17 Burst results for "Cory Weinberg"

"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

06:16 min | Last week

"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

"The automakers and tech companies working on autonomous vehicle technology for so called robot. Taxis have found themselves stuck in the dreaded trough of disillusionment. You know the trough. It's where artificial intelligence or crypto currency or virtual reality developers have found themselves to the means that technological progress is hard to spot and there aren't many believers. It was a tough year painful year. A lot more tash burned without much. Payoff it's a familiar story to amirah. Friday the information's executive editor. Who has been one of the sectors fiercest muckrakers. There are a ton of real world challenges that have appended those robo. Taxi dreams but the stakes are only getting higher. Companies in the sector from light are makers to trucking startups are starting to get a ton more cash thanks to public listings inspects that will put them firmly in the public market spotlight. That's going to present. Its own challenge. Shortsellers are going to be there watching the real financial consequences when deadlines are this. Is the four one one. I'm cory weinberg on today that soda. You highlights from the information's fifth annual autonomous vehicle. Summit we have two interviews for you that you're dead where he asked his own questions and fielded some from the offense virtual attendees. The first interview is with. Brian celeski the ceo of argo. A self driving car startup backed by ford. That is testing. About one. Hundred and fifty prototype autonomous vehicles in places like ami austin and pittsburgh celeski said argo a. I is looking to go public within the next year. The second interview is with tim. Kinsley clay who was fired as the founding. Ceo of self driving car startup zips before it soul to amazon last year. He recently founded a new self driving car. Startup called hyper. I wanted to know given that were in this kind of strange period of disillusionment in in among some technologists. What gives you the confidence to know that. What you're building is gonna work. you know. Yeah the media has been pretty harsh on us of the evening sector right. But i i would say that all that opportunity is still there in. At least we've always said this is going to be a multi year multi potentially even decade long thing to achieve. I'm happy to say that everything that we set out to do in twenty seventeen were continuing to forge on. We've made great progress. And we're looking forward to commercializing this starting out. In those businesses working were actively working with real customers today. We haven't announced those pilots but Have had really great validation In those pilots that we've run This year and will continue to do but is there. Is there anything specific about the software. Something that's giving you confidence that you're heading in the right direction. Yes percent when we started out in seventeen we were operating in some of the hardest cities to drive in in a lot of people that turn some heads right but we went where the demand is where we know we can stand up a great business in for years later regularly driving without any takeover disengagements in some of these tough miles were dealing with construction intersections where humans are not behaving according to the rules at all Double triple parked vehicles traffic lights. That are out You know stop signs of fall down the whole nine yards right and it's just it's really incredible. How much progress. The team has made and You know as we continue our testing and development. We're gonna continue to improve that system. But i think the next stage now beyond just the technology questions. The is okay. Now who's gonna build a put together a a a truly profit generating business around this technology right in in what to go after And you see you see a lot of folks active in trucking. And that's something we're also looking at We're really work. We've been focused since seventeen has been on that urban core where there's a lot of trips There's a lot of demand there's a high amount of utilization over large time window to work whether that be delivering goods moving people Going address to address in that opportunity remains huge. So in in terms of your your approach. Obviously i'm sure you saw waymo move a lot of its efforts to san francisco. Some of its efforts to san francisco. You've always taken this this kind of multi-city approach in had kind of a more urban Testing environment that you focused on. Do you feel like some of the players in this field aired in in focusing so much on the suburbs will i think that Every company has its own objectives right For us it was about Making sure that we could build a business around around the miles that we were automating and then Making sure that we go after that right. Because in any sort of robotic system development It becomes really easy to start to sort of teach to kinda the miles that you're operating in the system starts to find like this local minima where it will only ever operate on those miles and so what we wanted to do is throw a lot of diversity. At the system from the gecko and make sure that we weren't Over fitting to any particular city I think we've effectively done that. In the most recent city that we added was austin. In a matter of about a month we had that city mapped in. Were up at running. So that's that's gets to Building for scale from starting. That's something we really focused on when since we started the company. Can you tell us a little bit more about that. What you're what you're looking for in an ipo. And you know. Does it make sense for the public.

Brian celeski amazon last year san francisco Friday next year cory weinberg Hundred celeski today This year nine yards two interviews first interview twenty seventeen Kinsley clay second interview seventeen fifth annual tim
"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

08:19 min | Last month

"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

"There is a dizzying array of electronics manufacturers and assemblers who make apple products the iphones airpods and watches. That help. Make it the most valuable company in the world one. Those suppliers is act bell. Polytech which makes internal power components in china and taiwan a couple years ago bell had make a pro that illustrated how it used laborers from xinjiang. The northwest region of china. That is home to many muslim. Ethnic minorities including leaguers electronics manufacturers and local governments have been creating videos out in the open to show the chinese government in beijing. They were working to meet national goals aimed at assimilating minority groups. One joel jalili. Cushy want you to so siga tell you jolla. Eci annual but this kind of work according to scholars and human rights. Researchers isn't voluntary. It's modern slavery and what was shocking about that. Video was that a. They interviewed a special tactical police officer from seen john who escorted them there and was assigned to them. And you know when we talk to researchers about this. They said that this definitely shows the repressive nece in restrict the nature of of these labor transfers. That's wayne mom. Reporter based in hong kong for the information who done significant reporting on. The tech industry's reliance on chinese labor. Working with human rights groups of the information found seven companies supplying device components coatings and assembly services to apple. Who are using suspected forged labor involving meakers and other oppressed minorities in china at least five of those companies received thousands of acres and other minority workers not specific factory sites or subsidiaries that did work for apple the investigation found. This is the four one. One i'm cory weinberg on today's show. We're going to hear more about wayne's reporting on forced labor and discuss the implications for apple which has said it has found no evidence of forced labor anywhere it operates manufacturers including advanced connect tech also denied. They used forced labor in xinjiang. But after winds reporting us lawmakers have asked apple to explain itself. Further conglomerates like apple face a challenging task managing supply chains in a country that has tried to keep suppression of minority groups. Under wraps wayne's reporting help showed us the path that laura t murphy a scholar on contemporary slavery. So it's taken a while for people to really understand what's happening there. But now that we know. And now that we can see from wayne's own reporting here just how how possible it is to track down these labor transfers into know which companies on the ground in china are complicit. I'll speak to laura in the second. Half of the episode about the broader context on forced labor and what companies consumers can do about it. I think this is a really important story. So thank you for listening i. What's my conversation with queen. Mom joined now by the information's wayne. Ma whose investigation this week found that apple suppliers participated in labor program suspected of being part of china's alleged genocide against leaguers wayne. Thanks for coming on the show. Hey thanks for having me so you started your story this week. With a scene from an industrial park and china's xinjiang region. You write that. This park is unglamorous. But there's something really important about it. What did you learn about this. I'll tell you how we kinda found the park. We noticed that there were these statements talking about this industrial park that Supported companies like apple. Hp lenovo and i decided to kind of look at corporate violence to see what companies were registered in the park and one of them popped out at me and it was a company called advanced connect tech. It was a subsidiary of them and I knew advanced. Connect the supplier to apple and so it made sense why that park would say that You know provide support to apple and we started looking into more of this parking and up satellite imagery of it and noticed that there was a structure next door that appear to be a detention camp. And the reason. I knew this is because Other journalists have kind of paved the way using satellite imagery to identify some of these detention camps and they all have very kind of typical features. Why would there be detention camps right near right near an industrial park right near the factory for a manufacturer to apple so one of the goals at that. The chinese government has been trying to complete his raising income levels of she. John residents and so dave transferring millions of migrant farmers and workers from rural parts of xinjiang to factories within john and outside of seen john but also They've been detaining lots of and other ethnic minorities as well and Putting them to work. You know While they're in detention. And so you know. One of those ways are doing is by building these industrial parks next to these detention centers and using the detention centers as a source of labor for the parks. So apple as we said has said that it hasn't found evidence in its supply chain of forced labor. What did you find well. One of the things i looked for is the addresses of some of these factories that apple uses and the names of the subsidiaries and tried to match them up with reports are online public disclosures of These labor programs where workers are transferred from joan to other factories and land and i found him six examples of at least the parent company's The apple works with Receiving these workers and then within those six four of them And i i with advanced connect tech. I guess being at at sites where we know that apple products are made or at least business lines paypal uses. So you've reported before about the issues. That apple has had with its suppliers including the company taking years to cut ties with the supplier that used underage labor. What's the tension here for apple so in july last year tim cook was asked about forced labor and he said that he finds forced labor abhorrent that if they found it they would not the only they would they would terminate a supply relationship if if it were found. But the truth is is that You know that means suppliers apple can turn to for components. Everything they make is everything they have is custom made. It takes years to develop a supplier to develop their capabilities to certify them to get them into the supply chain and even though apple. Has this rule of adam. They require at least two or more suppliers per component Getting rid of one is still very difficult given the the the volumes that they make in the capacity they need so typically in these kinds of situations if they really really want to remove supplier It's a gradual process. They will i stop giving it new business. But that doesn't mean that their existing contracts with the supplier go away and they'll continue to use that supplier up until the end of life of a product. You know when even though they've stopped selling the product is still servicing via warranties. And things like that and so we've seen that in the past as well. When are the companies that we found that received weaker and other ethnic minority labour from xinjiang. luck share prison industry They are very important supplier to apple. They assemble. They started selling the airpods for apple before that they start actually started making lighting cables. I think and then they went into assembling the airpods than they to assembling the apple. Watch and now. They've just acquired a company. That assembles the iphone and they reported last year. That apple was responsible for ten billion dollars worth of revenue which is about seventy percent of their revenue last year and so a company like that apple can't get rid of overnight you know it has.

china apple taiwan paypal july last year iphones wayne hong kong laura xinjiang iphone last year lenovo this week joel jalili cory weinberg second laura t murphy john thousands of acres
"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

08:10 min | 2 months ago

"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

"If you were to get an invitation by mark andriessen into hit menlo park office. You might see photograph on the wall of early. Banking mogul j. p. Morgan andriessen might tell you that. He admires jp morgan for his ability to build a long lasting institution which also has his name on it. And it's the sort of as you'd expect from a master of the universe type like andriessen. The netscape founder. Of course put his own name on a much younger. financial institution. injuries and horowitz. So what kind of legacy is andriessen. And his firm building for itself. What is the state of in recent horowitz. Those are some questions posing on this episode of the information or what one. I'm cory weinberg. The information recently published deep. Dive headlined inside andriessen horowitz's rise my colleague. Kate clark join me to discuss in this episode. Of course recent listings of coin base and airbnb as well as the upcoming ipo instacart robinhood as well as slew of investment in that. One little app called. Clubhouse have given andrey horowitz new relevance then we discussed a story about one of the most classic tensions in startup land. Do quote unquote digital founders. Actually want to go public. My colleague kevin mclaughlin will join me to discuss future story. He just published there's investor pressures employees pressures dramas. It's worth reading and listening to first. Let's get to kate. and talk. And recent horwitz andriessen horowitz or a sixteen z. Is up there with sequoia excel and founders fund as one of the most recognizable names and venture capital. But over the years. A nagging question has hung over. The firm does its financial performance of the firm. Really live up to its big reputation. The information's kate clark was one of the reporters that dug into that question in recent weeks and she joins me now. Hello hey how's it goin'. It's all right So you've been on the show bunch recently talking about fintech and the rapid pace of investments of tiger global management Now we turn to andriessen who is also investing in a at a torrid pace first. Let's take a little bit of a step back because you cover venture capital you cover. Start you talk to a lot of entrepreneurs what do entrepreneurs usually think of when they think of a sixteen z. And you said already at are. They're known first and foremost for being one of the best top winter capital firms. But i think second to that second to their their global reputation they're they're known for their somewhat. Celebrity founders marc andreessen. And ben horowitz. Two who are both former entrepreneurs who had you know multi-billion dollar exits on early internet companies and then came together. To form andriessen horowitz. So there's there's that piece of it and then second is the platform model andriessen horwitz pioneered decade ago when they founded the firm and what that means is in addition to a check that they give founders. They will provide them with recruiting experts. Sales experts marketing experts security experts. They'll connect the people in their portfolio to founders that they backed years prior. It's this hollywood agency model that they really brought to venture capital and since they they did that twelve or thirteen years ago we've seen other firms follow in their footsteps. And i feel like the firm has also always had its fair share of skeptics. I feel like because they are maybe more out there. They built a reputation. They put more of a target on their back. They elicit maybe some. I rolling or some some back chatter from from others in the valley. What is that side of their reputation. Yeah it's absolutely true. I would say the more recent years and actually maybe throughout their entire history. I dunno some of that is before my time covering venture but they have been known for paying really high prices for companies and therefore running up valuations in silicon valley. They they have long kind of said you know. They don't concern themselves So much with entry multiples. So they're not gonna worry about the fact that evaluation might be fifty to one hundred x current revenues. They are much more concerned with the future with future. Growth prospects with with wilder company become a trillion dollar company. And while a lot of vc's may say that that's that's also their philosophy. I think this is something that we've seen andriessen do from. The beginning is is be willing and being comfortable paying high prices and now in this market. You know you're seeing every company has kind of high prices so it's really interesting to see how andriessen has adapted and we can talk about this more but i think one of the ways in which they have adapted is by doubling and tripling down on their best companies right and i think you point out in your story that one key recent example of this was of is of course point base which had a monster direct listing last week and gave andriessen horwitz. One of the biggest returns in vc history. What dot investment. Tell us about the firm's strategy andriessen general partner chris dickson Invested very early in coin base anderson hurwitz continued to invest in the company over many years including during the so-called crypto winter when nobody really wanted to invest in crypto or blockchain companies because people thought bitcoin heyday was over. And it wasn't really going anywhere. So people do give andrey horwitz a lot of flack for running up prices or being sort of time media or having politics that they may not agree with or whatever it may be but i think it's sort of undeniable the success that they've had with coin base. I mean you just mentioned. It was one of the largest the stakes in history. I think the firm is netting about eleven billion dollars from their investment and that could rise or fall depending on the performance of the stock. But it's pretty remarkable. So i think you kind of have to give them kudos for that because they did stand by a company that a lot of people were very skeptical of for a long time and they seem to be emboldened by these potential exits. They keep raising bigger and bigger funds and investing at a more furious pace. As you point out. I think in your story you said that the firm is making multiple deals per week which raises the question can start ups handle all this cash. Yeah yeah i think it's. It's a question that i ask. Sources investors founders all the time. Like if i'm interviewing a company that has raised four hundred million dollars in the last year. I'll say why do you need to raise that much money. And and there's a spectrum of answers. I think from will why not take take take the capital. Now when it's cheap and easy to come by and not knowing what's ahead especially after going through something like the pandemic and other companies you know. They're they're growing faster than ever. It's easier to scale company now than ever. And they're using that money to sort of quote unquote hyper hyper scale. Hype lit scale. Whatever you wanna call it and blitz for plants exactly but on the other end of that as investors one of their favorite investor quotes is that more startups die of indigestion and starvation and that really begs the question. Are we going to see a generation companies kind of wipe out. Because they raised too much money. I mean we will see losers. And i think it's just a matter of time before we know who those losers are and why that happened. I think your story at least made me realize that look. This is a firm that is probably more confident than ever. It probably was not lacking for confidence before. But you know. They're finally coming into a period where they've had some pretty significant ed exits and that more coming so i think he took us inside of the swagger a little bit And i i encourage everyone to read the story that we'll.

andrey horwitz marc andreessen andrey horowitz kevin mclaughlin ben horowitz mark andriessen chris dickson Kate clark cory weinberg andriessen horwitz last week fifty kate clark twelve andriessen horowitz last year four hundred million dollars Two horwitz one hundred
"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

07:05 min | 2 months ago

"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

"This was a milestone week for california residence. Everyone aged sixteen up became eligible for the kobe. Nineteen vaccine people are lining up driving up booking appointments to get that job as the kids. Say there's a real sense of optimism that concerts open bar weddings. Even fancy tech company cafeterias will soon come roaring back but could are post vaccination future also get a little weird. The pandemic has opened up a pandora's box of questions and public health politics and technology but here are a few new ones bull society or institutions. Need to prove who's been vaccinated. How do we do that. And who keeps our health data. This is the information for one one. I'm cory weinberg on this week's episode. We're talking about vaccine passports. My colleague nick wingfield this week wrote about growing coalition of companies including microsoft and salesforce. That are working with nonprofits to make sure that the rollout vaccine passport does turn into a big mess. Then we check in with the hong kong bureau coin days wasn't the only startup this week that hit a major milestone toward becoming a public company. Singapore's ride hailing super app grab announced a huge merger with the back and china's didi trashing said that it had filed to go public. I'll talk to joe about these companies prospects. First let's get to vaccine passports. I'll start with a little personal reporting story last year. I was given access to watch an all hands meeting of the real estate company. Zillow as they were planning their back to the office strategy. One employee asked a question on a lot of people's minds with the company enforce vaccination for employees before they returned to the office. It's a question about health data so it was a little awkward at executives kind of sidestepped. The answer but vaccine enforcement could be an essential step toward reopening workplaces events and international travel. One of the first attempts is playing out in new york where people have been able to download a qr code onto their phones. That says that they received the covid nineteen vaccine or a negative test result for the virus. This is called the excelsior. Pass and yankee stadium. Madison square garden and other new york. News are already testing it but paul maier sees a potential problem with his new york system. There is that question of walled gardens. Should these systems be proprietary. What if i want to go to new jersey. New jersey needed you do. The springsteen my springsteen password york pass new jersey. Or what. If i want to fly to ruta meyer runs. The commons project a nonprofit backed by the rockefeller foundation that is trying to set technical standards for vaccine passports. It's called the vaccine credential initiative or vci the initiative has more than three hundred members including tech heavyweights like microsoft oracle and salesforce along with healthcare organizations such as mayoclinic and cigna but the company behind york's excelsior paths. Ibm it's not yet compatible. With the system that myers helping to create. If employers states sports stadiums mantra require proof vaccination myers organization. Wants to make sure that the evidence or that credential is compatible across systems some communities states make vision and we wanna be able to provide a privacy preserving verifiable trusted way of implementing there's policies they're put in place. Ibm by the way told the information. It is open to working with common pass. But meyer things that any blockchain startup or any airline that wants to kick up. Its own vaccine. Passport solution should connect into other systems not just ended up. Its own walled garden. Travel industry should be setting standards about how health date is and so i number start apps. There are a number of companies that have come out with solutions that are effectively. A proprietary blockchain solutions. That basically require anyone. Downstream shoe connects you or pay the technology provider. Hell digitize those records my colleague. Nick wingfield a senior editor at the information wrote about the comments project and vaccine passports. This week he was interested in part in this question of. Is there a prophet opportunity for some of these new digital health applications and what would a nonprofit like the comments project. Think about that. here's nick. I think they're concerned about is that maybe more technology oriented companies. Look at this as a moment of a to make profits really to make money off of this growth of digital health and their goal is is for this really not to be a source of profits but there are other concerns with vaccine passports in general should they even exist. Rhonda santa's the governor of florida put out an executive order that banned state and local governments from the proof. Vaccination documents jd. Vance the venture capitalist and author of hillbilly. Elegy tweeted earlier this month. That vaccine passport are the our way of giving a big tech even more control over our society. What vance is concerned about really is tech a thorough -tarian ism. He thinks that there are going to be records. That are created of where you of your digital health but also of where you're going to shop and venues that you're visiting and that's really an idea that that the backers of this open vaccine standard that i'm talking about in the story push back on. They say it's really Just about proving your vaccine status and you're testing status. It's a portal into all sorts of other information and this isn't a totally new thing. Parents typically have to provide immunization records for their children to get registered for schools and for decades people have provided health documentation to travel someplace internationally. Those are the kind of precedence that meyer of the comments project points to. I think it's a reasonable expectation that you know. People want to go places where they're not going to be exposed in and get becton. Myer says there's been this twenty year slogged setup interoperability standards for health data. What am i missing is consumer demand like most people wake up any morning. Thank god. I wish i had my ready dish. Last my health information but the pandemic could be a turning point to allow people to more easily gain access to their digital health records. It can be a kind of a catalytic moment to really accelerate the adoption of these interoperable kind of interoperability standards and empower people to get laxer In a way that can.

Nick wingfield microsoft new york nick wingfield nineteen vaccine mayoclinic paul maier cory weinberg cigna california Rhonda santa last year new jersey Madison square garden Nineteen vaccine twenty year This week First this week earlier this month
"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

03:19 min | 6 months ago

"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

"Like many of you to looking forward to the last couple of days of twenty twenty. It has been a rough year. Hope you and your loved ones are well and safe. This is tom. Dotan reported here at the information at our year end episode. We thought we should take the time to think about the year. That just happened in the year looking ahead. We have this annual tradition the information of predictions. We like to use our reporting powers to think about what's going to change in the industry that we cover and joining me to discuss. These is cory weinberg hickory. Hello hello so the whole prediction racket that we run here. It's an interesting one because Just as a little inside look it. One gives us an opportunity to you know. Prepare for the year ahead. In terms of what stories we to be reporting and writing about but also gives us a chance to say well. We weren't able to confirm this really hot tip that we had trend in the industry. So let's make it prediction around it and And see if we can get it out there that way. That's been my strategy. what about you. yeah. I don't think prediction making is like the most comfortable place for reporters to be. You know some reporters are maybe enjoy it. I know some folks on our staff like really love making predictions but for me. And i know for some other colleagues. It's it's a little uncomfortable. You're you're kind of always looking to uncover what's happening in the here and now not like using predictive powers to figure out what's going to happen to the future but come around on it. You know a give train your mind to like actually going to be important on your beat next year. So you know like i think i think people get value out of it. Yeah and full transparency for us. What we did this year is. We also looked back at our predictions graded how successful. They were some of mine on the media. Beat were not bad..

Dotan cory weinberg tom
"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

07:59 min | 8 months ago

"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

"Basically everyone in Silicon Valley every Kotor every marketer. Every salesperson has been working from home for about seven months. Now, seven months and many tech companies expect more of their workers to work from home in perpetuity. But all of this brings up a nagging question for these companies. Can they count on their employees to be as productive when they're juggling things at home juggling children, partners, and maybe even watching playoff baseball from their desk which that definitely doesn't apply to me. But I'm Cory Weinberg I'm a reporter for the information and I'm joined now by my colleague Nick Batstone as well as Liz fossil in. An executive at Hulu, which is a software startup focused on changing workplace behavior, and they're going to help answer some of the big replace productivity question. Thanks for thanks for joining me today. Thanks. To be here. So Nick, let's start with you. You wrote a great story this week on the topic of workplace, productivity? You got internal survey data from Google about how engineers felt that they were doing on the productivity scale recently. Find. We've found that engineers, Google only thirty one percent felt they were highly productive in their jobs in Q. Two. Twenty. Twenty. and. That was down pretty sharply eight percent from the quarter before. So Y- more engineers or Google or feeling less productive, interesting and were. You surprised but he's was alter your sources surprised by these results at all. I don't think necessarily like surprise I think what was also interesting is and what sort of prompted. Are Writing of the story as we came across an email from Google head of Engineering Productivity Michael Bachman he sent an email last week to engineering directors bringing this issue up. And in the email he he cited the survey. So he said that you know the the number of change lines which are like attempted changes to Google Code that had dropped in a period in August as well as like actual coding time. Yeah totally. Liz whoa how. Google outlier here. Obviously, huge intellectual company particularly when it comes to the workplace and obviously the founder of who was Google former head of people but. Are they alone sort of seeing productivity drops made? kind of this work from Home Environment Yeah I definitely don't think so I think actually a lot of patients saw or perceived that productivity spiked early on when covert hit and when we all shifted to remote work and I, think a lot of that was just driven by adrenaline. There were also around of land in the tech sector. And so there's a lot of job insecurity people also might be feeling survivor's guilt, and so I think just with everything that was happening, it's entirely possible that people were working harder in those first few months. So March April May, and then these things that kind of hamper our productivity. To some extent. So for example, if you're a parent and you have kids at home, if you live alone, you're feeling very isolated I think those are the things that now are starting to really affect people and I would guess contributes to that dip August. And we've been hearing that to who we work with large global organizations and we're hearing from a lot of managers are feeling like they've lost. One of their senses. Employees are saying I'm doing the work, but it's just fun anymore and it's just it's like starting to feel like groundhog day, and then that's hard to stay motivated. It's hard to feel like the spark of joy that you might have felt. Even if you love your job thing. Earlier either what is the like sort of why? Why do companies care reader sort of right now, the Google stock price seems to be doing okay. It's up to fifteen percent since the start of the year outpacing the SNP. Are they concerned about about productivity issues? Definitely, companies are very concerned. It's one of those things where the longer this goes on the more of an issue it's going to be and definitely seems at this point like this is not a six month thing this could be a year. A lot of tech companies have extended work from home to at least next summer. Many are actually making the switch to permanent work from home or at least some kind of more flexible arrangement going forward so. These are problems that need to be solved. Figure figured out you know a concerning trend from the from the report that we saw was that. Productivity sentiment was dropping even faster for a short tenured employees. So people that had been at Google. You know. had been hired recently hadn't been there as long. That's definitely concerning like you're you're you're not setting these people up for success. You want these employees to thrive and be there for the long term, and if they're struggling initially, it's going to be good for the company in the long run. It's interesting. Yeah. Starting a new job right now can't be fun. I'm curious Liz. What do you think this looks like post pandemic you know how do they make this work? Once we have a vaccine once people can maybe interact face to face, but they're still going to be pressured to give them remote work flexibility. We're hearing across our customers about seventy to ninety percent depending on the customer of employees don't want to go back to the office full-time So my guess is that there will be A. Lot more flexibility going forward and one of the primary things that were advising executives and helping them think through is being really thoughtful about when you're bringing people together and who you're bringing people together. So for example, new hires having a cohort that starts and making sure that they get to meet the leadership team get to meet a bunch of different people across the organization so that you're facilitating those spontaneous interactions at drive innovation kind of form that. To, that keeps the organization. Creative and then. Thinking too I. Think One really important thing will be. Asking who wants to come in to the office so some people might be caretakers. Might have other constraints, they maybe immuno-compromised and still not feel comfortable coming in but then also being aware of the equity portion of that. So if it's just like young people who are single and super eager to get back into the office, making sure that there don't you know you're you're actually having fairness in access and how you measure performance. So I think those are all really hard things to figure out and no one has the answers yet because we're all new to this. But those are things that we're thinking about that. We're hearing executives think about a lot google gets a lot of attention around this topic because they are they are sort of trendsetter and. They sort of get since the early two thousands have been tagged with the cat of notion of free food free bikes ballpit. All that stuff for for employees. How are they handling this moment in general? You know what do you think Google? Company. Becomes. In relation to how it. Kind of How it develops relationships with.

Google Liz fossil executive Nick Batstone Cory Weinberg Hulu reporter founder head of Engineering Michael Bachman
"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

05:50 min | 10 months ago

"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

"Information, for one one, I'm cory, Weinberg. This is part two in a series on the impacts of AIRBNB and the short term rental economy it helped spawn. Paris you're going to take us through some of your reporting on this. Yeah. So this all started when I got on the phone with the sky. Dan Weisman maybe I watched the wire too many times. It taught me how things were connected. Dan is a pretty normal dude. Actually he lives in Nashville with his wife and works for a wealth management firm. They moved East Nashville in late twenty seventeen around the same time the tourists were flocking to the music city in record numbers. Nashville head always been a popular tourist destination but the rise of short term rental platforms like airbnb catapulted tourist interest into the stratosphere all of a sudden the tourists weren't just town hotel districts. They were everywhere for residents like Dan the transition was kind of frustrating. You'd have just a lot of strangers hanging out on the deck loud music a lot of drinking the trash would pile up. Dan Actually had an accident and he ended up having to have foot surgery leaving him bedridden with little to do but sit in bed staring. At the AIRBNB across the street, he soon realized that it wasn't the only home that had been converted into short term rental on his block. There was the condo down the street that a dozens of tourists filing in-and-out each weekend in another house a few down from his that had different groups of drunk young people in the art every week. Once he started noticing them, he couldn't stop. So he started digging what kind of digging are. We talking about here like looking at property records or at least that's how it started. The first one that I looked up turned out. It was owned by two men that had a long island address on the deed. Lucky for me. It's really easy to look property in Nashville. So I got their names I, Google them and turns out they both worked at a company called Domingo donate. Now what was Dome wherefore for Art Thou Dome Yeah. I hadn't heard of it. Don't be a household name but much like Dan wants I started looking I quickly got obsessed like a six foot tall cork board covered in red string and posted notes obsessed. The story of Domingo begins with CEO and Co founder J Roberts the way he tells it the idea for Dome started when j was living in Manhattan's Times. Square around two thousand, sixteen. Jay was banker living in New York as pinkers do and he started renting spare bedroom in his apartment on AIRBNB. He started making a lot of money from it. Actually he got good reviews from guests who appreciate it having a decent place to stay without paying an arm and a leg for microscopic hotel. Room? Here's Roberts talking about it at the skift short term rental summit back in twenty thousand nineteen. That's when the light bulb went off and I said brands are going to be the future of home sharing of Airbnb and around this time that light bulb was going off for a bunch of different entrepreneurs buy twenty sixteen or so airbnb was becoming dominant revenue was growing by close to ninety percent A. Year better. BNB's could be inconsistent. You didn't know what you'd be getting startups thought you could deliver hotel like consistency to short term rentals by professionalising them becoming the Marriott of Airbnb or something like that. A bunch of startups popped up to service market. There was lyrics to Alfred the guild before he'd filed the paperwork to Incorporate O. J. had actually accepted a job at one of these companies called Saunder. He learned their financial models got access to pitch decks, materials, detailing Sandra separation strategies. He was even trained by Sandra, CEO and their head of real estate. But a couple of weeks before his official start date key reneged on the job offer left and ended up starting his own company. Domingo doing pretty much. The exact same thing for now don't mio. It's decent business idea. The idea was to run a bunch of European bees. Basically, hotels dough rented at apartments and homes in popular cities around the nation outfitted them a stylish furniture and in many cases, fancy adult bunk beds and beer pong tables and then rented the mount fulltime on platforms like Airbnb for cheap what made them really different than any other type of host on Airbnb? Well, they a brand name employees employee's dough meal raised upwards of seventy million dollars from some pretty marquee investors and hired a lot of real estate experts to scare. For buildings and strike deals with landlords to lease apartments to get inventory in interviews and in press releases over the years, Jay would also tell one other big difference technology according to J. Dole meal was a capital T. Tech Company. We've hired amazing engineers and product folks from airbnb from Uber from Amazon So we are building our own technology would often tell the super advanced quote unquote quant style algorithms that Dome Yeah us to figure out where to expand to you. You know there's always there's always an algorithm they're always this. With all this in mind I started reaching out to former. Tomio. Employee's in the hopes of getting a better understanding of what the company was up to. One of the first people that I spoke with was this Guy Josh, Benson who worked on the real estate team in late two, thousand eighteen pretty much right away things started to get weird there is no algorithm whatsoever on finding a property absolutely zero algorithm if anyone says that absolutely boldface lies the more than I talked to Josh other former employees, the more than my understanding of this company began to change..

AIRBNB Nashville Dan Domingo Dan Weisman Dan Actually J Roberts Jay Paris Sandra CEO cory Google Weinberg O. J. Josh Manhattan
"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

14:36 min | 1 year ago

"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

"Everybody it is. Wednesday time for your mid week information. Four one one. This is Tom. Dotan hosted the show reporter at the information. Just general man about town not not even about town about home and I've Got Cory Weinberg on the line with us today to talk about. Well we mostly AIRBNB and he wrote a great profile of Brian. Cherokee who has the headline says is he the man to save airbnb. Which really I would hope that the company would be the person that would help. That would help. Save them before we get into them. He had a great scoop and something that I think. Many people in the world kind of sadly anticipating Which is Layoffs and this one coming to open door which is a War Actually Corey. Why don't you first explain kind of its financial situation what what is open door to door? Thanks talk yeah companies. I think people in the daily are fascinated by in part of. It's like this really It's a really cool idea to Essentially made the home buying and selling process a lot easier and it's very sort of sort of silicon valley go about it. Uses data science algorithms to determine the price of a home. It makes an offer on a home that you know. People are looking to sow And it takes a fee. You know essentially a convenience fee For the trouble of not having to sort of show the home and go through all the rigmarole of of of of selling a house which everyone knows is a terrible process. Open door comes in with the solution to do it. It's also a very capital intensive risky county. Big Debt. Kind of a business. That's been slowly you know. Sort of picking up steam around the country Open door I think it was last valued in the four billion dollar range. It's raised you know. Billion the back with the three billion of debt And you know all of a sudden the pandemic meant that had to come to a screeching halt rights open door always struck me as like a very classic. Silicon Valley Company of this era in which they identify an inefficiency in the market or some sort of a very specific pain point kind of seems to be one that told me from wrong here but appeals mostly to people that are kind of well off or not as concerned about making a ton of money in the short term. But it's it's a huge convenience to the people that use it right. I think yes. It is a convenient product. I think it actually I haven't seen agreed sort of study on this but I do think it actually opened door falls under the radar sometimes in part because it's mostly killing two people that aren't that well off. I think it's mostly middle class product upper-middle-class products. The homes that buys from people who are mentioned either intentionally stays away from luxury housing intentionally stays away from like San Francisco housing anything. That's different CISCO doesn't operate here In part because it's much more difficult to price those homes Shorter predictably but essentially what open door. I was GONNA say the kind of business for them. Maybe you're getting to that. Is that if I'm someone selling a House. I would be willing to take the price that they're offering to me and then open door and turn sells it for a higher price. It's just an arbitrage in that way Ann Arbor to they need to make money off You know sort of the appreciation of that home right like it does some repairs on them and it hopes that you know housing market keeps going up. And it can Saudis homes within a few months general eight. But it's like a big rent if they miss priced homes or if the market suddenly takes dip like right. Now than digress. Right where where you know. Essentially you all the gains that used or made Sort of on Sort of some of the last batch on homes that you told are suddenly wiped out by the losses that after the take right right and so this gets to the story that you published earlier today which is you know. It's funny when I was speaking to a lot of investors in the valley I would ask which startups out. There are uniquely vulnerable right now. Do you expect there to be a huge number of layoffs? Open door was almost always at the top of the list So so what happened? Yeah so this morning opened or informed employees that they were laying about six hundred hundred of their staff That's about thirty five percents So the big company has about eighteen hundred eighteen hundred employees And those were those cuts were across the board everyone from software engineers to meet people that started working on home repairs on the ground in Phoenix or San Antonio or wherever And to let the pretty steep cut I mean six hundred. Employees is at least by my count one of the largest layoffs that we've seen from a private check on the I think only a toasted also up their their arrests. Were you know their restaurant? you know sort of software and hardware company. And so you know you're seeing obviously some of the biggest hits right now are are still being taken by businesses that are ego. Their businesses is directly impacted by the end up back home home by selling anything related to real estate a lot of transportation restaurants. You know The it up. It's not like these start-up certain insulated and I and I think like you know question now and we didn't have any tracks reporting on this but I think it's it's the question on everybody's mind Us How much cash do these companies have left You would think that a a as diva cut as they made you know you would think that they are. You know sort of quickly tied to preserve the cash that they have Can they raise more money? Raise convertible debt or the or another way to keep going Can I do think like this business model ins in trouble right now? I can see like a bull case. Where if they can get through the pandemic that this way of buying and selling houses could catch on You know a it was prior to this right. I mean their business was doing. He was improving this. This was a growing business and growing. Yeah IT'S A. It's a low margin business. Ride like they you know eating these people intensive capital intensive. It's it's not like they're just running a software program or a website on and you know the profits like the whole. The business model is contingent on using her. This great service as almost like a Customer Acquisition Channel and then the plan that open door had started talking about in the last six months or so was. We're not gonNA make all that much money on the actual home sales. Were using that just to kind of get people in the door and bring people to our service while we're actually going to sell them on is like More sort of WanNa be the mortgage provider. We WANNA BE. We want to Sell the insurance title insurance or you know other. I Dong services like the company had started talking about how that would be out of their money maker and it was kind of only the early earliest stages of building that out before Really getting hit. There's nothing going it's like you're you might as well be in the travel world which is is a transition to airbnb which you spoke about last time you were on the podcast and and we talked about. Airbnb decision to kind of side with travelers when it came to refunding them. But you sort of have the opportunity in a story The beginning of the week to talk about just the state of the company right now which of all the major silicon valley certainly private companies. They have been the one to watch. They have this massive valuation massive business. They're legitimate brand name but they also have really hit you. Know the the brunt of this this whole pandemic has really come down. Hard on their business model There's so much to kind of take in with AIRBNB and where it's at right now but Maybe we start with Brian Cherokee. Yeah you've profile them before he's an interesting Kind of curious and charismatic founder. How would you assess his performance? So far in what's really kind of an impossible position. Yeah I really with the story. I wasn't trying to profile him in the sense of we're going to go back into his childhood and understand who this person is but You know to me for all the years I've been reporting on the company Branch Husky has been someone who has sort of these outside Expectations and sort of this optimistic perspective on the world. You know he is. A one of his strengths are Sort of product and design excellence and marketing and I think he really has these amazing. Pr Instincts and he's built a company where employees really believe in the culture. I think by and large I mean there's obviously exceptions by far not a perfect place to where but you know you hear people speak about it with the kind of reverend. They don't necessarily hear other Silicon Valley companies How does that hold up in pandemic? When you're businesses down it are by three quarters And all of a sudden the idea that you were planning And the equity that that employees are hoping to cash in on. All of a sudden news is out and so I think the new points that I was kind of trying to raise In contextualising Brian and its performance lies. There has been a couple of years now of sort of simmering skepticism about his ability to scare Airbnb effectively You know in in these came out of like two dozen conversations. I've had with people who work up. The upper ranks of the company to things did not mean One is certainly the big bet that he put his reputation on. Which was the idea. That airbnb would be this company that had multiple sort of successful product lines. Starting with you know obviously outside of the main business in twenty six days. He launched experiences which is travel tours and activities. You know sort of going out and doing a cooking class when you're in Italy or what have you. I'm sure some of our listeners have done them You know some some new data that I have is that that would instill even for years later. Three and a half years later a very small part of the business. Right Peterson. Less than thirty five million last year right people still think of AIRBNB as a hotel alternative cheap way to stay or maybe an interesting culturally more fun way to stay when you're on vacation. Yeah yeah good business duper. It's a great business site you know it is not we work right. We should maybe. So that bluntly it has got a business model that is asset light in. And you know generally you. There's a reason it was. It's been able to raise two billion dollars in debt capital from some of the biggest names in private equity. Okay okay so let's get to that actually because that's been kind of amazing parade of announcements. That have come out over the last couple of weeks which is as it's been more clear that. Airbnb IT'S IPO. Is Very much in doubt and the timing they had around it in the sort of business fundamentals that we're GONNA power it are no longer the case. It seems like every couple of days. I hear about a new amount of money. That's being poured into AIRBNB. Mostly debt right. Yeah so the first round Two weeks ago exit early last week. It was a billion dollars of debt with warrants So you know. Death is a billion dollar debt capital from silverlake sixty partners which spun out. I think from teepee dream And then those investors also have the option to buy equipment in AIRBNB at eighteen billion dollar valuation. So that's a pretty significant haircut. You know that is sort of would think of that. As sort of what does investor St as like a price floor for airbnb right now and not as a significant step down from the thirty one billion that they lost raised and think dirt their internal valuation. A year ago was in the High Thirties. You know so it's it's a big step down But they need you know they want to have the financial cushion to be able to not fear kind of running out of cash. You know at a moment when no one is. You know it's would really start traveling again in earnest all year. You need seventy percent. Revenue Declines Right so this year basically. They're just trying to build up there. I don't know war. Chest is the right word but they just need a large cushion of money to be able to get them through however long this truly awful period for their business lasts right. Yeah for sure and I think You know people around you know airbnb booster and whatnot are kind of talking about how the strategy is to come out of this Really Period Biplane Defense. And you know we can use this moment to buy companies that want businesses. Maybe WanNa get into things like that. And that's all well a good. I think they're trying to project a position of strength. I think obviously the skepticism you know that is worth raising here is that they raise his dad at a significantly higher interest rate Which will have been Tang hundreds of millions of dollars and you know sort of Debt payments The next year at the very least and and this company that isn't.

AIRBNB Brian Cherokee WanNa Silicon Valley Company Cory Weinberg Dotan San Francisco reporter High Thirties Ann Arbor CISCO Customer Acquisition Channel Italy Branch Husky Phoenix founder
"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

"Your podcast from the reporting team at the information where we run down our big stories of the week and give our analysis the backstory all the things that you want as regular readers and hopeful future readers of the information for people who are just generally interested in tech podcast my name. Is tom cotton. I work here at the information and here's what we got for you this week. I'm talking to ross mannequin and amira friday. Ross is our summer intern amir. He's he's been here for longer than i have and they wrote a story about top towel a tech company. You may not have heard of they do <hes> help coordinate remote workforce for tech companies and they've done very well over time but unfortunately it's a case where a company that did well ended up not being helpful to its investors in employees the c._e._o. And co founder of the company ended up holding and onto shares. He's the hundred percent over company based on a very unusual structure in which the early investors in the company <hes> invested on the condition that when the company raised new round of funding that investment would convert into equity same went for all the early employees but the company never raised a new round and so employees louise and investors are sort of left without any of the upsides of company doing all that well <hes> really amazing story about what happens in some of the less usual google and you know sometimes somewhat misleading <hes> ways that companies raise money <hes> then i'm talking to cory weinberg who did the yeoman's work of sifting through the we work s. one that company just filed paperwork to go public and it is an interesting company something that everyone one of the tech world has been talking about unusual structure <hes> strange relationship from its c._e._o. To the company and all the stuff that i'm sure you want ought to not understand whether this company really can end up being what it's cracked up to be which is age <hes> in some estimates fifty billion dollar company <hes> going going to be a rough road but corrie company as well as anyone else and we have a good time running through all the ins and outs of its s one <hes> all right. That's the intro. That is what we you have on tap for you today. Let's go over to a mere ross bill <music> so i've got <hes> ross madigan our summer intern and amir friday are. He's just been as.

Ross tom cotton intern amir google cory weinberg co founder fifty billion dollar hundred percent
"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

15:57 min | 2 years ago

"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

"Friday. Everybody happy upcoming long weekend. This is Tom Dotan at the information bringing you our weekly podcast and not make side about the long weekend. I'm excited about this episode because we are changing things up on you format wise. I've got Cory Weinberg one of our excellent reporters here talking to a guest Kim, my Cutler VC over at initialized capital. Also, an expert on housing and bay area, and they had a great conversation about what Tex influence is on the housing crisis happening, both in San Francisco in across the state, and really what it means in California to, to be a homeowner and see what it's like to have all these housing prices going up, and what it means for a business to have housing and real estate prices going up. It's a.

Tom Dotan Cory Weinberg San Francisco Tex Kim California
"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

"I work here at the information. I've brought along two coworkers of mine in this episode here, I've got Cory Weinberg and Amir Friday. We're gonna talk all things lifts they are very much in the news recently with the filing of their paperwork to go public that happened a week ago today so last Friday and then a couple of days ago. Cory followed up with a profile on Logan green, their CEO, a fascinating character who is trying to reconcile his social urban beliefs with the fact that he's now running a business, and then a mere also kind of deep on the information in the one. So that's that's today's episode gentlemen. Thank you very much for joining me today. Thanks for having us, Tom could I might? So where should we start off? Let's actually start off with lifts S one. Let's start off with the with the the show. Not that they that they released last Friday slogan the chaser. Exactly. Okay. So so they filed paperwork, and we finally get and we've gotten a lot of glimpses here and there on kind of how different quarters of gone, and I know you've to get some financials in the past. But this is the most in-depth look we've ever really gotten on all their finances their profitability a few other interesting things about the companies. We we've published financials before we did call out the fact that there were some adjustments made between the last few months as auditors probably dove deep and Astle out of questions. So. In actually, in some cases, there were improvements beyond what we initially reported during during the second and third quarters of last year. There was the Q one numbers actually got a lot worse. But the numbers are a bit better than what we reported. So, but it was fairly in line with that. And the surprising thing was that the fourth quarter of last year sign immense improvement over the fourth quarter of twenty seventeen. If those trends continue, that's very very good. We don't know if they can continue and there's been a price war that lift has been. Kind of starting up during during this period right now in the lead up to the IPO. But in general like given the amount of losses, given the kind of general negative sentiment that exists around those types of losses. The trend lines are positive like they are losing less money as a percentage of what they're generating. They're obviously still a lot of people who don't think they can be profitable. I'm one of those who think they can be it would come at a cost in terms of growth. But I think they have they have a lot more lovers than than people realize to make money. Let's take just like a broader look at what this company is right now in terms of its finances, which is a company that lost almost a billion dollars last year. I mean, there's really no way to paper the fact that that is a huge amount of money for any company to lose as it's going to be vetted by the public investing world. Yeah. And you know, who lost multiple billions? But again, I think there is there's always going to be you know, as we see with tesla. Netflix and other companies go public. There's always the tension between growth and profitability. And yes, it is. It is a lot of money to lose. There's no doubt that lift is going to be under tremendous pressure because it has much much lower market share than Uber. Uber has a lot of efficiency advantages and financial advantages as a result. So you can't paper over that. But. The fourth quarter of twenty eighteen was a big surprise to me personally they were able to and they were able to significantly reduce their marketing costs. According to their according to their ass one in ways that they really hadn't before and they did not cost them in terms of growth..

Cory Weinberg Logan green CEO Netflix Tom S billion dollars
"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

"The information for one one podcast and happy thanksgiving to all our American listeners out there, we have a global reach. So I wanted to be specific about that. I'm Cory Weinberg reporter at the information. Tom Dotan, your usual host is here with us. But I'm going to be peppering him with questions and another reporter Aaron Tilly with questions about Snapchat and apple respectively this afternoon, say hi, guys. Acor got that settled. Yeah. Did you have a good thanksgiving? First of all any like weird thanksgiving stories. Sure, I thanks giving for for the baby. So that was something that will be memorable to everybody but him, and we we all we all just made it work. You think Turkey is overrated meat. Yeah. I've come away from it with the grand realization, and strong belief that Turkey is something that I'm going to be phasing out thanksgiving disappointing. Meet the hottest take come at of yours today. Aaron difficult point to that. I had a delicious easing skating. Yeah. Favorable. I'm I'm okay, if they're cool to to stick around is going to be more of the diets on the podcast episode is. It's a it's giving week notoriously notoriously slow. Yes week. But thankfully, you guys were on your game. Tom, you launched launched you published? Yeah. That's all right. Yeah. Industry speak here. Tom, you polish an indepth story. I think you've been working on. Do like apple product launches. Cast just like what if I told you? That'd be.

Tom Dotan Aaron Tilly reporter Turkey apple Cory Weinberg Acor Snapchat
"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

"Keep up the good work next year he coming on the podcast all right i wanna bring up our next panel which is going to be talking about big tech companies serena bring up cory weinberg preah non kevin hard k mclaughlin hat how do you feel like facebook has done so far i mean they had to testify in front of congress or of their g seated i mean how to facebook fair in this new role of being you know the power in the enemy yeah i mean i think they're clearly they've been in defensive mode ever since there was sort of the slew of news stories that made it very difficult to ignore that the role that sort of russian troll farms played in the 2016 nearly turned into like a marketing strategy other like for only three hundred thousand dollars they were able to reach several million people jacked up politica political ladder clearly a big deal for facebook both on the business side antelope political side they clearly they're playing defense like they have been out there trying to essentially if congress or if the media says how sort of how high will you jump facebook tries to get may be an inch or to higher every time like okay we'll do that okay will do this the bottom line for them is that they been on this incredible terror as a business for several years the biggest risk for them has always been image in politics and came to a head this year so they managed it i think i think okay maybe you're gonna see but i think it's pretty clear that we've now sort of thing mark zuckerberg ever gotten to see in his life i dunno dropped at harvard.

facebook congress mark zuckerberg harvard cory weinberg three hundred thousand dollars
"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

"Happy friday everybody welcome to the information's four one our podcast covering the tech industry and all other businesses being offended by uh things changing in technology my name is tom dotan i am reporter here at the information this episode we're covering two stories of your wrote this week one is kevan mcglaughlin and air aaron silly making his first appearance at the punch as he just joined us uh earlier this week uh and they wrote a story about clarify this very promising may i started up that uh interestingly enough aaron wrote about it in his previous job and they were showing a bit more promise at the time and then kevan sort of does this followup story saying that there's actually quite a bit a turmoil on the executive level so really great talking to both of those guys you get to hear about now what it's like to delve deep on a story that both shows promise and worship the company shows promise and also has some troubles and then i'm talking to pre anond who did another one of our or charts the things that we are increasingly known for uh she did it about amazon and uh that is of that was a beast that was probably the largest company that is the largest company by a long shot that we've ever created the chart for in preah sort of explain through strategy of doing that and what she learned about the various intricate businesses an arms of amazon before we get to that though there's a couple of things i need to plug first off we've got our live show happening december 18th in downtown san francisco to the piano fight theater seven thirty p m very excited about that we're going to have most of the staff of the information wrapping up the year in tech have some games have some some qna with the audience and then we finally can announce our our guest in the episode is going to be crystal hain the head of policy at airbnb cory weinberg who is our airbnb reporter is going to go deep with him about the company and also technology in policy in the intersection between dc in silicon valley which is increasingly becoming the most important thing happening in the.

reporter kevan mcglaughlin aaron amazon preah sort san francisco cory weinberg tom dotan executive airbnb
"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

"We'll see what the future brings thanks for joining and he said all right so we've got cory weinberg hold read alber gotti in the studio here uh there's been a lot going on in the facebook world for the last couple of weeks released been nonstop since since the election but it seems to have picked up significantly in the last couple of weeks so as we delve into this topic i just want to give a brief rundown on on where we are right now because a lot has been changing uh in in in the past couple of weeks o on november first it looks like facebook is going to have to testify as part of some sort of a congressional hearing so far it does not look like cheryl or zaug will be there of them little more technical yeah someone like actually knows what's going on in the company they're they're they're big picture delta earnings today that day yeah just so happy impacts world yes so so they couldn't possibly there because its earnings bears they're going to send you know someone with technical skills to go up here before congress and um and then elliott schrag the head of what is this communications policy what exactly as his role there the that sounds right knee but he's you've now he is one of the key behind the scenes figures at facebook layer he sort of thought of his like sort of a pr guy by the israeli much more than ninety deals with policymakers in brussels in dc li right so it's you know his posting a kind of lengthy blog post on on the topic is more meaningful than just having like appear person put out some can lyons i mean he has real import in terms of nato facebook policy totally but they've been all over the items occupan to this facebook live right video like they've been trying to their they're like strategy has clearly been like working to be conciliatory try to like figure out how to like.

cory weinberg alber gotti facebook cheryl congress brussels elliott schrag
"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

"Abby lee walked information's on august brought to you by the information dot com we cover tech my name is tom dotan i write about tech for the information happen to be back after a couple of weeks off my thanks to cory weinberg for abe we filling the host chair and a handling us will i was uh out for a couple of weeks but uh back now and a happy to be so he show we've got today first off kevin mcglaughlin joins us talk about cloud computing he had a pair of scoops about aws and some of the partnerships they've been rolling recently uh if you're in the enterprise software space or cloud computing or i don't know it's heavyweighted stuff but it's important animals were couvert at his at wants to run for that and then read it i have a long conversation about augmented reality why it may not be as cracked up to be white may not end up being as it's been cracked up to be as a lotta small words of in any way a jaundice look at augmented reality by me and read over gotti and looking at uh some of these strategies of the major tech companies have so exciting stuff not like underground tunnel network between new york dc philadelphia and was there anyone else in there anyway that's the on musk citing this is a this podcast exciting but uh in any event let's let's get to the show boom boom boom boom boom boom boom boom boom boom they were talking cloud computing fell computing time with kevin laughlin i welcome back to the show kevin thanks sam so you had a pair really good stories this week about stuff that i frankly don't know much about but it's interesting so let's just let's start right off with a it aws time sounds like they're kind of straying a bit from the path that they stuck to for the fat the past few years and and making some interesting partnerships.

cory weinberg abe kevin mcglaughlin cloud computing aws augmented reality gotti philadelphia kevin laughlin Abby lee tom dotan enterprise software jaundice new york musk kevin
"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"cory weinberg" Discussed on The Information's 411

"Happy friday everybody welcome to the information four one one uh were a podcast brought to you by the information dot com lead tech news site that hopefully you're familiar with the we break can cover a lot of the the big tech stories gone on today um i'm cory weinberg your fillon host again this week tom dotan is in some valley idaho covering all of the kind of big deals going on uh among the business moguls that are meeting up there this week we're going to hear from tom later in the podcast were also gonna talk a little bit about cryptocurrency later in the podcast which uh i know nothing about but uh we're going to bring in a reporter who does know something right now we have the amazon experts kevin mclaughlin say hello kevin hi cory thanks for coming on the show you brook a really interesting story this week uh about what the alexa team is going to do to try to make developers happy and uh i think he got a lot of attention on the web so why don't you tell us a little bit about your story what what what news did you uncover here yeah well uh the whole thing was very interesting i was not expecting uh the story to get this must a much attention first of all specially in trump's america exactly exactly with so much else going on uh but this was basically probably the most pressing important issue right now in the amazon elixir developer world because uh.

cory weinberg tom dotan idaho reporter trump amazon kevin mclaughlin america developer