35 Burst results for "Cousteau"

"cousteau" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"cousteau" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"And those are the farms that we are endeavouring to create a market for to create the demand for to support and to to condone. Because this is part of the solution. There are farms that were working with today. That are absolutely examples of what we should be doing. This is like jok cousteau said many years ago now. A mark of civilization is a transition from hunting to farming. And we need to do that with the oceans. We simply Expanding industrial-scale hunting is it's not sustainable shortsighted. And there's a finite supply. Also there's increasing problems with the cleanliness of the oceans and depending on where those fisher coming from you know. they're they're. They're by accumulating things through the food chain that are frankly unhealthy for us. So in a controlled environment we can control what goes into the feed and we can control other factors like what comes out of the farm so there are concerns about farming fish about it being unsustainable or being bad for the environment so for example effluent or fish. Poop is a significant concern with fish. Would you call. what'd you call. Fish poop effluent. So that's a scientific term fish boot. I guess i missed our call my own. Put my effluent so your poop. Art my poop fish poop from a certain perspective that's waste right but in nature. There's no such thing as waste. Stream of nutrients like nitrogen is only bad for the environment. If it's highly concentrated and does not have a symbiotic partner for that so in nature you have a lot of organisms that are consuming that. Unless it's being overwhelmed so monocultures in. Aquaculture are just like monocultures on land to many of a living creature in a confined space. You're gonna have a problem but it's not the only way to farm. There are farms. Today that are pairing thin fish with shellfish and kelp that work symbiotically together because those nutrients from fish poop effluence are highly nutritional for shellfish and seaweeds and mollusks and a whole host of other organisms. In the right balance you can create an ecosystem that mimics what nature has taught us for years. We just have to get away from the mindset of just producing largest quantity as possible and the commodification of of aquaculture. It's a it's really a reflection of the first aquaculture farms that were developed frankly Cultures are relatively new industry as a as a commercial enterprise and some of the first farms raised money from big ag and they followed that same business model. But that's not the only way to farm. There's there's a growing demand for artists and aquaculture farms and. That's what see. Toby is really about so. I think your first question is what is see topiary is. It's the butcher box of seafood but behind the scenes..

jok cousteau fisher Toby
"cousteau" Discussed on The Current

The Current

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"cousteau" Discussed on The Current

"Admitted that that it was something he would never do ago. Does he feel guilty for hammering spikes into the sea floor to try and figure out whether there was oil beneath the surface. You know he never interesting you know. We poured through everything. He never talked about oil with regret in that way. He talked about his interference with sealife and wreaths etc. But i never heard him express any remorse about oil. We certainly were looking on the lookout for that. What do you make of that you know. I think that there wasn't an understanding until really towards the end of his life about the damage of it And perhaps it's just like the the limits of how much human can get kind of stomach their own failures or perhaps he wasn't asked enough because it wasn't such a well known fact. He was a great guest on talk. Shows and on those talk shows started to shift what he was talking about becoming a much. Louder advocate for the environment and pushing for environmental regulations. As well take a listen to this. This is from one of his talk. Show appearances i was Only involved in to say standing the possibilities of exciting energy from the sea. This was a choice that they made and he is but what Was shot by. He's the speed and shamelessness with switch. The industrial interests have sought to the wastebasket. All environmental measures that had been very laboriously. Take at this point jacques. Cousteau is an international celebrity. What sort of impacted him saying that on. Television have it had a great impact And i it was the birth of the environmental movement you know since nineteen seventy one and then through nine hundred ninety two. These were his main talking points about protection. You know in the early decades of his life has conservationists. He thought his best role was to make people love the sea and therefore ill attached to it and want to protect it but as he got older he felt in fact he had to go further than that and really sound the alarm. Of course his television shows as he was doing so became less adventure and less entertaining. And it's strict sense. And he lost an audience has shows that cancel the they ended up going on lesser seen networks and so he paid a price for a commercial price for Sounding the alarm. But i don't think he regretted that at all. What does that tell you. I mean as a filmmaker yourself. What does that tell you about the line that he had to walk in terms of crafting a message that would resonate with people but also would have an audience. Well i think. He became first and foremost advocate and he realized he would lose some audience that way and and he was very comfortable with that idea. In fact he would become quite testy with interviewers later in life who would push him on this subject about becoming too dark and you know hearkening back to that earlier spirit because he thought he really had one and only one mission at this point in his life he says in the film in some ways when he's talking about the state of the oceans that it's too late do you think he did. He believe that that it was too late to save the oceans that he loved. I think after the loss of his son philippe he did take a pretty dark view. Felipe was also an environmentalist together. Perhaps they felt Invigorated by carrying the message of conservation. I think after the loss of felipe and cousteau doing by himself. It was definitely a darker time. But he said he always had hoped and rio in nineteen ninety-two which he attended five years before his death was a real turning point for the e could have been turning point for the environmental movement. It felt to those involved as like a major milestone however we now know thirty years later it was not that but i do think he felt somewhat hopeful after rio but he also knew and he said himself many times we are throwing blank checks on future generations and they are going to pay and here we are. We are paying. Why do you think you talked earlier about the journey that we are on and in some ways mirroring the journey that he was on. Why do we need to hear his story now. Well this summer twenty twenty one. The idc report came out about the effects of human activities on our planet and As many of us have known for a long time there is damaged and change that is irreversible but some of the most dilatory effects. We still have a moment to change course. And that course change is what cousteau's journey was so we are very much in this moment in which we are running out of time and it's it's the most urgent issue for for all of humanity. Quite frankly and i don't think that's an overstatement. He died in nineteen ninety-seven. Would you have asked him. Wow who's next because there's nobody who can carry this mantle. There's nobody today. Who has the celebrity and the authority to speak for the environment to a global audience. And that's a real loss for us. I know he felt that felipe was going to be next to sun. But that didn't happen and You know i. I suppose i would would have talked to him about that. It's a beautiful film and it's just nice in some ways to remember the power that he had in the influence that he had his garbage. Thank you very much. Thank you so much. Liz garbis is the director of becoming cousteau screening as part of the toronto international film festival which runs through sunday for more. Cbc podcasts goto. Cbc dot ca slash podcasts..

Cousteau cousteau felipe Felipe philippe idc Liz garbis toronto Cbc
"cousteau" Discussed on The Current

The Current

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"cousteau" Discussed on The Current

"Living together and having this great adventure yvo mayor one of the early crew members and cameramen said you know when you were accepted to work on. The calypso was like you're entering the holy house of saints. It was an extraordinary life changing experience for those men. They look like a lot of fun to. There's a real romance. The you mentioned the whiskey. There's a lot of wine. That's their accordions. That are on the boat. Everybody seems to be having a great time. Yes and you know. Most of all i would say simone cousteau. Who is the only woman on board with all the bikini-clad frenchman. Who who says very clearly she would absolutely not accept another woman on board and of course for their young sons who were aboard You know maybe four months a year when they're out of boarding school it was yes. It was incredibly romantic the calypso sales around the world and one of the things that you learn in this film that i did not know before i watched it. Is that jacques. Cousteau release claims that he is responsible for the oil wealth in abu dhabi. Can you explain this to me. Well before he wasn't a tv star. He had to fund these expeditions. And i there were donations but ultimately that was not enough to keep them going their reputation and the press had had gotten out and there was an understanding that there will be divers who could go down to the bottom of the ocean. And stay there. And we're the best in the world so this drew attention of of Oil prospectors and ultimately they yes. They did comb the ocean floor looking for black gold oil and finding locations for drilling Undersea drilling stations. There is not an understanding at that point that this was doing damage to the sea. But this is how they funded there early expeditions. I'm david written. And this is the next call. In september nineteen ninety-six many disappeared from northeastern ontario. Her mother. Selene is still searching for answers. I can't let it go. I need to find her. She deserves done much. I follow every tip and every theory investigations that could break wide open with the next call available now on the cbc. Listen app and everywhere. You get your podcasts. They filmed everything as well and he starts thinking of how to use that. And and is led to become an undersea filmmaker. What was it that the got him thinking that the rest of the world should see what he was up to. I actually think cousteau is a filmmaker way before he was a aqualung diver When he was a kid. And you know bill lex. First cameras were available. He was making films before he was diving. So it was always something burning inside of him. And i think those of us who are in this particular business have similar memories and stories of filmmaking as children. I'm so i think it was something he always was doing. And then when you start seeing what he was seeing under undersea while it doesn't take much to imagine how he would then come up with desire to turn these extraordinary experiences into films to share with the world the first feature film the silent world one the palm door at can. Why was that such a sensation. do you think. And also the oscar here in america It was you know because it. It was showing unbelievable on unbelievable undersea photography. There was a a intern who most sydney is. We'll have heard of called. Louis mom It was it was an extraordinary collection of imagery plus it had an incredible sense of timing adventure and cinema. I'm in cousteau said in something that will make a lot of us in this business shift in our seats. He says i am not documentarian. I am an adventure film maker. And they really structured the film through their adventures There are many of you know now. They seem somewhat clear shade pieces of drama. That they have to. You know overcome in the course of the film but it really isn't a documentary in its strict sense was gonna say. Where's the daylight between the two well. The daylight between the two is that he construct. He'll say he'll say i've seen the he'll say you know you walk outside now and say look at the dolphin and later when the dolphin comes we will shoot the dolphin. You know so. it's it's constructed in. That sons was television. Kind of the natural successor to to him doing feature films. Do you think yes. I think you know so. He did these feature films but you know there. There seemed to be such a hunger for this technology at invented on and he wanted to continue living on the calypso and feature films. We're not going to pay for that. So you know. Use a terrific entrepreneur and businessman and he understood that a way to finance these voyages as well as further. His aesthetic desires was to turn to television. Which would like to go back and watch those tv programs. I mean in some ways. They very are a moment of their time from not. Just the tiny little swimsuits and the unadulterated ocean. But there's something that that's something that's of the of the time it's in the for you going back and watching them. What was that like. Well i think the early shows and when he starts on abc. It is very much about adventure. And there's this kind of arrogance to the journey you know and it is about the conquest going as far as possible seeing absolutely everything and what was interesting to me was then you know because i i had remembered you know so much of his later work as a conservation at st- that going back to the early which do not have that ideology was really quite stunning. And it actually really for me. Crystallize the narrative arc. That i was exploring in this documentary. When did he start to realize that the oceans that he was documenting. And as you say. I mean in those early films in the early programs trying to conquer in some ways. When did he realize that. Those oceans were really being threatened. You know. I think there were there. Were certainly early conversations with ty has diving partner about the fragile -ness of the of the underwater ecosystem. But i don't think it wasn't until cousteau had been diving for about twenty years and returning to some of the same spots and comparing his photographs and film of the same locations that he understood that we were in a period of extraordinary change And i think especially in the antarctic is where he felt it so dramatically and that became a passion of his to sound the alarm for the antarctic and the melting glaciers embassy life. That was at risk there. I'm so really. Threw him seeing for himself that he became this the siren for conservation of the undersea world. What was his responsibility. His role in that destruction. One of the crew members of the calypso says the whole world was being discovered. We had no idea we were destroying it. That's right. I mean he certainly looks back. I mean i'm not imposing this idea upon it. He looks back and he sees some of the footage some of the things that he did. You know there's in the silent world. There's this famous very controversial scene of them. Slaughtering a shark and cousteau looks back on. That says it's terrible and we would never do that today. They also put bombs dynamite underwater to see what would come up on. You know they wrote on the back of sea turtles for fun. All of that stuff. I think you know not just as crew members but also cousteau utilize was was inappropriate and. He.

holy house of saints simone cousteau cousteau bill lex Cousteau Selene jacques abu dhabi cbc ontario oscar david sydney Louis america abc ty antarctic
"cousteau" Discussed on The Current

The Current

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"cousteau" Discussed on The Current

"It's fantastic. Imagine having no wait. Imagine that this would be underwater. You adjust your lungs and you would float around. It would move like this swimming in space volume fans. It's beautiful. That is some of the remarkable archival footage featured in a new film called becoming cousteau. The film was made by the director. Lives garbage. who joins me now. Liz good morning where you like. One of those little kids. Who was hanging on. Every word of jacques cousteau yes. I was all of those children in that audience. Hanging onto every word and dreaming of being the calypso with his seeming may marry band of Journeyman i wanna talk about the merry band of journeyman in a moment. But i mean i grew up watching that show as well and watching the specials and it was like being transported into another world. What do you remember about his tv program. I just remember it was like opening a to a new world. That was really i mean. As he says a dream world it all came about for me. Because i was reading a book to my young son and cousteau was part of this book and i had occurred to me that he was growing up. Kind of steeped in these images. That were made possible by the work of cousteau. And you know so. Much of a young child's television diet now consists of undersea world and and it's beautiful excitement and looking back that that was really the first time these kind of fish and coral reefs were brought into our living rooms. It was just a magical spectacle. And i wanted to hearken back to that wonder as well as revisit his legacy and its meaning today in twenty twenty one. How much did you know about his life before. You started making the film and nothing about his life. Before i started making the film. I knew what the television viewer like you or like those children in the audience knew that he was an explorer who had shown us what had been hidden behind the surface of the ocean for hundreds of years. But you know in order to make a film where i i need more than than that. I needed to know if there was a great story. There a human story and as i began to dive into the material read his journals. Read the extensive interviews. bios I began to understand that he he went on a wonderful journey that i thought was extremely relevant today and it was a. It was a journey from kind of hubris and arrogance and a sense of kind of conquest molded in the the explorer mold of twentieth century nineteenth century explorers to attorney towards consciousness and conservation and global citizenship. And to me that felt like a metaphor for the journey that we need to go on society. Which is you know. We've been abusing with planet and It's now calling us to to transform our our attitudes as well. What was it that that initially drew him to the ocean. Because there's this incredible archival footage of some of you know early early even dives but when he snorkeling and he's spearfishing. What was it. That was so intriguing to him about that. So he was. I think he was always an adventure. One of the stories. He told that did not make it into the film was that he was always a bit of a rascal and his family wants. Ca came to to america and he was sent to a summer camp in vermont and he was a bit of a rascal. Always getting in trouble so He had a counselor he told. The interviewer was a german counselor. Who made him dive to the bottom of the lake swim to the bottom little eight to quote unquote clean up the weeds and as a young child this thing that was supposed to be a punishment actually delighted him and so there must have been you know a taste for what lay beneath the surface since a very young age however he wanted to be a pilot and started training for that. But then as we you know we talk about foam had had an accident and shifted. He went to to the south of france to recuperate from the accident and started diving there. But i think in him. There was always this thirst to defy the boundaries and Go deeper further and longer and as you say he started as goggle diver but there are the limitations of that you have to come up to grieve. And he wanted to to change that as you say he was always trying to defy the boundaries. And so eventually coming up for air was not satisfying enough. You forget that that scuba diving wasn't really a thing when he started out. Take a listen to this clip from the film. It's always the same. This is the other two good deeper and longer. I became an inventor by necessity sort of underwater technology. Did he invent so three of the relationships of his wife's family he was able to meet a man named emil gun young who's developing a compressed air system and Together they developed a new device called the aqualung which enabled you to pressurise air and put in a can and throw it on your back. This is ultimately the beginning of scuba. And i don't think people really realize. I mean i didn't realize that we owe scuba diving to cousteau and his partner emile john young and again anybody who has gone scuba diving or knows of it. You might take it for granted at that point. How revolutionary was this technology. That as you say you could have these tanks on your back. You have a regulator and you can stay under the surface of the water. I think it would be like today saying okay. Here's something you can put on. Here's a jet pack. Matt go ahead and see what you see above the cloud. I mean i think that's you know that's what it was and enable the human being to be independent and responsible for their own motion as opposed to in some big suit connected to ship and explore. It was absolutely transformative the next piece or another piece that that that allows him to transform his. Expeditions is the calypso you mentioned this earlier. This is his boat. What was so special about the calypso. You know there was nothing special about the calypso. I mean it sounds sacrilege to say it was an old minesweeper. That was an american Ship that was retired. What was special about. The calypso was its crew and the people who lovingly transformed into the vessel that brought the undersea world to millions of people across the globe and it really was the muse for cousteau and also his wife simone mel shar simone cousteau who ended up really being the steward and the the soul of that boat for so many of the sailors eclipse so crew who were his crew. Oh his crew crew. He called them the misfits the dropouts they were certainly people who we have. Lots of shots of them you know guzzling down bottles of whisky. Never certainly people who were rejecting. The conventional lives being are offered to them in large cities and they had sailors hearts and explorers hearts and so from yvo mayor to To falco to You know there there. There are a bunch of folks who Were on that boat for decades along with cousteau and and his wife among and it's like they signed up for something. I mean there. There is footage of them painting the boat when he acquires the boat in getting it into shape so that it can get out on the water. It's not like they were just there helping him. Explore the ocean. They were there as part of something larger. Yes it was a bit of a family almost like a cult. People who's.

cousteau jacques cousteau Liz emil gun swimming emile john young vermont france america simone mel shar simone coustea Matt falco
"cousteau" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"cousteau" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"This is the same thing we watched tony games of last year's i don't know if they're championship team. Like i just don't know how what can have what has transpired over the last four months. Why could sit here and say like no doubt their championship team. Because there's those things that you can't measure that matter and this is football. That has not focused on football over the last four months at least in the forefront while tampa has in seattle has in the rams have in washington has like those teams have been locked in on football and and in green bay. Has it and i think they're scheduled very difficult. I think two things that really. I'll be folks. Because i think they'll be really good. But when a bunch of games all that stuff like is there a different sentence by everybody you know like well. The coaches coaches certain situations differently. Because of we got one last year like four down not just bringing this title game that that feels like a regular season. They'll be more aggressive in certain situations because they only they know they have a smaller window. And then how often do they keep the main thing the main thing. And that's winning you know. We've we've watched them bring randall. Cobb back brian cousteau general andrew said yeah it was because you know aaron wanting back wall that keeping the main thing the main thing like how does it all work together because there might be decisions throughout the season for moments or the season. We're like do they do things or say things or make decisions based upon. This might give us the best chance to keep him around after this year. Or does it get give is the best chance to win. Sometimes they'll those will align and sometimes they won't. Yeah it's tricky you know when the gm we applaud rogers because of full transparency at his press press conference when the gm..

football tony rams brian cousteau green bay tampa seattle washington Cobb randall aaron andrew gm rogers
"cousteau" Discussed on InnovaBuzz

InnovaBuzz

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"cousteau" Discussed on InnovaBuzz

"But how do you use the artificial intelligence to then recognize what the cameras is saying without a papal getting involved in in lengthy and time consuming analysis. That's quite amazing. Absolutely and then you also mentioned the underwater space stations This was another early one that i was excited to write about so fabien cousteau. Who is the grandson of jacques. Cousteau he has been working in marine biology for most of his life. It's almost like his. You know his heritage right of like the work. His his grandfather started. His grandfather was the original aquanautic. How cool is that In a few years ago he was really looking at the international space station. He'd always had this hope and vision for creating something other underground underwater. Um couldn't really figure out how to make it last. There are underwater research centers today but they are very tiny three limited in the technology. You can have An and frankly they rust out they rest. They tend to rest out. And then you can't do much with them. They just kinda stagnate under there and he wanted to think of a way to modernize that and so he looked up. He looked to the stars and he looked at the international space station Which uses modular so international. Space station is designed to have pieces added and removed as they are created time s acknowledgee develops to create new spaces and bring new tools. It i'm so he has idea in. I think twenty eighteen and he started to go. He had this idea in two thousand. Eighteen to basically create an underwater space station called protease in curacao. And so he. He knew he couldn't do it alone. You know he was the guy but he wasn't the engineering guy And so he started to go around to the world governments navy organization. They will organizations higher education institutions and say. Hey i have this idea like how you know. Do you want to help. Do you want to participate in it. Juicy see value in this And one thing that i loved about his story was that he was so passionate about it he would go into rooms that he would speak about this vision that he had and share share what he'd love to do and then there'd be a pause and every single person in the room be like yes. Let's do that. We have to try and do this like it's worth. It is worth the potential risk to like. Try and actually make this thing happen. And he shared with me that he was really surprised at the positive feedback that he got but in talking to him and hearing him speak about. It was clear why that had happened. He had this vision and he saw the value of benefit of it. And he could clearly articulate the cure the ways that this could change the world And honestly it was hard not to be excited after hearing him speak. So they've been cousteau's Deeply example of someone who's taken passion and really turned into action.

fabien cousteau international space station Cousteau jacques curacao navy cousteau
"cousteau" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

The Darin Olien Show

07:57 min | 1 year ago

"cousteau" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

"That's such a beautiful frigate story because the things that ring true to me. Is it systems so systems either. Allow things to thrive or they destroy. It's very clear right. You know see spiracy revealed so much crazy shit. That's going on thank. Thank you for that right. And an it's just that system and you're right that system just keeps playing an intel. We rise up as the community as the consumers as the customers added as the voters. Because every you know listen whether you agree with whatever the politics situations are going. I believe that the dollar that we carry is probably infinitely greater than any voting cast of any vote that that can ever be putting election so we can shape things by what we do and what we put our attention on. And and that's a very very powerful thing that i want to stoke the fire of that young young group in young youth more than ever but Yeah man it's just resiliency of nature just phenomenal when tapping into that. And i think that's the key to you know remembering the you know things like the fact is were always trying to help. People remember climate changes in ocean problem rates climbing but the half the biodiversity on this earth loss in the last forty years almost seventy percent of wildlife and nature. We've lost in forty years You know these are very real things But when we come together and enact solutions and embrace innovation and embraced opportunity and recognize work ended him with with nature and and allowed to recover Break in amazing things can happen and do happen is not click bait and doom scrolling stuff because The hopeful death doesn't isn't fears short-term. Right fear is a very good shorter motivator from behavioral perspective. That will get you to scroll and click on stuff rallo each other each other only marble But it's hoping opportunity that inspires long-term actions fires people in the long run and we need as much of that is awesome right now. Our messages you know recognize that the ocean is the center of the conversation around climate change center compensation conservation and asian about our planet about our planet. Exactly that there's good things happening in good people making good things happen. Is you also effectively. Shown and inspirationally In the message right there. There's good things we need to come together and protect the planet because we're denver protecting ourselves. Listen to survive right like there's gonna be nature lasts If if we destroy ourselves just thrilled about human survival. I wanna dig into that. We need to talk about the children's programs that you're doing what would you say. I mean it's so cliche but we're talking about it. What would you say is a thing as a way that children from from nine to twenty nine like there's some emerging opportunity here. There's there's some. I just met a third star general and he just told me he goes. I think my daughter wants to talk to you. Said really it's like she. She is a fiction. It's talk to you. Talk to me because she is now gain your phd in environmentalism directly on the ocean about the ocean. And it's like just to know that that is a thing that's huge. That is a system that's largely. I'll be so bold. Not teaching us that much. Like you know. My major taught me a little bit. Physiology nation got me enough to get a little curious but really my education was life and the fact that that young person is now in a phd directly related to the ocean. Let's celebrate that shit like come on. There's so much opportunity and you know we ask permission to bully combat earlier. That's kind of what you were talking about but You know the the when we think about all in his nine to twenty nine Is is you know. As an organization were building global movement restore from plant in the idea that environmental movement as a whole as neglected education moving boeing and used for decades to all in in recognizing the best way we grow constituency of people care about these issues that we build a foundation in society for conservation ethic is by focusing on young people in education. Hard to change behavior But focusing on people's the best way to do that and build at the cultural economic and political will society To build a new world and So that's been our focus from the beginning. My grandfather said you know before we can talk about conservation to talk about education. Not what we do To that very point because those are the generations that make chain society ever and it's everything from school programs. All the way up to looking at entrepreneurship A great example is is the blue economy where you look at okay. How can we leverage will steam restoration. You know a. There's a lot of work in ever being. Invested in sustainable aquaculture for safer like health for us in seaweed as a carbon sink natural habitat restoration. Can they become de facto re preserved but also income for amazing source of nutrition and food for people on they can become forests and farms in the ocean that are restorative and restoring is and restore to farming the oceans and tremendous economic opportunity communities around the world over overdoing increasing a lot of work in that space in recognizing that's just one example of opportunities to be using algae based materials plastics. That are biodegradable in the ocean. You know there's so much innovation and opportunity out there that focus is on how we restore renew trading energy from the ocean. That is again renewable restorative in. And so that's really you know about the higher end of that nine to twenty nine year old at what we always talk about is. There's tremendous opportunity out here. You know it's not just about being beaches doing recycling campaigns. You said it's It's about recognizing all traces of consequences in the things that we find the things we do in the business that we start the old model of like. I'm afraid of business. Make hundred billion dollars destroying the planet. That i'm going to maybe like colonel started started foundation and trying to donate some money to fix the mess. I made As as a were done more years instead it's like how start a business that is both making money providing jobs and opportunity and restoring the environment at same time. Imagine that and also i feel like when growing up you know we were always told feels the same way we were always told like all your years of tomorrow. You know somewhat your life. You'll be able to be able to lead and i was wondering when is that magical time happen and what we like to tell. Young people is. That's so not right. You are the leaders of today you. At six years old little girl we met she went out and she. There was a water balloon fight in her hometown which was an estuary fishing fishing town estuary. They would be a water balloon. Fight every year and she would go paddleboarding and.

forty years today nine hundred billion dollars earth third star both twenty nine tomorrow six years old last forty years almost seventy percent twenty nine year old half one example asian decades biodiversity each
"cousteau" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

The Darin Olien Show

08:37 min | 1 year ago

"cousteau" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

"I love that one. In so when my grandfather invented scuba diving it was the first time people can speak freely in the ocean and he sought subsequently invented on work cameras. You know unwanted documentaries and films like the silent world and world outside and all these and then his documentary series So they came out around. Nineteen sixty eight was a revelation because for most people again hard to imagine that people are grandparents grandparents didn't grow up with images of nemo and sharks and coral reefs. New stuff look like only knew about the ocean was what we pulled out food and we'll be dumped in and trash and so this was you know. As opposed to humanity's millennia long duration of a lan- we've really only been explored the ocean or not even a decades not even eighty years. So you it's it's it's it's pretty incredible when you think about how far we've come and yet how far. We still have to go his documentaries around the world in the nineteen seventies eighties and even the nineties was the first time for most people To see a walrus a coral reef sharks Dolphins swimming underwater. Any and it was a revelation. So that's kind of where. I came from my grandfather when he started out. It was really about exploration. it was really about understanding what existed out there but pretty quickly within a relatively short timeframe see twenty years from the nineteen forty s to the nineteen sixties at which point my father. Felipe senior got involved is shifted from being about exploration because in that time period they already were witnessing the this postwar economic boom that caused massive degradation destruction of the environment we huge population growth and resource extraction and explosion of oil and gas and fuels. And my father went to my grandfather sometime in the late. Nineteen sixties instead. You know. this can't just be about exploration this has to be about. So every step of the way they were at the forefront of of going this movement and ted turner all's refers my my grandfather's the father of the modern environmental movement and i think about my generation now in a fight grandfather's generation was about exploration. My father's was about observation. I think about my generation now as generation of of artistic vision. This idea that we all now understand the serious consequences that we're facing with ocean collapse in half the biodiversity on earth disappearing at forty years with climate change all these crisis that are essential threats Threatening her very existence on this planet realized that we all have to come together. We're all in this together and You know when we talk about protecting coral reefs and forests and all these talk protecting ourselves talking about the future our children and and so. That's exciting to me is that we see with young people. We talk with people earlier and we're seeing new generations recognize that He believes the health of the planet and health. People are extremely blinked. And and. that was the message you know working my family for generations. But you also want to say something. I think is so interesting and it wasn't just that shock. Cousteau was incredible inventor or that he had these amazing ideas and he had calypso the ship and he had flying saucers he had you know he was like a james bond of his day right. He also was an incredible. He was an incredible adventure. He was an incredible show men and he was also an incredible incredible marketer. Because when you go back in you wash the undersea world jacques cousteau. I mean it was translated. I think into twelve different languages lease. It was shown into almost any every country of the world. Some they still show it today. You know in like zimbabwe you can still go in the show still on but you put it into contact for people. That didn't grow up. Jacques in these late sixties early seventies. This is where my background comes in. Djakou's cousteau tied as the most famous person on the planet with the sitting. Pope and felipe senior was number. Four five. i'm so it could just show like this in back. Then there were only a few networks on television. So i mean every sunday nights As a kid which you probably remember. I mean people go to their television and watch and i mean they would get ratings that the super bowl would be happy to get you know today so it. It's one thing you know. And you didn't just tune into the shows to to go on his two to go learn about walrus or octopus sharks. You also went on because it was a fun story about the krill and it was a story about job and his son philippe. Andy's you know. Cute crew of frenchmen tans little bathing suits you know going around the world and running out of water. Run out of wine and smoking cigarettes under the judge on the submarine. I mean it truly was one of the first reality shows on television but it was a reality show for good and my always liked at into context people. Because i think if you didn't grow up knowing what phenomenon was. I mean it truly today. There really is nothing that would be as famous because there's so much content out there and and honestly that's wife liv and i do so many projects because we realized that jocks day your audience came to you but in today's world we have to find the audience. We have to go to the audience and so i think that's a big difference. How do you make saving the world. Fun and exciting in full adventure so you get people excited. And that's as you mentioned before we always have this mission of her because if you if you focus on the doom and gloom everybody's just going to be frozen and enact in into being inactive So i always have the command jock for being really truly a amazing jomon In really embracing that you have to entertain people while you teach that his Might you now. What do you use on your skin. I use this incredible product. The good from caldera lab. It's like wait. Serum is made of twenty seven active plant tentacles that are ganic and wild harvested. Yes this is my ideal serum for my face just a small amount every night after washing my face in his all it takes to have this great skin smells good feels good and helps tackle dry skin without being oily wrinkles scarring. It really does. Keep my skin looking young as i absolutely feel from the inside. Gotta try this stuff. Go to caldera lab dot com forward. Slash darren or use the discount code all caps darren at the checkout for twenty percent off your first order of the good. If you don't like it guess what they will give you a full for kin refund so invest in it invest in your skin and your health. It's easy guys. Go get some you know that. Thank you for because as you were talking. I was i was literally recapitulating. Running to the tube and watching it was just like a world that your grandfather brought to the world that was so utterly incredible and any child of any kind has empathy for every animal and understands nature right. You're absolutely never put it together. You're absolutely right. They were an open book. In terms of what was going on. It was literally the first great Docu series reality show That was so inviting because they brought. You is like okay..

twenty percent Jacques twenty years philippe nineteen sixties nineteen seventies eighties Pope ted turner nineteen forty s felipe earth Andy Nineteen sixties two one twenty seven active plant tent late sixties today eighty years forty years
"cousteau" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

The Darin Olien Show

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"cousteau" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

"I'm so stoked. I mean i'm another person that you've heard this a billion times probably billion in one time. Now that i grew up watching your grandfather for sure You know being fifty now. I definitely was in that pocket when i was a kid So i'm stoked to talk to you. And i'm also it's not necessary as a child and as a grandkid as a legacy that you do what it is that you do. So you've made that choice clearly now you and ashland are this is in you. You're all about ed your involved in all of your own little docu series and documentaries and pirate hunting l. That's going to challenge. I think i have a good job at sale ending me a little bit. That sounds pretty good But also the you know the the shark awareness and all of this stuff that you're doing it's just it's such a pleasure to connect with people that clearly have their trajectory in their life aligned with their heart and their passion towards something that is in our face that needs support in there. I say one of the most important things in the world for us to do the health of ourselves in the health of the planet so all that being said stoked to talk to you both and thank you for everything you're doing will make you. We always love spending time with kindred spirits and people as committed as we are doing extrordinary. Where in the world so yeah. It's it's funny there on the bench. The you know our our work is full of purpose because this is technically my second career right. I rare entertainment journalists by i covered the oscars old globes and i've interviewed every single Streaky broadbent clooney. And i loved it. It was it was my dream. Job is absolutely my dream job but about seven years in the same time that i met Seven years and i got the seven year itch. I loved my job. It was missing purpose and it was just a perfect timing for man. Thank goodness lead came into my life at that time. Because it's you can love what you do but if you don't find purpose in Empty so i thank you for saying that because it's true i feel like there's so many people out there that are in jobs that they don't you know that are good jobs in that. They can pay their bills. They're looking to be able to do that. they don't have purpose. There's that part of you always missing in a saas so easy it you know it. Meaning that it takes a on the one hand of sacrifice from the normalcy and you know you can put that ne'er quotes whatever that means people Because you know set. Quintessential i mean hell you edict come philip edict. Come from that family but for for for many people there their there in the box and you know every intention. The parents want their kids to have a successful life. But no one really very few exceptions teaches you how to kinda lead from the heart and then through the brain and through the kind of the assistant of the brain and the mental side of things to assist yourself in the kind of fulfilling wife and that's call which want that that's kind of a learning from life slap in the hell out of you because that's gonna happen And then what do you want to do with that information. It's on you know we live in this. This really strange and And destructive cycle where on one hand society teaches us that how big your houses a faster car is. Those are the things that will bring you happiness and they are doing not And yet that's our economy. Our whole system is built on we got to make stuff in by stuff and unfortunately the linear economic model. We were you were you. Do you extract you build. You buy in. The new fro out is devastating. Our planet devastating our health. Devastating us And yet what brings us. You know the contradiction is that what brings us. Joy and happiness is doing for others is having purposes options in life. In so reconciling. Those two is difficult. And is that journey that you during that you just refrigerated that that so many people struggle with is science. Teach me one thing school and the economy and how he lives. Teach me one thing and those aren't making me happy There's no secret that a lot of celebrities reached fame. And you find the ones many of them. Ben go off and look for some purpose. Look to you. Know jerk clooney's a great example. His extraordinary were dr foreign. funding satellites. Doing work human rights You know these are people that recognize that that that fame An fortune aren't the past to happiness but in fact it's it's helping others and again funny purpose that achieve that and so for us it's notes. It's trying to reconcile those things that help people connect those dots and make the world a better place journey hall. Join in on to be part of. That's the good news is that we all have within us. The power of are no matter what we do to to achieve greatness by helping others. Yeah so i mean. Let's let's get into the fun of some of this stuff that you guys are doing like it's so cool to see all of these things are active for you. I mean i didn't say how you got into this but All but but let's how 'bout we do that because there's a lot of younger kids listening to this listening to me like i got the opportunity to build this year. Your grandfather get exposed to your father and now thank you for coming on board here talk to me through like a little bit of that legacy and the seeds that got planted and and now the sprouting that you're doing in the world. Those endure context is always a good thing so remind people on the has been. You know. I've been in tv for a while. There's a younger generation. That doesn't necessarily understand or remember what he did. But he was seventy seven years ago thinking about one lifetime ago that my grandfather was a co inventor of of. They called at the time. The apple longer will be scuba diving. And i wanna put that into context in into how remarkable that was because for millennia human beings have been exploring the land force in the surface of the ocean but prior to that Invention the only way the human beings could explore the ocean was through free diving so that breath hold diving. Actually you know what you're limited to a few minutes at best and Diving with big copper hard helmets Big little boots and a hose connecting to the surface you limited habibie who go clumping on the bottom. You couldn't swim so much weight on you. And that was really limited to military. You know at the time salvage diving things like that. Yes.

Seven years seven year fifty seventy seven years ago both two this year Ben about seven years second career one one lifetime ago one time one thing billion habibie so many people single one hand people
The Music of World Showcase in EPCOT

The WDW Radio Show - Your Walt Disney World Information Station

08:40 min | 1 year ago

The Music of World Showcase in EPCOT

"If i say the music of epcot what's the first song that comes to mind. Probably something from future world and as we covered extensively back on show six nine six ten future world has background scores and attraction and so show themes that not only. I think resonate with us but are enjoyed by us beyond just our time in the parks. They are on our playlists and in our ears when we drive run exercise. I'm obviously like reaching and assuming those last two or whether we're just relaxing at home but why which is my favorite word. And i think it's probably because so. Many of these songs were created by disney for disney they are original themes built around the theme using the time-tested recipe of what makes disney music so memorable but for the other half of the world. Showcase much of the music is not only traditional but helps to set the stage and represents the culture of the participating nation. And these aren't songs. I think that we would normally associate with a theme park experience. Either that is like if we're talking about walt disney world But some of my favorite songs. That dizzy songs are found in many of these background. Loops of not just future world. But some of these world showcase pavilions and they always seem to bring a smile to my face as they hear them. Whenever or wherever i am and i said on the intro to the epcot show that that the music is very much a melting pot of so many cultures ideas ideals technology and different flavors. And it's a place that you can hear music that is as diverse as the pavilions and cultures and speaking of diverse. I want to continue our musical journey from future world to world showcase once again with friends who helped kick off this musical odyssey so i'd like to welcome back to the show. Lisa denote glasner from the castle. Run and core memory candles dot com to be back. Jason connect from here with the magic and the after our show on the facebooks. Hello it's good to be back with you guys and the one and only zac brown from the one and only the zac brown show. Everybody excited to be here. So i am excited for this. And i'm curious to one because i want to see if hopefully we can beat or not break record long. Our future world discussion was. But i think and i'm curious because we don't talk about this ahead of time how this may differ. Because i think again so many of those future world songs and themes are ones that we can mention by name. Papillon came up again. I think exactly you know if it was a drinking game and papillon was your word. You're in some serious trouble but so much of world showcases different because one. We can't pronounce many of the names the songs they don't necessarily roll off the tongue and they're not one that we might necessarily know by name but we know in terms of how they make us feel and they are there are some pavilions that have themes or some that. Just have background music that we enjoy very quickly. When and they'll round in the same order. When you think of world showcase when you think of world showcase music what is the first song idea pavilion. Thought that comes into your mind for me. I remember when we sat down to do or when was sitting down to prep for the future world. Show i joked that. I've never felt so prepared and so unprepared at the same time for a topic because it was like it was a topic. That's just sort of ingrained in my soul but at the same time i didn't know quite how i was going to articulate it and This show said hold by juice because like the rest of disney right is supposed to sort of insulate you from the rest of the world and i think the unique thing about showcases that it has the opposite job. It's supposed to transport you into the rest of the world. And so while you know so much of the music throughout disneyworld otherwise as supposed to sort of encapsulate you and bring you into this place. You know. the imaginary kind of didn't do their job right right if they did. If that's the result of in world showcase because the point of showcases to make you feel like you're not in central florida. It's supposed to make you feel like you're traveling around the world. As you're walking around world showcase so i don't know if i have a quick good answer to like what song first comes to mind. it i mean i could say something. Easy like golden dream of course. Which is you know sure. We'll talk about that more But now i think it's it's like background stuff. Like le vian rose and like the stuff that green and like that. The the the music that i just associate. Because i'm here. So much with walking around world showcase but at the same time you know like you said in the intro. It's not necessarily music that you're supposed to associate with a theme park. Don't you have a green sleeve. The greens leave story to which will have to get to. Because i remembered crossing the bridge an international gateway with you and i said isn't the screen sleeves using it yet and then you told me a story from your childhood is i am. I am right. I mean who doesn't have a green sleeve story like there's a green sleeve story and i want to don't jump ahead of ourselves but that really from my childhood i whistle. Inslee leaves all the time and it makes my mother crazy. Maybe i was just hoping it was from your childhood. Okay i i mean to answer the question. What's the first song pavilion jumps to mind. It's gotta be mexico and it's got to be the three cobb heroes right like that's got to be no actually. It's not that i think. The the for me world showcase had an anthem and no it can't be eliminations but it had an anthem. It would be basically the soundtrack to impress his france. Of course which. I am super excited about francine far away i know he s- t and wonderful. We'll get there For me it's kind of an unfair answer. I think about the international gateway. It's kind of this. Great little collaboration of everything that you're going to experience it's kind of the coming attractions. You know like lisa said you've got le vian rose and you've got a little bit of music piping in from like the china pavilion and everything just kind of blends and it just sets the overall tone and of prepares you for the pallet. That is in front of you whether it be musical or food you kind of preps you and gets you in the mindset that is world showcase and for me you know if i was to close my eyes and just say world showcases a couple of songs that jumped right to the top but one of them and this is actually a great way for us to begin. I think is. There is a world showcase background loop and being disney enthusiasts that you are. I'm pretty sure. It exists on your iphone or ipod your spotify playlist because this is one of the ones that i think people do have an play when their home or even in their cars or when they're working or walking or just relaxing and while you might not necessarily know the names of the songs if you were to listen through it and serbia following along this. This item list of the music yelich like. Yes inca dance by cousteau. That's my favorite song. Although you wouldn't walk into sam goody's not that there's a sam goodies but go with me here. You wouldn't walk in goodies and say i need incan dance on forty five guys have that. But i love the world showcase loop that you can hear on both entrances to where you could. We'll talk about some of the changes that came about relatively recently but those are some of the songs that i hear that like the future world entrance mentally

Disney Zac Brown Lisa Denote Glasner Le Vian Rose Walt Disney Papillon Inslee Jason Florida Francine Mexico France Lisa China Sam Goody Serbia
Project Sealab 1 Summary Report - Part 1

Scuba Shack Radio

07:56 min | 1 year ago

Project Sealab 1 Summary Report - Part 1

"Way back in the nineteen sixties when i was growing up most of us were intently focused on the space race in one thousand nine hundred sixty four. The united states was making the transition from the mercury program to the gemini program and there really wasn't allowed manned spaceflight going on that year but there was another amazing exploration going on in interspace natwest project lab. One well i didn't know a great deal about c. lab until i started doing some research for the segment. I did hear on the show about scott carpenter. I did read. Ben held hells worst book about c. lab and that gave me a really good understanding of the magnitude of the entire c. Lab project both one two and three. And as i was doing more research i came across a report from the office of navel research. And it's the project sea labs summary report so today. I wanna start two part series on this report in part one today. I'll take you through the report up until the c. Lab one habitat is placed in position and then in part to a couple of weeks from now will review the mission some of the findings and conclusions by the project sea labs. Some report is subtitled. An experimental eleven day undersea saturation dive at one. Hundred and ninety three feet and report is dated june fourteenth nineteen sixty five for anyone looking for the report you might want to search on n r report. Ac are one zero eight. It's not that long to sixty two pages now. The copy. I got had a stamp on the cover. Then indicated. hard copies of the report would cost three dollars while microfiche would be seventy five cents and the copy was also stamped. Archived copy of this report are ha o.'neil from the office of navel research. Gif bond captain united states navy from the united states naval medical research. Laboratory are eland. Fear lieutenant commander. Us n. office of navel research and t odum of the mind defense laboratory in the preface pen by rear admiral. Leighton he says project sea lab one was the navy's first step into space. He also states that this report is being published by the navy so that all may share the information it is interesting to note that the background section of the report the authors do reference the work being done by captain shot cousteau and mr edwin a link and that was on their man in the sea concept they they stated indeed. The navy seems to be left at the post by the well-publicized efforts of captain cousteau and mr link. So it sounds like there's a little bit of sour grapes. Their report goes on to describe a december nineteen sixty three conference with the navy's bureau of ships where they obtained support for a c. lab now at that conference. They decided that the mine defense laboratory would build a habitat needed to select a location and they had five critique criteria for the selection one was the prospect of good weather too was good visibility. Three was a level bottom for was moderate water. Temperatures at depth and five was the general features of ocean graphic and marine biology biological interest. Now the site that they selected was argus island off of bermuda by march of nineteen sixty four all the appropriate approvals were obtained and they were often running and the operations were supposed to be conducted in the summer of one thousand nine hundred sixty four now. The mine defense laboratory selected an old experimental minesweeping float. Now the report has quite a few pictures and illustrations in it. Unfortunately the pictures are really not that great because of this. Pdf being produced either from a microphone. Show old old dot copiers but the stations are pretty good. Particularly the architectural drawings of c. lab won both the plan view and the cross section views by marched by may nineteen sixty four. C. lab was ready for sea trials off panama city. Florida on may twenty second nineteen sixty four. It was towed out to sea and sank uncontrolled and flooded over half full of seawater. Fortunately there were no injuries. The habitat was lifted. Towed back dried out and ready for another try on may twenty six this time with success. The previous incident was attributed to a misunderstanding of line handling waters by july. They were in bermuda and ready to sink. C. lab on july fourteenth. They again had issues because of the three to five foot swells and the yard patrol boat that they were using just wasn't powerful enough like chief brody said in jaws. I think you're gonna need a bigger boat. Well in this case. It was a crane that they took from bermuda. The reach the report details the adventure of getting c. lab on the bottom but they finally did an after getting everything hooked up and twenty four hour checkout on monday july twentieth. One thousand nine hundred sixty four at seventeen thirty five. That's five thirty five pm for you. Civilians c. lab one was manned by robert e. less anderson robert a barth sanders w manning and robert e thompson. Now what were the conditions like on c. lab interesting. The report says see lab proper dry inhabitable atmosphere satisfactory temperatures. Seventy eight degrees chilly. Water supply water not available heaters operable. Tv monitor not hooked up properly. Hot water heaters not operating refrigerator not operating co two scrubbers satisfactory. Electro writer. Satisfactory calibrated microphones not functioning. Crass burgo two meters satisfactory lights satisfactory. So you can see. There was still a lot of things that needed to be repaired. So i had to do was fixed everything that wasn't working and then complete their mission so in part to this series i'll take you through the mission the findings and conclusions from project sea lab some report of nineteen sixty five americas first journey into interspace. And that will be next time here on scuba shack

Sealab Project Sealab 1 Office Of Navel Research Natwest Project Lab Navy Project Sea Labs United States Naval Medical Re Scott Carpenter Mr Edwin Captain Cousteau Mr Link Argus Island Bermuda United States Navy Cousteau United States Leighton BEN Neil
Biden says "no need" for Trump to still receive intel briefings

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Biden says "no need" for Trump to still receive intel briefings

"He shouldn't be privy to intelligence briefings. I'm pam cousteau fox news. That's how president biden feels about his predecessor. The issue came up during an interview with. Cbs news value is giving him and then tell us appreciate what impact is he having all other than the fact he my slip and say something the president citing what he calls former president trump's erratic behavior intel updates are routinely given to past presidents as a

Pam Cousteau President Biden Fox News Cbs News President Trump Intel
Show #49 "Laughs" TV Show starring Bob Dubac, John Pate & Ron Robertson Open! - burst 2

Standup Comedy "Your Host and MC"

01:54 min | 1 year ago

Show #49 "Laughs" TV Show starring Bob Dubac, John Pate & Ron Robertson Open! - burst 2

"Jim was here. He's getting the dookie kicked out by a wild end. The marlins helicopter with a pitcher amid juleps saying. Yeah while jim place tag. That king cobra fly on ahead. That's up another batch of these corporate head butter maybe to kick the dookie out of him writer boy when you're tied up like in uni mutual of omaha the all time greatest wildlife series. This is the undersea adventures of jacques cousteau devils into the of and dover to the ocean down nail we discover how strong ronge and unusual creatures and then a different habitated. My son joke s. He decided to try his hand. At this clinic. Elude of the animals we seek it. Lingus monitors gama known. Is the details. Well real unusual america.

Nightclub Stand-Up Comedy Ron Robertson Jerry Miller Sunday John Pate Los Angeles Sacramento Texas Bobdubac Jim Place Marlins JIM Jacques Cousteau Omaha Lingus America
Sea Hunt - It's Still Alive: Point of No Return

Scuba Shack Radio

06:38 min | 1 year ago

Sea Hunt - It's Still Alive: Point of No Return

"It's time for another installment of seahorn. It's still alive in this time. We're going to season four episode one titled point of no return and it premiered on january seventh nineteen sixty one sixty years ago. The episode starts out with a boat pulling up alongside coast guard cutter. The boat is dropping off a reporter. Dorothy may brooke. She is heard that. Mike nelson is on board and figures. There must be a big story. If he's involved. The captain of the cutter tells dotty that you'll have to wait three days to talk to mike. The research is about mike. Living and working out of the scuba sphere. A two hundred and fifty feet now. That was right at the beginning of the work. That the davy jacques cousteau and ed link. We're doing on underwater habitats so sea hunt was a little ahead of the game after dadi get some basic information from the three scientists on board the cutter. The scene shifts to mike underwater. He's in doubles swimming with a big bag of rocks. And he's going entire inside the scuba sere. The scuba sphere is small diving bell shaped habitat with liquid helium and oxygen tanks. Act out once. Mike is inside. He gets a call from the booth. Lieutenant totally tells him that a tropical storm is heading your way rather than hall him up. It seems that mike is going to ride it out so he strings up. His hammock gets ready for bed in gets into the sack and because he says he can't raid the refrigerator like he normally does. He settled for a bottle of liquid protein. Well you guessed it. The big storm hits and as the cutters tossed about so is the scuba sere. Suddenly one of the tanks cured to the side of the sphere breaks loose and crashes down on the hatch rendering it inoperable. Mike can't fix it and now they can't bring them up and properly decompress. The project engineer vic jennings says it will take a day to make a new hatch. Should they cut him loose. They try to get them off the bottom and ride it out but discovers fear is being dragged it gets caught on a coral formation. Two hundred fifty feet. Mike gears up with his doubles and he has some additional small tanks between the double cylinders. Not sure what they are. But there's copper tubing Spiraling up to the vows on his. Saunders looks like kind of like a still. Maybe it's helium. They never really say as his fear breaks free. Mike reid it along until the cable and telephone connections part and luckily to screw this. Fear settles when the bottom in an upright position. So mike can go back inside and he says that he needs to spend his second night in this chamber of ours. I gotta tell you mike wetsuit. Looks pretty beat up in this episode starting to peel or something like that will now. The storm has passed the cutter realizes that mike is no longer attached. They have a new door but now they have to find a habitat might goes outside and tries to inflate one of his marker. Booties but it won't work at eight atmospheres so he takes out a balloon. Blows it up a bit ties it off to a line and sends it up. Will you guessed it it bursts now. He reverts to filling up a pair of denim jeans tied off at the bottom. I remember this from my time in the navy where you could use your pants. As type of life preserver on. Mike sends the inflated pants to the surface they briefly mark the location before collapsing. But lieutenant totally thought he saw something so they stay in the area back inside scuba sphere. Mike says that he needs to conserve. Air and pray then. He remembers something from this cub scout. Days and concocts a plan to use his wetsuit. Top as a surface marker buoy. He goes back outside. Fills it up and shoots it to the surface and then ties it off to the scuba sphere dadi and or intently scanning surface suddenly dadi spots to wet suit top. Well the next thing we see. Is mike nelson signs wetsuit. Top two hundred and fifty feet dragging a new hatch cable and telephone line across the bottom. He fixes the hatch. Attach is the cable and splices in the telephone. It's cold wet work he says and he's ready to rejoin the human race. Might get back inside. He hits the hammock and sleeps through the hours of decompression. They have to bang on the sphere to wake him up once. Mike opens the hatch up. Pops dotty to give him a big hug. Mike says he must be in heaven. 'cause this is the angel he's been dreaming about what are the best of my knowledge. This is the only episode. That dadi mayfield was in. Although it appears that from the dialogue from lake that daddy was intent on marrying mike nelson or as as he puts it put a ring through his nose. Dorothy mayfield was played by the actress. Joyce meadows whether there wasn't a lot of diving in the point of no return but mike nails nelson was well ahead of the likes of george. Bon jacques cousteau and egg link in deep sea. Saturation habitation

Sea Hunt Mike Nelson Scuba Diving Mike Ed Link Mike Underwater Vic Jennings Jacques Cousteau Mike Wetsuit Dorothy Brooke Mike Reid Swimming Saunders Navy Dadi Mayfield Dorothy Mayfield
"cousteau" Discussed on Anything But Idle

Anything But Idle

05:19 min | 2 years ago

"cousteau" Discussed on Anything But Idle

"A uk based site talked about the fact that three quarters of workers across the globe coming with mental health because of the lockdowns and that of course is Causing some impact on work productivity This is of course Known and understood. I think it's still important for us to talk about But i think it's important for us all to remember that Any group of people who are restricted from being able to You know go about their daily life. is going to feel some level of negative emotional impact This is not the right data to be presenting to people for or against personal productivity in remote work environment So just so. We continue to keep conflicting these things where I say oh. I took a lab rat and i locked it in a cage And it's unhappy That's an oh it should be happy and productive inside. Its cage is very different than You creating an environment for that lab to work and be productive in and it has the choice of going to do those things and is encouraged to go ahead and do those things very very different environments and circumstances so we can't use all of this data in In saying for or against a remote work or hybrid work or anything else like that. It has a very nice hamster wheel. It should be much more appreciative. Exactly so Good article. I think it's useful for us to be paying attention to how people are negatively and positively impacted by these lockdowns But i think we should also be mindful of the fact that we don't have the whole picture and we should continue to keep researching. I think at the end of the day. Most people are can be productive wherever they are if they're given the right tools the right mindset in the right motivation so don't don't keep kind of getting concerned by seeing these statistics. You know it's just like eggs too much. Cholesterol not enough cholesterol. You're gonna you. You should have so many eggs every day. You should not have exit. All in the every year is a different study on the other side of the argument Let's not get into this You know bouncing the ping pong back and forth over a remote work productivity. We know that people can be productive. you know remotely period. Let's not try and decide whether or not everybody on the planet is right for remote work during the pandemic okay. Cousteau alexa now has our routines on the amazon fire. Tv devices under the nicest has them for a long time. What is new is that they add those now to the fire tv so for routine you can tell the big a hey do this you know on on now you can even tell them hey do cartoons and she will be able to go you know for parents of a small kits. That sounds wonderful. Actually you know when the kid come and wake you up. That doesn't happen anymore. Mouthful but i remember when the kids will come at six. Am an open your eyes. Are you sleeping in your. Yes and they look at you and say can i watch the. We'll give really nice time to be able to say maybe a. Please turn the country on the living room and turn around and continue sleeping. That sounds wonderful. The moment that morning routine can bring me coffee and milk. It will be set for life but for now you could do it on the on your fire to be and i think that more and more. We're going to see his routines and this alexa really amazon is trying to make it a how. How one thing that..

Cousteau alexa amazon uk
"cousteau" Discussed on Chill-A-Kill

Chill-A-Kill

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"cousteau" Discussed on Chill-A-Kill

"Second bizarro now is on. This year's gonna quarterback was it that gay you represent the heroes in those not trump no in this area to komo news look present. Dante's mutual mass in abraham was established on in california as it'll tell them and has this seco can win those or yet dome under those as referential no mementos was another lack looking for. Let's say wounded bass. Don this thousand needles botha madonna l. candy that took a receiver. Law is your no matter. What does what does this way. Al gore league got at your bush. Gase does but i wanna see nagano l. You went eleven quadrennial. Don't they let the hillary was gone. Cassie trays municipal does mask. Gay is mr carrillo. Trump bearup was gone author bottles for more source those electoral even though you can receive and cousteau now sees this but they likely the Willing but a himba nor to the california as you narrow and establish territories that they you know they see companion. Ics on the question. Okay so it does. Is it boy combined you this scientists to focus on the political deal of no milwaukee pc etc catherine stop illegal zealand all the analysis recuse because when it comes in and tells you what this meant them on say occasion. If i'm also in package political window idea used finance companions delivery see yes liberally. Zebras.

california mr carrillo Trump bearup Al gore komo Dante hillary milwaukee cousteau Gase
"cousteau" Discussed on CNN 10 (video)

CNN 10 (video)

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"cousteau" Discussed on CNN 10 (video)

"Underwater ocean scrapers while Danish firm B. I G has imagined entire fighting cities. We may travel teapot than ever before without physically moving out of our seats. Cousteau points to breakthroughs in automation and underwater mobility that could take us further than the naked eye can see you visa Thomas. Vehicles are amazing. They have a very practical reason They are able to go places for longer periods of time without having to have a human being. Just, like juvenile, not less powering these vehicles may one day be electric even renewable. There's enough energy. Could be extracted from the ocean to power the world's current needs without creating significant environmental impact. One such piece of technology is called Oh tech ocean thermal energy conversion Oh Tak converts the cold water temperature from the deepwater to the fairly warm surface temperature to create energy. Imagine how amazing that piece of technology could be to help solve some of the climate change related issues as continue to develop as we continue to expand as we continue adding more people on this planet that will need that energy. So where does that leave us now we'll these breakthroughs takes further and deeper into the ocean and like we may one day, find ourselves living that. Well maybe.

Cousteau
"cousteau" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"cousteau" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Officials announced that small businesses and nonprofits can apply for commercial rental assistance it began this past Monday. Program the C early. I told you you couldn't do it. The program will provide up to $10,000 in grants to eligible commercial tenants, which are not required to be paid back, Okay? It's good for now, so that money runs out. There's so much going on. But I found this little piece of science news. That was so interesting. So Fabien Cousteau is the grandson of the legendary Jacques Cousteau. Would you want shock Cousteau and you know I did. I was great loved it. So father in Christo. He's raising money for what he calls a space station of the ocean and International space Station of the ocean. It's going to be called Proteus. OK, it'll be about 4000 Square feet of space 10 times of that. Of Aquarius, which is another one that biology and oceanography research 4000 Square feet is the size of a pretty good sized home. Big house everything else they're going to put it off the coast of the Florida Keys. And it will be the first modern undersea research base in over 30 years. Take that Elon Musk. You know, it's just wonderful, doesn't it? Yeah. I mean, what a great thing to do. And you know, it will be open for international researchers and OK, quite quick question because we got to hit the break If you had your choice, and they said to you, you can either go up in space or you can go down to this. Throw this new Cousteau. That's hard. I think I might think about it. Just give us a don't don't rush. Don't rush into that, okay, Many are wondering what they're going to do. Administrators of the Sacramento Unified School District are now warning they could run outta cash by February. Aubrey Aquino joins us live in three minutes with what she found out news radio from California's capital City Radio station News. 93.1 KFBK is available everywhere with the I. Heart radio at number one for podcast. Also on 15, 30 a m and kfbk dot.

Jacques Cousteau Fabien Cousteau International space Station Aubrey Aquino Elon Musk Sacramento Unified School Dist Florida Keys California I. Heart
"cousteau" Discussed on Túnel de vento

Túnel de vento

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"cousteau" Discussed on Túnel de vento

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Bush. Beverly Hills Cousteau
interview With Rik Emmett

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

07:50 min | 2 years ago

interview With Rik Emmett

"Welcome back. It's Eddie trunk on this week's podcast. Thank you so much for listening We start off as mentioned with Rik Emmett of triumph coming up second and just a bit. It'll be Rachel Bolan of skid row a very, very deluxe expanded double dip addition to great interviews for you this week I. Hope you enjoy him. We start with RIK Emmett right now. How are you rick? I'm Great Eddie how are you? Good how you in Canada how are you home? Yeah, yeah I live in Burlington, which is sort of a western city suburb, of Toronto and It's been great here. Actually you know it's I haven't minded sort of being isolated and. You know it hasn't had too much effect at actually allow me to become a little bit more creative so I've been enjoying myself. Well that's the thing you know all this pandemic time all the artists I've been talking to all seem to have a different take. Some are really chomping at the bit to go out there and do things and others are enjoying the reconnect with family and not used to being home. This long others are taking the time to do really creative things. Right record do streaming videos what what's been the focus for you. In this time I mean you you are semi retired from touring anyway weren't you? Yeah I had sort of stepped back from touring at the beginning of twenty nineteen. So I was getting used to it and I had told my agent. Well, you know I'll go out and try if you want to necessarily have to fly two gigs. But if you put some stuff together that can drive to maybe I'll try some of that and then along came covert thing and those got bumped and canceled and so but I was already getting used to being off the road. anyways. So I don't really miss the road and I mean. I do Miss Playing And and having that I interaction with the crowd and that energy you know but I don't miss you know airplanes and hotels and taxi cabs and all the rest of it. You know a And the thing. That's weird. Eddie like it was almost like a retirement was a great career move for me because. Round Hill records was putting out the triumph stuff said, he would you like us to put a all your back catalog and I went well sure that it'd be great. It's nice to have somebody believing me. So all of the albums that I made after I left triumphed they've just digitally released him and then I was sitting around going I. Think you know I still want record and stuff when I was writing tunes in When I in nineteen, sixty, two, I don the Bob Dylan record, it was just called Bob Dylan and it was just a cousteau Qatar voice voices. You know all my years I've never really done a whole album like that. So I'm going to do a project like that. So I put that out on my website and then I I was. Writing a book of poetry and it looks like a publisher wants to make a deal so that I can do book of poetry and a memoir. So it's like one thing led to another thing about to nosing before I. Knew It. I had like a completely full calendar, and now of course you know I'm doing all of this promos on calling you. What is what is strung out troubadours I saw link for that. What is after the newest thing you're doing? Now Strung out troubadours was a thing. There was a guy named Dave Dunlop who played in my band and he actually went try and fly the reunion Gig in. Sweden in an Oklahoma Day was actually in the in the triumph hand as well playing rhythm. Guitar and Stuff. So Dave and I had a little duo thing like a lot of times my touring and got to the point where I was doing a lot of solo stuff I wanted something else and so I use the piano player for a while and then I kinda got the edge to have a little bit more of a rock and roll approach. So two guitars made it a little bit more kind of versatile and so Dave is the guy and we did it for you and then I said, Hey, you know what? We should do an album together and put it out. We can sell it at emerge table, and so that was the birth of the troubadours and we did three albums. and. Yeah Round Hill bought my rights out to those days still has his side of it. He he didn't sell them. So he stands to make some more mechanical royalty. Whatever there is to be made these days, right Yeah. So I wanNA talk to you. I. WanNa ask you some triumph stuff of course but before. But before that, let's let's let me cover the reason you're calling which you mentioned the release of your albums after triumph ended for you and I think rick that people would probably be surprised to learn how many records there are, and there were a lot of people that sort of. Categorized what you did after triumph as being a jazz guitar, but that's not all you did. You really ventured into a lot of different styles. So for people that especially here in America that maybe didn't follow all that closely some of the stuff you did after triumph tell everybody what you did musically, and how many records there are in the different journeys those records took you on. Okay well, you know settle in folks make yourself a cup of coffee. This is a long story. There there was thirteen that round hill made a deal for and they ran the gamut and when I first got of triumph. So a little bit of sort of ancient history here left eighty eight. I actually made three albums for an indie either had a distribution through universal and in Canada. And those sort of started an evolution or You know I don't know a a mutation change from being sort of Iraqi. Guy To kinda be in a singer Songwriter Guy and that took me from eighty nine through to about ninety five six. And then I sort of had enough. I. I was I mean the industry had changed You know the whole thing of being sort of in an arena rock band. It's kind of converted to an MTV banned through the eighties that was dying off and there was the rise of Nirvana and soundgarden and so radio had gone in a different direction and I try and thing just seemed like it was over for me you know so I left made those three records in there and I got to the point where I went. Okay. This doesn't really seem to be working for me either and it's not really why I left triumph. In the first place I just want to indulge myself creatively artistically and I don't care if I make money or not This is not a question of chasing career. This is a question of sort of. Chasing what art in music and the music is is pulling me towards calling me. You know. So I, one was a classical guitar instrumental record next one in very short succession was a blues rock and kind of a thing because really that was like where I cut my teeth when I was first learning electric guitar was the whole Eric Clapton Jimmy Page Jeff Beck thing these guys out of the yardbirds then back into the Chicago Blues and down the Delta all of the you know the the same path that those guys went soon as you discover them, you go back down the path that they did too. So you know And then the next record was sort of top jazz because that was the next thing that happened in my life I went to college for one semester in Jazz Music Program but at the time, I was heavily deeply into everything from west, Montgomery to Charlie bird to Joe Pass and so Yeah you know swinging and that comes on playing blues and so those were the first three records I made real quick

Rik Emmett Eddie Dave Dunlop Round Hill Rick Canada Bob Dylan Rachel Bolan MTV Toronto Yardbirds Oklahoma Burlington Publisher Eric Clapton Soundgarden America Chicago Charlie Bird
Allen Clark

The Candid Frame

06:02 min | 2 years ago

Allen Clark

"A mistake that many photographers make as they make a go at being a professional photographer. is believing that being a generalist is an advantage. Saying that you can photograph, anything doesn't leave impression with a client that you think it should make. Secondly. It leaves the photographer to be defined by what they're hired to do. Rather than by the work that they have a passion for. You may achieve financial success. But. It may not be the type of photography. Sings to your heart Alan Clarke had a clear idea of the kind photographer. He wanted to be and the kinds of photographs you wanted to make. Based in Nashville Tennessee his desire to be a photographer in the music. Industry could have led him to photograph. Country Music Stars. But. He didn't want his physical address to pigeonhole his photography or his aspirations. so He created his own path as a commercial editorial photographer resulting in a career that has allowed him to photograph the likes of Sir George Martin even. Hawk Bob Newhart and two former presidents. I hope this conversation demonstrates the importance of defining who you WanNa be and who you are as a photographer. This is about an annex and welcome back to the candidate frame. Are, I. Alan Welcome to the show. Thank you glad to be here so glad to get Nice Mike. Voice this should be. This is gonNA sound good? Stuff. You ever watched thirty rock now know. Alec, Baldwin and Will Arnett, both have amazing voices, and so they played that up a lot, and that's to our strengths as well so they had like a sexy voice off at one point. Close to each other, and be like I can do that and then they to be like. Yes, you can this. Man Gets. Today's the record this. The astronauts took off on the capsule and the rocket today and I know you're thinking. What you're talking about. You're saying. Neil. Armstrong! Yeah, it's a replica of his suit over a Hoodie. So Yeah I've completely nerd out today you've you've photographed a bunch of the of the suits. But where did the best nation begin? I think like most of us. You think of these images and you dream when you're a child like I was I wanted to be. An oceanographer wanted to be part of the cousteau. Society I wanted to be an astronaut and. Set in my second third grade class looked out the window and reflected on every port report card ever had. Would get these notes of our report cards to be like a you unsatisfactory. He just doesn't pay attention. He looks out the window constantly. That's what I got. Unsatisfactory what they had on the report Carsberg. Takes. A dreamer looks like when they're little. We have the album are recordings of the Apollo flight at my house, growing up so double album and it had pictures of the flight and I remember. I didn't think I really understood exactly what I was listening to just Kinda of thought, it will couple. At record on and just listened to it and look at looking at the pictures. I think it's probably still in my house somewhere. Let even though I don't have a record player anywhere near, let's. I, don't know I'm not one of those. Guys. Are. You saying you're not a hipster? Is that what you're saying? I think that by a couple of decades man I duNno, sometimes. My wife tells me their original hipster. Looking into some of this I'm like I. Don't know, but then I look at myself. When I do that. A you still have a record player and listen to things and she may be right. Working the idea that you want it to be able to photograph the spaces issue. Number of them have and you know I guess the idea came along Huntsville. Space and rocket center is only two and a half hours from Nashville so. have been going down there since I was a kid. My parents took me when I was little, and it just never stopped and something like a tradition. Take took my children there and. I've had photo shoots. Their showed up multiple times I. Don't think they. Enough to where they're sick of me, but it's pretty close. And just kept going there and going there, but then when I would do like photo shoots across. You know our great country. I would go to in in Boston there's A. Museum for JFK and I've been there and just seeing Johnson, space center in Houston of course, and all the different spots every time I get a chance I'll go and visit and just take my camera with me when I go, and my whole point is to just record these to record them like I would do it. Not like a tourist would try to actually light it really well, and sometimes you get permission to do these things, and sometimes you don't. But most of these things are on public display, and were American citizens, so we can kind of like just Bassani and people don't know this, but all all the museums in DC are all. All free to American citizens, because that's part of our taxes, and that's what it goes towards, and so you can kind of do anything you and requests, these types of things, so it started years ago through a space and rocket center, which was a privately funded thing, and it was on the redstone arsenal, the right next to the arsenal base course Verner von Braun worked out of Huntsville Developing Saturn five, and so it's steed like a weird thing like an Alabama of all places steeped in this rocket tradition. You know that know people just don't know about and they kind of had them. They're just to kind of hide them a little bit. Kept them safe there instead of putting them in a big city like DC or New York, but that's when the fascination started from as from a very early age, just repeatedly going down there and shooting these things and You know on crappier cameras when I was little like instamatic disclaimer. Even growing up as a for NYKANEN.

Nashville Huntsville DC Alan Clarke Bob Newhart Sir George Martin Verner Von Braun Tennessee Boston Will Arnett Armstrong Apollo Neil Alec A. Museum Johnson Alabama Houston New York Baldwin
Finding Positivity

Trainer Talk - The Podcast

03:07 min | 2 years ago

Finding Positivity

"Have been we have planning on you course you yes indeed is very exciting. Yes indeed so. That's you know while emails going out this week quickly. The twenty ninth of April. That's quack sightseeing planning our future. Trading Business Co ops. Oh yes yeah. Which is what we say what I would not be doing in terms of my on. My program has a successful business. Because you know those is principles whether in a situation whether or not are the same of course and then you are going to bring over online training online. Cousteau chip making noises in the background is in the background. Nobody chaired the interrupt service. So yes it will. That's he's very very. We had a spotlight session members last FIDE. I could find a with them. Rebecca Perkins we were talking about resilience. Which again is very topical at the moment which is why I stood to commodity a session and And that was great. Actually it was really really nice to you. Know it was gonNA call every combing and everybody shed different ways of dealing with a really interesting sort of came out center. So that's great enjoyed that I've been talking of confusion. Stop this weekend are you. Do you know why you don't have to live. Go out okay. Well what kind of do what are those jobs? No I just such a check that will try to superman. Dissolve weather's supposed to be A mixed at the word I just needs to check can still go through Leicester and make sure that everything's okay. And that he received emails they should do constantly a bit more of that stupid day. We had a chance to like leaps meeting choose. Don't talk about the The latest round tweeting Chester. Because obviously they speak quite you. People who have to pitch will advance. Everybody has to leverage on so that was something that they were experienced the first time so. That was really nice to hear that. How would you getting on with? That was yeah definitely definitely is great and we'll come onto this get talk mine topic as well But I think people are having new experiences that they didn't anticipate they. They would have quite so quickly. Which I think he's actually. It's a good thing The say yes FAB factor to here and actually see the expressions of people's faces that they Achieved something with it as well and were pleased with themselves rightly so For having done it.

Rebecca Perkins Trading Business Co Chester Leicester
"cousteau" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

09:41 min | 2 years ago

"cousteau" Discussed on WGN Radio

"He is certainly no exception check out John Mitchell Cousteau's ambassadors the environment and right here at the Ritz Carlton it's a really great educational program that gets you out it gets you in it gets you under and get you educated about all the interlinking mechanisms between us animals marine life and of course the ecosystems of the world and it's open anybody here at the hotel so check it out and you want more information either on that or any of the other programs around the world just correct our website Peter Greenberg dot com speaking of getting out in an under my next guest I'm still I'm so honored to have on the show when you want to talk about underwater photography you talk to flip Nicklin he was in Alaska but he's here for a lot of time at this time of the year because it's well seasoned flip welcome it's great to be here in a great to be a through another whale season look you just showed up here and showed me a picture just showed me on your iPhone that you took what three hours ago yesterday morning yesterday morning at the wells are here I think Wilder here in gang busters as well super out there it really is well soup yes and they're coming pretty close to shore yeah the people to tease the from shore when people are trying to load up the box in the morning they're crazy they're next to see the blows off shore and sometimes you look for in your next usually straight out is all the rage of the harbor the right break at the harbour mouth and going through the ship's itself lots and lots of cows and calves it's always amazing to me and and I shake my head at this all the time you look in the mirror posters in Mexico the the butterflies that come back every year to the exact same location traveling literally thousands of miles the wheels are doing the exact same thing exactly and and we don't know quite how they're doing it but we're really really glad there are and the numbers it's a great success story when we started in the seventies or maybe fifteen hundred north Pacific humpback now it's over twenty five thousand still rage so the protections that have been imposed by the world organizations are starting to work they they're working really really well it yeah I mean you still have issues with Japan you still have issues allies learned that that the big issues that probably aren't countries probably more habitat fight for prey things like that and I I think surely an ethical or moral issue but the environmental issues are the same issues for all of us in the oceans now you're one of the founders of the wilderness I am explain how you came about to do that and what exactly it is that you do well I started doing well first National Geographic in the late seventies Peter travel around the world doing all kinds of whales and dolphins in I can't get ahead of the game a little bit nineteen ninety six and decided this was the best place to do where research and got to the gym Darling one of the pioneers will research put in ten grand we came back to see it was worthwhile it was really worthwhile he came back and started looking at a really small program they grew and grew and grew and but it's a program that does what it started out looking at social functions song why are whales singing looking a breeding behave and I remember that when you guys did your first work on that with the acoustics on that were unbelievable the nineteen seventy nine issue my dad worked on where they had the record in there that or just first pressing a record ten million records and you can have the will of the wedding and and they're still waiting for the world I'm sure they are but we we we were doing that starting right around two thousand we started working with Megan Jones who's now or director and she was looking at female role so we're looking at at humpbacks whether singing what stresses females are making and my job was coordinating photographing the work we're doing and the behaviors wheels are doing and has the behavior changed in those years that the paper what we don't really know I mean one of these trying to figure what normally as was a normal winter fifteen hundred animals or is normal when you have twenty five thousand animals there there my dad took my dad one of the real pioneers my dad wrote a well nineteen sixty three and sort of became famous around Wales but he did a number of stories we just tried to shoot anyway picture and talk about any science you knew when you came in nineteen ninety nine we're showing all these behaviors you good with the always doing those behaviors because it was a new thing to have a camera and look at the behavior talking about right now she didn't realize that when you have the camera other than they're really talking about it I'm sure yeah I'm gonna say what's this guy doing the cal what was that whole idea and and one of the shortest anybody's how much does me being here changing that behavior and that's what that's what something we're very conscious of and the thing is you won't even know the answer to that is what what went up early on we had a hill station and they look what we'll be doing before you got there while you're there and after you left and I'm going to really matter what happened what it does sometimes things change sometimes they didn't but one of the things you found that there are so many things in the real world that you didn't see above water that many of the changes that we thought we were doing was actually other animals in the water the precaution to change exactly now speaking of change and our impact they you know you get so angry when you read a story like I did in the last two months about the Wilder that washed up with two hundred pounds of garbage in its stomach and a plastic one those who begins when we talked about hunting the big issues are are praising our our habitat or pollution temperatures in the ocean changing of those are the big things to work one of the things that I noticed not too far from here on midway out on midway island which for those people who don't know midway is actually an island located midway between San Francisco and Tokyo it also happen to be the most decisive naval battle site in the history of the world back in World War two and we had a big a navy base there we still have a big base there but it's not used by the government's used by fish and wildlife with huge long runways and all sorts of stuff and when you go out there and you start walking the beach to things you notice first are you the only one on the beach because the navy left alone maybe other people in the entire island along with the seventy five thousand people base their but then as you get closer to the shoreline you're seeing the carcasses of the dead going to birds and their stomachs are split open and what's in a cigarette lighter six pack of beer holders the plastic beer holders I mean fishing nets I mean and it's right there in you can't avoid it is it's literally in your face sure the trash in the sea is one of those big issues and that the trash gyres in the north Pacific and I think all of those things that one of the things Wales right things are great iconic animal to bring attention to all those other things that affect us too but but for some reason we've decided we really love whales and all the things that affect them what's the one overriding lesson you've learned from wells boy probably the biggest thing we've learned is that the animal can keep on going can change and adapt to have animals that have had the world change around them and have continued to succeed have continued to adapt and do pretty darn well now when you consider swimming with the whales so you do a lot right we we we do our project my part of it's largely being in the water with wells all under federal state permits and things to write close ridge occasion yes remove wheels have been my job since nineteen seventy nine right now great job if you look at the orders up in up in British Columbia you know and you understand the way that these pods work there or they stay in the same family have it right and you could name them and they do yes yes right after that the second job I did on wheels for National Geographic was on those whales right and now the wheels that you were just with yesterday they're coming back to the same location yes you tagging them yes your name what what what I mostly retain them by taking pictures of their tails right so we have an individual ID like a thumb print on those animals I see this the striations marks you can see the cars if you will and you're right you tend to see the same animals often at the same time and the the with the facial recognition refusing to match tales we're getting a much better pictures of where they're going when they're going who they're with okay so not gonna ask the really stupid question please forgive me you just mention facial recognition this if they're all coming back at the same time and they're all coming back to more or less the same location and you're in the water with them do they recognize you I think sometimes they do whether they recognize me a recognizable terrain in I think there's others out of the book but there there's some of that but one of those things is when you think about the wheels coming here they're not all coming and going at the same time he is like a river of Wales coming and going it's like the hotels they're always full but it's not the same folks but that group of when they're coming when the going may change and that's that's one of those things we'd love to know we're just getting the gear to really make those matches not just what science is doing but what they cations are doing taking pictures on well watch is putting into things like happy willing going well I saw was also here here and here at this time that time in the sun right and for those people who do the serious research and tagging them it's G. R. tracking time and you know exactly where this is a geo tracking it's a last last couple years we've been sending remote vehicles from here to Mexico listening for Wales and finding singing wheels a thousand miles east of here to attract the whole picture hi tech is giving us all these great tools to get a better idea of what wells are doing when we come back I want to talk about will personality and what I've noticed and what I know you go to sleep before I got the water with an amazing story what happened when I was well watching the president of Mexico down in Baja and what happened when they sang a song not when the will sing the song when we sang the song it was absolutely mind boggling and guess what we got on so that's what we got on the field so we come back we'll talk to flip Nicklin about all that stuff and what we really some of the wheels back with more from the Ritz Carlton Kapalua in Maui right after this I have a travel question or problem.

John Mitchell Cousteau Ritz Carlton
"cousteau" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

05:19 min | 2 years ago

"cousteau" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Offer give green on capital for the long post game because he looked like a different approach I wonder Jacques Cousteau's now the coach junk bond I'm sorry does that undersea explorer speaking of undersea explorers Antonio girl on the other side of the glass is finalized here the fan he's graduated B. often L. and I are still in third grade and enjoying it as we've always up so paid goes on the other side he did line up like the character in later tonight on the program the brilliant columnist for the New York Post and we will discuss the Atkinson departure among many things with Mike it's always good to talk to Mike for car always good to talk to you eight seven seven three three seven sixty six sixty six R. number we had a nice neck when this afternoon Terrel one is first golf tournament here in the states that was nice for him as the Players Championship is next weekend but tiger's not playing so that takes some luster for a lot of fans out of the tournament but all the best players in the world outside of tiger we'll be playing it is it is often called the fifth major and they have changed the calendar in golf so it normally is the plate may now it's played March so we look forward to that then obviously you get to the masters the PGA the U. S. open and British open what else we have well look we got these injuries are Gary Sanchez didn't play today again he wasn't really expected to but they thought he might be back tomorrow now it looks like at least according to some down there including Kristie Ackert of the Daily News that he won't play until Friday with that bad back they are not attributing it necessarily to his new catching position the way he sets up behind the plate which is new to him but I think it's fair to say that you know I'm not and I mentioned this at the time I was one of the ones that many people believed over reacted to the lost the role mine and only time will tell if I did over react or if I was right but bottom line the backup catcher who is now Kylie gosh Yoko is gonna play a lot that I think is not debatable so it's an important part of for the Yankees season the Mets have I had a pretty good you know we'll talk about this later but they've had a pretty good spring in terms of staying healthy other than Jed Lowrie's mishaps it's been you know pretty quiet and we just hope that we get performance really it's about showing up and get it done for so many players but most importantly the the notable players Rommel's defensively Conforto Rosario Middle and you hope that you get something close from macmillan Alonso even though hoping to get exactly what we got last year might be a little bit too much but there's plenty of reason for optimism there plenty of reason for optimism most of the regular season coming to a rest in college basketball it is a down product what is still a very competitive product you know I don't know what we've talked about this so much that I'm sure many of you are tired of it I don't know why and I'm gonna talk to Mike about this slope much listening so we can prepare to answer with something more intelligent and I've been able to offer I don't want no one could tell the truth I don't know why it's so out of style and why it becomes so difficult to just say the truth in love with it are you one of the things that bothers me about it is I don't think the consequences of telling the truth are that bad I don't think it's that much worse to say we fired Kenny Atkinson because we want to go in another direction can is a good coach but not for us right now we need to make a change somewhere Joe Girardi got changed nobody does Joe Girardi could manage yeah I thought it was stale they made in the executive decision they're not asking for everybody to agree with it the problem with with the lack of truth out there is that it smells of fear as if we have some sort of power and we really don't you know we talk about this all the time we don't have that much power over these teams not we don't want them to be arrogant in our face and say by the way we know you don't have any power so we're doing this and through you if you don't like it we don't want that but we also don't want them saying things that we know are true or masking things in order to sell tickets because they're afraid of what happens if we tell the truth I'll tell you what happens very little and you gain a lot of respect that's what happens when you tell the truth you get a lot of respect you know this mutual departure style fun you know Erin judge L. hill in two weeks and I mean it's you know it's one after another it's all sorts of organizations it's not just here in New York.

Jacques Cousteau
What We Learned from the Harvey Weinstein Verdict

WSJ What's News

05:41 min | 2 years ago

What We Learned from the Harvey Weinstein Verdict

"Women who came out with allegations of sexual assault against Harvey Weinstein were some of the biggest voices in the metoo movement. But even some of them were worried that he would be hard to convict this week. A jury found Mr Weinstein guilty of First Degree Criminal Sexual Act and third degree rape counts joining us. With more is Wall Street Journal Legal Affairs reporter Laura Cousteau Laura is this a watershed moment for these kinds of cases. It really is. I think as you said Culturally this was already a really central sort of touchstone over the last couple of years. He was one of the most high profile people to be accused of Sexual assault by dozens of women but it wasn't clear that that would really translate very well legally and it wasn't really clear how much had resonated with people And so what this case which had some very complicated. Very difficult facts. Facts that would have probably precluded a conviction say five years ago This really kind of showed that it has actually really kind of changed the culture and Change. The legal system with the idea of the casting. Couch has been around for decades and in many cases. Weinstein claim that many of these were consensual encounters. How is his case shifted? How Society thinks about what constitutes assault or even rape. Yeah this is what made these cases one of the things that made these cases so difficult. A lot of these women had long term relationships with him long term romantic relationships. They needed him professionally. They continued to talk to him. After the assault they continued to correspond with him safe for new affection of things to him. And that's a very difficult set of facts and I think what the me to me too. Movement really opened up. Was this idea. That complicated facts are life complicated. Facts are part of sexual assault. They don't necessarily mean that it didn't happen and certainly experts. I talked to said they. Just don't think that that idea had as much currency a few years ago as it does today have we seen sort of a ripple effect and how businesses deal with these problems. Yeah so absolutely. We've seen changes in industries everywhere from Hollywood to the fast food industry and some of these changes have not been necessarily voluntary states have changed rules including New York which now requires sexual harassment training There's also been an uptick. Empl in in cases in employment discrimination cases being brought Which is of course also led to changes in behavior you know. Hollywood is a great example of this where it's a lot of it is also just changing the culture. Where in Hollywood? They no longer have meetings in hotel rooms which seems pretty intuitive but was pretty much the norm for a long time so yeah we've seen pretty widespread cultural cultural changes. One of the big hurdles the accusers had was that many of their claims were from incidents that happened years ago. What impact has this case head? And do you think will have on the Statute of Limitation Laws? So we don't know I mean. Of course it's it's just a you know twenty four hours later but there is a sense that this is going to prompt states to look at some of the things that made this case so difficult to bring forward so one of those was the statute of limitations another was nondisclosure agreements. Many of these women had signed and D. A.'S. Which precluded them from coming forward speaking to the media bring civil cases and so there is some hope from experts that. I talked to who would like to see these kinds of changes This will also be something that they can highlight and say These are changes. We need to make to make these kinds of cases easier to bring. That's right just last week in the Nevada debates we saw Michael Bloomberg get called out over these as I guess. The question still has has the metoo movement changed how lawyers and businesses use or will use. Nda's it's very tricky. So New York state changed the law and said you can no longer require employees to sign. Nda's around sexual assault but they said unless unless the employee wants to and that creates a sort of tricky situation where employers may just not agree to a settlement at all if an employer doesn't sign an NDA according to lawyers. I talked to so it's very still very tricky to get this right but certainly experts that I talked to are hopeful that if we make it much more difficult or impossible for employers to require NDA's when their Employees are alleging sexual assault That could also be Something that helps protect people in the workplace if people know they can't hide behind these kinds of NDA's you've spoken to a number of experts. This field is there a sense that this conviction will have ripple effects and prompt more women to come forward both for criminal and civil filings. So there definitely is a sense of this that that you know. I think women often saw these kinds of cases as hopeless. You didn't see. It was very hard to get a successful conviction. These kinds of cases they they were kind of notoriously the he said she said cases. There wasn't physical evidence if there was if there was a complicated set of facts women would often just feel. There's no point in coming forward or a lawyer. I talked to said women would off to come forward. Make that first phone call to her and then change their minds and not want to deal with the repercussions But there are certainly others who I who. I talked to. Who disagreed with that? Who Said you still saw? These women get really eviscerated on the stand. Have Their sexual histories uncovered? Have there have being serve accused of selling sex? And so you know that that may still give some women. Pause Wall Street Journal legal reporter Laura Consist. Oh thanks a lot. Laura thanks very much.

Assault Laura Cousteau Laura NDA Harvey Weinstein Hollywood Reporter Rape Wall Street Journal Legal Affa New York Wall Street Journal Laura Consist Couch Michael Bloomberg Nevada D. A. Harassment
An Interview with WWE Legend Kurt Angle

TKO with Carl Frampton

13:15 min | 2 years ago

An Interview with WWE Legend Kurt Angle

"Incredibly pleased society. We've got joining us. Who never quite expected? That's phones on silent everyone. I never expected that we would have on. Tko wwe wrestling legend. Kurt Angle first of all. Thank you so much for for taking the time to join us. Thanks for having me on. And let's see you're over here with them. WWe promoting the new bt sport. Yes exclusively in the UK for the two thousand and twenty busy day few. Yeah we started early morning and we're GONNA go out tonight we just have like a a gathering at bt. Not and. I think it ends at eleven o'clock but we started early morning and this is normal for for sports entertainers. Yeah do a lot of media so going a huge wrestling fan on A. You didn't have sky in your house. Yes so I was like an a young kid by Cole I was Afam. wrassling bottom was on the subway channels and I didn't have sky the watch it as much as other guys. Yeah but I was obviously a world of high beg ables. Did you know when you first joined. Because obviously in these this day and age social media the Internet you know how truly global the companies and how far you're reaches but were you aware in in the late ninety s just how many people were watching worldwide now. I I didn't watch wrestling. I didn't grow up watching it. I start watching it it would. I started so when I saw the company late ninety eight. That's when I started watching I do WanNa come on those days. But he's okay. You got quite like to find Natalie about your amateur wrestling career because as a professional sportsman. That's something that you were known for his part of your. WWe character but actually that was a huge part of your career and your life you were in a family of rest is your brother's arrest sits right yeah had four brothers. They all wrestled. They were all very successful. I was the youngest. Didn't really like wrestling. The START WITH I. I like team sports. I didn't like it depending solely on me but the more I watched my brothers and growing up I start liking wrestling. I started getting better and eventually I got better than they were and then I became came the best of my family by win the Olympic medal. Yeah 'cause wrestling in America's be of a high school institution because we have it starts when you're serve in elementary school visit. Almost every school has a program right so junior high high school college. It's very big over there. So it's it's part of our culture because a lot of people call for boxing to be put into schools as part of the curric- it used to be in the schools and there's a call for it become back and installs obviously a lot of discipline and everything else and you see the the problems that society has these with Nayef Cram and gang culture and everything else. I think. Think that programs like that rather than in the states and boxing programs and the stats are in the UK. Only going to help us. What point did you? What age did you think this could really be serious for me as a career I would say around thirteen fourteen? I started having a lot more success and got to the high school level and I lost success there and it just carried over to college and I didn't really. Oh you think about Olympics. When I was younger I just thought about that season and if I could win the championship that year and every year I continue to win which Olympic I'm big city one nine hundred ninety six Atlanta Atlanta well? Is that your proudest moment. Out of everything you've done in your career. Olympic gold medal surpasses says anything. Yeah it was You know even bigger than anything. I've accomplishing wwe. Yeah Yeah Imagine. That was a kind of Golden Olympics for the US esteem cousteau was the homeland picked. Michael Johnson it like the basketball team is Charles Barkley and Shaquille O'Neal came one. Those guys Gail Devers. Even Andre Agassi won the tennis and we're legends in that team. What was it like to be off in the Olympic Village? Seeing those people it was pretty cool. You know you knew it was special when you went to opening ceremonies and you saw the athletes there and the guys you mentioned they were the guys and girls that were participating that were already professionals professionals and they made it you know viable for pros to end up competing in the Olympics and so you saw basketball and tennis. Ns and now even golf. So the the pros are going and winning medals as well now so those of it because one of the things the Olympics exp boxing is one of the only sports where there is a kind of. There's another trajectory and other policy if you win a medal for of sports certainly minority sports. That aren't necessarily a lot of TV coverage the Olympic medal can often be the kind of end of the road. There isn't anywhere else. I speak to go resting very well. Be One of those is and and so for you that amazing so the question I was going to ask you without. FMA How to beg then as it was Ni- would you have took that pop rather than the wwe without a doubt. Yeah wow it wasn't at that point. UFC struggling they offered me a ten fight. Deal for one hundred fifty grand and that was our biggest contract they ever offered. This was in ninety seven and then sound very good to me so I decided decide to go pro wrestling and by two thousand one two thousand and two you have see was kicking in high gear but I was already drawn in and a pro wrestling scene. So how how did the what was the chain of events that let you to the door of of the W W well in one thousand nine hundred sixty minutes man offer me a contract. I flew up to meet with them and I wasn't interested. I had a lot of people. Tell me you know you grew up. You never watched the Fake what you did was real a lot of my peers. Were telling me don't do it. So my agent through the contract the way and I'd say in one thousand nine hundred star watching Watching stone. Don't go Steve Austin the Rock and however flannel. They weren't how entertaining they were. I thought man I could do this. I think it'd be a lot of fun and you have see at the time. Time wasn't going anywhere so I went with a wwe. What was the the early memories? Because I imagine wrestling's one of the toughest sports there is a is a amateur wrestling but of red. If in a few places that is a pro wrestling were were incredibly tough. What were your first memories of some of the first lessons and training training sessions? You did all the first day. When I started training I quit? I took three bumps and my neck the pain I was getting my neck and back it was like this isn't normal. You don't it's like self abuse and you know we bump on plywood. It's a lot like this and There's no spring underneath It is self mutilation. You're you're basically beating that crap on yourself because you're allowing. I mean people were throwing around and take your head off with a clothesline and the object. You're bumping on his plywood so it was very abusive in the first day. I I didn't like it and I decided to hang in there. I came back the next day and I continued on. I got used to bumping and and used the pain so eventually didn't bother me as much but I'm paying for it. Now see a leg generation before ours. My Dad's generation. They would not really look favorably upon the tablet Ali. But what these guys do is take some serious stick their body. There's some serious injuries and stuff. It's you know your two weight world champion. And you've taken many punches to the head and body is is anyone WanNa taking a lifetime. What is what is pain to you guys? How do you manage pain? Do you ever get used to it as ever become less painful or do you just become used to living in that place. It's something you get used to. And as a young boxer I think Jimmy Moore. My trainer is spoke about this and said that you can tell from a very young age or someone hazard or not and it's normally a kids barn and if they take a punch annoys on they don't cry and they punch back it's like you can't make the Paean it's like I don't know what obviously adrenaline carries you through a lot of it but it's not like a real specific. If you punch me in the arm Ni- I would feel feel more pain than actually punching ahead fate strange sensation. It's not nice but it's very very hard up. Manassas gray but law detainees. I've not been able describe pain amateur wrestling pro wrestling. What are the worst kind of pain that you can describe? And how do you deal with those. I think the worst pain I had and I still have it now as an amateur wrestling right before the Olympics I got thrown on my head and I broke my neck and I didn't know it. I kept wrestling again that day. I ended up winning the US Open and that put me in a good position to make the Olympic team for the Olympic. Trials made me the top guy so I didn't have the Russell the mini tournament Face the winner of the mini tournament. I was the guy that the mini tournament faced. So Oh i I I couldn't get passed by any doctor doctor. Wood Passer would allow me to wrestle so I eventually found a doctor and and he said the only thing you can do. You can't train you just would just stick in a neck with Nova game and you won't feel the pain. And he was right every match. I had at the trials and the Olympics. I got twelve shots. Novacaine the back of my neck couldn't feel it for about an hour and Russell and then an hour later I'd be in a lot of pain. You won the Olympic Games uh-huh with a broken neck that's insane quotes and wwe also. Yeah yeah I broke both my hands. The last vote doesn't ideal and it wasn't wasn't nice but it's hard to imagine when the pinnacle of Your Sport Olympic Games to be competing against the top guys in the world with a broken neck does that. I can't imagine boxing. We're broken hand. We are called you a few weeks ago and you said this is the most pain I think I've ever been in the radon especially she'll have a little bit of bone removed from the right time but there there was a a tendon that had ripped and it needed stitch together without that Han was give me more than than the left hand which has seven unscrews and appropriate and at night. He's but just because it had to have some work done the Tandon It was It wasn't wasn't nice. I WanNa ask you a question. Did you know ahead had a time that you're gonNA be suffering after your career from the injuries. Would you go back and when you do it all over again I we do it all over again because obviously enjoyed every bit of my career. I've been very successful more successful than I probably would have imagined. I've been lucky enough that my injuries alot. My last night I broke Mahan but previous my husband really suffered injuries but I would one hundred percent hop gum heart do it all over again. What about you? I don't know I mean I'm I'm hurting pretty badly my knees my back my neck. Sometimes I think about you know what when I go back my quality of life right now socks so I do have a lot of suffering. I had a painkiller addiction overcame about six years ago and you know stay clean and struggle. In the way I have been very difficult. was there a lot of pressure even when you had injuries week in week out to go and perform Tom. Did you ever feel that. You couldn't say no part of the problem no I I. Nobody ever forced me to do anything. There are a lot of times. I had a a great doctor that you gave me off had three neck surgeries and he was very easy to manipulate. So you know when I broke my neck and I had surgery I would talk him into clear Amina go back early and At the time he didn't have their wellness policy L. A. C. set where they had their doctor clear. You we go to our own doctor and I was able to do that a couple of times where I should have. I've been back and I did so I broke my neck four more times and WWF and It caused me to go into a downward spiral painkiller. Alert addiction in just almost room my life so it was. It was very difficult. Can I just say you have one of the strongest biggest looking knocks. Have you seen as well. Yeah Rick out again. Yeah wow so. How many times are you performing when when you when you arrested him? Mm to twice a week. You'll be performing five days a week. You for forming five

Wrestling Olympics WWE Boxing UK United States Kurt Angle NI Gold Medal Cole I Gail Devers Andre Agassi UFC Afam. Wrassling Bottom Golf Steve Austin America Basketball
'Jedi: Fallen Order' Shows That a Good Star Wars Game Doesn't Have to Be Original

Game Scoop!

06:30 min | 3 years ago

'Jedi: Fallen Order' Shows That a Good Star Wars Game Doesn't Have to Be Original

"Talk about what might be my favorite game of the whole year star Star Wars Jedi fallen. I haven't walked back. He came in two three days ago and so game of the year hasn't finished it so he says journalist so I played it for about a week now and who ooh I love it David. Lexus Game Tomb Raider. It is a lot like tomb. Raider little uncharted and then apparently a little dark souls. But I wouldn't know. Oh will you like Neil and save at points so yes that's right yeah so it is very tomb raider but but I think it controls like more like an action game which looks kind of goofy over the shoulder and you're watching somebody play still bouncing around like an idiot but it makes sense for doing that but I also downs around like and and it's also because the only time you've watched well watched other people. Maybe yeah well mainly combat the Jevon driven around like an idiot probably okay Salmon Tina. You're both playing just. Nasim played it yet to hear how RPG like it is uh-huh this say it's very RPG. Excited I don't mean to derail I had heard was that has a really big really involved skill tree which I didn't know it has the skill tree that pretty much every game released. Okay this Asan's creed got it it's less RPG as isis greenhouse so it's like everything is RPG like in some way so it falls on the RPG scale somewhere. Yeah these are the distinctions. We need to make before twenty question. No that's one of the greatest things about it has all of these like little elements five different games and different genres and kind of come together in a cohesive way so excited it should decorate. Yeah we're actually recording this before a review goes up Dan Is Handling Review. I I don't know what's so I don't know what score is GonNa come down on but I know he's very very high on he's bullish on one thing I like about The the combat so far has been frustrating. Although I know you solve it when we were the three demo and you've got through a bunch of the stuff but right now it's like I'll have a group of enemies around me and it's actually like tough enough that I'm dying a lot. And I've had moments in Batman Arkham asylum. It like that but what I like about it is that while I'm doing that you are constantly deflecting shots being shot at you from faraway really really fun and I know so. It's because like the lasers are slower than bullets which is like the stupidest thing like me a human see the blazers. It's coming at me. I feel like really cool like doing it. But if that was really how lasers work that I could probably do that. They just slowing it down the human you but the jet I you in the game actually sees it much whole games running et exactly the just showing you what a Great Lakes game design challenge feel like lasers but be slow to deflect all the other game design challenge too. Is You have a lightsaber. That should be able to push through most anything but there's like really big pots into but other ones. Okay no the really big ones. You can't do all you can't through any walls and the game either Tori really great. Yeah you're always on the other side of like three like metal bars looking through it's like you and it has actually for sure they have you looking indication later you'll be able able to get through here like Metro and you know just melt bars you got but you are in Jeddah temple so maybe it's Anti Jetta made made from some metal. What's the DELOREAN's metal armor made out of? I don't know I just watched a whole episode about it. I can't tell you I love hearing how metro-wide Vania e it is or Metro chime specific measure prime which which the developers were up front about that multiple planets that are way more intricate. And you you know. Non Linear and and sort of loopy pathways than kind of expected that so an expected and cousteau metro prime was famous for this Big Three d map that you kind of see really needed needed to go or you haven't had been yet and it's really good and it was like feels like super futuristic and stuff this game has that Matt but I don't know if I'm like like if it's just like because it's less boxy unlike more organic. It's so hard to use for me right now but you say you wrap your mind. Map has a learning curve that was it was confusing at first. But now I'm used to it and I can I know. Ah If there's something on the map that I want to get to. I can usually get to it and you can. I love how the robot a BBDO sorry droid projects in math in real time. It's like in dead space when you have like your health package just like lights on your armor and there's a lot of stuff in this game really doing the work early beating the flashlight. That's true and that's also he's also your health bar on your back yes. It's so like dead space magnate and also a tip since beatty one is projecting your map in real time. It doesn't pause the game you can. It'll be a ten. Oh yeah the hard way giant rats around. Yeah don't look run for your life is i. Don't want any stories. Spoiler the rats kill you is your killer viciously. It's a big threat to a jet here right now is that are you. Is your character cool. I think so. He's likeable and it's not like super every other characters better. I mean he's just like he's like a pretty vanilla hero but it doesn't bother me. I will say this there are some really funny moments. I forget what it was. What was one of the early comments? Oh because he's a yeah exactly like they're like no trashes allowed here something and he makes a joke about how he's actually trash. So there's like these little funny cute goofy moments that he just didn't make him more likable. That's another thing that I've heard just around the office is that You know that doesn't come through in the trailers just seems like incredibly generic and I've heard this game has better writing in dialogue expected surprising to me and this is not a spoiler. He's just really young. So it's like all the characters that are interesting around him are adults and he just doesn't know a lot and doesn't do a lot because he's like a teenager so I think they they don't. They didn't do a good job of sabotaging that outside the game. Now that I'm in the game like oh he's just like his whole he's just a kid. Yeah I've come to a decision I'm GONNA play it that's good. I think you're going to be happy with their. I've been joking on scoop for weeks about how I don't play anything but that's just you know I wasn't interested in call of duty and wasn't interested. Trust in-depth stranding. So this is this is the one this is the woman.

Metro Lexus Nasim David Arkham Great Lakes Blazers Neil Jeddah Temple Tori Beatty Matt Two Three Days
"cousteau" Discussed on Serifacast

Serifacast

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"cousteau" Discussed on Serifacast

"When CARAJAS MO- scams she booked and format to set the former here. My School for travel to the Moon Launching Cousteau on Youtube it here Jesse. She inverse canonized approaches. Spoke CASH FOR MINNESOTA. Cheever key foot In nowhere Mizpeh to Poach Geisha with my scarlet putting it was his dad's watch most of Mosul. Numbers are seeking June. When you're interested in various van twos ancient dodge m`ont pistols guys specials poet interesting in God is on these us out buys beigey. Profession is in about how much pissing fittings could lose all the barrel. Your quiz entertained up catching commit. So essentially fatherless saints yardage swap. Soy's an APP rap Cossiga Lita Question Events Yearly Stained Program Clear Adolescence Kayeli stores following fees. You you mice facility. Tavak on this person policies they toss it for you for cash and show via we possible. Missiles are familiar with the puskas pies. Daily familiar with are seeing I was diamond. Jim is I want to specify Matt don't at a price and we became my jeans. Civil penalty going to trickle dodgy gene. Rather see 'em with that will save as it has to be man civil settled expert Parkway Maggi Sega Fuzzy Thinking Scoot from Tashkent stomachaches. All Seniors yes. Amash Channel caboodle..

Jesse Cousteau Tashkent Cheever CARAJAS MO MINNESOTA Mosul Jim Matt
Why is Data Interoperability critical for the Digital transforming of the Healthcare system

Breaking Barriers with CJ Devgun

09:39 min | 3 years ago

Why is Data Interoperability critical for the Digital transforming of the Healthcare system

"I will be talking to leading minds in the healthcare sector and exploring how disrupters are leveraging technologies Jock how you doing hi I'm doing I'm doing great excellent thank you for sharing your time with that would you like to share more on ladies roles you have worked in and May I also share a fun fact about yourself yeah I I've held a variety of different roles either directly in healthcare air or serving healthcare so I was a cio for a hospital for about ten years and then after that I worked in a variety of companies selling it solutions to to healthcare assistant companies preparing their message for CIO's and and so on so I've had a variety of of roles within serving healthcare or in healthcare and a fun fact I'm an advanced scuba diver and one of the things that I love to do is go dive where their sea turtles a passion of mine last year I had the pleasure of of diving in one of the places where my hero Jacques Cousteau was diving in Thailand so it was it's one of those things where if I could do it every day I would excellent that's interesting so how many places have begun and I the interestingly enough I only started diving later in life I probably have about fifty dives so far and I've died in the Caribbean mostly in Thailand fifty more than we do I have not been able to get around and get my information I do a Lotta snorkeling but Dan Scuba dive that is something on my bucket at least hopefully the cross that off my list well it's something that that is very it it's fun and relaxing to do so. it's a great thing that I like so let's get back to the main topic on the fetus known challenges that house system is facing today and how digital transformation can solve so please share with our audience from your vantage point what do you think are the critical challenges lesbian faced and if I may ask can we break those challenges by Rita's entity types that says providers there's far mom medical device manufacturers to the agencies and most important really the basic sure why don't we start with the patient because I think that's where the challenges for the rest of the system comes from I I would say today with the amount of information that the disposal of patient they expect greater service rapid service they expect access to the healthcare system in ways that they actually it's every other aspect of their lives so they do banking they go online and do banking when they go watch it when they want to consume media they go online and they consume media and the challenge for the healthcare system is being able to respond to those needs in the way that a consumer is looking for services and putting a lot of pressure on the different level service delivery so if you look at the primary care physician one of the challenges that they have is that for the most part patients come in with more information that their disposal Ol- that the primary care physician may have and they almost pre diagnosed themselves so by coming in fully informed it puts a lot of pressure on the primary Care Heider too too quickly and properly diagnosed and properly recommend course of treatment so when you go one level up then from primary care then you have the the acute care or or the hospital sector or the private care facility that has a lack of data so you have there's so much a discrepancy between the connectivity between the different providers that the flow of information doesn't readily go from one provider to another so there's a disconnect between gene primary care and there's a disconnect between acute care and there's a disconnect between private care whether it's physio or whether it's a radiologist or or whatever the practitioner may be so one of the big challenge for the system as a whole right now is connectivity data sharing and what's putting pressure on is Asians to to overcome is all the pressures a financially how do you build a system fast enough to be able to accommodate the need of a consumer just their iphones every three years and expect their applications to be renewed every three years and so how do you build that infrastructure and information systems that meet those needs you've got financial pressures you also have pressures from leadership of organizations to also restructure and and modernized the healthcare system so you hear about all these jurisdictions across the country or even internationally where there's mergers and acquisitions in hospitals in the hospital systems in the the US or in Canada you have mergers and acquisitions forced by government so regionalization of healthcare delivery so the continuum of care the suffering because of that so there's a lot of pressure on on organization leadership to consolidate the system and that puts pressure on digitization or going digital for that matter so here's my question and excuse my ignorance but having been a set of rentals in healthcare and ninety per boss Twenty Years Twenty five buses I have hard time understanding why these rash shows are unique to healthcare because you mentioned an example of online banking and banking as as a whole lot of emanate that happened in banking industry CBS Well may not be so much in Canadian space everybody stay boo five banks but if you look outside they have been lot of mergers and positions within the financial industry and sector but they are able to transmit data and I give this example that I travel a lot because of work and if I have to be in India for example I was and then I need some money I was a school to an ATM machine and Insert my Canadian Takhar and my brain and machine will dispensary money and that machine that interactive machine that eventuate image in Iran will be over bank in India you know for that matter and they will be able to identify me valley did communicate with the bank and Kinda and dispense the money and then put proper credit and do my daughter balance and all of that happens within minutes if not seconds and all so that interoperability of data is the question that I am not able to our put my arms around as to why data onto might be gone not get me to do my hospitals and Wieser was so what. your point of view is that these systems can communicate and show the banks in India not using the same information system at bank and Can you help me understand that I won't answer that we leave with two points. The first point is data standardization so in healthcare her that there's so many different systems that are in place that are Emr's of different varieties and flavors and the consistency and the data standards for the Alexa of bad data is not easy to transmit from one system to another so that is is definitely where the biggest challenges in terms of of data sharing but the second aspect of that is monetization so in the banking systems there is financial rewards for transmitting that data online institution to another because the customer there's usually transaction fees attached to it there's usually a monetization process where when bank in exchange data or using another ATM of another bank because the data the data standardization is better on the financial side for communicating transactions than it is on the secure site it's easier to do and the second thing is that there's monetization so there's money changing hands to accommodate those consumers that travel so they're in the healthcare assistant that's not there so there's no financial incentives to build to build those connections in the healthcare system as it exists in the financial systems.

Alexa EMR Three Years Twenty Years Ten Years
Tpac Amaru executed - September 24, 1572

This Day in History Class

04:13 min | 3 years ago

Tpac Amaru executed - September 24, 1572

"The day was September twenty four th fifteen seventy two to pop a motto. The last indigenous indigenous ruler of the INCA was executed inco by the Spanish in fifteen thirty three Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro and his forces was captured and killed Incan emperor to Halwa. He was the last stop by Inca or sovereign emperor believes to be a direct descendant of guides. Though later rulers of the NEO INCA state considered themselves stop Inca after his death the inca empire effectively collapsed Casado and his forces proceeded to march on Cousteau the capital of the INCA empire and occupied the city from there the Spanish continued in their quest to conquer and colonize Peru the Spaniards had cavalry guns swords and steel armor and many Lincoln's sided with them but the anchor who were loyal to the Empire did attempt to resist Spanish colonization originally a puppet ruler installed by Pisarro Manco Inca you panchi rebelled against the Spanish informed his own army. He and his followers were not able to retake cousteau but they did establish a a neo interstate imbue Kabamba a remote region east cousteau. The Neo Inca state functioned as a seat of Resistance Manco and his supporters quarters were not a serious threat to the Spanish but vehicle Bomba was a concern to colonial officials after Marco's rule ended in the NEO INCA state state. He was succeeded by his son siree two bucks then t to cousy you punky then to pot Amaru to park became the Inca ruler after Tito cousy died in fifteen seventy one while t to cousy fortified Bill Kabamba and did not go to cousteau he did eventually relent lent and was baptized into the Roman Catholic Church to Puck Ahmadu though opposed Christianity and Spanish rule churches and Bill Kabamba were destroyed. Spaniards there were killed and the borders were closed but the Spaniards Inco were not aware of the changes in Vilcabamba after a Spanish diplomat returning to Vilcabamba from Kuske was killed the Spaniards justified attacking ink by concluding that they had quote broken broken the inviolate law observed by all nations of the World Regarding Ambassadors Viceroy Francisco Toledo Declared War on Bill Kabamba in fifteen eighteen seventy two when Spanish got to build Kabamba in June. The city was destroyed into pot a motto was gone but Spanish soldiers pursued the the Inca who had fled and captured Tutti sign and wife to pot a modern relativists generals as well as other prisoners and valuable items with the help of a group of indigenous people to a motto and his wife were captured. The captured were sent to cousteau late September. The Spaniards attempted attempted to convert the captives to Christianity to puck maters generals were sentenced to death by hanging after a hurried trial to a motto was was convicted of murder and sentenced to be beheaded. Though many people were short that he was innocent. According to one account to pot a matter was riding a mule mule with his hands tied behind his back on the day of his execution other said that he was surrounded by hundreds of guards with Lances there are several roll reported versions of the speech to Parramatta gave as he prepared to die on the scaffold on September twenty third after he was executed his head was reportedly. He put on a pike along with the heads of his generals. After locals began honoring to Pock Ahmadu at the site of his severed head the Viceroy ordered that his head be burried with his body. The Spanish had colonized Peru in culture and the landward drastically affected by the arrival of the Spanish Europeans. This carried diseases that decimated in populations and culture and religion was imposed upon the remaining Lincoln's.

Cousteau Neo Inca Pisarro Manco Inca Bill Kabamba Peru Kabamba Francisco Pizarro Lincoln Marco Tito Cousy Resistance Manco Viceroy Francisco Toledo Pock Ahmadu Halwa Puck Ahmadu Vilcabamba Casado Murder Bomba Parramatta
The Movie That Changed Me: Ratatouille

This Movie Changed Me

01:55 min | 3 years ago

The Movie That Changed Me: Ratatouille

"The first time that I saw a to e I couldn't get over the fact that I was seeing rack cooking in the kitchen. It's something that you know if you've ever lives in New York City or any major city in the US Minneapolis included where I currently live you fear rats and yet there is something so delightful an extraordinary about watching this rat create his masterpieces. What have you got there the whole you found chief he's not just any cheese tone chevrette of AA that would go with my room and and intent rosemary this rosemary up with. Oh baby with a few drops class wrote on the a pilot guests and then we'll go with the garbage. This is what we're supposed to return to the colony before sundown her dad's meal meal. There are possibilities unexplored here. We got cook this now. Exactly how we this is the real question. The key is to keep turning it. Hey Ronnie. Maybe we shouldn't be so oh you got the main rat in Ratatouille is romy and he's voiced the comedian Patton Oswald who also loves food so watching him explorer amis creations especially lovely remmy wants to be a chef half in the tradition of the great French Chef Cousteau and he realizes the only way that he can accomplish this is by working in goose kitchen in Paris all his time underneath heiress.

Chef Cousteau Patton Oswald New York City United States Minneapolis Ronnie Amis Paris
How Do Tidal Bores Work?

BrainStuff

06:40 min | 3 years ago

How Do Tidal Bores Work?

"Today's episode is brought to you by IBM. SMART is open open is smart i._B._M.'s combining their industry expertise with open source leadership of Red Hat. Let's unlock the world's potential. Let's put smart to work learn more at I._B._M.. Dot Com slash slash red hat welcome to brain stuff production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff lauren Vogel. I'm here. The Alaskan coast is as dramatic as it is vast and it spans over thirty three thousand miles or over fifty four thousand kilometers the forty-ninth U._S. state owes. Its very name to this sweeping ocean border. Alaska is an English language corruption of an Alouette term that according to one translation means the shore where the sea breaks its back and if you drive out to a place called Kernigan arm in the Gulf of Alaska at just the right time you get to watch some aquatic action. That's pretty spectacular attorney can arm waterway is a northern branch of the cook inlet the cuts into the Greater Anchorage area. Here the water normally flows out toward the inland but shortly after low tide waves move in the opposite direction and travel upstream and these waves can epic in scale the biggest waves are up to ten feet or three meters tall. This is is a well known example of bore tides also known as tidal bores or just bores and writing them has become a rite of passage for many surfers in the Pacific northwest while this phenomenon has been seen at numerous locales around the world it requires a very specific specific set of conditions but before we dive into those it might be a good idea to go over some basic title science by and large tides are gravity's handiwork due to the gravitational influence of our moon plus the inertia of our movement through space the ocean is always bulging out a bit on opposite sides of the planet while Earth rotates at passes through these tidal bulges that means your favorite seaside beach will experience high tide when it enters each old and low tide as it travels between them. So plan your sand castle contests accordingly because earth finishes a new rotation around its axis once every twenty four hours most coastal areas witness to high tides and two low tides per day but there are loads of exceptions the layout of Continents Islands and Peninsulas impedes tides in certain places a parts of the Gulf coast for example only see one daily set of high and low tides no matter where you are though the tides will vary in strength from day to day all over the world during full moons in new moons when the Earth Moon and sun are arranged in a straight line high tides are especially high and low tides are really low. We call these extreme tides spring tides which despite the name occur all year round not just in the springtime but let's turn back to turn again arm although it's shallow and narrow the turn again feeds into a broad bay mainly cook inlet on this wide expanse the difference between high and low tides. I e the tidal range. Can Be Stark the cook inlet water level at high tide. Maybe thirty five feet or ten and a half meters higher than it was during the preceding low tide and these are exactly the ingredients needed to produce tidal bores after a low tide on cook inlet water funnels into the tournament arm generating bore waves that barrel inland sometimes travelling at speeds up to twenty four miles per hour. That's nearly thirty nine kilometers per hour since bores only happened when the circumstances are just right not all waterways the touch the ocean can get them in total. There are eighty or so rivers around the globe that undergo tidal bores the phenomenon tends to be at its most dramatic during spring tides whereas the turning and arm has twice daily tides the Amazon River only receives chiefs bores on the days of new and full moons once the spring tides arrive water from the Atlantic comes charging up the Amazon River temporarily reversing its natural flow waves generated by this process have been known to journey about five hundred miles or eight hundred kilometers. There's inland code AROCCA. The Amazon Boers attained considerable size measuring upwards of thirteen feet or four meters tall in some cases the strongest poor Arocca events of all take place every year on the equinoxes to to prepare for these searches local residents move their boats and livestock safely away from the Amazon accidents do still happen though Jacques Cousteau wants lost a boat depar- AROCCA waves while filming in South America Tidal bores impact ecosystems wherever they occur trees he's rocks and river bottom sediment get pushed around by the waves and those aren't the only things they turn up down in the Amazon current reversals can leave stunned or dead animals floating in the water attracting hungry piranhas strong bores are also prone to object fish from rivers stranding them on beaches or launching them into the air. That's why Alaskan Bald Eagles Australian sharks and Malaysian crocodiles like to scavenge in the wake of tidal bores big boars attract humans as well Sao Domingos Dough K._p._m.. Community the borders the Amazon has been. Hosting the Brazilian National Per Arocca Surfing Championship since one thousand nine hundred nine Alaskan wave chasers flocked tiny arm shortly before or after every spring tide when the boers are their largest. Oh and there's one last thing we should mention about boar tides they roar the waves produce a great deal of turbulence wildest placing sediment scraping up shoals and unleashing loads of air bubbles at all those sources APP and you've got a recipe for thunders low-frequency booms the can be heard of vast distances episode was written by Mark Van Chigney and produced by tyler playing brain stuff is a productive iheartradio's has works for more on this and lots of other swell topics visit our home planet has networks dot Com and from our podcast iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows your network decades pioneering television broadcast once and never seen again. There was nothing else like this on early television generation of American musicians.

Cook Inlet Amazon Amazon River Red Hat IBM Alaska South America Tidal Gulf Of Alaska Lauren Vogel Sao Domingos Dough Continents Islands And Peninsu Pacific Attorney Gulf Coast Jacques Cousteau Dot Com Atlantic Mark Van Chigney Apple
Dave Bautista, Keita And Makita discussed on The Frame

The Frame

16:28 min | 3 years ago

Dave Bautista, Keita And Makita discussed on The Frame

"They were coming out a week after Spiderman far from home and a week before lion king I mean could we have like one shot at it. You know that weekend doesn't go well for gone forever. That's not Camille Janis only problem. It is new movie stupor. He plays an uber driver who picks up a nightmare passenger. Who's got a gun? That's Today on the frame weekend. Plus for filmmaker Lewan diverse casting is key even if it surprises surprises movie goers type of American lead that we're used to but that's part of it you know people need to get used to these faces as being part of the faces of America re talk too long about her new movie the farewell and we'll say hello to the LUBEC sister's piano duo from Paris who wowed the crowd at the Hollywood bowl this week. It's the frame weekend from the Broadcast Center at K._P._C._C. John Horn stay with us. I'm John Horn and this is the frame weekend on this show we talked with creative people about how and why they do what they do and about how their art is shaped by the wider world a little later today. We're going to find out why Tuesday nights are taking off in downtown L. as little Tokyo but I this you know there's a sense that certain movies theatre movies and certain movies are not theater movies. I think comedy's our theater movies to Oh. Actor and screenwriter male Nanjiani hopes that audiences agree he's going for big laughs and his new dark comedy. It's called Stupor the film just open this weekend. It's an action packed buddy cop flick with with a twist Nanjiani stars as an uber driver and he picks up a total nightmare of a passenger and out of control policeman played by Dave Bautista. He's losing his eyesight and he's got a gun. AFTER JANIS 2017 seventeen breakout film the big sick he was looking for an entirely different kind of role for a follow up so when he came across the script for Stupor he thought he'd found one as long as he could help tweak the script a bit genuine motto of the L._A.. L._A.. Times was my co host for the frames recent summer movie special and Nanjiani was one of our guests we started out by asking him to explain the premise. That's driving the stupor storyline. An Uber driver gets kidnapped by a COP and forced go on an adventure to catch a murderous drug dealer and the cop can't see because he just got leasing just got Leszek. That's the thing I don't know why it's not in the trailers. The cop just got laid sick and so there's like over the course of the whole movie. He's got this chart that he's staring at waiting for it to get on blurry so I'm curious how this came about. Were you looking for something like this. After the big sick I sort of had a little bit of paralysis about what to do next ext so I decided that the only way I wouldn't put too much pressure on myself was to do something completely different that nobody could compare it to the big sick right and so I kind of was I want to do like a big studio action comedy type movie so then descript came in and I read it and I thought it was really fun and funny by was like if I want to do like an action comedy with guns and all this stuff there has to be a reason for it to exist like it conscious be that it's entertaining and so I actually talked to to Fox a bunch about it and was like hey. I think there's some like underlying themes in this movie that I think we should really bring up to the surface and if you guys are willing to do that then I think this could be a cool thing to do. We'd be able to talk about things you don't normally see in like a big action movie like this. That seems like such a guy movie toxic masculinity in men talking about their feeling exactly exactly I was like if we're doing a movie in twenty nineteen about out angry dudes with guns. We have to talk about that. I feel like we're obviously in a narrow where you know. Masculinity is under the microscope and we're really sort of figuring out. Most of the world's problems come from men who can't feel their feelings so it was like I think this is a great rate way to talk about that stuff in a movie. That's traditionally a very like man movie and for people who don't know what's tuber means what does to remain Camille so my character's name is Stu and Driving Uber so my boss calls Me Stupor to make doc fund me and it really gets under by skin cancel. It affects my rating icon trouble for stars lose this job. ooh Do right now that that you for this stupid you can stop calling me that he really loves you. I think that's it's a really fun too because we were like let's take all the male types and reconstructive so this guy is sort of the you know the petty tyrant type of guy and we do a scene where we deconstruct that where he's just like kind of lonely and feels bad and insecure about himself on you have a whole seen in a male strip club. Yes exactly Steve. How is the name of the guy that I talked to a bunch and it's funny? He's like Hillary Clinton Tattoo. She was up twelve points in August. We just wanted to take a a bunch of different types of men and sort of deconstruct. All of the stripper is talking about being honest with your feelings and you know not hiding. You need to tell her you feel a relationship cannot thrive without honest and you know he's been body shamed by his his boss for being like you know one percent body fat as opposed to point five right right. He looks great by the way I'll tell you I felt very inadequate in that locker room because it's like Ted of the most gorgeous hunks and then me like I notice I watched this movie a bunch of different audiences. My posture is so much worse in that scene than any other scene in the movie the match up of you and Dave Batista his persona has his outward appearance appearance like it it lends itself to a deeper deconstruction along those lines. That's what's interesting about him is that he looks like such a brute. You know he's so big and he's looks like a scary guy but he's the sweetest most sincere man have truly ever met he he is completely in touch with his emotions. In a way are characters in the movie are Kinda swapped. He's the one who's really comfortable being sincere and crying and really talking about his feelings whereas I was the one who was really cut off for myself for a long time and in the last four or five years I've been sort of trying to do the work of getting in touch with my feelings and feeling comfortable expressing something other than anger anger you know what is that about. I mean is that about things that you think you can do. Through acting where you can start understanding yourself better yeah I mean honestly was I started taking acting classes like a year before the big sick because I knew that had got to be able to access parts of myself that hadn't been able to access an taking acting classes. It's Kinda was like therapy. I realized that for years I didn't know how I was feeling why was angry about stuff and so in doing doing acting work for the big sick I realized like Oh. There's a lot of stuff going on inside me that I thought was not good to feel and so after the big continued doing that work on myself like I cry it almost every movie movie now and I went like fifteen years without crying at all. When this movie came along? I was like well. I think this could be an interesting way to talk about some of the things that I've had to deal with on my own when I was sort of talking to Fox about this. I don't want to take credit for this movie in any way. All that stuff was in there but I was like I see these characters as one needs to get angry and one needs to cry. So how do you do that and make what is a summer movie with like you know. I won't say car chases but there's some car action. There's a ton of violence. There's a lot of like what we would see in a big action movie. How do you make sure that that is responsible as well that you're not just kind of random? gunplay people are just getting mowed down because that's what you have to do a summer movie I mean. That's tricky right. That's tricky so it is a shooting movie. It is people with guns. It is it is car chases. Those things happen in movie and that's the language of this type of cinema but I but I was like my cocker should be anti doc. I was very adamant. I was like fire. Hold a gun in this movie. I don't want to feel cool or good about it. The only time I fire is once into the air when we went to do the poster shoot for the movie. The concept was both of us holding guns and I was like I'm not going to hold a gun. That's completely not what this character is so I'm honestly not trying to take a big stand against guns or anything. Obviously you see I think gun control is very important but you know Dave has a lot of guns and he's a very responsible gun owner and he's very comfortable around guns. I'm not comfortable around counts I wanted. I thought that that perspective should be in their drive. I'm sue how do you do can get you some bottled waters and Canadian chocolate. It was one of those things where I thought was getting five bars Amazon but I ended Koreatown no rea- town now hold on. I'm going to bang a UEY Hero Quick Doc. No don't got it. It's clear that uber was a willing participant in this movie I mean they are all over the film and yet they're these jokes about the driver like Oh my God he took the right turn. It's now four minutes two minutes. How much freedom did you have to actually make fun of ride? Sharing Services and Uber particular first of all did not pay us any money for those people think this is like an ATF ruber. I'd be like this is a terrible herbal admiral the driver get kidnapped. How is this a positive thing for Uber? They wanted to make sure that the APP was used correctly. That was there. They wanted to make sure that that technically everything we were doing in the movie would have happened that way in real life they weren't too concerned about US making fun of Uber like they were kind of cool with that but they wanted to make sure that it was an accurate portrayal Nanjiani co stars in Stupor with Dave Bautista. It's in theaters now. You're listening to the frame weekend. I'm John. Do you know what if Akita is no well. A lot of people don't and a lot of future generations won't because it's almost extinct the vikings are a casualty of fishing nets in the Sea of Cortes off Baja California. The Nets are there to capture another species of marine marine animal the Totowa by the Documentary Sea of shadows examines not only the rapid eradication of Akita but also the nearly intractable plight of local fishermen. We sat down with the film's director Richard Laud Connie at at the Sundance Film Festival where see shadows premiered and he started by telling us more about this small porpoise like mammal. The Makita is the smallest waylon earth. It looks like it's very cute. It looks like a cross between a pond the baron dolphin there's so few left after them so the first mammal that may go extinct in a decade when we started there were less than thirty left now. We believe there's less than fifteen left so they're really declining fast but DEV akitas just a symbol for a much bigger story which is that the drug cartels tells the Mexican cartels in a Chinese mafia based in Tijuana are attacking this habitat of the Makita because they're looking for something else that cocaine of the C- the Toba and they liked that so much because the swim bladder ladder of this fish can fetch up to one hundred thousand dollars in China so they discovered it as an alternative to the drug trade so this is why story so big and dangerous because they're attacking a notion that Jacques Cousteau called the aquarium of the world and they are destroying it just to get this swim ladder and nobody was looking like when we did the IRA game the elephant crisis was known and it was a big deal and you know everyone loves elephants. This one was a silent war that no one knew about but it was so deadly because tens and hundreds of thousands of animals being killed in slaughtered and I was five hour south of Los Angeles Richard when I think about the challenges in making this movie obviously the first one is the by Keita. They're very few they're hard to find and there's certainly hard to document and then you're working in an area where there are people who don't want you to document what's happening and they don't want you interfering in their business and those people are powerful and they have guns so what were the biggest challenges is for you in trying to document what was going on outside of San Filippo. The Beach Chattan starts with that. Do you need a lot of money to make a film like that because Justice Security that goes into keeping us all safe because every day that we spend there we were noticed more and more and we try to pretend to be like a natural history kind of film team just doing a film on wildlife right but they were wondering why are they on the sea shepherd ship which is fighting the cartels house and why are they so interested in what's going on here so yes. It became the most dangerous film I've ever done. I set that as well. When did the every game they started sending us more clear messages that they do know who we are and especially the really bad guy? <hes> Oscar Para started to <hes>. Let us know by sending us a messenger saying. Why don't you interview me but we were like Oh? We're not going to do that because he had actually just murdered soldier in some Philippa a few weeks back caught on videotape too caught on videotape and we thought it could be a trap. There's a moment in the film where you were filming. If I keep that is in distress and to watch what is happening to this Keita's your cameras are rolling and the marine biologists who are trying to care for it is unbelievably difficult to watch because this is an animal. That's not only almost extinct it is in some ways kind of anthropomorphic and it's a it's an animal that has almost kind of human qualities in its face. Can you talk about without revealing what happens in the scene what was like to film that sequence where you see this Keita who is struggling to stay alive you know it took five weeks of us being out there on fifteen boats with ninety scientists who we're the best in the world to try to find them. You know for us. It was this journey this rollercoaster ride of emotions of being with a scientists looking for this animal which they wanted to rescue they wanted to extract all of Akitas and put them into a safe zone so they can stay alive because the thousands of ghost nets were going into catch to our killing everything they're like walls of death but yeah being close to that Makita that after five weeks was caught was was incredible. It was the first time Akita was even filmed like we were the first film team ever ever to film this animal in its entirety that was like Oh my God but then also watching it struggle with captivity that was emotional like you cannot believe it was tears of joy I to actually sleep find one bring it to safety but then also watching how it was struggling it was <hes> big rollercoaster for US emotionally direct KITA. There's maybe a dozen of them left. What would you say to people who say what differences the Fakih to make to the world? You know <hes> we have a responsibility I think to care into not look away and this story is remarkable because it is a small story but it's a small story that you find over and over again across the world. I want everyone to start looking at this and say like this can't happen like I can't allow this. I'm angry. I want to inspire especially the young people like our our hero Jack Drawn to these twenty one and he's risking his life every day and he's out there facing poachers and he's I angry and he's not ready to accept so he's fighting and to show here is like that I think it is very inspiring and empowering for young people who I think do

Dave Bautista Keita Makita Camille Janis Male Nanjiani FOX John Horn Broadcast Center OH Hillary Clinton Lewan America United States Richard Laud Connie ATF Hollywood Paris Steve Philippa
Flooding Displaces Tens of Thousands in Iran. And More Rain Is Forecast.

TED Radio Hour

00:42 sec | 3 years ago

Flooding Displaces Tens of Thousands in Iran. And More Rain Is Forecast.

"Heavy rain began last month has killed scores of people and displaced tens of thousands in an unusually arid region. The state news agency earn reports six cities in southwestern Cousteau province are being evacuated and that a forecast of more rain, Dan is home to a series of dams and rising reservoir levels prompted emergency discharges from some of them. Increasing the flood risk Iran's interior ministers quoted as saying as many as four hundred thousand people in Kuzan could be wrist. The news agency reports recent flooding in Lorestan province washed away, entire neighborhoods and left some villages. Cut off the interior minister says women and children are being evacuated while young men are being asked to stay behind to help with rescue

Iran DAN Lorestan The State News Kuzan
In Cuba, condom use stretches far beyond sex

The Economist: The Intelligence

03:52 min | 3 years ago

In Cuba, condom use stretches far beyond sex

"The beautiful city of Havana. Cuba is full of surprises. It was early evening. And I was walking along a quiet stretch of the sea front near the ferry terminal and Old Havana. And there was a man standing next to the water blowing up condoms. Lake is the economists Cuba correspondent, not just one condom. In fact, three of them. Why on earth is this man blowing up condoms on the seafront? All I had the same question. But I have actually found out that he was fishing. In cuba. Actual fishing equipment is very hard to come by because Cuba's very poor country, and the US has an embargo against it. So Cubans have to be rather greatest in the ways that they do many things, including fishing. So this young man was blowing up the condoms as a way of turning them into floats. That would keep his Bates near the surface. Very very resourceful. How how did you come by this sort of investigation into the use of condoms? Well, I was doing a story on the hair trait and Hugo women who have a need to increase their income. And so they sell their hair, and I was at a beauty salon where this hair is on display were other women by it as Harry extensions. And I noticed that the hair was tied together with condoms, and I asked you know, is that what I think it is. And they said, yeah, we don't have rubber bands. So we just use condoms to hold the hair together. And I said are there other things that you use condoms for that? I wouldn't expect. And it turns out there are many well now, I'm dying to not tell me tell me some more. Well, I went to a pharmacy and started chatting to some of the ladies there and asked. Water the things that people use common for other than the obvious. And they said hair hairline, that's one thing. But they also use them to fix. One like a mall put him over the places where leak may have sprung, and I'm told they're actually very effective, which is a testament to the quality of the condoms in Cuba. Butchers have very curious us for them. They fill them with water and they use fly traps. So it seems Khanna's become slightly reflective when they're full of water and that scares flies away. Another of my favorite uses for them is taxi drivers who used the lubricant in condoms to polish the bonnets of those fifties cars that they're so proud of now we've all been and ended up having to ask difficult questions in journalism. But I imagine perhaps one of the most difficult would be just walking up asking people about their condom use. Especially in Cuba. It's an interesting question to be asking. And I kinda made the mistake of asking someone a gentleman what favorite city. How? Honest in his response meals over your head who's over Witold me as well might and with tremendous Cousteau that his favourite use was the one for which the product was originally conceived. Right it it's hard not to see the funny side here. But I guess the serious point is that there are shortages of everything. And that's why people use condoms for lots of things. But if lots of things are in short supply, why are there so many condoms around condoms are widely available and in very inexpensive because they're subsidized by the keeping government, which is keen on family, planning and sexual health people. Really appreciate this. Sometimes they go into sort supply. But for the most part, they're around one gentleman, even said, you know, it sits never been so comical to perform the national sport. Roseanne? Thank you very much. Thank you. Jason

Cuba Bates Old Havana Havana United States Hugo Roseanne Khanna Harry Jason Witold Cousteau