4 Burst results for "Corvo Coleman Npr"

"corvo coleman npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"corvo coleman npr" Discussed on KCRW

"Tech company Apple has backed off its plan to scan phones for images of child sex abuse. Privacy advocates say that feature will also let repressive governments crackdown on citizens. Advocates say they'll protest at Apple stores next week from member Station KQED in San Francisco. Rachel Myrow reports There's no end to the justifications Apple could find for mass surveillance should it roll out the scanning technology, according to Matt Hatfield of the group Open source. The reality is that Apple is a commercial legal entity, subject to the laws passed by governments, where it operates their strongest defense. To date against turning over our data on request has been their assertion that they couldn't do it. There voluntarily getting that up. No comment yet from the company. Although its software chief told The Wall Street Journal the plan was widely misunderstood for NPR news, I'm Rachel Myrow. Apple is a financial supporter of NPR. Today is the start of sports betting in Arizona, which is already permitted in several other states, people will be allowed to make live wagers online on college and professional sports. Will also be able to do it at the Arizona Diamondbacks Baseball stadium. The practice was allowed just a few years ago by a decision from the Supreme Court. Corvo Coleman NPR News in Washington. Support for NPR comes from the News Leaders Association supporting the First Amendment and seeking to empower news leaders to build diverse, sustainable newsrooms to inform and engage the communities they reflect and serve. More at news.

Matt Hatfield Rachel Myrow Arizona Apple Corvo Coleman Washington San Francisco NPR next week News Leaders Association NPR News Station KQED Today Supreme Court Arizona Diamondbacks Baseball few years ago Open source First Amendment Wall Street Journal
"corvo coleman npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:11 min | 1 year ago

"corvo coleman npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And 2016, according to the national climate Assessment. Similar increases are playing out across the central and northeastern US Rebecca Herscher NPR news This is NPR. California Fire officials say this may be their worst fire season ever. There are about a dozen large wildfires burning in the state. These have destroyed thousands square miles and burned down hundreds of homes. Dixie Fire in Northern California has scorched an area about the size of Rhode Island. It's about 40% contained. In New York with Broadway and touring shows reopening producers and theater owners have signed a new pledge. It's with a prominent group of artists. Black Theater united Seeks to make Broadway a more diverse, inclusive workspace, Jeff London explains. The 17 page document, titled A New Deal for Broadway outlines the changes. The signatories, which include owners of all 41 Broadway theaters hope to achieve among the pledges, setting up diversity, training and mentorship programs, making sure creative teams aren't all white renaming Broadway theaters for black artists. And setting diversity rules for the Tony Awards. Black Theater United includes several of Broadway's biggest stars Audra McDonald, Brian Stokes, Mitchell and Billy Porter, among them. The Broadway League, which represents producers in theater owners, as well as actors Equity, the Professional actors union signed onto the pledge for NPR News. I'm Jeff Lunden in New York. The opening ceremonies for the 2020 Paralympics are being held today in Tokyo. Like the Summer Olympics. The Paralympic Games were delayed a year because of the pandemic as they open Tokyo is struggling with spreading cases of coronavirus infections on Corvo Coleman NPR news Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include Capital one with the capital one. Venture card. Details at capital one dot com. What's in your wallet? Credit approval required Capital One bank U S. A. N A. And the listeners who support this NPR station. Number It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Leila Fadel in Culver City, California and I'm Steve Inskeep in Washington, D. C. Good morning. The Food and Drug Administration is now fully approved a covid vaccine. It's the one from Pfizer, which, like other vaccines had only emergency use authorization up to now, President Biden would like unvaccinated Americans to draw a conclusion. So let me say this loudly and clearly If you have if you're one of the millions of Americans who said that they will not get the shot. When it's until has full and final approval of the FDA. It has now happened. Moment. You've been waiting for us here. It's time for you to go Get your vaccination Get it today today. An important moment in our fight against the pandemic. Dr. Francis Collins joins us once again. He is director of the National Institutes of Health. Dr Collins. Welcome back. Nice to be back with you, Steve Day where we have some good news. Well, let's talk about that news. I assume that full FDA approval is a higher standard of proof than the emergency authorization from late last year. So what does the FDA know now that they didn't know late last year? Well, they've been able to look now over many more months of follow up in terms of assessing both the safety and also the efficacy of this vaccine in the real world. They've pored over hundreds of thousands of pages of material from Pfizer about every detail about every participant in the trials. They have learned more details about the manufacturing process. They've actually sent inspection teams to the places where the vaccine is being manufactured. To be sure, everything is exactly the way it's supposed to. And they have pronounced this all in order, and hence the full approval. And, as the president said a minute ago, that means if you're one of those folks who was waiting for that, to be sure that this vaccine was going to be okay, that day has come. Guess we can also just point out the obvious year to put it in simple terms. Many tens of millions of people went ahead of you across that bridge and the bridge didn't fall, so to speak. Exactly, And they're actually in a much better place because of it. So, yeah, There's about 85 Million Americans. Steve that are still on the fence have not yet gotten that first dose. The hope of many of us is that this will be a motivation. For those folks to decide to go forward because polls had said that was an issue for at least three out of 10. And now the three out of 10. I hope they're listening right now will decide to go to vaccines dot gov and find out where the closest places To get their immunization and do it today. Well, you must have had had time to think about have been forced to think about the psychology of all this. You're absolutely correct, according to polls, A lot of people said they were awaiting final FDA approval to act. What people say. And what they mean is not always identical. Do you believe that final approval was the reason that some people hesitated. Well, I hesitate to second yes, human behavior because I'm always wrong, But I think that was a factor in there amongst others, of course, And unfortunately, a lot of the resistance is also based upon misinformation or disinformation that is so widely spread across the Internet. But maybe this would be a good day for people who have held back to kind of hit the reset button and say, Okay, let's really look at the facts here. About why I might want to take advantage of this safe and effective vaccine both for myself from my family to help protect the people around me, because it's up to all of us to do that, too. Does this approval make it easier for federal, state and local leaders who want to to mandate more vaccinations? Well, it already has. Within hours of the announcement, Several universities Minnesota, Louisiana have moved forward. They said. They were waiting for this. They didn't wait long to act upon it. Some businesses as well and, of course, the military now with the announcement that the 1.2 million Military individuals will be required to be vaccinated timetable not yet stated, but presumably soon, so. I think you're going to see a lot of that in the next few days of those industries, universities, other organizations that were kind of waiting because they wanted to be sure they were on the firmest possible footing to step forward and say we're going to require this now The doctor Collins let me raise a question that is constantly on the minds of every household and I live in one where there is somebody under 12, who currently cannot be Vaccinated..

Brian Stokes Audra McDonald Leila Fadel Billy Porter Steve Inskeep Mitchell Jeff Lunden Jeff London Rebecca Herscher Tokyo New York Rhode Island 2016 1.2 million Steve Day Summer Olympics Washington, D. C. Francis Collins 17 page 2020 Paralympics
"corvo coleman npr" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"corvo coleman npr" Discussed on WBUR

"Held here in 1964. So there's pride in that, And there were many things being done to really increase the exposure of Japanese people to the athletics to the sport by bringing in tens of thousands of school Children free of charge to watch inside the venues. Now, of course, all of that is being dramatically reduced because of the covid pandemic. The BBC's Rupert Wingfield Hayes reporting from Tokyo. The controversial president of the Philippines, Rodrigo Duterte, has agreed to run for vice president next year. His political party is announcing the news. Duterte is term limited as president. On Corvo Coleman NPR News in Washington. This is 90.9. W b. You are good morning. I'm Bob Oakes. Today. The state Education Commissioner will request authority from the State Board to mandate masks in public schools statewide for the start of the school year this fall. Until now, mask requirements have been left left up to local districts. The commissioner wants the authority to mandate masks until at least October, 1st. Among those watching today's vote is Kevin Manley, parent of a student in East Longmeadow. Some kids can't be vaccinated. Some kids choose not to be vaccinated. I think it's a great idea to put mass and to reduce our potential exposure. East. Longmeadow is among the school districts that have recommended but not required masks for unvaccinated students in the next school year. State health data show. The seven A positive coronavirus test rate statewide has been dropping for a week. Now the number is just under 2.6% down nearly 3% from down from nearly 3% from last week. Number of people getting first doses of vaccines continues to outpace the number of second doses. Nearly 31,000 people got first shots here last week about 4000 took the second shot. Hampton Superior Court Judge today will consider whether to dismiss charges against two former leaders at the state run to Holyoke Soldiers home where more than 70 veterans died in a coronavirus outbreak last year. Double to be Urs Sarah Rose Brenner has a preview the homes former Superintendent Bennett Walsh and its former medical director, David Clinton, of facing criminal neglect judges for their alleged roles in the outbreak in the early days of the pandemic. When the charges were brought last fall, State Attorney General Maura Healey said the two endangered residents by putting those who showed covid symptoms in the same unit as those who did not, and the space was overcrowded. Washing. Clinton have pleaded not guilty. They're also among the targets of a federal class action lawsuit filed last week by staff at the home who say they were forced to work under unsafe and inhumane conditions for 90.9 w bur. I'm Sarah Rose Brenna. Boston City councillors are considering trying to offset climate change by beefing up protections for the city's tree canopy. Counselor Liz Brandon is co sponsoring a measure to in part require those who cut down to public tree to plant a new one. Within a year. She says trees are scarce in some Boston neighborhoods, exacerbating so called heat islands and making extreme heat even more dangerous. We can have big storms and flooding in the seaport. We can have windstorms, etcetera. When we have an extended heat with it actually kills people and the urban heat Island effect is a real threat to people's health and well being. Aidan says some private landowners cut down too many trees because they see them as a nuisance. It's a slow start to the morning commute for some people on the D branch of the Green Line. Shuttle buses are replacing trains right now between Reservoir and Kenmore because of downed power lines in Brookline. The T says repairs are being made, but there is no estimate yet.

Kevin Manley Rupert Wingfield Hayes Aidan Bob Oakes David Clinton Sarah Rose Brenna Clinton Washington 1964 Duterte Tokyo Today last year Corvo Coleman BBC 90.9 w bur East Longmeadow Boston Liz Brandon last week
"corvo coleman npr" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"corvo coleman npr" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Is 58 years old. Today news is next. Lie from NPR News in Washington. I'm Korova Coleman, A celebration of George Floyd's Life is set for today in Minneapolis. It was a year ago today that he was murdered by then. City police officer from Minnesota Public Radio Mats epic has more Today's gathering at a downtown park honors Floyd's life and legacy with a focus on black culture, history, food and music. It caps off three days of anniversary events that included a march and rally as well as panel discussions about policing and racial equity. Former police officer Derrick Show. Vin faces sentencing next month after a jury in April convicted him of Floyd's murder. Matt Sepik reporting Secretary of State Antony Blinken is in Israel toe work to shore up the cease fire between Israel and Palestinian Hamas fighters. He's already met with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and will speak with Palestinian Authority President Mark Moody Abas. Other stops for blinking on his trip include Jordan and Egypt, which mediated the cease fire. Most Children who suffer a rare but serious complication of covert 19 recover in less than six months, according to a new study NPR's Richard Harris reports on a paper published in the land set. Children generally handle covert 19 better than adults do, but on rare occasions they developed dangerous inflammation which can affect the heart and other vital organs. It's called M I S C Doctors at a major hospital in London followed up on 46 Children who had been diagnosed with this condition within six weeks. Most had recovered pretty well and most of the rest were largely better by six months, but some didn't fully recover their strength, perhaps due to extended time in a hospital bed or to the drugs used to treat the condition. And nearly one in five reported serious emotional difficulties that had not resolved six months after their diagnosis. But overall, doctors were reassured that the dangerous inflammation had cleared up in all but one patient. Richard Harris, NPR news Big tech company. Apple and video game developer Epic Games have wrapped up legal arguments over whether the iPhone maker abuses its market power. NPR's Shannon Bond reports. The case centers on whether Apple fairly treats companies that make popular smartphone APS. Closing arguments took the form of a debate in the Oakland California courtroom where Apple and epic have been making their cases for the last three weeks. Epic, which makes the popular game fortnight urge the judge to force Apple to open up its grip on its APP store and allow more competition. Apple defended the 30% commission that levies on every purchase made in the APP store and said it already faces plenty of rivals in the smartphone market. Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers press both sides on how to define competition and whether the court should get involved in changing a company's business model. She said she'll give her verdict as soon as she can, but did not set a date. Apples among MPR's financial supporters. Shannon Bond, NPR News This is NPR news. President Biden is going to tap upto $1 billion for a federal Emergency management agency program that prepares for disasters that includes severe weather. Biden point rather pointed to record hurricanes and tropical storms last year. He says. Forecasters say this year's hurricane season will be active. A suspected killer who evaded police for a week in South Carolina was captured Monday after a massive manhunt. From South Carolina Public Radio Scott Morgan reports, agents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives found 27 year old Tyler Terry lying on the ground in the woods in Chester County. Although agents reportedly found a gun near him. He was taken into custody without incident. The federal agents were part of a 20 agency 300 person manhunt for Terry, who slipped Chester County deputies following a high speed chase last Monday. Harry was sought in connection with four murders in South Carolina and ST Louis. Police say two deputies chasing Terry and a woman were fired at Terry faces two counts of attempted murder in that incident, plus another five counts of attempted murder in Chester City. For NPR News. I'm Scott Morgan, Texas State lawmakers have passed a bill that would let people carry handguns without getting any permits. It would not have to get state background checks either or any training. There are strong objections to the bill. Texas Governor Greg Abbott says he will sign it. Law enforcement groups say this will put the public and law enforcement officers in danger. Gun control groups point of mass shootings in Texas, such as the one of Wal Mart in El Paso that killed 23 people. I'm Corvo Coleman NPR News in Washington. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include ex chair introducing the ex HMT Heat and Massage Work Chair. Ah, Home office chair with heat and massage therapy, plus de VL Support and 10 ergonomic.

Matt Sepik Richard Harris Shannon Bond Chester County Floyd Korova Coleman Tyler Terry Monday South Carolina Chester City April Washington Minneapolis London Apple El Paso ST Louis iPhone Palestinian Authority George Floyd