21 Burst results for "Courtland"

"courtland" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

05:25 min | Last month

"courtland" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"All right daniel. Europe tell us about the next startup. That's inspiring your in excellent. I'd love to chat quickly about a company called palabra which is actually a launch company. Now palabra is. Let's talk about the business. I in touch base about the person. The website is palabra dot echo and actually originally got started as a product a adjacent to it now urgently started as kind of a zippier for email and karen the founder of a nice job of focusing it on a a much more specific use case which basically this no one has truly kind of dethroned force at date and i think the right strategy to to dethroning it is not trying to build the whole thing whole hog but just plucking piece by piece off the mess flopper as this. Maybe it will pitch it to courtland users arriving on your website. They're different flows in a final terms of where you'd like them to be at your traditional business. You're not selling software but maybe can imagine person made an account person submitted one up vote person wrote a post person wrote five comments. And maybe that's kind of your terminal goals. I want to get a lot of users into the five common face. Because you figure it out boy if just right five comments they're committed and so it organizes your users in different steps if your funnels and it'll basically automatically manage went email each user based on triggers in different steps their finals and the only tool in the world. That does this. But i think it's one of the more specific and precise ones like you can can torch salesforce to do this. But you know you can control a database to do whatever you want It's helpful to have a more specific tool karen. I i am see as adema if you guys have read his books as lisbeth slander from the girl with the dragon tattoo. A your penultimate hacker female hacker personality who is seemingly very strong out and quiet. Like you won't hear her much on do the all sorts of colitis athletics quiet assassin. He said it best so need. It's so interesting. Because i watched her. We're having a little inception point here. I watched her on you. Having her display the product. Can i just watch. I just thought. Who is this person. And i think she had like five hundred dollars in revenue. Something completely diminishes said to my team like us. You're looking for more than this. Like five to twenty five k kind of our sweet spot. I like give this person. We have to just so completely understood or customer and that was watching her build the product and had looked at different videos. You had done with her And i think that's actually something very strong. You're doing daniel on you. Even though you're an introvert you fake being an extrovert. Pretty well livestreams. Nobody went out. And those livestreams are so so powerful that you do where you bring somebody in. Who's a founder who not able. Who's got knowledge and then you just have them give feedback to another founder and then you know people are lurking and so i'm sitting there lurking and i'm like. Wow what a great idea. She's doing this email automation and these triggers and it feels it. Looks like notion looks beautiful. So it's got this incredible design. And then i went under the hood and i started looking at her expense base and how quickly the product velocity was and. That's one thing. I'll say daniel about the company's remote our and palabra the product velocity is Extraordinary on those two companies to some of the fastest. I've seen and we all know. Speed is important because with the iterations comes the lessons right. You start to learn and understand your customers faster than your competitors or just another company and that means you can get to profitability. Get to break even before you run out of capital or run out of energy courtland. Any thoughts on palabra. Yeah i like that. That they're moving quickly. I was talking to david. Shoe the founder of retool on the hackers podcast awhile back and when retail got started. I was always in their little entercom chapel saying like. Hey i need this feature. I need this. And they're incredibly quick about executing and getting out the door. Same with hiroko. In the early days i was using her roku and i was talking to the founders and early engineers and they were like iterating super quick And every company where. I've seen this pattern run to build something and they're like building features. You know the same day i requested. I regret not investigate in companies because they always end up being a ton so maybe you should be investing labra. Well it's interesting. You know that is. That's very interesting. Insight is that the velocity equal the success. Eventually it could be like a really good. Tau coupon courtland. You want more races through the loop and the faster. You're going the mortar reasons to go to the loop in the faster you learn and your course correct. I also like that. It seems very opinionated. These kind of tools are any. Eat these tools up because they're all trying to build websites. It takes a long time to build something. It's hard to find traction and when an opinionated tool comes around that gives you more insight about your users and not only that but tells you like. This is how it should be. You should have a funnel setup that you know your customers or users go through etc people just build better companies. Not because genius founders. They've read a bunch of strategy play books but because the tools themselves are telling them what they should focus on. So i liked this because i think it will end up know gets big increasing the size of the top of the funnel because more founders are gonna find it easier to get started and to find success which means i'll have more.

five hundred dollars daniel palabra five comments two companies five each user david one one thing twenty five common face Tau coupon courtland dot echo girl with the dragon courtland lisbeth slander hiroko Europe karen
Storm leaves thousands without power on East Coast

Michael Wallace

02:11 min | 2 months ago

Storm leaves thousands without power on East Coast

"It was quite the storm Last night into Christmas morning, the tri state hit with more than 60 Mile an hour winds in some spots the power still out this afternoon for thousands WCBS reporter Christi collision has more from Bergen County. It's estimated that some power outages in the state could last into Sunday morning at the latest Marines to get everybody back is best as we can welcome here safely. That was PSE and G spokesperson Michael Jennings. He says Bergen County was hit hardest by the storm, and the PSE and G is reminding its customers that workers will not be able to work in bucket trucks due to the severe winds. With this storm happening on a holiday, Jennings says, it's not causing any delays to power restoration got a full complement of people working people ever growing their vacations We have over 1500 people that work in the store power while doing it. Take me to court. PSE and G also reminds customers to be at least 30 ft. Away from any down wires. It should always be assumed to be live in Bergen County Christi Collision. WCBS news radio 8 80 Taking a look at where most of the outages are right now in New Jersey, reporting about 15,000 between PSE and G and J C P and L. In the northern suburbs Orange and Rockland Utilities just about 10,000. And why s e g, a 12,000 and ever source in Connecticut at just more than 12,000 Con Edison outages now numbering around 8000 across the city and Westchester. This is spokesman Alfonso Quiroz. Some locations that are a little bit hard to reach The nun. When the tree comes down it will. You know it comes down more. It comes down on A lot of areas, not just our power lines that comes down on the streets and sidewalks and different things like that, so some of these areas can be very difficult to reach because of the different streets. So first thing we have to do is try to clear the streets. Then we get an assessor out there to go and look at what the damage is. And then we assign a crew out there to make appears as quickly as we can. So the situation doesn't repair itself automatically. It's not like a light switch that goes on and off. There does take some time to actually get to the location before we can make repairs. Con Ed says. Mount Vernon Yonkers, Courtland and Rye are among the hardest hit communities in Westchester on Staten Island. The storm caused most of its damage in the northern areas of the borough.

Bergen County PSE Wcbs Michael Jennings Christi Wcbs News Radio Con Edison Alfonso Quiroz Marines Jennings Rockland Westchester New Jersey Connecticut Mount Vernon Yonkers Con Ed Courtland Staten Island
"courtland" Discussed on Startups For the Rest of Us

Startups For the Rest of Us

05:16 min | 2 months ago

"courtland" Discussed on Startups For the Rest of Us

"Infusion soft and zero did with quickbooks. You can build on your if you have an audience. Reputation built on that. If you have a good network bill on that if you on and on and on any of these is almost individually a thought experiment each of those things i just rattled off and again those will be in a book out sometime next year. Maybe but there are so many ways in each of them. There's no path. There's no blueprint for this part. So there's no one to three step now once you get once you get to product market fit and you have customers and you start having channels at work it kind of is it's extremely repeatable and usually there is a pretty solid blueprint of how to go from there up how to go from there to a million to ten or whenever there's all these past and everything but in these early days much more you have a compass not a map and so you're just kind of wandering and trying to take in thoughts and see what resonates with you and see you know there's product counterfeiting. There's all these things but there are a lot of ways to get there. Don't expect that anyone else approach will definitively work for you but look at a lot of different approaches and i like courtland that you brought up the you know the folks who interviewed on because those are just two examples of people who have found their way. Maybe it sounds like they almost did it accidentally. Maybe they didn't they just took it one step at a time these very small increments and build it into something. Pretty impressive yeah. I'm a big fan of being very deliberate about idealization. I think it's a very tall order to tennis. Sit around for inspiration district you in the shower. But if you're going through the world and you're deliberately looking problems and your kind of antenna up and whenever you see somebody complain about something wherever if somebody pay for something whenever you see somebody asking for something you evaluate that problem. You're just gonna get a lot more shots on goal and most of those problems won't be something that really resonates with you. But i think just sort of absent mindedly hoping problem comes to mind. Almost none of them will turn into anything and often. If you just start with something that's not great and of course a building that you will encounter lots of other problems that are burning that maybe you need solved and other people need soft and i think that can get you to where you want to go so there is no tried and true blueprint a roadmap but there are a lot of things you can do to massively increase your chances of having a good idea to start with and for me. One of those is having a notebook and taking notes as you said every time an idea comes around or someone mentions a pain point and just adapting that over time my best ideas never come in flurries. They never come instantly..

courtland tennis
"courtland" Discussed on Startups For the Rest of Us

Startups For the Rest of Us

05:43 min | 2 months ago

"courtland" Discussed on Startups For the Rest of Us

"And it's an excellent interview and topical new show that many of us listen to every week. I'm a fan so let's dive right in to our first listener question courtland alan. Welcome back to the us rob. Thanks for having me. It's always great to have sir. I am excited to talk through some listener questions. Today we have a nice stable of things ranging from splitting branding to business structure to co-founder equity stair stepping all that stuff. You ready to dive in. Yeah ready to sounds like a lot of good stuff as usual. We always start with voicemails at the top of the stack. So we'll roll our first question from destin overbeck here he rob. My name is dustin overbeck. And i run a web design agency called town web. We are a web design and hosting agency for municipalities. All across the united states. I've been running this for thirteen years. We have more than five hundred fifty customers and we're in about thirty five different states. I'm getting ready to build a sap that would be sold specifically to the same customers that it currently have for the web design and hosting part of things but also to other municipalities who are not currently web design customers of ours. I'm curious to know if you have any input on other web design agencies that entered the sas space because my question is more about branding and business structure. When i'm looking at the numbers for the sap and the price points that we could sell to in the market that we can go after. I feel that this sas business could be ten to fifteen times bigger than what we currently have for the web design on the hosting side of things. So i'm leaning towards yes. We should have a separate brand for the sass product. I'm just kinda curious if you know of other agencies who have done that same thing or if they entered the market with the same name as their agency although we do have a really good brand known the municipal web design industry. I feel like the brand that we can come out with for. The sap could actually be more exciting. And maybe even more memorable to those potential clients that we can go after and the other question is about business structure. So if it's going to be as a separate brand should it be a completely separate business. I know there are inherent costs and you have to separate businesses because you're now keeping track of two different books two different tax filings. But if i feel like the second business could be ten to fifteen times bigger than the first business is a worthwhile to have a separate businesses. Thank you for any input. Thanks for that question destined courtland..

courtland alan destin overbeck dustin overbeck united states sap courtland
Water Main Break Causing Flooding In Bucktown, Chicago  Near Kennedy Expressway

Bob Sirott

00:30 sec | 5 months ago

Water Main Break Causing Flooding In Bucktown, Chicago Near Kennedy Expressway

"Water main break at Ashland and Courtland is now causing high standing water right underneath the Kennedy traffic is still going by or going through, but it is high standing water and police and cruiser there trying to get that resolved for you. Delays are starting to build across your expressways on this morning's commute. We have a couple of accidents in the suburbs to watch out for one in Naperville at Book Road and 75th in Willowbrook at 75th and Route 83 in Bloomingdale's at Lake Street, and Glen Ellen, I'm Vicky

Courtland Glen Ellen Ashland Naperville Bloomingdale Vicky
"courtland" Discussed on 94WIP Sports Radio

94WIP Sports Radio

01:34 min | 5 months ago

"courtland" Discussed on 94WIP Sports Radio

"Guys. The week to injury report is a who's who of big names and major injuries. The latest Seahawks linebacker Bruce Servant who's done for the year with a tornado C L. Anthony bars season is over the Vikings linebacker as a Tauron pectoral muscle, the 40 Niners with the hardest hit yesterday. Losing to defensive lineman, their quarterback and a couple of running backs. They'll have to go most likely the rest of the seas without Nick Bos and Solomon Thomas, both of whom it is feared, suffered a torn A C L. Jimmy Garoppolo suffered a high ankle sprain, and he is now called week to week. Nick Mullins likely starts on Sunday where he most are dead and 80 yard touchdown run to start things off, but didn't finish the game after suffering a sprain. Ian is out this weekend and Kevin Count all Coleman Out. Also a couple of weeks with a knee injury, the Broncos lost quarterback Drew locked to a sprained shoulder. He'll miss 2 to 6 weeks. It'll be longer for receiver Courtland Sutton, who has done with a thorn A C L as is the giant, say Quan Barclay Christian McCaffrey out up to four weeks with an ankle injury. Malik Hooker out for the year with a thorn Achilles to concludes with the Saints and Raiders in Vegas. Baseball bottom four Rangers and Angels or even a three bill writer. He's back and lighter than you Monday through Friday, 10 A.m. to noon Eastern 7 to 9 Pacific on CBS Sports Radio. Are you a survivor?.

high ankle sprain L. Jimmy Garoppolo Nick Mullins Quan Barclay Christian McCaffr Drew Nick Bos Seahawks Bruce Servant Courtland Sutton Vikings CBS Malik Hooker Broncos Baseball L. Anthony Kevin Count Ian Rangers Solomon Thomas writer
Denver Broncos wide receiver Courtland Sutton out for season with torn ACL

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:15 sec | 5 months ago

Denver Broncos wide receiver Courtland Sutton out for season with torn ACL

"The Broncos. Not only lost quarterback Drew locked for several weeks with shoulder injury receiver Courtland Sutton has suffered a torn A C L Colt safety Malik Hooker done for the season with a torn Achilles and Anthony Barr out for the year. A CZ well due to a torn pectoral muscle

Courtland Sutton Malik Hooker Anthony Barr Broncos Drew
"courtland" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

06:46 min | 5 months ago

"courtland" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"And we'll get through it all the ghastly special teams blunder by Atlanta Campbell Ross, exchanging haymakers and highlights Josh and become a star. Her cousins of mess Brady bounces back, Herbert Flash in Big issues, and Philly will get AIDS robes for the Lakers. Bryson to Shambo forever Changing golf batik story is the bloodbath of injuries to some of the Biggest names in the sport. What? Ah, we'll never forget. Yesterday put it that way. Now. It felt like every other break as I was watching this on the red zone, Scott Hanson's hopping on and things breaking news from Denver drew lock is that with concussion that was the tameness of them don't want her to shoulder. I mean our shoulder with the shoulder. Somebody else went out with a concussion. You know, obviously the sake one issue was the biggest one for me As I was watching that Giants game and he tears his A C L around this kind of knew it. Right away. You can see the subjection of his Negro Fours like on and you hate that for him, But it wasn't just him. It was Bruce Irving just came down that Seattle Seahawks linebacker. He tore his A C L. The Baltimore Ravens had one of their cornerbacks, the highest paid nickel back then football. He tore his A C. Courtland Sutton. Courtland Sutton. He tears his A C l. Both Nick Bosa, not Nick. For the San Francisco 40 diners. He tears his a seal on the MetLife turf, which we'll get to in a little bit as Kyle Shanahan and others have been ripping it, and they got to come back there and play this week against the New York Giants. But, bt I gotta ask this question yesterday. A lot like how is this happening? And why is this happening? Why are so many of these players Getting hurt in a serious injuries and we're not even talking about I mean, there was a half of a handful of guys that tour kill ease in the pre flight before they even know stepped on the field. Yes, and everybody wants to point To the lack of preseason and into an extent, they're probably right there to get your body. We talked about it before Calista. You know what I mean? You you lifted weights all the time. You're grabbing heavy rocks your hand You get used to it. After a while. It doesn't hurt anymore. My hands are callused. You kind of got to get callous to play in the game. Of football on the professional level, because how violent it is, so that's one part of it. But I think the bigger issue Beatty is was the off season or the lack of all season Because, remember what happened back in March players all of a sudden, we're no longer allowed to basically leave their houses. Some of them had workout facilities in their gyms. Maybe they would go to a gym or whatever it may be, but they weren't working out with their strength and conditioning Coach is for their teams, right And these guys aren't just hired because They look good, and I don't know and coaching short since been in tank tops. You know what I mean? The's guys have specific programs that they're that they're using to develop the body's specifically for football. Now, these guys couldn't do this the entire off season. It was all virtual meetings, but nobody talked about what these guys were doing. I'm sure guys, we're staying in shape. But when you're staying in shape by yourself like in your gym to doing the beach workout, and one of the orders are going to run up and down ST sprints up and down the street. That's that's It's not the same program that these guys were used to doing. So all of a sudden. You get the training camp and they begged for this acclamation time, which they get. It simply wasn't enough. I think I think guys maybe got strong and fit. But not functionally strong and fit. And as a result, we're seeing the result of it come these first couple weeks of the NFL season. There's theories out there. I'll certainly take that. It's passable. It makes sense. But and by the way we left out the Caffrey who thank God you know, for Carolina, not his. Don't think it is. As a Barkley or Bosa. But you know, 4 to 6 Weeks got Jimmy G high ankle sprain. He got Davante Adams tweaked his hamstring. Believe Coker, safety for the Colts, his Achilles shredded he's done for the year. Colts defense is great. By the way, I told you that defense is gonna be awesome and that Cole's defense is awesome, but I don't even if you're right, and you probably are OK, but there's really nowhere to distribute. Blame outside of maybe the turf at Met life, which we will hear. But it's a pandemic. It's it's the strangest most, you know, obviously depressing. But, yeah, strangest, most disconcerting year any of us has had collectively In our lives, So it's not against the NFL's fault. Like I can't look at the NFL and say well, They should have done this to ensure that that didn't happen. Not agree that way. You can't see it that way because everybody's life was disrupted. The NFL is just seeing it in a for a lot of its stars, and I don't think blame is the conversation because you're going to spin around. You know, endlessly trying to assign blame, change anything, and exactly is not gonna change anything. What you need to look at is what does this mean going forward? All of a sudden, there's a lot of teams that have lost valuable pieces of what they needed. To win. Not that the Giants were gonna win. But if they were going to start developing that culture that we all want to see you be reinvigorated there. And Joe Judge you needs a Kwan Barkley, who's been your captain for two years, by the way he's on his third year, but he was a captain last year. Now he's out, and that hope and optimism that Daniel Jones and this offense of line would build around him is gone now. Interestingly, they played pretty well afterwards on almost won that game against the Chicago Bears actually had a shot. With, you know, seconds left in the game to win it. So there is there is still hope that they're not going to fall apart because they lose their their star player, and that's a testament to their coaching. But I think I agree with that. By the way, I don't think they'll fall apart like Yeah, I think they'll still fighting. I think they'll be competitive. I think you're right. But think about like, why you tune into games that you're not. If you're a Jets fan, you're going to need to watch the Jets as bad as they are. It doesn't matter, right? If you are a NFL fan and say Quan Barclay was your first picks that can pick up your fantasy draft or you use him and daily fantasy. Whatever it may be all of a sudden, there's a there's a tick that's gone away. Rides like Yeah, I can't watch him anymore, or Jimmy Garoppolo or whoever it may be the stars and they go down it. It doesn't hurt the nature of the game. But it hurts the the publicity of the game. And it's just it's I think there's a there's a There's a There's a psychological side that gets damaged when all of the stars a lot of the stars that we know aren't playing any more. You know, along that along those lines here. This is a real quick aside..

NFL football Giants Courtland Sutton Kwan Barkley Scott Hanson Jets Nick Bosa Atlanta Campbell Ross MetLife Lakers Bryson Baltimore Ravens New York Giants San Francisco Colts high ankle sprain Shambo Josh Kyle Shanahan
"courtland" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:22 min | 6 months ago

"courtland" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"NewsRadio. Time is 102 Frontier Airlines says it acted in good faith during the pandemic, But the Giza office says it's fielded complaints. State Attorney General Phil Weiser says he's received more than 100 complaints from frontier passengers who couldn't get refunds, used flight credits or even get help on the phone. Some people said they were disconnected. Mid call or parked on hold for hours. Wiser wants the U. S. Department of Transportation to investigate Cathy Walker Koray News radio governor, Polish visited southern Colorado on Tuesday. He says Colorado is still in the range of having several 100 new covert 19 cases per day. But it seems tohave plateau DH from the increases of several weeks ago. Governor says Mask wearing has been very important. True mass Wearing and social distancing. Colorado has been more successful than many other states in keeping this pandemic suppressed. The levels that allow for people to return to work returned to school whether it was last week this week or in a month. Aunt. I think Colorado families really value that forward Progress and mass wearing his important part of that whole assess. Colorado seven day positivity rate is just under 3%, the Broncos season opener less than two weeks away, wide receiver Courtland Sutton talked about quarterback Drew lock with a new offense. Okay, we're trying to Get those rights back. But I also understand the urgency way have that time. So on maximizing all those reps in Teo The masterful in our crowd, understanding the system and Jews. During that, Sutton says. Lock has embraced the pressure of being the starting quarterback and has been pushing himself to be perfect at every aspect. Nicola Yoko today shot in the lane with 27 seconds remaining and the Nuggets held on for an 80 to 78 victory over the Jazz in Game seven of their first round. Siri's Utah missed a three pointer as time expired to send Denver into a second round matchup with the Clippers. I'm Chad Bauer on K AWAY NEWS radio Thrill Lombardi Trophy is coming home, winning it all mile High City Broncos Thrill Aggie 2015 Broncos postseason Tomorrow night at six. It's the big game here, the Broncos win their third championship Super Bowl 50 against the Panthers hazard on the home of the Bronco..

Colorado Broncos Phil Weiser Courtland Sutton Frontier Airlines Giza Nicola Yoko Attorney Chad Bauer Cathy Walker Mask Clippers Teo Siri U. S. Department of Transporta Nuggets Panthers Denver Drew lock
"courtland" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

01:42 min | 8 months ago

"courtland" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"I'm picking between Courtland Sutton and Terry MacLaurin here. I thought today. McLaurin was the sixth overall grated receiver by Pff from last season as 1/3 round rookie, with Dwayne Haskins throwing in the football. There are so many good ones. The bills. A scent at wide receiver is really impressive and exciting. There's one thing about it. That I sort of wish were different. And that is they don't have any of these guys. They haven't drafted any of these guys they drafted, say Jones. With league is absolutely loaded. With great receivers from the last three years, and the bills don't have any of them. They're good round is good. Diggs is very good. Beasley is fine, but there's not one of the if one of these guys on this team would be exciting to me. Yeah. I'll take a guy who was a second round pick what? Two years ago three years ago Now I'll go with Courtland Sutton. You got it. There are other guys there, Judy. They drafted KJ handler. Ah, dish my boy day. Shawn Hamilton is still hanging around, eh, Shawn Hamilton. Oh, yeah. You're still living like that? Yeah, the cameo He's known member. Um, was it for your birthday, but was that nose after winning a championship? Okay, um, Sutton's going Big Target chair. I don't love Drew lock, but Alex Sutton Lot. Alright. Is my receiver to definitely we're in around five of our mock draft here. Sneaky Joe and myself, Mike show my guy was picked So I have to come up with somebody else because I'll tell you who it was..

Courtland Sutton Shawn Hamilton Um Alex Sutton Dwayne Haskins Pff Terry MacLaurin Diggs Beasley Joe football Jones Judy Drew Mike
Who Will Be the Broncos Defensive MVP in 2020?

Broncos Country Tonight

01:56 min | 10 months ago

Who Will Be the Broncos Defensive MVP in 2020?

"Said we do have a poll question up right now at KOAA Colorado on Twitter who will be the Broncos defensive MVP in twenty twenty von Miller drill Casey Bradley Chubb Justin Simmons right now von Miller winning this poll Bradley Chubb is you're right there so pretty close I voted for Bradley Chubb by the way okay I voted for Justin Simmons the only because he sees the field the entire the entire season and I I really think you even thinking badly troubled well they they see the field was a ninety percent just the same as a hundred percent I mean pretty much yeah so I mean we're we're splitting hairs I I actually think there's argument for all all four of them I think there is I think you'd even throw in like I said Kareem Jackson I think we can have a argue about Todd Davis will likely leave we can at least leave the team in tackles there's there's there'll still be harassed kit comes away with with big plays batted passes I mean there's there's probably argument for anyone of these guys yeah other then then yeah I I could totally understand that just and you know he's good for the show and you know I enjoyed enjoyed talking to him from time to time but I'm not you know I I look at and and you know we're all big fans Justin Simmons B. last year before all this went down I was like he's going to become a household name by the end of season sort of maybe all pretty but you know I look at these guys and I'm just for my own personal thing and they have a bounce back season knowing how Bradley Chubb is is kind of Courtland Sutton on the defense enters the attitude work ethic all that kind of stuff and he was where it was interesting get to talk to both those guys a buffalo wild wings last year because it felt like it was kind of a new unified narrative between the two you know Courtland brother has sent a lot of the same things very similarly it's interesting because they're off the side of the ball so it's it's it would it was kind of fascinating to you know to see two guys have the same approach would be different sides of the ball that aren't necessarily in the same same meetings and

Koaa Colorado Twitter MVP Justin Simmons Von Miller Bradley Chubb Kareem Jackson Todd Davis Courtland Sutton Broncos Casey Bradley
"courtland" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

11:22 min | 10 months ago

"courtland" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Gone way back up. People have just started. The people were just sell off for a while. The only thing they wanted to read about was the Toronto virus and with Andy Hackers. Since we're publishing a lot of content on how to start a business and how to market your business etc that just took a backseat. Oh my God. Is everybody going to die next week? Just wasn't up there in the list of priorities now. I think people sort of adjusted. They've gotten their bands they forget what's going on and a lot. More founders and entrepreneurs are coming to you on the actors to try to figure out. What am I GONNA do? What does this mean for my business? I don't have time to sit around. And Shell shocked have been the last couple of weeks actually to take action and do things. It's always a lot more conversations on more projects being started with some other websites as seeing the same thing saw health from gum road to a picture of the number of creators releasing products on gun road and it was like an exponential graph with massive numbers of people selling things online in the last couple of months. I might buy that dealer at home. A lot of people have lost their jobs especially for what he's doing with with creators. You don't necessarily know how to can definitely put out some writing or some sort of digital product or sell goods online. Maybe that's their best bet to make money while they're looking for a new job. The unemployment numbers are pretty staggering. So I think that's that plays a role. Yeah I mean it would be really interesting to see how this ends up. Impacting the online GIG economy. Because I've always thought that fiver was an underappreciated place where people could earn a living. I think probably a lot of the people that have been driving. Uber May eventually find may partially through this pandemic that there are a lot of jobs on fiver for example that they could find and transition to a digital career and that could eventually lead to maybe more of these people becoming indie hacker type of people. It's kind of a maybe a starry eyed or overly optimistic perspective on the impacts here but there is an online gig economy and addition to the online creative economy. There's an online egg economy. And you know. Hopefully you know some of the GIG. Workers can utilize that become more digitized speaking of projects that people released during the corner virus. Somebody I had on. The podcast recently released a website called. Modern DAY JOBS DOT COM and headline is changing times. Call for new ways of earning money. And it's just a list of a hundred different ways to make money online at somebody who's not necessarily a developer so they've got up work and five on their red for doing transcriptions. Amazon Mechanical Turk and Ninety six other different businesses and companies that you can use to basically get a job online if you're just sitting around home day not making any income that's great. When the I've been pleased by is the fact that this has shown us that the Internet can give us a lot of resilience to these like Societal Black Swan events. I've typically been kind of afraid of the fact that the entire world is now running on. Aws In this company. That's a single point of failure. But you know in some ways. It's provided our society with extreme resilience. So I don't know that is one nice lesson to come out of this. Yeah I think the Internet is actually getting better as a result because we're now creating more capacity both network capacity and Computer Bassetti just from response to heavily increased online activity and I think that this capacity is going to go away so in some sense we come out of this with a better internet more resilient Internet just as a result of this. Yeah I mean if you had asked me six months ago what do I think it'd be more catastrophic? Aws going down or all of American small businesses shutting down for weeks. I've probably would have chosen the ladder. And now we're getting to see how that plays out and like surprisingly there's no riots on the street. It's not it's obviously not a great situation. It's GonNa take a long time for all this sort of second order effects. Play out in the second order effects of those second order effects to play out. But if there's an underlying resiliency the Internet's getting stronger and it makes me a little bit less worried about being a single point of failure to see that people are a dynamic creatures. We react. The government reacts when things happen and things go down we figure out ways around each of you've learned about yourself from this virus experience so far that you didn't know about yourself beforehand that I asked you. Kate dislike working from home. I don't know I think my ability to predict the future is really not that good. Maybe overly confident in January. I mean this is a black swan event. I don't think you can do anything about that. You can't but there's news coming out about this in January and I remember actually sitting in one of these poker games that I was a part of and we were. We had a graph up of infection rate and Wuhan. And you're looking at it. You know. It was like twelve hundred day before it had been at like nine hundred or something and we were worrying about it and I have a little chat on my who hang out with some friends or you know. What should we be doing? Should we leave major cities like what do we do friends like? No NO NO I. Don't you know there's nothing to really be done that but I was worried enough about it back then to actually be talking about it in January and yet I didn't change anything I didn't buys any stock and then sell any stock by precautions and stockpiling goods. I didn't do anything. I just sat there like at the end. The headlight so yeah I guess. It taught me that in the case of Zombie apocalypse or any other foreseeable event that that starts probably just not going to do anything. That's worrying well now that you're aware of it. You're probably going to do something next time because you'll be like oh you know last time this happened. Hopefully hopefully we'll see but it's like one. Man's decisiveness is another man's being panicked. You know. That's a good point. I've talked to so many people and I keep hearing this word panic and I remember in February telling. My mom stay quarantined at home in friend was like. Oh you know. You're you're spreading panic but I look out. I just don't. I don't see that much panic. I don't see stores being looted and writes on the street like I see a lot of people dying from virus and I think one form of panic is basically being the deer in the headlights. I think it's not just fight or flight. I think it's fight flight or freeze and that a lot of times when we interface with US extraordinary decisions and events we freeze up and we don't take any action but I think not. Taking action is a decision in and of itself and we gotta weigh the costs and the benefits of that as well. So I think you're right. We shouldn't make these hasty panic decision. Just because something's happening doesn't mean we need to take action. Oftentimes taking action. It's better than doing nothing and sometimes not taking any action at all is itself away of panicking. I am a little worried about the stores. Being closed and some of the clothes stores being vandalized or looted being sensitive that seemed to be growing. I just hope that this isn't something. That accelerates more people lose their jobs and we truly get to a store being loaded situation. I mean I think it will accelerate hopefully not that much but I guess it's the cost benefit analysis. What's more should we have kept everything open to avoid panic? But then the cost of digging mass graves or two million people. Like I don't know I don't know if the trade off makes sense but now it's for sure concern. People don't have jobs if they don't have income and stores were closed in this last for months and months and months. I'm sure we'RE GONNA have to pay those costs to our guys well just to close off any other reflections on how life has changed for you or what you expect in the near future for me. Another thing that's been crazy is recruiting in this time. We continue to hire people and engineers and not being able to see them face to face before make him. An offer is not something you've done in the past and I think that that has been challenging to being able to quickly adapt our onsite interview process to a remote onsite reprocessing challenging. Not just for us but I think for pretty much any company. That's hiring right now. In some sense it's also challenging. People were looking for jobs and even people who aren't looking for jobs because they were laid off but because they just want a new job and the recruiting industry. I think is going to be impacted by this in a lot of ways. But I'm hoping that somehow this also helps make it easier to interview engineers remotely. Hopefully someone will come out with tools that make a remote onsite easier. I think the cool thing about a running a business is constantly run into other business ideas. There's so many things like this but it doesn't exist. I hope someone starts a company to do this thing. But the interviewing coder pad sweeter things. That doesn't do it for you. I think they're okay. I don't think that they replace the experience of just spending more time with the candidate when they're online or when they're on site and getting a ton of just ambient signal both for the candidate and for the company in terms of you know how they interact with other people around them how they work with the team when we go out to lunch. What are the things they talk about? You can't really do the lunch interview anymore unless you WanNa make really awkward and so. I think we're missing out on those signals. It's not the worst thing an special compared to everything else but it is something that is interesting and something that we have adopted and the actors were all remote team. So I'm working from San Francisco. My brothers working from New York City or community managers working from the UK etc. And so our sort of interview process hasn't even really had to sort of evaluate people on these like. How do we connect in person type things because we never actually happened connected person but one thing we have had to shift on a lottery is just the way that we are content with your podcast? The way we write our newsletters and we're doing a little bit less evergreen stuff a little bit less like tried and true business advice and stories a little bit more current events news things that are important to people right now just seeing the shift in. What people's attention is focused on people care about? What's going on in their lives right now. That's an interesting trade off to make all sorts of implications if you're trying to do things that are relevant in the modern day and how fast you have to have your turn around time become. I'm struggling with that a little bit. But I think that's probably the biggest change in me and my work life and and my personal life. I think I might be higher poker coach. Playing every night gets expensive if you lose a lot so that's all changes for me. The only other thing I think think that I realize is just how fortunate I am. And just how much of a difference it makes when you have a financial cushion when you have a job and you don't have to worry about being laid off. You don't have to worry about getting sick or going to the doctor not having insurance. It just underscores all of the ways which my life is so much easier. Because I've just been lucky hundred percent. I mean I basically feel at this point like or at least I feel like I'm in virtual reality like the life that I live is so dissimilar from the average person you know just in terms of you know as digitally empowered person. You really just have such a massive advantage and massive fortune. That is definitely something to reflect on yeah. I think we're all very lucky to have found ourselves in the careers that we're in and I worry a little bit that.

Aws Toronto Shell Andy Hackers Amazon developer US Wuhan Kate San Francisco New York City UK
"courtland" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

08:37 min | 10 months ago

"courtland" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"I just don't have a lot of sympathy for you. I think that media organizations need to really question their incentives and question. What drives them. And make sure that doesn't sort of send them over the edge and times like this in situations like this and obviously you're right. The world of journalism is huge. It's not just analogous monolithic. And everybody's getting strong. There's been a lot of great journalism done. That's helped a lot of people but I also agree with your point about certain four-match just being excellent. The podcast format is excellent. Because you're not really getting a message. Filtered through the lens of a journalist the host is right here on the podcast talking to the experts. And you get to hear from the experts mouse with all their caveats and all of their insights and I think in a time like this where you're dealing with such a quite frankly like scientific phenomenon biological phenomenon one where like. You really need experts. These journalists don't necessarily know what they're talking about. I don't necessarily know what I'm talking about it for bringing an expert on. I think it's more important to have a format where the experts can speak for themselves. And I think that's sort of lowers the risk of the journalists that are pushing their own agenda misinterpreting. What's being said which we've seen a lot of as well. I also think that especially during a time like this. I'm hoping that the click beatty stuff is going to die down because people feel more of a sense of social responsibility because they see everything bad. That's going on as journalists hopefully with that sense of increased responsibility to help people in general and with a sense of charity by hope that people are able to move beyond just the clicks and the money and truly helped that readers. I'm just talking to stick in that sense and hoping that that is happening across the board by do think some people who died at wrong earlier but again we're all humans we make mistakes so shifting back to purely online subjects that we're more well versed in. Have you guys seen any new online products that have gotten started? As a result of the virus. The opportunistic product starting. Have you seen anything interesting? I haven't seen any opportunistic. Sort of predatory products yet diluting people are trying to pass off the already have as perhaps a little more helpful for the virus. Because somehow make up how. It's more helpful. Everyone's social distancing but what I have seen as a lot of people especially on render we were seeing an explosion of websites and resources related to the virus and people are building a lot of things to help people just deal with the virus but also in specific situations where someone built a website for his wife who is doing a lot of telemedicine calls and she just wanted a good system for tracking those calls and timing them and used by the really simple view APP because he wanted to get into view and I think it showed up on hacker news too and that's just an example of just ingenuity and people taking the time to do something useful and learning the process. We're seeing a lot of that on render windy see websites being created. These days aren't seeing a ton on any hackers so many people who were basically sitting at home with a lot of free time on their hands and who have the skills to build something the desire to build something and all sorts of Corona virus checkers and trackers and end for products helped disseminate information. Little dashboards all along with the stats in your hometown or your area things to help. People basically spread sort of these good faith efforts like wearing masks literally college projects. We launched a group. A couple of weeks ago on hackers called the BIOS group. Just because there's so much conversation happening around this topic and is happening for different reasons. Some people are just thinking very opportunistically like okay well. This thing is happening. Lots of change. How can I as a founder build something that takes advantage of this and you know perhaps builds things accessible but a lot of people are operating what I see as being altruistic -ly just trying to help and seeing themselves as part of some bigger global conversation movement were everybody's kind of on the same page and we all have a common enemy so I like seeing that stuff feels really good to see. It's kind of hardening when something bad happens you can count on people to at least come together and do good for each other whereas in situations where the world kind of operating. Normally you don't see into that coming together mindset on that note one thing that I have seen. That feels a bit. Opportunistic is older. Recruiting companies are trying to compile these layoff lists and using sort of viral marketing. Or what have you to try and be more visible? Because they're compiling a list of people who've been laid off and then connecting them to whoever. I think that obviously some of that is useful. But in a lot of cases I see that just from the tone and from how it's being presented it's come across as opportunistic. Yeah it's it's tough line to walk because basically entire conversation now is all about the virus. I scroll through my twitter feed the other day and I think I had to kind of like nineteen tweets before I saw one tweet. That wasn't talking about the pandemic are the economy and it's Kinda like like walking into a funeral. You can't have the same conversation. You can have the same marketing that you had otherwise because it's just not really you know being in line with the tone of the conversation but on the other hand has also complex. I mean if you are a restaurant business if you're in the sort of hotel industry if you're recruiting industry you're probably facing pretty dire straits right. Now it's kind of like do or die like your company's existence hangs in the balance and so one hand I think people are being opportunistic and kind of off tone and it's easy to do that if you're not careful but on the other I think people are also pretty desperate. Because of a couple of weeks they've gone from probably having a solidly operating business to looking bankruptcy or the end of the company and the headlights and having to figure out what to do pretty desperate times for a lot of founders. Think yeah absolutely. It's almost hard not to appear tasteless in any kind of marketing. That is not be like things that are going to immediately help people in Corona virus time. But it's weird because we're in the digital economy and we're at least us three our day to day lives are fairly minimally affected by the virus. As far as I can tell with you guys and you have to maintain this degree of TAC because there are a lot of people that are really really impacted by this on that front. I really do wonder about the retail shops and the restaurants that are getting just slammed by this. I mean there is like this five to ten x adoption of retail and food delivery. And I don't think much of that. Business is going to these retail shops and restaurants. And I just wonder what the secular impact of this is GonNa be as more and more people learn about delivery and you've got virtual kitchens and you have all this retail space and this restaurants based this basically not like doesn't serve purpose anymore like we'll see what happens afterwards but I really wonder what happened. All excess real estate gets turned into Amazon stores. Yeah I was GONNA buy up all the shuttered restaurants. I heard. That's what they did with the shopping malls. I HEARD. Amazon went on a shopping mall buying spree. Yeah they're just either going to convert them to these Amazon. Go store some of these restaurants where you can just walk in. And I don't want to be an ad for Amazon right now but it's a pretty quick errands and or otherwise. I mean with larger buildings. I can imagine them being turned into warehouses or deliveries. By wonder how many companies that are shuttering. Now just won't ever be replaced. How many do you have any sort of technological shift? You have this kind of a long transition period you know. There's probably a long period of time where people were riding on horses and Buggies at the same time. People had cars on the road and when those horses died like they probably didn't get replaced. I think this is going to kill a lot of businesses that you know. Some of them will come back like we probably still want restaurants. There's probably a lot of physical locations it just don't need to be physical anymore and it's GonNa be a ton a real estate leftover and the implications of that. I can't even speculate about in Montana Thomas but I think it's GonNa be pretty transformative. You.

Amazon founder Corona twitter beatty Montana BIOS TAC Thomas
"courtland" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

09:48 min | 1 year ago

"courtland" Discussed on Code Story

"Viewpoint where I get to see. Examples of thousands of people in the different decisions they make and what works for them and what doesn't doesn't rather than just got to having an example of just one which is just myself and so I can literally go down the list of any podcast guests. I talked to John on Nolan recently. He's the founder of Ghost and he's like one of the most solid mission driven founders. They've ever spoken with. He's very big on the fact that he's taking a slow steady approach approach to grow and his company. He's not trying to go to fast so that he can hold onto his ideals and he's doing something he actually wants to do so he's not going to get bored of it a year or two. This is a lifestyle that he wants to. These made sure to set his lifestyle so that it's happy while he's running his business and I think that level of patients commitment to emission while also trying to cope with growing companies. Something that I really admired I try to make time for it in my daily life. Another podcast guest Derek. Anderson had a close and reviewing him. which is that? It's a little bit cliche able to set. It's about the journey not the destination. And that's something that I've thought about a lot when running and the hackers at whatever. I'm doing right now on this moment. That's really the whole point of any hackers gets to some sort of predefined and goal reaching this many millions of people having this many people create a product page. Or whatever like. That'll be great. When I get there but the entire path there needs to be fun and needs to be enjoyable and that affects my decision making a lot another founder? If out on the PODCAST is Taylor out. Well creator of Larry Bell which is an open source framework for PHP and it's really an entire ecosystem. Awesome at this point like he's almost single handedly changed the ecosystem for PHP developers and been super impactful simultaneously turning into business for himself and he has a very refreshing gene. Take on motivation. which something a lot of founders struggle with? How do I stay motivated to finish a project that I'm working on and for him? It's just about balance. You need to balance passion ashes with discipline. It's not about a hundred passion. It's not about a hundred percent discipline. Sometimes you're gonNA be working on things and you're going to have these days pure drudgery and and you need some degree of discipline you need some degree where you're going to work on something even if it isn't the most fun thing and you're going to push through it and for that you need discipline and there's lots of tricks and tools you can use to sort of increasing discipline. For example having co-founder employees partners can help you say disciplined to commitments. That you've made telling your audience making promises and setting dates for things can help you you sort of increase your discipline with the podcast. Susan release schedule. I can't really miss that release schedules. They have to be disappointed about that. And that helps me get through the days where we don't necessarily have the passion to push myself forward but there are plenty of days where I don't have to rely on to spend it all because I'm working on something that I really like and I have the passion and I think a lot of founders and developers work on things that they're not passionate about and they don't get that side of the equation either. I think it's important to have both and that's something I think about largely in part because of Taylor out. Well I could probably go down my entire list of Indiana's PODCAST Gessen since eight different lesson that I've learned from a different founder every single time but I try to incorporate into how I run run any hackers. That's a really cool thing. I totally relate to with interviewing and people on the code story podcast just little tidbits and hearing people's stories It really it's really fun and it's really cool but it also is super educational. Yeah it's hard to learn entirely from your own experiences because you're just one person and this is why encourage people to to read some interviews. We've done on the website or to listen to the podcast because when you get this sort of broad perspective of talking to dozens of people or hundreds of people are listening to how they've done things you just you just begin to realize that there's no one right way and you get to figure you're out which approach jives the most with your particular personality and your situation you can even still bits and pieces of what others have done so create a game plan for yourself and I think that's hard to do if you're not talking to lots the people and being a podcast founder is kind of a hack because you literally have to talk to lots of people. You don't have a choice and so you end up getting that perspective so if you could go back to the beginning what would you do differently. I would avoid all the mistakes that I made the first time around. I think it's funny. I've asked people the same question. And a Lotta people. People say I wouldn't do anything differently. I do it all the same you know. I think that answers canopy asked because at the end of the day look. We've all made mistakes. None of us did things perfectly the first time around. And I I think there are features that I built hackers. That would not have built their emails that I sent that I would not have sent. There are things that I stressed about. I just worried so much about them. That didn't make any difference at all. I remember in November of two thousand sixteen a few months after I'd Launch Eddie Hackers. I was trying everything that I could to try to grow the website. I was posting on Qudra asking questions and answering questions and write blog posts and doing all sorts of stuff and just stressing about the numbers. I can get more visitors more visitors and I remember actually like earning out L. and really needing to take like a two week break because they just couldn't handle anymore because they felt so much pressure to make the website bigger and then in December when I finally started reaching out to sponsors and selling you you know slots on the podcast and the newsletter. It turned out the numbers barely even mattered. And I was so stressed out about this sort of precursor first step to what I saw as being necessary to generate sponsorship the ship revenue that I essentially didn't even need to do any of that in the end it was just a total waste of time and emotional energy and if I could go back get that just go straight to the part where I tried to generate revenue the site and see if that worked if worked. Great let's get the heart step and if it didn't work great now I know for sure and I could go do that other stuff so I think it's something that a lot of founders. I don't realize that you should probably charge for what you're doing as early as possible. And you'll get the exact feedback you need. You try to charge a customer for something. If they don't buy they'll tell you exactly why why they won't buy. And you could fix that rather than just sort of guessing and stressing editor of what you think they might need before they buy so. That's one thing that I think is a big part of my story and I think that is applicable to most people shouting revenue-generating projects while you're getting on a plane and you're sitting next to one of your India hackers one of the users of your platform just built the next big thing. They're pumps to go get it up to the world they want to show. Oh you knowing all that you know all the different past that you've walked in the the the road the experience you have building any hackers. What advice which you give them the first thing I would tell them is to be careful who you take advice from and how you interpret that advice everybody is different? The people giving you advice might have goals that are different than yours or skills that are different than yours or experiences that are different than yours. Insert vice might be good for a person who's not you but it might be terrible advice for in fact that's kind of the premise was built on that. If you're trying to build a business to change your life for the better and achieve financial independence for yourself a lot of the advice that you you see for startup founders is not right for you. Because it's geared towards people who were building these very high growth venture capitalists funded companies trying to acquire more users at all costs and don't really care about having a sustainable business model and running a lifestyle business so I think you should be careful about who's advice you take really put thought into whether or not at apply see and that includes me as well. Well you can consider other advice applies team the second thing I would say start small. I mentioned this a little bit earlier in our conversation but most things that are big most things that are impressive started almost embarrassingly small. They were very modest in the beginning. And it's very important to do this because if you bite off more than you can chew founder in the early days if you start working again. Someone's going to take you six to twelve months to build a ton of effort or take a ton of money you have a lot of negative tradeoffs that come back if you're working on something and it takes you forever to get it it out the door. You're very likely to lose motivation. And not finish it if you're working on something and it's taking you forever to launch it. You're not going to have any customers not going to have anyone that you're accountable to except for yourself. You have to rely entirely on your own passionate willpower to get out the door It's just it's just kind of killer of dreams and people bite off way too much and in the beginning so I would say take whatever your ideas figure out how you can get it done in a week like the most barebones version. But I've talked to so many founders. You've done this and eventually build something that was world. Changing good example would be Peter Levels nomad list. He has a giant community of digital nomads. He traveled the world and help each other. Basically figure out the best places to say what to do when they're they're you know. What places have the fastest Internet places have the cheapest cost of living the best food CETERA? He's got probably a better database in the community built around than any other place online and he started with the spreadsheet he didn't build a website it in code anything he literally just made a spreadsheet and tweeted it out. People filled that out and that was sort of his first version. The second version wasn't much more complex than that and step by step. You got to working wanted to go so I would advise people to think about their business and their journey is a set of steps literally staircase and every tiny step. You take get you the height that you need to reach the next up a little bit easier and that's a much better saner. Her approach trying to jump straight to the top of the staircase from the floor is probably not going to reach it if you do. It's GONNA take a ton of work and you're not going to get all those little dopamine hits that would come if you instead took one small step at a time to get to where you're GONNA go so start small and if you're not embarrassed by the very first thing that you release if it's not like embarrassingly simple almost trivial real than you might be starting a little bit too large this great advice Portland. Thank you for being on the podcast today. Thank you for telling the creation story of indie hackers. Thank you for serve for having me on the show and hopefully I can come back sometime in the future absolutely in. This concludes another chapter of coat story. Code Story is hosted and produced by Noah lab part season two episodes or co produced an edited by Bradley Dinner. Be Sure to subscribe on Apple podcasts. spotify or the podcasting. Happy your choice. Support the show on Patriotic Dot com slash code story for just five to ten bucks a month and when you get a chance leave us a review both things. help us out tremendously.

founder Taylor Eddie Hackers Derek Larry Bell Indiana John Portland Anderson dopamine co-founder Nolan India Qudra Noah editor Bradley Dinner spotify
"courtland" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

10:57 min | 1 year ago

"courtland" Discussed on Code Story

"Even that wasn't really enough. Sometimes the out of scaling would take too long to kick in for the site will be down for a little bit There's a little bit confusing to have site running on multiple servers. Deploy a little more complex than if you had your saw running on multiple servers so so I did rated with a bunch of different things at one point and made the site completely. Statin didn't do any service I'd rendering and that situation. It's very easy to serve your site in the scale because is everybody gets back the same H.. File making just cash that through that. CDN But the downside is without services rendering but everybody gets US basically a blank page and that blank page will load for a while before the jobs kept up boots up on their machine. And I can tell you if people click a link on social media on Google to an article they want to read what they get is a blank loading screen for a few seconds they click away. It's not what they want to see. They want the article right now. And if they see loading screen they're going to be reminded that they're distracted from work or something and just close the tap so a sort of a stopgap measure. What I did was I took a page out of balsams? Playbook balsamic is an APP by this Guy Kelly. It's been around forever. Such a clever way of dealing with user complaints applauded which is that. He showed very relevant inspirational quote on his loading screen before the Apple. Dude up so I did the same thing for any actors. I would take a quote from one of my interviews. I would try to make it something useful and inspirational and I would also show the interview name and their business and revenue numbers and the loading screen and sedan. Easley all the complaints about the website. Speed would go from. Hey this is loading too slow. Can you make a little faster due to you. Hey this is actually listening to quickly. Didn't have time to read the cook and you slow to the website doubt that was good. Stopgap measure while they were on a bunch of other things and eventually I said you know what I really want to tackle this problem. Improperly I want to quickly and people get straight to the content that they want so what I ended up doing is creating a Krahn job that runs periodic fan. My server. I think it sets around like every thirty seconds then what that does is it actually paintings the server side rendering and generates the html for the homepage of the form and then it saves it html file on the server over and so that's constantly updating html for the homepage. And if you requested as a user what you get is that updated. HTML file which is just a static file while and so instead of getting a loading screen and getting a static file that has a very recent snapshot of the homepage so technically the homepage is always about thirty seconds out of date when you he accidentally hackers but it allows you to go straight to the website. See what's going on not be a day out of date and then the APP boots up and loads the most recent version rather than having wait around loading screen. So that's what I'm doing right now. It's kind of one of the challenges that having a small development team right now the only developer working on hackers and so I've got to wear different hats juggle serene doing marketing stuff and going to meetings and proving the website and scaling things increasing the podcast. But I'm sure there is a lot more scale ability sort sort of low hanging fruit that I could tackle in the future and a lot more I can deal with caching and cache invalidation can make the website faster and other pages. It's not just the homepage awesome. Sounds like you've done a lot already though to make the pages faster cash. Interestingly and it's fun to where those multiple hats on a startup and fight the scale ability issues you have to you have to. There's no choice you're the you're the founder. The only person doing anything so until you got your team. It's all up to you and you have to figure out how to prioritize. What's urgent and what's not that's right So as you step out on the balcony look across India hackers in the team and the community that is. They're the rich community of India Hackers what are you. Most proud of Brenda's proud of is how much people are able to help each other. When I started Andy Hackers I had a very some might say selfish mission for it as the project? I wanted to help myself. The entire point of hackers is really. I want some personal freedom. I don't want to have to go back to getting a job. I want to support my own lifestyle but once you get ah locked in as a founder your missions and your priorities start to change and for me. The biggest change came when join stripe about nine months. After I started hackers. It was acquired by stripe race. Still work on it today financially. I wasn't worried anymore. Learn had any sort of imperative to like. How do I pay my rent? And they became much more about. Well how do I help in the hackers do what it does best and help founders and inspire founders to get started and the cool thing is that. Because it's it's a community and because it's a podcast interviewing people it's it's never really mean directly helping anybody like I'm not dispensing a bunch of advice on how to start their companies rather than just providing sort of a stage or other founders come on and share their own story in their own advice in their own experiences and they can help each other. It's the same thing with the community forum. I'm rarely posting on the community form warm nowadays but there's thousands of posts every week from vendors. Who are helping each other? It's almost beyond belief to see what can happen. I've started to have a lot of people on the podcast recently who themselves. We're just fledgling it'd be hackers on the forum asking how they get started their podcast listeners. A year ago or two years ago and now they're running these businesses that are making twenty thousand and fifty thousand one hundred thousand dollars a month and Revenue Avenue and living the dream that they spiring because they heard another episode of the podcast. That really lit a fire under them or they got just the right amount of help on the forum and so I think the thing that I'm the most proud of it is just how cool and actually impactful it is to see people helping each other and and really learning that ends. Brayson is not just a buzzword that people really do make life changing decisions that alter the entire course of their career in their life because they heard a story about what somebody else did. That's amazing. I love that the flip the script a little bit. Tell me about a mistake you made along the process. And how did you respond to it. I've made dozens of mistakes. Running the hackers probably the the most unforgivable mistakes are related to Code specifically violating the principles that helped in the become a success in the first place so I was very focused on building something that would be quick to build testing things out not committing too much into building building a ton of software in the beginning before launch hackers but since launching and since having things workout a lot of that external pressure moved. And you kind of feel like the other websites work they they can do whatever I want. And I've had a few of these slog projects from like this will just take a couple of months and it takes like five months of coding and the rest of the community is not getting better. Nobody sees seasoning improvements. Because I've taken on this just absolute monster of a project that I really. So they're taking the time in the beginning to break down. Think about how we can break it into bite size pieces east one of which is useful and can contribute and they can release instantly so people constantly see a steady stream of updates and so I can really tell if I'm going in the right direction before committed to months months of coding. A good example of that would be the director of products on any hackers. If you run a product or this you can go to any actress dot com slash products and create a page for your product. You could share your revenue numbers if you want you have a whole timeline air you can post milestones updates about what you've done and I was so excited to build this because I just felt like it was necessary and really everybody buddy on the form hats something they were working but then no place to share it on hackers and so I just absent mindedly jumped into this. This is a couple years ago and it just took forever to build this I Over designed eight. I made it look really good. It's it's very nice but it was a focus on the wrong things and then after I was done within people made these pages they had no real reason to use it. Because you would make all these posts on your time line and then nobody would ever come and like those posts. They would never use them. And there's just no visibility into them and I hadn't even thought about that part of the equation Luckily as able to sort of rectify that years years later by building what we now call the milestones leaderboard so any update than anybody posted their product. Timeline gets put in that day's leaderboard for the top milestones. These are almost always. Is Celebratory things like I made. My first dollar in revenue just came up with my idea. My company just got acquired or we just released as cool feature and here's a learned people love those milestones and as a result they upload let them and ask each other questions. But how'd you do that. Or how can I do the same thing. And finally the product pages have been sort of brought into the fold of the rest of the website. But it took me a while of making mistakes of that kind of for a really stuck to my guns and said I'm never working at anything that's GonNa take me longer than a few days or a week to build so tell me what the future looks like for the product and for your team the feature Friday akers is is mostly about growth. Hackers as a community is a great place we survey people use any hackers and a pretty decent percentage of people say like hey I would never have started my company. If it wasn't for a story that I read on any hackers or podcast cast episode that I heard on any hackers really convinced me that I can do this I have to take. Some ideas are actually better than I thought they are. So I think that's great and in terms of Al Helpful in the hackers is that's also also great people get a lot of help on the forum and so the question now isn't so much. How do we make any hackers better? But it's the tattoo brings more people if if we think this is truly inspiring and if it's really helpful to founders that you know that I feel lonely going to their journey like nobody understands them but they have a whole community online like. How do we get more people in the community and I think that's a huge challenge because most websites that grow up losing their initial appeal? You know there's something about the initial group of people who helped them get to where they are you're that the turn a blind eye to they really alienate their initial users. And so for me. The challenge is how do I make any actress bigger and reach more people alienating people making them feel like we're getting away from our original goal the answer that I have sort of arrived at and it's too early to say that it's it's the right answer but it's what we're trying to basically break up the community into smaller groups and so I don't know if anyone listening is a fan of read it read it. Initially it was kind of just one forum and now today read it as many tens or hundreds of thousands of these smaller communities that will feed feed into one bigger community. And I'd like to be the same there. A ton of founders who have very specific interests for example there are founders of ECOMMERCE businesses. They're our founders. Were selling courses sources that our founders who were making mobile apps founders were making gains founders. You're making SAS software and just hundreds of different things founders or working on and so we're creating groups within the community mm unity so founders you have particular interest and skill sets can actually meet other founders have more in depth specific conversations geared around these things and they could just sort of general will Andy Hackers Forum so it's early days each one of these groups we've created so far is its own tiny community that we have to nurture and get off the ground but hopefully a year from now you will. We'll have thousands of these communities and many of them will be flourishing will be reaching more people never would have discovered any hackers otherwise so who influences the way that you you work neiman architect or CTO CEO Tech Person. Whoever it may be that you look up to and tell me why? Most of the founders of they've had on the podcast. Oh cast had some impact on how I run hackers. It's funny because you know in a way because the accuracy is all about interviewing founders and talking to them on the community forum. I learned a ton about how to run a company just by by running any hackers. I've got kind of a unique.

founder Guy Kelly balsams Google Apple India Easley CTO CEO Tech Person Brenda development team Brayson developer director of products akers
"courtland" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

09:14 min | 1 year ago

"courtland" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Unquote no code tools to build his website and he's now using those to basically provide a living for himself. I want to interview that you should enter if you've been great I think this is the feature at the end of the day. People tend to coalesce into similar needs like for example. My mom wanted to go to a website and I was telling her she should just use wordpress or something similar where you don't have to code so many people built blogs. If you bowling anything that's blog like at all. There's ways that you can do that without really knowing a ton about Co.. You'll need to hire our developer to build it for you. I think the number of these tools is only going to increase. We're going to take the different tools and the different process. He's developers tend to reinvent from scratch. When if we're blowing APPs going to have drag and drop tools to do a lot of that stuff. I think if we WANNA veer too far off the beaten path and do something super custom build completely unique product. You're you're always gonNA need code but at the end of the day there's so many businesses are so many opportunities so many niches that founder can cater to on the Internet that don't require a custom product that really gonNa see more and more people who are non developers starting startups yeah. It's it's like those you know you used to hear about the welcome sure you've the price still hear about these companies companies start landing page or type form and then they gradually over time build more and more functionality the type former the landing page feeds into and they gradually get there. Now you can just build a lot of functionality on that first day I mean I've been asking like people who work at bigger startups or bigger companies this question just like we know how to use these tools as MVP's or were learning learning how to use these tools as MVP's especially. If you're a non coder yeah you get started with web floor air table or whatever but if you're big company do you hire hire no code engineers. What do you think so. Do you ever do that because I think big companies generally just go really deep on things like yeah. I think about my role as a founder. I'm wearing every like I'm doing the marketing sales and during the customer support I'm writing the code designing the features everything which means I can't go that deep. I can only only go so shallow because if they go too deep in the area neglecting some other important part of the business when I look at a company even looking at a company like stripe from the inside. They're not really doing anything thing. I don't do as a solo founder. They're just doing it with significantly more depth. They can hire specialists who can do the thing that I'm doing way better than I'm doing doing it with way. More attention to detail Google have an engineer who's optimizing like one tiny corner of Youtube for example and if you're GONNA go that deep why they have someone who doesn't know how to Code right why not just hire a specialist you can tweak all the specifics of that thing. I think a lot of the tools people code and people starting these no code businesses are are pretty rough around the edges. You'll get the job done but they're not like the best thing you could build. If you build it custom from scratch I wonder if we'll get lake AAC if the way if these turned into cogen tools because if they turn to cogen tools then you're it's all one and the same right you start with a web flow thing and then you one click export to a rails app on the rails developer can take it from there yeah. You know that seems like the way it'll go. Uh that seems to make sense at the end of the day. I wonder how much it's in any of these like there's so much psychology goes around here where it's like. What are the incentives of web flow loaded that right. If you're a web flow you'll probably won't lock in. It won't be Web web globally the Oracle of this space. Yeah I mean I say that with with the deepest love for are web flow like they will own this space. I mean for a very long for some period. Do not own it but maybe they'll disrupt themselves. Maybe they could be you have to last question. Give me your bold prediction. I know you don't like making predictions these days but you're boulders prediction for how the Indy and e hacker landscape will change in the next five years. My boldest predictions going to be pretty optimistic because I'm hoping to be at least one part of this agent for change but I think we're living in if you examine sort of the market of being in the Akkar living in a time where technology is more available than it's ever been. It's cheaper better than it's ever been. Information is also cheaper more available than it's ever been. There's never been as much written about how to start your own business online. There's never been as much shared like the number of companies but he's a sharing literally their exact playbook how they've done everything in the amount of revenue they're making is staggering when ten years ago you would probably find only a small handful so I think it's becoming easier randy hacker business and it's ever been I was thinking there's lots of platforms bill to support and the actors and then these bootstrap founders including Andy Hackers and there's also a lot of money. Any of people of investors are looking to finance these things and so five years from now. I think we're going to be seeing not only more. We're GONNA. We've seen like more mainstream vacation of this. I wouldn't be shocked if they're college offering degrees for like you know the the Andy acker degree right put on you you know this hat and has had in his hat. Learn these different skills do that right. I wouldn't be surprised if we start to see a shift and also like parents attitudes to their children's career career paths right now. Aw at ruins assumes that you need to go to college degree. That's sort of becoming less popular. I don't think it's going to shift dramatically in five years but like maybe ten fifteen years from now parents parents are more excited to see their kids go to straight into the industry of starting startup says teenagers. You know maybe five years now everyone's like getting their kids on the lambda school and and high school and who knows right so I think the end of the day the fact that it's becoming significantly more popular I wouldn't be shocked that we just see infiltrate the mainstream whereas right now it's not like people we're not talking about bootstrapping. Internet businesses on TV sitcoms really it's kind of like a joke that someone like started somebody in their dorm room and they're going to be the next sector bird but but that's a whole different class of start up we're not seeing as much on the mainstream and people certainly smaller businesses that can sustain their lifestyle but it's such a much more attainable goal for most people and so attractive to be able to start something that gives you your freedom and your ability to work with whoever you want wherever you want whenever you want. I'll be shocked what if it doesn't infiltrate the mainstream infiltrate the mainstream at some point in the near future not open a can of worms but you you mentioned there's more more investors looking to fund these kinds of businesses the number of emails. I get it from investors are like hey. You've got a ton of companies. Did you introduce me to any standout companies insane. There's a lot of people with money would love to to invest in high growth start ups or even just small startups sometimes just for fun because they like the aesthetic of doing it but oftentimes because they think it's going to be lucrative. They're also these new basically weekly accelerators that have cropped up in the past few years including venture capitalists also have like sort of an investment thesis of investing in smaller profit revenue driven in companies before sort of user growth traction driven companies so you've got andy. VCU has been doing this for a number of years. They're more of a traditional. VC firm but there are these is around and revenue generating companies. You've got ernest capital who started by Tyler Trinkaus and his partner who was a guest on the podcast. They're also investing in these smaller businesses with different terms than you would see venture capitalists investing. What's your dividends much or the exact terms of all these different tiny as well. They have their own model all but essentially it's very founder friendly very slow growth friendly. It's not I'm only going to get paid back. If you exit your company for two hundred million dollars or a billion dollars it's like if you just put a long on generating revenue or your current rate and growed by accident five years. That's great for me. Is the investors great for you as well. Pay Me back and we're all happy so I think we'll see a lot more of that coming up. We'll see how it plays out. Who knows how these companies I runs. Are The funds going to turn out but I suspect that they're gonNA find a lot of companies where founders could use the money. If when I was building any hacker someone came up to me and said Hey I'll give you a hundred grand for you to support your lifestyle in San Francisco but if you you know the thing works out and you start generating Revenue Avenue need to pay me back up to five that over the next ten years. I'd say great. That seems perfect. I liked you like those terms. Those terms are cool where you just pay some multiple yeah. I mean there's like a cap yeah. Peter Levels had a pretty cynical. Take on this. I don't know if you saw that but he compared these people who are investing in India hacker businesses to to record old record labels. I'm sure some of that for like that but who's usually there's a diversity judging by what you said. There's a diversity but I saw his tweet about that today and I was like NCAA. I wonder I wonder what the capital I guess. You know the dividend side of things you know. I don't know if I would have viewed as old record labels to me. The thing is when when I think about a record label I think of like I think about almost everything is a business. Nowadays like I think of a musician is a business but there are a business where they're taking care of the product side of things the music and they're I'm trying to outsource the marketing and the sales and like all the distribution and all the other parts of the business and so of course if you outsource that like you know three or four quarters of your business to a record label. They're going to have a pretty onerous terms for Nash right because they're doing a lot of the work..

founder developer MVP Co Akkar NCAA Google VCU Andy acker Andy Hackers Youtube India Oracle Peter Levels Nash lambda school Tyler Trinkaus
"courtland" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"courtland" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"You know what's funny. Is I think one way that I've seen this cultural this time together few things we've talked about. I think that one way this cultural evolution does happen in Games are in competitive environments or certainly in the in the still small world of of mm startups and technology companies in India. Hacker businesses is through this Meta game evolution like like even back back when I play poker like poker is such a small game you know like it's fifty two cards you know one hundred big blinds usually in the same game all the time but the Meta game changed all the time and what I think that says is that it takes us so long as humans to actually explore space confidently confidently and reach the most superior version of that game. I mean you're looking at chess a lot. These days. I'm guessing magnus. Carlsen is significantly better than anybody before him arguably the best chess players ever lived but he has access to supercomputers and like the Meta game now for chest will be playing against the computer studying leading the lines at the computer generates and it's pretty fascinating. I'm a totally new it like but there are certain moves in chess that are named after like sixteenth century monks who originated that move we can like look at them playing this move we still call it by the same name as that monk but there will probably be new moves and new patterns named after people exist today where many centuries went by where there it wasn't that much innovation because there's been such a shift in the Meta game and if you read the book from fifty years ago it was different from one hundred years ago. It was different. It just keeps changing. This is what confuses me about the competition so we are also talking about competition earlier. If the game space of chess remains not yet that fully discovered that says so much about how much greenfield opportunity there is in the universe right and yet some people people like to indulge in the competitive impulses of ourselves like you're talking about you like I mean we can talk about what can competition actually means you know the person to person competition. There's something about person to person competition. That is a fixed sum or zero sum or unlike a non growing pie. You went someone else to lose yeah. I don't know what's the correct competitive framing if you like you say you like competition love. What does that mean gene that means I thrive on competition means that like at a base level I find it entertaining and enjoyable but I also guess in a more productive way and pushed to do more when I know that there's some sort of competitive aspect to for example if I'm growing my podcast and basically like the the darkness of space where it's just me by myself and my podcasts if I go from a thousand dollars a two thousand downloads like will I be happy about that. I have no idea because I don't know if that's quote what unquote good right what I define. As good or bad is entirely subjective. It's entirely relative to what numbers other people are getting and that's kind of what I take satisfaction and it's not necessarily beating being other people or having them feel bad. It's more so knowing that like I don't know I just want some way to assess myself and it's really hard for me to do that. Without some reference point. The reference point is other people. I think that's the nature of competition. Do you think starting a business is in terms of pop culture doing starting a businesses becoming more normalized or is it becoming taboo both at the same time. Actually I think starting a business like being a non business owner and transitioning into the state of having a business is becoming more normalized and isn't really taboo. I think owning a business and especially making lots of money is becoming taboo. Just the political climate that exists is a little bit more classes today day than I would say the United States that I grew up in in the nineties back in the nineties. You could release a movie like Richie rich on right. This kid is rich. It's great and all of the poor kids. WanNa play with the Super Rich Kid and no one cares bats an eye parents secular get to see that movie today that we would probably not fly he would knock the hero. You'll be the de facto villain so I think there's something to be said about like obviously politically. We're just more conscious of wealth. Disparity gradually gone that way over the last twenty years and a lot of that is inherently connected to business because people who owned businesses typically make tremendous amount of money because it's tremendous source of leverage bridge that being said I think the Internet is is incredible. Democratizing force where now the barriers to building your own sort of business are much lower than they ever were right like most of the people who will for example be demonized by the press like Jeff Bezos or Mark Zuckerberg. These people are generally self made billionaires like they didn't then have like billions of dollars passed down to them like Jeff Bezos I believe adopted and like made his fortune from nothing and so it's kind of ironic that we live in a in an age age where it's easier and more democratic for the average person to build something successful than ever was in the past but it's also frowned isn't the age where it was like. I don't know robber barons passing them money to their kids also the agent which business was looked upon as a more noble. How possible is it to build an indie hacker business. Business is a non software engineer these days increasingly possible so I interviewed Ben Tassell. He runs maker pad. He has an anti hacker business. It's very matter the entire businesses devoted to teaching people who don't know how to.

Jeff Bezos business owner chess India Richie rich Carlsen United States Ben Tassell software engineer Mark Zuckerberg one hundred years thousand dollars twenty years fifty years
"courtland" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"courtland" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"First things that I dealt after joining strike. Was this giant directory of products so you could basically say hey. I'm Jeff. I'm working on software engineering daily. Okay let me create a page from my product and the cool time line than a design rican like basically posts updates to your timeline as like this'll be so cool. People had this and it is cool. People do have it and I think it is great but at the time I had no way to connect that to the rest of the site just like a Product Design Faux Pas on my part or people didn't really want to use the directory and browse products and read these updates and I just kind of let it languish for like a year and a half working on other things and then finally maybe four or five months ago found a good way to connect it back to the rest of the website and now it's the fastest go to the website. It's doing really well posting all sorts of updates to their timelines and people are commenting and liking on it. That's milestones the milestones. I've used it exactly people see it was my I can see your staff and if you go back and the older products like some people post ten things act. It works really well. I've got better I think as a product designer overtime at understanding standing like what people want and how they behave but it's definitely been a lot of trial and error to get there which is why didn't that product work initially so if you think about the way that maybe the best way to explain it is by explaining what does work so the milestones feature on any hackers is kind of a leaderboard that says the top of the forum. It's almost pot resets every day and anyone who has a product page. Age Can post a milestone which is sort of an achievement. They've made to their timeline exactly so you might say hey. I just got just reached the million download mark or I just got my the sign up or something are just made my first dollar from paying customer and people love reading the milestones leaderboard and saying Oh. This is a really cool accomplishment. Let me tell this person congratulations or I would ask how they did eggs. I also want to land a sponsor. Whatever the most without any traffic you didn't have incentive for people to post their milestones because there's no automatic distribution. I didn't have the readers yes and so I had people posting they post milestones. There just wasn't like a milestone leaderboard where people could go to read this. He wouldn't have a good way to browse. You'd have to if you wanted to read what somebody was posting to their product page. Go to the product directory search for some product that you like you might say oh. I WANNA find somebody. WHO's working on something in ecommerce making ten thousand thousand dollars a month then it would filter click that you'd have to read their individual updates so most people's updates weren't getting any likes or comments because very few people were doing this now. It doesn't matter who you are. Are All of updates get pipe to a single feed. That feed is visible on the homepage. Everybody bits hackers. We'll see it and now you're posted some degree visibility so I think that was sort sort of a pond my part and I had some good ideas but this is a couple years ago and I think it took me. You know a lot of trial and error and other experiments for really understood how did take these ideas and wrapped them. In a package at the actual user base would like so. There's a lot of stuff that went into that for example. The leaderboard mechanic is really important. That's one of the biggest things I learned from. My attempted redesigning the website to look like twitter. People actually don't want you to have a website. That's very egalitarian. They don't want all the likes and comments almonds to be spread out evenly overall different content. If your stack overflow to go back to that example or maybe even cora that's fine because most of traffic is coming from search. People are sort of doing this job. Searches they see an answer they leave but if you're more of a dedicated community where regulars hang out all the time and at the end of the day the best post need to get the most attention the best milestones milestones.

cora twitter ten thousand thousand dollars five months
"courtland" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"courtland" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"And there's so much advice out there but i thought it could be quite fun to pick up on some of these really common themes and think them in the context of actually what not to do because sometimes it's easier to avoid things and not repeat mistakes than it is to find the perfect solution for you right because we're all working on different things we all have different goals and outcomes in mind so portland. If you're gay we're going to go with this. What not to do and start with first name game yeah yeah. There's a lot to do so i wanted to start with a question that came up in productivity makers <hes> so we recently launched discussions which is a place for folks to start discussions any threat on anything they want and check each other and this idea of good ideas keeps coming up so we have makers who are like. I have thousands of good ideas ideas and i don't know which one to start with. How do i pick which idea to start with from these thousands of great ideas that i have so kirtland over to you first thing not to do and this is sort of a meta point. Don't take advice from people who don't understand your goals or shares goals and so i can sit here and tell you how to an idea or how not come up with a good idea but you need to understand that i'm telling you that from like a very specific perspective where i am an anti hacker and the kind of things and specialized. I don't like how do you take a side project actor an aperture building and get it to profitability so that you can be you know earned some type of freedom as a maker. If you're trying to build the next facebook like probably my advice won't be that that could free like my burst <unk> how you validated idea and come up with a good idea won't work for you and vice versa so i think it's always important you know. Step one to be careful. You're taking the advice trump and try to understand where they're coming from and make sure they understand what your goals are so i i don't blindly. I let you hear this reading the booker blockposts because you might lead you in the wrong direction specifically for ideas a lot of stuff that you shouldn't do when coming up idea. Probably you need look at what your particular issue is so. Let's say you're somebody who has trouble coming up with ideas. Which i think is a very common problem right. You think oh i would love to work on something and i have the time to work on something but i'm just not sure her what to work on. There's a lot of things are probably doing that. Are preventing you from timing a business ideas. The first thing i'll say you probably shouldn't do is create an analogy analogy to what a businesses that is inaccurate so the two analogies that i hear the most we'll stick with one for now is inventions. A lot of people think a business as an invention which is a kind of a useful analogy beezer creating something that might not have existed before they might be valuable to somebody but with analogy goes wrong is an invention needs to be this entirely novel new thing right. You need to get patent on it because no one's ever done it before. Where's the business is really more of a process. A business doesn't have to be completely unique for example if you're a developer and you teach somebody how to code owed and they pay you. That's a business plenty of other people have taught others to code. You're not the first you're not an inventor but you're still a business and i think a lot of people get frustrated and they get really just like blocked by their inability to come up with something that's completely novel and no one's ever come up with before but i think like number one thing..

portland facebook booker developer
"courtland" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"courtland" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"The amount of knowledge being shared on podcasts on twitter on blogs for how to overcome overcome these hurdles at in the past. Were just like completely opaque. You had no idea how to do it. <hes> there's just so much out there to make it easier than ever which means more people than ever are doing so many many more people. It's like really. I don't if i meet somebody who's like. Oh yeah i've got an app. I put it online and make ten k. a month from it. I don't have a job. I mean so many people like that whereas three or four years ago it would have been exceedingly rare. Most people didn't do that. You know that it was possible so i think that's a lot of why indiactors responsible. Why did i get into this because i'm an indie hacker myself. I spent a wile following the traditional startup route so i graduated from college. I started to start up. I got into y combinator. We raise money through them and we never really had a business model. We didn't charge money for anything we just tried to get millions of users and it didn't go very well and i was burned by that experience and then we eventually did when stripe finally went into betas is two thousand eleven. We finally did charge money. Charge five dollars a month for what we were doing and a couple hundred people signed up like right off the bat and so i think back then i was sort of enchanted by this idea that like i don't have to raise money from investors. I don't have to hope that there's some sort of exit opportunity in the future i could build something. Put a price tag on it. Insult people directly and feasibly pay my rent pay my groceries pay my bills that way never ever for anybody else and just be sort of a perpetual self-sustaining maker and just make things. I like and support myself that way so that's always been a dream of mine but the problem is there was never a resource to help me do that right. If you get a tech crunch. There's really not people reading articles about how ought to be anti hacker threatening articles about how to be a high growth silicon valley startup founder which i have nothing against but it's not right for. Everybody and it's not the only path out there in fact it's probably the ah the more rare sort of weird path for trying to start a business to go that route and so and two thousand sixteen. I decided that i was going to create the actors. Here's which would be a website for people who are just like me. People who want to be andy acker he'd been wannabe makers who are generating their own revenue who want the freedom financial freedom them to live where they wanted work on whatever they want with whoever they want at whatever time they want and the actress was born to really help enable that for a lot of people just like me and so the first version many hackers. I was really just interviews. I would find people who are doing what i wanted to be doing and i would ask them. Hey like can you come my website. Let me interview you and by the way you have to share your revenue numbers and almost everybody said no because everyone's like why would i share my number's under random website but a few people who are early adopters said yes and that snowballed n._t. More and more people people think i launched on product on august fourteenth two thousand sixteen and hacking august eleven and that weekend was just it was so big people are so excited. There's a lot of pent up. I think emotion and desire for something like this do exist a lot of people who wanted to do this but it just wasn't all in one place <unk> track down these stories and hunt down people who live this lifestyle and accomplish these goals because it was hard to find him otherwise it didn't get in the mainstream press because they weren't raising money and so i guess any actors really an extension of my own desire and and luckily for me. There's lots of other people like me who are interested in doing the same thing that's incredible. It's funny because <hes> in another episode product radio. I got to speak to jeanette bianchi the founder and z. o. mighty networks and their solution to help anyone they.

founder twitter andy acker jeanette bianchi five dollars four years ten k
"courtland" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"courtland" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"Hunt radio where i'm joined by the founders investors and makers that are shaping the future of tech today. I'm joined by cortlandt allen. He is the founder and c._e._o. Of indie hackers i'm really happy that portland agreed to do something different different with this episode. Try something fun and focus on what not to do as a maker in hackers is a community of people who have successfully pitstop companies found sustainable growth and i thought there'd be a lot to learn from what has learned from his community so get the note pad out because we're going to cover really important topics like what not to do when validating ideas launching a product finding an audience generating generating revenue and we also talk about how to recover from setbacks. This is an episode. You don't wanna miss. It's packed with valuable advice coralline allen. Thank you so much for being on the show today. You are one of my favorite people in the tech world. What am i say founders and i feel feel like i'm speaking on behalf of all of the community when i say you're one of our faith makers really <hes> you are the founder and c._e._o. Of indie hackers which was same famously acquired by stripe just a few years ago for folks who are listening and maybe aren't familiar with india hackers because they've been living under a rock or something. Tell us about what it guess what you do well thanks for such a wonderful interwebbed as he made me feel so special. Hackers is community for makers who are interested in generating rating revenue from their side projects and things that are putting out online so contrast that a little bit from politics which is i think for all makers of any kind. Any hackers is more for entrepreneurship partnership business founder minded makers and so the site consists of a whole bunch of different parts. There's the india's podcast where i will bring makers on to talk about their businesses. Mrs and how they're making money. There are the interviews on the website where we'll interview people overtaxed and we asked everybody to share how much revenue they're making how they came up with their ideas how they got their first customers burgers how they built it etcetera and we've done about four hundred of those interviews and then we've got a community forum right on the homepage so it's full of makers asking each other questions you so. How do you market the side project or how did you find time to take time off your job to build the states that are just practical questions for people to sort of help each other out and help each other build successful fool online businesses. I think it's incredible what india hackers has been able to do one in terms of disseminating knowledge from as you say successful successful revenue generating businesses within the tech space because i know so many people that find value in the meet up in articles..

cortlandt allen india founder portland