14 Burst results for "Corporation For Public Broadcasting"

"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on The CMO Podcast

The CMO Podcast

08:36 min | 10 months ago

"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on The CMO Podcast

"Using who's bringing these story. Do you think there's anything that non media brands can learn from that. You know i remember when i was at. Png i was on the plane with our ceo at the time and we are our company was sort of coming back and i. We were talking about how to humanize our brands more and i remember talking about. Should we just take some of the people who are the scientists on the brand or the consumer insights people are the factory people and just get them out there more. You know on social media at events because they're so sincere. They're so good. They're so expert at what they do. So do you think. There's any learning for non media brands on humanizing their brands by showing a bit more of the personality of the people who are behind the brand which make the brand. Yeah i think it's a natural You naturally effective tactic tactic. Connect people with real people that that embody your brand that the challenges making sure that you find people that are also have that natural charisma and the national connection because part of what you hope you is this young of some brands. It's it's it's a sense of humor a An empathy an entertainment value. And you think about the personalities thing about the beer's network bat was you know we we have the same. We've got what should we you know what makes a good mood. Tv host is just somebody who is an expert shop Who has the greatest food is putting on the air or is it somebody who has a little bit more of Entertainment celebrity magic and We're lucky to find people who can combine that. If you think about people like a guy area an rolla garcia. Rachel ray they have. They have the food shops but they also have that unique ability to connect this as great personalities. Deloitte is exclusive sponsor of the cmo. 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Abi buyers visits cmo dot deloitte dot com. I saw one of the first things you did. When you joined or she dug into the anthropology of npr you went back and actually spoke to the founders of the people that were there at the beginning with the first show as this was just an emerging thing. So tell us about that. Why did you do that. And what did you learn your. I really wanted to go back in your stand. The essence of the brand and In what's true values were just any warranted story. And so i went and talked to bill simmering. Who was the original program director for npr. Who wrote npr's first mission statement And had a long conversation with him in separately emails just to get a sense of what was the thinking behind the creation of npr. And what what were they trying to do at the beginning. And it really helped me understand How the brand should live on in. When when the brand started the idea was it was supposed to be a sort of a compliment to the areas that commercial media and so the free market. The incentives around media did not serve. It came out at the great society programs in the nineteen sixties instead of you know the corporation public broadcasting and public broadcasting act Set up the funding for that and so the idea of npr was you know. Are there certain voices that are not being being spotlight certain stories. They're not being told you know things that baby. are commercially viable. But they're important for americans to know and understand and also we. We goal was sir audiences that weren't being best served by mainstream media and as the years went on There's been a disconnect i think. npr's becoming a an obviously super trusted news brand. But it's i think the audience that the it predominantly serves It's not necessarily be the unheard or be under under represented voices became really Maybe we did too good of a job. We created a A fan base of people who super highly educated super upscale and you know super intelligent But we've a lot of the country and they think You know bill. Help me understand that you know. There's still a long way to go in terms of performing that mission. We need to really use the analogy that we're spreading seeds but we aren't plowing the entire feel anything else didn't share anything else about that mission and about fifty years ago the thinking and motivation behind it and how he feels about it today. Yeah i think that One of the things is this idea of serving the entire person You know we're not just a news and information ran but really About storytelling that can make you just more complete human being so there's room for news headlines and political information but there's also room for cultural stories in stories about lifestyle and and Travel music booed. And just you know all the different ways that you making human and never to let that part of the brand slip away and a great job of that today know thanks to the being able to leverage multiple platforms beyond just radio shows. You know we've been able to on youtube with our tiny desk concerts. Create a whole new cultural movement around discovering in platforming new music artist So i think that that whole person aspect of it is something that We still we still listen to bill today. Was there anything in that anthropology dig. That surprised you. Yeah a little bit the radical but but Yeah sort of a classic nature of the people who started. Npr they they. Weren't you know they were people who probably wouldn't wouldn't have been able to get hired at. Cbs news or the mainstream media. Outlets ma'am they took a lot of chances on young up and coming journalists. Who couldn't get jobs in mainstream media especially women we talk about season stanford and cokie roberts and they all have stories Up how you know. They were rejected by the big mainstream media outlets so been a place for That lifting up voices that normally get get a stage. Michael hata that iq that anthropology dig shape your priorities as you were putting together your agenda. Cmo only the third one at npr will help me frame what are challenges. And i think that they're to court. Challenges one is to just increase the reach of our work Have a bit. The boss of is the cloud of feel and create more american su.

npr rolla garcia deloitte Rachel ray beata youtube Cbs news Npr cokie roberts Michael hata stanford
"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on The Young Turks

The Young Turks

02:16 min | 10 months ago

"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on The Young Turks

"Of worms but anyway so of mark's well-done you've been in hollywood way too long time waiting for that's funny right. I'm sorry you're right. Is there just laugh to already having fun so mark is very competitive by the way the score. Now i know because he just didn't have sort of the edge with mark thompson. That was nine hours long ago. I try i try. Yeah yeah just too. Competitive won't do you might get a. Is this freewheeling here my allowed to ask mark absolutely free. I will get back to my point. Maybe that's all school so is show you. How old mark thompson is. Do you remember the joke about the macneil. Lehrer hour going down half an hour to that was a joke and jank knows it too because i believe ben has related it to jank. It was frank. Mangku which who said at a meeting of cpap the corporation public broadcasting. They're talking about where their money is going to go and they He was at that point franko which was running npr national public radio carson They said we're going to have this kind of this much money for you know investigators stuff we're gonna have this much money for international law officers. We're spending this much money to expand the macneil lehrer report to an hour so it'll be mcneil lehrer news hour and franko. It's chirps up. Says i thought it was an hour clips. We what do they call it now. It's it's the pbs news hour. Right right right. Okay and is frank has another line that i absolutely loved and say on the air still to this day from time time and by now everybody is forgotten where it comes from but so frank was Babacan these press secretary of course tragically announced the news of his death Eh did a miraculous primary campaign for mcgovern and got him to.

jank mark thompson mark Mangku franko macneil Lehrer hollywood macneil lehrer frank mcneil lehrer pbs news ben npr carson Babacan mcgovern
"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"That every single country that has ever been founded involved population transfers and violence that is true and if corey bush wants to give up her house in saint louis to whatever native tribe originally occupied that area. She is more than she is more than capable of doing so. I don't see you're making many moves along those lines. Do you mean way of representative maxine waters. Another beneficiary of living in the united states is able to gripped off the american public in los angeles for last thirty years and meanwhile to crying every area of law and order indecency in american life. Messing waters truly one of the most corrupt and horrible members of the american congress. She tweeted july. Fourth and so the declaration of independence has all men are created equal equal to what what men only white men. Isn't it something that they wrote this. In seventeen seventy six. When african americans were enslaved. They weren't thinking about us then. But we're thinking about us now okay. This is so historically accurate. Because maxine waters she does not have to brain cells to rub together. They're not any synapses. Firing up there equal to what okay. What all all men are created equal means credit equal before god in rights equal to each other in rights. They weren't thinking about black americans. When they wrote the declaration there was a specific provisions of the declaration of independence in the original draft that discussed slavery who removed at the behest of southern states. You're recognizing the hypocrisy of thomas. Jefferson does not mean that the principles he espoused. we're not universal. In fact he's only a hypocrite because the principals were universal. If the principals were not universal he wouldn't be hypocrite. If thomas jefferson had written in the declaration of independence all white men are created equal. It'd be very difficult to call him a hypocrite. He didn't he said all men are created equal. This is the great irony entire country that has decided the thomas jefferson is a through and through villain a terrible person and that the declaration of independence was ally. Has you on. A fundamental level acknowledged that the declaration of independence the truth in order to condemn thomas jefferson because if the declaration was a lie then he didn't do anything wrong but the declaration is the truth and we all know it you know what because we were handed. Those principles by people like thomas jefferson. Yes people who send like all human beings yes people who lived in the context of a different history like all human beings have lived over the course of history but to to throw away the declaration of independence because it was written by people who don't live in two thousand twenty one in a context in which slavery was legal. The world over is pretty insane and pretend that what may jefferson. A unique human being was his slaveholding. As opposed to the declaration is to ignore all of human history and every culture on earth at the time in seventeen seventy six maxine. Waterston stop there. She then continued further the declaration of independence as we hold these truths to be self-evident yet. Seventeen states have enacted voter suppression laws. This is a lie. There are no voter suppression laws in the united states. That's illegal you can't actively suppress the vote in the united states and the lie that black americans are being prevented from voting. Again is a ginger up. Apply designed to apparently boost voter turnout for democrats but also divide the country supreme court gutted section five of the voting rights act. no they. Didn't george foy brianna taylor. Michael brown sandra bland. Tamir rice. need. I say more hashtag july fourth. It just disgusting okay. First of all t even lumped together. Brianna taylor and michael brown is an absurdity. Each one of these cases have pointed out before has its own particular gradations. But whenever michael brown gets listed in the in the sort of lexicon of black american victimology michael brown attacked a police officer in the obama. Doj didn't prosecute the officer in that case the evidence showed that michael brown was the aggressor in that particular scenario again. It's it's it's not a matter of truth. It's a matter of a fundamental outlook about the united states that the united states is a bad place. It's a bad place again. Taxpayer-funded entities like npr or pushing the same nonsense so npr is funded through the corporation for public broadcasting corporation. Public broadcasting does receive money from the taxpayers. they tweeted out on july fourth quote. Two hundred forty five years ago today. Leaders representing thirteen british colony signed documents. Declare independence it says that all men are created equal but women slave people indigenous people in many others were not held as equal at the time. I just have a question. Is that what made the declaration of independence important really. I like. There are lots of people who openly said that all these groups were not equal. None of those things are enshrined in americans in america's monuments. You're the writings of john. Calhoun enshrined in america's monuments or even the writings of thomas jefferson with regard to superiority or inferiority of particular races. None of that. The jefferson monument or mo jefferson memorial right. What american history chooses to focus in on is the fundamental principle that allowed for the growth of the united states and the adaptation of the united states to more and more human beings and para says the documents also includes a racist slur against indigenous americans. Author david troyer. Who's o.'day says. There's a lot of diversity of opinion among native americans a community more than five million people about the documents words. I'm sorry this is what you choose to focus in on july fourth with taxpayer dollars. No less in this threat of the declaration of independence is npr. You can see. Document was and deeply ingrained hypocrisies. It also laid the foundation for the country's collective aspirations the hopes for what america could be. Okay get what. And you didn't lead with that you know. Because here's the point. The notion is always and forever that the founding principles were insanely corrupt at the beginning and remained corrupt today. She can't have it both ways. The left wants it both ways. On the one hand they want us to inherit the values that the founders the spouse and at the same time condemning those values inherently corrupt written by brutal and dictatorial. Men.

thomas jefferson corey bush united states michael brown maxine maxine waters american congress Waterston saint louis george foy brianna taylor sandra bland Tamir rice Brianna taylor npr los angeles Jefferson Michael brown thomas jefferson Doj
"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

08:58 min | 1 year ago

"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"That you're a white supremacist, and I'm not seeing your Hitler in your fascist. And you know that's that kind of double standard stuff that has people hurt because if you've been paying attention for years, it's pretty normal now as his political violence not because of last Wednesday, but because since Barack Obama came in and promised the fundamental transformation of America, and they started sleeping in parks and in their own filth. And so on in New York and occupy Wall Street across the country, I explained to the time that was really just say, a grassroots organizing thing, putting together Twitter and Facebook groups so they can find out who the real lunatics are like the Parallax Corporation and the Parallax view and they've done a good job of that. They've certainly done a good job of that. Of organizing lunatics across the country. So in any event, lots of lots of crazy stuff in and you know, Michael, I I let's go to a telephone call. Big because I see that Jimmy and Little Rock is talking about this stuff to Jimmy. You're on the Chris Plante show. Hey, Chris. Jimmy. Hey up. Yeah, So the first I was just going to make a statement. But I'll ask the questions and you think it's bln Incorporated or and people would have broke into the capital and scared the daylights out of the senators and the congressmen and women that they would have their Pictures posted all over Washington, D C looking for him. That's you know, it's possible because you're you're right. I mean, you're this is an important thing to take into account the reason for this massive response to this while there was no response. From Capitol Hill for all the riots across the country and the thousands of cops injured and David Goran shot to death, police shot to death and Oakland that literally thousands. I looked up the data again this morning. More than 2000 police officers injured more than $2 billion in damage across the country, and not a peep out of clothes here and, oh, it's the riot is the voice of the voice, the voice of the unheard It's the voice of the unheard, and they told us that again and again, and they said, Well, you know, it's their first social justice and racial justice. So burning Lafayette Park and ST John's Church and forcing the president for the first time in history into the nuclear bunker underneath. The White House was all righteous because you know they're for justice. And you know these people last week they're not for justice. But you're right. They were. They were afraid because suddenly it was them. It wasn't some stranger's business being burned. And Kenosha. It wasn't a federal courthouse in Portland. It was that their front door And on DNO. Now, look, look at the reaction. Now. The FBI's rounding up people all over the country. They're you know, they're Louis Red. No in in a Casa Blanca round up the usual suspects and billboards in all of the bus stops in Washington, D C are pictures of people from the capital, but there's still they still haven't arrested anybody for torching ST John's Church. I think they arrested four people for trying to pull down the statue of Andrew Jackson in Lafayette Park. And I'm sure that d C just let them go on. We hear Over and over again about these people being arrested for riots and then they end and Joe Biden's team is raising bail money for them, and the news media thinks that righteous and the New York they're just letting him back out on the streets. As soon as they arrest him. They assault police with deadly weapons and they put him right back on the street and a lot of people who served in the Marine Corps direct come home and they see what's going on. And are not entirely amused by this, But finally, it reaches Congress. And now look at the reaction. But now tens of thousands of troops we practically have martial law in Washington, D C. Isn't it amazing? Jimmy. You know you're you're onto him. Yeah, Now that it's about them now, now, the reaction. Yeah. Jimmy Actually one more thing, But of course, that's why we're here. Hey, uh, you know you're you put on an amazing show every day and you you make me belly laughed may just imagine how great your show would be if you had a staff of 26. Like like NPR? Yeah, man, You have a good weekend. Well, thank you. Thanks, Jimmy. Yeah, you know, I mean, look, it's me and Michael Pearcy. And Victor, and we and the three of us do the show and that's that's it. You know, Victor posted Terry victim posted there. I'd say I got to be careful because they're FCC regs when it comes to saying his name, but victim posted Terry and producer and Michael Pearson, executive juicer and myself. And and at the same time on national Panhandler radio. There is another three hours show and they have a staff of what was it Michael 24 23. His 23 or 20. It's in the low twenties for NPR, and that's what Jimmy's referring to because they suckle on the taxpayer teeth. I mean, I honestly I don't know. And Michael and Victor and I have talked about this. If we had 20 more people, they'd be playing Ping pong in the basement. You know, beer ponders have been because we wouldn't have nearly enough for them to do not a chance. Not a chance. But that's you know, when it's other people's money, taxpayer money $500 million a year to the corporation, public broadcasting the fuel PBS and NPR across the country, which are just an engorged dependent on the on the Democratic Party's body politics. And, um and boy Oh, boy. Oh, boy. Oh, boy. They are something. Yes, they are. All right. So, um They did arrest this thief. FBI did this. This one guy who's one guy on he is and people on black lives matter. John Sullivan, Hey, was arrested by the FBI. And we have a little audio of him. They were gonna get Tonto. Get to it a bit. Um So many big stories today. Let's go to let's go back to impeachment for a minute. Let's go to sound bite number one because the Democrats think this is a great idea what they know that it says, polarizing as anything they could do. They couldn't think of anything more polarizing than this more divisive, more insightful. Than pursuing the A president in a gratuitous way out of vindictive, spiteful away Nancy Pelosi, look at her face. Hey on, and Richard, you know you remember Danning Dick, Democrat Senator from Connecticut, Richard Blumenthal. They call him Dick and rightly so. He used to go around and tell people about his days in Vietnam serving in Vietnam. He didn't serve in the Marine Corps. Briefly. He never left the United States, You know, good, good that I mean, That's great If you just just say that's the case, but he repeatedly talked about coming home from Vietnam and what it was like in Nam and being a NAM vet, and it was all a lie. But he's a Democrat. So it's okay. And Dunning Dick as he's known. He he was asked yesterday about the impeachment and Trump and listen to how ridiculously smirking it looks like a lizard. Yes, he's a lizard man. And any smirking when he says it appropriately, he said, No. No division and divisiveness is the best way to bring the country together. You see, they want to unify. Country, Joe Biden. One way to unify the country is a bipartisan vote for conviction. Yeah, right in the Senate for impeachment. Yeah, one way that's uh now they're not that heavily, mentally impaired. He is not a bright man, but nobody is that stupid. So he's lying and in any thinks it's cute when the city is right that the cities and the like. Military lockdown. The country has been riding for a year, and they think this stuff is cute because he's a lizard. He's a Scalea lizard congressman's thieves. Police was, of course shot and nearly killed by a Bernie Sanders volunteer who hated Republicans so much because he watched Rachel Maddow on MSNBC and followed the Southern Poverty Law Center. Which demonized Steve's police, No Democrats or demonized by the Southern poverty Law Center. Media pretends they're legit Congressman Steve Scalise, who barely survived the attack by a Bernie Sanders. Volunteer and met with Bernie Sanders. People in his office on Bernie Sanders. Capitol Hill. Steve's police disagrees with Denning Dick. Let's focus on turning the page. Let's focus. On moving on, and that's going to happen next week on the 20th When Joe Biden sworn in his president, You know this. This is on Lee going to make matters worse in a country that's deeply deeply divided right now. Natural. Plus, he knows that Chuck Schumer knows that they're acutely aware of that, and they want to pour gasoline on the fire. That's what they do. Lindsey Graham, who you know has his good days and is not so good day. Lindsey Graham also wanted to point out that this is not the path To unity and on bringing the country together..

Jimmy Joe Biden Bernie Sanders Michael president Congressman Steve Scalise FBI Dunning Dick Washington NPR Victor Chris Plante New York Lafayette Park Barack Obama Marine Corps Lindsey Graham ST John Vietnam
"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"09. Alright. Johnny could live in a place where people are educated and stuff. Can you imagine that one of these other towns and states where everybody's just like your rules? E can't stand that everyone It's all this job. I lost my right. Oh, and they are pushing so hard. Somebody you guys in the world. CBS has responded, I guess Visa Twitter. This employee no longer works for PBS as a mid level staff attorney. Let's minimize them as much as if we can throw him overboard. He did not speak on behalf of our organization, nor did he make any editorial decisions. Project Veritas founder and CEO James O'Keefe is back with us. How are you, sir? Hey, Sean. Great to be with you. Um, you know, by the way I get my first question is is there Mork coming? Because I don't know if it can get worse than what we just heard. Yeah, Sean. Well, I did speak with this is the principal counsel for PBS on the street. Last night. I spoke with him. We are releasing that video. Uh, in a bit, But as you can see this, they're they're kind of minimizing his position. He's the principal counsel for PBS. That's not a quote mid level staff attorney and Sean the CEO. PBS should be thanking us because, but not for what we did. Nobody would know. That they were trying that this guy was talking about throwing Molotov cocktails at the White House. This is the rhetoric, the violent rhetoric that the media has been talking about, and they're evidently doing it, saying it So we're glad that they're doing something. But I don't know why they're attacking me. They should be thanking us for exposing this. We go for all the Republican voters and homeland Security will take their Children away, and we'll put them in reeducation camps, enlightment camps. They're nice. They'll have Sesame Street characters in the classroom and and they'll watch PBS all day. Wow. Yeah. Better also says that the Americans outside of D. C are dumb people are dumb. You gotta wrong. No, they said their effing dumb effing w want to see it on the radio. But, yeah, he said that And the interesting thing is This man this enlightened attorneys for PBS Corporation. Public Broadcasting thinks it's small, smart, intelligent and enlightened, thinking to think we should take Children away from their parents. The DHS should do that. This is the lead attorney TBS, the television station that we should put these kids in front of PBS so that we can on indoctrinate them and take away their philosophy. Their parents have given them, Shawn, This is what this man is saying. And I don't think that they're upset at the man for saying it. I think they're upset at me for exposing it on the week of the capital insurrection, and if you know they had to fire him for for saying things just as violent as a Swede been talking about this week, So it's it's really Insane what they're doing, But I'm sure Sean those many other people like him, and that's why our mission is so important to expose this. And think about how revealing this is. And I've said many, many times on this program, James that it's not just Donald Trump that the left hates and the media hates and Democrats hate. It's we, the people that they hate and you know that. That's why these comments are so revealing about going on olive garden and staying in a Uh, you know, a Marriott Garden hotel running and they're gonna go back. You know, to the olive garden and to their holiday in that they're staying at in the garden Marriott and they're.

PBS Sean James O'Keefe PBS Corporation staff attorney principal Marriott Garden garden Marriott founder and CEO Johnny Donald Trump CBS Molotov homeland Security CEO Project Veritas DHS TBS Public Broadcasting attorney
"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Know how long I can't stand it. I mean everyone, so I'll look a fox news and it makes me frog. It's all this is your body so hard you guys in the world. CBS is responded, I guess. Visa Twitter. This employee no longer works for PBS as a mid level staff attorney. Let's minimize them as much as if we can throw him overboard. He did not speak of behalf of our organization, nor did he make any editorial decisions. Project Veritas founder and CEO James O'Keefe is back with us. How are you, Sir? Sean? Great to be with you. Um, you know, by the way I get my first question is is there Mork coming? Because I don't know if I could get worse than what we just heard. Yeah, Sean. Well, I did speak with this is the principal counsel for PBS on the street. Last night. I spoke with him. We are releasing that video. Uh, in a bit, But as you can see this, they're they're kind of minimizing his position. He's the principal counsel for PBS. That's not a quote mid level staff attorney and Sean the CEO. PBS should be thanking us because what not for what we did. Nobody would know. That they were trying that this guy was talking about throwing Molotov cocktails with White House. This is the rhetoric, the violent rhetoric that the media has been talking about, and they're evidently doing it, saying it So we're glad that they're doing something. But I don't know why they're attacking me. They should be thanking us for exposing this. We go for all the Republican voters and homeland security will take their Children away and we'll put them in reeducation camps. Enlightment camps. They're nice. We'll have Sesame street characters in the classroom, and they'll watch PBS all day. Wow. Yeah. Better also says that the Americans outside of D. C are dumb people are done. You got the wrong No. They said their effing dumb. Their effing w want to see it on the radio. But, yeah, he said that And the interesting thing is This May on this enlightened attorney for PBS corporation. Public Broadcasting, thinks it's small, smart, intelligent and enlightened, thinking to think we should take Children away from their parents. The DHS should do that. This is the lead attorney TBS, the television station that we should put these kids in front of PBS so that we can on indoctrinate them and take away their philosophy. Their parents have given them, Shawn, This is what this man is saying. And I don't think that they're upset at the man for saying it. I think they're upset at me for exposing it on the week of the capital insurrection, and if you know they they had to fire him for for saying things just as violent as a Swede been talking about this week, So it's it's really Insane what they're doing, but I'm sure Sean. There's many other people like him, and that's why our mission is so important to expose this. And think about how revealing this is. And I've said many, many times on this program, James that it's not just Donald Trump that the left hates and the media hates and Democrats hate. It's we, the people that they hate and you know that. That's why these comments are so revealing about going on all of garden and staying in a Uh, you know, a Marriott Garden hotel? Stunning and they're gonna go back. You know, to the olive garden and to their holiday in that.

PBS Sean staff attorney James O'Keefe principal attorney PBS corporation Twitter founder and CEO Marriott Garden CBS Donald Trump Molotov CEO Project Veritas DHS TBS Public Broadcasting Shawn White House
"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"And now he's got a brand new video Any joins us now, James, What's that in the bag? Hello, James. Keith. Thanks for being here. Hey, good to see you. They just fire the guy, by the way. They did OK, so let's tell everybody who this was. This was the lead counsel for PBS, the public broadcasting system. Yet it is the lead lead lawyer won't like second in command in their legal department very reminiscent of the NPR investigation from 2011 if you recall, so what would get started when you're ready? His name is Michael Feller. And one of your undercover journalists caught him on tape one can you tell us when this was recorded? It was recorded over the last few months is recently is this past week? We had, like, three or four meetings with the guy. And are we on the air? You are. Yeah. You're on the air. James. Oh, didn't know that OK? Yeah, we recorded him over the last few few months and Aziz recently. Is this pattern as recently as yesterday actually way as I walked up to him, too. Speak with him. I actually did that. Larry will put that video out later this evening. I confronted and Mike Wallace style and he was telling us About what would happen if Trump won the presidency. They're going to throw Molotov cocktails around the White House like an insurrection, sort of. On the week York of the insurrection. has been able to figure We thought this it out. was newsworthy New York to release this My friend's New and York Has and been able to figure and out how to just open schools, just but we as can't about do it here in the Washington area, 30. Minutes either ago, in PBS Virginia or fired Montgomery Mike County, Beller, and I'm going to Uh, hear from you about this. the TVs We're going to talk. issued If a you're statement Montgomery saying, County quote. There is no place for hateful parent rhetoric or of PBS for that matter, Fairfax and this County individual's views later in no on in way the program, reflect we've got a representative our values, from the Open F. C. said P s PBS spokesperson movement, trying to put Phenomenal pressure Result on the James school board their O'Keefe toe open and and Fairfax good on PBS County public for schools, moving We now rather see as rapidly. we just I discussed. mean, it's only been out for what, Yesterday five on this hours. program, I think the this video union or six is hours. now making It's been out demands for three hours. I've never seen that have a nothing reaction to do with so education. swift, They're making demands and they're phenomenal. rolling out And tactics I think you know like the week getting of the people to swarm week of the people being Social Media censored and Twitter. on Twitter. They've This given deal them is instructions a million views already have obtained on Twitter and a people copy have been embedding of these instructions. it themselves They want in to the instigate different channels a and by Twitter the way, that's storm why to social make it look media like freedom it's some is sort so important of organic movement, and but and it's all making scripted. sure that we hold It's all managed. social media It's accountable all manipulated. in the big tech accountable You think which you also Twitter do should James crack through project. down Let's on get the more abuse to some of these direct. of their I'm directly application. quoting This now your should project be Where they very should touched be cracking journalists down as where What tweets have do we been do written if Trump and crafted wins? for people And I'm reading and his spoon quote right fed now go to them to the to White put out House there and all throw the Molotov given time cocktails. to make it look Is like there? Is there's there a any groundswell of support, and any they're demanding possibility things that like he was just doing being away outrageously with rent funny or and mortgage just sort of foreclosures being stark? I'm not not and that evictions. that's any thing to joke about. But It's what did he give you any explanation on that? Insanity, Well, let me let and me put it's it to a this left way wing on political the week when agenda everyone is that's saying been injected the president into did the teacher's incite union violence and they're by using saying everyone your marched Children down to Capitol as pawns. and You know, he didn't Your kid expressly doesn't get say to go throw back into things the classroom at the domain and get the quality specifically education said, We're that going they to peacefully deserve. march and let our voices Until be heard. That's all he said. their Not political say Let's demands be, he said. are met. Let's surround the White House Not limousine. safety, not health, not And sanitary let's political and let's throw demands, Molotov cocktails and that's where we are at with the way Fairfax he did it twice County public twice. schools at this He point, also said, Let's and put we'll have the a Children representative of Republicans as I said of in the Open camps, F C. P s he said. DHS movement coming up during a little a later bite administration on. should put I the Children also in want camps to hear from where you, they can quote frankly, Watch about what PBS you're choosing all day. to do with your Children's So they can education, weaken kind Because of, you clearly know, you remove have been ignored. the Republicanism that has been indoctrinated to the Children of Republican family. So I would argue that you know, as Alinsky would say, make them we'll have live up to their own book of rules. This is a media, which Tells us that you know, you know, the president saying, Go walk down to Capitol Hill and let your voice be heard isn't insurrection, So if you're interning The corporation, public broadcasting and you're saying quote, go to the White House and throwing Molotov cocktails? Certainly that would rise to the standard off being a criminal criminal speech Now is it criminal speech? Very Probably not. But they've made it criminals so that the shifting standard that they have applied. Yeah. And by the way, this is much worse than anything I've heard for, Trump say So. This is an attorney. I'm right up against it. But I just want to point out because I've known you for 10 years now in our public lives. Um, in no way Are you suggesting that You are against violence of all stripes. You're just pointing out the hypocrisy of this guy working for PBS part of the Deep State in D. C. Literally saying If Biden wins, we should be violent. No, I mean, this is Larry. This is we gotta expose these people. I'm a reporter. I don't advocate anything. I think the violence is bad if it was despicable. What happened this week on Capitol Hill is very sad to see it. We got to expose our media because the media has all the power now and I'm telling people stopping hopeless Veritas tips that proton mail dot com Send us an insider senator. Tip will tell your stories. We're not going away. We distributed this through an army of patriots who embedded it on their Twitter. And this is what happened. We're holding their feet to the fire is the only thing they fear, Larry. Great work, James and thank you for breaking this developing news with us. After three hours, PBS announced this guy is fired. James O'Keefe project Veritas. Happy New Year. Great Talking with you, sir. Thank you, Larry. Thank you..

PBS James Twitter Larry Molotov Trump White House Fairfax James O'Keefe president representative York PBS County Keith NPR Michael Feller DHS Aziz
"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"If you have an antenna, a roof antenna look at all the PBS stations on your roof and tenant. W EPA has like w e t a one w E T A two day is like the BBC. W E T A three WTT Before they got wt for kids w E to the B B C W E ta. They've got all the and they're all broadcasting over the airwaves. They all have staff and crew and offices. And the corporation. Public Broadcasting gets 500 million taxpayer dollars a year just like Planned Parenthood, but but they did. And you know, some Republican needs to put an end to this stuff because it's absolutely insane. Uh, so NPR. They put out this thing saying we don't waste your time and we're you know, and it's a distraction, and it's not a real story. They're lying, and they're lazy and they're stupid and they're dishonest. But they're lying and then guess what they put out yesterday. President elect Joe Biden. Son Hunter. Biden says he was recently informed that he is under federal investigation over a tax matter. It's been going on for two years. They continue to live for the party. Because they lie all the time. Hunter Biden under federal investigation for tax matter and then they don't even scratch the surface. If you scratch the surface, you know, understand quite rapidly. That the I rest investigates tax matters, not U. S attorneys and grand Juries and seizing laptops on the FBI in multiple states. This is about an international crime ring called the Biden family with their Chinese ties and the 2.8 Carat diamond, and it's also about the $83,300 a month no show job with the Ukrainian gas and oil company. Armel on gas man. Speaking of which, you know, just in time for Christmas, Chris Plante story. Good stuff. We have the beer glasses. Now we have the pint glasses but with fun like sayings on the Good stuff, like were it not for double standards, liberals would have no standards. And we got Hunter Biden stuff, too. I'm a oil and gas man mugs and things like that Good T shirts and And mugs and all kinds of good things for the whole family. And that integrate? Yes, it is in Minneapolis. They murders what murders are up 50%. I think. So the Democrats decided to cut the police budget by $8 million. They're Democrats They like murder. Murder is Democrat thing. It's a Democrat value. Minneapolis cuts police running by $8 Million amid crime surge following summer riots. Why would.

Hunter Biden Joe Biden Biden murder Minneapolis BBC W EPA NPR B B C W E President FBI Chris Plante U. S
"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:07 min | 2 years ago

"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Revenue streams are faced with really severe economic impact coming up more on what this pandemic means for local news stay with us China some factories are up and running once again with extreme measures in place to prevent another outbreak of coronavirus in the lunch room each seat has a QR code and if an employee does get infected they can figure out who was sitting close by and also changed how China is managing to get back to work this afternoon on All Things Considered from NPR news we starting at four on W. NYC I lose you Leary and we're back with the take away we've been talking about what this pandemic means for the news industry especially at the local level Victoria milk from pen America and Kristin here from pointer are with me now the news industry relies on a lot of freelance journalists so biased Christian about the effect of coded nineteen on people working outside traditional newsrooms I think we should assume that it's ten times worse are more than what local newsrooms are dealing with that people who you know have relationships with local newsrooms to count on them to pay their invoices on time I have seen you know tweets from journalists reporting that they won't be getting paid for work they've already done because the way the pay schedule works these people are part of an ecosystem and when that ecosystem collapse it hurts everyone including freelancers are we seeing impacts may be on the the quality of coverage if say you've only got a few reporters who are being forced in as much as they can to work from home our local audience is getting the kind of high quality news that could help them make decisions in a really scary time the short answer is it's it would be impossible for local news outlets to be and the financial stake they're in right now and not have it impact the kind of coverage we have been enormously touched and impressed by the degree to which local outlets across the country have risen to the challenge but the problem is that we already know that before this crisis hit there have been study after study that shows that when local journals and declines government costs go up government corruption increases local officials conduct themselves with less integrity and efficiency we know that civic engagement is deeply impacted by local journalism so fewer people go out to vote and they don't know what their candidate is served the plot from that their candidate stands for when you lose local journals that it impacts communities and democracies in really serious significant ways and so you can imagine that if this process has suddenly been accelerated and last month at exactly the moment when we most urgently need local news there's going to be an impact on coverage that's impossible for there not to be Christian I want to dig into this dichotomy a little bit of you know news rooms on a national level doing relatively well The New York Times being a great example and the polling that shows the majority of Americans approve of the media's job right now and yet people saying oh I hit a paywall on my local news site or I don't subscribe to you know the newspaper in my city is there a way to bridge that gap and motivate people to support local outlets now I think we're starting to see that now there are a number of funds out there people raising money for layoffs and furloughs journalists but along with that trusted that people say there is a report I am I think it was last year from here that said seventy one percent of people thought that local news was doing well financially the dichotomy as that national newsrooms particularly The New York Times The Washington Post I have figured out how to switch their business model over to ask to get paid for what they produce and what we're seeing more and more is local newsrooms making the case that we're bringing you something of value and that you should pay for it and you know setting up their walls that are dynamic that say okay you need this kind of reader will read three pieces before they have an opportunity to subscribe but the other tricks to this and I see this as the biggest problem for really small independently owned places even those that are online only and has existed in the last ten years is we have to get the technology right we have more sophisticated news consumers than we ever have before thanks to our tech giants right who have made everything really easy to use so if you're in the US consumer and you want to open up your local news site to read the story and you're hit with walkie ads that don't open and pop up videos you're gonna flip off really quickly so we have to make it keep the prod the product is worth paying for the news itself is worth paying for we have to make platforms for our consumers that are also worth paying for I mean one thing that happens when you have enough tables out everywhere is the fracturing of the media landscape so that people suddenly now have to go to ten different places and pay ten different fees in order to try to access different kinds of reporting a lot of local news outlets must you be sexually put town temporarily lower their costs for coronavirus coverage because they want to do the right thing but that raises the issue that if you know all journalism if you have to a for a whole journalism that's gonna leave folks who are in financial straits who are poor or marginalized in some way out in the cold and so I do I do think it's worth just you know we've been making the case at ten for the last year and so have many others local journalism is a public good it is a service that is so vital to society that it's worth more than the kind of ticket price right or the amount that people have to pay for that it has a larger impact in larger benefits for for society Victoria one thing I wanted to to have your elaborate on is this call for potentially federal funds to to support journalism right now can you elaborate what pen your organization is asking for and whether that poses any weird ethical dilemmas after all you know we all report on government all the time despite the fact that they may receive some funding from the government as well as funding from other sources I think it's really important to have some context there first of all the US government has actually supported journalism's country since it was founded in the form of postal subsidies tax breaks government ads and from the nineteen sixties onward through direct funding to the corporation public broadcast we are having this conversation on public radio after all yes but second of all those countries that rank highest on press freedom indices around the world democracies like Norway Sweden the Netherlands and Belgium are also have the highest rates of public funding for local journalists so there are clearly ways that we can set the smack innocence up which we already have time in this country the protected editorial independence while providing funds it's just a question of will and way and I do think the top point that Chris made earlier that seventy percent of the American public don't realize that local outlets are in trouble I hope and I think that that is changing that we are kind of in this moment where there's an awakening of the need to support local journalism Kristen I'm gonna give you the last word here are there any bright spots that you are watching right now where you think yes that model is going to help or yes this thing is going to work both in the pandemic and after it's the relationships that local newsrooms regardless of what they look like have built with their communities so places like Berkeley side which raised a million and a direct public offering previously you know are able to reach out to the community and tell them what's happening and get support I see here in Tampa Bay people speaking out in favor of the Tampa Bay times it's a fuzzy thing but that relationship is what makes local journalism unlike anything else and the beat reporters who can now work from home because they've had relationships with people and institutions are why we know what's happening in government and hospitals and schools and all of the things that impact our lives so I'm hopeful that those relationships will be one of the key things that pulls us through and one of the places that matters most is with our communities and those communities understand we need them just as much as.

China
"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Loan guarantees or other aid to businesses states and municipalities including the possibility that the dump the company the government will take direct equity stakes in distressed companies that by the way companies are going to reject this companies are just going to not do it Boeing are you sad if you try to take a stake in us we just wanna take a loan and so the government absolutely caved and the Congress just create an exception for bowling is that there are national security institution thirty two billion dollars in grants to cover wages a passenger air carriers cargo air carriers contractors a hundred fifty billion dollars in direct aid to states to our twenty one billion dollars in tax benefits for businesses three hundred forty billion dollars in supplemental spending also just a bunch of like a bunch of pork is in there Kennedy center got tens of millions of dollars there the national endowment for the arts got tens of millions of dollars corporation public broadcasting on tens of millions of dollars it wasn't on any normal level this does a bunch of crap I mean on any normal level it's a bad bill but given the fact that the alternative is either a pork laden bleep show or nothing and this is going to allow businesses to continue to operate for the next three months okay but here's the problem Hey Lindsey Graham exist right center from South Carolina he had held the top because one of the provisions the bill they need to be clarified is seen from the bill you would actually get more money from being on unemployment insurance then from being employed which should create incentives for employers to throw people out of work and throw them to the unemployment lines I mean that that was in the bill and so a few senators Ben Sasse among them several senators Lindsey Graham they said we need to get that corrected they did get that corrections of the past Lindsey Graham said listen I don't want everything in this bill but we need to do something so here is Graham saying I can tolerate some bad to do some good here because we have no choice in the name of doing good we're going to make it hard for the next four months for employers to find workers and we're going to incentivize people to leave the work force because the first time in my lifetime America will pay you more not to work than work I can tolerate some bad to do some good I'm I'm made deals I know what it's like to negotiate with the other side but really do we need to be giving PBS more money now when people are dying of course none of that is necessary we we we shouldn't have to do any of this stuff but here's the point this is not going to stop now is when the real political battle begins right I got unanimous support to do something to shore up the economy because the government has forcibly driven a car through your living room but there's an entire side of the political aisle that not only wants to make a lot of this crap permanent wants to expand on this map you can see this break out into the open over specifically the provision that Graham is talking about there is a provision in the bill that basically suggested that you should get six hundred dollars plus whatever salary or making your company in order the unemployed engram was like I know that that that does make any sense if you're trying to maintain jobs in what you don't do is pay people more to stay out of the park and you stay in work that doesn't make any sense enough people can be fired already without incentivizing people to be thrown off the payroll instead you're Nancy Pelosi out there saying no no no we're talking about six hundred dollars what what do you care what do you care we're spending a lot of money anyway why not incentivize people to be thrown out of work is from the same lady who just a few years ago was suggesting openly that we need to make a national health insurance system something akin to national health insurance system that people don't have a job lock right so that they're not stuck in their jobs in Oregon health insurance okay yes blows he's long been on board with the idea of paying people to be unemployed here is Nancy Pelosi talking about all this the fact is that we are consumer economy and that.

"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

11:12 min | 2 years ago

"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Hey what's up with them for the film when you see it you'll get what took so long gotta get this so much material had to be woven together had to be found and woven together but to talk about the difficulty getting that stuff and other challenges the raising of the money and maybe copyright stuff I don't know sure permissions what do two things that led us to raise the money ourselves which is you can imagine you know was that took time the first one was that if somebody were to write a check for this film and then control the final story it wouldn't have been our story and in a way I feel much more like the curator of this film than than the producer director because so many people involved so much material came from people the interviews were so critical but you know Danny Scheckter who was the news dissected BC and you know before he passed away we were talking about you know trying to get it done and he said you know it's really important we do this ourselves he said you know this is not a film that like VH one can make sure you get the story right not because they don't do interesting you know documentaries but this really was our story we have to tell it and wanted to do that and have control over it we have to raise the money at the same time going to national it it was when he could come in with a completely off the wall reference there are these a master class tapes from famous important people telling you how to do things the woman who invented spanks said the when she went to people with spanks you talk to them about the idea and everybody to a person so thats most ridiculous thing I've ever heard she said that's how you know you have a great idea you know we took this idea a nationally to funding sources foundations and corporations public broadcasting in and to everybody it sounded like a video about a local radio station and that didn't couldn't possibly have any national significance and and you know it's because what made this very gray was and nobody knew it but it also meant that is we went out to raise money for it people have no clue what an important story was so now that it's done they get it yes because they put in and putting it in the theater what are they not get what do they get when they see the film they didn't get before the impact the BCN had on music on media on the women's movement of women you know the fact that there are things we forgotten that in nineteen seventy the great you know conservative talk show host Jerry Williams was on the radio in Boston saying women don't belong on the radio their voices are made for radio he said that yeah it's you know and and it's in the film right and and the same time the Max St was coming to Boston play your you know rock and roll and break all these important groups I think young women particularly don't understand possibly that did not very long ago it was on the cards for them to be on the radio because of this kind of an attitude the windows you know stories of of gay people on the radio that they talk about their lives are all this of BC and shattered all these ceilings and you know when you go back and check in to to piece together the history of media it had a tremendously important role soon as I mentioned before make decisions and you you I need to be accurate but you also need to entertain how about that push pull for you what kind of high was that tough arm it was tough because there are things that you would think would be interesting and entertaining they weren't exactly any are you a pretty good arbiter of that I made the film that I thought would be you know entertaining and engaging part of it is I I have a a pretty good skill which you need to make I think any documentary of being able to watch something over and over and over again as if it's the first time and and and get the impact but for example there's this you know we found a piece of tape and it was like this you know all my goodness moment of a Steven Seagal on the air and the whole come walking into the studio and he says them well it's Peter Townsend Roger Daltrey and John Entwistle Keith moon welcome with his guys look I have the American release of Tommy have you seen the album yet no we haven't crawled in there talking about it and Charles says to them so this song go to the mirror and and what what does it mean with touch me feel me is he trying to and and towns is Ono no you've got it all wrong and he explains it you know that this is amazing but trying to in in that case part of which suffered was that there were no visual elements were able to find of them at the tea party or but many times is when vendors we tried to cut it to make it work in the film it was interesting but it didn't really grab you in the same so I guess I get it so didn't it hi that's interesting so these are these the right up on the yeah that's cool now you you have a lot of experience in this kind of thing can you talk about your filmmaking experience well I was involved radios at B. C. N. as a teenager and then went to work for ABC news we learned about putting pictures to sounded twenty twenty and and you know working maybe she's for six seven years and pretty big jump I worked at B. C. and then I went to twenty twenty well I went to brown and then I went to Columbia journalism and I was hired out of Colombia draws okay do invested a lot of hard work and money to get there end of what I contributed was the investigative reporting piece and I was learning the TV which is essentially filmmaking arm and after that really became interesting documentaries I think right now if you ask most Americans to raid the credibility of information sources the evening news daily newspapers I think documentaries are pretty high up on the list because people feel like you can see for yourself yeah even though they they are subjective at the end of the day yeah and and I think that that they can be a very powerful attack out first okay these some visual evidence of what's being reported right and and that really the the the the mission of this film was to make people see and understand that the something they don't like about the world that they can change it they can do something so there's a lot of big picture themes throughout this movie yeah it's how media can create social change and the I mean it we just I guess it just worked out how a group of adult group a generation a drove to unpopular presidents from office and then did a war using rock and roll in radio and and politics aren't you tickled pink out that this is so successful he didn't you say you didn't have any expectations of sure had some hope and I can't imagine you hope to that it would be in a get a major public release I when you saw the stories in a connect the dots on it it just seemed and and I think the early returns were people who were just fanatically still so in love with that station and and who still felt the impact it had on them that it seems that this was a topic that have done right they should have this kind of a response and so was really being true to the material and there's one other you know we have one other great asset that's that's all sort of sleight of hand because you don't see the media Lee but it should be clear and that is of you we interviewed all the announcers from that period and others Danny Scheckter in in in they largely form the fabric that tells the story around the archival material these are all people who were incredibly successful largely because of one skill that was a could tell a great story you know people in radio you include great storytellers and so this film is populated by great storytellers who was fortunate to be able to interview for three four five hours of peas and then pulled just the the gems from yes one and and link them up and so that's a great thing so another choice of course is the length was that tough because it is fairly long yeah probably probably at some point it was seven hours long and yet there we did that first wife because frankly that was weak start I mean that we can actually sit and watch it and start heading over to arm yeah the we'd have to we'd you're you're in the back of your mind if you're aware that she's pretty long but you get to the point I cannot take anything more out how do you know I guess in a related question how do you know when it's done like anything music how do you know when your song is done one thing that is is done is you watch the film over and over and over again with people usually having another person in the room with you when you watch it changes the whole certainly through there on the rise and if you watch the film over and over again you'll find if there are objective issues with that people get confused at a certain point or they take out the phone and start texting at a certain point and you can sort of do an assessment of where the film right now just to me wide like a roller coaster you get on the opening of it with the the scenes on the common just takes off there were certainly things that could be cut and it's possible for public television some of it may be caught but it's I think not to the I think you said that it will be to the detriment of the film I don't think there's anything there with people feel like all that section was just too long in this area the advice I've gotten repeatedly from people is you know it it probably could be a little bit shorter but don't cut anything just take a little bit from here a little bit from there because the idea of taking anything out it's all so good and it also builds Intel's an important story to have a commitment for public from public television what we're finalizing a an agreement for that that's Jan that's huge thank you that's where we'll get out and and reach you know people in the American public and then of through local stations we can do screenings in you know educational region so we really just saw this from the beginning is being something for public television as opposed to a pay cable or there's more to come folks for example the story about how the F. B. I. got involved after this on WBZ well you to talk about hi my the June talking WBZ news radio ten thirty Hey Dan whose accent is you go to practices Boral conscious sedation yeah you're thinking about doctor mark our Turner.

three four five hours six seven years seven hours
"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

12:32 min | 2 years ago

"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"M. dot O. R. G. and the challenge grant the challenge grants I'm very I'm getting sing song again very dangerous want to give a huge thank you to proof Bruce Moffett he has taken another one of those challenge grant dollars pulled it down from the sky brought it to us here in the ward studio thank you thank you Bruce he turned his fifty dollars two hundred dollars I dislike that fabulous mad just so and you should do yes you should and I won one announce that the grant status from Ken Jacobson in memory of his wife Pat's pretty beautiful and fabulous can has offered us two hundred and fifty dollars and challenge grant so far a hundred of the two hundred and fifty dollars been taken that means that a hundred and fifty dollars is out there it is not ours yet it is waiting to join the other lovely dollars here to make W. O. R. T. the community radio station that it can be that it is you know we're having a fabulous conversation with Ernesto I want to talk about some of the shows that we get to talk about on this station no in this past year we had a one hour detailed conversation with governor Tony givers we've had interviews with all the mayor candidates and of course a detailed conversations with mayor Satcher was Conway the Attorney General Josh call was here we talked with doctor Chen chi damage she was on her her farewell speech on her way out after being the superintendent of massive public schools those are the big names but there's lots of big names of all the school board candidates city council candidates Wisconsin Supreme Court candidates we've talked about changes in the tenet resource center of the Enbridge decision voices still affrontare as events our state legislators just on the from the national to the local all the different things and we don't you can only hear these conversations here on a public fair on W. R. T. they're not on NPR I love NPR thank you NPR but you know what you don't have an hour long conversation with Tony overs opened up for callers to call and join the conversation it's just so fan tastic up please join please support us please allow us to continue to bring these conversations to challenge us to challenge you to be the best that we can be area code six SO eight to five six two thousand one W. O. R. T. F. M. dot org Ali what are some of the fabulous gifts that we have we have you know some some pretty incredible stuff we have up pint glass with a punch card we have a backpack that I am incredibly excited about that is what I will be getting with my pledge we have a fabulous long sleeve T. shirt we have the new super duper wore headphones for a hundred and eighty dollars so you can be out here listening to music and enjoying yourself and also listening to war on your headphones like while you're you know while you're riding the bus so there's a baseball hat there's so many different things please go online and check out all of your options I the first time I pledged I pledge and I got a subscription to progressive magazine which was really pretty awesome but there there's a lot of of things that you can get in exchange for supporting community radio and sustaining community radio which you should definitely do and you can do right now by dialing six zero eight two five six two thousand one support W. R. T. eighty nine point nine FM make sure that our kids continue to have this space to come and ask questions to come and have important conversations and yes we get to talk to incredible people but we also get to talk about really important things so I have been on the show we're talking about what it means to have women in leadership and you know I've seen carousel one of the reasons I'm here today is because I love carousels work with you know conversations about what it means for women to be in positions of leadership one of the most tremendous conversations I got to participate and in the wake of Donald Trump being elected was carousel hosting all these women talking about you know what it meant to be galvanized by that moment and talking about reproductive rights and talking about you know immigration and talking about education and talking about kind of the things that create our our community and our society and this is where we get to dissect really you know important ideas and so I think in talking about the press one of the things I really wanted to talk about is you know accurate information and our ability to access the truth because I have said since our current president was elected that part of the reason he was selected was because people could not distinguish reality TV from the truth that our our sense of accuracy and precision hi men's Q. that's changed and and when you get into local media you're close enough to tell the difference to know your you know you can say well I I know that the slide is not fake news because because you know it and I think my changing my commute is changing the park that my kids play at and and so it's the closer you are the more accurate you get to be and the more you get to confront what folk they're talking about so I really hope that you get yourself a share or backpack or baseball hat and and that you play age and that you turn your pledge from fifty dollars and two hundred dollars by calling six zero eight two five six two thousand one W. R. T. F. M. dot org and any amount makes a difference absolutely we don't want to leave this challenge grant behind a hundred and fifty dollars still waiting to be of matched but you know twenty five dollars agree give ten dollars a great gift five dollars is a great gift every amount if you know the that we know that you're supporting us and that means so much and is so important a little devil lacked I'm like this is you know this is a really or the average Dan and and you know flexible organization that has had that makes every single dollar account and every single dollar stretch I want to talk okay so we're gonna bring this spell when we need to I hope we are ringing at many many more times bird and Evan and then media I need a her out there they're ready to take your call the ready to do what they need to do and help you in any way that you can to support the work that we're doing we're gonna come back to a the pledge conversation in a moment I want to turn back to Ernesto Ernesto can lead change gears for a second talk to us about what the heck is happening with the W. B. I. a closing tell us what that is tell us sort of give us a little one oh one of what is happening in the community radio all world because something happened yesterday it's certainly so and I'll be happy to give a quick disclaimer so I was program director and keep E. F. T. and civic is Houston station from twenty two thousand five to twenty sixteen and before that I was on co director the news department from two thousand three to two thousand five and a volunteer a little bit before then so I'm fairly well versed in familiar with this is been in your head you are at the community rate the community news neither of us we need but yes and yeah it's so you're you're very kind but SO you yesterday W. B. A. R. I. announced a reorganization efforts and let go of its staff and it closed its programming for volunteers is now running a feed of content from it so I I believe it's probably a pacifica satellite service as well as some of its programming from its audio ports service which allows radio stations like W. or T. to upload programs that can be shared by other stations and that seems to be where it's at right now I this is not the first set of Laos the W. B. A. I. has had in the past there was a lay off I believe it was probably around two thousand and nine and then there was another look lay off that happened around two thousand and thirteen and those were adding two thousand nine and they laid off most of the staff and then they re hired a number of people in twenty thirteen elite off three quarters of the staff and I think this past effort that happened this past week or this week wait up the remainder of the staff which I think is about six people that was left I Debbie be A. I. has had a number of issues over the last gosh twenty years frankly and has at Pacific as a whole has had a number of issues over those years as well a WBA I lost a court judgment in twenty seventeen to empire state realty trust where it had its tower on WB a I was in arrears for a significant amount of money for tower range and lost a three million dollar judgment then yeah I have read to radio is is quite a pricey thing especially New York it is cut quite expensive and WBA I did not keep up with the it's monthly costs for keeping its tower but your organization itself is in this framework also had its own issues there was an audit two thousand seven that said that pacifica had about thirteen million dollars in listener support for its five radio stations are by twenty seventeen the reason on it that said that the organization had about eight million support that's about a forty percent drop in the listener contributions so there it had there's been bad there's been a lot of other issues that have been going on there was a twenty fourteen investigation by the California Attorney General Kamala Harris too many people are familiar with about formal investigation into financial irregularities in twenty twelve the corporation public broadcasting audit cited pacifica for insufficient accounting practices and there's been a rotating cast of executive directors when I was there between two thousand five to two thousand sixteen we probably had someone the neighborhood of nine executive directors and so it changed quite a bit over a period of time and there were just a number of other problems that kind of wind from there but the WBA I problem has a lot of roots in a lot of different problems that have been cited with a rising costs governance other kinds of things the question I run into in people ask me about this matter and what I think about W. B. A. is that it's a cautionary tale for all of community radio about relevance and about one the community thinks of the station and how the community is or how the radio station is listening to the needs of the community in this case I mean I have to ask myself and I think we and community radio should be asking ourselves that in a city with eight million people I'm and with the radio station that is literally at the center of the dial W. B. I. as many people know is at ninety nine five it's not it though the far left of the dial it actually proceeds those FCC judgments to move educational radio to the far ends of the dial it's actually ninety nine five how does a radio station at ninety nine five with eight million people only able to to attract seventy nine thousand five hundred.

"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

14:45 min | 3 years ago

"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"March takes place, the big ones, the safter noon, you're in New York City, and John is joining us on a program in his rule, as I mentioned earlier in his background where at one time he had worked in broadcasting in radio. That's he is also worked as film director producer now. You get involved in working on documentaries about LGBT issues. And that included looks at stonewall. How did that come about? You know in nineteen in night. Sixty in the sixties I was very much involved as young man and going to bars. Now, you know, it was interesting that you just mentioned baseball and baseball was really important organizing element for the early gay and lesbian communities. The bars used to have baseball teams, the women and the women bars and the med bars. And these baseball teams were one of the first major sort of getting together for gay people to play as a team against other teams and each other's there were leaks. And it really was an organizing tool baseball for the game. But because people had only been two bars and, you know, and that was it. But then all of a sudden it were like baseball games and other things. And so if it was a fascinating kind of take on organizing for the gay community to see baseball happen will in the film world. I was over at NYU going to film school. And I was the only person that I knew of in the in the class that I was at the graduate program and sort of it was that understanding that there were so few people in film, that it seemed to boarding I happen to speak to the folks at the corporation, public broadcasting there had never been a gay or lesbian themed film on PBS. And so all these things were first and. Putting together, you know some really good and now of why it was important to do this. We were able to get some funding and we went ahead and made the first gay one of the first but I. PBS again. Let's be in films. That was on public television called before stonewall and this to this, too, in the early history that thirties, the forties of gay life and in. And so it was pretty exciting. And a lot of people had never seen this around the nation. So this was because, you know, gay people were hidden. And so this was like one of the first major visible. Images that people were saying for some I to get like Barney. Frank. Called me up and said how important was because, you know, just to see himself and others to be in, in, in films and see the image was really affirming for their lives. And so there, you know, one we were telling the rest of the country that gay and lesbian people existed and mostly though, we're telling a lot of gay and lesbian people that they, they weren't horrible that they that they were, you know, doctors and lawyers and merchant marines and a lot of things. So besides they rejoice other things, and so that was kind of a big step. And I think film was very important in organizing the LGBT community as well as was baseball. Now before stone will, and then what's is after stonewall, just a wall, as a film that just takes off right after the riots, so before, all is all that led to the riots after stonewall is this, which I was talking about was this major thing that took place, you know, the riots were pretty big, but, but that organizing that took place in every in the entertainment world in the medical world in the universities huge amount of changes started taking place. And after stonewall kind of chronicles all those changes that affected the institutions, I like to say, well, we changed the world in many ways, we get because every institution was changed by this large gay and lesbian group that started coming out. Whether it was at universities at in media, you know, like, like us in film and TBS, but all over the institutions of America, something was happening between the seventies and eighties. And specially in the nineties, that would never did that would change forever. The way we see the world and, you know, John, you think of the generations who are with us now relatively young to whom. Even this concept would seem like or seems like ancient history. Well, fifty years is, is a long time. But given you know, like you think about like the woman's vote that took, you know, that started in the early nineteen hundreds and it took almost, I think it was something like sixty years to get to the, the for women to vote. So these changes, take a long time, but relatively speaking, it's pretty amazing to think that in my own lifetime. I was arrested for being gay in the early seventies to think that now I you know, I just received an honorary degree from the local college over here, an honorary doctorate degree. And so that's ban of being from criminal to be on. Every doctor is. Pretty a pretty short when I think about it. But yet. It, it happens so dramatically that a lot of younger people just don't realize what it was like before. And what it is that they are, what shoulders they're standing on so to speak, or what, what has allowed them to do things that others couldn't do and not even think about it. I mean, you know, the idea that you wouldn't be able to be a teacher if you wanted to be a teacher was very you know, I don't think people think about that. You know, you can't imagine not doing these things because you're gay, you know, whether you could be a police officer, what you couldn't be a police, you couldn't be in the military. You couldn't do any of these things without the changes that took place. So a lot of people just don't realize ever you wanted to do you most likely couldn't do it. You could be a hairdresser, you could be in the closet in hiding and maybe getting a job. But the truth is, you know, you couldn't be a politician. You couldn't be, you know, we now have a gay Senator. We have a couple of gay governors and the governor Colorado is gay. Nobody even knows who he is anywhere. You know what I mean? I mean it's just like, but you'd never would have had that in nineteen seventy idea that a that a gay prison to be opened in big governor of Colorado. Impossible. You couldn't you couldn't get married. You couldn't do any of these things that people now take for granted are still doing the reality is that those, those were hard struggles. Those weren't easy things to do. There were a lot of people who had to be out in the streets and fighting and many people off their jobs and. And so that history is filled with great pioneers in great. You know, I think a Frank Cam Andy the one of the first gay men who, who fought the US government when he was fired because he was a geologist scientist. He was fired for being gay, and he kept fighting and fighting fighting, but he never one really the he did not win. He never got his job back. But it was really nice if you years ago to see President Obama bringing him to the White House and apologizing for firing him in the White House and making that proclamation so Frank, you know, finally got his ability to at least have the government recognize that he was in the right in the, the government was in the wrong. But that was quite a struggle. I mean like losses job. He you know, had survive somehow and it was. Very difficult for him. But yeah, he continued to persist an fought him was one of the organizers of some of our first day, demonstrations that took place around America in, in Washington. And, you know, those early picket signs, we have them before, stonewall. There's Frank, you know and so. Without his job. But there he is on the picket line. So a lot of people had to go out and and, and lose jobs. And but site, and it is at fighting that, that has made the big difference for people, I mean, me myself when I was arrested, I had take my case and work with the ACLU and fight it all away to the Massachusetts prem-, court, and we changed the laws there. But, but, you know, wasn't real easy, and it was kind of difficult. I mean, you know, I was in news director WBZ. It was it was difficult. Luckily where I was working they didn't fire me. So in thirty four states in America, you still can be fired for being gay. So it's not that everything is done completely. I mean there's a lot of work still ahead. What was the actual charge? When you were arrested. Oh, trying to I forget list cities, and I think lascivious and trying to commit an unnatural act, okay? You know, if it was the vice squad based arrest people, and we got rid of the vice squad through the fight in the supreme court. They were just, you know, the, the finally the supreme court of messages to this ridiculous. One of the great ironies of the stonewall inn. If you go through the history of this, I understand it is the stone will in was actually owned by the mafia. Oh, most of the bars in New York, where the gay bars in the lesbian bars were mafia owned in some strange. We can think the mafia birth. I mean because they were important for bringing gay people together, let's face it. I mean, there were a lot of private parties to be honest with you all over the country where, you know, gay people would go to people's homes and stuff like that. Not so much organizing parties, then slowly, but surely organizing, but the, the bar scene was pretty pretty much run by the mafia, who would pay off the police. And what happened stonewall is that they had forgotten to do the payoff that week. So the police just, you know, when you forgot your pay off, they would raid, basically stuff like that. I mean it was, you know, in any given time you could be raid. There were a lot of raids at gay bars. When the mafia didn't pay off the police that week. Pretty incredible situation. Jones. Sometimes it was cleaning up because it was election time to, you know, like. We used to they used to, you know, gay people gay men, mostly used to go to the parks and meet others. You know, because they weren't very many places to meet people to meet, you know, Resper regular society. We're getting people at bars and other places like that. And at work, you could meet someone and whatever whatever the rules were, they were those rules, weren't in for gay and lesbian people. So they would. But if it was election time this was very difficult to go to the parks, because, that's when the police would be cleaning up the park. So it, it was very kind of interesting life. You had you know if you're in the know you knew what the police were up to. And, and so the fightbacks were really amazing. I mean, it was pretty high energy fights that took place around the stonewall. These were not this was not just, you know, a few people being upset and screaming these riots. And a lot of people involved over thousand people on the second night in and third night. A lot of people came out to show their anger, and John hold hold that thought, we take a pause here. And come back talk more with you. We're talking to John Scaglia Di on our.

baseball John Scaglia Di Frank Cam Andy New York City America director stonewall inn Colorado NYU supreme court TBS Barney ACLU US producer Senator officer Washington White House Massachusetts
"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on WBAI

WBAI

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"corporation public broadcasting" Discussed on WBAI

"You listeners, our sole source of support, we get no money from anywhere else. Trying to restore our relationship on the corporation, public broadcasting used to give. Thousands and thousands hundreds of thousands of dollars every year. We haven't received that money for several years now. Reasons we're always so far behind the eight ball. Kind of laid back into their good gracious. Have I done to work my way in your good graces? Ask you to drive the twenty five dollars. You can't just pick up the phone. Or go online. To WBAI dot take out a pledge. He's away, take you less than five minutes. One of the gifts either search for. Dot org. Website. Something else. Tights. You. Calling the line just tell them you want. Well the ultimate Harlem. Right. Because. It on the list either. Although it is available on the website. The new premium offering you this evening. But you can get percents. Operator or the golden age archive, flash drive dollar pledge sixteen gigabyte some Dr clash rive, with years of the golden age of radio two thousand twelve maybe thirteen. Least three hundred hours.