20 Burst results for "Cory Turner"

"cory turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:22 min | 5 months ago

"cory turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Close your eyes. One, two, three. Open your eyes. We can tell who was the big star there, but the secretary was promoting the Biden administration's efforts to help students and educators and college borrowers. NPR's Cory Turner is in Pittsburgh, Cory good morning. Good morning, Steve. What's the secretary sack? Well, a little bit of everything. He started this 6 state bus tour Monday in Tennessee talking about the teacher pipeline, Tuesday in Virginia. He was talking about ways schools can use federal emergency dollars to help students make up for missed learning. And then yesterday, the secretary was talking about student mental health in the morning, reading to kids after lunch, and men made time last night to pop into a workshop, encouraging teachers to apply for public service loan forgiveness since the temporary expansion of that program expires. A lot of news to touch on there, but you mentioned missed learning. Let's dig in on that because we've had discussions on this program about how much kids missed when schools were closed, particularly in the early many, many months of the pandemic. What does cardona say now about K12 education? Yeah, he is still very focused on the pandemic's toll. Not only missed learning, he's also highlighting emotional and mental health supports for kids. Honestly, kindergarten through college. But yeah, as you said, he is very focused on missed learning. Let's take a listen to one of the things he told me. I'm proud that this summer, I think a record number of Americans attended summer school. And I smile because, you know, when you think of summer school, you think of a traditional summer school, well, over the summer children had an opportunity to engage socially, to have academic enrichment. Cardona told me that on this trip, he's also seeing more federally funded learning support in schools, after school programs. That said, Steve, look, cardona's job right now is to be the optimist. Recent testing data show that reading and math scores both are way down and cardona and school leaders that I have talked to now, the effects of the pandemic are not going away quickly. This will take years. Then there is the matter of student loans, which is the other big news that you mentioned. How's that unrolling? Yeah, so he reiterated that the application for the big student loan relief plan is going to be available in our early October. Remember, loan payments are supposed to restart in January. So if The White House is right, that some 20 million borrowers should technically qualify to have their debts completely erased, then the timeline here matters, Steve, erasing them before payments restart would save an enormous amount of hassle and confusion for borrowers and the department both, which is why cardona told me he's determined to get this done quickly. What I'm not going to share timelines right now, I will tell you January 1st when the lone start, we have to have all that set up. Not just set up Steve cardona told me by January, we're going to have to be done with that process, he said. Then again, honestly, based on reporting, I've done in the past, we know that the education department has not been good at implementing student loan relief programs in the past. So when I expressed some skepticism about the department's ability to do this, he really doubled down. And he said he had a message for borrowers and reporters like me who are feeling kind of cynical about the department's ability. He said, we're going to do it. And we're going to do it

cardona Biden administration Cory Turner Steve Cory NPR Pittsburgh Tennessee Cardona Virginia Steve cardona White House confusion
"cory turner" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

04:10 min | 5 months ago

"cory turner" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"The digestive system. Designed to be taken every day. More at metamucil dot com. And from the listeners who support this NPR station. This is all things considered from NPR news. I marry Louise Kelly. And I'm Ari Shapiro. After months of speculation, President Biden announced today a sweeping move to a race some federal student loan debt for up to 43 million people. The plan would offer $10,000 in debt cancellation to most borrowers and twice as much for lower income folks. For the details were joined by NPR education correspondent Cory Turner, hey Cory. Hey Ari, walk us through the basics. How exactly would this plan work? Well, all borrowers who earn less than a $125,000 a year can qualify for up to $10,000 in debt cancellation. Borrowers who received a pell grant to attend college, they can get up to $20,000 in cancellation, and overall The White House says up to 43 million borrowers could benefit. And of those up to 20 million borrowers could have their debts completely erased. My colleagues Sequoia carillo spoke with one of those borrowers right after the announcement just a couple of hours ago. Triana downing has about $16,000 in federal loans and thinks she should qualify for the $10,000 in cancellation. I very, very, very grateful. Because this is obviously a big help to me personally. So downing said her big question now, Ari is when will she get that help? And do you have an answer to that question? Do you know when and whether borrowers are going to need to do anything specific to get it? Well, it's a little complicated. It's a bit of a hitch. Because of the means testing most borrowers are likely going to need to submit some kind of basic application that verifies their income and that they qualify for this relief. According to The White House, only about 8 million borrowers already have that information on file, they are the lucky ones. They will likely have their debts erased automatically without having to do anything. The other 35 million borrowers or so will have to act to get the help. There have been calls to cancel all student debt or to go up to $50,000, obviously this plan does not go that far. What's the reaction to that been? Well, one of the chief proponents of canceling more was senator Elizabeth Warren, and in a statement she said quote today is a day of joy and relief. Another staunch proponent, congresswoman ayanna Pressley, tweeted that President Biden's action to cancel student debt is a victory for the movement and so many families. And you know, I think this move also helps protect Biden at least a bit from criticism of earlier proposals that folks said focus too much help on borrowers who don't need it. Doubling the amount of cancellation for lower income borrowers was really a late pivot Ari and according to The White House, it means roughly 90% of this benefit will now be going to borrowers who earn less than $75,000 a year. A big underlying issue here is just the cost of college. Is there anything in today's news that might address that? Yes and no. There is nothing that is going to drive down the cost of college. Nothing, which representative Virginia Fox, the ranking Republican on the House education committee pointed out in a pretty scathing statement to NPR, saying quote, taxpayers are forced to pay for a bill that they should not owe, and colleges are allowed to continue raising tuition. This is wrong, unfair, and irresponsible, she said. There's also been criticism from other Republicans and some Democrats who worry about this plan's effect on inflation and the economy. But to your point, Ari about the cost of college, I should say there are a few big changes here that should help future borrowers afford college. Biden proposed a new kind of income driven repayment plan that would reduce monthly payments based on discretionary income. The plan would also forgive some remaining debts after ten years instead of 20, and perhaps most importantly, it would cover unpaid monthly interest as long as the borrower is making payments, and that could be huge for borrowers who in the past have seen their balances balloon because of interest. NPR's

President Biden Ari NPR news Louise Kelly Ari Shapiro NPR Cory Turner Sequoia carillo Triana downing White House senator Elizabeth Warren ayanna Pressley Cory downing
"cory turner" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:48 min | 10 months ago

"cory turner" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Is be patient In Paris Cory Turner Cory thank you very much You're welcome You're listening to here and now It's three 22 This is 90.1 W ABE Atlanta Thank you for joining us this afternoon here and now bringing you the very latest from the war in Ukraine along with new developments as far as a student loans and repayment goes all very useful information on this Wednesday afternoon and we have a great opportunity for you to make a shared investment in WAB right now That's because we are in the only cornerstone challenge of the entire spring member drive My name is Emile Moffett I'm here with ayesha Hyman and ayesha is going to tell us a little bit more about it Yes Emil the way that this works is that when we hit all of our hourly benchmarks today and this is our only challenge of this kind in this spring member drive So this is really important but when we hit all of those hourly benchmarks today our wonderful Friends Howard and Colleen Austin have put up $10,000 of challenge fund for us that we can claim And that will go such a long way here at WAB In order for us to stay on track we've got to hit the mark So we started out needing 22 We've received a few calls So now we're at 18 We're looking for 18 more calls And we can do that That's about a call a minute right If we can do that and reach that benchmark before it gets to 4 o'clock So you're listening now you're thinking about it now You've been thinking about renewing your support becoming a new sustainer here at WAB will now is the best time for you to do that because you're listening now because you're thinking about it And because you're going to help us claim that $10,000 fund for W ABE and it's going to come back to you In so many ways and it's going to come back to you in the form of stories in the news coverage that we're going to bring to you 6 7 8 5 5 three 90 90 is the number to call to make your contribution You decide the amount at W ABE dot org slash donate My name is Jessica O'sullivan and I live in Brookhaven Georgia I became a monthly donor for WAB during the last spring campaign And I did so because when I heard about all the programs that I listened to I realized that a small monthly contribution to keep those programs sustained was low impact for me and impact for the programs that I was listening to That's Jessica and Brookhaven and I like what she said low impact for me and high impact for the programs that she listens to And that is really what we're asking for you to do like Jessica you decide how much you want to give It's all up to you and no matter what amount that is it does have a high impact on.

Cory Turner Cory Emile Moffett ayesha Hyman Colleen Austin ayesha Emil Ukraine Paris Atlanta Jessica O'sullivan Howard Brookhaven Georgia Jessica
"cory turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"cory turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Some school districts are doing what seemed pretty unthinkable just a few months ago They're sending students home and resuming online classes The past few weeks have brought a dramatic spike in school closures And in some cases the whole thing is pit school districts against teachers unions against parents NPR's education correspondent Corey Turner joins us a Corey What are these Where are these closers happening And do they signal Maybe a meaningful shift back toward remote learning Yeah so we've seen closures in Detroit Milwaukee now Louisville they're all virtual as well as a third of Baltimore schools There's also Chicago where teachers and city leaders appear to have resolved their standoff overnight over whether it's safe to learn in person the mayor says students will return to class there on Wednesday A closures are still fairly isolated and short just a week or two but it wouldn't surprise me to see more You gotta remember oh Macron was hitting its stride right as we hit the big holiday travel rush You know I spoke with one elementary teacher in Louisville yesterday Penelope quesada She told me she supported the decision to go virtual for a week but she worries about her kids now her students She told me school staff met online yesterday to prepare for remote learning Man I mean nobody was smiling Everybody had this traumatic phase of oh my God we're here We're back again I know oma cron is more transmissible than other variants but it also appears to lead to less severe illness vaccines are all over the place and lots of pediatricians and child advocates have been very forceful Corey and saying that kids are better off in school So why are schools closing Yeah in many cases it really comes down to one word staffing So many teachers and bus drivers are out sick right now that districts just don't have enough adults Making matters worse many communities are suffering from a very real shortage of substitute teachers I spoke with Louisville superintendent Marty polio yesterday He told me last week he even sent staff from his district headquarters to cover for sick teachers But when you start on Thursday it was over 600 uncovered classrooms in our district It becomes really untenable at a certain point And you know a polio estimated that's roughly 10% of his classrooms that didn't have teachers That's a lot There have been a lot of conversations about COVID in schools the last couple of years Our school is better equipped to roll with these punches or is it getting more difficult You know I was talking to Dan Dominic yesterday He talks to superintendents all the time as head of the national school superintendents association And he told me he's heard something from a few superintendents personally that he's never heard before And I should say this this might be tough to hear Superintendent's calling me telling me that they're ready to commit suicide That I've never ever seen a period of time where at the deal with that Wow Corey I mean what is it about this moment That's left school leader superintendent's feeling this way Yeah the problem Dominic says is the debate around safe schooling has become toxic You know some families are angry if you close schools or make kids wear masks Others are angry if you keep them open You know not to mention some educators received actual threats not only to themselves but to their families during this recent critical race theory fight And the result really is that schools are a pressure cooker in a way that they just weren't when these closures started in March 2020 If there is hope right now it's that the closures we're looking at will be brief matter of a week or two buying districts time until omicron peaks NPR education correspondent Cory Turner Cory thanks You're welcome And before we go on we want to know if you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide There is help contact the national suicide prevention lifeline at one 802 7 three 8 two 5 5.

Corey Turner Louisville Macron Penelope quesada Marty polio NPR Milwaukee Dan Dominic cron national school superintendent Baltimore Detroit Corey Chicago Wow Corey polio Dominic Cory Turner Cory
"cory turner" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"cory turner" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Colleges have to restrain tuition growth if they think they can rely on the federal government to subsidize their students tuition fees through loan forgiveness Well given that kind of Republican resistance what options does the president have to pursue some kind of broad student loan cancellation Yeah so they're basically two ways Ari Congress could do it if there was the support Obviously there doesn't seem to be I mean we've already seen the president cut his build back better agenda roughly in half and that's just a win over every member of his own party The other way to do it though would be to use an old authority that came from Congress that technically allows his education secretary to cancel loans I've spoken with several experts who say he could do this but it is somewhat controversial and Biden himself doesn't seem to be in a hurry to try it Part of that may be the politics of the cost which would be more than his free community college and universal preschool proposals combined There's also a question of would this kind of move to cancel student debt hold up in court On Friday I spoke with Biden's under secretary of education James and he told me the administration is still working all of this out We are looking very carefully with The White House and the Department of Justice at whether we can cancel loans across the board for everyone and that's something we're deliberations are still continuing So officially are a broad student that relief is still very much on the table I will tell you though I have heard from several advocates who insist if the administration really wanted to do this they could do it today And they're worried that times running out And peer education correspondent Cory Turner Thank you You're welcome In turkey concerns are growing over the state of the economy and the response by the country's president The Turkish lira has plot has plunged to record lows having lost more than 40% of its value so far this year and prices are rising and peers Peter kenyon has been speaking to people in Istanbul who say they don't know if the government can turn things around In the latest negative indicator turkey's finance minister quit causing some to wonder if he left because he was about to be fired President Recep Tay Erdoğan had already sacked a string of finance and banking officials well before the Turkish lira hit an all time low of nearly 14 to the U.S. dollar recently That caused prices to go up Istanbul shop owners and managers say the price hikes are by now familiar but no less painful As butcher chef get yield rims saws a leg of lamb into chunks for a customer's soup pot he says every time the rates get cut customers stop.

Biden Congress Ari federal government Cory Turner Peter kenyon Department of Justice White House turkey James President Recep Tay Erdoğan Istanbul U.S.
"cory turner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"cory turner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"There is ample evidence that wearing mask This will help keep schools open. Cory Turner NPR news A new scientific study shows climate change was to blame for the deadly floods that devastated parts of Germany and Belgium last month. Here's Esmie Nicholson scientists involved in the world. Whether ATTRIBUTION Project studies say the record rainfall that caused flash flooding and at least 220 deaths in Germany last month was made up to nine times more likely. Climate change. The study also shows that climate change is made rainfall in the region up to 19% heavier. One of the study's authors. Fredricka Auto from the University of Oxford warns that quote even developed countries are not safe from the severe impacts of extreme weather. And that the world urgently needs to reduce carbon emissions. The World Weather ATTRIBUTION Group has also produced findings recently that show the Heat dome in North America this summer would not have happened without climate change for NPR news. I'm asthma. Nicholson in Berlin. It's NPR Live from KQED news. I'm Paul Lank or The Bakersfield Police Department has agreed to a five year reform plan after a misconduct investigation by the state attorney. General. Reforms include de Escalation training improved services for non English speakers. And a ban on the use of Tasers on Children. Here's Attorney General Rob Bonta. The community spoke out about a number of practices, including concerns around excessive force and other serious misconduct. When communities speak out about injustice. It's our job as leaders not just listen, we must take action to correct it. KQED previously reported on 31 cases over four years where officers broke bones and weren't disciplined. Bakersfield Police chief Greg Terry calls the states concerns unfounded and says changes are already underway. Concord has selected a master developer to repurpose. The 5000 acre naval weapons station. Plans include a new regional park more than 12,000 units of housing and millions of square feet of commercial space. KQED s analyst Finney reports the conquered First Partnership one the exclusive negotiating agreement in a 3 to 2 vote at a City council meeting on Saturday. The partnership includes the controversial see No Discovery companies, who have been criticized by environmental groups and previously accused of fraud. At the council meeting Albert scene of the third who directs, you know, Discovery highlighted his local ties. Our team is here. Our family is here, born and raised here some of the first subdivisions ever. But we're here many decades ago, and it's something that I know we can pull together. Construction is expected to begin in 3 to 4.

Cory Turner Paul Lank Berlin Esmie Nicholson University of Oxford 31 cases 3 Saturday 5000 acre North America Greg Terry Germany last month Belgium Discovery Concord Nicholson five year first KQED
"cory turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"cory turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of it from W. N Y. C. I'm Alison Stewart this week. We are hearing from the folks who make all of it. We are highlighting our producers favorite interviews today we'll hear segments chosen by producer Kathryn. Coming up this hour. We'll hear from actor Gabriel Byrne about its acclaimed memoir, Walking with dosed, in which he reflects on his childhood in Ireland, his decision to write about abuse he suffered as a devout child. It is difficult relationship with saying Kirkus Review called it a gem like memoir, elegantly written and rich and hard experienced. And later we'll speak of chef and author Yasmeen Khan about her cookbook, right figs, recipes and stories from Turkey, Greece and Cyprus, which examines the refugee crisis through the lens of we will get to all of it. I'm Alison Stewart and I will meet you on the other side of the news. Yeah. Live from NPR News. I'm Lakshmi saying the Taliban say they're blocking Afghans from getting to the Kabul airport, where evacuation flights are underway today. A spokesperson for the insurgent group that recently took control of Afghanistan said the Taliban are also refusing to extend the August 31st deadline for the US to withdraw all troops. President Biden is under pressure from allies and members of Congress to negotiate more time to evacuate tens of thousands more people still waiting to leave Afghanistan. The evacuation was among the issues to come up at today's G seven meeting. The Pentagon says flights are leaving Kabul at a pace of one every 45 minutes. More than 21,000 people have been evacuated in the last 24. Hours alone, Pentagon spokesman John Kirby addressed the need for more refugee housing. It's possible that we might be looking at additional U. S military installations here in the United States. Right now we are looking. We're working with four of them. Fort Lee Fort McCoy for bliss and joint base. McGuire, Dix Lakehurst in New Jersey. Those are the four that are operating now and are beginning to see a flow of of s. I V applicants. In other news, parents and caregivers may have to wait till the end of the year before Covid 19 vaccine is approved for young Children ages 5 to 11. NPR's Cory Turner has details. The news came from the head of the National Institutes of Health, Dr Francis Collins in an interview on NPR's morning edition. Collins said. Both Pfizer and Moderna are still collecting data trying to understand, among other things, whether young Children should receive a smaller dose than what's already been approved for adults. Fighter could submit its data to the FDA for review by the end of September, Collins said. But I've got to be honest. I don't see the approval for kids 5 to 11 coming much before the end of 2021. Collins also said he's puzzled by the fight over Children wearing masks in class because, he said, there is ample evidence that wearing mask This will help keep schools open. Cory Turner NPR news A new scientific study shows climate change was.

Gabriel Byrne Alison Stewart Kathryn Yasmeen Khan Cory Turner United States Cyprus National Institutes of Health Ireland John Kirby Kabul Congress August 31st Collins 5 Greece Francis Collins Turkey Pentagon Taliban
"cory turner" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"cory turner" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Ari Shapiro. And I'm Mary Louise Kelly, a former football player had big dreams until he missed a critical field goal. You've never even thought of failure. You never thought of what if it doesn't work out. There is no plan B because plan A is the only thing that matters how he found his plan B and kept going after this summary, The day's news Live from NPR News in Culver City, California I'm Duane Brown. U. S. Military troops have been working around the clock to get Americans in credentialed Afghans airlifted from Afghanistan. For nine days now, evacuation efforts have been plagued by Taliban forces and large crowds blocking the entrance to the Kabul airport, National security Advisor Jake Sullivan says. With the help of US allies, they've managed their biggest day of airlifts so far all told, 26 countries on four continents are contributing to this effort, one of the largest airlifts in history, a massive military diplomatic security, humanitarian undertaking, Sullivan says the military has developed methods to get around the airport chaos and transfer groups of Americans to the airport. But Declined to elaborate. He says the Biden administration doesn't know precisely how many Americans remain in the country because some did not register with the U. S. Embassy and others left without notice. The U. S secretary of Education is throwing his support behind school leaders in Florida who are being told by the state's governor, they will lose funding if they continue to require masks in schools. Here's NPR's Cory Turner. Florida is one of several states that has banned schools from requiring kids wear masks when two districts there recently defied that ban, the state threatened to withhold funding This weekend, Secretary Miguel Cardona sent these embattled school leaders a clear message. The Biden administration stands with you. The Department of Education says Covid. Relief funding already passed by Congress can be used to stop gap any money that states try to withhold from districts. Cardona also reiterated an earlier threat by President Biden. That the department could investigate states that prohibit mask requirements if those bands are making it unsafe for Children to learn. Cory Turner NPR news Stocks finished solidly higher on Wall Street Today You're listening to NPR news. The World Health Organization and UNICEF for calling for a humanitarian air bridge to make sure lifesaving aid gets into Afghanistan. As Lisa Schlein tells us, the W. H O says it couldn't deliver 500 tons of medical supplies because of restrictions at the Kabul airport. The block shipment included trauma kits, surgical equipment and treatments for childhood pneumonia. UNICEF spokesman James Elder says the shipment also contain nutritional food for malnourished Children. We Fear that you could have as many as a million Children under the age of five suffering from severe malnutrition this year. That's the most dangerous form. That's the type of malnutrition that kill We need to continually ensure that those supplies on the ground at present no commercial aircraft is permitted to land in Kabul. Elder says A humanitarian air bridge would ensure lifesaving supplies could get into the country and reach the people in need for NPR News and Lisa Schlein in Geneva, President Biden addressed the nation after the FDA gave full approval today of the Pfizer Biontech Covid 19 vaccine for people 16 years and older Biden Urging the unvaccinated to go get their shots. Fighter is the first of three drug makers to receive..

Mary Louise Kelly Ari Shapiro Lisa Schlein James Elder UNICEF Cory Turner Duane Brown Afghanistan Congress Sullivan 500 tons 16 years Cardona 26 countries Kabul Jake Sullivan Geneva World Health Organization Florida NPR News
Houston Man Arrested on Illegal Voting Charges After Casting Ballot on Parole

BBC World Service

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Houston Man Arrested on Illegal Voting Charges After Casting Ballot on Parole

"Cory Turner. NPR NEWS A Houston man has been arrested for alleged illegal voting as the Texas GOP is pushing to pass tighter voting restrictions. During a legislative special session, Jen Rice of Houston, public media reports service. Rogers captured national attention during the 2020 presidential primary when he stayed in line well past midnight at Texas Southern University, waiting to cast his ballot. Now he's being prosecuted by state Attorney General Ken Paxton's office on two counts of illegal voting and held on $100,000 bail. Rogers served nearly 10 years in prison for burglary, and he was still on parole at the time he voted making him ineligible in Texas. The attorney general's office arrested Rogers on Wednesday, the day before the Texas Legislature convened to begin a special session

Cory Turner Npr News Jen Rice Houston Rogers Attorney General Ken Paxton Texas Southern University GOP Texas Texas Legislature
"cory turner" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"cory turner" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"News is first. Live from NPR News in Washington. I'm Louise Schiavone. The White House today defended yesterday's U. S airstrikes against Iran backed militia in Iraq and Syria, White House press secretary Jen Psaki told reporters today. The action is meant to protect us and allied positions on the ground. The president's view is that It was necessary, appropriate and deliberate action. These strikes designed to limit the risk of escalation we will take and he believes we will should and will take necessary and appropriate measures to defend US personnel partners and allies in the region. She said. The White House did notify appropriate members of Congress ahead of the strikes. The Supreme Court has declined to take up a case involving whether transgender students must be allowed to use restrooms that match their gender identities. The move leaves in place a lower court ruling that the Gloucester Country Virginia School board acted unlawfully in preventing Gavin Grimm, a transgender student from using a bathroom at his high school. Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel leader would have granted review of the case. Disagreeing with the move that allowed the lower court ruling to stand US Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona has announced the release of nearly $4 billion in federal aid to the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. NPR's Cory Turner has that story. The money is a mash up of funds that have been set aside but hadn't yet been cleared. $2 billion from the American rescue plan. Another 1.2 billion from an earlier Covid relief bill, plus more than half a billion dollars in grants set aside last year. The money is meant to help the Commonwealth reopened its K 12 schools safely. The announcement comes as Cardona is in Puerto Rico, meeting with government leaders there, the first member of President Biden's Cabinet to make the trip..

Louise Schiavone Gavin Grimm Cardona Washington Congress Cory Turner $2 billion Samuel Miguel Cardona yesterday last year Clarence Thomas today NPR Iraq Jen Psaki Gloucester Country Virginia Sc NPR News first member President Biden
"cory turner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"cory turner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Iran backed militia in Iraq and Syria, White House press secretary Jen Psaki told reporters today. The action is meant to protect us and allied positions on the ground. The president's view is that It was necessary, appropriate and deliberate action. These strikes designed to limit the risk of escalation we will take and he believes we will should and will take necessary and appropriate measures to defend US personnel partners and allies in the region. She said. The White House did notify appropriate members of Congress ahead of the strikes. The Supreme Court has declined to take up a case involving whether transgender students must be allowed to use restrooms that match their gender identities. The move leaves in place a lower court ruling that the Gloucester Country Virginia School board acted unlawfully in preventing Gavin Grimm, a transgender student from using a bathroom at his high school. Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel leader would have granted review of the case. Disagreeing with the move that allowed the lower court ruling to stand US Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona has announced the release of nearly $4 billion in federal aid to the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. NPR's Cory Turner has that story. The money is a mash up of funds that have been set aside but hadn't yet been cleared. $2 billion from the American rescue plan. Another 1.2 billion from an earlier Covid relief bill, plus more than half a billion dollars in grants set aside last year. The money is meant to help the Commonwealth reopened its K 12 schools safely. The announcement comes as Cardona is in Puerto Rico, meeting with government leaders there, the first member of President Biden's cabinet to make the trip..

Gavin Grimm Cory Turner Congress $2 billion Cardona Clarence Thomas Miguel Cardona last year Syria Iraq White House Samuel Iran Jen Psaki Gloucester Country Virginia Sc NPR today more than half a billion dolla 1.2 billion Supreme Court
"cory turner" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"cory turner" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"And cover up at the Texas capital. Also, though, so much still unknown about covert 19. This much is certain The impact of the pandemic has been severe for mothers and moms to be Our own Alexandra Heart reports. Also, Dr Fred Campbell takes on more of your Kobe 19 questions and new research showing major racial disparities for younger Texans fighting cancer. Those stories and more when the Texas Standard gets underway right after this. Live from NPR news on Korver Coleman President Biden will deliver his first address to a joint session of Congress tonight. NPR's Cory Turner says bye and is expected to promote his American families plan calling for a massive investment in Children and their education. Call with reporters, Senior administration officials laid out a handful of proposals so ambitious and expensive that in previous years any one of them would have turned heads. For example, the plan calls for $225 billion to help low and middle income families pay for childcare for the nation's three and four year olds. The plan calls for a $200 billion investment to help provide free Universal preschool and at the other end of the learning curve. The plan calls for two years of free community College for all Americans, as well as a big bump in the Pell Grant award, which low income students can use to pay for college. Cory Turner. NPR News Police in Northern California have released body cam video of an arrest. A man died after being pinned to the ground for more than five minutes after scuffling with officers. It happened last week at a park in Alameda after police responded to a call about someone being drunk or disoriented. NPR's Jacqueline Diaz says the man who died was identified as 26 year old Mario consolidates. The video shows police attempting to handcuff Gonzales several minutes after first arriving on scene Officers struggled to restrain him. Eventually they get him face down on the ground, using arms and knees to keep him down. Gonzalez can be heard yelling. I didn't do anything wrong at times as you lays there. Five minutes later, Gonzalez suddenly goes quiet and his unresponsive police can be seen rolling him over and performing CPR. Gonzalez was later pronounced dead at a hospital. Involves his family has accused Alameda police of using excessive force and murder. The cause of his death is still under investigation, as are the events leading up to his death. Jacqueline Dia's NPR News. India's total death toll from Covert 19 has crossed the 200,000 mark Today. NPR's Lauren Frayer reports from them by the country is also setting world records for daily infections. India today confirmed more than 360,000 new infections, but the real number maybe many times that. Test kids have run out in many areas, so his medical oxygen India also confirmed nearly 3300 deaths. Today. It's the first time that daily toll has crossed the 3000 mark, even though that, too is likely an undercount. NPR's Lauren Frayer reporting In the U. S. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says people who have been vaccinated against Cove in 19 don't need to wear masks outdoors unless they're in crowded areas, The CDC says. That includes places such a shopping malls or houses of worship that air filled On Wall Street. The Dow was down about 100 points at 33,083. This is NPR news. European lawmakers have approved the final ratification of a trade deal between the European Union and the United Kingdom. The UK pulled out of the EU, a trading bloc in the process called Brexit. Deal has already been ratified by lawmakers in the UK President of Somalia is seemingly walking back his effort to extend his term for two years. NPR's later Peralta reports. His decision was met with popular protests and an armed confrontation from the opposition, with fighters loyal to the opposition, forcefully taking control of parts of the capital. Mogadishu. President Mohamed Abdullahi Formaggio came on national TV late last night. 100 tonight. He said he is still committed to implementing timely and peaceful elections in Somalia, and he called on the opposition to begin negotiating on what those elections would look like. Last year's Somalia was supposed to have its first elections with universal suffrage since the late sixties. Instead, they were delayed in the opposition now accuses president from a Joe of turning into a dictator. No. Even the capital is under siege. It's one of the few places the federal government once maintained, full control it a Peralta NPR NEWS Nairobi The State Department is reducing the number of staffers who will work in the U. S embassy in Kabul. People who can complete work outside the embassy will leave the Afghan capital. Agency says it's preparing for the time when U. S military forces will leave Afghanistan. President Biden has announced an unconditional withdrawal of U. S forces from Afghanistan. By September, 11th. Encore for Coleman. NPR news Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include wobbly committed to helping self employed workers and small businesses Get their P P P loans application determines eligibility. Maura W. O M p l y dot com slash NPR. Politics doesn't have to be a raging fire..

Jacqueline Diaz Cory Turner Jacqueline Dia $200 billion $225 billion Gonzalez European Union Alameda 33,083 Lauren Frayer Fred Campbell September, 11th Texas NPR U. S Somalia today Maura W. O Last year three
"cory turner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"cory turner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Reviews Judas and the Black Messiah about the death in 1969 of Black Panther leader Fred Hampton. First news. Live from NPR News. I'm Jack Spear President Donald Trump. Second impeachment trial is winding down. Senators submitted questions to both sides today. In response to a question about whether Trump knew his followers intended to storm the West Capitol House impeachment manager Stacey Plaskett pointed to the president's remarks leading up to his January 6 rally. He had every reason to know. I think we're armed. Violent. And ready to actually fight. He knew who he was calling and the violence they were capable of. But President Trump's lead defense attorney, Bruce Castor, questioned the entire impeachment process. The only Logical conclusion is that the purpose of this gathering is to embarrass the 45th, president of the United States and in some way trying to create An opportunity for senators to suggest that he should not be permitted to hold office in the future. Senate reconvenes tomorrow. A vote on whether to convict or acquit Trump could come this weekend. The city see released its much anticipated school reopening guidelines today, and as NPR's Cory Turner explains, the release should bring some clarity to the reopening debate. The new guidelines are not a mandate to reopen, but clarity for school leaders struggling to figure out how to safely reopen or stay open. The guidelines break virus transmission rates down into categories low, moderate, substantial and high and then match them up with precautions that schools can take and whether it's advisable to be in person or remote or somewhere in between. The CDC makes clear that the layering of precautions like combining mask wearing with physical distancing, can make schools relatively safe, even in hard hit communities. The guidance also says vaccinating teachers is recommended. But not a prerequisite to reopening schools. Cory Turner. NPR News U. S. Census Bureau has announced a six month delay in releasing the 2020 cents is stated need to redraw voting maps around the country. NPR's Hansi Lo Wang reports, the bureau says it needs more time to run quality checks. State and local governments were supposed to receive redistricting data from the 2020 cents is by the end of March, But the Census Bureau says it's now playing to deliver that information by the end of September. The pandemic and last minute changes under the Trump administration up ended the bureau's original schedule. Agency says he needs more time to sort through duplicate and incomplete responses, including many about residents in college dorms. This delay puts pressure on redistricting officials facing tight deadlines to prepare for elections. Some states have been planning ahead by amending their constitutions and getting court orders to push back deadlines. Angela Wang NPR NEWS New York on Wall Street stocks end of the week on an up note. The Dow Jones industrial Average gained 27 points to close at 4 31,058. NASDAQ was up 69 points the S and P 500 rose 18 points today. You're listening to NPR. Live from KQED News and terrorist Siler. State officials announced today that people with disabilities and severe health conditions will be eligible for covert 19 vaccines. Starting March 15th. But advocates say that's not soon enough. Jessica Lehman is with the San Francisco senior and disability action. The group demonstrated this morning outside the homes of two top state health officials. Lehman couldn't go to the events herself because of her disability. If I were to get coveted, it could be very, very severe, and that's true of a lot of people with disabilities. Right now, you know, many of us have not left our homes or barely left our homes for many months. Lehmann says She's glad the state has set a date but worries people without regular medical care could be left out. Heading into Valentine's Day to bury legislators have authored a bill to help couples get their marriage licenses. Virtually cuties Brian what has more, Senator Nancy Skinner of Berkeley and Assembly member David Chu of San Francisco say during the pandemic, it has been difficult for couples to get marriage licenses in person. Last April, Governor Newsome signed an executive order allowing county clerks to issue marriage licenses remotely. But not all counties made it easy and the order is temporary. So Skinner and to have co authored a B 5 83 to make the remote option permanent and create a statewide standard process for issuing the licenses. Virtually. Skinner said she had officiated a virtual wedding last year and choose said there bill is a small step to make government services more accessible. And spread the love. I'm Brian. What? Kqed news from or local and state news. Head to kqed dot or g'kar. I'm terrorists. Tyler in Oakland. Have a good night. Support for NPR comes from rocket mortgage, working to help home buyers find a home loan that fits their budget Homebuyers Gonna just payments see tax estimates and closing costs all in real time Rocket mortgage rocket can and the.

Fred Hampton Jack Spear Stacey Plaskett Jessica Lehman Hansi Lo Wang 18 points Angela Wang 27 points Bruce Castor Cory Turner Lehman Lehmann Trump January 6 March 15th Last April Black Panther Census Bureau Brian Oakland
"cory turner" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

06:20 min | 2 years ago

"cory turner" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"In this not Congress. That's Texas Senator John Cornyn, who opposes the Senate impeachment trial. Cornyn is not alone in his thinking. North Carolina's Thom Tillis agrees and notes. The current battle between the party's establishment and populous wings are old hat. You know, I think that discussion's been going on since 18 54 when the GOP was Established. You have that discussion every year. It's a perennial discussion. There's some valid arguments, and sometimes I think it's just muscle memory. Republicans do not expect the president to be convicted in the Senate impeachment trial, but say even as the party six with him now, over time, voters will have the last word clotting. Dese Ellis NPR NEWS, the Capitol. Tomorrow. The Senate Education Committee will have a lot of questions for me, Gail Cardona. They'll be considering his nomination to be the next secretary of education, and he will no doubt be asked about school choice, closing opportunity gaps and most critically. How to help America's schools Reopen. It will be Cardona's first big moment in the national spotlight. Here's NPR's Cory Turner with a quick primer on the former fourth grade teacher. Let's start with the man in his own words when he accepted the head secretary nomination, and I Being bilingual and by cultural and as American as apple pie and rice and beans. Cardona's biggest job to date was as Connecticut's education commissioner for just the past year and a half before that, he'd spent his entire career as a public school educator in married in Connecticut, Far from the politics of Washington. Marilyn is a small urban district. We have 12 schools 8500 students, But our Central office core leadership teams about six individuals, so mark the me is superintendent of Merit in schools. He hired Miguel Cardona in 2013 to join that small team after Cardona had served as a teacher and principal Benik knee, says he and Cardona both grew up in the old factory town of about 60,000. Where three quarters of district students qualify for free or low cost meals. Neither our parents can't much you know, I grew up in a third floor apartment. He grew up in projects. This system mattered to us on a deep, deep level. I mean, not only help to raise us, but it also is where our own Children go. Cardona grew up in public housing two parents from Puerto Rico like many families and married him, he attended a local trade high school and studied automotive tech. But when he went to college, he decided to focus not on cars but kids and became 1/4 grade teacher. I remember one time I was kind of struggling with school. You know, I wasn't really doing what I needed to do. Chris Garcia was one of Mr Cardona is very first students in marriage in he spoke into me. He was like, you know, Chris, you're a young Hispanic man. And do not let any obstacle. Stop you Whatever you want to. Do you condone you. A few years later, when Garcia was having trouble again, his mom sent him to a neighborhood homework club. Well, guess who's there? Mr Cardona In fourth grade, Karla Rodriguez says her passion was singing. So Mr Cardona encouraged her to sing in front of the whole class. Even years later in high school, she remembers taking the stage at a talent show. And I hear my name Go. Carla and I look over and he's right there, and I would always know he was there because I could hear him like he was not shy. You would always hear him in the crowd. 27 Cardona became the youngest principal in Connecticut later as a district leader. He was known for his ability to find consensus, says Erin Benham, the former head of the marriage and teachers union. Like you're not gonna get someone screaming and yelling. That's not Miguel. I don't think I've ever Never seen him scream when Samuel runs the Connecticut parents union and says her daughter had a bullying issue and married him when Miguel Cardona was assistant superintendent. L am a girl said. This just should not be happening. We got some serious stuff going on, and that's one of his strengths. Samuel says he was parent friendly and responded quickly but that his plan ultimately did not work for her. And Samuel worries that Cardona is so willing to find consensus and so new to national politics that she doesn't know what he stands for. If you wanted to heal the nation, he's going to be great for that. Where you might get in trouble. Where he realizes he is letting kids is is when he starts to make some of these decisions because he will have to find his voice. Since it was Cardona, who helped Karla Rodriguez find her voice back and fourth grade. I asked her Does she worry if he's ready for the politics of Washington? I do worry because his heart is pure. He's one of the best people I've ever met, but she's also thrilled. Says. This time when he takes the big stage, she'll be the one cheering loudly. Cory Turner NPR news This'd is NPR news. Coming up next on 90.3 K a Z you and streaming at Kay's ew dot org's is marketplace. Good evening. I'm Erica Mahoney, now for a weather update from the National Weather Service. Mostly cloudy skies and Monterey tonight a slight chance of rain and Carmel Valley mainly before 8 p.m.. And then partly cloudy tonight in Santa Cruz. The low will be in the upper thirties. Too. Low forties. Slight chance of rain tomorrow mainly after 10 a.m. Otherwise mostly sunny and the high will be in the mid fifties tomorrow. The time now is 5 30? This is 90.3 K A Z you marketplace is next. Marketplace is supported by GDP, helping transform supply chains with strategy services and software, including GDP, Smart ngp next AI based digital.

Miguel Cardona Mr Cardona Senate Senator John Cornyn Samuel Chris Garcia secretary Connecticut Cory Turner Ellis NPR NEWS Thom Tillis superintendent Congress Washington Karla Rodriguez NPR North Carolina Texas Senate Education Committee GOP
"cory turner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"cory turner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hi. I'm Jenn White. Today on one a immigration and Joe Biden's new approach to a very old problem. He kicked off his presidency with a flood of executive orders, including a handful revoking some of his predecessors, most aggressive and restrictive measures. But it's one thing to stop a policy and another to start one. How much his tactics different this time. Find out as we speak to part of his team tasked with passing immigration reform, and we look forward to sharing your experiences in comments to email us at one A. W A. M u dot org's or tweet US at 18. Live from NPR news. I'm Shea Stevens. President Biden says the government is ramping up production and deliveries of covert 19 vaccines and supplies that are needed to fight the pandemic. Biden says his administration is trying to buy an additional 200 million doses of two approved vaccines. This is a war time effort. When I say when, when? When I say that people ask war time, So yeah. Within 400,000 Americans have already died because 411 or 12 have died in one year of this pandemic. More than all the people who died in all the Americans have died in World War two. Biden says thousands of pharmacies will be used to help vaccinate Americans. The president also wants to ensure that states, tribes and territories received three weeks advance notice of how many doses of Corbett Vaccines are on the way. New overview of CDC researchers finds little evidence that reopening K through 12 schools contributes meaningful Lee to the broader spread of Cove in 19 details from NPR's Cory Turner. The review was published Tuesday by the Journal of the American Medical Association. The CDC report runs through several studies of school systems that reopened in the fall. And while there were cases of students and staff getting sick outside school There were very few examples of spread in school. The review says. Indoor sports are still risky, signing a wrestling tournament that led to dozens of infections. But the authors say with masking socially distanced classrooms and adequate ventilation schools did not seem to create the kind of rapid spread scene in nursing homes. The report comes as president Biden has promised to provide schools with clear science driven guidelines on safe reopening. Cory Turner. NPR NEWS Chicago public schools. Have stopped plans to resume in person instruction after the city's teachers union said its members would not show up. Thousands of teachers were prepared to pick it over coronavirus safety concerns. Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot's his bargaining will continue. New York City pension funds are preparing to divest from fossil fuel companies as NPR's Sally her ship's reports the sales with total and estimated $4 billion New York City's largest pension fund, the one that invests retirement dollars for city employees, ranging from accountants to clerical and sanitation workers, has voted to divest from fossil fuels. Plan was first announced two years ago, making New York the first major city to commit to such a move. New York has five pension funds totaling almost $240 billion fund representing city teachers also voted to approve fossil fuel divestments. The statement, City Comptroller Scott Stringer said the divestment is expected to be one of the largest in the world. Last year. Mayors of 12 big cities around the world including Berlin, Cape Town, Milan and Vancouver took similar steps. Sally her ship's NPR news, This is NPR. The Justice Department says it has resented the Trump Administration. Zero tolerance policy on Immigration Department statement says the action restores the authority to prosecutors to decide whether to bring charges based on a careful review of facts and circumstances of individual immigration cases. Well in Houston. The federal judge has blocked the Biden administration's 100 Day moratorium on certain deportations pending a lawsuit by Texas Republican leaders. For the first time since 2013. The Baseball Hall of Fame is electing No. One. Once again. Several star players linked to ban drugs were kept out of the hole and Hall of Fame. Voters have been put off by the political comments that picture Her chilling has made in recent years. NPR's Tom Goldman has more no players on the ballot got the required support of at least 75% of the voting. Baseball writers. Two men linked to the game so called steroids era got slight increases from last year, but all time home run leader Barry Bonds and all star pitcher Roger Clemens still were under 62%. Three time World Series champion Curt Schilling had the highest percentage at 71.1. But his incendiary comments apparently kept him out again. He's made anti Muslim and transgender statements and this month tweeted his apparent support for the mob attack on the U. S. Capitol. Shilling Bonds and Clemens have one more year of eligibility with writers. But in a letter to the Hall of Fame, Shilling asked that his name be taken off Next year's ballot. Tom Goldman. NPR news in after hours trading, U. S futures are mixed. This is NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations..

NPR Joe Biden president Cory Turner Biden administration New York Curt Schilling Baseball Hall of Fame CDC New York City Jenn White Hall of Fame Chicago Tom Goldman Barry Bonds Shea Stevens Immigration Department
"cory turner" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"cory turner" Discussed on KCRW

"Kids like Lindsay, who was 17 and lives with her mom outside Atlanta. We're not using last names to protect her privacy. Lindsey has autism. She thrives on routine and get special help at school. So when the pandemic hit and schools closed her mom Sandra, who's a nurse says they're living hell started. Lindsay began hitting her mom. Also, she would still wake up early for school. But when the bus never came, Sandra says she'd often grow agitated and just walk out is like how brain was wired, and she's out the door and I'm chasing her. That's when Sandra would race through the short list of places she could call for help. There was her state's mental health crisis hotline. But she'd often have to wait. This is ridiculous is supposed to be a crisis team, But I'm on hold for 40 50 minutes, and by the time you get on the phone is done. There was the local hospital, but she'd already been there with Lindsay a few times and been told there's really nothing they can do So on May 17th when her daughter ran out before breakfast, Sandra followed in her car. And called the last option on our list. The police she's turning this way. She's turning this way in this a man staying in one spot, but I can't because if I stay in one spot, she's gone. I don't know my daughter is turns out. Lindsay wanted a bag of Doritos and walk to the store on the way she took off her pants. So when she got there, she was wearing a red shirt and gray underwear, according to Sandra and police records at the store in front of a female officer. Lindsay hit her mom hard on the back and she hit me in the latest song. I said she's autistic. You know, I'm okay. I'm a nurse. I just need to take her home and giving her medication. But the police said they couldn't drive Lindsey home and asked if Sandra wanted to take her to the nearest hospital. Sandra said No, because they already told me, ma'am, there's nothing we can do. They just check out labs is fine the ship from back home. So, the officer said the only other thing the police could do was take Lindsay to jail for hitting her mom. At that point, Sandra says she felt helpless and out of options. I don't know, she said. I'm trying everything. Finally in tears, she told the police take her. When Lindsey resisted, several officers wrestled her to the ground and handcuffed. ER, The teenager still in her underwear, was taken to jail, where she spent much of the night until her mom was able to post bail. Lindsay's case is still pending. Clayton County Solicitor General Charles Brooks told NPR his office is working to ensure that the resolution in this matter involves a plan for medication compliance and not punitive action. Millions of kids are grappling with similar challenges many cycle through police custody and emergency rooms or faced long, costly stays in residential treatment facilities. That's exactly what Sandra is hoping to avoid. For Lindsay. For me as a nurse, and as a provider of that'll be. The last thing for my daughter is like they leave it to the school. And to the parents to deal with and they don't care. And that's the problem Is that because if I'm not here, you know she didn't ask to be actually have all to them, you know? To help families like Sanders and Marjorie's advocates say governments need to invest more to create a mental health system that's accessible to anyone who needs it. But given that many states are right now, seeing revenues drop, there's a concern that services will instead get cut at a time when the need has never been greater. For NPR news. I'm Cory Turner and I'm Kristine Herman. That story comes from a reporting partnership among NPR, Illinois Public Media and Kaiser Health News. This is NPR news. KCRW sponsors include Netflix, presenting Ma Rainey's Black bottom. Viola Davis and Chadwick Boseman star in this adaptation of the August Wilson play about the 19 twenties. Mother of the Blues now on Netflix awards eligible There are lots of great ways to support KCRW joining us a member, of course, but also spreading the word to friends, subscribing to newsletters and writing reviews or donating that unused vehicle in your life unfold. Family car could be hard to let go. But.

Sandra Lindsay Lindsey NPR officer Atlanta Netflix Viola Davis Ma Rainey KCRW Kaiser Health News Chadwick Boseman Clayton County Illinois Cory Turner Charles Brooks Sanders
"cory turner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:30 min | 2 years ago

"cory turner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Just because folks don't believe those of us that they come from targeted and marginalized communities doesn't mean that we haven't been predicting this. All the while. The South has been saying that white supremacists and elected positions is a dangerous inconsequential matter. This country needs to pay attention to Henderson is the co executive director of the Social Justice Center in East Tennessee, The Highlander Research and Education Center. Last year their administrative building was set on fire. Ah white power symbol spray painted on the ground. White supremacist violence. Hate crimes have been steadily rising. Then there was the hypocrisy, she says. White extremists taking Selfies with a white police officer as Congress, people sheltered in place, and a man walked through the halls with a Confederate flag again. It just exaggerated the contradictions to me around like how the state and how police respond to black and an indigenous and let an ex and agents of M Pacific Islander folks. When we processed or even white people that are protesting for social justice and economic justice for all people versus how they responded Tiuna. It's a gun toting white supremacists that we're coming into the capital. Some in the crowd say they don't subscribe to the racism and anti Semitism that was on full display Wednesday. Ron Harris, a native of Minneapolis, is on the Democratic National Committee and was in Georgia for two historic races that were overshadowed by the insurrection in D. C. Do not even have a day to celebrate that, and then they turn on and see. Huge white mob that was incited by the president to them take over the Capitol building. It was frustrating because I've seen people tackled arrested. Pepper sprayed tear gas shot with rubber bullets killed For a whole lot Less hair is protest in Minneapolis this summer on what he saw in D. C, he says, proves what he and other organizers have been saying that police make choices about how they react to people, depending on their race. I think that people for the large majority are saying, Look, you know, how do you know how to act when it's white folks, You know how to apprehend. When it's someone white. You know how to be called. You know, I'm not to escalate. You know how not to kill. Right. For whatever reason, it seems like that knowledge that ability and those skills you lost when it's us, he says. Black and brown people wouldn't have made it to the steps of the Capitol. If those folks were black. Those folks are brown. We'd be having a much different conversation today. Layla Father NPR news. Since the beginning of this pandemic, experts and educators have feared open schools would spread Cove in 19, which is why so many remain closed. But a new study suggests that reopening schools may be safer than originally thought. MPR's Cory Turner has more Up to this point. Researchers have focused largely on positivity rates, as in did the rate of positive coronavirus tests among kids or communities increase after schools reopened. But researchers at Tulane University worried that testing in the U. S is still too varied to give us reliable answers. But if you get infected with Corona virus and you become substantially Il, you're going to be hospitalized. Susan has egg to lay an epidemiologist who worked on the stuff. Says hospitalization rates maybe a more reliable indicator of covert spread, so mining a trove of national data from last year, she and her fellow researchers looked to see if more people ended up in the hospital after nearby schools reopened. They found two things, says NGO. The banner A to Lay, an economist on the team first for communities where hospitalization rates were already relatively low as of mid December. We're talking a little over half of all counties in the U. S when they opened in person or hybrid mode. We did not see increases and hospitalizations Post re opening. In fact, In many places, hospitalizations appeared to go down. Maybe because of rules and norms around social, distancing and mask wearing the kids may not be following at home. The other thing they found was that in communities where hospitalization rates were higher The data was messy and inconclusive. Does that mean school should stay closed in places with higher rates in that category you're talking about. There are tradeoffs involved. Lead researcher Douglas Harris says all communities should weigh the risks of not reopening schools. Risks to kids. Mental health child abuse going on reported not to mention learning loss. Still, Harris insists we're not trying to make a forceful cases. Go shit open or not reopen. All we're trying to his frame. The decision to make a little clear the risks of reopening schools. And of keeping them closed. Cory Turner NPR news Pro trump writers that stormed the capital this week appeared to be mostly men. But women played a huge role in the day's events, too, and their support is crucial to the far right movement here more tomorrow on weekend edition to an end by asking your smart speaker to play NPR or your local station by name. You're listening to all things considered from NPR News. The condemnation.

Douglas Harris Cory Turner Minneapolis NPR NPR News Highlander Research and Educat Social Justice Center Henderson Semitism M Pacific Islander Tulane University Democratic National Committee executive director East Tennessee Selfies president Tiuna Pepper officer
"cory turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:57 min | 2 years ago

"cory turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Just because folks don't believe those of us that they come from targeted and marginalized communities doesn't mean that we haven't been predicting this. All the while. The South has been saying that white supremacists and elected positions is a dangerous inconsequential matter. This country needs to pay attention to the Henderson is the co executive director of the Social Justice Center in East Tennessee, the Highlander research and education. Center last year, Their administrative building was set on fire. Ah white power symbol spray painted on the ground. White supremacist violence, hate crimes have been steadily rising. And there was the hypocrisy, she says. White extremists taking Selfies with a white police officer as Congress, people sheltered in place, and a man walked through the halls with a Confederate flag again. It just exaggerated the contradictions to me around like how the state and how police respond to black and an indigenous and let an ex and agents in the Pacific Islander folks when we protest or even white people that are protesting for social justice and economic justice for all people. Versus how they responded Tiuna. It's a gun toting white supremacists the we're coming into the capital. Some in the crowd say they don't subscribe to the racism and anti Semitism that was on full display Wednesday. Ron Harris, a native of Minneapolis, is on the Democratic National Committee and was in Georgia for two historic races that were overshadowed by the insurrection in D. C Tonight even have a day to celebrate that, and then they turn on and see. Huge white mob that was incited by the president to then take over the Capitol building. It was frustrating because I've seen people tackled arrested. Pepper sprayed, tear gassed shot with rubber bullets killed For a whole lot Less hair is protest in Minneapolis this summer on what he saw in D. C, he says, proves what he and other organizers have been saying that police make choices about how they react to people, depending on their race. I think that people for the large majority are saying, Look, you know, how do you know how to act when it's right, folks? You know how to apprehend. When it's someone white. You know how to be called. You know, I'm not to escalate. You know how not to kill. Right. For whatever reason, it seems like that knowledge that ability and those skills you lost when it's us, he says. Black and brown people wouldn't have made it to the steps of the Capitol. Those folks were black. Those folks are brown. We'd be having a much different conversation today. Layla Father NPR news. Since the beginning of this pandemic, experts and educators have feared open schools would spread Cove in 19, which is why so many remain closed. But the new study suggests that reopening schools may be safer than originally thought. NPR's Cory Turner has more Up to this point. Researchers have focused largely on positivity rates, as in did the rate of positive coronavirus tests among kids or communities increase after schools reopened. But researchers at Tulane University worried that testing in the U. S is still too varied to give us reliable answers. But if you get infected with Corona virus and you become substantially Il, you're going to be hospitalized. Susan has egg to lay an epidemiologist who worked on this stuff. Says hospitalization rates maybe a more reliable indicator of covert spread, so mining a trove of national data from last year, she and her fellow researchers looked to see if more people ended up in the hospital after nearby schools reopened. They found two things, says NGO. The banner A to Lay, an economist on the team first for communities where hospitalization rates were already relatively low as of mid December. We're talking a little over half of all counties in the U. S when they opened in person or hybrid mode. We did not see increases and hospitalizations Post re opening. In fact, In many places, hospitalizations appeared to go down. Maybe because of rules and norms around social, distancing and mask wearing the kids may not be following at home. The other thing they found was that in communities where hospitalization rates were higher The data was messy and inconclusive. Does that mean schools should stay closed in places with higher rates in that category you're talking about. There are tradeoffs involved. Lead researcher Douglas Harris says all communities should weigh the risks of not reopening schools. Risks to kids. Mental health child abuse going on reported not to mention learning loss. Still, Harris insists we're not trying to make a forceful cases, collision open or not reopen. All we're trying to his frame. The decision to make a little clear the risks of reopening schools and of keeping them closed. Cory Turner NPR news A pro trump writers that stormed the capital this week appeared to be mostly men. But women played a huge role in the day's events, too, and their support is crucial to the far right movement here more tomorrow on weekend edition to an end by asking your smart speaker to play NPR or your local station by name. It's double u N Y C. You're listening to all things considered just ahead after the break. The condemnation is growing against Senator Josh Holly, Republican of Missouri, who was the first Senate Republican to announce he would vote to object to the electoral college results. We'll hear all about that and more this hour just after the break. W N. Y C supporters include Netflix, presenting the trial of the.

Douglas Harris NPR Cory Turner Minneapolis Social Justice Center Pacific Islander Henderson Netflix Semitism Tulane University Democratic National Committee executive director Tiuna East Tennessee Selfies president Senator Josh Holly Pepper Congress
School reopenings off to a rocky start amid pandemic

Morning Edition

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

School reopenings off to a rocky start amid pandemic

"Students arrived on campus earlier this month. So did Cove in 19. Clusters of infection hit several residents, halls and the school logged 135 positive cases just last week, most of them students, And so after one week of classes, the school said it would move all undergraduate instruction online. In late July, The Orange County Health Department recommended the school start the year online only and warned that Cove in 19 could pose serious problems if UNC Chapel Hill tried to resume business as usual. In a public response to weeks ago, the school's chancellor, defended the decision not to follow the health Department writing. We are well prepared for the start of the fall semester. Cory Turner. NPR NEWS President.

Cove Orange County Health Departmen Unc Chapel Hill Cory Turner Health Department NPR Chancellor President Trump
ICE says foreign students can't take online-only fall classes

BBC World Service

00:55 sec | 2 years ago

ICE says foreign students can't take online-only fall classes

"Foreign students attending U. S colleges and universities are having to scramble. NPR's Cory Turner reports that the Trump administration says international students may not remain in the U. S or return to the country. If their schools have moved. Courses online. The announcement from U. S Immigration and Customs Enforcement has major implications for students and schools. Ice says foreign students will only be allowed to stay in the US if they're enrolled in a program with at least some in person coursework. The move comes as Mohr and more colleges announced online only programs in the fall to prevent the spread of Cove in 19 The administration recommends that students transfer to schools with in person classes. A tweet from President Trump reads. Schools must re open in the fall. The American Council on Education, a top high red advocacy group. Calls the new guidance

Trump Administration President Trump U. S Immigration And Customs E Cory Turner NPR American Council On Education Mohr United States ICE