32 Burst results for "Cosso"

NRDC's Dr. Vijay Limaye Discusses Measuring the Health-Related Costs of the Climate Crisis

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:35 min | 1 year ago

NRDC's Dr. Vijay Limaye Discusses Measuring the Health-Related Costs of the Climate Crisis

"To the healthcare policy. Podcast i'm the host. David intra cosso with me today to discuss the climate crisis related health. Costs is dr. vj lemay climate and health scientists at the national resources. Defense council center. Dr lemay welcome to the program. Thank you dr maze by is of course posted on the podcast website on background. Twenty twenty set another global warming record this past year tight twenty sixteen as the hottest record year and strikingly warmer than twenty nineteen. For example average temperatures in some parts of the arctic last year were more than six degrees celsius higher than the twenty one thousand nine hundred eighty one to two thousand ten baseline average per no at twenty twenty seven. Us record with twenty two one billion dollar plus climate disasters. The previous record was sixteen and twenty seventeen toiling in some ninety. Five billion dollars in damages are more than double the forty one year average of forty five billion seventy events were linked to hurricanes and tropical storms concerning wildfires california suffered over ten million acres burned more than double the previous record set in twenty eighteen at four million acres adverse health effects caused by climate crisis. Events are on bounce well known for example in two thousand sixteen. The government published the impacts of climate change on human health in the us. And i recently cited lance and twenty twenty countdown on health report that concluded in part quote the world has already warned by one point. Two degrees celsius resulting in profound immediate and worsening health effects close quote nevertheless response. By thorough policymakers. Along with the health care industry remains far beyond inadequate. The best the recent congress recently concluded congress can do as produce a five hundred fifty page climate crisis report that drew no connection between the climate crisis and related effects. Imposed on medicare medicaid beneficiaries. Do likely in part to the fact. That neither med pack or mac. Pack independent gresham commissions given broad authority to address issues affecting. These programs has never addressed much less mentioned the climate crisis with me again to discuss climate crisis related. Health costs is the national resource. Defense counsels dr. vj lemay so at that As background vj. Let me begin by asking. If you can briefly describe the nrdc signed centers work shirt and. Thank you david for the invitation to speak with you and your listeners. I work at nbc. The natural resources defense council we are a profit organization working really to stay guard the earth. it's people plants animals and the natural systems on which we all rely. We combine the power of more than three million at rdc members across the country with the expertise of about seven hundred staffers that scientists like me but also lawyers policy advocates who are working together to protect clean air clean water and the natural systems on which we all depend so i work in the science center at entity see and science release the foundation of our work to protect people in the environment. We worked to understand environmental and human health problems working in interdisciplinary spaces in some of the work that we'll talk about today. In terms of connecting the dots between climate change in house is really the focus of my work. And i just have to say you know this period unprecedented on the scientific enterprise. It's more important than ever that we recognize the value that science brings to society and helping us to confront respond to some of these. Really urgent threats thank you. I appreciate that last point As we are well aware. Let me go to you recently. Published an article To your credit in health affairs Last month last month december issue was a theme issue on the climate crisis. I should say a health affairs polishes. Nineteen eighty-three had never previously addressed. Or excuse me. Nineteen one had never previously addressed this subject So again a -gratulations. Your article with your colleagues was titled estimating the cost of action and the economic benefits of addressing. The health harms of climate. Change But i wanna ask you specifically about that because you wrote in this essay quote unquote. There is currently a knowledge gap that must be addressed for more complete understanding of climate change related exposure response relationship. So explain to me what this knowledge gap is. Sure you know in your setup remarks. You mentioned the huge toll that climate and weather disasters inflicted on the united states last year. About ninety five billion dollars by the federal governments fresh estimate and well that's a staggering number as a health scientist. I'm an epidemiologist. I look at that figure and i wonder what's not included and the truth is that when our federal government is tracking the damage the climate change in reports like the billion dollar disaster list. It's actually not accounting for tremendous profound and sometimes irreversible damage to human house so there is a huge missing component. We think about the continuing and mounting costs of inaction on the climate crisis

Vj Lemay David Intra Defense Council Center Dr Lemay Dr Maze Natural Resources Defense Coun Gresham Commissions Given Broa Congress Arctic United States Lance RDC Medicare Drew
"cosso" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

09:54 min | 1 year ago

"cosso" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

"To the healthcare policy podcast on the host. David intra cosso during this podcast discussed with the union of concerned. Scientists climate energy programs policy director. Dr rachel cletus. What the biden administration needs to address mitigate the effects of the worsening climate crisis. dr cletus. welcome to the program. Hello david thank you so much for having me. dr cletus. bile is of course posted on the podcast website. This is my fifteenth climate crisis related interview on background. The climate catastrophe continues to accelerate hemispheric carbon concentrations are now measured at four hundred seventeen parts per million the greatest concentration of carbon in our species existence. Not surprisingly there's a ninety nine percent chance. Twenty twenty will be among the top five warmest years. Two thirds chance for sixty six percent chance that will be the warmest year on record. This year is also experiencing a record-breaking atlantic hurricane and with thirty named storms to date and record breaking wildfires in the arctic that is warming at upwards of three times the rate of the rest of the planet the albedo effect from the loss of summarized will be equal to the release of one tree tons of carbon equivalents in the atmosphere. This amount approximates forty percent of all human caused ghg emissions. Since seventeen fifty in addition northern permafrost that holds almost twice as much carbon dioxide is currently in the atmosphere his thawing seventy years earlier than previously predicted the plan is also experiencing unprecedented biological violation. Vector-borne diseases including covid nineteen continued to proliferate and the trump administration in denying scientific reality has rescinded approximately one hundred environmental regulations that i discussed with sabin centers. Michael burger last may and finally listeners are where he federal court ruled earlier. This year. that americans do not have a constitutional right to survivable climate. So with that welcome. Dr cletus again were here discuss climate policy under the vitamin station. So before diving into that. A doctor cletus <hes>. Regarding my brief assessment. Is there anything. You'd like to add or alternative. I can i alternatively i can ask the question. The union put out a document a few years ago called the title the world scientists warning to humanity. so if you prefer to answer <hes>. The ladder what was in that warning. I think you've just made out a very thorough set of reality that were tainted with respect to the climate crisis. Things that climatize this morning house project are now actually happening around a severe climate crisis. If you're now it's no longer about some distant problem and it's affecting us here in the united states and around the world you mentioned the record breaking hurricane season we've seen the cocaine season moby seem pretty extraordinary type wounds on the other side of her world with the teams being. Hit back to back. In the last few weeks we've seen extraordinary heatwaves around the world in europe in asia <hes> flooding <hes>. And see living wage which is inexhaustible <hes> continuing slow moving disaster that many low-lying things around the world are facing <hes>. Including as in the us <hes>. Especially in on that. He's been go goes. We're at a point. Now where we are rapidly running out of time to address very new classes and as you pointed out <hes> as well we actually earn a moment for our nation is facing colliding. Place the covid nineteen pandemic as you mentioned <hes> but we also have a rapidly worsening economic crisis. We have a crisis democrats in our country. That is being made there <hes>. In this moment so all of these colliding to creative patrician where underlying social economic disparities than discrimination being exacerbated and a climate crisis is holding a very inequitable way <hes>. Around the world and here in the us so what we do now what the biden administration does and what future us administration to is very very important. The most significant difference. We're going to see is that we now have an administration that recognizes the fines will be guided by the signs and how they respond to the climate crisis instead of an administration that basically lied relentless me about the existence of <hes>. Munchies the climate crisis that even the reality the cova christ who actually worked to make them more worse. So now we have a president who actually five <hes> instead of sidelining them and silence them yes. <hes> thank goodness. I will say <hes>. As had been speculated trump's legacy will probably be moreover his <hes>. Calling the crisis a hoax and of course <hes>. Rescinding these operas of hundred epa mostly epa regulations. Let's get into <hes>. What we might expect from the biden administration. We could start with. I did intend or ask you <hes>. What did the biden campaign pledge to address the climate crisis. But let's let's pass on. That says now he's been elected you wrote <hes>. In a union of concerned scientists blog post. I believe it was dated november seventh <hes>. What the by presi means <hes>. Relative to the climate crisis you identified <hes>. Various aspects are measures that the biden ministrations should take under the title wet. President biden's should do on climate. You could note a few of these relative to what you think would be most productive coming from a biden administration. What's most important for the vitamin that administration to extend a very clear strong and early signal. They're going to take this challenge seriously. They wanna aggressive with all of that. They have so. I know that maybe have pointed out that <hes>. In our democratic took them eighty the actions that the president together with the action congress that will really allow for full <hes>. Aggressing of problems like climate crisis. And no doubt congress. Must say it's hard if we're going to get your <hes>. They should have and comprehensive action. But there's a loss at the biden expiration can and should do on its own and much of that can be done fairly quickly <hes>. Within the first hundred days of the administration taking power one quick forward and simple thing that everyone has been talking about is of course are getting back in the remount of the trump administration on november. four <hes>. The final the us from the of women that is an action that puts us on the sidelines and uniquely isolated on the world stage where the only country that has actually stepped away from the therapy. We need to get back <hes>. An after the responsible major nation of the world i together with other nations to raise invasion around a dozen the global climate crisis. And i miss fans there's no different the covid nineteen pandemic. we can solve the global complex challenges only when the app in concerts that other nations. So that's pretty straightforward <hes>. It's not enough to just get back. In paris agreement we have to borrow <hes>. A with domestic action. That shows that you are gonna take this seriously. We have to set signs and gone goals cutting <hes>. He in mission here in the us. The ipc record and twenty eighteen all down some pretty cure now. Metrics are the growth of the global community would have to meet to stay below two degrees here. Aiming for one point five degrees celsius about pre industrial levels the temperature increase so. She do contribute. Its fair share to that. The us must be on a bad day to get to net zero emissions. No later than twenty for before. I'm have to be well on that. By twenty thirty having our mission show <hes>. By twenty thirty to do that we're going to need action across the economy. Has inspector the biden administration should be directing every federal agency <hes>. To make sure that they're incorporating climate science and their actions that they're looking for opportunities to go cut emissions as the bill climate billions <hes> to the climate impacts that are unfortunately already locked in <hes>. Their action that the administration can take to the deputy voters and regulatory action to cut heat trapping emissions cosby economy. They should do so <hes>. There are a number of very aggressive. Compensation decorative voter that <hes>. Should be giving both back and one thing that <hes> is the has not recognize the now taking these kinds of ambitious actions requires leadership not just from the president but from his gatherer competitive agency. You'll be watching me. What appointments look like we need to have people in charge of these agencies and appointed to cabinet positions that recognize how climate change touch with every aspect of our economy and our lives and there needs to be david into their world view.

biden administration biden David intra cosso Dr rachel cletus united states president policy analyst Twenty twenty Michael burger dc dr cletus. bile trump dr cletus. epa cocaine director europe
Union of Concerned Scientists' Dr. Rachel Cleetus Discusses What the Biden Administration Needs to Do to Address the Climate Catastrophe

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

09:54 min | 1 year ago

Union of Concerned Scientists' Dr. Rachel Cleetus Discusses What the Biden Administration Needs to Do to Address the Climate Catastrophe

"To the healthcare policy podcast on the host. David intra cosso during this podcast discussed with the union of concerned. Scientists climate energy programs policy director. Dr rachel cletus. What the biden administration needs to address mitigate the effects of the worsening climate crisis. dr cletus. welcome to the program. Hello david thank you so much for having me. dr cletus. bile is of course posted on the podcast website. This is my fifteenth climate crisis related interview on background. The climate catastrophe continues to accelerate hemispheric carbon concentrations are now measured at four hundred seventeen parts per million the greatest concentration of carbon in our species existence. Not surprisingly there's a ninety nine percent chance. Twenty twenty will be among the top five warmest years. Two thirds chance for sixty six percent chance that will be the warmest year on record. This year is also experiencing a record-breaking atlantic hurricane and with thirty named storms to date and record breaking wildfires in the arctic that is warming at upwards of three times the rate of the rest of the planet the albedo effect from the loss of summarized will be equal to the release of one tree tons of carbon equivalents in the atmosphere. This amount approximates forty percent of all human caused ghg emissions. Since seventeen fifty in addition northern permafrost that holds almost twice as much carbon dioxide is currently in the atmosphere his thawing seventy years earlier than previously predicted the plan is also experiencing unprecedented biological violation. Vector-borne diseases including covid nineteen continued to proliferate and the trump administration in denying scientific reality has rescinded approximately one hundred environmental regulations that i discussed with sabin centers. Michael burger last may and finally listeners are where he federal court ruled earlier. This year. that americans do not have a constitutional right to survivable climate. So with that welcome. Dr cletus again were here discuss climate policy under the vitamin station. So before diving into that. A doctor cletus Regarding my brief assessment. Is there anything. You'd like to add or alternative. I can i alternatively i can ask the question. The union put out a document a few years ago called the title the world scientists warning to humanity. so if you prefer to answer The ladder what was in that warning. I think you've just made out a very thorough set of reality that were tainted with respect to the climate crisis. Things that climatize this morning house project are now actually happening around a severe climate crisis. If you're now it's no longer about some distant problem and it's affecting us here in the united states and around the world you mentioned the record breaking hurricane season we've seen the cocaine season moby seem pretty extraordinary type wounds on the other side of her world with the teams being. Hit back to back. In the last few weeks we've seen extraordinary heatwaves around the world in europe in asia flooding And see living wage which is inexhaustible continuing slow moving disaster that many low-lying things around the world are facing Including as in the us Especially in on that. He's been go goes. We're at a point. Now where we are rapidly running out of time to address very new classes and as you pointed out as well we actually earn a moment for our nation is facing colliding. Place the covid nineteen pandemic as you mentioned but we also have a rapidly worsening economic crisis. We have a crisis democrats in our country. That is being made there In this moment so all of these colliding to creative patrician where underlying social economic disparities than discrimination being exacerbated and a climate crisis is holding a very inequitable way Around the world and here in the us so what we do now what the biden administration does and what future us administration to is very very important. The most significant difference. We're going to see is that we now have an administration that recognizes the fines will be guided by the signs and how they respond to the climate crisis instead of an administration that basically lied relentless me about the existence of Munchies the climate crisis that even the reality the cova christ who actually worked to make them more worse. So now we have a president who actually five instead of sidelining them and silence them yes. thank goodness. I will say As had been speculated trump's legacy will probably be moreover his Calling the crisis a hoax and of course Rescinding these operas of hundred epa mostly epa regulations. Let's get into What we might expect from the biden administration. We could start with. I did intend or ask you What did the biden campaign pledge to address the climate crisis. But let's let's pass on. That says now he's been elected you wrote In a union of concerned scientists blog post. I believe it was dated november seventh What the by presi means Relative to the climate crisis you identified Various aspects are measures that the biden ministrations should take under the title wet. President biden's should do on climate. You could note a few of these relative to what you think would be most productive coming from a biden administration. What's most important for the vitamin that administration to extend a very clear strong and early signal. They're going to take this challenge seriously. They wanna aggressive with all of that. They have so. I know that maybe have pointed out that In our democratic took them eighty the actions that the president together with the action congress that will really allow for full Aggressing of problems like climate crisis. And no doubt congress. Must say it's hard if we're going to get your They should have and comprehensive action. But there's a loss at the biden expiration can and should do on its own and much of that can be done fairly quickly Within the first hundred days of the administration taking power one quick forward and simple thing that everyone has been talking about is of course are getting back in the remount of the trump administration on november. four The final the us from the of women that is an action that puts us on the sidelines and uniquely isolated on the world stage where the only country that has actually stepped away from the therapy. We need to get back An after the responsible major nation of the world i together with other nations to raise invasion around a dozen the global climate crisis. And i miss fans there's no different the covid nineteen pandemic. we can solve the global complex challenges only when the app in concerts that other nations. So that's pretty straightforward It's not enough to just get back. In paris agreement we have to borrow A with domestic action. That shows that you are gonna take this seriously. We have to set signs and gone goals cutting He in mission here in the us. The ipc record and twenty eighteen all down some pretty cure now. Metrics are the growth of the global community would have to meet to stay below two degrees here. Aiming for one point five degrees celsius about pre industrial levels the temperature increase so. She do contribute. Its fair share to that. The us must be on a bad day to get to net zero emissions. No later than twenty for before. I'm have to be well on that. By twenty thirty having our mission show By twenty thirty to do that we're going to need action across the economy. Has inspector the biden administration should be directing every federal agency To make sure that they're incorporating climate science and their actions that they're looking for opportunities to go cut emissions as the bill climate billions to the climate impacts that are unfortunately already locked in Their action that the administration can take to the deputy voters and regulatory action to cut heat trapping emissions cosby economy. They should do so There are a number of very aggressive. Compensation decorative voter that Should be giving both back and one thing that is the has not recognize the now taking these kinds of ambitious actions requires leadership not just from the president but from his gatherer competitive agency. You'll be watching me. What appointments look like we need to have people in charge of these agencies and appointed to cabinet positions that recognize how climate change touch with every aspect of our economy and our lives and there needs to be david into their world view.

Biden Administration Dr Cletus Trump Administration David Intra Union Of Concerned Dr Rachel Cletus Biden Atlantic Hurricane Michael Burger Us Administration Cletus United States Sabin Arctic EPA
Caleb Barlow Discusses Healthcare Industry Ransomware Attacks and Measures to Prevent Cybercrimes

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

06:36 min | 1 year ago

Caleb Barlow Discusses Healthcare Industry Ransomware Attacks and Measures to Prevent Cybercrimes

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host David Intra Cosso. This podcast discussed cybercrime or ransomware attacks against hospitals and other healthcare providers with Collab- Barlow CEO Synergistic Tech this barlow welcome to the program. Hey pleasure to be here. David. Mr Biles vile is, of course, posted on the podcast website. On background computer or cybercrimes against healthcare providers, more of a hospitals, disabled computer networks holding them for ransom. Frequently for Bitcoin fee, the tax have been prevalent since at least two, thousand and ten. This past month however, universal health services with over four hundred locations. Over in the US suffered a cyber attack disabling it's company wide computer network causing some it's hospitals to revert to pen and paper recordkeeping also last month the first known death. Resulted from a ransomware attack in Germany when a patient did not survive transferred to another hospital. Though a twenty nineteen hhs report found between twenty, twelve and sixteen. Hospital deaths increased after ransomware attacks. Earlier this month covid nineteen VACs. A covid nineteen vaccine trial was delayed by more attack or at least one. Likely. The most costly ransomware attack was to the UK's national health service in seventeen that amounted to an estimated one, hundred, twenty, million in it costs and lost productivity. ransomware attacks are on the increase especially amongst small hospitals, particularly vulnerable to phishing attacks, lasting upwards of tumor weeks because of their lean or inadequate security support. As Josephine Wolf noted in October Seventeen New York Times editorial quote Unquote cybersecurity shortcomings in the healthcare sector needs to be addressed now. More than ever when medical care is increasingly being offered via remote online formats. In twenty twenty states introduced more than two hundred and eighty cybersecurity related bills enacting several related to task forces or commissions training. Cybersecurity insurance in criminal. Penalties. The US Senate and House passed seven cybersecurity bills whoever not specifically addressed the healthcare industry and none became law. With me again and discuss healthcare cybersecurity is synergise texts, CEO. COLLAB- Barlow so club with that. As background LET'S START WITH A. Primer Info. I've read these ransomware products. in part are. Titled or named Wannacry Laki Win Plock encrypt locker. Are some these known ransomware product. So my question is, how do these encrypt clinical data and to what effect? So. So basically, what happening if you look at ransomware incident is a you know a narrow will gets access to a network and that could be as simple as grabbing somebody's credentials. You know maybe you were on a retail site, use the same credentials you used at work that retail site was compromised and There are many locations on the dark web that will. Sell compromised credentials or could have been through a phishing attack once the bad guy is into the network then there's two primary things that they're looking to do first is to move laterally. They WANNA get as much access across the networks they can, and there are a variety of tools that they'll deploy. They will actually help them harvest additional credentials once they've got a beachhead. On, the network in addition to harvesting new credentials and kind of moving lateral or what we call lateral movement. The other thing that are going to do is to try to elevate their privilege. So going from maybe an administrator or you know a nurse and triage and maybe getting access to their credentials, they're going to try to work their way up to a network. Administrator or someone that controls access to the whole domain once they've been able to get in and move their tentacles around the organization, then they're going to deploy their payroll, which is one of several of the tools that you mentioned will allow them to then lock things up effectively what these tools, our cryptographic tools, and they basically take the entire hard drive at the device. Scramble it and lock it up with a cryptographic key. What we've seen of late is the bad guys oftentimes insert a new step just before scrambling data, locking it all up in that the exfiltrated lot of it, and they're using that to increase their chances of getting paid by potentially threatening to. The organization by releasing that data if they don't pay ransom. Okay. Thank you so. I in my reading. It's uncertain Saul. Asked you this question? What's your understanding? How frequently? Is this occurring in the healthcare sector? Oh, it's every day I mean literally every single day because you got to remember what you read about in the news is only a very small fraction of what's actually going on even though technically speaking ransomware incident is as far as I'm concerned reportable incident because you gotta remember if the bad guy had enough access to walk up your data, they had the same level of access needed to read the data and they actually in many cases had the same level access needed to change the data. So the problem is you've actually lost control of that system when you've had a ransomware incident. I. So that was that was a question I did have. Other than. Possibly, making this data public and you know healthcare data's is is is confidential proprietary, of course. What do they typically do this data other than hold it hostage? Well remember, this is a organized crime. It is a volume organization you're dealing with a human on the other end and that human is organized right. You're not the only target, their targeting dozens of organizations at the same time in many cases are teams of thirty individuals and you know there's a breakdown on that team there's a project manager of a boss. There's people that are responsible for getting access. There's people that are responsible for moving laterally people responsible for elevating credentials and people are responsible for negotiating. Once walked up system

Mr Biles Josephine Wolf Seventeen New York Times Wannacry Laki Bitcoin Barlow National Health Service HHS Collab Us Senate Tumor Germany David UK United States House Saul
"cosso" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

07:29 min | 1 year ago

"cosso" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

"To the healthcare policy podcast on the host. . David. . Intra Cosso. . During this podcast saw discussed efforts to address social determinants of health with John Gorman chairman of the nightingale partners and founder and former Executive Chairman of Gorman Health Group. . John Welcome to the program. . Thanks David. . Great to be here. . especially with another native DC guy here most welcome John's by is, , of course, , posted on the podcast website. . Briefly on background, , the ongoing covid nineteen pandemic has exposed. . The country's failed to adequately address the social determinants of health. . Generally defining health access and quality education, , economic circumstances, , food security, , social conditions, , and environmental factors. . It is estimated that where people live work and socialize determines as much as sixty percent of their health status. . Whereas formal medical care accounts for just ten percent. . For example concerning. . Circumstances forty years of wage stagnation among lower income earners has left forty five percent of working age Americans. . With either no health care insurance for insurance without a pocket expenses so high. . They avoid sinking care went for example, , they developed covid nineteen related symptoms. . Healthcare policy makers have slowly begun to take an interest in addressing sto ages as a way to improve health delivery by increasing increasing appropriate utilization and reducing costs. . For example, , Medicare, , advantage plans which enroll more than one third of all Medicare beneficiaries have recently been given regulatory authority to offer Ma benificiary supplemental benefits beyond medical care such as mail deliveries, , home modifications, , and Personal Care Services. . With beginning, discuss, , , addressing, , social determine, , specifically use of what are termed opportunities zones. . Again. . John Gorman. . So Jon with that as background. . Louis. . Begin by asking if you could provide a brief overview of nightingale. . Sure David Nangle partners is one of these weird opportunities zone funds that came out of trump's big tax giveaway bill <hes>. . It was actually <hes> Cory Booker's program that was designed to <hes> encourage investment in real estate and disadvantaged communities and <hes> I was sitting on my ass retired last spring and <hes> got a notification that the irs had just completely revamped the rags to allow opportunities own capital to be used not just for real estate investment. . But also for leases one portly for working capital or for meeting the business requirements of a new company inside one of the nine thousand roughly nine thousand opportunities zones around the country and those opportunities owns David are all. . Severely, , economically disadvantaged and more importantly medically underserved, , and because the irs allowed now opportunities own capital to be used for working capital for meeting business requirements. . That's what opened the door to allow us to use opportunities on Capitol to make large scale investments in social determinants of health intervention. . So <hes> nightingale partners with insurers with health systems with large medical groups to finance design <hes> launch, , and where necessary <hes> execute on our goals to improve. . The quality of care for vulnerable populations. In . this country, , a lot of people <hes> like to say and I love it that we packed a Republican billionaire tax shelter in order to improve care for black drought people on that gets me up every morning. . Sir Thank you. . So this as you noted, , this was a provision in the December seventeen tax bill. . Specifically <hes> page one, , hundred, , and thirty. . This was picked up this previous legislation as you noted, , <hes> that as you mentioned <hes> senator from New Jersey Cory Booker but also the South Carolina African American Republican, , the only one Tim Scott. . So <hes> <hes> this is picked up in the tax bill previous legislation and you mentioned the nine thousand. . So these are census tracts that meet this low income community criteria wrote <hes>, , and then explain to me. . Governors than have to select a discrete number. . That could benefit from this. . Tax Advantage program is that correct doubts correct and there was a little bit of mischief but some of the governors in the designation of some of those areas and there's been, , you know some gamesmanship with this story like you know Chris Christie, , the former governor of New Jersey is. . Used an opportunity zone fund open up frigging LAUNDROMAT. . In Asbury, , Park with Bruce, , springsteen cats not the kind of stuff that we do. . I'm not surprised to hear that I guess <hes> the former governor is a is obsessed with. . <hes> Mr Asbury Park <hes> and again just so on. . Understand better more clearly, , this is the tax advantage here is that by investing the capital gains on your investment, , you can avoid paying the. . Twenty three percent the capital gains tax and that basically. . Sure go ahead, , go ahead. . Well, basically, , , the way it works is that if you invest money or capital gains in and opportunities zone and you leave it in for at least ten years, , not only is the initial investment completely tax free but then all of the proceeds that you make on that investment are completely tax free. . So high net worth individuals. . And family offices large corporations the generate large amounts of capital gains love this program, , and indeed it opened up about six point two trillion dollars in available capital <hes> based on the amount of capital gains that we generate in our economy. So . <hes> of that amount, , David Roughly <hes> a hundred billion dollars has been invested thus far <hes> into opportunities zones off. . The roughly eight months programs operate. . And again, , the idea is the long leave the money and means completely tax free for ten years out of step seven years you pay are you're eighty five percent excuse but I know that that number surprises me would you say this this this one, , hundred, , billion, , his far more than was estimated when the legislation was passed. . No I think it's probably rolling out slower than <hes>. . A lot of folks had hoped <hes>, , and as you can imagine, the , vast majority of those deals that have been done thus far has been around real estate and real estate redevelopment <hes> certainly in the healthcare sector I think we're still the only firm out here. . That's a healthcare focus opportunities on fund <hes> it. . You know it we've been the only ones to my knowledge. . So we're you know we're granted here, , but we have yet even break a billion, , but we're that's our goal. .

John Gorman David David Cosso Gorman Health Group policy analyst David Nangle Cory Booker chairman Medicare Louis Personal Care Services Executive Chairman trump Jon irs
John Gorman Discusses the Use of Opportunity Zones to Address Social Determinants

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

07:29 min | 1 year ago

John Gorman Discusses the Use of Opportunity Zones to Address Social Determinants

"To the healthcare policy podcast on the host. David. Intra Cosso. During this podcast saw discussed efforts to address social determinants of health with John Gorman chairman of the nightingale partners and founder and former Executive Chairman of Gorman Health Group. John Welcome to the program. Thanks David. Great to be here. especially with another native DC guy here most welcome John's by is, of course, posted on the podcast website. Briefly on background, the ongoing covid nineteen pandemic has exposed. The country's failed to adequately address the social determinants of health. Generally defining health access and quality education, economic circumstances, food security, social conditions, and environmental factors. It is estimated that where people live work and socialize determines as much as sixty percent of their health status. Whereas formal medical care accounts for just ten percent. For example concerning. Circumstances forty years of wage stagnation among lower income earners has left forty five percent of working age Americans. With either no health care insurance for insurance without a pocket expenses so high. They avoid sinking care went for example, they developed covid nineteen related symptoms. Healthcare policy makers have slowly begun to take an interest in addressing sto ages as a way to improve health delivery by increasing increasing appropriate utilization and reducing costs. For example, Medicare, advantage plans which enroll more than one third of all Medicare beneficiaries have recently been given regulatory authority to offer Ma benificiary supplemental benefits beyond medical care such as mail deliveries, home modifications, and Personal Care Services. With beginning, discuss, addressing, social determine, specifically use of what are termed opportunities zones. Again. John Gorman. So Jon with that as background. Louis. Begin by asking if you could provide a brief overview of nightingale. Sure David Nangle partners is one of these weird opportunities zone funds that came out of trump's big tax giveaway bill It was actually Cory Booker's program that was designed to encourage investment in real estate and disadvantaged communities and I was sitting on my ass retired last spring and got a notification that the irs had just completely revamped the rags to allow opportunities own capital to be used not just for real estate investment. But also for leases one portly for working capital or for meeting the business requirements of a new company inside one of the nine thousand roughly nine thousand opportunities zones around the country and those opportunities owns David are all. Severely, economically disadvantaged and more importantly medically underserved, and because the irs allowed now opportunities own capital to be used for working capital for meeting business requirements. That's what opened the door to allow us to use opportunities on Capitol to make large scale investments in social determinants of health intervention. So nightingale partners with insurers with health systems with large medical groups to finance design launch, and where necessary execute on our goals to improve. The quality of care for vulnerable populations. In this country, a lot of people like to say and I love it that we packed a Republican billionaire tax shelter in order to improve care for black drought people on that gets me up every morning. Sir Thank you. So this as you noted, this was a provision in the December seventeen tax bill. Specifically page one, hundred, and thirty. This was picked up this previous legislation as you noted, that as you mentioned senator from New Jersey Cory Booker but also the South Carolina African American Republican, the only one Tim Scott. So this is picked up in the tax bill previous legislation and you mentioned the nine thousand. So these are census tracts that meet this low income community criteria wrote and then explain to me. Governors than have to select a discrete number. That could benefit from this. Tax Advantage program is that correct doubts correct and there was a little bit of mischief but some of the governors in the designation of some of those areas and there's been, you know some gamesmanship with this story like you know Chris Christie, the former governor of New Jersey is. Used an opportunity zone fund open up frigging LAUNDROMAT. In Asbury, Park with Bruce, springsteen cats not the kind of stuff that we do. I'm not surprised to hear that I guess the former governor is a is obsessed with. Mr Asbury Park and again just so on. Understand better more clearly, this is the tax advantage here is that by investing the capital gains on your investment, you can avoid paying the. Twenty three percent the capital gains tax and that basically. Sure go ahead, go ahead. Well, basically, the way it works is that if you invest money or capital gains in and opportunities zone and you leave it in for at least ten years, not only is the initial investment completely tax free but then all of the proceeds that you make on that investment are completely tax free. So high net worth individuals. And family offices large corporations the generate large amounts of capital gains love this program, and indeed it opened up about six point two trillion dollars in available capital based on the amount of capital gains that we generate in our economy. So of that amount, David Roughly a hundred billion dollars has been invested thus far into opportunities zones off. The roughly eight months programs operate. And again, the idea is the long leave the money and means completely tax free for ten years out of step seven years you pay are you're eighty five percent excuse but I know that that number surprises me would you say this this this one, hundred, billion, his far more than was estimated when the legislation was passed. No I think it's probably rolling out slower than A lot of folks had hoped and as you can imagine, the vast majority of those deals that have been done thus far has been around real estate and real estate redevelopment certainly in the healthcare sector I think we're still the only firm out here. That's a healthcare focus opportunities on fund it. You know it we've been the only ones to my knowledge. So we're you know we're granted here, but we have yet even break a billion, but we're that's our goal.

David Nangle John Gorman Cory Booker Gorman Health Group IRS New Jersey Chairman Mr Asbury Park Chris Christie Executive Chairman Personal Care Services Medicare JON
"cosso" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"cosso" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

"During this podcast saw discussed efforts to address social determinants of health with John Gorman chairman of the nightingale partners and founder and former Executive Chairman of Gorman Health Group. . John Welcome to the program. . Thanks David. . Great to be here. . especially with another native DC guy here most welcome John's by is, , of course, , posted on the podcast website. . Briefly on background, , the ongoing covid nineteen pandemic has exposed. . The country's failed to adequately address the social determinants of health. . Generally defining health access and quality education, , economic circumstances, , food security, , social conditions, , and environmental factors. . It is estimated that where people live work and socialize determines as much as sixty percent of their health status. . Whereas formal medical care accounts for just ten percent. . For example concerning. . Circumstances forty years of wage stagnation among lower income earners has left forty five percent of working age Americans. . With either no health care insurance for insurance without a pocket expenses so high. . They avoid sinking care went for example, , they developed covid nineteen related symptoms. . Healthcare policy makers have slowly begun to take an interest in addressing sto ages as a way to improve health delivery by increasing increasing appropriate utilization and reducing costs. . For example, , Medicare, , advantage plans which enroll more than one third of all Medicare beneficiaries have recently been given regulatory authority to offer Ma benificiary supplemental benefits beyond medical care such as mail deliveries, , home modifications, , and Personal Care Services. . With beginning, discuss, , , addressing, , social determine, , specifically use of what are termed opportunities zones. . Again. . John Gorman. . So Jon with that as background. . Louis. . Begin by asking if you could provide a brief overview of nightingale. . Sure David Nangle partners is one of these weird opportunities zone funds that came out of trump's big tax giveaway bill <hes>. . It was actually <hes> Cory Booker's program that was designed to <hes> encourage investment in real estate and disadvantaged communities and <hes> I was sitting on my ass retired last spring and <hes> got a notification that the irs had just completely revamped the rags to allow opportunities own capital to be used not just for real estate investment. . But also for leases one portly for working capital or for meeting the business requirements of a new company inside one of the nine thousand roughly nine thousand opportunities zones around the country and those opportunities owns David are all. . Severely, , economically disadvantaged and more importantly medically underserved, , and because the irs allowed now opportunities own capital to be used for working capital for meeting business requirements. . That's what opened the door to allow us to use opportunities on Capitol to make large scale investments in social determinants of health intervention. . So <hes> nightingale partners with insurers with health systems with large medical groups to finance design <hes> launch, , and where necessary <hes> execute on our goals to improve. . The quality of care for vulnerable populations. In . this country, , a lot of people <hes> like to say and I love it that we packed a Republican billionaire tax shelter in order to improve care for black drought people on that gets me up every morning. . Sir Thank you. . So this as you noted, , this was a provision in the December seventeen tax bill. . Specifically <hes> page one, , hundred, , and thirty. . This was picked up this previous legislation as you noted, , <hes> that as you mentioned <hes> senator from New Jersey Cory Booker but also the South Carolina African American Republican, , the only one Tim Scott. . So <hes> <hes> this is picked up in the tax bill previous legislation and you mentioned the nine thousand. . So these are census tracts that meet this low income community criteria wrote <hes>, , and then explain to me. . Governors than have to select a discrete number. . That could benefit from this. . Tax Advantage program is that correct doubts correct and there was a little bit of mischief but some of the governors in the designation of some of those areas and there's been, , you know some gamesmanship with this story like you know Chris Christie, , the former governor of New Jersey is. . Used an opportunity zone fund open up frigging LAUNDROMAT. . In Asbury, , Park with Bruce, , springsteen cats not the kind of stuff that we do. . I'm not surprised to hear that I guess <hes> the former governor is a is obsessed with. . <hes> Mr Asbury Park <hes> and again just so on. . Understand better more clearly, , this is the tax advantage here is that by investing the capital gains on your investment, , you can avoid paying the. . Twenty three percent the capital gains tax and that basically. . Sure go ahead, , go ahead. . Well, basically, , , the way it works is that if you invest money or capital gains in and opportunities zone and you leave it in for at least ten years, , not only is the initial investment completely tax free but then all of the proceeds that you make on that investment are completely tax free. . So high net worth individuals. . And family offices large corporations the generate large amounts of capital gains love this program, , and indeed it opened up about six point two trillion dollars in available capital <hes> based on the amount of capital gains that we generate in our economy. So . <hes> of that amount, , David Roughly <hes> a hundred billion dollars has been invested thus far <hes> into opportunities zones off. . The roughly eight months programs operate. .

John Gorman David David Cosso Gorman Health Group policy analyst David Nangle Cory Booker chairman Medicare Louis Personal Care Services Executive Chairman trump Jon irs
"cosso" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

06:36 min | 1 year ago

"cosso" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host. . David. . Intra Cosso. . During this podcast saw discussed efforts to address social determinants of health with John Gorman chairman of the nightingale partners and founder and former Executive Chairman of Gorman Health Group. . John Welcome to the program. . Thanks David. . Great to be here. . especially with another native DC guy here most welcome John's by is, , of course, , posted on the podcast website. . Briefly on background, , the ongoing covid nineteen pandemic has exposed. . The country's failed to adequately address the social determinants of health. . Generally defining health access and quality education, , economic circumstances, , food security, , social conditions, , and environmental factors. . It is estimated that where people live work and socialize determines as much as sixty percent of their health status. . Whereas formal medical care accounts for just ten percent. . For example concerning. . Circumstances forty years of wage stagnation among lower income earners has left forty five percent of working age Americans. . With either no health care insurance for insurance without a pocket expenses so high. . They avoid sinking care went for example, , they developed covid nineteen related symptoms. . Healthcare policy makers have slowly begun to take an interest in addressing sto ages as a way to improve health delivery by increasing increasing appropriate utilization and reducing costs. . For example, , Medicare, , advantage plans which enroll more than one third of all Medicare beneficiaries have recently been given regulatory authority to offer Ma benificiary supplemental benefits beyond medical care such as mail deliveries, , home modifications, , and Personal Care Services. . With beginning, discuss, , , addressing, , social determine, , specifically use of what are termed opportunities zones. . Again. . John Gorman. . So Jon with that as background. . Louis. . Begin by asking if you could provide a brief overview of nightingale. . Sure David Nangle partners is one of these weird opportunities zone funds that came out of trump's big tax giveaway bill <hes>. . It was actually <hes> Cory Booker's program that was designed to <hes> encourage investment in real estate and disadvantaged communities and <hes> I was sitting on my ass retired last spring and <hes> got a notification that the irs had just completely revamped the rags to allow opportunities own capital to be used not just for real estate investment. . But also for leases one portly for working capital or for meeting the business requirements of a new company inside one of the nine thousand roughly nine thousand opportunities zones around the country and those opportunities owns David are all. . Severely, , economically disadvantaged and more importantly medically underserved, , and because the irs allowed now opportunities own capital to be used for working capital for meeting business requirements. . That's what opened the door to allow us to use opportunities on Capitol to make large scale investments in social determinants of health intervention. . So <hes> nightingale partners with insurers with health systems with large medical groups to finance design <hes> launch, , and where necessary <hes> execute on our goals to improve. . The quality of care for vulnerable populations. In . this country, , a lot of people <hes> like to say and I love it that we packed a Republican billionaire tax shelter in order to improve care for black drought people on that gets me up every morning. . Sir Thank you. . So this as you noted, , this was a provision in the December seventeen tax bill. . Specifically <hes> page one, , hundred, , and thirty. . This was picked up this previous legislation as you noted, , <hes> that as you mentioned <hes> senator from New Jersey Cory Booker but also the South Carolina African American Republican, , the only one Tim Scott. . So <hes> <hes> this is picked up in the tax bill previous legislation and you mentioned the nine thousand. . So these are census tracts that meet this low income community criteria wrote <hes>, , and then explain to me. . Governors than have to select a discrete number. . That could benefit from this. . Tax Advantage program is that correct doubts correct and there was a little bit of mischief but some of the governors in the designation of some of those areas and there's been, , you know some gamesmanship with this story like you know Chris Christie, , the former governor of New Jersey is. . Used an opportunity zone fund open up frigging LAUNDROMAT. . In Asbury, , Park with Bruce, , springsteen cats not the kind of stuff that we do. . I'm not surprised to hear that I guess <hes> the former governor is a is obsessed with. . <hes> Mr Asbury Park <hes> and again just so on. . Understand better more clearly, , this is the tax advantage here is that by investing the capital gains on your investment, , you can avoid paying the. . Twenty three percent the capital gains tax and that basically. . Sure go ahead, , go ahead. . Well, basically, , , the way it works is that if you invest money or capital gains in and opportunities zone and you leave it in for at least ten years, , not only is the initial investment completely tax free but then all of the proceeds that you make on that investment are completely tax free. . So high net worth individuals. . And family offices large corporations the generate large amounts of capital gains love this program, , and indeed it opened up about six point two trillion dollars in available capital <hes> based on the amount of capital gains that we generate in our economy. So . <hes> of that amount, , David Roughly <hes> a hundred billion dollars has been invested thus far <hes> into opportunities zones off. . The roughly eight months programs operate. .

John Gorman David David Cosso Gorman Health Group policy analyst David Nangle Cory Booker chairman Medicare Louis Personal Care Services Executive Chairman trump Jon irs
John Gorman Discusses the Use of Opportunity Zones to Address Social Determinants

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

06:36 min | 1 year ago

John Gorman Discusses the Use of Opportunity Zones to Address Social Determinants

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host. David. Intra Cosso. During this podcast saw discussed efforts to address social determinants of health with John Gorman chairman of the nightingale partners and founder and former Executive Chairman of Gorman Health Group. John Welcome to the program. Thanks David. Great to be here. especially with another native DC guy here most welcome John's by is, of course, posted on the podcast website. Briefly on background, the ongoing covid nineteen pandemic has exposed. The country's failed to adequately address the social determinants of health. Generally defining health access and quality education, economic circumstances, food security, social conditions, and environmental factors. It is estimated that where people live work and socialize determines as much as sixty percent of their health status. Whereas formal medical care accounts for just ten percent. For example concerning. Circumstances forty years of wage stagnation among lower income earners has left forty five percent of working age Americans. With either no health care insurance for insurance without a pocket expenses so high. They avoid sinking care went for example, they developed covid nineteen related symptoms. Healthcare policy makers have slowly begun to take an interest in addressing sto ages as a way to improve health delivery by increasing increasing appropriate utilization and reducing costs. For example, Medicare, advantage plans which enroll more than one third of all Medicare beneficiaries have recently been given regulatory authority to offer Ma benificiary supplemental benefits beyond medical care such as mail deliveries, home modifications, and Personal Care Services. With beginning, discuss, addressing, social determine, specifically use of what are termed opportunities zones. Again. John Gorman. So Jon with that as background. Louis. Begin by asking if you could provide a brief overview of nightingale. Sure David Nangle partners is one of these weird opportunities zone funds that came out of trump's big tax giveaway bill It was actually Cory Booker's program that was designed to encourage investment in real estate and disadvantaged communities and I was sitting on my ass retired last spring and got a notification that the irs had just completely revamped the rags to allow opportunities own capital to be used not just for real estate investment. But also for leases one portly for working capital or for meeting the business requirements of a new company inside one of the nine thousand roughly nine thousand opportunities zones around the country and those opportunities owns David are all. Severely, economically disadvantaged and more importantly medically underserved, and because the irs allowed now opportunities own capital to be used for working capital for meeting business requirements. That's what opened the door to allow us to use opportunities on Capitol to make large scale investments in social determinants of health intervention. So nightingale partners with insurers with health systems with large medical groups to finance design launch, and where necessary execute on our goals to improve. The quality of care for vulnerable populations. In this country, a lot of people like to say and I love it that we packed a Republican billionaire tax shelter in order to improve care for black drought people on that gets me up every morning. Sir Thank you. So this as you noted, this was a provision in the December seventeen tax bill. Specifically page one, hundred, and thirty. This was picked up this previous legislation as you noted, that as you mentioned senator from New Jersey Cory Booker but also the South Carolina African American Republican, the only one Tim Scott. So this is picked up in the tax bill previous legislation and you mentioned the nine thousand. So these are census tracts that meet this low income community criteria wrote and then explain to me. Governors than have to select a discrete number. That could benefit from this. Tax Advantage program is that correct doubts correct and there was a little bit of mischief but some of the governors in the designation of some of those areas and there's been, you know some gamesmanship with this story like you know Chris Christie, the former governor of New Jersey is. Used an opportunity zone fund open up frigging LAUNDROMAT. In Asbury, Park with Bruce, springsteen cats not the kind of stuff that we do. I'm not surprised to hear that I guess the former governor is a is obsessed with. Mr Asbury Park and again just so on. Understand better more clearly, this is the tax advantage here is that by investing the capital gains on your investment, you can avoid paying the. Twenty three percent the capital gains tax and that basically. Sure go ahead, go ahead. Well, basically, the way it works is that if you invest money or capital gains in and opportunities zone and you leave it in for at least ten years, not only is the initial investment completely tax free but then all of the proceeds that you make on that investment are completely tax free. So high net worth individuals. And family offices large corporations the generate large amounts of capital gains love this program, and indeed it opened up about six point two trillion dollars in available capital based on the amount of capital gains that we generate in our economy. So of that amount, David Roughly a hundred billion dollars has been invested thus far into opportunities zones off. The roughly eight months programs operate.

John Gorman Nightingale Partners Gorman Health Group David David Nangle Cory Booker Medicare John IRS Sir Thank JON Louis Tim Scott Asbury, Park New Jersey Mr Asbury Park
"cosso" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

06:27 min | 1 year ago

"cosso" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast I'm the host David Entra Cosso. . During this podcast discussed with Austin Whitman, , CEO of climate neutral industry efforts to go green or achieve carb climate neutral rather status Mr. . Whitman. . Welcome to the program. . Thanks David it's crispy here. . I very much welcome Mr Whitman's BIOS across posted on the podcast website on background collectively termed sub nationals, , numerous academic institution states, , cities, , and local governments, companies , NGOs, and , other enemies across the country have pledged to become climate neutral. . Journey this means that our greenhouse gas emissions our carbon footprint are completely offset by consuming or funding renewable energy resources and or funding reforestation or other carbon sequestration efforts. . Though the healthcare benefits of reducing carbon emissions are crystal clear as I'm not previously be of this podcast healthcare providers in federal industry regulators are climate nihilists. . They have been some ignored this issue despite the fact after the food industry healthcare is the largest amount of carbon dioxide equivalent. . It over six, , hundred, , fifty, , million metric tons annually or approximately ten percent of the US greenhouse gas emissions. . As I've noted previously per research published in plus one four years ago, , Mount Sinai research concluded. . Health harm caused by the healthcare industries carbon emissions causes upwards of ninety, , eight, , thousand deaths per year just in the US. . In addition, the , US healthcare industry substantially lags behind other prominent US industries in publicly reporting their carbon emissions. . Two weeks ago however Kaiser Permanente, , the US's largest integrated nonprofit healthcare provider, , and now it had achieved carbon neutral status. . Meeting the organization had a raised as eight hundred, thousand , tonne carbon footprint. . Or Eight, , hundred, , thousand tons emitted annually. . As. . Kaiser noted in his nine fourteen press release quote unquote as physicians climate changes absolutely in our lane. . Kaiser's the first healthcare system in the US to achieve status and listeners may recall interviewed Kaiser's Kathy Gerwig. . Regarding her own. . Climate. . Neutral efforts in. May . of Twenty nineteen. . With me again to discuss corporate efforts to go green is climate neutral CEO Austin Whitman. . So. Awesome . of that as background, , let me begin by asking you if you could provide a brief overview of your organization. . Yeah well. . Great, David , I love that background because what you've done is I think shown a spotlight on something that needs to change and we hope it will change in the sense that climate is an overarching challenge that for anyone not to see it as their challenge. . Is really mistake and one of the encouraging signs that I've seen in the last few years is that more and more people are taking note of the challenge and really picking it up as something that they've got to think about in their in their day to day climate. . Neutral. . <hes> we started a year and a half ago really with the basic sort of <hes> with basic problem in line to which is that consumer pick up any consumer on the street and them what they've been told to do <hes>. . To help, , reverse or address climate change and people will probably tell you. . Well, , I know that I should stop eating meat and I know that I drive an electric car and I know that I should fly less. . And maybe some other things too <hes> and one of the interesting things is if you if you think about those three, , are you eating meat is pretty obvious when you pick up before you can say You know I'm eating a steak where I'm eating a banana <hes> driving cars pretty obvious and are you flying is pretty obvious as well, , and and unfortunately those those three things only address a small chunk of the total carbon that each of us is responsible for, , and that's because all the things the objects that we rely on day to day are the product of a fossil fuel intensive production chain or value chain, , which we call kind of a carbon trail that stretches around the world. . and. . So the best <hes>, , the best idea we could come up with to deal with this is to create a label just like a USDA organic label that would indicate to consumer the climate impacts of something that they buy. . So we can sort of turn the money that people spend on stuff. . When it's not obvious like a, , you know a steak versus a banana <hes> when it's not obvious what the climate impacts of something that they buy are we can. . We can put a label on it that says, , you know did the company that made that thing measure it's carbon emissions. . Carbon that they were responsible for frowned producing that thing and bringing it to the customer, , and then did they take steps to offset that carbon <hes> offset also known as remove or purchase a carbon? ? And we can get into those technical details at some point is you want And then are they working on plans to reduce their carbon emissions? ? So this is sort of the the basic designation that we came up with and the label launched officially in June of last year, we , recruited about one hundred forty companies to get certified. . which was going to happen from January to April of this year <hes> with the pandemic I feared the worst but actually turned out to be the best we ended up getting one hundred and fifty companies certified by the end of it so. . One of the things we learned from that was yes, , there's a pandemic if anything it has sort of reinforced the idea that there's a shared vulnerability across all of us that we really need to. . You know we really need to to get together and figure out in the cases cove. . It's obvious. . It's public health flying in the case of climate. It's . obvious. . It's environmental one so. . We certified one hundred fifty brands were now in the midst of recruiting more companies to get certified for. . Twenty Twenty <hes> I. . Guess The final detail I would add would be were restructured a nonprofit and Mission is simply to decrease global carbon emissions <hes> and to engage consumers brands to make that happen. .

US David Cosso David David Entra Cosso Austin Whitman Mr Whitman policy analyst Kaiser Permanente Mount Sinai dot CEO
Climate Neutral's Austin Whitman Discusses Industry Efforts to Go Green

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

06:27 min | 1 year ago

Climate Neutral's Austin Whitman Discusses Industry Efforts to Go Green

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast I'm the host David Entra Cosso. During this podcast discussed with Austin Whitman, CEO of climate neutral industry efforts to go green or achieve carb climate neutral rather status Mr. Whitman. Welcome to the program. Thanks David it's crispy here. I very much welcome Mr Whitman's BIOS across posted on the podcast website on background collectively termed sub nationals, numerous academic institution states, cities, and local governments, companies NGOs, and other enemies across the country have pledged to become climate neutral. Journey this means that our greenhouse gas emissions our carbon footprint are completely offset by consuming or funding renewable energy resources and or funding reforestation or other carbon sequestration efforts. Though the healthcare benefits of reducing carbon emissions are crystal clear as I'm not previously be of this podcast healthcare providers in federal industry regulators are climate nihilists. They have been some ignored this issue despite the fact after the food industry healthcare is the largest amount of carbon dioxide equivalent. It over six, hundred, fifty, million metric tons annually or approximately ten percent of the US greenhouse gas emissions. As I've noted previously per research published in plus one four years ago, Mount Sinai research concluded. Health harm caused by the healthcare industries carbon emissions causes upwards of ninety, eight, thousand deaths per year just in the US. In addition, the US healthcare industry substantially lags behind other prominent US industries in publicly reporting their carbon emissions. Two weeks ago however Kaiser Permanente, the US's largest integrated nonprofit healthcare provider, and now it had achieved carbon neutral status. Meeting the organization had a raised as eight hundred, thousand tonne carbon footprint. Or Eight, hundred, thousand tons emitted annually. As. Kaiser noted in his nine fourteen press release quote unquote as physicians climate changes absolutely in our lane. Kaiser's the first healthcare system in the US to achieve status and listeners may recall interviewed Kaiser's Kathy Gerwig. Regarding her own. Climate. Neutral efforts in. May of Twenty nineteen. With me again to discuss corporate efforts to go green is climate neutral CEO Austin Whitman. So. Awesome of that as background, let me begin by asking you if you could provide a brief overview of your organization. Yeah well. Great, David I love that background because what you've done is I think shown a spotlight on something that needs to change and we hope it will change in the sense that climate is an overarching challenge that for anyone not to see it as their challenge. Is really mistake and one of the encouraging signs that I've seen in the last few years is that more and more people are taking note of the challenge and really picking it up as something that they've got to think about in their in their day to day climate. Neutral. we started a year and a half ago really with the basic sort of with basic problem in line to which is that consumer pick up any consumer on the street and them what they've been told to do To help, reverse or address climate change and people will probably tell you. Well, I know that I should stop eating meat and I know that I drive an electric car and I know that I should fly less. And maybe some other things too and one of the interesting things is if you if you think about those three, are you eating meat is pretty obvious when you pick up before you can say You know I'm eating a steak where I'm eating a banana driving cars pretty obvious and are you flying is pretty obvious as well, and and unfortunately those those three things only address a small chunk of the total carbon that each of us is responsible for, and that's because all the things the objects that we rely on day to day are the product of a fossil fuel intensive production chain or value chain, which we call kind of a carbon trail that stretches around the world. and. So the best the best idea we could come up with to deal with this is to create a label just like a USDA organic label that would indicate to consumer the climate impacts of something that they buy. So we can sort of turn the money that people spend on stuff. When it's not obvious like a, you know a steak versus a banana when it's not obvious what the climate impacts of something that they buy are we can. We can put a label on it that says, you know did the company that made that thing measure it's carbon emissions. Carbon that they were responsible for frowned producing that thing and bringing it to the customer, and then did they take steps to offset that carbon offset also known as remove or purchase a carbon? And we can get into those technical details at some point is you want And then are they working on plans to reduce their carbon emissions? So this is sort of the the basic designation that we came up with and the label launched officially in June of last year, we recruited about one hundred forty companies to get certified. which was going to happen from January to April of this year with the pandemic I feared the worst but actually turned out to be the best we ended up getting one hundred and fifty companies certified by the end of it so. One of the things we learned from that was yes, there's a pandemic if anything it has sort of reinforced the idea that there's a shared vulnerability across all of us that we really need to. You know we really need to to get together and figure out in the cases cove. It's obvious. It's public health flying in the case of climate. It's obvious. It's environmental one so. We certified one hundred fifty brands were now in the midst of recruiting more companies to get certified for. Twenty Twenty I. Guess The final detail I would add would be were restructured a nonprofit and Mission is simply to decrease global carbon emissions and to engage consumers brands to make that happen.

United States Austin Whitman David Entra Cosso CEO Mr Whitman Kaiser Twenty Twenty Kaiser Permanente Mount Sinai Usda
Dr. Charles Binkley Discusses Medical Ethics in the Time of COVID-19

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:55 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Charles Binkley Discusses Medical Ethics in the Time of COVID-19

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host. David Intra. Cosso with me today discussed the nation's response, the ongoing Kobe nineteen, pandemic and context of healthcare ethics. Is Dr. Charles, Brinkley the director of bioethics at the Santa Clara University's or coolest center for Applied Ethics. Dr Bank welcome to the program. Thank you, David. It's really good to be with you today I have to say dark billy Bigley I particularly appreciate time since of course, California's once again. Experiencing another unprecedented wildfire season. So thank you. For making. Absolutely it's a real privilege to be on the show Dr. Bentley's vile is, of course, posted on the podcast website. On background, our nation's response to the ongoing covid nineteen pandemic has been I would characterize as disastrous. For example, as has been widely reported approximately one third of all Kobe. Nineteen related deaths have been among Nursing Home Facility residents. African Americans have been more than twice as likely as non Hispanic whites to die of covid nineteen complications. Inadequately protected healthcare providers. Now conveniently turned heroes in a war against Covid as if the virus will one day surrender. Defeated, have been required to work in lethal environments as for Service Workers Moreover, minorities instead of recognizing their do a livable wage. Health Insurance and or sick leave. We term essential workers and give them a hand. Clap. Has for the federal government's response to the president's sensitivity apparently goes so far as his stating, it is what it is. That the dictionary defines a business phrase that can be literally translated as and pardon my French fuck it. As for the Congress's response seventy, five percent of direct and indirect cares act money's went to corporations any forthcoming or additional federal response must include for the Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's prerequisite covid related legal immunity protection, or legislation consistent with what over twenty states have adopted to date. Are Spas the pandemic in some brings to light the chasm that continues to exist between medical ethics. Requires provider to support the betterment of public health and a responsibility to seek positive forms that are in the best injures of patience. And how we deliver health care that is substantially profit motive dominated. I'll add in my nearly twenty five years doing healthcare policy work in DC. I never wants to tenor meeting or participated in a conversation with the speaker disgust or made reference to, for example, John Rawls veil of big nurturance or tick him Olam. With Megan discuss the woeful state of healthcare ethics in the time of Covid is again Dr Charles Bentley. So with that as a somewhat lengthy introduction Dr Brinkley. Limb in assuming, you'd largely agree federal policymakers have to understated done a poor job of living up to their obligations and responding to the pandemic. So my question is in your view what generally accounts for this. David I. Think from a public policy perspective. Many of the issues have become overly politicized. So for instance, things like mask wearing school reopenings, how to reopen the economy have not always been based solely on the best medical or scientific principles but they've been put us is to take, for instance, the initial recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention about school reopening those were revised based on the administration's desire to somehow make them more applicable or to open up things more aggressively. So science hasn't always. been the most respected voice in the pandemic Dr. Falcone has emerged as really a hero for what is truth, and so you have to consider the perspective of physicians in making recommendations in a physician or a scientist in general is going to base recommendations on doing good and avoiding harm. That's really the ethical principle of medicine, and so for instance, plan the American Academy of Pediatrics Recommendations for. School reopening is a very child centric perspective as well. You would expect the group of pediatricians to speak from the perspective of children and when you take the balance of school opening on the whole, it's far more advantageous to children for schools to be reopened not only because of the intellectual benefit schools provide but all the other resources of schools provide for children besides the traditional reading writing and arithmetic. Takes Her instance the number of hungry children who rely on schools for nourishment, the number of children but medical problems who rely on schools For their care asthma screening vision dental care. You look at children with disabilities who really are dependent on their schools, not only for learning but also for occupational therapy physical therapy and those students not only are not progressing in minsters they're regressing during the pandemic when they're not in schools, you can't substitute the services that they were offered in person with remote learning and must be heartbreaking to those parents to see their children regress in this time. So really the perspective of the most vulnerable and some ways has come to light. During the pandemic when I think globally about how ethics the affected the pandemic

Dr Charles Bentley Covid Dr Brinkley David Intra Dr Bank Center For Applied Ethics Centers For Disease Control An Kobe Billy Bigley Santa Clara University John Rawls California Nursing Home Facility Mitch Mcconnell American Academy Of Pediatrics Congress Director
Professor Ruqaiijah Yearby Discusses Structural Racism in Health Care

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

06:57 min | 2 years ago

Professor Ruqaiijah Yearby Discusses Structural Racism in Health Care

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host David Cosso. During this podcast rookie year be professor and member of the Center for Health Law. Studies at Saint Louis. University School of law. Joins me to discuss the effects of structural racism in healthcare, Professor Year be welcome to the program. Thank you for having me on professor year. Because bio is of course posted on the podcast website briefly on background listeners are likely well aware of the US has had a long history of persistent and substantial disparities in healthcare, access, delivery and outcomes. For example, the black to white infant metality ratio has never dropped below two to one. Over the past two decades, the healthcare research and quality has publishes disparities report. In it, a third of disparity measures have shown no improvement in nearly one in six have worsened. Or largely explains healthcare disparities or health inequities is structural, institutional or systemic racism, though frequently less overt structural racism, the fair to provide equal benefit to racial and ethnic minorities is embedded in healthcare, education, employment, environmental housing, transportation, and numerous other governmental policies as a result, structural or endemic racism, 'cause minority population, suffering far greater disease burden, and has results significantly higher mortality rates. As I've noted recently in previous PODCASTS, due to higher rates of on and under insurance that have led to higher rates of comber biddies covid nineteen related deaths among African Americans and Hispanics are far greater than among Non Hispanic whites. George Floyd before he was killed had recovered from covid nineteen infection. This will recall structural racism was the theme of my January ninth discussion with Andrea Freeman, regarding her recently published book scam, breastfeeding race and injustice with me again and discuss structural racism in healthcare. His professor year be so professor with that. I opened with a brief and I'll admit somewhat blurred definition. Of Structural Racism I know you distinguish between structural. And Institutional. Can you explain this difference? Yes Oh structural racism is about the ways that our systems are structured particularly to advantage the dominant group in disadvantaged minorities. It also includes ways that organizations and institutions work together to create standards and policies that benefit them while harming minority and so we can see an example of this particularly in the healthcare sooner in the healthcare system when we look at access to healthcare, many predominantly African. American neighborhoods, predominantly immigrant neighborhoods do not have access to hospital care and that is so important doing Kobe nineteen, because that's where many people are receiving tests and treatment for covert nineteen and so the fact that we don't. Place hospitals based on need or need for health care rather we structure our system in a way that access to healthcare is based on ability to pay then benefits though who have jobs that have health insurance that can pay for health care, while it disadvantages racial and ethnic minorities who tend to work at low wage jobs, but do not have health insurance and cannot pay off for health care. Thank you I do have a question about hospital locations in. We'll get to that. Let me ask as a follow up question regarding critical race theory, somewhat similar fries actually possibly shocked that a week ago today the health affairs blog. BRIEFLY DISCUSS CRT in a post by Michelle Morrison and others. Can you give us a brief definition of what is critical race theory? for me. Critical race theory is about critiquing how. Has Been used as another means to harm minorities, particularly as I think about it anti-discrimination law when we look at historical articles about this we see they. antidiscrimination law has been set up to facilitate and support the existing social structures. When you look at anti-discrimination law in the area of employment you are looking to prove that an individual or that institution allowed policies that harmed individuals and. And so it never gets to the point where you're challenging the structures or the systems of employment, they can stay the same. We only look at individual perpetrators who have done some harm. So when we think about employment that is so relevant now in covert nineteen, because a lot of the wage, workers are being deemed as essential workers under covid nineteen, but they're not being provided with math. They don't have paid thickly. They do not Count under worker's COMP. They do not receive unemployment compensation because. Those are do not apply to them and so let me give you a specific example so the fair Labor. Standards, act. was passed back during the new deal time in nineteen thirty eight, but that was also the time of Jim Crow, and so it left out. Many workers domestic workers who include home care. Workers agricultural workers as well and so. What the? Standard acted was. Provide for a minimum wage overtime pay and limit the work week to forty hours, So. Most of these workers are not covered We're not covered by this actual act when in two thousand and fifteen. They did actually begin to be covered under fairly. Standard to act Then you see a shift again and the structure of employment, and so no longer are they considered employees companies shifting to independent contractors

Professor Center For Health Law University School Of Law Saint Louis David Cosso United States George Floyd Andrea Freeman Kobe Michelle Morrison Fair Labor Jim Crow
"cosso" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:10 min | 2 years ago

"cosso" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host David Intra Cosso. During. This podcast saw discussed with Mr. Randy ostrow, president and CEO Pro-meta and Ohio based nonprofit healthcare system. Efforts to create a congressionally mandated National Health Care Reform Commission. Miss Joe Stra. Welcome to the program. Missed oestrus bio is of course posted on the podcast website. On background. The current public health emergency brings into stark relief, US healthcare's ineffectiveness. I've noted previously with four point, two five percent of the world's population us currently accounts for twenty six percent of worldwide Kobe, nineteen infections and deaths. Black American Cova deaths and hospitalizations are respectively two point five and four times greater than American whites. Concerning our response to date harbor widely cited global health professor. A she's jaw was quoted yesterday stating we may end up being the worst of any country in the world in terms of our response. Despite outspending all other always OECD countries to to one currently at four trillion annually, the effects of the pandemic is having should not altogether unexpected. In, the first major attempt to rank performance in two thousand, the World Health, organization listed US healthcare thirty seven, the world immediately after the Czech Republic and Jamaica. More recently twenty seventeen Commonwealth Fund ranked US healthcare's performance last among eleven, comparatively wealthy countries. With a current projected toll over two hundred thousand by October one. The question begged is what will federal policymakers learn from this experience more specifically. What will they do to reform? How healthcare is defined delivered and financed. With me again to discuss efforts to create a congressionally mandated national health care reform. Commission is chromatic. CEO Randy Oestra. For purposes of full disclosure I've been working with Primerica in advocating before the Congress on this issue. So to begin Randall, let me ask you if you could provide a brief overview of pro-meta. Sure. <hes>. Was a traditional integrated delivery system regional and an integrated system. We had hospitals. and. Doctors had an insurance company and then <hes> so we were several billion dollars in revenue primarily. Ohio sawfish Michigan and then about ten years ago. <hes> through. A variety of of interactions <hes> became <hes> very focused on of the hunger in the health issues, good as security that really less in spending a decade Fox's on the social determinants of health and a lot of experience. A lot of stories could tell as we talked to organizations around the country that have that were forever covering. We were probably the first houses than they ever talk to them. They said you know. What are you doing here? And then the next special as we're in the of bed and really it's been quite a journey of. Over two years ago while we purchase <hes>. largest for profit, senior companies in the United States cold hr matter. And <hes> so today we would call ourselves the health and wellbeing company <hes>. We're around. You know just in broad terms of seven billion dollars innovation we, we work in twenty eight states, and really the whole idea is about that. How do you integrate? Things, we do clinically with the things that immediately drafts from a social economic standpoint. You ready records some of that code, and then hot that translate into healthy aging, and all the things that go with it, some of the inequities in healthcare from the inequities treatments, and so we set back from an looking for model <hes> in healthcare in realize that we're ought to relieve wrong, pat. We Really Kinda Organization. Try to embark. Do APP, and that's his house voting folks. Okay thank you. Let's go specific to of a national commission, so let me begin with the substantive question, and that is in your experience. What would you say are the three or so overriding structural problems or challenges? Confronting Health Care Delivery and financing today. Yeah I think it's actually a a US question while. You know the American healthcare mile was a mess. <hes> I. Think you know that's real clear and I think when you look at the statistics have to go too far whether it's you know the back that we're headed toward ninety percent of the gross domestic. Product by twenty twenty five the statistic. Thank you get already cited from the OECD. Ranked in the world

US David National Health Care Reform Co David Intra Cosso CEO Randy Oestra policy analyst Mr. Randy ostrow World Health Primerica Joe Stra president and CEO Randall OECD Commonwealth Fund Kobe Ohio professor
Why we need a Congressionally Created National Health Care Reform Commission

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:10 min | 2 years ago

Why we need a Congressionally Created National Health Care Reform Commission

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host David Intra Cosso. During. This podcast saw discussed with Mr. Randy ostrow, president and CEO Pro-meta and Ohio based nonprofit healthcare system. Efforts to create a congressionally mandated National Health Care Reform Commission. Miss Joe Stra. Welcome to the program. Missed oestrus bio is of course posted on the podcast website. On background. The current public health emergency brings into stark relief, US healthcare's ineffectiveness. I've noted previously with four point, two five percent of the world's population us currently accounts for twenty six percent of worldwide Kobe, nineteen infections and deaths. Black American Cova deaths and hospitalizations are respectively two point five and four times greater than American whites. Concerning our response to date harbor widely cited global health professor. A she's jaw was quoted yesterday stating we may end up being the worst of any country in the world in terms of our response. Despite outspending all other always OECD countries to to one currently at four trillion annually, the effects of the pandemic is having should not altogether unexpected. In, the first major attempt to rank performance in two thousand, the World Health, organization listed US healthcare thirty seven, the world immediately after the Czech Republic and Jamaica. More recently twenty seventeen Commonwealth Fund ranked US healthcare's performance last among eleven, comparatively wealthy countries. With a current projected toll over two hundred thousand by October one. The question begged is what will federal policymakers learn from this experience more specifically. What will they do to reform? How healthcare is defined delivered and financed. With me again to discuss efforts to create a congressionally mandated national health care reform. Commission is chromatic. CEO Randy Oestra. For purposes of full disclosure I've been working with Primerica in advocating before the Congress on this issue. So to begin Randall, let me ask you if you could provide a brief overview of pro-meta. Sure. Was a traditional integrated delivery system regional and an integrated system. We had hospitals. and. Doctors had an insurance company and then so we were several billion dollars in revenue primarily. Ohio sawfish Michigan and then about ten years ago. through. A variety of of interactions became very focused on of the hunger in the health issues, good as security that really less in spending a decade Fox's on the social determinants of health and a lot of experience. A lot of stories could tell as we talked to organizations around the country that have that were forever covering. We were probably the first houses than they ever talk to them. They said you know. What are you doing here? And then the next special as we're in the of bed and really it's been quite a journey of. Over two years ago while we purchase largest for profit, senior companies in the United States cold hr matter. And so today we would call ourselves the health and wellbeing company We're around. You know just in broad terms of seven billion dollars innovation we, we work in twenty eight states, and really the whole idea is about that. How do you integrate? Things, we do clinically with the things that immediately drafts from a social economic standpoint. You ready records some of that code, and then hot that translate into healthy aging, and all the things that go with it, some of the inequities in healthcare from the inequities treatments, and so we set back from an looking for model in healthcare in realize that we're ought to relieve wrong, pat. We Really Kinda Organization. Try to embark. Do APP, and that's his house voting folks. Okay thank you. Let's go specific to of a national commission, so let me begin with the substantive question, and that is in your experience. What would you say are the three or so overriding structural problems or challenges? Confronting Health Care Delivery and financing today. Yeah I think it's actually a a US question while. You know the American healthcare mile was a mess. I. Think you know that's real clear and I think when you look at the statistics have to go too far whether it's you know the back that we're headed toward ninety percent of the gross domestic. Product by twenty twenty five the statistic. Thank you get already cited from the OECD. Ranked in the world

United States World Health National Health Care Reform Co Oecd Ohio President And Ceo David Intra Cosso Mr. Randy Ostrow Joe Stra Ceo Randy Oestra Commonwealth Fund Primerica Kobe Randall Professor Congress
Trump administration is rushing to gut environmental protections

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:53 min | 2 years ago

Trump administration is rushing to gut environmental protections

"Your host for the program is David. Cosso a DC based healthcare policy analyst. And we invite you to comment on the program by visiting the healthcare policy. Podcasts DOT COM. Now here's David. Welcome to the healthcare policy. Podcast I'm the host David Intro Cosso during this podcast discussed with Professor Michael Burger Executive Director of the Sabin Center for Climate Change at Columbia Law School. The trump administration's efforts to unwind the nation's environmental regulatory rules and the status of Climate Crisis Related Litigation. Professor Burger. Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me. Professor Burgers by was posted on the podcast website on background to state the obvious we interact with the environment constantly as a result. We are exposed to harmful animal-borne germs like viruses bacteria parasites or so called zoonotic diseases. Scientists s made more than six out of every ten known infectious diseases and three out of four new or emerging infectious diseases. Come from animals. Think Dengue Malaria Rabies covid nineteen according to the National Academy of Sciences. The environment is responsible for thirty percent of premature deaths. He Fi far higher percentage than healthcare prevents. This explains why minority Communities Face Higher Kobe. Nineteen related mortality. Upwards of three times their immune systems have already been compromised by degrade environment for example poor air quality despite for recognizing the adverse effects. The environment has on our health. The for example environmental impact statements. The trump administration has worked aggressively to gut the nation's environmental protections according to the Save Insanity Administration has unwound or ten zone wind approximately one hundred environment regulations ranging from power plant and car and truck. Co Two emissions. Mercury and hydrofluorocarbons emissions. Who was protecting wetlands from oil and GAS LEAK RULES REGARDING PESTICIDE? Use drilling fracking and coal leasing rules offshore oil and gas drilling rules etc concerned. The climate crisis listeners. Mary call my having discussed research. Polishing Twenty sixteen that concluded the adverse health effects resulting from the healthcare ministries greenhouse gas or carbon emissions our response properties Roberts of nearly one hundred thousand deaths annually in the US alone with begin discussing ministrations attack on Varma deregulations centers. Michael Burger so with that Professor Burger. Let me start by asking. If you can briefly describe the same incentives work sure The Saban Center is a think and do tank housed at Columbia Law School. We focus on Climate Change Law across the board meaning. We look at both mitigation related issues. How to go about reducing greenhouse gas emissions as well as adaptation issues to respond to climate change impacts that are already happening that will only increase in intensity and frequency over time. We are not policy shop so we don't do policy analysis. We're really team of lawyers. That focus very much on the on the legal aspects of climate policy. I and we do this at all. Scales of government from the from the local to the global We have a number of different things. We do On the side of our think and do tank We do what thinks generally do we produce a original research and writing on a range of climate law related topics we also produce An put up on our website free for public. Use a number of different resources for researchers lawyers policy practitioners students and others. These include our climate change litigation databases both US and non us. Our silencing science tracker our climate deregulation tracker which we launched on inauguration day in two thousand seventeen our legal pathways deep decarbonisation database which includes Hundreds of model laws setup for governments at all scales to adopt To achieve deep decarbonisation in the number of other tools on the do side of our thinking do tank We engage actively with partners including international organizations Domestic and international NGOs. Political staffers And representatives other academic institutions And others to leverage our expertise to have an impact on the real world so in this regard be Senate comment letters on environmental impact statements to end proposed regulations. We filed amicus briefs On behalf of scientists coalitions cities and others in big climate cases And we regularly seek to influence an inform public decision making around climate law and policy. So you're busy. Yeah we have our hands especially these days. Yes Okay. So let's go to these days So my next question. Let's get to the meat of this Though would take hours to detail the administration's assault on the environment. Let's focus on air quality since among other things accounts for a seven million deaths worldwide or degraded air-quality so Let's focus more over again on this subject. So what's the administration's policy toward amongst other issues Power Plant emissions. This was the Obama. Administration's Clean Power Plan Auto Tailpipe pipe and particularly as well of course methane emissions which is a much more potent greenhouse gas.

Professor Burger David Intro Cosso Policy Analyst Columbia Law School United States Professor Michael Burger Save Insanity Administration Professor Burgers National Academy Of Sciences Barack Obama Assault Sabin Center Mary
"cosso" Discussed on FashionTalks

FashionTalks

10:45 min | 2 years ago

"cosso" Discussed on FashionTalks

"Of spell shoes sells shoes. Bell's designs Zell Server. Savell that all those things are amazing. Things that she does as well as peg. Car Gar of repaint history and part of the reason. I'm so excited to speak to these. Two women is because they have done something inspiring and have infused a sense of not just a sense of purpose but very tangible practical way of bringing their missions to every element of their business go so before we get into the discussion. I'd like to just invite them to introduce themselves so they can share a little bit about them themselves and their brand before we get started so l. I'M DELIGHTED TO BE HERE DA L. I'm the founder and creative director of savell and our mission at is to bring this idea of global citizenry to fashion. We do that. Through the products we create and the stories we tell about those products and through interview series with women and our goal would those interview series is to really revolutionize the way fashion portrays women their stories. Thanks Donna for having me today. So I'm hege on the founder and CEO of repaint history and repaint history. Essentially a company that brings recognition to the female artists of the past while supporting present and future female identifying artists as well as addressing the gender gap in the art world so part of our business is dedicated to using and leveraging fashion to address this gender gap as well as the mentorship series for artists that we have in the events that we host address. This gaffe in. Yes thank you for having me excited. L. I'd like to start with you. What was the spark that inspired you to start fell? You're a relatively new brand. Your background is in finance. What was the moment when you said? I want to be a shoe designer. I think the long answer is the moment sparked was thirty eight years ago when I was born from a kind of wanting to do something that added to this world and from shoes it really was just a way for me to express myself and when I still to this day I think of myself more as yes shoot designer but I think that I'm more than justice shoot designer for me shooter away to express yourself and it's also a way as my good friend. Elizabeth Semel coast the Creative Directorate. Batta Shoe Museum says it's a way to understand power structures in society. So when I look at shoes it's just more than what we put on our feet on a day to day basis. Can you talk a little bit more about that? Relationship between shoes and power dynamics because I think that seems to as you're talking about global citizenry that seems to really inform that foundation. Yeah I mean you know. One example is when I used to work in finance and I was young and I was new to Canada so I used to wear these. You know red bottom shoes which you know for the randers and sitting on my desk and we had a driver driver surround so I you know that was one you know kind of a part in my life and I decided to become an entrepreneur and business. They gave me the idea for this one and I didn't have the funds to invest thousand dollars on uncomfortable shoes and I really started to think. Why is it that you know? I spent thousand dollars on shoes at make me feel like Shit. Hope I can say that and and and at the same time these are not shoes that last so if you look at a power women are People. Say will beauty hurts. Why does it? Why do women have to wear certain things to certain places? I mean who actually made that up so I've never been someone who read a fashion magazine and ran out and bought something. Of course I enjoy fashion magazines especially even more so when they feature our shoes bags. But it's I don't see myself as a woman who just kind of like loves to listen to society and when I look at our where or clothes a lot of it is related to what society tells you you go when for example. When I used to work in finance I remember having a red briefcase. And a very sweet older lady. Colleague pulled me aside and said L. You like to direct attention to yourself and I said. What do you mean she goes? We'll look at your red briefcase and I just didn't. I was so shocked I was you know like I just cut move to Canada for this job was wondering like no I. It's just a briefcase that I bought and it's red reds one of my favorite colors and I'm wearing today so that to her was something that I shouldn't have because I was working in finance and I was. I don't know mental look boring. That's one example peg. I could see you nodding as L. was talking about power imbalances and the pressures of society. Can you talk a little bit about what? What the moment was that? Inspired you to notice this imbalance with with female artists. And why did you choose fashion as a way to express that purpose because I think what is interesting is l? Story has her entrepreneurship for footwear. And she brought in a purpose that you started in a way the opposite way so for me. Essentially the way that I came across gender gap in the art world was strewn reading and I've always been an art lover but literally by Fluke. I was thinking of artists of the past in. I named Monet. Manet van Bob Cosso an I named named the name then for Second. I realized these are all male artist. Why can I name a female artist and so I thought of free and I was like thank God for Frieda? She's there? She's a savior and so I thought okay. That's interesting. Is it just me? Is it my circle? What's happening in so I started doing ton of research around this and I thought when I started seeing the numbers and the stats and the facts. That are out there I thought. Oh Wow. This is a huge gap in the art world. There are stats such as like a female. Female artwork is sold forty percent less than a male artist. And that's larger than wage gap. And so I started reading. The Stories of contemporary women. Artists in past few artists and their stories just became so overwhelming because for instance the past few artists. The all made a name for themselves. There were famous in their time. They were equal to their mill artist. But as soon as they died names were removed from art history. And so I thought okay come on like we got to do something about this one thing. That was interesting at the time was that I never been in the art world and so you. There's this notion that. Are you an artist do you like are you a woman art and my answer always was will no but I've done tons of research around this and I've dedicated so much time to learning about it and at the end of it a few you don't have to be in the art world to understand inequality you can be in any industry and if you see a gap you can think of addressing it. And so what can I do? I'm a bit of a Geek on the side as well so I thought okay. Maybe it will build an APP for this. You know. Maybe that's how I can address this then. I thought you know who really downloads an APP. Nowadays when it for something? That's nice to know. And it's not your or Uber. Or a must have so it has to be something that's non-intrusive a conversation starter. Clothing was something that came to my mind. I saw it. You know you're walking billboard when you wear something so why not address this gap through clothing? Why not bring the names of this woman in our Brogan I saw the okay reaping history? And you're wearing very cute t shirt this evening but if people go to your website and go to instagram like your fashion brand is not t shirts you've got surround really interesting tailoring. Can you describe a little people have a sense? A- absolutely it actually so repent history actually started with a symmetrical collar blouse that I bring a name of female artist from Barak Eric called artistic gentlest CGI. Who was in the same era as Carthago? Very well known equal but we've heard carvajal in the past probably haven't heard of Artemisia and so I wanted to make the caller design different simple but different just so that it grabs attention and start to conversation and it was very difficult decision in terms of 'cause I made one sample and I put it on and I was in finance world at time as well and I were to work in literally every five minutes. I got stop. What's going on with your caller. What's going on with your blouse. What's happening and so I thought okay..

Canada founder and CEO L. savell Bell Zell Server Batta Shoe Museum founder Elizabeth Semel Creative Directorate Donna Carthago Barak Eric van Bob Cosso Frieda Fluke director
Algorithmic Injustices: Towards a Relational Ethics with Abeba Birhane

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

09:46 min | 2 years ago

Algorithmic Injustices: Towards a Relational Ethics with Abeba Birhane

"Welcome to the Tuomo. Ai podcasts thank you so much for having me Sam. I'm really excited about this conversation. We had an opportunity to meet in person After a long while interacting on twitter at the most recent NRA conference in particular the black workshop. Where you not only presented your paper. Algorithm ick injustices toward a relational ethics Best Paper there and so. I'm looking forward to digging into that and some other topics but before we do that I would love to hear you kind of share a little bit about your background and I will mention for folks that are hearing the sirens in the background. While I mentioned that you are from University College Dublin. You happen to be in New York now at the ES Conference in association with AAA I and As folks might know it's hard to avoid sirens and construction in New York City so Just consider that background are mood mood. Ambience background sounds. Cosso your yes. How did you get started working in a ethics so my background is a cognitive science and particularly a part of cognitive science cord embodied cognitive science? Which is which has ruled. Seen A in cybernetics in thinking. The idea is to focus on on the on the social on the cultural on the historic In kind of view cooperation in continuity with the warrant with with historical background in that in as opposed to you know your your traditional approach to cognitive which just rates combination as something located in the brain or something formality. Something that can be computed so yet. So that's my background. Even during my master's I lean towards the AI. Ice I'd of Koebnick science the more I dave into it the more I much more attracted to the to the site to injustices to the social issues. And so the more deputy goes on the more. I find myself in the that they takes site. Was there a particular point that you realize that you're really excited about the ethics part in particular or did it just evolve for you? I think it just evolved. So when I started out at the end of my master's in at the start of the day my idea is that you know we have this new relatively new school at thing way of thinking which is imported Kokusai which I quite like very much because eighteen sizes you know ambiguous eighties in Messina and contingencies. As opposed to you know drawing create Clean Boundaries and so the idea is yes. I liked the idea of redefining competition. As something relational something inherently social and some think that is continually impacted in influenced by as our people ended the technologies. We use so the technology aspects. The technology end was my so initially. The idea is yes. Technology is constitutes aspect of aspect of article. You'll help the famous nineteen ninety eight thesis spy and Clark in the John Muir steak standard mind where they claimed in. The iphone is an extension of your mind so you can think of it that way and I was kind of advancing the same line of coats but the more identity into it the more I so yes ditch technology with its you know computing such as face recognition systems on the streets or your phone wherever yes it does. Impact in the does continually shape in reshape. Our mission in what it means to exist in the warrant. But what became more and more clear to me is that not everybody's impacted equally a the more privileged. You are the the more in control of at you are as to what can influence you end what you can avoid. So that's where I become more and more involved with the attic solve computation and its impact on cognition. The notion of privilege is something that flows throughout the work that you've presented at blackened. Ai Our make injustices paper and this idea. This construct of relational ethics what is relational ethics. And what are you getting at with it? Yeah so relational ethics is actually not a new thing. A A lot of people have terrorized about it and I have written about it but the the way I'm approaching it the way I'm using it is. It's I guess he kind of springs from at this restauration that for many folks who talk about ethics or or fairness or justice most of it comes down to constructing these needs formulation of fairness or at mathematical calculation of who should be included and Who SHOULD BE EXCLUDED? What kind of do we need that sort of stuff? So for me relational ethics is kind of. Let's let's leave that for a little bit late. Zoom out and see the bigger picture and instead of using technology to solve the problem stats emerged from Technology Self. So which which means censoring technology late instead center the people that are people `specially people that are disproportionately impacted by the limitations or the problems that arise with the development and implementation of Technology. So at there is a robust Research in economic fairness or go to speak injustice and the the pattern. Is that the more you are at the at the bottom of the intersection level. That missed further away from you are from you. Know your stereotypical White Sis. Gender made the more the bigger the negative impacts are on you ways there it's a classification or categorization or whether it's being scaled in scored for by hiring algorithms or looking for housing or anything like that at that the Maury move away from that stereotypical category status score the more. The HABE that they embarked his own use. So the idea of relational ethics is kind of to to to take from that perspective to to take that as a starting point so these are the groups are these are the individuals that are an much more likely to be acted so in order to put them at at advantage or in order to protect their welfare. What do we need to do? So the it's died is to start from there and then ask for wishing instead of saying here we have this technology or we have these Saito Algorithms constellations. How do we apply them? Or how do we then use them to to you? Know for Beta or a fair outcome and sometimes the answer you arrive at. Is that a particular technology. Shouldn't exist in a given form. Yeah right exactly exactly. So I think one of the downsides of an obsessively working on and some matrices or some equations on fairness is that you forgot. Forget to ask in the first place do we. Should we even do this in the first place and I think some people have articulated this really? Well you can think of this. In terms of that you know face recognition systems that are becoming very normalized in common spatial in the states. Do you feed at your face. Recognition Algorithms with diverse data in order. So that it recognizes everybody equally or do you stop and think do we actually need face recognition systems in the first place.

AI Twitter Tuomo NRA University College Dublin Koebnick Science New York City Saito Algorithms New York Messina John Muir White Sis AAA Clark
"cosso" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

03:36 min | 3 years ago

"cosso" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

"And they find is that these, these network of enterprise, people have different things going on, and they're not necessarily doing them all at once, but they'll have these different interests, the move on one. Maybe we'll get stuck the move to another one and they keep circling back, and they all sort of end up informing one another way, so interesting. This guy, Santiago Ramon. Kahal Nobel laureate father of modern neuro science Spanish, Nobel laureate wouldn't. Sort of describe this. He would say, like the most creative, scientists have this, this broad network and his quote is basically to him who observes them from afar. It looks as though. They're dissipating their energies, when, in fact, they're strengthening and channeling them. Right. So forty you say this, because my fuel who you'll meet as Matt, he called me Picasso. He's like, I don't know how you do it like you've got so many things in your head that are always like you come back to stuff. You do this, you're painting was like Cosso. He's like I'm more like Michelangelo lover. Why just I love the seat, how it is structured how it is. But you're just kind of all over the place, but it always works out in a beautiful way. Yeah. And by the way, Michelangelo. So let's talk about Michelangelo, right? So there's this Michelangelo painting didn't like painting probably his rivals got him that gig to keep them out of sculpting, and was forced to do it wrote some poems about gave up our little while just write poems, most of which he didn't finish one of which was about how much he didn't like painting. And there's this idea that he would. See a figure inside of a block of marble and just draw out. Like taking a figure out of a bath of water. Turns out not to be true was written in a biography by guy was like a famous fabulous basically and Michelangelo actually left, like two thirds of everything he ever touched undone, because he would start with the block of marble he would decide to try something else. Do something else and run out of stone and discard and go to something else. So it's sort of an interesting metaphor for this idea that, oh, he just saw the finding erotic when, in fact, like he left almost everything on done because he didn't see that. And so it's just sort of an interesting, I mentioned, this, and the very end of the book is this sort of interesting metaphor for how we should think about ourselves because that's sort of part of this mythology of like you just see the finished rutta chiseled away. What wasn't supposed to be exactly? Exactly. Exactly. And so whereas the reality is like most of everything he ever touched. He didn't finish right here to throw away, six months on something and mesh start over because he tried to do something different than you don't have enough marble left or whatever. Yeah, well, what is it that all? Your mind from your research all the best athletes scientists, you know, billionaires entrepreneurs have in common or there things that you think they all have in common. I mean obviously the athletes, the top of the top, we know that they had more unstructured activity as a child child develop. What about is there any common themes from the top athletes billionaires Ross stars in your mind? I mean, I think they have to have some tolerance for. I think we give a lot of lip service to itali- for failure. But I think in practice, like good. Oh, conference and see people like failures green learn from failure. And then you talked to somebody who like actually it's something at work, and it's not like anyone was like that was great. Yeah. Do your job better here. So one of the one of the places that I write about in ranges, three, m the company, which is like it's, it's always listed on the world's most innovative companies. But all the other names, you've heard like, Google, apple all this stuff, and then it's like three m and their inventions. Our crate from posted. Oats to like, high-tech, mayor nautical, engineering stuff. And, and one of their biggest inventions that I've profound. Here's called multi-layer optical film, which is all phones, everything we've got an here because it recycles, light inside the device that you can get brighter picture with less battery power longer..

Michelangelo guy Matt Kahal Nobel Santiago Ramon Cosso Google apple six months three m
"cosso" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

06:14 min | 3 years ago

"cosso" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Toronto nine tenths of a second ago and possession goes to Toronto just have to get the ball inbounds for championship net. Bathing is sixty time do not throw it to a guy with a dark shirt on lower gets it in. Came is over. Or is it not? We're going to send everybody off the floor. The photographers that foul occurred on the catch. Right before time expired, apparently as Mark Davis. And John Goble will put on the headsets to Secaucus to review the Cussing right now. Toronto Lowery wants the best. The key thing right now as he got fouled, and it will be the referee's decision, whether he got fouled on catch before he made the move or did he get fouled once he made the move? We're getting a look at the ABC play on the inbound. Iggy dollar was tugging. I definitely a foul. FM. Before the shot he fouls before the shot. So we all know now that, that would be the penalty anyway, right odd for Golden State that would have been their fifth thousand two free throws essentially ends it or make you could miss the second bounce off the revenue time expire Toronto. Raptors on the doorstep of their first championship the first championship for team based outside the United States. In the last game in Oakland. They're already celebrating down on the bench and the Canadian fans who've made their way from north of the border so many Canadians and ex pats who work in the Silicon Valley area have flooded and spent a lot of money to get tickets to get into the oracle tonight. And if we thought they partied after game four here you imagine what the seems gonna be just moments from now here in game six did this has been a great game to play as you're going to close this arena, drum NBA basketball, but to end it the way were ending it in the last nine seconds is hard to take. It's unfortunate out. Exactly. Right. I mean you're site Cosso, that's exactly right now, if you're Toronto, you don't wanna hear about it, because, you know that you're going to be the champions here, and it doesn't matter what happens whatever. The core is. They're going to keep the clock at nine tenths of a second. And they're saying that any throat while now comes down. Did you foul him before the inbound for the inbounds amid give? Right. I mean, we're, we're doing every single role that you think of now nine seconds. All right. So they put nine tenths of a second back on the clock Toronto once. Well, Golden State won ten the warriors had the nine to close in the final three and a half minutes up in Toronto. To extend the series to a six game force the raptors to head to the west coast. I let her go into the line shooting to nine tenths of a second ago, if he makes both doesn't really matter what happens after that, first one is good one thirteen one ten and a chance to ice it and make it a two possession game. Does we all know that the rule is what three tenths of a second? You still can catch and take a shot without a. All right. Leonard free throws. One. Fourteen one ten raptors inbound curry launches one from seventy no good. And it's over the raptors have their first championship bay to thrown the dynasty Toronto in six games, Pete's the lawyers for their first NBA title Toronto won fourteen. The warriors won ten the Toronto. Raptors are the twenty nineteen NBA champion a happy for them. They've very scrappy, and they defeat Golden State once again in their arena for the fourth time this year. Now that not too many people have been able to do that during this ran, that's an amazing stat old buddy tries done at the raptors were the only team to win three road games at Golden State in the same season over the Steve Kerr era, if you include the December victory here in the regular season four and, oh, the raptors at mighty, Golden State. And how about to why Leonard acquired by trade in the summer leads them with an amazing game seven game winner that hit the rim four times and went through down two games to none to the mighty Milwaukee Bucks in the Eastern Conference finals? They real four straight wins and Nick nurse in his first year as an NBA head coach is an NBA chat. While give give a lot of credit to the team, the team, definitely has performed for you, but you have to give them a ton of credit. We once again, I they hold Golden State. Think about it. They only got one hundred ten but we all know Durant didn't play and then the heartbreaker today was Thomson giving thirty two minutes and thirty points has the knee injury and naturally, we have no idea the seriousness since he left the building on crutches. But they hung in there and they still were right there at the end right down to the last nine seconds game could go either way. If they could make a steel while the raptors are still celebrating on the floor along with their coaches some executives, they're putting a stage together a presentation that we will bring for you. The Larry O'Brien trophy is in the house and for the first time ever will be going north of the border to stay and raptors fans who are in their red jerseys are making their way from all points into the lower deck. Hawaii, Leonard a standing by with our Ramona Shelburne trade in here, this summer, did you ever envision that it could end in the night like that?.

Toronto Raptors Golden State NBA Toronto Lowery Leonard ABC Mark Davis Oakland Secaucus Iggy dollar Larry O'Brien John Goble United States basketball Durant Cosso Milwaukee Bucks Hawaii Ramona Shelburne
"cosso" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"cosso" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You so much in one night. Book. Smart is a new movie directed by Olivia Wilde about too smart young women Malia naming best friends, finishing at the top of their class because they spent high school getting all as and volunteering instead of party, so they can get into good colleges only to realize at the last second that they're hard partying classmates. Also got into the same good schools. That's next party. Are you kidding? No way. Only have one night left with studied and partied in high school, otherwise. We're just going to be the girls that missed out. We haven't done anything. We haven't broken any real, okay? We've broken a lot of rules, one. We're fake ID's state college ideas, we can get into their twenty four hour library name one person whose life was so much better. Because it broke a couple of rule Cosso. That's he broke art roles impersonal broker. Real Raza parks. They Manella Susan B Anthony, dammit. So they embark on a wild Wadi. Booth fuel odyssey to get to the mega party. But the depiction of the two characters and their friendship isn't generic. It's very specific and fresh and believable. Molly is played by Bennie Feldstein, who was in the film lady bird playing shears Ronin, best friend. Okay. What happened? Nothing really nothing. Why are you crying? Some people are built copy. And Amy in book, smart is played by Caitlyn Deavere, whom you might have seen in the FX series justified. In this moment. Collander. Daddy..

Manella Susan B Anthony Olivia Wilde Caitlyn Deavere Bennie Feldstein Cosso Amy Molly twenty four hour
How to Use the Word "Retrospective"

BM English Speaking Radio

04:44 min | 3 years ago

How to Use the Word "Retrospective"

"Retrospective. The meaning of retrospective is looking back or dealing with BAAs events or situations can exhibition of work done by an artist or were many, yours would be English. Speaking radio channel loan one new what every day and impress the world in these English will cabinetry lesson you will learn how to use the word retrospective. We are. Sure that this lesson will help you to enhance your English cab Lori, and speak English, fluently, and confidently retrospective is spelt as odd. E D. S b. C T. The e whenever the government issues notification for any new act on it also mentions vendor. The new law will be implemented from current date or retrospectively if it is retrospective. Then a pas date is specified from which it is applicable. Wasn't it easy to understand listen carefully? How we can use the word retrospective in eight different situations in eight different sentences example, number one of it Marta was given a sales target for the newly launch beauty products by her company her efforts paid off or give results and the saves volume. Almost doubled the owner of the company was a static, and he increased Marcus salary with retrospective effect since. Last three months example, number two eight the museum held a retrospective of the paintings by Cosso. It was a rare opportunity and thousands of visitors came to the museum moving onto example, number three of eight a go clay is a scholar of ancient texts. His research suggests some of the gadgets used today, I will already use in historic times to support his claims he has found retrospective. References in books written hundreds of years ago. Now lettuce understand example, number for of it. There are several old weaker releasing heavy smoke and polluting air this has affected equality and people suffer from breathing related diseases. Thankfully, in many cities that traffic police have issued circulars penalizing such week. From retrospective effect. Learn to speak English fluently and confidently from any part of the world from certified experts Raynor's to know more about our online English speaking causes log onto our site. WWW dot VM consultants. India dot com. Example number five feet. A new school opened in the neighborhood soon. All seats were filled up with students how ever six months later the school revise the fees. Retrospectively naturally. The parents were upset they're registered a protest with the principal. Moving onto example, number six of eight Missa Benjamin. The chief auditor found various errors in the agreements made with suppliers. He presented the details to the board of directors the board. Immediately ordered a thorough means compete retrospective. Inspection of all agreements example, number seven of eight. Both wall was resulted in invention of several weapons of mass destruction means destruction on a large scale this week the national art gallery is. Is organizing a retrospective of short films made about these weapons moving onto example, number eight eight the recent Guam music festival included a twenty four hours nonstop musical extravaganza. The organizers bay tribute to the Mastro ATI Bowman by plane, a retrospective of his musical work to Devi

Mastro Ati Lori India Dot Cosso Chief Auditor Marta Marcus Raynor Devi Principal Twenty Four Hours Three Months Six Months Five Feet
"cosso" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

07:39 min | 3 years ago

"cosso" Discussed on WTVN

"Okay. Back to the phones we go. This is Rick Rick is in Munster, Indiana. And it's great to have you with us today, sir. Hello. Hi, rush. Great talk to you. Hey, grit to get through to talk to you. Also. Concerning the border wall with Mexico and paraphrasing. Ronald Reagan, Mr President tear down this wall. But only in California, President Trump, I think we agree with Nancy Pelosi that in the state of California the wall along the Mexican border is a moral like she said, he should declare California and outlaw sanctuary state and order that the wall taken down starting at the Pacific Ocean and working eastward toward Zona. You want people to eat their words, and you want them to be eaten by what would happen as a result? California would have to contend with this whatever illegals crossing the border and the federal government. The federal government will not provide the state any assistance. No, no, detentions the federal government. All property like naval bases camp. Pendleton national parks, and such will be vigorously defended. And at that point Nancy Pelosi will have to concede that a wall works or suffer the consequences over moral, righteousness. Well. It would be fun to hear Trump threatened such an action. It's an interesting talking point. It's a it's a great. It's a great exercise teachable moment. You do have these Democrats out there like Pelosi talking about Walzer immoral, and they don't work California has a wall. If they didn't they're all their overrun without a wall, California is gone to the Republicans, politically and has been for a while because of this. But it's an interesting thing to tell people, you know, it'll never happen but warn fee, if if most people don't even know there is a wall, California. I mean other people near it. So you tell them tear down the wall, separating Mexico from California, watch what happens. Why why are you afraid that state would be overrun? But that's what you want. You got sanctuary cities. You've got welfare system set up in education health care for illegals. What's more? Excellent way of illustrating things. And if it did happen, you would have some people clamoring for it to stop like Pelosi and Feinstein others out there who are standing in the way of doing this. Around the country. I I'm glad I'm glad you called Nick. Thanks. Let me squeeze something here real quick before one of the time for it yesterday. Folks, I made a point. Clinton and Obama got away with being radical leftist because they didn't have to act it. They didn't have to admit it. They were allowed to camouflage. They got to pretend to be moderates and pragmatists but in truth, they were radical leftists, and they they they're voters. No it, but nobody else did. And they got away with this this game of of being triangular states and pragmatists and moderates, not the radical liberals have never been able to get away with being who they really are. But then something changed and that change is Twitter. The Clintons were said to be moderates, triangulate pragmatist Obama the same thing. That was seen as the best way to advance liberalism pretend to not be a liberal a centrist don't be a crazed right winner. Don't be entity radical centrist Obama played the same game. He was a radical leftist. He was born a Frank Marshall. Davis Bill Ayers, Jeremiah Wright, he was as radical as any of these people running around today. He just didn't have to act so or say, so but then Twitter happened. Twitter. Became the home of angry unstable irrational. Nicole leftists who had no interest in pretending to be moderate about anything. They hide behind fake names. But they do not hide their radical liberalism. So they they form moms that actively worked to destroy reputations. Policies business interests of conservatives they've made great use of fake news. And now, they are demanding, and they're succeeding look at all of these democratic presidential candidates are now apologizing for all their moderate pragmatism in the past and they're apologizing for their white privilege, and they're apologizing for this and that they are appealing to the Twitter mob. They are appealing to the radical left wackos. Who populate Twitter because as everybody does? They make them a stake of Twitter is a stand in for popular opinion. And it isn't. And everybody makes this mistake. Businesses make marketing mistakes thinking that what happens on Twitter is the same thing as a national public opinion poll on anything. And Twitter is. The playground of radicals and predominantly left wing radicals. Now, the reason I make it a big deal out of this. There's a survey that just came out and the upshot of it is is that moderate Democrats are a much bigger percentage of the democrat party. Then the progressives than the than the radical leftists. The media false for this to the media is so lazy that Twitter has become a stand in for public opinion. So the media is helping not helping the media is contributing to the democrat party belief that their party is a bunch of radical left lunatics that that is the majority of their party. That's who is running for president. And they're campaigning as legitimate radicals are leftists when the truth is the majority of their party is said to be moderate, according to this in comparison. So do you find it interesting that just yesterday the day before the AP has a story claiming Democrats all of a sudden realized they need again the votes of white males, white working class males? Because they are starting to realize, but it's going to be too late. Not enough. Do you Alexsandr Cosso Cortez does not speak for no represent the majority of the democrat party, but don't confuse yourself? Don't don't be confused. I'm not saying the parties a bunch of harmless middle road moderates. They're not. But it is not the lunatic left. Majority that the Democrats themselves think it is they're they're on the way to being taken over by. This group is the point bottom line. They're being sucked in the defeating themselves. I actually shouldn't be talking about this because it may be giving them a heads up. Yeah..

Twitter California Nancy Pelosi democrat party Obama Mexico President Trump federal government Rick Rick Ronald Reagan Indiana Munster Pacific Ocean Alexsandr Cosso Cortez President Bill Ayers Nick Frank Marshall president Nicole
Harold Miller Discusses Improving Medicare's Alternative Payment Models

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

04:54 min | 3 years ago

Harold Miller Discusses Improving Medicare's Alternative Payment Models

"To the healthcare policy podcast again on the host, David intra Cosso during this podcast, discuss Medicare's, alternative payment, models, APM's or more. Specifically, how APM's can be improved with Munis gust? The topic is president and CEO of the center for healthcare quality and payment reform herald Miller herald, welcome back to the program. Thank you. David vigor listeners may recall, I spoke with Mr Miller in September twenty fifteen moreover about bundled payments. Mr Miller's bio is of course, posted on the podcast website on background that twenty fifteen. Macro law created Medicare's advanced payment models again APM's these are otherwise term pay for performance reimbursement models where the provider assumes financial risk based on historical on regional spending in quality measurement performance. There are currently a dozen APM's although this year Medicare Advantage could qualify almost all of these are demonstration and the flagship of APM's or the one of currency give against is the as Medicare should savings program. More commonly termed ACO's because the vast majority of EPSN beneficiaries are over ten million are assigned to it. Or again, ACO's the ACO program just to note is currently. In its eighth year is unclear to what extent ACO's have reduced Medicare spending growth largely because CMS does not formally evaluate the program. If Medicare program, however to remain financially saw build fee for service APM's must produce meaningful. Savings results since the Medicare Advantage program that currently enrolls over thirty three Medicare beneficiaries and his rapidly growing does not in federal financial accounting terms score savings with me again to discuss APM's the flaws in their current design. And moreover how they can be better designed or generate meaningful savings is Harold Miller. So that is back on her. Let me start by asking we just celebrated or some did the nine year anniversary of the Affordable Care Act. So if I could begin by asking what's your overall Sussman of efforts moreover under the ACA to reduce Medicare spending growth over almost now ah decades time. Well, I think it was called the Affordable Care Act, but most of the law and most of the attention has really been about improving access to insurance and the the law has clearly done that. But I think that the track record in terms of actually making healthcare more affordable as much weaker. There really were weren't that many provisions in the law designed to deal with that. And the few that were there have had pretty slow implementation. I would say one of the things is you wanted to talk about alternative payment models today. One of the hopes was that the center for Medicare and Medicaid innovation. That was created under the Affordable Care Act would really spark a lot of innovation in terms of the way Medicare, and then hopefully other payers would pay for healthcare, but it's been pretty disappointing in terms of how. Much or how little is done to to do that in those nine years. Yes. Correct. I was going to follow up with your view of the Medicare cheered savings program December final rule, but let's we'll get to that. So let's move onto. Generally, you've written now numerous detailed reports regarding Medicare payment reform over the last several years, let's focus on your latest work. That is your January report titled the prom with Medicare's alternative payment models and how to fix them. Let me start by asking what would an idealized APM generally, look like. Well, I think in my opinion, if it were ideal model, and I know that there's written there's no one ideal model, but the the the elements of it would need to address the problems that exist in fee for service payment without taking away the strength of fee for service payment, and would actually and able physicians hospitals. Other health care providers to be able to deliver care to patients in in ways that would be both better for the patient and lower spending for Medicare or other payers. There are many many opportunities in to reduce spending without hurting patients in

Medicare APM ACO Harold Miller Miller Herald President And Ceo David Intra Cosso Sussman David Vigor ACA Medicaid Nine Years Nine Year
"cosso" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"cosso" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"We've a great interview with Bill Bennett. Bill Bennett is very cerebral. He's very thoughtful. He's kind of the one of the wise men of the Reagan administration, and we cover a lot of ground, and you're going to really enjoy it. I'm sure. What else are you gonna do? Ten pm on the east coast Sunday night. Seriously. What are you gonna do? Watch endless reruns on on one of the cable channels come out China's you don't wanna watch this stuff. I won't do it. Promise. I got plenty to do. But I think this is a very very important program. It's a full hour one on one or one onto and we invite. Xanada ocasio Cosso, whatever we invite her. They come on the program Bernie Sanders. Bernie Sanders hit his head on the shower. Did you see this on the edge of the Sherry had seven stitches? That's not like an accident. Do you really have to slam your head? Banging your head against what are you doing? Exactly. And what is it with Democrats in their showers? Remember Harry Reid at a black guy because they shower, Mr. producer. He get a black eye from shower. I can see you get a cut on your face on your head on your whatever a black eye. What is it with Democrats? They don't know how to shower. We know they don't have to drive drive. We we know Kennedy and Chappaquiddick. Anyway, he's got seven stitches in his head there. Maybe he lost a little bit of his Marxism. Although I don't think so we'll get back to him in a minute. But we want to get back to Bago dork. And he was in Iowa yesterday, saying all kinds of brilliant, things capitalism is racist. What else? Listen to this one. So all those he doesn't say anything it has it. He got actually listen cut through the platitudes. And then you can tell what he's saying cut thirteen go. What if there were justices selected by.

Democrats Bill Bennett Bernie Sanders Kennedy Xanada ocasio Cosso Reagan administration Harry Reid Sherry China Bago Chappaquiddick Iowa producer
"cosso" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"cosso" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"We have a great interview with Bill Bennett. Bill Bennett is very cerebral. He's very thoughtful. He's kind of the one of the wise men of the Reagan administration, and we cover a lot of ground, and you're going to really enjoy it. I'm sure. What else are you gonna do? Ten pm on the east coast Sunday night. Seriously. What are you going to do? Watch endless reruns on on one of the cable channels come out. China's you don't wanna watch this stuff. I won't do it. Promise. I got plenty to do. But I think this is a very very important program. It's a full hour one on one or one onto and we invite. Xanada ocasio Cosso, whatever we invite her. They come on the program Bernie Sanders. Bernie Sanders hit his head on the shower. Did you see this on the edge of the Sherry had seven stitches? That's not like an accident. Do you really have to slam your head? Banging your head against what are you doing? Exactly. And what is it with Democrats in their showers? Remember Harry Reid at a black guy because he shower, Mr. producer. How do you get a black eye from shower? I can see you get a cut on your face on your head on your back. Whatever a black eye. What is it with Democrats? They don't know how to shower. We know they don't have the dry know how to drive we we know Kennedy and Chappaquiddick. Anyway, he's got the seven stitches in his head there. Maybe he lost a little bit of his Marxism. Although I don't think so. We'll get back to him in a minute. But we want to get back to beta dork, and he was in Iowa yesterday, saying all kinds of brilliant, things capitalism is racist. What else? Listen to this one. So all those him. He doesn't say anything. He got actually listen cut through the platitudes. And then you can tell what he's saying. Cut thirteen go. There were five justices..

Democrats Bill Bennett Kennedy Bernie Sanders Xanada ocasio Cosso Reagan administration Harry Reid Sherry China Chappaquiddick producer Iowa
"cosso" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"cosso" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Who wants something Bengals postmen. We are dealing with a collector here and not a serial thief. Well is this for users this for adults for adults? This is definitely not an animated movie for kids. It's a very sophisticated piece of work from Hungary and director, but it's been dubbed into English. So you don't have to worry about subtitles. And that's good because the screen is filled with of for ninety minutes with the most astonishing visual sites that you're ever going to see this is a beautifully crafted movie in terms of substance. It's about a series of art thefts. And it's about the subliminal mind control and CIA experiments, and there's a lot of espionage work that goes on in it as well. The story is is really pretty cluttered. But what's good about the film is that it's filled with RAI allusions to artworks it's filled with allusions to films that people are going to be able to pick up and recognize it's gonna it's filled with all sorts of takeoff. On the cliches of espionage films and chase films. What you're gonna come away with mostly though is just an appreciation of the artistic style of the film, even the characters are drawn into Cuban Cuba's style list Cosso, for example. It's just a lovely film to look at. And if you get confused while you're watching it, you know, it doesn't really matter. Just enjoy the beloved Jewish images that are coming at you for ninety minutes. To follow the story line. That's okay. Finally, real quick, the German film, the invisibles. Yeah. This is a documentary slash drama. And it's based on a very interesting story about Jews who hit out in Berlin through the whole course of the war. There was some seven thousand of them and about fifteen hundred survived. This is the story of four of them the four are actually introduced so you get talking head interviews with them, and those are interest spiced with recreated scenes of the events that they're talking about the two elements. Don't meld perfectly in the course of the film. That's the major stumbling block at the picture, and the re-creations are very stiff and almost amateurish. But the story is so fascinating that it holds your interest. Anyway. And so if you're willing once again to read subtitles because you have to do that with this film. This is a film that's worth seeing. All right, Frankie, always liked those foreign films. You can find out more at one guys. Opinion dot com. It is eight twenty five let's get an update on traffic on the.

Bengals CIA Hungary Berlin Cuba RAI Frankie director Cosso ninety minutes
"cosso" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:22 min | 3 years ago

"cosso" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Org. The Warren peace report, I mean, he Goodman, one week after Trump's former personal lawyer in fixture. Michael Cohen delivered an explosive congressional testimony. The New York Times is reporting New York. State regulators are investigating insurance claims and policies of Trump's businesses. And if subpoenaed the Trump organizations insurance broker Aon Michael Cohen told lawmakers last week, the Trump organization regularly inflated, the value of its assets for insurance purposes. The news comes one day after the House Judiciary committee requested documents from eighty one people and groups and Trump's inner circle in Sacramento, California. Protesters continued to take to the streets following the news Saturday that the county's district attorney would not file criminal charges against the two. Police officers who shot and killed twenty two year old unarmed African American Stefan Clark and his grandmother's backyard last year on Monday. Tonight. Police arrested eighty four protesters including local religious leaders tiny face on founder of the local black lives. Matter chapter said there was heavy police presence prior to the crackdown which she attributed to the demonstration taking place in a wealthy neighborhood. Demonstrators are now occupying a local police station in action coal by black lives matter Sacramento, after California attorney general have your announced his office will not file charges the Justice department along with the US attorney's office and the FBI said Tuesday, it was launching its own investigation into the killing in Chicago. Police officer filed a whistle blower lawsuit. Monday, alleging he was directed to falsify a report on the two thousand seventeen police shooting of unarmed African American teenager Ricardo Hayes sergeant Isaac Lambert who investigated the shooting says he was told by superiors to portray the police officers victim and Hayes as an aggressor. He was demoted from his position after. Refusing to alter his report at the time of the two thousand seventeen police shooting officer Khalil Muhammad claimed he shot Ricardo Hayes who court documents say has profound intellectual and developmental disabilities. After an escalated encounter, where Hayes appeared to be pulling out a gun, but footage of the events that was later released instead showed officer Muhammad chasing after the teen in his car before shooting directly at him. House. Speaker Nancy Pelosi told reporters Tuesday, a resolution condemning antisemitism will now also condemn anti-muslim bias the resolution is seen as a direct. Rebuke of recent comments by Minnesota, congressman Ilhan, Omar questioning the US relationship with Israel, even though the draft resolution does not explicitly name the freshman congressman Bor the resolution was announced after comments by Omar at an event last week in which she called out the quote political influence in this country. That says it's okay for people to push for. Legions to a foreign country. Referring to Israel, Omar has repeatedly condemned antisemitism. Prior to Pelosi statement, New York, congress member Alexandra Cossio Cortes, posted a flurry of tweets Monday and Tuesday, accusing Omar's critics of using a double standard Alexandra Cosso Cortez tweeted quote incidents, like these do beg the question where are the resolutions against homophobic statements for anti blackness for Zena phobia for a member saying he'll send Obama.

Ricardo Hayes Trump officer Aon Michael Cohen Omar Khalil Muhammad New York Sacramento Nancy Pelosi California The New York Times Alexandra Cossio Cortes Goodman House Judiciary committee Alexandra Cosso Cortez Stefan Clark
"cosso" Discussed on NFL: The Dave Dameshek Football Program

NFL: The Dave Dameshek Football Program

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"cosso" Discussed on NFL: The Dave Dameshek Football Program

"It just doesn't this doesn't break that way. It's easy to like. I can't imagine any other team beating the chiefs it. Yeah. Well, that's that's because you're. You know, and you're still drunk on on the booze of the seas in the off season things change in chemistry homes on the new Rogers. He's way he's so immensely talented and their if they lead de forego cares. They were the leading the league in sacks defense was still awful. They'll have but the fly the way way Matthew there still awful by the wing hack or it was terrible. Packers lose clay Matthews contract. They share that gives them more money to spend. That back end is suddenly at position of great strength for them with the youth that they have there in Green Bay. And if they add levian bowel behind Aaron Rodgers, I mean, just. What do you need? Devante atoms. And that's it start. You started by saying this is the stupidest thing we'd do just because you think of the big names in free agency or the trade market that are available and how much that will swing based on where bell goes if Brown gets moved to contending teams. Right. Earl Thomas, like just imagine. If the chargers signed Earl Thomas, and they solve that free safety position that burned them all season long. My God that defense. That's that was the one hole or if they can actually get a viable middle linebacker like so I'm just talking about the teams that were close the cheese if they're able to get a dominant lockdown corner, and Eric berry is healthy and back, then it's like, okay. Well, that's that's what they were missing. Now, you're screwed. You're not you're not gonna outscore them in any game. There's just so many little things like did talk to your powder when James who's delightful young guy and is only a rising force as dominant as he was in his rookie season. He is going to be better in year two that defense. I mean, imagine. Now what if? Jason Barack comes back with Hayward on the other side. I mean, I I could see them like for me. It's that safety if they can if somehow Gus can convince Earl Thomas the come down and play that position. And he's healthy. And you don't have to worry about ever put Derwin James up there. You are during you are free to run a muck and just create chaos because Earls got it locked down high. That's to me change him interesting. He's a humble guy. He soft-spoken. But is definitely when you press him brassy about stuff I say who's the rookie of the year? But Derwin James cannot get a vote who gets rookie of the year in twenty thousand and he's like Derwin James. I said, no, no. I don't think I understood the question friend again. I I'm not gonna say anyone. But me, he's it's only me, and that's kind of swagger. He's got. He's got the understated swag. I'll tell you. I don't know if I'm supposed to share this story. But I will. I don't think I'll get in trouble for it. But one of the coaches on the chargers when he was when he got the all pro. Mod for two positions defensive back and safety first team or first team safety second team defensive back that they've added because there's so much nickel being played. Now. He said I was stand in when one of the one of the lower level assistant said that there are one. Hey Darren now, you're not gonna get big head on on us. Are you now that you've got the all pro stuff, right? And he sincerely looked at the guy and goes, whoa. Why would I mean people been telling me, I'm the best player on a field the whole life? It's eighth and he was just completely sincere. Like, no, you don't have to worry about that. I've been that's what people tell me every day. They tell me on the best football player on the field. So this is. Yes. Two thousand four he and I got together, and and the kick Cosso the so-called kit Cosso the man who paints the sneakers and did all the my cleats. My cause for Odell Beckham and everything else created customize shoes for Derwin and for Dave damasec. And now he's got those on this. So that I get a big L up to ask you can go back and look at all that stuff NFL dot com slash p. It was positively gay.

Derwin James chargers Packers Earl Thomas chiefs Earls Rogers Derwin Hayward Aaron Rodgers clay Matthews Dave damasec Eric berry NFL Matthew Odell Beckham Cosso Darren football Green Bay
"cosso" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:20 min | 3 years ago

"cosso" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Coming up a little later on today on all of it with Alison Stewart, a look at the true crime podcast from investigative reporters at the intercept called murder Ville, it's about a brutal crime in a small Georgia town plus conversation with Christian fry the director of a new documentary that follows a group of fossil hunters and researchers as they attempt to resurrect the woolly mammoth all of that today at noon on WNYC. It's forty three degrees in New York at nine twenty. This is ball with NewsHour live from the BBC in London. There are big changes afoot in Washington DC as of today. Democrats officially take control of the house after winning an extra forty seats in November's midterm elections. It comes as the partial government shutdown over President Trump's demand for border wall funding as its thirteenth day. Let's go first to DC and speak to the BBC's. Anthony, Cosso Anthony, the number of Democrats. Indicating a real change in diversity. I mean, it's going to look different the house, but also a huge power now for the Democrats. What are they going to do with it? Well, the first thing they're going to do is be able to stop the Republican legislative agenda in its tracks. That means Republicans Donald Trump aren't going to be able to do any more tax reform healthcare repeal. No major overhaul of the immigration system. No big entitlements social security reforms now, whether Democrats can actually enact their legislative agenda. Remember, the Republicans still hold the Senate? They still have the presidency the house could possibly pass government ethics reform changes to voting rights gun control climate change, all these things they wanna do. But the reality is is probably going to be partisan gridlock for the next two years. The big thing that they will have however is oversight power of the Trump administration for the first time in these two years. They're going to have contra control committees of the house representatives the able to issue subpoenas. Look into a business background look into possible election Medellin, his ties to foreign governments everything that was essentially stymied by Republicans for two years is now on the table, and they are definitely up. For that challenge, aren't they? I mean, there's no questioning that. Absolutely. I they've been itching for this for two years now they finally have some skin in the game. We had unified Republican control of all of the levers of power here in Washington DC for the past two years, essentially Democrats were doing their best to throw sand in a year. Now, they have control of one of those gears the house of representatives, generally, it tends to work on a purely a majority basis. The speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi is good have considerable power to determine the legislative agenda in that chamber, and they're gonna use it. They're essentially going to try to lay the the framework for a twenty twenty campaign saying we deserve the presidency back. We deserve the Senate back, and then these are the sorts of things we can enact they want to track record that they can run on. I've just very briefly what impact is the shutdown having. Well, we have about eight hundred thousand federal workers across the country who are either working for no pay or not working at all national parks are closing. The Federal Communications Commission is going to be shuttering soon here in Washington DC, their museums that are all closing that people can't get to it is having a real impact at impacted on people's lives because they if they're leaving paycheck to paycheck are working day to day, Anthony Zaka joining us live from Washington DC. Let's speak now to Mark short who was director of legislative affairs for President Trump and oversaw the White House's handling of the last major government shutdown in January last year. Welcome to the program. President Trump has said that he would welcome a shot down. If he didn't get out of quote funding for the border wall. It quickly got called the Trump shutdown. I wonder how you see all of this resolving itself. Well, thanks for having me Raza. I think the shutdown doesn't usually play beneficially to either side politically. So it's not something really to embrace. I think the only way out of this particular shutdown though was if the deal becomes larger because essentially the budget for the US government is about a trillion dollars, and what we're arguing over a small fraction of that in a difference between one and a half billion and five billion for the border wall. So you basically have to size entrenched, politically and neither cycle even that they can give in. So I think the only way out is if the deal becomes larger meaning that perhaps Democrats be more willing to give funding for border security, if Republicans gave up something that Democrats want that's not on the table now. So should be what well such as a resolution to the dock recipients. Those who have our children of adults who came the United States illegally, but our bit have been abiding by the law here and working and to make sure that they. Go ahead and get legalized that's something outside of the appropriations process. The finance of the government. It could be added that perhaps it'd be way out. But I think that it's probably going to be a shutdown that lasts for an extended period of time. Because Anthony just said, you're correspondent, this isn't an entire government shutdown. It's just a partial shutdown that doesn't mean to make it smaller for those eight hundred thousand people, but many people in America will not even see the impact of the shutdown shit show. But I mean, it clearly is becoming a a war of words as well between Nancy Pelosi and President Trump. I mean, she's questioning the language that he's using about trying to justify getting that extra four or five billion dollars funding for that for that war. You know, he's talking about people who are coming over potential terrorists. And so on and she's continuing to say, well, this is actually just a lie. Well, I think one thing that the situation should have done would be to would be to have had the border security people have asked for the security measure to make the argument. Instead, it's become personalized as you just said is Donald Trump's wall. When in fact, what the president is advocated for is a plan that was preceded him in the administration has a plan that customs aboard between the United States and ask for in the previous administration, but it's now become personalized. And so therefore it makes it political between Nancy Pelosi and Donald Trump as opposed to the career officials. Accustomed board ritual said, here's where we actually need enhanced port security show. So in the context that you've just outlined. It's quite possible. But there's no reason why Nancy Pelosi who is now again, very very powerful would want to give any ground over this issue. Not only that I think in many ways she's paralyzed because the new constituency she has is a more liberal constituency that does not want to see your give any ground to the president. And if she did it could perhaps jeopardize her standing as the new speaker of the house, so in many ways alleys if not that she doesn't want to but politically should be jeopardized. If she did it is there any possibility given what we have seen of President Trump over the last two years that he might want to finesse the way in which he operates in order to be less polarizing less divisive of a figure because clearly eat the politics is now more polarized than ever the way the government is going to function is going to be much more difficult. Is there any possibility that he might change, you know, I don't see the president changing. But I do think there's several policies. He could agree with Democrats on Donald Trump is not a traditional conservative and they're mentally areas. Such as infrastructure. Funding for the United States or drug pricing that he actually agrees more with the Democrats plans. So if if politics removed aside, they're actually would be legislation that could move in a bipartisan fashion, but I don't see really the tenor of the tone changing did do you think that the president is doing a good job? I think the president is delivered on the campaign promises. He made. I think our economy is has certainly turned around in the United States. I think from a national security perspective is stronger. So yes, I think that the president has many accomplishments American people can be proud of. Okay. So you say he's he has many accomplishments. What what about the very radical shift in the political discourse, many, many people have criticized including inside the Republican party for the way in which he talks about America about his opponents in the way in which he talks, generally. I think there's no doubt that the coarseness is something that many people are not comfortable with. But I you comfortable with it. I think there's certainly a town that the many would would not be comfortable with. But I also believe that the courses in American politics at something that was coming for some time. The words I think that Donald Trump in many ways was reaction to the years of the Obama presidency and the American people were anxious for something different. I don't think that Donald Trump created this. I think it's something that has been evolving in American politics. And he was the the answer to it. Marc short, director of legislative affairs for President Trump who has overseen the White House is handling of the last major government shutdown in January last year. Thanks for joining us.

President Trump president Nancy Pelosi United States Washington DC Trump White House Cosso Anthony Senate director of legislative affair BBC America Alison Stewart WNYC Republican party New York murder
Tom Brady calls Aaron Rodgers 'inspiring' ahead of rare matchup

The Frankie Boyer Show

00:56 sec | 3 years ago

Tom Brady calls Aaron Rodgers 'inspiring' ahead of rare matchup

"Doesn't do that very often. Like, he'll give some platitudes. The platitudes aren't quite that strong. He's not saying he's better than me. He's saying if anybody is on my echelon or close to it. It might be Aaron Rodgers all I think he's saying naturally. He's the most gifted quarterback. He's seen. I think he is saying that he's well we anonymous anonymous sources have said I think was Ian O'Connor who said I'm not sure in o'conner reported with anonymous sources that Tom Brady has said to an NFL coach that Aaron Rodgers is a hundred times better than more more talented than he is. When Tom Brady's calling. You your play inspiring. Cosso complimenting Michelangelo those times. I don't know if those time periods you understand what I'm saying Tom Brady telling you that you're inspiring as a quarterback. Is the highest of compliments? It's also a waste of Chuck solid. Doors time. Show on ESPN radio. Trade pros Ferguson's proud to be a part in what you do. And it's our aim to be the easiest one of your long day on the job one thousand one stop shop counter. Locations expert associates had an unmatched collection of Goto and hard to find OEM repair products. You can depend on us to do our part

Aaron Rodgers Tom Brady Ian O'connor Goto Espn Chuck Ferguson NFL
See Meghan and Harry's official royal wedding photos

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:50 min | 4 years ago

See Meghan and Harry's official royal wedding photos

"Thank you even even if you have somewhat soggy peppers still quite possible to throw it into a stir fry unsafe that's what suit since jesus fool hasn't he slow cookers linda this one topic of couse that we avoid like anything if we possibly can here but it is on the front pages still i'm gonna let you say the word it is the royal wedding as well as some of the other papers is the release of the informal photographs in other words not the wedding photos but the the photos taken within windsor cosso of the marriage of prince harry and meghan markle the new duke and duchess of sussex and these photos are dominating the front pages and there's one element of it i think that most of them are picking up which is the stance of harry megan is a lot more informal than his brother will when he married the duchess of cambridge now that was a theme through the wedding they were they are a more informal couple and the wedding was private all those things suggest that of course they don't have the same responsibility says prince william who's one of the the second in line to the throne and i suppose even though it's a private wedding in terms of the economic impact and business impact i would say was probably pretty substantial judging by the viewing numbers and the number of people who went to windsor and consumed sure along the high street and the number of americans because that's not forget megan markle how could we forget his american who flew over for the occasion so it may be more informal but i think probably the impact was still sizeable we'll we look you i think it was one point nine billion views well.

Windsor Cosso Prince Harry Sussex Harry Megan Cambridge Prince William Megan Markle Meghan Markle Windsor