35 Burst results for "Craftsman"

The Single Most Important Lesson Enrique 'Ric' Prado Learned

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:33 min | Last month

The Single Most Important Lesson Enrique 'Ric' Prado Learned

"Single most important thing in my life, as far as lessons go. What is my father? My father had a 7th grade education, but he was extremely smart, incredible craftsman, and he had a faith that is uncomfortable with any of us. And imagine I am an only child. I find that all the best people are. I happen to be an only child as well. Well, yeah, but the point here is that my dad was willing to put me on an airplane. To a country that he had never been to. At what age, how old were you, Rick? I was ten years old when I got on that plane. And what, what year is this? This is 1962, April of 1960. This is one of the Peter Pan flights. That is correct. I am a Peter Pan. So a country your father's never been to before. So why does he put you on that plane Rick? Freedom. My dad knew he had never read Marx or Lenin, but he had definitely had the heart of a lion and he knew what freedom was. He knew what we needed to fight for it. And of course, that fight was one already to the enemy. But that decision opened up my eyes to the value and the sacrifices made for freedom.

Rick Peter Pan Lenin Marx
"craftsman" Discussed on Woz Happening!!!!

Woz Happening!!!!

06:19 min | 4 months ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Woz Happening!!!!

"Was happening. It's your co host Kira stepping in for Ben today. I'm actually just taking first chair because we have our very first guest on the podcast Adam. He is going to do his own intro in a second, but he is a good friend of both Ben and mine and we're really excited to have him on the pod. Hey Kira, hey Ben. Yeah, thanks for inviting me. I'm super excited. I've just a little background on myself. I've been doing art now for the past couple of decades. I started off in high school as a metal smith and then I went on to college doing more metal smithing and sculpture and casting. I've done some like set design back in high school for a couple of different organizations and yeah, so I don't know, I hope we can have some cool stuff here to your content today. And are you ready to get right into it? Absolutely. So we are talking about art and film today and practical effects versus CGI effects. This is something Ben and I had actually touched on in a previous podcast if you guys remember our Batman podcast. We talked a lot about how Matt Reeves used filming on scenes and real-life explosions to really make certain aspects come to life. So within that sort of within those parameters, we're going to look at using real jewelry, real set pieces, real costuming, things like that versus having things be c-g-i'd. Yeah, I think that you could definitely tell the difference and we were just talking earlier about Peter Jackson's film, The Lord of the Rings, when he fell on the location. And you look at the location, you can see how majestic and how beautiful it is. And then if you watch CGI stuff, you can tell it's not real. It's got that King Kong versus Godzilla when King Kong's in the bubble area. And it's CGI him being there, and you can tell that it's not real. And it just doesn't seem. I mean, it was a great movie, but just didn't seem right. The way the trees weren't moving, it just didn't seem. Yeah, I agree with you there. I was doing some research funny you mentioned Lord of the Rings because I really made a point to try to figure out what was going on with the Arkansas, like how they fit that into the movie. It was very upset when I kept on finding 50 billion videos on the lore. But yeah, I remember doing some research on that. And something I found that I thought was an interesting topic was just not only their sense between CGI and real life versus or in regards to what you can see visually and how fake or real it looks. But also the way that actors interact with it as well, which I didn't really think about before. So if you have a real object, let's say you have an actual arkenstone that they're holding onto in their hands. There's a lot easier for them to act with the stone experience of stone in real time. And it just, it seems a lot more tangible and realistic in that way. And then, of course, they probably just add some CGI effects to make a shine and stuff afterwards. But versus them having to pretend they have an Arkansas in there. Or pretend they have a dragon. They could have just looked at a certain Q area, but I think it actually seems to have videos. I don't know, did you guys do some videos, but I thought I saw some videos where they actually had a head or something like that. They made the actor who was playing the voice of the dragon like where this funky head thing and then kind of like stand off to the side. So they had something a little bit more tangible to actually work with. And I didn't make a big difference when you're trying to compare like CGI versus real life. Absolutely. And I think a really good example of this in two different forms is most recently Spider-Man far from no way. What's the newest one? No way home. No way home. Okay. The no way home with Doc ock. What made Sam rami's dock so good was that those his tentacles in the original Spider-Man two was actually puppeteer work. So he worked with a team of puppeteers and they acted together to make those claws work obviously during major battles there was CGI that was added to it. But to have that main core of being an actual extension of Alfred Molina, obviously no way home, it's different. His arms are CGI. They did take that realism out of it. So I think it's, I think it's so funny that you can watch Sam rami's from 20 years ago. And it looks the same as a movie that has a half a $1 million budget. To me, that's crazy. And I think that shows and speaks to how well practical effects age. Yeah, and another thing too is, you know, all right, so for they're going to concept like a budget, obviously. But if they are going to go real now, what are they going to do in terms of budging their money? So I looked up, I tried to look up with Bridgerton specifically with jewelry because I was like, okay, so now you have this cast, it's supposed to have this super ornate jewelry, Julie has to match the character and what their purpose is in the series. And there's just so much going on. Obviously they can't budget for everything. But I assume that it was all going to be costume jewelry. It's not. So they costume jewelry for the majority of the cast. And then as you got more prominent and the stones were smaller. So I think there's one, there's one ridiculously ornate necklace that one of the characters has. It probably has like 50 stones on it. I mean, they use crystal and like pale stones on that one because they were smaller, but then when it came to the actual queen, they used real stones for that. They had diamonds. They had pearls, and then they had like giant rubies. I'm wondering what they did with the jewelry afterwards. Do they resell it? Try to make back some of the money, I don't know. But I thought that was pretty crazy. So obviously they have to plan their budget out. But the costume designer was literally like, listen, you are not going to get the same shine in the same effect with these largest zones. If they were fake. So that's where they decided to put their money. And I thought that was pretty sweet. I think that's so cool. And I think especially in a show like Bridgerton, where you have to show, in comparison to all the other characters, how the queen has to stand out. So just to have this minor detail of this real jewelry, she's already standing out on screen. Already. And I think that those details is what makes shows great. And I mean, we were looking at examples earlier. And I think this goes back to Mulan rouge, and that stunning piece that Nicole Kidman wears. And that was a that was made for the film. And that was all real diamonds. And that necklace actually still exists. I think how much is it now? Like, 5 million? Yeah, I can't afford. You're.

Ben Kira Sam rami King Kong arkenstone Matt Reeves Arkansas Doc ock Peter Jackson The Lord of the Rings Adam Bridgerton Alfred Molina Julie Mulan rouge Nicole Kidman
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

09:14 min | 1 year ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"That tv show. Oh the destruction old one where they like battle and box paddle by cool And he has machine shop six man machine shop But he's a tinkerer and he grew up around tinkerers and he inherited the the welding shop and sausalito But he comes from that lineage of of that very few times do we see it. Yeah but i think the Getting back to as we do make things in the people that are on your channel. It's a pride of ownership of my labours. It is that having some real skin and a game. Right where i might cut myself making. I really might. But that's okay because it'll give me a little proud of next at work there's a there's a remarkable percentage of our viewers are software engineers lots And other types of engineers as well but there are plenty of people from the computer industry right and comment and then it's just it's an interesting By lord of the rings and the other one that the tv drama this kind of middle ages type of game of thrones game of thrones. You know that with with kind of a mix of the survivalist. Either you get this fantasy play and the survival and the uncertainty of the times new. Throw it all together with some coke and you bash. You make something yet right you board. What's it wasn't like and maybe let's speak for a second so you have. This had his whole career on this part of the construction industry. Yeah i mean you're the last guy in and looking through your website haven't senior coffee table books but it's it's just almost amazing. How many parts of this industry exists lots of them. You don't even realize we occupy one of those parts right now ourselves kind of making an educational content part like microscopic part of the education part of the construction industry. But what's that been like. Sort of being attached your with the architects and engineers and designers and Did you think of yourself as kind of in the construction industry or is it just always kind of been more like the publishing end. If feels to me that. I am in the the fashion moment because the politics that i photograph are ones that the architecture design are very proud of to to go and photograph and take the expense and the time away from their practice. Then that has a certain style. That didn't probably happen three years ago and then in three years from now it won't happen so there's always been kind of fashion curve on what i do interest and i can tell you by tile pattern project was built. How bet you can. I can tell you by the delights fixture housing and so these little elements that are are changing every day On a wide picture point of view. Yeah those of us that are in it kind of notice. Those different says you're flipping through a magazine. That looks alex. Nice yeah so yeah. Yes like when in the divorce product where. She's telling her like you're wearing that because it was on the clearance rack right and we decided that five years ago. Whatever that went. It's a maybe a little of it like that. But i think for one of the things as we came into instagram and utah to buy was hoping for this amazing democratization of employability of style and choices. That people were able to an instagram. We don't see it as much as actually narrowed interest down the ascetic choices. The people gravitate to. But i think in youtube merrier In that sense so as i'm photographing today what i'm seeing in so all see things that oh. I haven't seen that before. We need to photograph that. Or this is the first time these things. I've seen combined if i if i shoot a lot in my market i. I'm kind of part of that arbitrator of that. Trend line. yeah. You sure are digging that a little bit on instagram. That everyone's kinda coalesced around a a a very common sort of style or wh- what exactly is going on. I think well with instagram. The more it changes all the time. It's it's not even playing field But the more people that like your your channel the more likely it's going to go out to other people. Yeah so the the strongest stronger yes And then those are strong kinda up anti and their production value of what they're doing and so they getting stronger and then instagram really. Just want to hold your attention longer. Yeah the ones that maybe are the outlying areas here thinking well most people don't look out so we're not going to put that out there. Wow i think probably even and the what you to kind of loose rose up as your next things algorithm right wanna see then you kind of get you know as you break into a bubble and then become de bubble. Yeah you've become kind of the player. And i don't think he woke up and said i. This is my goal right now. You just kind of put one foot in front of the other and get one idea that okay. I guess we'll do that. It's the same as the choices that happened in the first part of a career. We have no idea that this person or that person or this job choice or that we have no idea. We just do them. Because there's momentum in that direction and you look back and say. Wow yeah well sometimes. When with my son. I give them a wide berth. Since to what he wants to do and only a couple of times said you know there's choices in life and some will affect your other choices in life. I'll stand by you whatever you wanna do. But this is one of those moments. My dad was completed lazy-faire so i didn't have that. So maybe i'm looking for to be able to share that with my son. Wow so wh where should we direct the viewers to get a good look at some of your work. I think The the first one would be my website which my full name. David duncan livingston. Okay we'll have a link-up okay. I'll include that and then my instagram is. David d. livingston okay. We'll link to that a little side note about instagram for those that. Play it or not. I consider instagram a huge time suck. And if if you're the lowest bar that i think one might have is ten or twenty photographs of your best work that's all you need. Yeah it's just a really quick way to show what you can do. Yeah no one's going to go to you know. Meet me at a coffee shop and say what do you do. I'll go to your website right. They'll say what you have socratic healthy. Whip out their phone. Look out we talk about bam. Yeah so but you don't have to post every day it's like it's almost the differentiating factor. Are you building an instagram account. 'cause you wanna have a big audience and influence the do wanted to use it as a tool for your business. Because you're you're you're i guess. The short portfolio yeah. That's that makes perfect sense. Well sounds good. And and obviously for the viewers the probably the most interesting photos for you guys is going to be the pictures of the spec house. we will When the time is right and we have them get him in front of you and whatever way seems the best. So you'll definitely get a f. I if i didn't mention this in the intro Even just five minutes of watching dear thing was. I've never done photography but it was definitely kind of not mind-blowing but it's it's it's really neat. I heard you say a light bulb just went off under see anybody take pictures of the house. I've taken i've done it. Maybe seventy five times house. That i bought and sold man and not make forty or fifty and i was not getting it but point is you're going to see the pictures a i mean. Well thank you very much i think. What my clients summed it up the most They said that. I'm a very intentional. Yeah so if something is there it's there for some ellery and at the same time it was like it's also pretty simple. It wasn't like some. You didn't walk in with this whole crew and lights and all this commotion very simple very intentional and can't wait to see him. One of the first thing you said when we sat down here was pertaining to making things elegant thinking of an elegant solution to a design.

instagram sausalito coke David duncan livingston alex utah youtube David d livingston ellery
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

07:14 min | 1 year ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"A little bar in there. Yeah yeah exactly. And so in terms of blacksmith and artists at least for me that is almost like artists. Anyways i'm making. I'm blacksmith and i'm making a living at or brechfa. Talk jake victims. You know so. I look at this intersection a lot. And i was in italy in venice. Merano's island of the glass blowers in june. I spent four hours on that island talking to shops in a time when there were no tourists so they had time to talk to me. Yeah i've always had ideas about doing light fixtures and so i was kind of seeing those those multi generational families having these little shops making kind of the same stuff in a the kind of meets a mass market appeal of something that can cost forty dollars But their skill sets are so deep they could produce incredible saying zenia. And that's the mastery of the Of the guild. Yeah but then. Those skills oftentimes worked with somebody. That had the artistic. 'cause you need to have the to to really do phenomenon. That's rex that trial and so it's rare that somebody can have the craft the artistry at exceptional level in the same body. That's right and then if you add that the marketing skills if you had a little bit of p.t. Barnum right bam got so another fellow that i was that i am superficially acquainted with. He helped me a little bit. One time he's up in the seattle area. Steve lopes is his name. I don't know if steve still working up there but he had a working blacksmith shop. Five or six guys working. It's a bigger market in seattle and the man is an artist. I mean he has that that the things that come out of his shop ice cream and coffee table books. It's like how do you think those thoughts and then how do you produce that that beauty. But he is unabashedly not he said yeah. You can call me artist if you want. But i'm a blacksmith. And he's he's not. He's not being condescending or patronizing when he says that he's just laying it out there. Call me what you want. It doesn't matter. I'm a blacksmith. Now that's a healthy attitude especially when you can produce the work. I was watching an hour long video of a talion master glass blower who must be in his eighties. A guy named lino and lena's now he was the one that came to seattle and helped inform the whole pill. Chuck school with the old world techniques. 'cause they wanted them to stay in moreno. They didn't want their guys going around teaching a bunch of americans how to do as of now and that kind of opened up what we call studio glass. Astuter glass and in studio blacksmith and sculpting is is in their plastic mediums. They have a lot of heat But so watching this man. Great these blown vessels with the supporter. Four or five people on his team. is just amazing but then when you hear his words his words are so italian to me. It's like you you you feel the glass. You obviously can't feel the glass you know you see at you you know. It's like when when we're baking something that i when i look at you smell. That is my son who's ten. It's ready it's done. Go go get those cookies out of the oven because we have to use all our sins like when you were stamping out nail. In what color is that iron and at that moment and then as you know at what color'd you stop you. You just gonna move onto the other one. But i think all these things in where to as individuals we find. I don't think any one person is all one or the other i. It's what that mixes for each of us in how we are able to put that mixed together inaccessible life career and and families of relationships that come together When you worked for that fellow you know the first guy. You probably learned a lot of things in just a couple of months or however long it was maybe a couple of years. I can't remember before he hired And i'm thinking of you. You also probably knew quite a bit about prerogative before that. So what kind of things did you learn from being around. This was call master. You right doing that that were that was. I'm guessing really helpful. Even though it was kind of a short internship jabour will actually. It's the photography is such an internal thing that has creating his compositions. I didn't know what he was thinking about. Oh you're decide. Tripod ks god. I need some film got. And so i only learned that it didn't seem that intimidating in i think if you make a nail as your first thing and blacksmith You know that you gotta get it hot in united bash it up you start in and you do it again and you do it again and you make ten nails and the last what's gonna look better than the first one. Yes and they may be think mike and do something else. I see my my son challenges himself. He's pop. I'm challenging myself and i let them hopefully. I'd have to go to the hospital to doing. just what. yeah i. there's some trades. Like i remember the first time i hired a guy to fix a broken eric conditioner and in arizona in this house. They are concerned in the attic. And it's very mysterious. You're like miserable. The houses thing in the guy gets up in there and he comes back out and it's like magic you know. He's like fix this thing and he wasn't he did. Yeah it's and it really felt like at the time like. Wow what a miracle anyways. The next time. I crawled up there with the guy i was kind of like. Oh he was just like cleaning off the little evaporator and like it was not in other words. There was no magic. And i may not like i'm a guy but i remember thinking like i used to really think these air conditioners when he took off and there was all these wires that were just like burned and i was like well. That wasn't that hard trouble shoot. It's that like the others. Yeah so it's just kind of being used. You gotta be in the job site or get hired or be rounded but sometimes just sort of seeing. Oh this may be isn't as magic or maybe for an more artistic thing like that like you said like he's setting up. You're like oh this. I could probably do that. We're also have over. The past couple of decades just have gone through a phase where the trades were appreciated. And that we are coming through if we come through that and we know that we need to provide these opportunities. We need to create these programs. Or how you know. Schools said that have auto shops like that. Not everyone's going to be a computer Code or something like that up in my high.

Merano zenia Steve lopes seattle Chuck school Barnum venice bam jake lino italy lena moreno steve mike arizona
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"Didn't mess up. He's had a nephew he just had another job. Nephew there you go so in that kind of a husband ship are however you say that word. that courage to i can do this. Yeah i took that little piece of information and i realized that there was a new Store the rented professional photo equipment that had moved from los angeles to san francisco. So i knew they had a whole building shoulder commitment and no clients yet. In other words you not owning. The equipment was no barrier. Because you were now able to rent the and had a dark room in eighth grade. I had a dark on a day. Your dad my first purchase from my newspaper route. Money was a professional camera in eighth grade. Wow so i thought you know. I think maybe i can try to do this. And i was pounding nails during like construction during the day. And then on the days off i'd put a suit and tie on and show my portfolio with how i got that portfolio was. I went to this store. And i said i have a thousand dollars and i have a month. I how about this. You set me up with the gear. And i will make my portfolio and then i cold called lots of architects and designers. And say i'll shoot for free and if you'd like the photo you can buy the photo for fifty dollars now. This nineteen eighty six. Fifty dollars probably was fair amount of money. So how did you arrive at the number of fifty dollars for a photo. How how did you inform yourself of market prices That's always the problem. I guess for the rental house i could. They were They were my reddit as well. I mean that's were you were your vendors were would would you know if they could take you under their wing and say you know other guys do it. This way you might try this or i went to the lab the process my film and they say you know you should. You should just your exposure little like this and so this this group of just giving shopkeepers that that provided that information slick san francisco. Francisco's also a little unique. It was where i'm from and that areas that because it's a peninsula and there's east bay and south bay and and maranda north bay. You don't come. You don't always have to come competing with each other so it's a community that can be a little nurturing in in that sense Because i won't come up against you. You know maybe once every two years so you and i can share information. Wow sorry about derailing your story so you decided that you would shoot for free for these architect. You coul- columnist dressed. You had a growing portfolio. Yeah gimme a shot exactly. And i made three thousand dollars in my first month. Which while felt great which broke even because the the film and and the polarize and all that was was expensive to it's it was in. Its day a field that you had to have the gear to do the work. But you couldn't get the gear because it was too expensive to get the work so there was a real trap for most people and most most photographers come up through a traditional apprentice program and run around and do You know the lackey stuff and so after my first month. I think I did carpentry work for another two two weeks to months. The most 'cause i couldn't be clean and dirty as stuff that same day. Right at what point. Maybe when you were working for the guy who hired you did you kind of transition your mind like okay. This is gonna work. I'm not going to need to go back to the ski resort. i'm gonna this. Is there something here for me or was cause for a lot of people takes years to kind of settle inter career bright you kind of have described it relatively quickly. It seems like were you pretty much committed. Like i'm gonna. I'm going really dial in. Let's see there was a there was a monetary factor. That was highly motivated because most of our friends had gotten advanced degrees. I had a male educate from the a bachelor's degree. But i had been skiing for four years so i had set a mark of age thirty two years after i started to being able to buy a home And so i busted my butt. Yeah my friends for doing you know sales jobs and they were selling photocopiers or whatever it might be and they would tell me the process on sales were you you build a farm and a networking you keep hitting them again and you know give it time and it will pay off and so i kind of treated it as a sales job for the first year As i was developing my skill i had kind of sales skills and interpersonal skills. That i i was a waiter Lake tahoe and so those things transfer their sorry. I like to say a biography is best written in reverse. Yeah but all those little micro steps that come to take you on your path in the in the moment you don't quite know have no idea what's really happening glass On friday i was photographing in a new high rise in san francisco. There was right next to the the merchant marines hiring hall and in nineteen seventy eight. I was in that lobby and that hired hall. And i had an hour to decide if i wanted to join and go working on cruise ship. Wow or go back to school. Wow us a looking at it. I've been in there and so now. I'm you know in.

maranda north bay san francisco reddit los angeles south bay east bay Francisco skiing Lake tahoe merchant marines
The Mysteries of Detection Engineering: Revealed!

Cloud Security Podcast by Google

01:55 min | 1 year ago

The Mysteries of Detection Engineering: Revealed!

"Is a fun episode today because we are talking about the discipline of detection engineering. Which i think i can summarize and give away a joke from the show as putting a pm in your sock. What do you think about that. Anton is that a fair summary. Actually yes but. I still think that there is a lot more to this. And frankly the whole bryn engineering discipline to the detection. Space has been a lot harder than people think because we do see a lot of people who are in deductions as opposed to engineering them. No they are talented craftsman. But they're not engineers maybe their titles in the saul communes to security craftsman Because they're really good they make detections but can they scale. What about the notorious busted. What if they hit by a bus. Does your soul go kaput. Like what happens so to me. The engineering part is the elusive difficult. Part of building detections that well get improved that scale if catch attackers unit to catch. Don't waste time to me. There's a lot more engineering needed. And i don't feel like many organizations actually have engineering in their security engineering. I think that's a really reasonable point. One of the things. I've gotten feedback on in. The past is avoiding the appearance of artisanal rules. We don't wanna be in a world where it requires ten thousand hours of expertise to craft role. You need to build to churn out high quality rules that consider the user at the end of the day. Well you sell ruled for money. Sort of your product vendors but if i am in my own salk and building my own custom rules i think the logic is somewhat applicable. But it's less critical. I agree you can be successful. But then you have a lot of fragile elements because of your approach to detection. If you are a detection craftsman you may be successful but the whole thing the whole system again. Another tip from the podcast that you'd listening in a few minutes is that the whole system approaches critical. I think that's absolutely right.

Anton
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"Could stand we get her all over the place but so for a to you if if you could go back to your twenty year old self and give yourself one piece of advice with the knowledge and wisdom that you know now. What would that advice be. I haven't. I'm fortunate that i haven't made very many huge blunders. So for me. The advice i that comes to mind and maybe it would change if i thought about it longer. I know that i was maybe continually. Maybe i am still impatient with with almost my life. In general you know. I remember when i was twenty three or no no no. I was probably twenty six. I was like coming to the end of college. And i kind of realized i didn't actually learn very much and i did learn about accounting and stuff but i kind of realized like oh man i don i so. I bought some books about things that i was interested in and kind of realized and in reading those like self help books. I almost instantly became impatient. Like i need to have this wealth through this career this family. Oh that right now. And i was twenty five and i remember really thinking like what the heck. I've been working pretty hard. I was paying for my school. And yada yada. And i. And and even now as i hear myself say this. I'm reminding myself that. Got to be patient for the things in your life that you want. And and i know when i was younger. I was a little impatient with certain things that i felt like. I was ready for right at that moment looking back. I'm kinda glad. They rolled out just the way they did. But i think. I i think i might have tortured myself a a little bit unnecessarily by feeling like i wasn't either entitled or deserving or you know life was unfair that certain things weren't happening to me that i felt like they should have an and looking back. That's just that was just being in my twenties and and and now i'm in my thirties. Altern forty next year. So i'm kind of coming up on the next milestone. And i have a feeling when i look back. I still haven't cracked that code. But that's the first thing that comes to mind really good. I have the advantage now. Wait until the end of the conversation to say something right. And so that's one thing that that we only learn right is just gonna keep powder dry but I've got several things here. And i think i think the first one would be if i if my one year old self could have realized the way my sixty three year old self realizes how short life is and how how the moments just disappear and you don't remember the and so all three of you guys need to realize this to you won't remember these these things they just blur into the past and and you'll have to see a photograph to remember it and it is almost as if they didn't happen so try to keep track of that The corollary to that is your kids are going to grow way faster than you think. They are And they'll they'll just come a moment when they're all grown up and you have no idea how came so quickly cooled out of proverbs that you busted out on us. Davis is so powerful that strife is always a product of pride and and if there is strife in your life if there's other place in proverbs where it says that contention cometh only by pride. And so if you've got contention in your life it's because both parties are acting out of pride. Both parties are out of pride. I wish i would've liked that way sooner now at one a one year old probably not but at some point k at some point. It's powerful recognize at everything you don't paul wasn't kidding. When he said all things work together for good them that love the lord. He wasn't kidding. And it's hard to believe that my mom was she drugged on that so hard we all got so sick of hearing it but but she was right and i guess the other one would have been at age. One or two of someone could have helped me understand that. There's an old man in my in my future. That is going to really wish that you would be wise every chance you get you know seek wisdom. Just seek it as hard as you can. And it's not the same thing as knowledge that's right so that's a much longer answer. That's a that's a much longer answer than what you your question. Probably supported but they're out. I love it. You could keep going. That is not fair question to ask you because you get so many different people with so many different backgrounds because like we said earlier you can learn from everyone and we have learned so much from you guys. As being in a short time we had a guy our last podcast talk about a heathen in the way that he actually was different and he said that he would just go back until his twenty year. Self the hangman. You doing a good job. Just keep going. you know. just encourage himself more. He's like you know you face some things in your life but you've been where you are now and just keep it up. I was like nance. That's a different answer. We've had before like that's school is everyone has something to share like. I wish we'd known forever but thank you guys so much for being on here today. I'm seriously it's been an incredible opportunity. just very humbling that y'all would take your time out of your day and speak to us and share your life a little bit while you're very gracious and keep up the good work. Okay thank you so much. Thanks appreciate it was great being here..

Davis paul nance
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

06:40 min | 1 year ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"They got a great Way to live they can do work and not have to do it under somebody So i i kind of put myself there i guess. So so. there's there's a ton of philosophy this right. I mean and the elephant in the room is and late night. Talk about this is what what do we mean. We talk about success. I mean what an ambiguous determine that is as really good and the short and easy and incomplete answer is money But if you don't have money you're not successful right. I mean it you hear. Lots of people talk about the joys of simple lifestyle. Yeah that works. Just really great until you can't pay your mortgage payment and then those joys are gone though it's just establishing that probably most people agree that there's gotta be a certain base level income and something better than a base level income is more successful but but it's really easy to take that definition too far and then step past the things they were just talking about about the satisfaction that comes in doing something with your hands The satisfaction that comes from realizing i've just. I'm a little tougher than i used to be. Not only that but my kids are learning to be tough. Because that whole concept of grit. If you don't learn some grit by the time you're about twelve man. It becomes a hard thing to learn. That's right and it's very likely that. I should lower that number and say if you haven't learned some grit by the time you're eight. It's a hard thing to learn along with a lot of other disciplines right. Lots of stuff has to be in place by the time you're not tool at and it seems like an so i could rant for way too long about our culture and the negative aspects of what our cultures becoming way. But but we have. We've begun to think that if it's not easy it's not good at what a handicap that is. We've begun to think that if it's not safe it's not good there's another handicap. I mean alex handle you guys know alexander liz. He's a guy that climbed l. cabinets l. Cap right okay. I just watched that documentary solo. Yes three stink. And so credible. That is incredible. Dan safe is the last word you you describe that that's right there now. I've been critical of that guy because they are young people who watch that. I can do that and somebody's gonna climb up there and get hurt all right but doggone it there has to be space. I mean that's why extreme sports are so popular in our culture rights. Because we see people doing that we things that we wouldn't have nerve to do even at a much lesser level. I mean there's got to be spaced. Exercise little courage if you're going to be successful so good so What else oak comfort. If it's not comfortable it's not good. Yeah but comfort is just the flip side of complacency right. It's two sides of the same darn coin and so i. I don't know how how to help. All of us as a people recognized that we're living in a new time and more people are comfortable and more people are safe and more people are healthy and more people are living longer than ever before ryan. We're getting ready to tear that apart. Because we're letting some of the some of the things we've had a chance to develop rise to the level of virtues when they're not just virtue they're just maybe pragmatic or reasonable. But it's not a virtue to be safe. Kate but it's good to be safe but i don't know i. I'm a little wacko on these things. But they're all tied into what it means to be successful. Now i agree with you. I i like it do not i remember. You've talked about kind of like calculated risks to you. Know the bill the house on your calculated risk and insurance not also but yet say you know it's just how you look at it and you maybe think of as we started thinking about success. I said well it's kind of like the lens you look through it on. I mean if you look at the winds of it's just money than if you don't have any mind than yeah you're gonna say not successful but if you look at it from a lens of maybe you know you value your family and relationships and you have a lot of relationships than hey you're successful and so it really does go down to the lens of how you look for success and i kind of wanted to go back a little bit. You talked about one to be able to learn from someone and One of our values that walker. Now half of this podcast to welcome feedback. And i can think of so many times in my life. I was to my earlier. Where i wouldn't do that. But now you think for a second to welcome feedback even when You know you're not doing something right or doing something good and if i can just find it real quick there. There's a saying that i looked up the other day and i was reading it. And it's actually it's proverbs thirteen ten where there are stri. There's pride but wisdom is found in those who take advice. And i hear that and i think about you know welcoming feedback and having accountability to good thing. It's a good thing for someone to tell you know you're you're not doing that right. Come learn from me. are that stupid. Come on come back to me. What do you guys think about that. I think that's the most important concept. I think that. I think that if we can't if we can't make ourselves vulnerable enough to learn if we're not open to constructive criticism then to start digging a hole. Benjamin franklin said that most people die at about age twenty three and don't the decency to lay down and be buried until they're about seventy and that's what you're talking about is give were unwilling to learn than why would we think we should keep breathing right. And then you just identified something. Hugely important from my perspective nailed by i. Nothing really great. I just agree completely. You know you know when you see you know whether it's an old man whose made his mind up decades ago or someone like sei swan who we already mentioned who to. This day is diving into brand new tools and ways of doing things and for example. He's he's actually pretty decent on a computer you know you. He's just he's a good example of another way to live and Right man it's it's hope i can help. I can be that way myself. I mean this is. This is refreshing hearing all talk about this and also just incredible to get to learn you guys. We're we're starting to come to the end of our time a little bit. We wanna be you know we went value your time and not take too much of it but we like to ask this question about podcast. Honestly of my favorite questions.

alexander liz alex Dan ryan Kate walker sei swan Benjamin franklin
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

07:35 min | 1 year ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"I would say for me being you know not being too scared of trying something new not being too scared or understanding how to find the answers to the problems that you might be having has every even when i was in school school is a struggle and i headed battle through it and and i think that it's really helped me to have a mindset that kind of whatever problem i square up to. I could probably solve now. I have a lot of really great resources. Obviously my dad. Not everybody has a dad who can give him the answer looking forward the phone call and i've got a great wife and so i'm extremely blessed and i'm not saying that i myself have solved all these problems but the point remains that if you kind of just our little tenacious about it you can you don't give up. You can usually find opportunities and solutions. That don't present themselves immediately. Yes so so that that was really important. That's that's an impersonal. That's a nice short story for for how to to get a toehold in in this twenty first century right that really is and he is good at that at solving the problems that on a computer i would just solve it with a six pound single jack. I just hate it but he just keeps. He just keeps pecking around the edges and pecking around the edges. And try this. Try this and listening to him. Talk about that. I realized that was useful for me in the blue collar. Sort of mechanical world So i've always been kind of discontented. If i didn't know why something worked it i would be. I would be a little bit irritated and a little bit annoyed. And i just didn't like not knowing how something worked. I think if. I would have been a good engineer for that reason but so that so that's one thing I i know too. Many people who are perfectly content did not have a clue right. And that's men you talk about a rate limiting factor in your life. That's one part of that just not. Everybody has the same amount of curiosity so got to cultivate curiosity. Swan my friends side. That you may have met on the channel. He is so curious he's relentless in learning. Why things do what they do and how to do Another thing that has been really important to me. is my friends and my network It it's easy for me to engage with people for whatever reason or combination of reasons and and that that network of friends and friendship and trust has been a much bigger asset to me. Probably the i know but it. It's a huge asset in every area of my life and then to What what you just mentioned is to just start set you apart from almost everybody else to just start enron. I built a sawmill when i was twenty one k. There was no way that there was no possible way. I should've been able to do that But i just determined you. Don't what if. I don't know how to do something i need to start doing it. And by the time. I'm done i'll probably pretty good at it and that that has worked out for me and it certainly worked out for nate with the videos. He didn't know how to make these videos and now he's better than pretty good at. He makes a darn good video just because he started and so. I think those are really important. Now that mr sky touched on the relationship side. I heard someone tell me this before. Just kind of opening up to you. I was very in. I'm twenty four. So i can't say it's too long ago but in my mid last teams almost twenty on these internships. I was hot. Head was not doing well particularly to in my in my opinion and someone told me. Now you're only going to guest as far as you can with relationships davis so every time that you talked to someone you're mad about something and you're ticked off. Did something wrong. you know. you're not gonna get very far online. So you got to be more approachable so when you talk about relationships. That's a huge side. I love that the networking and being able to talk to people. I really love nate. What you said Kind of the feedback. That i wrote down was you did the research to figure it out. And then you're kinda fearless. And i sum that up and wrote grit now. We've had a few guys. I've come on and talk about the quality that they most want out of someone younger if they're going to learn from them in construction or if the older guy can teach the younger guys to have grit. Because if you keep coming back you keep pursuing you. Keep trying even when you don't feel like it like mr scott said even if it's your enemy and you're still going to go learn from them and you keep pursuing them and that's what it's all about and you know you'll get to where you want to be one day in If i can kind of transition just really quickly isla would like to talk about you. Know we'd be remiss if we didn't talk about construction and actually kind of dive in a little bit and mr scott like you said you grew up in the trades and that's one of the the premise ideas. I had a developing this podcast. Was you know. I saw on the commercial world when i went on these internships. How people may be looked down on some of the traits people in how now even in most of the schools there are a few but most of the schools kind of tailor down on. You know woodshop or going to have a mechanic class. Or i'm getting involved in that while you're in high school and i just kinda wanted to talk about no. What was that that made you want to work in the trades. And how has it been for you. Obviously we've talked about that a little bit but just talk more about that. Your your experience of growing up from the traits so i didn't exactly grow up in the trades. My dad wasn't my dad was logger and worked in a mill and then drove trucks but i perceived that he respected and saw value in trades. And so you know we are drawn to kind of do what it is that we see our fathers placing value on k. So i think that was something for me But i did grow up in a blue collar. Hard work and like nate. Said if someone's waiting on you you run to get the job done and that's even more true when it's a machine if there's a machine waiting on the ground man growing up logging you learn to just race because the machines worth more than you are and if you're slow in the machines waiting it costs everybody money so that that The first thing that i learned and that nate really learned as a kid was to work to work and work takes. Grit work. Needs work requires that you learn to accept a certain level of pain because work is pain. Everything about work is painful. Even if it's just at the level of keeping you from doing something you'd rather be doing. There's an element of pain with that. So you have to become hungry for the work. And it's a certain level you have to be I'm hungry for some pain to sort of pit yourself against right So the the the one piece of advice for every young person is. You've got to learn to do the hard thing the like right at this moment. Maybe the hard thing is just shutting off the video game. Maybe that's the hard thing so do it once in a while and then you can go to the next hard thing because construction is full of hard things. The trades are full of hard things. That's right and you can learn to take immense satisfaction in being able to do a hard thing and and push through.

nate mr scott enron davis isla
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

06:44 min | 1 year ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"To do in concrete been logging and now you're doing your own kind of your small custom home business all these experiences you've had given you great knowledge and i mean that's the essential craftsman so from your perspective. What would you tell someone. Or what are some qualities that you would tell someone to have if they want be knowledgeable in our industry. Okay so what. I'm going to say next is going to sound like nonsense to a certain portion of your audience. But you've got to learn to read and when i say learn to rehydrate you have to learn to read with the intention of learning something and not this. I'm not just talking about technical manuals. I'm not talking about fine home building. I'm not talking about concrete references. I'm talking about all kinds of reading and when you're reading analyzed how the people are using words and what they have learned. Just you're analyzing how when you're reading your hearing another person's thoughts stream if you're paying attention and if you really pay attention you can think about. How did they arrive at that. What what what did they do to get to where they could think those thoughts on what can i pull out of that and so that is the first thing i would say is if you can't learn from reading. How are you gonna learn from reading instead of blueprints or anything else so that that would be the first answer and i don't know if if that's complete enough for you but okay then the other thing is like like we have probably mentioned on. The channel is determine every day. You're gonna learn something from the people you work with. Even ate them even if they're your enemy cave you're competing for the same job or whatever it is you're gonna learn something from them and and if you're consistent in that nothing can stop you right and i think that's fantastic for life in general because like you exactly what you just put up me. Davis talked about this before on recent podcasts. You can learn something from everyone and it's either gonna be something you can take with you and use for later or something you know not to do. It is one of the other. It's gonna be something good or something bad so you can learn how to not do something later in life or learn out to emulate them for you guys. How much of a learning curve has been. Let me try to rephrase that when you is you mr scott. You've been doing logging blacksmith. Thing working with your hands you know building for your whole life an inmate. You've been doing the entrepreneur. Been doing the investing. You've been doing some building as well and going to school getting all that stuff that the numbers you know everything. They're two different. Skill sets have come together. Which is fantastic. Like a power. Do you know for this. I think is simple. Craftsman's incredible in that regards because both of your strengths complement each other weaknesses in each area. And how has learning the construction industry. Learning the youtube industry learning the Housing industry out his. That are have the all the more that you I'm trying to work with the more that you dove into everyday like having great video having to learn how to create videos nate. You're talking about like you had no idea out to edit a video had to do something you know you went out there and did it. Because are the entrepreneurial. Spirit is just doing it you know. Most people most people fail because they don't start and it's like that's a thing that i've seen a lot of people. Everyone has ideas. they don't do it. And mr scott you know you. You've just went from like smith thing or for logging saying i don't really want to do this anymore. I'm like bill house. I'm not not never built out before in my life. But i'm just gonna try it the really my question is just the speak on your experience of maybe not knowing what you're gonna do next but just going out there and start in outed just starting something shaped your next steps into getting where you are today. Nick you wanna go first. Yeah i don't know to house the answer. Your question precisely but it comes to mind and that is i so i was born in nineteen eighty two which makes me one of the oldest millennials and when i was a kid i should say computers were kind of came of age. You high school when computers were around in middle school but there are so terrible and same with the internet in high school. I we had a computer class and it had been one of the first times high schools. Were getting kids on internet and it was terrible and i really got this. Don't you almost had to learn how to like force the computer to do you wanna do and like so rush tr- troubleshooting and problem solving and like now these computers and all these tools are really intuitive but man they were terrible then you're constantly like rebooting it and control delete so i think that i kind of got this like A skill but just like out a necessity of like four forcing things to like go. I know this'll fit. I just maybe. I'll try and just like kind of figuring out like in whatever the problem is if you just kinda like keep messing with enough you can kinda jam it in place. Sort of and to some extent that sort of skill with that. I feel like i developed because of these terrible computers and who knows what other part of my life but has really helped me in all of the other businesses. I've been involved in whether it's a a remodel or a type of construction that i know nothing about but for whatever reason i've never really been too terrified to not only do it but maybe by the property you know and really risk a lot of money and and a lot of financial harm if it goes wrong because i had had this idea that we'll figure it out and nowadays with the internet you know my dad mentioned how important reading is and it really is but you know kind of related having the skills to use google properly and just fine dig deep and just i know it's on their get the information you need to find the person and just really get in there and figure it out is a really useful skill. It's been very very helpful for me. Through my real estate business the The storage business that i developed was total street fight and own. The only reason it got through is. Because i have this stubborn insistence that this. I could probably figure out a way to do this. And the video production and all that has been kind of the same story that all these cameras i got. It's just been a struggle to figure everyone out but but by just kind of sticking with it we've been able to. We put out a lot of videos. That were pretty bad. You know in terms of video and audio and all sorts of things but we never let that stop us from actually putting them up and getting onto the next one..

mr scott bill house Davis nate youtube smith Nick google
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"Even right now today. We are in a in the completion phase of a project. We started years ago. And so it's almost like i don't know that the journey the journey has led us here but there wasn't necessarily one moment where we're like we're going to build a an online business. This is our goal. It was more like we're gonna these videos and then see what happens. And then we start the house project really. Let's build a house and make videos about it. There was never a time. We never had a chance to stop making videos. You know it's like when you start something you got to finish it and so in some ways that's kind of the story central craftsman because we started these things and and we need to finish them and so that that being said there was definitely a moment. I remember we had several phone calls at the beginning of two seventeen because i was already My business my real estate development was kind of on the side it was on the back burner going through permitting and engineering and stuff but but my dad had to basically stop taking clients and that so i didn't have to like cut the cord or pull the plug on on a business that that i had built up and he did so for him. That probably was much more of like a cold. You know jumping in cold bath water Because it takes a lot of time to make these videos you almost wouldn't believe it. It's almost embarrassing. How long it takes to put things together and And so and we need to both of our full time to do it so we were lucky to be in that in that time in our businesses where we could. We could do that. Fortunately the you know. The growth we saw for the first year was pretty predictable and it had been predictable over a year and then throughout two thousand seventeen it was kind of following that same trend and so we were kind of able to do the math and say okay. It's safe to assume we could probably keep growing at this level and if we do the income from all the different parts of youtube will should grow at the same rate and that's kind of proven to be true so it was. We had a. We had a little bit of foresight just from that. The couple years of of growth that we could we felt like we could predict with reasonable accuracy. That there would be something there even though it did take a couple of years so it was really paying the bills but we had reason to believe it. Would it would get us. There also felt especially me. I mean so so nate's right. At the in the middle now of his prime entrepreneurial part of his life right and i and i was at the end of the prime entrepreneurial part of my life i mean the the candle was pretty. Well burned up and so and so for me. At least it was look. It would be crazy for me not to try this because like you said. The trend was positive. The signs were auspicious. I was not getting any younger I had kind of pigeonholed myself here. In southern oregon. Far what i do and and what. I was comfortable doing. And so there was no reason to think that i was going to suddenly invent another wheel and so even though i had arguably more to lose i also had arguably more more to gain sort of for the last decade or two of my ride and so that that all kind of added up so i wonder back up and talk about the idea of continuing steadily up the incline of consistency inhabits. I i've heard about and read about something called convergence and that is at a particular time in your life. The different skills and aptitudes and relationships and and charge accounts and educate everything can kind of converge. And we had that in spades. I guess have right. Now that in spades would nate skillset and my skill set in this window of time with youtube. It does seem like the classic sort of textbook idea of convergence right and then another thing that we'd be interested. I'd be interested in your questions on or observations about. Is that the comment. About if you stop on the incline you slide back. There's no stasis you know. There is no stasis anywhere in life. And i have learned now that if you rest you rust mike. Concrete stakes are rusted k. And they didn't have rest on them since i bought them. Since i bought those square stakes they never had enough for us to even talk about And i'm the same way. I i'm losing my calluses on my hands. I'm not bragging about that. And and i was up yesterday. Logging sei swann gathering up those oak logs that i cut down a few months ago for other content stream and i exhausted myself. Doing what five years ago would have just been a hard day you know and so it's very interesting that you can stop on that incline while. I think it's so cool. You know nate kind of talked about the it's what y'all did was then lead the entrepreneurial spirit of conscious start something. You don't really know where you're going to find out what you're going to do. And then me scott you have your experiences in your literally bringing that the life of the youtube video. Nets the convergence you're talking about. That's really where i wanted to go. Next was on our last podcasts. That we're we're actually going to put out this monday aukin. I talked about how. There's a correlation between knowledge and time. And for you mr sky as you said you're you're not a young man and so you've been around construction a whole lot in so your experiences of going from working and doing finish carpentry.

youtube nate skillset nate oregon mike aukin Nets scott
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

06:53 min | 1 year ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"And so he'd been keeping track of the internet evolution. And he. I think he had kind of been seeing what was happening. And he's an entrepreneur. And so i think at least in the back of his mind maybe in the front he was thinking while there's a lot going on on the internet and and so he started he was he had his he was up here. I think your whole family was up here for christmas ray. And he said no doubt. I think we ought to make a video in your shop. I said pardon me and he said i think we ought to make video on the shop before he's a what we could put it on youtube. Yeah what four. And and he said well you know people like to watch stuff and they like to watch guys lay brick and guys crime and i thought i thought it was just strictly cat videos and car wrecks. I didn't think it was anything more than that. And so he brought his iphone out into the shop and the lighting was bad and it was a time in the shop when i was installing a crane kate and so it was just complete chaos in there but he's a no that's all right people won't care i mean it's interesting in here and so we filmed on our hammer and and so as we began to as we started watching what the reaction was and it was slow. Bright it was very slow and tentative and but we began to think I wonder what's going on here. And then he made a video about four months. We'd probably put up about one a month sort of there for about four or five months. And then he made a video called the blacksmith's anvil that kind of a little bit viral. It got one hundred twelve thousand views over the weekend. It just got our attention and so it was about a year after we put up the first video. We monetize the channel so that the algorithm would begin to promote. You know And that coincided like he said earlier with some lucky the timing was really auspicious because we both could set aside some time. Right then i remember. We had a conversation. What should we do and we thought well we have to do something. We can't just ignore this and i. I told him that. I could probably tread water for six months. I can invest six months and and he was developing his his historic project. He could commute about once or twice a month. So anyhow that that's where kind of it was his idea and wait went not to mention you know. You said the first video. Y'all put up was in two thousand eight that was right out the housing bubble. So is that was that also affecting you guys At at that time. No i was in school and Dad's been he's been. You had a long land line of work always you know and so i. I'm sure things maybe. The list got shorter but at that moment we were kind of busy with the more traditional sort of job in school And that was sort of you know kind of a test and something fun to do and really he had acquired a whole lot of really beautiful photos from all of these things he'd made so it was almost in some ways just to kind of put those up permanently so photographs didn't get lost but now at the time at the time that wasn't i i can't say we were really strategically thinking that that was going to do much for us. No i i remember though that two thousand eight two thousand nine. It did not the props out from underneath me. I'm not. I was going to do some property development and a small general contracting oregon like make said i always had people at at work done but the hall started really slowing up. You know and i was getting kind of sweaty. You know that the properties. I had bought you know i was. I wasn't quite underwater. But i only had about that much clearance the you know and it was really funny. I i had just gone into escrow on sale of these properties. When like it happened you know so. That was a jumping in a bathtub of ice water. So keep that in mind with property development. It can't eat your lunch down. It is yeah but So that two thousand eight thing was was It was a marketing test. But when two thousand sixteen came along it was completely different you know an and eliminates exactly right. My mom was failing. I had an obligation to take care of her. It was going to restrict my ability to go out and do editions and remodels and be away from where mom was and so he he was kinda trying to generate a little more of a of an awareness of the blacksmith thing thing as a as a reliable revenue stream. When i couldn't go out and and take the construction jobs for oil right in. I would imagine when i started this. You would have never thought today you know we would have no two youtube channels a podcast and that would be what the main thing are going towards Out now i've ever heard of john maxwell no he he's he's a leadership guy and what made me think of when walking i i started. I had really grasped this concept of You know trying to figure out where you wanna go. It's hard to find out in the future but together you have to have consistency. And so he about how. It's a whole lot easier to our. It's a whole lot easier. The day you stop. Having consistency you fall down that hill. By every day that you're slowly growing is like an incline. so it's takes each day. It takes a little bit of time takes a little bit time. The they stop you fall so gradually over time. It's thousand eight. You guys had just been consistent with putting out videos now. You know where you guys are at now. I think that's really cool. And you know that's just my little model. I love it thank you. When did you get to the point in your youtube career. That you decided. Hey this is something that we want to start doing. Full-time was it one video. That just absolutely took off or was it just kind of gradual sort of playing with it a little bit. Maybe we can do it but harley syria so my memory of that is exactly year after. We put up the first essential craftsman youtube video. We put that up in january of twenty sixteen. Exactly one year later. We had seventeen thousand subscribers and innate head strategically been putting off monetize the channel he had he had what i think has been maybe our most important inside the beginning to not worry about growth but just worry about making the best videos we can right so so one year later was when we had the conversation about okay. It looks like we have to do this. So that was january of twenty seventeen. At least that's the way. I remember it any way. You gotta wet. Yeah and it's kind of. It's kind of like what you mentioned davis although little different about putting one foot in front of the other because to be honest there wasn't like a moment that you know you were now officially fulltime in fact even right now today. We are in a in the completion phase of a project. We started years ago. And so.

youtube john maxwell oregon syria davis
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

06:08 min | 1 year ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"Questions on provoking that even going along with you talking about being with your data just learning atkins easily do this. I'm going to butcher it. But it's like you think either you can't you can't like whatever you think there you will be or something like that thank you. Can you might as well go do it. But don't offer the real estate bank. Because that's i love real estate day was no that was gonna head this way real quick so you mentioned that you had an accounting degree in earn now you graduated when kinda started doing that and then realize that. Hey real estate's kind of direction. I want to go first of all. What made you see that in a second of all. How did you get the whole process. Going on sale in rehabbing and Are you just now doing youtube full-time or you also do not on the side as well. Well maybe like you had always been interested in real estate. I remember the first time i learned you could own it. A neighbor kid was telling me how a square foot of land in this desert. We were playing in. Vegas cost two thousand dollars and i thought about it for weeks. Like one square foot cost a thousand dollars. I never did the math to see if that's right or not but i remember from that moment on just kind of learning like oh you can own this and also my whole life kind of interested in buying good deals on things so garage sale and anytime i since i was buying something at a good deal that was really exciting and so i kind of put those two things together at a young age like well. What if you could get a good deal on something really expensive like a piece of real estate was the most expensive thing i could imagine when i was a kid and maybe it is but so i had always wanted to real estate as well and as in terms of how i got in to be honest. It's kind of dumb luck because you didn't have to be a genius in two thousand eleven to know that real estate prices were less fair. It was the lowest they had ever been You know at least In in Nominal crash yeah and so it was kind of. It was kind of obvious and i was again. Just lucky that my wife at the time. We didn't have any kids and she was working fulltime enough to pay our bills. She was a teacher. And so i was just so lucky and fortunate that and she was willing. I kind of told her. I was going to quit my job. And she i think she like burst into tears. Basically why would you do that. But you know it only took a few days for it if you like actually doesn't make a lot of sense and it was. We took a chance but it wasn't a very big chance because real estate was on sale and honestly any looking back any deal any property. I bought i could've you you kind of couldn't lose and so at the moment. No i'm not doing real estate deals. I have some properties that i've acquired and put together that are Generating income for me. But that's not my primary Business and i'm looking forward someday to kinda of getting involved in it again. It's definitely a it's just a super fun and dynamic business and it's it's for me like the perfect marriage of construction and deals and people and solving problems and it's just a really terrific like it's almost like it's almost like the full package. That's awesome. I know is not a real estate. Part of podcast per se but something bangs. I've listened to talk with people about is exactly what you're describing just easy fun. It's something that everyone can do. No one really knows about it and it's going along with that you know you're talking about you're doing you to now kind of transition a little bit first of all. How did y'all just get started in youtube. Because i'm sure when you started it wasn't as big as it is now as you did this kind of taken off over the years and then when did y'all decide like hey. This is something i wanna start doing both time and just cut all ties to everything. Else let's start innately livery. I wanna start off with nick. Why don't you tell them about the first youtube video. You put up right after you made that website for me. What twelve go now or something. Yeah well guess big picture and as everybody knows now My dad here is a kind of a master and a very unique craftsman and has all these skills and there was always a kind of a small town and he's always sort of a puzzle for me like man. How come everybody in. The world's not like buying an ordering things from from scott wadsworth here so anyways i took a couple tries who made a website and we made a youtube video in two thousand eight. You talk about being early to the game. I don't really feel like we were but we kind of two thousand eight and we put up one video. It was a slide. Show of a lot of the blacksmith and things he he did. I was in school to time. So we didn't have time to pursue it and to be honest i didn't. U2 wasn't what it will now. it wasn't what it is now. Then so i don't think we even would have thought that it was a thing to do but in two thousand sixteen we put our first video up and it was kind of trying to do the same thing and the goal was to Allow more blacksmith thing to happen and and working in the shop. And my grandma was alive at the time and and heading towards needing kind of full-time care so we were thinking. Hey maybe if we could get a little audience too. That you could sell blacksmith items to Why not and also to be honest. I've always kind of enjoyed media and sort of digital content creation. I've never been good at it. But i've always been aware of it and so it was a fun like test for me to kind of try something new and and make a video which i had never done before. And so and basically after we did the first one It was almost like uncovering this i don't know like a gem. You didn't realize you have like a polish rock like oh my gosh. There's a diamond because my dad's really good. He's really natural. As as you guys know and once that kind of clicked we're like oh my gosh you can do this and i could probably figure this out and so we kept doing that and and it was really one foot in front of the other but the original idea was sort of two. Maybe we could build an audience and sell swords and knives and axes and blacksmith. Items to and nate kind of had to twist my arm because he had been you know. He's a millennial. And so he'd been keeping track of the internet evolution. And he. I think he had kind of been seeing what was happening. And he's an entrepreneur. And.

youtube atkins scott wadsworth Vegas nick nate
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

07:07 min | 1 year ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"I got a pretty wide construction experience for everything from production piecework framing to commercial work and lay out untilt ups and small bridges and all kinds of stuff and i ended up running a startup commercial concrete company for about two years and then move my family back to oregon. logged there again. I logged as a kid with my dad and for other logging operations. My dad was in the woods. Industry moved back to oregon from las vegas tired of construction data and i logged for two or three years and then i could see the handwriting on the wall there. That just wasn't going to work. And so i got my oregon general contractor's license and i've been a small general contractor here ever since until youtube came along and that is nate's conversation. Well my background is a little shorter. I graduated college in two thousand nine and in two thousand eleven. I quit the accounting job. I had for a couple years because real estate prices were so low. It was kind of an obvious opportunity. And so i spent the next nine years. Buying and selling and doing small rehabs rehabs on my own Real estate deals and then in two thousand seventeen. I guess or sixteen. Maybe i had a deal. That was kind of my biggest deal that was very slow as a slow approval process. I had a lot of extra time in the day so we started making youtube videos at which kept me busy while my little development was pushing through and and that is what allowed us to build our youtube channel. We kind of both were able to dedicate the appropriate time to grow at this point. It's what i'm doing with my fulltime energy as well and Basically if someone's or youtube channel tells a story of course you can go back and watch our first videos from then to now and there's several projects started there. we may talk about. But that's kind of where we're at this moment. I think that's awesome guys appreciate y'all both being willing to open up and share their. You know one of my first few things that i thought was pretty cool about mr scott. I didn't know that you're gonna jazzman. Apply for president. Carter tell me about that. Yeah so. I'm in high school here. Glide oregon and and there was a local guy who he owned a small general stores name was neil heart and he was also a carpenter and i can remember going into his general store and he would be quizzing kids about their algebra problems he was just a remarkable mentor for a lot of guys and and He ended up showing me how to use the framing square explaining to me how to cut stairs. You just with a big impact on me but earlier. When i was in high school he was talking to my mom who was a very accomplished pianist And said lorraine there's a kids band up an eugene Eighty miles north and. They're looking for a trombone player. And i think scott should try it and this was under the auspices of the traditional jazz society of oregon and rusty stiers had put together a kids band and when i started with them the youngest was thirteen. The oldest was seventeen. And i was sixteen and they were essentially unsponsored. We were Essentially unsponsored rusty just wanted a band and he just made it happen. And so i did that for four or five years before that kinda ran its course and then the band played at disneyland. After i left the band played there. Several of them are still pro or semi pro. That's awesome so even whenever you are thinking you're going to be in jazz band. You ended up learning how to use a framing square. Forget about them. I think that's awesome. And guys i wanna ask you all. What was it like for both of your perspectives. You know. Mr scott. Nee i would like to chime in on this scott. What was the first time you remember having nate around while you're going up construction the nate. What was your perspective that what was the first time year round. Your dad get involved in construction. You went right to the source subject. He nate started going with me and cleaning up and sweeping and carrying boards and stuff like when we moved when we moved. You help with the houses. Probably that we built in las vegas. You remember kid can. Yeah the kid could. Yeah 'cause we moved to oregon when you were in sixth grade seventh day. Yeah and then you know when i was on my own logging. At first there wasn't much for him to help with but but There there was a fairly. He helped me a lot and my next boy did too but i. I made the decision not to turn my boys into carpenters. Because i i saw that as having sort of sold myself short i saw myself as i should have stayed in school and i didn't want to sort of predestine them for that. And then when nate started improving properties he he kinda went right past the carpentry thing to to the bigger understanding of doing projects. Or and and so that. That's kind of how that went for my perspective. Yeah in las vegas dad. You're working for a big company so you can't really just drag your kids onto any job site in the row and that being said though i do remember a couple of instances when i was probably seven or eight maybe maybe nine but on saturday being on a job site with your dad doing odds and ends and a couple of things that that i remember playing his day learning and and i still do them basically i kind of lessons as a kid for job site is if somebody asks you to that they need something like a tool or a piece of material and they're standing there waiting for you you gotta run and get it because the entire job is waiting on that delivery and so that that really hit home and i'm i just i still just run all around the job site usually just getting a brumer boards and stuff but that was the lesson that i really made a ton of sense and it's probably helpful in all sorts of aspects of life when people are waiting on you so Yeah you know when your dad's a contractor you don't have to be on the job site for things to seep in tools loaded in the garage at all times Dad just coming home thrashed and filthy and seeing him you know even helping people in like service oriented things just watching him just you know. Tear things apart and do what he does. There's a there's almost like a. I don't know how you think of it. But when you when your father can do something you almost instinctually think that you have it by birthright you know like right you can do that therefore i can. Which is i think. A good thing. Because i even though i didn't have you know a lot of technical. Maybe i certainly didn't work in the trades. But i i just by kind of being around it maybe felt like some of it has just kind of come in through osmosis and i think that's a good thing so there's a lot there's a lot you can learn just from just from having in the house and the tools and the garage and and a dad who's on a job site because you kind of you just kind of observe and know what's what what real work is what this type of real work is.

oregon youtube nate jazzman neil heart las vegas traditional jazz society of or rusty stiers mr scott scott Mr scott lorraine Carter
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"Fun and i'm really excited for everyone here. You know just froze. You don't know. We have the essential craftsman on our show today. And that is scott nate wadsworth and they are some incredible dudes so much wisdom blowing from them today and i just. I can't wait to listen to it again. you know. some of the things i picked out were beat tenacious. And don't give up. That was just something he spoke about. A lot was saying. You know for those who just start sets you apart from everyone else and it just just start. You know. Eventually you will fail. That's guaranteed but just start. You know when you fail. Get back up again and do it better. And it's just so much wisdom and that's what scott talked about a is just to be wise to seek wisdom out continually in in your life. Will you'll be fine. you'll have ups and downs but you'll be fine. What did you think about it today. I loved the walker. Those great points. guys check them out is called the central crafts and they have a channel on youtube. They have another podcast called e. c. Two i these. These guys are all about construction in a cool thing as a dad and son do. Oh it was just a great dynamic of a team It was really enjoyable to get to talk to them. But like what walker said the wisdom. That mr sky and nate that they both had as a as a dad son team is crazy. Like we talked about you know the lindsay look through four success. We talked about. I'm taking that constructive feedback like walker said you know guys. That's one of our Big big values as the welcome feedback in thing i really loved was how the outlook that scott had was. Even if it's a guy you know you really don't even like be willing to learn. He might be able to teach you something and sometimes it's even ways of not to do it. We've all had a boss where it's like man. I don't really want to do this. But you learned a way that not treat. People are not do things. And so i just love. We talked about construction but they had just had a deep deep context of of of wisdom of applying things to your life. And i think it's great time to just see four guys deacon out about construction having a good time man that can have said it better myself. That was awesome is that was so great and can't wait for all our listeners. To hear it you know towards the end. Listen to scott just talk about pride and that was a fantastic one that just that one just hit me just remembering that talking about it. There's contention your life. Both parties are are probably acting out of and that's something huge. It definitely is very applicable to my life as well as something. I picked up a lot from him so it was fine. Yeah i can't wait to hear it and so without we'll go it. Yeah yeah. I mean just that one if we could take the one thing out of this podcast in something that really made me look back in my own life. Kind of like what you said walker is. There is there several times. When i think i'm right in several and guess what it's okay for. Someone did not agree with you. And i was listening to It may be gregor shell. Leadership podcast but He was talking about the same thing ultimately. When there's times. When i feel pride i feel like there's no way that i'm wrong. Those are ultimately the times. I should even listen even more. And i think that's great. Just the whole pride thing. I think the construction industry most guys and gals were just prideful. But you know we are made to be technical people to know about our craft and so we have great pride and responsibility and doing so but we can overstep people with our relationships. And i just thought that was a great point to kind of remember. Now i agree with that. Man is funny brought out today and church. We astra mile said that that you we need to listen understand and not to respond literally said the same thing which goes along with other values so i thought that was hilarious. And it's all very hit us me. Hit you in the face. Like man all right. I didn't need to hear that again. Well without further do scott it. Well welcome to the show guys. We really appreciate in scott nate being willing to come on the show with us today is really special treat because they are from the essential craftsman on youtube on so many. You have heard of it if you haven't go and check them out because they're videos are incredible and they are exactly what the to do on this podcast. Just share the instruction world Knowledge and understanding with people out there who may not know a little bit about it and and who haven't heard of it before so scott nate just to start off. Tell us about yourself both these. You know where you're from what do you do. You get started in construction anything. We just wanna learn more value. May who goes first. You wanna start. i'll follow you. How about you you lead. Ronaldo cleanup okay that sets that works pretty good. So i'm i'm an old man. I'm sixty three. And i spent two whole terms at oregon state university as a young man. I thought i was going to be an engineer. But i was distracted by dixieland jazz music. I played with a little band called the jazz miners. And we played for president. Carter and booked tour across the country and i remember thinking the eminently practical thought that i don't need an education because i'm going to be a star and so i quit school and played music until i got tired of that. And so i had always liked to build forts and tree houses and boats as a kid. And so i thought well i'll just become a carpenter and build houses and so i started that about the time that i got married to kelly. My high school sweetheart And i just started working for different guys. A big recession hit. Roseburg unemployment was twenty three percent in nineteen eighty-one which was three years after. I got married while so. We you know construction so cycle you know. It just is a series of booms and busts said is the way it always has worked always will work and so kelly and i moved to wyoming how north western wyoming and i worked there for five years In the powell cody area loved every day of it. It's a wonderful of the world and then that economy tanked about five years later the the local commodities went down there And so then. We moved to las vegas. And i saw in wyoming. I got a a well rounded custom home experience. I worked for a fellow that went from you. Know dig the basement for the walls right up through. Hang the doors and everything. So that was great. Weight welsh construction and then Moved to las vegas..

walker scott nate wadsworth scott mr sky scott nate gregor shell youtube nate lindsay astra oregon state university Ronaldo wyoming kelly Carter Roseburg powell cody las vegas
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"My last name is house housework. It's been that way my whole life. Everybody calls me house so We came up with housework. Because i i love to work at believe. In hard work i think it's the true path to purpose and So you can find me there. You can find me on instagram posts on your underscore work And facebook we have a really awesome. Facebook group called. Diy grinders machines. And it's just a bunch of guys like me you talking about their experience building their own industrial grinders and believe it or not. There's over ten thousand people in that group and we all chat and we're sharing concepts and sharing ideas and this goes back to your original question about you. Know how do you feel about sharing your intellectual property out with the world. I'm a. I'm at the point where i feel like. It's an important part of the process of moving us forward In in having people climbing and learn even if it costs me money which. I don't believe it. Does i think it makes me money. But i even if it were to cost me money i think the overall answer to you know if i can inspire one person to go through this it would. It makes the difference in that changed the world. That person will go out and make something new or different and that will slingshot the human race in wigs. Keep building on each other's ideas and concepts chances are people can look at my grind and replicated anyway You know so. why not. Just give them the keys to the castle and see what that's awesome. Yeah i love it half the time when i hear someone explain giveaway for information. I come away going like well. I don't wanna have to reinvent the wheel. So i will hire them for whatever the thing so it's almost like the more you hear someone explain all into it. It just hit locks in okay. I don't i. I got other things to work on. So there's you're dead on it's it's just it just smarter to be open in sharing and giving and well i love it. Well hey thanks so much. Brian for coming on linked all these things. Keep it up. I'm sure we'll be in touch and Just love your video. I didn't mention but yeah highest praise on your videos in the everything about him. It was just beautiful just like the rest of your stuff. So i hope you just keep doing your thing and we'll be. We'll be watching as often as we can and And i think to leave the listeners. With dad from your side they're No just a man. I i love i. Love your mindset. I love the work you do. I love the videos you make. I love your art since i covet. Your art sense i okay. I covered that sculpture education. It's so hard. I mean that thin blurry line between art and craft right. I mean it it so indistinct sometimes but you can tell when you're well on one side of the line or the other and it's just nice to anyhow. I covet that but where are you located. Where where are you doing. Your quick part of the world are you in i. I live in the polar opposite of you guys. So i'm in south florida. So i'm larry south west corner of florida in the state of And in naples is where my studio is. I was brought here to work. Got hired at at from a small airline hired me to be their tech guy and then i moved here for that and a great place to live. I love it here. There just isn't a lot of like minded people on it's a it's a retirement community here It's a great place to raise kids. Oh you know my my. I have three children and their their All you know hopefully going to be contributing members of society but we'll see but great place great place we'll we'll we'll mine are minor contributing members of society and it is life's greatest blessing greatest blessing. Well if you ever get up to the north if you ever get up to the north west man you come up by five you let us know you stop being. We would love to show you this part of the planet gay. There will definitely be a tour going on where we're actually toying around with the idea of taking a tour all around the us in meeting with everybody that you know these key people have built the grinder and spend some time with them and then do some youtube content based around that It'll probably be another year or so You know when things lighten up as far as the pandemic goes and everything but we were thinking about doing that. So i'm definitely i've never been to oregon. I wanna go there. So i just appreciate the offer. Thank you so much. We'll look forward to all right. Thanks brian we'll catch you next. Time cheers guys. I appreciate you. Thank you so much.

Brian brian facebook Facebook south florida youtube five instagram oregon three children over ten thousand people naples one side one florida of
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"I i'm i'm gonna push to nonsense but is not doesn't mean that the bloomberg mill owners aren't like rolling fat cats right now get into it but i mean it just happens to be that. They're really lucky situation. Yeah i mean think about it. These are a lot of mills out there. That can make this stuff okay. Five guys who are like on weaken. Do i mean there's a lot of meals out there. I mean the hello and if i was one of these small time mills i'd be loving right commodity like your two by four's not like inherently different than tex not supposed to be than another one so i mean if you have like a standard and better doug for two by four. That's going to be the same. As the senator better duck for two by fours and that guy i mean sure the qualities and everything else like personal preference over. It might be a little bit there. But you know on the bottom line of lumped. And they're not gonna you know. So i i mean nobody was like everybody screaming at these guys for making a bunch of money but nobody was like you know feeling. Sorry for him when it was at two fifty thousand. And they were shutting their mills. Now i mean though it was like oh god is look. What can we do for you so you know. Make enough for lost time. I don't blame them a little bit. I mean that's the american way. I i'm i'm cool with it with. Is the idea that you can manipulate markets. And that's where you know. I think probably the real concern would come in is that is there a manipulation of the market taking place or is this really just a series of unfortunate events that took place. I mean if it does turn out to be market manipulation will then that is something to be upset over because really these are people's livelihoods out. Here this is zeno. This is somebody's home. This is somebody's construction job. I mean to to manipulated the situation where it is now is very damaging i mean. There's a few homes being built right now with a lot of confidence that there's going to be a prophet behind it. I mean there's off of like nervousness when it comes to new construction right now and that's not a pleasant place to be. I mean when you say manipulate you mean are you referring to like a tariff pushing the price up higher than it should be like taking mills off line that that type or or something more sinister from mill owners are what what do you mean by that. I mean well. Yeah i mean it could be like you know because i mean they ultimately said it prior to the co like at the end of two thousand nineteen we are curtailing development to cause prices to go up. Yeah yeah. I mean that's straight upset. It is is that manipulation right there. Another point on this move on that. I feel like it gets lost is if there was a real like windfall happening here. Somebody getting rich. It seems like that would be the people who own the land timber grows on because the price of logs is also really high. And these mills. I know a lot of them. Owned the timber. Also fair enough. But there's also a lot of the mills it just by logs off log trucks and i'm guessing. The cost of buying a load logs has gone up along with the price of the lumber that they spit out on the other end right. I mean they have. They have to buy raw materials in order to sell their product and those the price of those raw materials has to be going up as well as that right. I won't. I'm just curious on the question now or did you assume that or did you read that. No i just know that around here in roseburg. The bills that logging. Let's say logging operation cut logging contractor. They'll go to a mill gadgil. You wanna buy you wanna buy logs from me. I'm going to be logging in this neighborhood. Yeah let's work out deal and they work out a deal. And there's a scaler who appraises the logs every time and we had a guy on the show Who works at one of these meals and he kind of explained how there's a almost like kelley blue book for logs that is get updated every week. It's called random lengths. I believe and how you know. All these mills and logging operators are looking at every day. Like what what are these things selling for. And so yes. The lumbers high but the price of logs and you'd probably timberland and real estate and dirt that can grow. Logs is also rising in price. Right well i. I would assume that you know that just because of everything else going up at the price of land in logs go up you know somewhat too but from what i was reading it from what i was doing at the price of logs. And what the lagers are getting is not nearly the same percentage of what the increase in limb lumber has dr and in fact from what i was gathering down in that southern area where all those canadian mills had moved to that. They're the same price of their lives that they were getting like ten years ago and right because of a glut of logs. That are down there right. There's too many like these people had this projection twenty years ago that there was going to be this demand for lumber coming into the future and so they planted all these traits. So now there's this glut trees down there that people need to bill all mills and this is another. This is another sad story for this guy. These mills are now really automated. They want a log. That's this big. You know they want to begin. They want all of them to be that. And this farmer down there the landowner he'd saved from cutting trees from way back in the great financial crisis. He didn't cut back then when he should've he's held onto his trees all the way up until now we'll these trees i.

roseburg Five guys twenty years ago ten years ago two two fifty thousand one gadgil american kelley blue four thousand fours meals nineteen canadian
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"Sitting on top of it. A think of it as temperature fifty degrees that if that's warmer than the twenty degrees outside than that's energy that can be pulled into the house. That's right now. Maybe in the loops and all that go ahead. sorry no. it's just. I think what you sat as a really good way of thinking about it and in the same way you can drill a water well if you live montage of an aquifer and then you just pump that water into your house. We're doing the same thing it's like. Every house is on this huge reservoir of energy just like heat energy. Well zona i lived in phoenix. Is that fifty degrees under the ground and phoenix just planet earth spec is fifty degrees or whatever it's not exactly so the the temperature in the shallow subsurface the average of the air temperature year round. So if you average the annual air temperature in a given area you'll get the ground temperature so fifty as i say. 'cause i am dandelions based in new york i guess maybe in phoenix might be a bit higher but phoenix has cold winters cold so the average is not going to be like hundred ten no into winter. After that the ground temperature is a bit higher in in phoenix. Would help you 'cause you'd be drying heat from a higher more heat content there Here's a geology question. But i'm just thinking out loud in. This heat is coming from the center of the earth. Not from like the sun. Although you said the average temperature which makes me feel like maybe it is the son which is it. It's the sign year. Exactly right so so shallow. And when i say shallow. We drill on average about three hundred and fifty feet deep so.

new york phoenix twenty degrees fifty degrees fifty earth planet earth hundred ten about three hundred and fifty house
Double Date With Ted Danson & Mary Steenburgen

Double Date with Marlo Thomas & Phil Donahue

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Double Date With Ted Danson & Mary Steenburgen

"We flew out to santa monica to visit. Ted danson and mary steenburgen. Their house is carved into the side of a hill. It's a craftsman style. Bungalow built in nineteen twenty two and it has what is called a living roof which is covered with greenery to fight off climate change. Ten mary decorated themselves is very relax and homey mostly. It was their warm connection to each other. That grabbed her attention from the start. This is fun. Yeah we've been so excited. We're really that you asked us. Well you came to mind immediately. Really people are always asking us. How did you. How are you married too long. And what i like in likes me. He's cute boys smells and that's a big deal so smell good. Ted likes to play the rascal but once we settled at their farm style kitchen table and began to talk. He was so honest and vulnerable rule of four of us here. I'm the only one who's only married once. Yes i'm the third. i'm being married. Well that maybe that's an interesting way to start because you're a wild optimist or you're total. Denial i mean. I got married and college carnegie Halfway through and i think it's fair to say the real communication would have been I'm afraid to go to new york by myself. Are you oh well. Let's go Sharon apartment and buddies that would have been kind of the emotional truth but somehow we ended up getting married and twenty two and Married for five years good friends but certainly not you know a a marriage

Mary Steenburgen Ted Danson Santa Monica TED Sharon New York
Dollywood with Amber Davis

The Family Vacationer

07:41 min | 1 year ago

Dollywood with Amber Davis

"Impossible to talk about dollywood without mentioning dolly parton then in are both big fans. She is a prolific songwriter. I think a lot of people would be shocked to know all the songs that she's written for other entertainers on her own. She sold more than one hundred million albums worldwide. We could honestly do a show several podcasts. Just don't hurt. She butts alone. She's amazing businesswoman and humanitarian her literacy program. Which all three of my kids have taken advantage of dali pardons imagination library which is a part of the dollywood foundation males one book per month to each and roll child from the time of their birth until they enter kindergarten. Currently over sixteen hundred. Local communities provide the imagination library to almost eight hundred fifty thousand children each live across the us canada uk. Australia and ireland. It's amazing she also helped to find one of the covid nineteen vaccines so i mean i could go on and on about dali yes. We absolutely could. Let's bring it back to the theme park. Dollywood was opened in one thousand nine hundred eighty six and one of the really interesting things about this. Is that for all its growth and offering of thrill rides. The park still retains a lot of history in roots. The park now known as dollywood has gone by several other names throughout the years and it still pays homage to the older parts. There are four years in the modern park river town junction. The village country fair in craftsman. Bali dollywood offers a fully functional. Gristmill where you can get incredible cinnamon bread and rolls and a fully functional chapel. That was actually named after the doctor. That delivered dolly truly. This is a part where you can ride some incredible thrill rides and get a glimpse back in time. So talk more about dollywood with us. We welcome amber. Davis publicist for dollywood amber. Welcome to the show. Thanks so much for having me and we really appreciate you coming on chatting with us. So robin our both. We're going to confess it. Where such huge fans of dolly. So can you talk about what her influence in the park. Looks like it could be major things or just simple touch here and there. Just give us a break. Yeah absolutely. I mean who doesn't love dali if you know anything else are dolly. We claim. She has a national treasure every believes she's just about as genuine as they come. We do see dolly from time to time so it's neat that the park not only bears her name. But there's there's things around that just remind you of who she is and what she means to a community here and at large but start dollywood really was her vision and so it's her. Her name is on it. She has the managing partners who know the theme. Park world but dolly. She really started this park to bring more people to the area to create jobs. And she's done both of those things so just the very welcoming nature of the park in a. We've were proud. Always tell people. Were the friendliest park. We won that award so many times that they actually retired at so now have the best park experience award from the golden ticket amusement today awards dolly wants us to be welcoming into you. See that and just the. The charm of the park itself are host week. We actually call our employees hosts because people who come our guest and so everyone who works there were hosting you so it again. In the culture in the nature of of who we are dollywood. You're going to see There's there's actually if you want to come for the dalai factor. You're gonna find dolly. There's a whole museums. Actually a fantastic museum chasing rainbows. It has things one of the things. We like to joke about dolly. Never throw anything away whether it's warehouse in nashville or if it's at dollywood we've got our hands on just really neat things. I mean her birth certificate and a replica of the coat of many colors. Actually it's a replica. Because you know. Intrigue fashion was continued to be handed down so that code is is longtime because it was down the many more kids after dolly but Her mom made another one for on us to put on display. So you're gonna see the coat of many colors. You're going to see movies threats and costumes from her movies. You're going to see you know dresses. Steve warranty to award ceremonies. You're going to see her awards museums. Fantastic there's also a replica of her. We like to call it the tennessee mountain home. So if you don't know dolly was one of or is one of twelve children so she grew in a very small home and so we need to put that in the context of walking through this house credible. You're like how limped year. The beginnings replica of the home. In what i mean by replicated. Her brother built it. Her mother decorated it. So it's not the home. She grew up in. But it is true to representations of of dali's. You're gonna say you know things like that in the park. There's there's there's smaller things like a popular. Eatery is drive in will read is actually a nod to the very first place. Dolly parton had a hamburger so easter eggs. You know the pines theater another location. That people don't know but that's where she had her first concert. So there's lots of things throughout the park that it's not in your face dali if you want that there are different areas. Not the whole. It's not all dolly all the time. So there's there's a lot but you have to kind of know where you're looking. Yeah i remember go into dollywood way back might have been the early nineties and then just recently. My daughter's chorale group went for to sing at dollywood. And i was shocked at all of the roller coasters. I mean there are rides galore. Can you talk a little bit. About what kinds of rides and attractions are dollywood. Mentioned some of it but talk about more than rides and stuff. Yeah you know. A lot of people don't realize that jolly win actually is a fantastic coaster park. You know a lot of people Thinking oh it's it's probably small little entertainment park actually does quite a few of the the big name coasters that the coaster enthusiasts talking about so yet we have our parking one hundred sixty acres. And we've got eight bay coasters so we've got lightning rod which you know we love and we're very proud to to reintroduce this year. I had lots of work in the off. Season practically brand new track thunderhead. That's a wooden coaster while eagle was the first wing coaster in the state So we liked to go. After unique rides we have fire chaser. Express which is a considered a family coaster. The reason is considered family is because it has a very low height requirements. Thirty nine inches. My actually two little boys and both of them were writing. Fire taser express when they were three. So you know on a coaster is kinda crazy but it's a fun unique ride. It launched as you out of the station forward but then by the time you're ending the ride you get launched backward. So that's it's a dual launch coaster. So that's a lot of fun so we we look for a lot of the The rides that are unique or that offer something that people haven't experienced

Dollywood Dollywood Foundation Bali Dollywood Dollywood Amber Dolly Parton Dali Steve Warranty Tennessee Mountain Ireland Amber Pines Theater Robin Davis Australia Canada UK Nashville Dolly United States
World in much better place to fight desert locust scourge  UNs FAO

UN News

07:50 min | 1 year ago

World in much better place to fight desert locust scourge UNs FAO

"It's been described as a biological time bomb the worst upsurge in decades this time last year. Swans of desert locusts started to spread across countries in the horn of africa devastating crops and people's livelihoods. Fa yours emergency campaign appealed for urgent action to avoid a looming locust plague and humanitarian crisis. Now one year on. I'll we winning the fight. I put that question to senior locust. Forecasting officer keith pressman case when we spoke a year ago or it was just as the desert locust swarms with starting to invade the horn of africa. Could you briefly sum up the events of the last you well. A lot has happened in the past year. The last time we spoke a year ago swarms or just invading kenya in the horn of africa. They're spreading through other countries in the region. And since that time now there has been several generations a breeding. So what that means is that the locust numbers had just increased further and this is mainly due to exceptionally good weather. Conditions for the locus. The the problem did not remain only in the horn of africa but last summer there is a very important threat to west africa. Fortunately that did not occur but there was an additional extension of the current upsurge in southwest asia so in countries like iran pakistan and india. Fortunately the end of the summer. I very intensive efforts of those countries. The app surge was brought under control there but it still remains in the greater horn of africa. So that means them. Kenya's mali ethiopia dan and yemen. And that's that's what we're facing now again this year. And it's very interesting because you know when we last spoke a year ago. I mentioned swarms invading kenya. Well that's what they're doing again now and they started invading kenya from the north from eastern ethiopia from central somalia. I'm just before christmas and this was predicted so similarly to what happened last year again is not a surprise. We were expecting this and are we in a better position now. Are we better place to fight the desert lucasville. Much much better. You know last year at this time. We're in a very very precarious situation. We had you know. Huge numbers of locust swarms had developed and were moving in invading countries. That had not seen logos for seventy years. You know such as kenya other countries. That was a worse situation and more than a quarter of a century. They just simply were not prepared to respond to such a large scale invasion. They weren't trained. They had no resources. I'm no vehicles no spray equipment. No pesticides no aircraft. You know no logisticians. You know all of the elements components that you need in order to invoke control campaign so we were really. Let's say trying to catch up very quickly. We had no funding you know. Let's say desperate collectively desperate. I should say and the country's nfl. We're obviously we're scrambling doing the best. We could have that time but it was not enough we had to really really upscale and that's what's been achieved so now here we are in january twenty twenty one. It means we have everything in place. Yes we do have shortages of funding to keep those operations going in. This is extremely critical. But at least we're not at the stage of having to look for aircraft or having having to order equipment from abroad and wait for it to be delivered. All of the countries have those Elements in place. The faa ledge. Emergency response has seen incredible. International support including the mobilization of funds to tackle the small towns and prevent a humanitarian crisis always succeeding in the fight against desert. Lucas that show. We are succeeding. Yes if we had not been what we've been doing for the past year we would have seen a play by now. You know swarms from west africa to india from the equator to the mediterranean. We don't see that so. I think that that's confirmation that we are succeeding. We have probably less locust swarms than we did a year ago. A doesn't mean that you know we can sit back and relax but you know. There's a lot of work to do but i think the response as you mentioned from the international community has been exceptionally good globally. A more than two point. Eight million hectares retreated and twenty twenty. And that's an extraordinary achievement. These efforts of course they've saved enormous amounts of crop production an estimated two point seven million tons of crops or save last year. That's enough you know to feed eighteen million people for an entire year. The cost of that That was saved is something around eight hundred million dollars and you put that into balance with you. Know what did it costs to save that production we received last year. One hundred and ninety four million dollars so with that investment were able to save you know eight hundred million dollars or the food in additional able to to protect and safeguard one point two million households their livelihood. It's so you know our desert. Locusts extremely devastating. Obviously the response in the pasture has been exceptionally good. And of course you have to remember. We're competing against other emergencies. Such as covid nineteen indeed twenty twenty was a particularly challenging year. What can we expect for the will. The current upsurge continuing the problem. Is that the weather. Continues to favor the locus and you know. In the past locus upsurges lukas plagues they collapse because of two factors on because of the human intervention. You know the control operations everything that. We're trying to do to reduce locus numbers and a failure in the weather at and so far we're saying the former i'm we see those upskilled control operations working very well. I mean more than twenty one aircraft or an operation in eastern africa. But we haven't seen the break in the weather. We had again an extraordinary event last month in the horn of africa. Right exactly where the locust were we had a cyclone in december. Cyclones don't occur in the horn of africa december. But this is the second year in a row where we've had that so until we see you know kind of a break in the weather. And what does that mean. It means a failure of seasonal rains essentially or very unusually cold temperatures or strange wins that might carry all the locus into the ocean and where they would paris but until we see that we still have the challenge to to manage. This locus upsurge and try to to reduce impacts on food security and people's livelihood so for this year twenty twenty one and basically from now until summertime. We need eighty million dollars and the majority of this would be spent on maintaining those essential control operations by air and by ground as well as protecting the livelihoods. That was cave craftsman. Faa's seniors locust forrcasting.

Kenya Africa Keith Pressman Ethiopia West Africa Southwest Asia Mali India Yemen Somalia Pakistan Iran FAA NFL Lucas Mediterranean
Where to Invest First by Derick Van Ness

Optimal Finance Daily

04:17 min | 1 year ago

Where to Invest First by Derick Van Ness

"Where to invest i by derek. Van ness of big life financial dot com. What i'm about to say is controversial. So-called pundits don't want you to know this in eliminates reliance on them they become obsolete su. Here's the unspoken but important truth. Nothing is more vital than investing in yourself. You are the key to everything in your life without you know doors open. No opportunities are unlocked if you are worthless hopeless and helpless than your results will be the same your finances. Your relationships your health without these. What is life were yet. You'll know that you suck that can be crippling and you playing small. You can't let it. You were the only one who can choose nobody else chooses. This verdict or can take action for you. So what do you do. Becoming strong is the answer. Now so you can bulldoze or take advantage of others the complete opposite strength to become so valuable that others don't wanna live without you and what you've created. You know you've accomplished us when it's as if you've become a great lover in their life without you there existence doesn't taste nearly as delicious. You are creating the music they dance to. At that point they will do whatever it takes to keep you around. You have become the soil where they want to lay their seeds and grow their life. This is the goal. It may start slow but it doesn't have to quantum leaps exist but you'll need to suspend your current beliefs to see them. He needs to paint from a blank canvas. Not the one with your current picture of life. It sounds scary. But that's why it's a leap as you get. Better sodas your life. It's a simple equation. And you are the key variable the multiplier that expands everything in your path ambitious. This means becoming indispensable the key asset strive to become the wheel rather than a cog in the wheel. Someone whose value is so powerful that you're not dependent on outside circumstances for your success. This is non-negotiable if you want freedom your primary business or income will dictate the lion share of your financial standing. This is your foundation the rock upon which will build your kingdom. You must master your craft so that you can access resources without proper resources. It's difficult to become your best self. Your financial success will go a long way and paving the smooth road for your relationships in health. Money isn't the answer. But it's far better than poverty if you want true success if your goal is to be a contribution to the world when you invest in yourself. The possible returns are unlimited literally. Where else can you invest five thousand dollars and make six figures. I did it you can too. I spent sixty thousand dollars learning to invest in real estate and it has made me several million dollars. I've spent six figures in seminars trainings in self-improvement and business courses they returned triple digit returns. Even better they continue to earn for me each day. More business income better relationships healthier and happier lifestyle. More intimacy with my creator. So this is your warning. Success isn't somewhere out there. It's an here invest in your human capacity. Your skills and your business you are the craftsmen who will scope the picture of your life. So focus on being the best crossman. Possible once you're performing at a high level and the money is flowing then we can talk about the framework to take you. Even higher optimize cashflow build assets save taxes as you become more successful. You'll need better systems for saving growing and protecting your assets. Until so then dropped the distractions focus on the most important thing developing yourself and your business live the life you were meant to live pursue. Excellence and all you do. The world's will reward you with a rich life and not just financially. You'll experience more love appreciation and gratitude. Best of all. You'll sleep better knowing the world is better because you existed

Van Ness Derek
How Your Attachment Style Affects Your Mental and Financial Health in a Relationship

The Mental Health and Wealth Show

04:04 min | 1 year ago

How Your Attachment Style Affects Your Mental and Financial Health in a Relationship

"I am interviewing ginger dean psychotherapist and founder of loving me after we her specialty is helping women overcome heartbreak. Increased self love and confidence after toxic relationship so they can become the best version of themselves. Love it thank you show. Thank you for having me. Melania it yeah. I'm so excited that you're here. You know we've gone way back for a while in the personal finance base. And i love what you're doing with loving me after we. I love your instagram. Your facebook group in everything that you're doing so you know before we jump into the questions i'd love for you to just tar audience a little bit about what you do and the community that you've started all right so my name is ginger dean and as you said i am the founder of loving the after we and that's where i help women healing after toxic relationships increase their confidence so they can become the best version of themselves so that might mean we cover a lot of topics around codependency toxic relationships childhood trauma attachment issues of course topics around narcissistic abuse. Do come up. But it's probably not my central focus but those are pretty much essential issues that we cover over loving me after way. It is such a helpful community. And i have to say that you know. I went through an incredibly devastating up three years ago. I ended my nine year relationship. That was probably the hardest thing i ever did. I didn't realize it was codependent. Until afterwards and you know. Because i had all of this these feelings of like why do i feel like my life has ended. And why is everything so hard. And then i got into really toxic. Rebound where i was always wanting more and he was always stand offish in that really how i kind of got turned onto this book called attached which was completely life-changing eye-opening. I feel like i read attached and suddenly everything made sense. I was like oh. This is why is behave. The way behaved in everyone relationship like a classic love anxious not not proud of it but it was good for me to realize that. Oh this is actually thing and as a love anxious person. I've attracted a avoid types and you know just like magnets and we just can't give each other what they want so new. That really just completely changed my life. And i just dug into the research really gave me insight into why behave the way. Behave my own relationships Happy to report that. I'm in a new relationship with a securely. Attached person in my own behavior has changed. And i've done so much healing in the past three years. So can you explain to our audience a little bit about attachment styles and how they affect relationships. Because to be quite honest i never even knew about them until after this break up rebound when i was like why am i in such a mess and you know it just opened up my eyes. So can you share that with our audience. Our craftsman styles are developed based on. You know how we were raised for example. Our caregivers are source. Figures to like teachers coaches mentors grandparents. Aunts and guest also our parents and so what can happen is depending on how we were raised. The weekend ended up being either secure anxious. Fearful avoiding or dismissive avoidance and so with the anxious types. You'll find that they're very overly concerned about whether or not their partners loved them. They will often. You know audition performance relationships. They're very hypersensitive to abandonment issues whether thoughts or just the perception around abandonment and rejection until they're often preoccupied with abandonment. However because they haven't really learned how to become secure because that was never really modeled for them. They tend to go after the partners that modeled how their parents were growing up. So if you're a parent was you know for example. And it doesn't have to be that it was. They were deliberately emotionally neglectful.

Ginger Dean Melania Facebook
"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

Essential Craftsman Podcast

07:57 min | 1 year ago

"craftsman" Discussed on Essential Craftsman Podcast

"John thanks for taking the time to come and chat with us today. How's it. How's it going on doing great man. Thanks for having me. will you give us. I read your bio on your website. But will you give me in the audience of big picture of your background and kind of have to where you are now in. kind of. Give us the backstory. Yeah sir so by education and training or by just sending a lot of tuition money to the university of tennessee. I eventually ended up with a couple of engineering degrees. So i started my career in construction even though that might offend some people when this always used to be an engineer i make fun of engineers used to be one but i got a degree in civil engineering and then a master's in structural engineering and then went out and did the engineering thing for several years and then realized i don't really know how to build anything and i wanted to get out on the job site so transition from i'd say transition from engineering into construction. I really got laid off from the engineering firm. Heart was working for <hes>. In went and joined project management team for large commercial contractor that. Put me out on large commercial sites <hes>. Building all sorts of seven are really really like that <hes>. Did that for a few years than my way. Up working for some architects and then for real estate developer <unk>. Doing construction management so. I ended up traveling around the country building commercial real estate projects. You know big stores in the out lot developing out lots and all of that kind of stuff in that for several years. And by this time i was married had five kids now so the second kid was on the way my wife was like. I'm glad you're enjoying your job but <hes>. You gotta stick around mean. I was on the road three or four days a week wherever the projects were so. That was my first business. Started back in. Two thousand five was a construction management and real estate development company. I'm here in knoxville tennessee. So as doing that work here locally then two thousand eight hit and banks were not lending money to real estate developers anymore <hes>. So i transitioned from there and started a remodeling in general contracting business <unk>. People these days called a pivot. I didn't realize pivoting at the time. I just time. I had four kids. Three four came back them <hes>. So <hes> put the tool belt on and started a small construction company. Built it up from there and then one of my subcontractors might trim and melwork subcontractor young guy. We went to church together. His business was blowing up because he got into the high end. Trim and melwork work <hes>. Market here in our area and typical difficult construction business owner great craftsmen horrible business person and he approached me one day and said man. Your i like the way that you run your construction business and everything's always organized <hes>. I wanna talk to you about how to run a better business. So we met up for lunch and was talking to him about that and giving them some tips and tricks. And and i didn't know he was interviewing me at the time he said. Okay well i think. I need to hire somebody to run my construction business. Much mill work company and <hes>. He's an acid yeah. I think you should do that. Because you're a horrible business person but you're an awesome. You're awesome craftsmen in great with the guys out in the field and the work was just unbelievable and he just said okay. I want you to do it. And so i thought i was like i got my own thing going on. I'm okay and he's a great salesman and he's like listen. You have a small construction company is gonna take you twenty years to get where you want to be. I'm already in those projects as a subcontractor we've landed some really high end stuff but this business that we just acquired meaning that the projects coming up he said it's gonna put me out of business doing these projects because i don't know what i'm doing and <hes>. He he so he said <hes>. I want you to come and run the business. And i thought i bluff bluffing okay. The only way. I'm going to run your business that you let me run the business. You run the field our on the business. But i'm i'm in charge of the business side of it. And he said no problem and he literally pulled out of manila folder with the entire business and it just random paper. Here's the business slid across the table and said you run it and went home talked to my wife and said this is a crazy idea. This is really stupid but my friends gonna suffer and he was right. It was an opportunity to get on some really into high level projects high end projects that i'd already always been wanting to do in such kind of step back and said all right. Maybe we should do this and <hes>. So bit the bullet went on went. Joined that team as a as the chief operating officer and at the time we had six guys out in the field in within eighteen months we were at twenty two guys in. He was in debt and not making any money. And we kinda turn that around and and that wasn't all me. We had great team a great owner. That had a really good vision and i was just the execute and putting systems in place. Oh did that for about four years and then got another crazy idea saying. Hey what i've done with my businesses and now with this treadmill work business. I think i see the problem here. Within an industry. I can help a lot more business. Owners with systems. All i know construction. It's all i've ever done so after about four years of being the executive there. I left that that job and started writing books and and speaking at industry events and now it's four years later and i've been doing coaching and consulting work strictly for construction business owners since those back in twenty sixteen. So yeah right up for years. We've been doing this <hes>. Before we move on but are you recommending to your kids. They go to college. You spend a lotta time in college. You said a master's in engineering of some type so talk about that for a second. Are you gonna man. You're gonna make mom hears this. He's gonna get offended. And it. Every time i say but <hes> m. i. encouraging my kids to go to college no not specifically i'm encouraging my kids to develop skills in areas that interest them and figuring out how they can make money at it now. Some of those things that some of my kids are interested in now will require them to go to college. But especially as we're seeing in twenty twenty man colleges change. They're still the same tuition rate but they're not allowing you to go on campus and all of the other things that higher said that here's where value is. Now they're saying nope can't come to campus. We're going to do all virtually. So i think the whole world has changed so but to answer your question. No i don't encourage my kids to go to 'cause. I don't discourage them from going to college. The i feel like it's my job as a parent when you're out on your own which i got four boys in a baby girl. I say baby girl. she's five. She's always going to be my baby girl. The boys they're on their own at eighteen. You better figure out how you're gonna make money at eighteen and if that means you're going to college then you know what i took me. I was on the five year plan to get my undergraduate now. Four year plan right but i worked the entire time and paid for most of my most of my college through work. They can do the same thing so <hes>. And it looked statistically it takes most people at least six years to get an undergraduate degree and only forty percent of incoming freshman even graduate with a degree at all. So yeah do. I encourage them to go that path. Only if it interests them. Only only if that's that's where their future light. Hey you know. One of my kids wants to be a doctor yet. You probably better go to college. I have several of them that are interested in computer stuff in graphic design and other things and got my fourteen year old son this year to start working for a contractor and over the summer and he came home with more money and more cash in his pocket. And said yeah. That's what happens when you go work. And that's what happened with skill so

sean van dyke sean Irby Sean chris amazon
Interview With Shawn Van Dyke

Essential Craftsman Podcast

07:57 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Shawn Van Dyke

"John thanks for taking the time to come and chat with us today. How's it. How's it going on doing great man. Thanks for having me. will you give us. I read your bio on your website. But will you give me in the audience of big picture of your background and kind of have to where you are now in. kind of. Give us the backstory. Yeah sir so by education and training or by just sending a lot of tuition money to the university of tennessee. I eventually ended up with a couple of engineering degrees. So i started my career in construction even though that might offend some people when this always used to be an engineer i make fun of engineers used to be one but i got a degree in civil engineering and then a master's in structural engineering and then went out and did the engineering thing for several years and then realized i don't really know how to build anything and i wanted to get out on the job site so transition from i'd say transition from engineering into construction. I really got laid off from the engineering firm. Heart was working for In went and joined project management team for large commercial contractor that. Put me out on large commercial sites Building all sorts of seven are really really like that Did that for a few years than my way. Up working for some architects and then for real estate developer Doing construction management so. I ended up traveling around the country building commercial real estate projects. You know big stores in the out lot developing out lots and all of that kind of stuff in that for several years. And by this time i was married had five kids now so the second kid was on the way my wife was like. I'm glad you're enjoying your job but You gotta stick around mean. I was on the road three or four days a week wherever the projects were so. That was my first business. Started back in. Two thousand five was a construction management and real estate development company. I'm here in knoxville tennessee. So as doing that work here locally then two thousand eight hit and banks were not lending money to real estate developers anymore So i transitioned from there and started a remodeling in general contracting business People these days called a pivot. I didn't realize pivoting at the time. I just time. I had four kids. Three four came back them So put the tool belt on and started a small construction company. Built it up from there and then one of my subcontractors might trim and melwork subcontractor young guy. We went to church together. His business was blowing up because he got into the high end. Trim and melwork work Market here in our area and typical difficult construction business owner great craftsmen horrible business person and he approached me one day and said man. Your i like the way that you run your construction business and everything's always organized I wanna talk to you about how to run a better business. So we met up for lunch and was talking to him about that and giving them some tips and tricks. And and i didn't know he was interviewing me at the time he said. Okay well i think. I need to hire somebody to run my construction business. Much mill work company and He's an acid yeah. I think you should do that. Because you're a horrible business person but you're an awesome. You're awesome craftsmen in great with the guys out in the field and the work was just unbelievable and he just said okay. I want you to do it. And so i thought i was like i got my own thing going on. I'm okay and he's a great salesman and he's like listen. You have a small construction company is gonna take you twenty years to get where you want to be. I'm already in those projects as a subcontractor we've landed some really high end stuff but this business that we just acquired meaning that the projects coming up he said it's gonna put me out of business doing these projects because i don't know what i'm doing and He he so he said I want you to come and run the business. And i thought i bluff bluffing okay. The only way. I'm going to run your business that you let me run the business. You run the field our on the business. But i'm i'm in charge of the business side of it. And he said no problem and he literally pulled out of manila folder with the entire business and it just random paper. Here's the business slid across the table and said you run it and went home talked to my wife and said this is a crazy idea. This is really stupid but my friends gonna suffer and he was right. It was an opportunity to get on some really into high level projects high end projects that i'd already always been wanting to do in such kind of step back and said all right. Maybe we should do this and So bit the bullet went on went. Joined that team as a as the chief operating officer and at the time we had six guys out in the field in within eighteen months we were at twenty two guys in. He was in debt and not making any money. And we kinda turn that around and and that wasn't all me. We had great team a great owner. That had a really good vision and i was just the execute and putting systems in place. Oh did that for about four years and then got another crazy idea saying. Hey what i've done with my businesses and now with this treadmill work business. I think i see the problem here. Within an industry. I can help a lot more business. Owners with systems. All i know construction. It's all i've ever done so after about four years of being the executive there. I left that that job and started writing books and and speaking at industry events and now it's four years later and i've been doing coaching and consulting work strictly for construction business owners since those back in twenty sixteen. So yeah right up for years. We've been doing this Before we move on but are you recommending to your kids. They go to college. You spend a lotta time in college. You said a master's in engineering of some type so talk about that for a second. Are you gonna man. You're gonna make mom hears this. He's gonna get offended. And it. Every time i say but m. i. encouraging my kids to go to college no not specifically i'm encouraging my kids to develop skills in areas that interest them and figuring out how they can make money at it now. Some of those things that some of my kids are interested in now will require them to go to college. But especially as we're seeing in twenty twenty man colleges change. They're still the same tuition rate but they're not allowing you to go on campus and all of the other things that higher said that here's where value is. Now they're saying nope can't come to campus. We're going to do all virtually. So i think the whole world has changed so but to answer your question. No i don't encourage my kids to go to 'cause. I don't discourage them from going to college. The i feel like it's my job as a parent when you're out on your own which i got four boys in a baby girl. I say baby girl. she's five. She's always going to be my baby girl. The boys they're on their own at eighteen. You better figure out how you're gonna make money at eighteen and if that means you're going to college then you know what i took me. I was on the five year plan to get my undergraduate now. Four year plan right but i worked the entire time and paid for most of my most of my college through work. They can do the same thing so And it looked statistically it takes most people at least six years to get an undergraduate degree and only forty percent of incoming freshman even graduate with a degree at all. So yeah do. I encourage them to go that path. Only if it interests them. Only only if that's that's where their future light. Hey you know. One of my kids wants to be a doctor yet. You probably better go to college. I have several of them that are interested in computer stuff in graphic design and other things and got my fourteen year old son this year to start working for a contractor and over the summer and he came home with more money and more cash in his pocket. And said yeah. That's what happens when you go work. And that's what happened with skill so

Melwork University Of Tennessee Knoxville Tennessee John Manila
Turning Your Passion Into Sustainable Work with Zachariah Moreno

Cafe con Pam Podcast

04:33 min | 2 years ago

Turning Your Passion Into Sustainable Work with Zachariah Moreno

"Hello welcome to go bam good morning. We're actually doing this during coffee. Time my favorite time of day. Thank you for having me. Thank you for coming on so zach. Tell us who you are. What's your heritage where you come from. I'm a mexican. American here in california oakland more specifically from the central valley of california grew up can actually west sacramento. You know went to school. They're pretty normal. Giant mexican family in california and Always had a love for creativity and art and different forms of expressing the that creativity so throughout my journey. That has come to life in a couple of different. Mediums started in kind of ink on paper transition to acrylic on canvas. art shows. Some awards wanted to do that professionally struggled to find a way to actually passion into sustainable work. Glad i saw that problem as early as i did. But then you know it always had an affinity for technology because of my my father's background been privileged to To be exposed to some technology pretty pretty early on and then i realized i could combine those two things together and make artwork and creativity with technology with squad. Cast is kind of the most recent body of that and that's actually another level of helping others be creative and connect and be creative with each other with their guests to record podcast interviews. That sound awesome from anywhere in the world. They do okay. So we're gonna pack all that story because this is what we do. So you're mexican american. Are you first generation. Second third generation. Right hey do how is that. I'm i yeah. I've actually thought about you know. My grandparents were barely born in the united states. A believe their family crossed the border into texas when they were like. I think my grandpa was actually. My grandmother was actually pregnant with him. when she came to america and i believe my grandma was a little girl when they crossed over into texas so work their way over to california and my grandpa was very fortunate to have an uncle who owned some farmland essentially in in the central valley here in in yolo county. They were farmworkers. The added bonus that he had is that his uncle rufus. I've never really gotten this full story. But he was able to own his own farm so he of course worked with farmworkers. They were out there in the field with them every day. My grandma grandpa learned to drive was he was super young was driving people back and forth from the fields and he's got gnarly scars all over his legs from like being out in in the different agricultural environments and walking around out there all day you know really exposed to that lifestyle and then became a sheriff's officer and later most of his career. He was a one of the best saw filers on the west coast. That's not a job really anymore. What is it at the time. These giant lumber companies would need these giant saw blades to take the raw number that they would bring in kind of millet down into usable lumber. So my grandpa started out in the yard stacking green lumber which is full of water. So it's incredibly woods heavy anyway but when it's fresh like that it's incredibly heavy so i'm sure he was pretty ripped back then he still is. He's in his nineties now. He's my favorite person and worked his way up to I guess it's kind of an apprentice situation where studied under somebody. He can take a piece of metal and make a giant saab laid out of it and Make that saw blade last for a very long time. And i guess there's very few people who can do that. He was very skilled skilled craftsman still to this day. Does a lot of woodworking and he's ninety nine only has he taught you how to make a late. He's taught me like on paper and shown me. He has a workshop that i helped build and we built in his backyard woodworking shop. And so does my dad. So this is what i mean about like creativity and craftsmanship. I think it goes very deep like my grandpa's. He's not a like a graphic artist. He's a very skilled technical drawing kind of pre autocad so he was What i would say is the first generation and my grandma you know to. That's how they match. She was one of the farm workers on his uncle's farm.

California Central Valley Zach Oakland Sacramento Texas United States Yolo County Rufus Scars The West Coast
What is Natural Moral Law? with Dr. Ross Inman

Knowing Faith

06:03 min | 2 years ago

What is Natural Moral Law? with Dr. Ross Inman

"So here's the big question what is natural moral law and what does it have to do with genesis? Excellent question was I see it I go conception of natural moral law. Entails at least the following to commitments. So the first commitment would be something like this. That God has built into the natural created order a moral dimension. So just as you might think, a piece of wood has sort of natural grain to it that. So to the moral realm has a natural grain too it that's grounded in God's creation intentional purposes. So, that would be the first tenant which all impact here in a second, and then the second thing would be that God has so created human beings with unique capacity to both know and live in accordance with this moral grain for the sake of living well I think one passage that's absolutely insightful in biblically rich which I wish we had more time to unpack is proverbs eight, twenty to thirty six. You might be asking what is proverbs eight, twenty to thirty, six with Genesis wanted to help to show you. So. If you permit me, let me just read very quickly a twenty to thirty six proverbs chapter eight. So this is what twenty two says. The Lord possessed me at the beginning of his work, the first of his acts of all ages ago. I. Was set up at the first before the beginning of the Earth when there were no depths, I was brought forth when there were no springs abounding with water before the mountains have been shaped before the hills I was brought forth before he had made the earth with its fields or the first of the dust of the world when. He established the heavens there when he drew a circle on the face of the deep when he made firm the skies above when he established the fountains of the deep when he assigned to the sea, its limit so that the waters might not transgress his command when he marked out the foundations of the Earth then I was beside him like a master workman and I was daily his delight rejoicing before him always rejoicing in his inhabited world and delighting in the children, of ma'am. And now it was sons listen to me blessed are those who keep my waves here instruction and be wise and do not neglect it less. It is the one who listens to me watching daily at my gates waiting beside my doors for whoever finds me finds life and obtains favor from the Lord but he fails to find mean injures himself. So a proverbs aid is is a wonderful passage that a uses a literary device here with respect to the personification of wisdom. So the idea your calls that we have a god has this intimate companion here. From the first act of creation onwards in in its denoting the fact that all of God's creative acts from the creation of the starry expanse to the separation of male and female there founded on and patterned after God's wisdom. So God. In proverbs eight here is is depicted as an expert craftsman master Workman's beautiful picture really So he's sort sort of starts with this meticulous plan. Any sort of skillfully fashions out of an unstructured pile of material something with strength. And Integrity it's actually really interesting here in proverbs eight, we have in a mere eight verses, a span of eight from twenty to thirty. There are eleven verbs here that denote God's conferral of order structure and pattern on creation. This is what I was referencing here a natural grain to the cosmic order. So for example, God's set up. He brought forth. He shaped he made he established he drew a circle very interesting sort of craftsmanship. Pictures. Here he made firm he assigned a limit any marked out the boundaries of his creation with skillful precision. And Care. So you have you have these. Images that portray God is the master workmanship in you just can't read proverbs eight Kyle without without your mind going back to genesis one through two. So it was beautiful about proverbs eight is just naturally points back to the original creation account were I think God's skillful craftsmanship in creation is on full display. In particular, we see in Genesis a genesis chapter one God will separating things apart and he's binding them together again, his craftsmanship on full display here. So for example, in Genesis, one, God separating light from darkness, he's separating the waters above from the waters below the expanse he's separating day from night he's separating see from land dwelling creatures sue separating. From the rest of the creation, he separating male from female, and he's separating of the seventh day of rest from the rest of the six days of his pre more. So you see him not only separating apart, but you actually see him interestingly enough uniting things together as well. And I think there are three important ways your kyle in in which we see God his master craftsmanship on display in binding things together and giving them natural integrity in strength. So first of all we have genesis one, twenty, seven. When God Unites Himself to human beings by making them in his divine image were made to reflect the radiance in the purposes of God. So there's something about the way that we are constructed Kyle. that. That makes the case that God is our final ultimate end. He is our greatest. Good. Were made in the image and likeness of this being who is a relational through and through and that nothing else can satisfy but union with God's

Genesis Kyle Earth Master Workman Kyle.
Why Lionel Messi Wants Out of FC Barcelona

ESPN Daily

03:05 min | 2 years ago

Why Lionel Messi Wants Out of FC Barcelona

"Sam borden six years ago we were in Brazil together and my facial hair situation was not good. I mean that isn't what stands out for me Pablo but. I think I. Think we all have different memories of experiences. SAMBORN is a global sports correspondent for ESPN and kind enough to forget the unfortunate beard I grew for five weeks while we were covering the two thousand fourteen World Cup it's actually kind of funny right I mean now World Cup in Brazil Lionel Messi was a big part of the story there and obviously is a big part of the story today to. We got to see Leo Messi in a World Cup final Sam and you fast forward six years and I bring you here today because Messi announced last week that he wants to leave F c Barcelona after a nearly seventeen year stint. Tell me why this is a big deal. The obvious answer is that Messi is the most famous athlete on the planet may be one of the most famous people in the entire world. He is not just a generational star he is a star that defines a sport. When you talk about people that are known all over the world for being absolute craftsmen absolute artisans at what they do messy is that guy? Governor. From the magical. Curiel who knows? He's a little guy from Argentina, who is an absolute wizard with a soccer ball? Hey, just tonsure. RIP UP OF REASON A perennial. He's magical. He's calculating. He's one of the most creative players with sport has ever seen. I said. I think one of the things that has always made him even bigger than just. As, see and other sports these his diminutive stature, he's not a giant he's not the one of these massive bodies. I've been in front of him several times and I'm five ten and I looked down on him quite a bit. To me that's what makes him during and beloved by so many people is that he kind of Rome's among giants and somehow finds a way to succeed in a way that no other player ever has coming up with gold medal messy. He made Barcelona. The juggernaut that it is today and him moving on that say massive seismic shift, not just in soccer but in sports.

Lionel Messi Curiel Sam Borden Barcelona Brazil Soccer Facial Hair Espn Gold Medal Pablo Rome Argentina
The Monster Movie Hall of Fame and 'The Invisible Man'

The Big Picture

13:11 min | 2 years ago

The Monster Movie Hall of Fame and 'The Invisible Man'

"Later in the show. I'll have an interview with Lebron L. The writer director of the new updated edition of the invisible man. A movie that shifts the perspective of the classic horror movie to the victim in this case played by the Amazing Elizabeth Moss when Elsa Clever Jonah craftsman and we had a fun chat about how he's reinventing the work of the historic universal monster movies and some of his aides filmaker. Heroes like James Cameron and Paul Hogan and John Carpenter but I I am joined by ringer contributor and one of the best film minds around Adam Neiman. Thanks for joining me Adam. Thanks for having me Adam. We're here to build another wing in the movie hall of fame. Today we said post and beam on the monster movie hall of fame. Now you know monster. Movies are tricky because there are two distinctions between them. One is your classical scare movie that enrapture audiences but maybe doesn't really mean very much and then. The other is the load-bearing bearing metaphorical monster that communicate something to the world about maybe it's ills or human psychology or things of that nature I assume that you are more fan of the latter. But May maybe that's not the case. I think I'm a fan of the ladder when it's less calculated You know the the joke I liked to tell his one day. Someone's GonNa make really good specific movie about a social problem like documentary and then at a press conference the director. She's going to be like this movie's a metaphor for zombies and just waiting for someone to do but I mean I think that in the last couple years because you have some like Jordan. Peele who has spoken not in terms of monster movies but in terms of horror movies. He's talked about you. Know his office for those social thrillers or Social Horror Movies and the metaphorical dimension to them. And so you know because monsters are a subset of horror movies as you say a delivery device for for scares those streams often do cross but yeah. I think some of the best monster movies of all time are definitely ones where monsters represent something whether it's something inside or outside society or something inside or outside people but I'm also just a a big fan of movies. Where like spooky things jump out at people in eat them? So it's a IT'S A. It's a fine balance before we get started on constructing this this list that we've put together here. Do you remember your first monster movie experience at the movie. That felt like a monster movie to me and I mean it it is a monster is when Pinocchio gets swallowed by the whale. Oh yeah which is. Obviously you know I mean there's a biblical reference there to to Joan in the whale and it's You know like for for for kids. Who Who who see Pinocchio? That whale is just nightmarish and terrifying and and gigantic. I mean my dad. I think that's the first movie he ever told you to. Took me to it. Just absolutely scared the hell out of me that and the giant squid in Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea. Same thing oh great both Some Disney spun con there. Well done by in and and you. Well I'm thinking about Pinocchio as you say it and the thing that scared me more than the whale is the sequence in which the boys turn into donkeys boys which is just absolutely disturbing and also kind of metaphorical in its way Not to put too fine a parasite point on it I'm trying to think of my first true scary movie experience. I feel like what I got two young Frankenstein before I got to Frankenstein in. It's funny. How when something like that happens how it can obscure your relationship to movies and I think it actually made me Not so much scared movie theaters but just just sort of happy and smiling and laughing. I tend to laugh at horror movies and monster movies because I get kind of perverse thrill out of them and I so I if young Frankenstein. Ken Count that would be. That would be my number one. I mean obviously. I saw a bunch movies that we'll talk about here on this list that a very young age. And maybe that's an opportunity to just go right into it. So here's what we're going to do. We'RE GOING TO GO CHRONOLOGICALLY. So there's a long history. I would say monster. Movies are essentially as old as movies themselves. So we're going to try to walk through. Essentially I don't know eighty ninety years of movie history and try to capture. What are the absolute most representative interesting compelling fascinating monster movies ever made and the monsters? I think the conversation should really be about the monsters inside of the movies and why they're so effective as devices for either sending those messages or just scaring the shit out of us. So you chosen five. I've chosen five. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA Ariffin vamp little bit. Why don't you give me your first pick going all the way back to the nineteen thirties? Sure and you know it's interesting because now when we've got it arranged chronologically we've got this this interesting blindspot which. Kinda be filled in as we go along. Which is we've both bypassed. The true initial cohort of Universal Monster. Movies right the very late twenties very early thirties because the first movie on my list is King Kong. So I have bypassed Dracula Frankenstein you know bride of Frankenstein Which are all these enduring literary properties that have been made and remade for a long time and I think the thing about King Kong. It just feels like the primal scene for me of monster as spectacle because he's not human sized right. He's not an actor costume he's not You know someone doing an accent or wearing makeup. He's a special effects creation and the thing about the original King Kong. Every time I watch it is. It is just so spectacular visually. In an analog era. You know the the integration of those stop motion special effects into old sets and the exaggerated camera angles on the actors and just the the surrealism of it. I've read that. The actual surrealists the the practicing artists within that within that movement re huge fans of King Kong for one thing. 'cause monster just keeps changing size. You know it's inconsistent it's inconsistent but it's also just stunning because from scene to scene you know when he's just represented by giant hander giants foot or the close ups on the is and then you can also still cut backing these establishing shots and seeing him in these different environments and. I think it's the way also that it goes from this primal island to this urban city. The monster in his home context. And then sort of you know thrashing around in the middle of maternity causing chaos. It's just like the deepest the deepest core horror fantasy. You know that that that I can think of I. I just think it's absolutely astonishing and I never tire of watching it. It's funny I think a lot of the monsters on our list Get repeated and reused and re contextualize over and over again the thing with King Kong is is the actual character of King Kong comes up over and over and over and over again. We're getting another King Kong movie this year. And for whatever reason I would say between King Kong and Godzilla. Those are really the only two significant monsters that we never tire of somehow. That don't don't expire. You know I think that the idea behind what King Kong represents and there's obviously been an extraordinary amount of both academic critical just fun writing about What happens when colonialists enter a less developed world and attempt to steal things from it But in addition to that it is this grand spectacle and we talk a lot on the show about is. It doesn't move. You have a reason to be seen in a movie theater. Then I feel like the original King. Kong is is one of the landmark achievements and you have to see this on a giant screen. There's nowhere else for to be seen. We'll for sure. I maybe just in terms of bridging King Kong with those other brand name monsters of the period he in genders the same kind of complex sympathy. That you have with Boris. Karloff Frankenstein. Right I mean you even have a rhyme in those two movies wherein Frankenstein. He picks the little girl up by the river without doing what he's doing. And you know drowns her accidentally and certainly king kongs intentions towards Aren't violent. They're they're in his sort of chivalrous or desirous or somewhere in between there. I think the reason he endures an even the point that God's Zilla as a character eventually got bent in King kongs direction because the original godzillas dot anthropomorphized sympathetic at all. And then over the years. And they made Godzilla more like King Kong. I think being inside that sort of like destructive force but you're also misunderstood and you're more a victim of circumstance than anything else that's a really appealing escapist fantasy for filmgoers even thinking the original King Kong as terrifying as it is and as brutal as the violences like a people have never seen it. He smush is people into Goo on screen. You know You're still with him and I think that that's a really great monster. Movie needs on some kinds of great monster movies that you need that possible level of identification or sympathy. So it's not just purely a nightmare. I think the original King Kong does that just just amazingly well. So you're next pick actually doesn't do the former thing that you were just describing which is there's no crushing there's no Gu. There's no absolute violence of a kind in your next week. What's your next movie? The next movie I have is is cap. People which is part of a cycle of really low key atmospheric horror movies produced in the mostly in the nineteen forties. Bhai guy named Val Luton and I would say that if you get a chance to see Ken. Jones documentary thou loot man in the shadows. I think it's the best documentary I've ever seen about a filmmaker at particularly about how Luton changed horror movies by using the lack of a budget. And the lack of franchise -able characters. You Know He. He didn't have the roster that universal was working with all these all star. You know horror icons so he made it less more. It's the it's the the the the cinema of of of suggestion and scary around the edges. But it's also movie about people transforming into cats I. It's a booby that plays the the ambiguity of is this or isn't this real up. You know for for a long time but it really does give over to the idea that the main character the heroin does when stimulated or afraid you know actually transform into A cat due to this this this Eastern European mysticism and it's also a movie. I'm sure they'll come later. That gets remade in the eighties and completely liberalised because instead of just talking with someone turning into a cat or remembering someone turning into a cat you actually see it on screen with with special effects and it's It's less effective to me. Do you do you like the Paul schrader version that you're describing the eighties version. I like the Paul schrader version. Because it's wild acid trippy. Paul schrader horror movie. And it's it's glory and it's actually not as full-on like latex hydraulic special effects. His other movies from the period. But I I love the original are you are you. Are you fond of the delude films directed by Jacques Turner? Who did a bunch of the other ones is it a? Is it a a a source of Phantom for you it is? I saw cat people and the Leopard men in a couple of them many many years ago and then actually over Halloween this year my wife and I were looking and you know as I get older Halloween. Getting more and more difficult to program. If we're not gonNA rewatch something. But we watched a couple movies. We watched The criterion collection had the ghost ship which I had never seen which I thought had. It has a very similar approach to kind of What's happening in the shadows? Which is most of his films are using that strategy of not showing the thing and then I watched by myself. The body snatcher and both of them. I thought were pretty great. I mean I this is also a case where I I. I probably saw Kent Jones's documentary before seeing any of the films and while that was a great thing for my film education it also kind of warped perception of the movie because I was seeing it as a kind of intellectual exercise in a way where I understood technique as opposed to some of these other movies that we're GonNa talk about here where I just happened to be nine years old when I saw it in a completely reorganized my brain chemistry in a way but I do like his movies. And especially this one that you've chosen well and then also just the last thing to say but it may be that because it's not special effects and spectacle it anticipates where horror movies would go in the sixties with the idea of the monster within right. I mean here. It's not a an invading apor vampire. It's the idea of a woman who's subconscious and her inner life motivates this transformations client about the link between monstrous and desire and monstrous and repression. Which is why it tends to be. You Know Pretty Beloved Academically but I mean by the sixties. Neither US talk about these movies. But you start having the idea of the human monster in movies like psycho or whatever else and you can kind of trace aligned from the way cat. People stages horror towards that stuff. I think I think that's right. And I think it's probably a capitals nifty double feature with the peg for this film the invisible man because that movie is also as much about.

King Kong Dracula Frankenstein Pinocchio Adam Neiman Paul Schrader Kent Jones King Kongs Ken Count Elizabeth Moss Godzilla James Cameron Lebron L. Director United States Disney Karloff Frankenstein Peele John Carpenter Joan
Demolition Mistake Leads To Wrong Home Being Torn Down In Historic Dallas Neighborhood

Larry Kudlow

00:18 sec | 2 years ago

Demolition Mistake Leads To Wrong Home Being Torn Down In Historic Dallas Neighborhood

"Maker and Irving based demolition company says it will make things right after tearing down the wrong house in Dallas Vickery place neighborhood a pale pink craftsman style home have been purchased by the friend of a friend who suddenly passed away last year Jamie weniger who lives in California was doing work on the home and eventually

Irving Jamie Weniger California Dallas Vickery
The European Drinker

Big Book Podcast

09:53 min | 2 years ago

The European Drinker

"Welcome back my friends to the big book podcast. My name is Howard and I'm an alcoholic sober since nineteen eighty eight one day at a time in this episode the third story in the personal story section of the first edition of alcoholics anonymous published in nineteen thirty nine. It's entitled the European Drinker. The story was also published in the second and third editions of the Big Book but does not appear in the fourth edition and now the European Drinker Preface. Beer and wine were not the answer. I was born in Europe in house to be exact shortly after it had become German and practically grew up with good Rhine wine of song and story. My parents had some vague ideas of making a priest out of me and for some years I attended the Francis in school at Basel Switzerland just across the border about six miles from my home but although I was a good Catholic. The monastic life had little appeal for me very early. I became apprentice to harness. Making an acquired considerable knowledge of upholstering. My daily consumption of wine was about a quart but that was common where I lived. Everybody drank wine and it is true that there was no great amount of drunkenness. But I can remember in my teens that there were a few characters who caused the village heads to nod pityingly and sometimes an anger as they pause to say that sought on Ray or said Pavel. Israel's who drank too much they were undoubtedly. The alcoholics of our village military service was compulsory. And I did my stretch with the class of my age goose-stepping German barracks and taking part in the boxer rebellion in China. My first time at any great distance from home informed parts many a soldier who has been abstemious at home learns to use new and potent drinks so I indulge with my comrades and everything the Faris had to offer I cannot say however that I acquired any craving for hard liquor as a result when I got back to Germany. I settled down to finish my apprenticeship. Drinking the wine of the country as usual many friends of my family had emigrated to America so at Twenty Four. I decided that the United States offered me the opportunity. I was never likely to find in my native land. I came directly to a growing industrial city in the Middle West where I have lived practically ever since I was warmly welcomed by friends of my youth who had preceded me for weeks. After my arrival I was faded and entertained in the already large colony Alsatians in the city among the Germans in their saloons and clubs. I early decided that the wine of America was very inferior stuff and took up beer instead. I soon found work at my trade in harness making. It was still an age of horses but I discovered that harness and saddle making in America was different than anything I had known. Every man in the shop was a specialist and instead of having a variety of jobs to do every day I was compelled to sit all day long at a bench. Doing the same thing and Leslie. I found it very monotonous and wanting a change I found it when I got work as an upholsterer. In a large furniture store fond of singing I joined German singing society which had good club headquarters. There I sat in the evenings enjoying with my friends. Our memories of the old country singing the old songs. We all knew playing simple card games for drinks and consuming great quantities of beer. At that time I could go into any saloon. Have One or two beers walk out and forget about it. I had no desire whatever to sit down at a table and stale whole morning or afternoon drinking certainly at that time. I was one of those who can take it or leave it alone. There had never been any drunkards in my family. I came of good stock of men and women who drank wine all lives as a beverage and while the occasionally got drunk at special celebrations. They were up in about their business the next day prohibition came having regard for the law of the land. I resigned myself to the will of the national legislators and quit drinking altogether not because I had founded harmful. But because I couldn't get what I was accustomed to drink. You can all remember that in the first few months after the change. A great many men who had formerly been used to a few beers every day or an occasional drink of. Whiskey simply quit all alcoholic drinks for the great majority of US however that condition. Didn't last we saw very early. That prohibition wasn't going to work it wasn't very long before home. Brewing was an institution and men began to search fervor shortly for all the recipe books on wine-making but I hardly tasted anything for two years and started in business for myself founding a mattress factory. Which is today an important industrial enterprise in our city. I was doing very well with that. And General upholstering work and there was every indication that I would be financially independent by the time I reached Middle Age. By this time I was married and was paying for a home like most immigrants. I wanted to be somebody and have something and I was very happy and contented as felt success crown my efforts. I miss the old social times of course but had no definite craving even for beer. Successful home brewers among my friends began to invite me to their homes. I decided that if these could make it I would try it myself and so I did. It wasn't very long until I had developed a pretty good brew with uniformity and plenty of authority. I knew the stuff I was making was a lot stronger than I had been used to. But never suspected that steady drinking of it might develop a taste for something even stronger. It wasn't long before the bootlegger wasn't established institution this as in other towns. I was doing well and business and in going around town. I was frequently invited to have a drink in speakeasy. I condone my domestic brewing and the bootleggers and their business. More and more. I form the habit of doing some of my business in the speakeasy and after a time did not need that as an excuse. The speaks usually sold Whiskey. Beer was too bulky and it couldn't be kept in a jug under the counter ready to be dumped when John Law would come around. I was now forming an entirely new drinking technique before long I had a definite taste for hard liquor new nausea and headaches. I had never known before but as in the old days I suffered them out gradually however I suffered so much that I simply had to have the morning after drink. I became what is called a periodical drinker. I was eased out of the business. I had founded and was reduced to doing general upholstery in a small shop. At the back of my house my wife upgraded me often and plenty when she saw that my periodical were gradually losing me. What business I could get. I began to bring bottles in. I had them hidden away in the House and all over my shop and careful concealment. I had all the usual experiences of the alcoholic for I was certainly one by this time sometimes after sobering up after about of several weeks. I would righteously resolved to quit with a great deal of I would throw out full pines. Pour them out and smash the bottles firmly resolved never to take another drink of the stuff. I was going to straighten up in four or five days. I would be hunting all over the place at home and in my workshop for the bottles I had destroyed cursing myself for being damned fool. My periodicals became more frequent until I reached the point where I wanted to devote all my time to drinking working as little as possible and then only when the necessity of my family demanded as soon as I had satisfied. That what I earned as an upholsterer went for liquor I would promise to have jobs done and never do them. My customers lost confidence in me to the point where I retained what business I had only because I was a well trained reputedly fine craftsman best in the business when he's sober. My customers would say and I still had a following who had given me work though. They deplored my habits because they knew the job would be well done when they eventually got it. I had always been a good Catholic possibly not so devoted as I should have been but fairly regular in my attendance at services I had never doubted the existence of the supreme being but now I began to absent myself from the church where I had formerly been a member of the choir. Unfortunately I had no desire to consult my priest about my drinking. In fact I was scared to talk to him about it for. I feared the kind of talk. He would give me unlike many other. Catholics who frequently take pledges for definite periods a year two years or for good. I never had any desire to take a pledge before the priest

America Basel Switzerland Europe Middle West Howard German Barracks Israel United States China Germany Faris RAY Leslie Nausea John Law
Canvas & Hyde: Making Handbags in Brooklyn

American Fashion Podcast

08:44 min | 2 years ago

Canvas & Hyde: Making Handbags in Brooklyn

"Hi Lisa Hi CIA. So you are. You are making handbags in Brooklyn and Italy Iam. You're making handbags in Brooklyn. This is cool. You're doing leather handbags in Brooklyn that's unusual Can you tell us a little bit about how you got to do that? A. K. Well I am when I started this business. I was looking for manufacturer and finding a great skilled craftsmen who can make beautiful bags is like women finding a fabulous hair colorist. It's impossible but once you find one you hold onto them and in fact we've become great friends and I my offices in his factory so I'm really hands on with everything that we make. I'm there on the spot. I'm able to watch an oversee everything from the edge painting to cutting the skins and positioning the dyes onto the letter. And it's I'm I'm very lucky to found someone who's been making bags for thirty years. And how did you get into making bags? Was this a thing for you so about four years ago I started the business and you know I came to live in America in two thousand and eight and I never understood why when you think of luxury handbags. You don't really think of American made you think of Italian and French and maybe Spanish but I could. This is such a great country. You guys do everything. Why couldn't we might beautifully finished incredibly luxury handbags here? Incredible actually So I said about trying to do it and I get it now after spending several years exploring I get the skills. And the craftsmanship left. I mean people didn't do it when people started mass producing in China and offshore. That skill set kind of dissolved in a little. Bit of a way. Here you're didn't get passed on to the next generation so there's a generation that doesn't have that knowledge and the people who do or aging out of the workforce some getting passed on some some is making it through which is kind of a sign of hope but it certainly it. There will never be a time where New York. City's largest industry is the garment business again. This is not a thing because cities won't specialize in that way. No one's going to specialize in the. It's well I don't. I don't know that sad. I think it's kind of human progress. We don't need that many people making clothing to make clothing. Do you feel like they're hiring. New People often like who's some manufacturer has people work for him and he. He does poss- on his tricks. Tricks of the trade and then he keeps his people close by. I think there's a little bit of a resurgence. I think there is a a movement back to making beautiful things and this disposable fashion. I think people a lot of people don't want that I certainly don't want that And I think there I'm not alone. I think there are a lot of people like me. Who WanNa make beautiful things whether it's garments or Couture or bespoke shoes or leather handbags. So I think. Maybe A resurgence here. So you came here in two thousand eight which is a very memorable year or one we would like to forget so how in your background was more interior fire call right and public relations. So how did you see the market here? I know you were just describing. You know so many bags made in Europe. But how did you see the market that made you see an opportunity and maybe also just talk about what? Nishi you see your bags filling kind of described them a little bit too because they're very like cool luxury. Okay it's that that's a that's a kind of three pronged question in a way. Two thousand eight was a terrible year for the whole world. I guess But Obama came into office and I was very happy to see that that New York was just a fabulous place to come to. Everyone was so happy and excited But I think that The financial crisis really stifled the sales of of a lot of luxury brands and retailers struggled. I mean retail has continued to struggle. It's been super challenging. Since then retailers are trying to find their way with online sales and flagship stores. I didn't actually think about making handbags in two thousand eight at all. That wasn't my path. I didn't incorporate this business until the end of two thousand fifteen so my journey was to see that. I couldn't find you know. There are lots of small emerging brands. But I wanted something that was really timeless incredibly elegant and something that would really lost and was not seasonal at all. Not something that would be recognized as A particular bag from a particular season So that's a lot of seasons or are you carrying bags that kind of stay on your collection season in season out. Yeah absolutely I mean I am introducing. I'm just bringing in November. The cross body bag. That's my best selling bag with linen on the front. So that will be full and summa black gas will be for full and the Beige will be more of a summer line because I still all over America. It's so different like an in Florida. They're buying ten bags all year and in Colorado or places like that. It's much more the the heavier colors so I try to do. Timeless works everywhere so color tends to be tied to the weather. Climate or is it the temperament the climate probably in I sell the lightest bags and in New York? Lack is still live there. Sela if you're in Miami when it's warm you're like can't even wear black. You feel exact really strange so especially in your bag or shoes. Yeah all the time. What else did you kind of? Learn from across the country like so. What was your path into building your business. Wow it's just being it's it's kind of been the most incredible journey. The Path to building has been like making mistakes and taking three steps forward and two steps back. I didn't have any experience in manufacturing at all and I guess if someone said to me now like would you do it all over again. I'd be a little more trepidation but I went in completely blind and thinking. How Cod can it be? Well let me tell you. It's pretty hard but I've learned that just through making mistakes. Luckily not drastic mistakes but just and finding good people other people listening to what other people have to say sitting down with people who've been in the industry a lot longer than I have seen and and what are you learning from customers like. How has that helped you? Because you're in a number of specialty stores. So that's that's very different feedback right than what you might carried through. So how has that helped? So I love listening to what my customers have to say And you know in the beginning I wanted to be everything to everyone and I realized that's a huge mistake. You cannot make everyone happy with one bag. One of the one of the things that has been really interesting is that I come from Australia. And I'm fairly tall. I'm five eight. I'm not incredibly toll but trying to make a cross body that fits a woman who's five to a woman who's six two has been quite challenging so I needed adjustability on the straps for example without making various size of thought of that. Yeah I mean you think of length and clothing but your thought of that because if you if you have too much adjustability on a strap then it flaps and you don't want that exists leather and if you don't have enough then people can't wear it at the particular point on the buddy they wanna wear it so I mean that's an example. One example of me to listen to the feedback of my customers and the retailers. I work very closely with my retailers. Here what they have to

New York Brooklyn America Hair Colorist Lisa Europe Australia Barack Obama Poss China Sela Colorado Florida Miami
The Life of Robertus Stephanus

5 Minutes in Church History

04:19 min | 2 years ago

The Life of Robertus Stephanus

"Back to another episode of five minutes in Church history on this episode. We're talking about Roy bear. SDN that it is his French name. It is Roberta Stephanus in Latin Stephanus was born in fifteen three in Paris. That is where he we live in worked for. Most of his life he died in fifteen fifty nine his life perfectly corresponds to the reformation and it's early formative formative decades SA- fantasies. Father was an established Paris printer and so steph. Ns when he came of age he took over the family business. He married a woman named Peret and her dad was a printer as well. They had four children together to went on to be prominent printers in their own right. One of the first projects that Roberta's defense undertook was a Latin Bible. He then published numerous Latin texts texts of the classics and even Greek texts of the philosophers in the poets and the great thinkers he published a Latin dictionary a French dictionary but he comes to us in church history because of his Greek New Testament he I printed a new testament in fifteen forty six prior to this. It was the era. Smith's text and so- Stephanus put out his taxed and fifteen forty six after a few revisions in a few additions and much time was spent compiling even more manuscripts from monastery scattered throughout Europe in fifteen fifty to finish published. What has come to be known as the Texas receptiveness us that Latin expression means the received text? This was hugely influential. And for centuries this Greek text was the basis for all English bibles as well as many bibles in other languages. Well things were a little difficult for Stephanus and Paris Harris up until fifteen forty seven. He enjoyed the favor of the king. But when Henry the second came to the throne he did not like Stephanus and all of this Bible printing and and by fifteen fifty defense had to flee and he ended up in Cavins Geneva he would spend the last nine years of his life and he died in Geneva in fifteen fifty nine. Well here is what he has contributed to us over his lifetime. He was responsible for the book of acts being placed between the Gospels and the epistles before him the axe came after the epistles. Bibles so every time you say Matthew Mark Mark Luke John and the ax you can thank Mr Stephanus and guess where those verse divisions came from in Your Bible. Well if you guess the the Fantas you'd be right. After divisions came in around the twelve hundreds but stephanus gave us verse numbers and they first appeared in that text disrespect us back in fifteen fifty and then these verse divisions appeared in fifteen sixty in the English Bible the Geneva Bible able well whilst fantasy was in Geneva he printed French bibles he printed books. By Calvin even additions of Kelvin's classic text next the Institutes of the Christian Religion Stephanus was hailed as one of the best printers of what was really the Heyday of printing in the sixteenth century. He was very skillful. He applied himself very diligently to his job. He surrounded himself with accomplished our and craftsmen. He worked with those artists to develop what came to be the best font. For Greek printing for Hebrew printing French printing Latin printing. His books were truly works of art as a printer and of course we know how important the printed page how important the Bible title the Printed Bible was to the reformation but also the printed page Stephanus stood up to kings stephanus. Serve the church Stephanus. Fantas was a significant figure than the Protestant reformation. Well that is the life of Fro bear esteem or as we say in Latin Roberta's Stephanus.

Roberta Stephanus Church Stephanus Stephanus Cavins Geneva Geneva Bible Paris ROY Matthew Mark Mark Luke John Peret Europe Texas Fantas Paris Harris Smith Henry Calvin Kelvin
Mark Downing Discuss Being a Maker

It's Wood - A show about all things woodworking

10:18 min | 3 years ago

Mark Downing Discuss Being a Maker

"Today. I'm going to introduce you. Mark Downing vadly with over forty years. Experience his Bene- Creator in so many disciplines woodworking metalworking design general contracting to just name a few. We will discuss what it's like to be a maker and how it affected his journey through life mark. Thank you for meeting with me and welcome to. Its would thank thank you. It's nice to be here very nice now. We just had a two or three or shop around your house. I'm going to have some photos on the website. So check those out out that this man's eye for design is stunning. Wanted you guys to look at those pictures somewhere. What turned what was the first time you've got turned onto woodworking? Oh Gee I've been making things out of wood. I can remember back to six years years old in the basement. Working at you know my dad would be working on something and I would be driving nails into a block of wood So it it goes back a long long way of throughout my childhood I built tree houses ever more fanciful and crazy and And then in in high school in my freshman year in high school I built a sailboat. that I then sailed for a couple of years and and Like that quite a lot and so I built other sailboat. I and then I in a and I enjoy sailing a lot and so from there I went off to college and had a regular liberal arts education but during that time Ah I hooked up with a sculpture teacher who In his basement was building a beady for airplane and Shy I got to work on Beatty Beatty for airplane which is all aluminum fabrication rivets and things like that and So I've just been making things all along I started out as a teacher that wanted to be a teacher I graduated with a degree in education and I went to northern Italy and studied for a year. They're in Montessori Education. It became certified as an elementary level Montessori teacher I then taught after that for are five years and decided that I really didn't enjoy that it was. I felt I felt like I was burning out really quickly on it and TAME Came back brought my my wife and my baby child to my parents house and Camp Out on the Sofa for a month or two and Tried to figure out what I wanted to be when I grew up on my mother finally got sick and tired of of that and She said Hey. Hey you know I know this. Nice young man. And he's remodeling a house and he needs some help and you know how to build things So you ought to go down there and and Dan she. If you'll hire you to do something and I went down and he hired me stuff. Insulation Attic of a two hundred and fifty year old house in Annapolis Helpless Maryland. It was a beautiful house. It was all timber frame. Basic core. Construction dovetails mortices and tendons everywhere everywhere. And it was just thrilling and stuffing insulation in. The attic was terrible and I did that for about two days. and Ah Jake Then decided that he wanted to hire me as a helper carpenter's helper. So I did that for a little while and decided if I they wanted to be a carpenter that I wanted to woodworking professionally and then I decided that I could do that anywhere And I ought to choose. Is the place that I want to do that. And so I chose Portland Oregon. My brother WHO's already here going to college and again I brought my my wife and daughter water out and we slept on his floor For a while until I got my feet under me and I did Various kinds of carpentry three and then finally settled into Cabinet making I I I was hired as a journeyman cabinet maker for the Charles Grant Company company here in Portland. Charles Grant Company doesn't exist any longer odd but it was the the largest most prestigious cabinet shop on the West Coast coast. It did a lot of very high in commercial work When I first started working there We were doing four floors of law offices in boob Inca all wall paneling all the doors when the elevator doors opened in your stepped into the hall. You were walking through sequence matched veneers Going around outdoors over bookcases. Everything is beautiful. Yeah for four floors And I was one of thirteen cabinet makers working there and the other there are only two of us spoke English as a native language. The other eleven had all served their apprenticeship in Europe up in the old traditional way where the parents pay the cabinet maker to take their kids away and teach them something useful and and and they they apprenticeship quite long. It's about four years or so and so they all had these beautiful handmade tool chest with full of beautiful handmade tools. And there. I was And I just felt like from the day I walked in the door to the day that I got laid off because they you know they are temporary slowdown On that my features weren't touching the floor. I was just running so fast. Just trying to just trying to keep my head above that water and So so that was really a special experience for me After that with that on my resume on I was able to which are able to get jobs in a couple of very nice con situations and I did I ran My own cabinet shop. I had twelve cabinet makers working for me and And I sold that and then I went to work for a a prestigious you just General Contracting Company as project manager and we did very high end homes there and so I've been I've been and seeking out very wealthy people and trying to get them to build. Allow me to build them something For some time and And that brings me to present so just so the audience knows. Can you tell me about Atlay. What what is the scope of Your Business Right Let's see basically I think of myself as wearing three different hats that I think of myself as a designer I will spend on some projects aval spent months working on my computer in autocad working. I can't on designs of things Designing both woodwork and and hardware for that woodwork. And also I designed lately I've been designing carve stone and tower two in as part of the larger project. I like working working with multiple trades in Working with top craftsman in other in other crafts and That's certainly the situation. I'm in right now. The project working on right now. I think I forgot what your original question was. I was I was just trying to actually And so that's the designer and then as a specialty woodworker I have my woodworking working shop in my backyard and I billed special things for the projects that I design and I also build things for other people to for other architects and other designers and and so yes I do a lot of woodworking. My shop is is specific acidic in that. It's not as small as twenty four feet by twenty four feet and it's not all set up for handling a four byte sheet of plywood and if I need to deal with far by shoot apply what I cut it down to rough size out in the driveway and then bring it in and deal with it then All almost all the work that I do in that shop is with solid. Wood solid woodworking frame and panel construction on that sort of thing and so I do a lot of specialty woodworking and then I also a licensed general contractor in Oregon Oregon and so I- organize a variety of other trades to accomplish projects I take on landscaping contracts And then I'm involved in The landscaping structures and building designing and building them I take on a residential construction projects and they may be designed by someone else or design them and then I build special would work work for them and supervise all the other traits. Bring the other trades in also so yeah Designer woodworker and general contractor. Now I know this is like asking you to pick your favorite child but which of those three brings you the most joy. Oh I think design and woodworking brings brings me the most joy I I really enjoy the general contracting because at its best on what I'm I'm just working shoulder to shoulder with other really top people in their fields and the synergy of the creativity that happens is is just thrilling and the the the final product is is just so cool and well beyond what I could've done

Charles Grant Company Portland Oregon Mark Downing Beatty Beatty Montessori Education Cabinet General Contracting Company Europe Annapolis GEE Carpenter Maryland DAN Italy West Coast Atlay
What is that mystery squeal on your Volvo?

Car Talk

03:34 min | 3 years ago

What is that mystery squeal on your Volvo?

"I have a nine thousand nine hundred eighty six. I'll Volvo station wagon and Last spring for just one week I had this problem and it started again about a month ago but I'm I'm I was driving on down in Boston. As a matter of fact I'm on the Cambridge exit getting onto the mass turnpike and all of a sudden. It sounded like a Boeing seven. Forty seven coming in for landing. Dan Unit Logan this high pitch warring noise. I thought the car was going to blow up and Then stopped for no reason and then I I drove around for a week and every once in a while just driving along and all of a sudden this noise and it stopped and went away and I thought well maybe duration ration- primate duration. Maybe a little bit longer and then sometimes it would stop and then another worry. Noise would come in and also the same pitches because you just described sometimes the same pitch and sometimes are not the same pitch and they wouldn't be they wouldn't be thanked. Okay Okay and then it stopped and I thought well maybe this is just because it was the first really hot day in the summer of the spring and then like a month ago it started again. And it's getting progressively worse. We're what color you can. Select question coming is blue. Yes yes it is hit and is it a seven forty or two forty forty two forty in the back. I I thought that was going to be my next question. Blue to forty and in the back in the back and it is. That's the right sound that the right south. I think it's the fuel pump. Uh Gone you awesome. Why not why not? It's only parties. We don't really thing that's back there. That would make that kind of south and in fact it does make that kind of sound and it's a common thing to happen and it's what was I actually. This isn't usually as high. Hi pitched is as you would lead us to think. We're talking like screaming. You're sitting in the in the cockpit of an airplane and and and he started. They started pushing you off often. I don't sit in the cockpit. Usually in the future lodge airplane a fuselage start back in Europe. So you're going to get ready to pass. They turbine start the turbines the noise. Can this happen at any speed slow. Slow speeds fast when it happened. Do you happen to notice. Did you happen to notice the tank was now. This is silly. Quick get the panthers with less than half full and half. uh-huh doesn't make any difference guys whether it's for almost empty tied. It can be cold it can be you know when I first started out the driver in the morning or craftsman driving for wire. And it's happening that'll stop and then it'll happen it'll stop. Yeah no I would bet money on the fuel pump. So you're telling me I need a new few you may also so Be leading to early fuel pump failure by having a dirty fuel filter. So you might want to have the fuel-filter change the pumpers and completely toast. Yet you may be able to salvage the week or two out of it but have that change and if you do of the pump change have the filter changed anyway. Yeah thanks guys. Go lucky to

Dan Unit Logan Volvo Station Boston Cambridge Panthers Europe One Week