positioning the dyes onto the letter. And it's I'm I'm very lucky to found someone who's been making bags for thirty years. And how did you get into making bags? Was this a thing for you so about four years ago I started the business and you know I came to live in America in two thousand and eight and I never understood why when you think of luxury handbags. You don't really think of American made you think of Italian and French and maybe Spanish but I could. This is such a great country. You guys do everything. Why couldn't we might beautifully finished incredibly luxury handbags here? Incredible actually So I said about trying to do it and I get it now after spending several years exploring I get the skills. And the craftsmanship left. I mean people didn't do it when people started mass producing in China and offshore. That skill set kind of dissolved in a little. Bit of a way. Here you're didn't get passed on to the next generation so there's a generation that doesn't have that knowledge and the people who do or aging out of the workforce some getting passed on some some is making it through which is kind of a sign of hope but it certainly it. There will never be a time where New York. City's largest industry is the garment business again. This is not a thing because cities won't specialize in that way. No one's going to specialize in the. It's well I don't. I don't know that sad. I think it's kind of human progress. We don't need that many people making clothing to make clothing. Do you feel like they're hiring. New People often like who's some manufacturer has people work for him and he. He does poss- on his tricks. Tricks of the trade and then he keeps his people close by. I think there's a little bit of a resurgence. I think there is a a movement back to making beautiful things and this disposable fashion. I think people a lot of people don't want that I certainly don't want that And I think there I'm not alone. I think there are a lot of people like me. Who WanNa make beautiful things whether it's garments or Couture or bespoke shoes or leather handbags. So I think. Maybe A resurgence here. So you came here in two thousand eight which is a very memorable year or one we would like to forget so how in your background was more interior fire call right and public relations. So how did you see the market here? I know you were just describing. You know so many bags made in Europe. But how did you see the market that made you see an opportunity and maybe also just talk about what? Nishi you see your bags filling kind of described them a little bit too because they're very like cool luxury. Okay it's that that's a that's a kind of three pronged question in a way. Two thousand eight was a terrible year for the whole world. I guess But Obama came into office and I was very happy to see that that New York was just a fabulous place to come to. Everyone was so happy and excited But I think that The financial crisis really stifled the sales of of a lot of luxury brands and retailers struggled. I mean retail has continued to struggle. It's been super challenging. Since then retailers are trying to find their way with online sales and flagship stores. I didn't actually think about making handbags in two thousand eight at all. That wasn't my path. I didn't incorporate this business until the end of two thousand fifteen so my journey was to see that. I couldn't find you know. There are lots of small emerging brands. But I wanted something that was really timeless incredibly elegant and something that would really lost and was not seasonal at all. Not something that would be recognized as A particular bag from a particular season So that's a lot of seasons or are you carrying bags that kind of stay on your collection season in season out. Yeah absolutely I mean I am introducing. I'm just bringing in November. The cross body bag. That's my best selling bag with linen on the front. So that will be full and summa black gas will be for full and the Beige will be more of a summer line because I still all over America. It's so different like an in Florida. They're buying ten bags all year and in Colorado or places like that. It's much more the the heavier colors so I try to do. Timeless works everywhere so color tends to be tied to the weather. Climate or is it the temperament the climate probably in I sell the lightest bags and in New York? Lack is still live there. Sela if you're in Miami when it's warm you're like can't even wear black. You feel exact really strange so especially in your bag or shoes. Yeah all the time. What else did you kind of? Learn from across the country like so. What was your path into building your business. Wow it's just being it's it's kind of been the most incredible journey. The Path to building has been like making mistakes and taking three steps forward and two steps back. I didn't have any experience in manufacturing at all and I guess if someone said to me now like would you do it all over again. I'd be a little more trepidation but I went in completely blind and thinking. How Cod can it be? Well let me tell you. It's pretty hard but I've learned that just through making mistakes. Luckily not drastic mistakes but just and finding good people other people listening to what other people have to say sitting down with people who've been in the industry a lot longer than I have seen and and what are you learning from customers like. How has that helped you? Because you're in a number of specialty stores. So that's that's very different feedback right than what you might carried through. So how has that helped? So I love listening to what my customers have to say And you know in the beginning I wanted to be everything to everyone and I realized that's a huge mistake. You cannot make everyone happy with one bag. One of the one of the things that has been really interesting is that I come from Australia. And I'm fairly tall. I'm five eight. I'm not incredibly toll but trying to make a cross body that fits a woman who's five to a woman who's six two has been quite challenging so I needed adjustability on the straps for example without making various size of thought of that. Yeah I mean you think of length and clothing but your thought of that because if you if you have too much adjustability on a strap then it flaps and you don't want that exists leather and if you don't have enough then people can't wear it at the particular point on the buddy they wanna wear it so I mean that's an example. One example of me to listen to the feedback of my customers and the retailers. I work very closely with my retailers. Here what they have to

New York Brooklyn America Hair Colorist Lisa Europe Australia Barack Obama Poss China Sela Colorado Florida Miami
The Life of Robertus Stephanus

5 Minutes in Church History

04:19 min | 1 year ago

The Life of Robertus Stephanus

"Back to another episode of five minutes in Church history on this episode. We're talking about Roy bear. SDN that it is his French name. It is Roberta Stephanus in Latin Stephanus was born in fifteen three in Paris. That is where he we live in worked for. Most of his life he died in fifteen fifty nine his life perfectly corresponds to the reformation and it's early formative formative decades SA- fantasies. Father was an established Paris printer and so steph. Ns when he came of age he took over the family business. He married a woman named Peret and her dad was a printer as well. They had four children together to went on to be prominent printers in their own right. One of the first projects that Roberta's defense undertook was a Latin Bible. He then published numerous Latin texts texts of the classics and even Greek texts of the philosophers in the poets and the great thinkers he published a Latin dictionary a French dictionary but he comes to us in church history because of his Greek New Testament he I printed a new testament in fifteen forty six prior to this. It was the era. Smith's text and so- Stephanus put out his taxed and fifteen forty six after a few revisions in a few additions and much time was spent compiling even more manuscripts from monastery scattered throughout Europe in fifteen fifty to finish published. What has come to be known as the Texas receptiveness us that Latin expression means the received text? This was hugely influential. And for centuries this Greek text was the basis for all English bibles as well as many bibles in other languages. Well things were a little difficult for Stephanus and Paris Harris up until fifteen forty seven. He enjoyed the favor of the king. But when Henry the second came to the throne he did not like Stephanus and all of this Bible printing and and by fifteen fifty defense had to flee and he ended up in Cavins Geneva he would spend the last nine years of his life and he died in Geneva in fifteen fifty nine. Well here is what he has contributed to us over his lifetime. He was responsible for the book of acts being placed between the Gospels and the epistles before him the axe came after the epistles. Bibles so every time you say Matthew Mark Mark Luke John and the ax you can thank Mr Stephanus and guess where those verse divisions came from in Your Bible. Well if you guess the the Fantas you'd be right. After divisions came in around the twelve hundreds but stephanus gave us verse numbers and they first appeared in that text disrespect us back in fifteen fifty and then these verse divisions appeared in fifteen sixty in the English Bible the Geneva Bible able well whilst fantasy was in Geneva he printed French bibles he printed books. By Calvin even additions of Kelvin's classic text next the Institutes of the Christian Religion Stephanus was hailed as one of the best printers of what was really the Heyday of printing in the sixteenth century. He was very skillful. He applied himself very diligently to his job. He surrounded himself with accomplished our and craftsmen. He worked with those artists to develop what came to be the best font. For Greek printing for Hebrew printing French printing Latin printing. His books were truly works of art as a printer and of course we know how important the printed page how important the Bible title the Printed Bible was to the reformation but also the printed page Stephanus stood up to kings stephanus. Serve the church Stephanus. Fantas was a significant figure than the Protestant reformation. Well that is the life of Fro bear esteem or as we say in Latin Roberta's Stephanus.

Roberta Stephanus Church Stephanus Stephanus Cavins Geneva Geneva Bible Paris ROY Matthew Mark Mark Luke John Peret Europe Texas Fantas Paris Harris Smith Henry Calvin Kelvin
Mark Downing Discuss Being a Maker

It's Wood - A show about all things woodworking

10:18 min | 1 year ago

Mark Downing Discuss Being a Maker

"Today. I'm going to introduce you. Mark Downing vadly with over forty years. Experience his Bene- Creator in so many disciplines woodworking metalworking design general contracting to just name a few. We will discuss what it's like to be a maker and how it affected his journey through life mark. Thank you for meeting with me and welcome to. Its would thank thank you. It's nice to be here very nice now. We just had a two or three or shop around your house. I'm going to have some photos on the website. So check those out out that this man's eye for design is stunning. Wanted you guys to look at those pictures somewhere. What turned what was the first time you've got turned onto woodworking? Oh Gee I've been making things out of wood. I can remember back to six years years old in the basement. Working at you know my dad would be working on something and I would be driving nails into a block of wood So it it goes back a long long way of throughout my childhood I built tree houses ever more fanciful and crazy and And then in in high school in my freshman year in high school I built a sailboat. that I then sailed for a couple of years and and Like that quite a lot and so I built other sailboat. I and then I in a and I enjoy sailing a lot and so from there I went off to college and had a regular liberal arts education but during that time Ah I hooked up with a sculpture teacher who In his basement was building a beady for airplane and Shy I got to work on Beatty Beatty for airplane which is all aluminum fabrication rivets and things like that and So I've just been making things all along I started out as a teacher that wanted to be a teacher I graduated with a degree in education and I went to northern Italy and studied for a year. They're in Montessori Education. It became certified as an elementary level Montessori teacher I then taught after that for are five years and decided that I really didn't enjoy that it was. I felt I felt like I was burning out really quickly on it and TAME Came back brought my my wife and my baby child to my parents house and Camp Out on the Sofa for a month or two and Tried to figure out what I wanted to be when I grew up on my mother finally got sick and tired of of that and She said Hey. Hey you know I know this. Nice young man. And he's remodeling a house and he needs some help and you know how to build things So you ought to go down there and and Dan she. If you'll hire you to do something and I went down and he hired me stuff. Insulation Attic of a two hundred and fifty year old house in Annapolis Helpless Maryland. It was a beautiful house. It was all timber frame. Basic core. Construction dovetails mortices and tendons everywhere everywhere. And it was just thrilling and stuffing insulation in. The attic was terrible and I did that for about two days. and Ah Jake Then decided that he wanted to hire me as a helper carpenter's helper. So I did that for a little while and decided if I they wanted to be a carpenter that I wanted to woodworking professionally and then I decided that I could do that anywhere And I ought to choose. Is the place that I want to do that. And so I chose Portland Oregon. My brother WHO's already here going to college and again I brought my my wife and daughter water out and we slept on his floor For a while until I got my feet under me and I did Various kinds of carpentry three and then finally settled into Cabinet making I I I was hired as a journeyman cabinet maker for the Charles Grant Company company here in Portland. Charles Grant Company doesn't exist any longer odd but it was the the largest most prestigious cabinet shop on the West Coast coast. It did a lot of very high in commercial work When I first started working there We were doing four floors of law offices in boob Inca all wall paneling all the doors when the elevator doors opened in your stepped into the hall. You were walking through sequence matched veneers Going around outdoors over bookcases. Everything is beautiful. Yeah for four floors And I was one of thirteen cabinet makers working there and the other there are only two of us spoke English as a native language. The other eleven had all served their apprenticeship in Europe up in the old traditional way where the parents pay the cabinet maker to take their kids away and teach them something useful and and and they they apprenticeship quite long. It's about four years or so and so they all had these beautiful handmade tool chest with full of beautiful handmade tools. And there. I was And I just felt like from the day I walked in the door to the day that I got laid off because they you know they are temporary slowdown On that my features weren't touching the floor. I was just running so fast. Just trying to just trying to keep my head above that water and So so that was really a special experience for me After that with that on my resume on I was able to which are able to get jobs in a couple of very nice con situations and I did I ran My own cabinet shop. I had twelve cabinet makers working for me and And I sold that and then I went to work for a a prestigious you just General Contracting Company as project manager and we did very high end homes there and so I've been I've been and seeking out very wealthy people and trying to get them to build. Allow me to build them something For some time and And that brings me to present so just so the audience knows. Can you tell me about Atlay. What what is the scope of Your Business Right Let's see basically I think of myself as wearing three different hats that I think of myself as a designer I will spend on some projects aval spent months working on my computer in autocad working. I can't on designs of things Designing both woodwork and and hardware for that woodwork. And also I designed lately I've been designing carve stone and tower two in as part of the larger project. I like working working with multiple trades in Working with top craftsman in other in other crafts and That's certainly the situation. I'm in right now. The project working on right now. I think I forgot what your original question was. I was I was just trying to actually And so that's the designer and then as a specialty woodworker I have my woodworking working shop in my backyard and I billed special things for the projects that I design and I also build things for other people to for other architects and other designers and and so yes I do a lot of woodworking. My shop is is specific acidic in that. It's not as small as twenty four feet by twenty four feet and it's not all set up for handling a four byte sheet of plywood and if I need to deal with far by shoot apply what I cut it down to rough size out in the driveway and then bring it in and deal with it then All almost all the work that I do in that shop is with solid. Wood solid woodworking frame and panel construction on that sort of thing and so I do a lot of specialty woodworking and then I also a licensed general contractor in Oregon Oregon and so I- organize a variety of other trades to accomplish projects I take on landscaping contracts And then I'm involved in The landscaping structures and building designing and building them I take on a residential construction projects and they may be designed by someone else or design them and then I build special would work work for them and supervise all the other traits. Bring the other trades in also so yeah Designer woodworker and general contractor. Now I know this is like asking you to pick your favorite child but which of those three brings you the most joy. Oh I think design and woodworking brings brings me the most joy I I really enjoy the general contracting because at its best on what I'm I'm just working shoulder to shoulder with other really top people in their fields and the synergy of the creativity that happens is is just thrilling and the the the final product is is just so cool and well beyond what I could've done

Charles Grant Company Portland Oregon Mark Downing Beatty Beatty Montessori Education Cabinet General Contracting Company Europe Annapolis GEE Carpenter Maryland DAN Italy West Coast Atlay
What is that mystery squeal on your Volvo?

Car Talk

03:34 min | 1 year ago

What is that mystery squeal on your Volvo?

"I have a nine thousand nine hundred eighty six. I'll Volvo station wagon and Last spring for just one week I had this problem and it started again about a month ago but I'm I'm I was driving on down in Boston. As a matter of fact I'm on the Cambridge exit getting onto the mass turnpike and all of a sudden. It sounded like a Boeing seven. Forty seven coming in for landing. Dan Unit Logan this high pitch warring noise. I thought the car was going to blow up and Then stopped for no reason and then I I drove around for a week and every once in a while just driving along and all of a sudden this noise and it stopped and went away and I thought well maybe duration ration- primate duration. Maybe a little bit longer and then sometimes it would stop and then another worry. Noise would come in and also the same pitches because you just described sometimes the same pitch and sometimes are not the same pitch and they wouldn't be they wouldn't be thanked. Okay Okay and then it stopped and I thought well maybe this is just because it was the first really hot day in the summer of the spring and then like a month ago it started again. And it's getting progressively worse. We're what color you can. Select question coming is blue. Yes yes it is hit and is it a seven forty or two forty forty two forty in the back. I I thought that was going to be my next question. Blue to forty and in the back in the back and it is. That's the right sound that the right south. I think it's the fuel pump. Uh Gone you awesome. Why not why not? It's only parties. We don't really thing that's back there. That would make that kind of south and in fact it does make that kind of sound and it's a common thing to happen and it's what was I actually. This isn't usually as high. Hi pitched is as you would lead us to think. We're talking like screaming. You're sitting in the in the cockpit of an airplane and and and he started. They started pushing you off often. I don't sit in the cockpit. Usually in the future lodge airplane a fuselage start back in Europe. So you're going to get ready to pass. They turbine start the turbines the noise. Can this happen at any speed slow. Slow speeds fast when it happened. Do you happen to notice. Did you happen to notice the tank was now. This is silly. Quick get the panthers with less than half full and half. uh-huh doesn't make any difference guys whether it's for almost empty tied. It can be cold it can be you know when I first started out the driver in the morning or craftsman driving for wire. And it's happening that'll stop and then it'll happen it'll stop. Yeah no I would bet money on the fuel pump. So you're telling me I need a new few you may also so Be leading to early fuel pump failure by having a dirty fuel filter. So you might want to have the fuel-filter change the pumpers and completely toast. Yet you may be able to salvage the week or two out of it but have that change and if you do of the pump change have the filter changed anyway. Yeah thanks guys. Go lucky to

Dan Unit Logan Volvo Station Boston Cambridge Panthers Europe One Week
Ban of "thin blue line" flag in Maryland sparks uproar

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

08:37 min | 1 year ago

Ban of "thin blue line" flag in Maryland sparks uproar

"Morning to you have you ever seen the typically black and white American flag with one single color line replacing one of the white lines it's a blue line it's a blue line and this it does this for for often as the thin blue line flag or thin blue line American flag and is meant to symbolize the police officers who serve as that seen blue line between order and chaos right so we have our police departments to rely on across the country are public servants who are helping to keep us safe keep the peace and do you have to do a job that imperils them potentially on any given day as we see far too many headlines of cops who were killed in the line of duty just doing routine things routine stops and all of a sudden losing their life in the process so there are people who honor them by of course flying the flag that Finn blueline flag they want to support them and in fact there was a nation wide woodworking effort to support the cops that was supposed to be on national first responders day which is October twenty eighth since come and gone so there was a call from a craftsman in Chicago to produce these thin blue line flags out of wood to deliver them to cops in every state all right here in Montgomery County Maryland there was a local one worker who answered the call his name is James Shelton and last week Monday that Germantown resident James Shelton and his son forest built they had built an American flag of what an American flag two of them actually one they put this blue line on and they brought it to the fifth district police station in Germantown W. jail as Kevin Lewis reports on this Kevin will be joining us this morning by the way eight thirty five to talk about this story they bring it to the cops they also bring one to the fire department is gonna thin red line on that one that's a fire station thirty one that's along d'armes town road in north Potomac so the cops are proud of it on Monday they get in by Wednesday they've posted a photo on social media Facebook and Twitter that show Shelton his son far as and I and three police officers all standing in front of the flag opposing they got a great photo and in fact the items the photo says on social media that they want to thank James Shelton who presented Montgomery County fifth district officers with a wooden American flag that he made and recognition of national first responders day they're proud of it they said the flag will be displayed in the fifth district station I gonna hang this line well that's when all the trouble started not long after people on social media started getting very upset about it upset about it somebody posting on Twitter that say blue lives matter flag they said it's racist and dangerous take it down now racist and dangerous to say the boy watch matter no disrespect to the citizens who were trying to show appreciation for their local police writes one social media user Monica Goldberg but boy lives matter is a racist response to black lives matter does not belong in a county facility take it down and the messages continue from there which leads us to our esteemed local leader mark outrage Montgomery County executive who constantly finds himself on the wrong end of important decisions and in this case he's done it yet again mark L. rich the Montgomery County executive said this on Friday evening quote the flag provides a symbol of support to some but it is a symbol of dismissive next to others because it is divisive the flag will not be posted at the fifth district nor any public space within the police department under my administration we are committed to improving police relations with the community and will immediately address any action that stands against our mission mark our actual weighing in saying remove it the bull fen blueline flag needs to go what's your message to mark hours this morning eight eight eight six three zero nine six two five eight eight eight six three zero W. I. L. L. first will he says is then it will he will immediately address any actually stands against our mission what your mission which mission is this against that's my first question but you keep calling it the thin blue line flag that is it is even in the thin blue line shop they call it the blue lives matter flag okay and so I think that's the problem people have with that that it should black lives matter started it should be anything that is not black lives matter if you say all lives matter if you say blue lives matter anything along those lines you you are your appropriating they're saying you're somehow diminishing black lives that's how they see it and and the the thing about this too is does she look like this is this is this is ray says to does not belong in a county facility take it down this is why I'm afraid to call the police and emergency because I'm afraid you'll hurt black people in my neighborhood the left is done a phenomenal job in again making making victims of people because they bestow victim hood on your so they have made anyone who is African American anyone with black skin is is a victim why because you are immediately on on the wrong side of the law number one they just assume that number one number two they assume that anyone wearing a uniform is an oppressor and therefore by you being black you are a victim automatically and so that has been so deeply ingrained that we have a very anti cop culture right now and this is happening all I think in the last ten years but but it is part of the left's quest to places all in groups and to divide because if you can get law enforcement fighting against on African Americans or African Americans fighting against black oppressor and oppressed you know and victim if you can make all white people Vic oppressors and anyone of color a victim you've done your job if you can put you know all Muslims are oppressed an and Christians are oppressors it all of those things have and have nots that's what they do because of your fighting each other you're not paying attention with the government is doing you're not paying attention what they're doing and ultimately they fly to the rescue and say all health care you can't afford to go to the doctor will fix that and they fix it so poorly they know that you're going to say this is terrible please fix it again for us we ask the government to fix the problems that they have purposely created and that's what's happening here that's what that's how I see this I see this as a presser verses victim that have been created by the last and that's why you can't have this because it offends somebody and now if witnesses before they do offend you too bad you're intolerant right well and of course that that oppressor victim arrangement will be artificially continued yes until powers obtained and exactly so so yet to to basically make flat assumptions that black people don't care about the lives of cops that's the position the mark our just taking I am and I don't think anybody I mean don't don't don't we all agree that we do need policing is not a sin shouldn't that just be a basic agreement but apparently it's not there's some division and because black lives matter and blue lives matter those things are not mutually exclusive those things can be true at the same time and they are this goes back to when people were saying don't say all lives matter it's offensive what it should be true it should be true yeah it's a matter of debate you're just a racist and involve and as I don't have time to address all these girls attacks but you talked about the relationship between cops in the community the the Obama presidency why this show active in destroying that relationship right destroying it because far too often when given the opportunity president Obama which side against the cops before the facts were even in how often did we see that we see it we thought constantly it's that damn real estate story was the most obvious one the professor were you at the end of having a beer summit and a bomb and knew he screwed up he was trying to fix it but he had sided against the cops and he kept doing that so that became an accelerated problem under his administration now what's your message to Montgomery County as they ban a friend blueline flag or if you want to call blue lives matter whatever you wanna call it they've banned this flag from appearing in that station despite of local would work on his young son making it for those

Eight Eight Eight Six Three Ze Ten Years
June 17th, 1765 in Williamsburg Virginia

5 Minutes in Church History

04:10 min | 1 year ago

June 17th, 1765 in Williamsburg Virginia

"On this episode. I'm once again on location in colonial oneal Williamsburg in Virginia last time we were together. We were outside of Bruton Parish Church a congregation that was founded an Anglican congregation Gatien that was founded in sixteen seventy four Williamsburg was founded as a town in sixteen thirty eight and of course Jamestown Jamestown was the original capital but in sixteen ninety nine the capital of the colony was moved to here and it held that capital all the way until seventeen eighty when and during the revolutionary war it was deemed that Richmond would be a safer place well we are interested in the year seventeen sixty five in fact a date in seventeen sixty five on June seventeen seventeen sixty five a group of seventeen men got together and petitioned Russian the court here and Williamsburg. This is what they requested. We intend to make use of a house in the city of Williamsburg situated on part of a lot belonging to Mr George Davenport as a place for the public worship of God. According to the Protestant Austin dissenters of the Presbyterian denomination well. This is an Anglican colony. The Anglican Church is the the established church and these seventeen presbyterians wanted an authorized legal Presbyterian church to be established they actually actually added a ps two it and the PS was this as we are unable to obtain a settled minister. We intend this place at present only for occasional worship when we have opportunity to hear any legally qualified minister well. The city of Williamsburg granted their request. They established their church perch. It was just a small little modest meeting houses. They mentioned they're not even able to have a settled minister. I walked it off and it measures about twenty two defeat by thirty six feet and in this very simple meeting house these presbyterians met member how Paul ends Romans by listing listing off a number of people well here are seventeen names William Smith John Connolly Walter Lenox James Holdcroft Robert Burke Nicholson John orchiston James Douglas James Atherton William Gemmell Edward Cummins Thomas Skinner Daniel Hoy John Bell James Smith William Brown John Morris and Charles Hankins. These were carpenters vendor's craftsman. Some of them worked in the courthouse. These were the seventeen who started this church on June. Seventeen seventeen sixty five these presbyterians came out of the great awakening. They were a new side Presbyterian Rian Church that meant that they were not only in favor of the great awakening but many of these were likely converted during the great awakening some of them might have been in converted under the Ministry of George Whitfield. Remember that sermon that we heard a paragraph from by Steve Lawson. Some of them might have been converted by I Samuel Davies Samuel Davies was a Presbyterian Missionary Tha Virginia his first wife died and his second wife was Jane Holt. Her family was a prominent family here Williamsburg and so Samuel Davies made many visits to the capital city not only to see his in laws but also to petition before the Virginia legislature and before the Virginia governor for Religious Freedom and no doubt bolstered these presbyterians that were here in Williamsburg one of those ministers who came occasionally to preach actually to those ministers who came occasionally here to preach once they've established their meeting eating house were trained by Samuel Davies well. That's the Presbyterian

Williamsburg Presbyterian Rian Church Legal Presbyterian Church Samuel Davies Virginia Bruton Parish Church James Douglas James Atherton W Daniel Hoy John Bell James Smi Jamestown Mr George Davenport Richmond Jane Holt William Smith George Whitfield Steve Lawson James Holdcroft John Connolly Walter Lenox Religious Freedom Paul John Orchiston
Don't Fall For Instagram Hoax

Dishin' Digital

01:26 min | 1 year ago

Don't Fall For Instagram Hoax

"In the house of road journeys far and wide to bring you exceptional quality kitchen and bath fixtures. We've discovered the world's best craftsman and techniques using materials native to the region and tolls accustomed to individual craftsman. We strive for perfection every step of the way with all of this. You'll see see the details of your own story. The story of a life welled crossed. If this is the story croft house welcome to the house of row dish in digital brought to you by b. n. h. New york's ultimate cameras superstore instagram is telling us not to fall for a hoax viral post about changes changes to its privacy policy. You may have seen it warning. The social media side is planning to make all instagram users photos public including deleted messages and photos that post also claims the policy change will allow instagram to use user photos against you in court and urges users to copy the post intel instagram. It doesn't have permission mission to share their content again. Instagram says this is not true but that hasn't prevented some celebrities from falling for it including julia roberts debra messing assing pink and usher they all reposted the mean riddled with typos which should probably be your first clue that what you're reading isn't legit dishing digital title. I'm palmer nain. There's more a w._c._b._s. Eight eighty dot com slash dish in digital.

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Best Back To School Laptops

Dishin' Digital

01:28 min | 1 year ago

Best Back To School Laptops

"In the house of road journeys far and wide to bring you exceptional quality kitchen and bath fixtures. We've discovered the world's best craftsman and techniques using materials native to the region and tolls accustomed to individual craftsman. We strive for perfection every step of the way with all of this. You'll see see the details of your own story. The story of a life welled crossed with this is the story kroft tells welcome to the house of row dish in digital brought to you by b. n. h. New york's ultimate camera superstore c net is out with a list of the best affordable laptops for college lead students starting with the h._p. Chromebook x. to which they say is the best chromebook to and one it's detachable display can operate as a standalone tablet. A stylus and keyboard are included when most companies will make you buy them separately for the best windows two in one scene it editors like microsoft surface pro. The top top pick for windows laptop goes to the dell x. p. s. thirteen which is recommended for those looking for a balance of portability power and price and if you're in the apple universe universe seen that says the macbook air gives you the most value the upgraded twenty nineteen version includes a retina display touch i._d. and u._s._b. Sea ports dish and digital. I'm pauline and there's more a w._c._b._s. Eight eighty dot com slash dish in digital.

New York Pauline Microsoft Apple B. N. H