19 Burst results for "Corporate Development"

"corporate development" Discussed on M&A Science

M&A Science

04:12 min | 2 weeks ago

"corporate development" Discussed on M&A Science

"Great things of having been around as long as I have been at this point I do have a pretty good network, and so it's usually pretty easy for me to get access to these different executives whether it's Su- mutual connection that we have at a VC firm private equity firm or just someone that we know mutually where I can easily leverage a contact that I have to get a connection. I prefer to have more that warm connection than just doing the sort of cold call in just reaching out of the blue one of. The benefits for having done this as long as I have is I usually don't need to do that out of the blue cold call one be tougher in that sometimes where you get that more initial adverse reaction to why is this guy calling in I talk about the fact that while my mandate is on the inside I worked very closely with the company in helping to identifies teaching partnership opportunities as well. If this is not emanate opportunity, there could be a great opportunity from a partnership standpoint and I can be a great way to start a relationship. For Twenty plus years ago when you didn't have this expensive network to lean on, that's a great question in twenty plus years ago I was doing this. It was a lot more of reaching out and figure out how it could get to those people and it was building those relationships. It was building those relationships with the VC's I'd say when I started a corporate venture fund document that was a great vehicle for me to get access to a great number of companies because I built this phenomenal network of Venture Capitalists, folks and I learned so much more about the kinds of companies that were in their portfolio. That may not have been on my radar if I didn't have those relationships if we weren't doing that corporate centerpiece Pe-. So it was a great way for me to build that initial networking and just build more relationships. Your approach to nurturing relationships sounds very similar to my own approach for Passover recruiting and is it the very similar or is there? Are there some differences from a recruiting standpoint? Yeah. You're sort of, hey, just getting to know somebody I may. Reach out to you even and ask for advice but just building that relationship over time that I may say Hey Jeremy I want to come join your team or something like that. You know yeah, it's a great point. It probably are real similarities there because it is all about just getting to know each other and sort of interesting and having just gone through the chef experience where we had to do the entire process virtually it makes you appreciate figuring out. How to build those relationships in certainly with shaft, we had to get a little bit more creative because it wasn't as if I was able to fly Seattle to sit down with their CEO face to face. So it didn't do any face to face with them a lot of face to face on zoom but yeah, person nothing in person whole transaction was done virtually..

Seattle CEO
Fresh update on "corporate development" discussed on  The Big Biz Radio Show

The Big Biz Radio Show

00:55 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh update on "corporate development" discussed on The Big Biz Radio Show

"Interesting is when I talk to CEOs that air out of their lane or seemingly out of their land is a good tell for investors sometimes, because if an I T guy after 25 years, a financial services guy who's also a hedge fund guy, the size I'm gonna take a left turn over here. There must be a reason capsule because it's not like rust fell out of the van and said, I think I'm gonna go this way, right? How can you tell me the arc of the story of your career, So my early career was in services? I work for a company called the school and we were the number one story provider. Ironically, right during the dot com boom, the whole story took off. So I remember I was an investor who wasn't story in the New York Stock Exchange. I'll tell you one year's it was. You know, I bought DMC and EMU at the same time and breaking. Sat there lived on the margins. Beautiful studio. So what? That And then after I worked in corporate development in a few deals, I realized I want to get more in the investment side didn't pay the corporate development guys much they pay the bankers, others. So I went into the money business hedge fund business and learned a lot about that and got my finance background married that with I D.

Corporate Development DMC EMU New York
"corporate development" Discussed on M&A Science

M&A Science

05:16 min | 2 weeks ago

"corporate development" Discussed on M&A Science

"Twenty plus years of experience in the technology industry focused on a strategic planning, joint ventures, divestitures, international expansion, and strategic partnerships. He's led all aspects of thirty five plus acquisitions divestitures and strategic investments with an aggregate value exceeding eight billion dollars a little bit more with the recently announced deal. So maybe eight nine to change I do. Today, we're going to discuss how to build a line of corporate development team with multiple mandates. For example, corporate ventures, joint venture, strategic partnerships, a characteristic of all corporate development teams. Is that each is completely different from each other. Can you share view of your responsibilities in your specific role? Sure. Am thank you. I think it was great to hear the history of what I've done. It just makes me feel really old but you're right. Every corporate development function is different and it's been different for me from my days. To My years at log me into even at progress. When I would say that at progress we're executing on more of a total growth emanate strategy. So progress is great. Company has been around for over thirty five years and is very focused on looking for assets that have sufficient scale of that we can bring into our platform and leverage the strengths that we've built over those thirty five years including operational efficiency strengthen being able to sell to a broader base of customers. So it's different than. In the past where I was more focused on technology TUCK INS in looking for technology that I could bolt onto different product suites of products that we had, and so it's true. Each corporate development leader probably has a different mandate as to what its focus is and for us it's really finding assets that have the scale that can make an immediate impact on the business and where we can implement some of our strengths from an operational efficiency standpoint to make them work with our business model. So what do you do? I spent a lot of time working with the leaders in the company to really understand each of the different businesses. The company today is broken out into three core business units, and so I spend a lot of time working with the to them to really understand the strategy of those businesses but also understand more macro company Ma. Strategy is well aware we're focused in taking that. And then really understanding for progress understanding the entire infrastructure software ecosystem in as part of that, devops is a key component of that in really spending a lotta time understanding who the players in the different spaces, what are the key trends in those different spaces? How could it fit within progress in those respective spaces and then it's really around going out there in sourcing these opportunities I know a big part. Today's teams around relationships in building relationships, and for me, that's been a critical part of my success doing corporate development for as long as I have..

corporate development
"corporate development" Discussed on M&A Science

M&A Science

07:59 min | Last month

"corporate development" Discussed on M&A Science

"Their first Prussian many times of of your company is in the negotiation process and so winning every point might make feel good moment of getting a deal done but long-term, it could harm the. Overall business you're trying to cheat, and then finally on the integration side, we borrow from the hippocratic goes here it ends this we did it sap as well, and in that it's do no harm and we are putting together integration plan. I WanNa make sure that we really understand what the acquired company tick, what made them successful and protect that protect your sales pipeline not go in and kind of rebe everything down Jeremy flesh out all of the value and company. Never, quiring. It's great. I loved all that that was awesome roadside commodore like the spirit of Dino harm but I would say never use those terms. Or. Sat out loud. The truth you're going to do some harm, right? You WanNa be very careful why Israel, with of incubating the value of making sure your own unnecessarily destroying it. But certainly being very clear communicating Abalta things are going to change if boss sometimes negotiation, there's sometimes it's it's not an. People over that that change per void there are I think private equity companies that will kind an employee into one of their assets portfolio right. So they're really answering to the private equity people, but were they really than working within the portfolio teen to find acquisition opportunities because that's part of the growth strategy that they're looking to implement how have your experiences been with those kinds of structures have any experiences to speak of and have those workout. Well I've come across some folks on the sell side and they've got a different perspective than let's say a homegrown corporate development leader within a company that campus standalone in the company as person on the other side of the table from someone like that it is helpful to research not imminent company you're looking to acquire, but also private equity firm in their entire portfolio to really understand where the motivations are where they lie on the other side. Because in that case, you know as I described making sure you get a good deal for both companies. A good deal in that instance may not just be A. For the selling company, it could mean a good deals abroad portfolio. Thoughts were. Seen that direct lamb looking the question to make sure I understand completely sold out not having seen it I would say having a counterpart in some form or fashion in the acquired company. In this case, we're saying him from. PG. Can. Greatly. Beneficial. I would still need to understand what the nature of the deal is and is this sort of an absorb or is this More merger of equals that will shape relationship. So can be very beneficial, would just need to be very clear on roles and responsibilities, decision rights and things like that. At Mirrored Naso just answer this piece that I have worked with private equity companies assertive. So when that's broad and help an organization that they are have an interest in in thinking about acquisition strategies. How do we think? About emanate and one of the things I will say is there are many times competing motivations within the private equity organization, there's a lot of focus on financial engineering meeting. You're doing a lot of modeling in your thinking about money where you can leverage capitalists about really cost to capital issues and through financial engineering. It makes sense however when you're talking to the operating executives, what you find is. Their focus is really on, wait a minute to our customers align. Can we actually reached these geographic market and what's our experienced in the past? A lot of those pieces get ignored because many times you don't know how to quantify them easily into the financial models. So there's a huge disparity and there's a lot of work that happens in translating that disparity to individuals. So it has been official. Because you get the exposure people know about the deal you have you know people are more ready to accept when you ask for capital infusion to go make an acquisition but then there's competing motivations. So I would really caution organizations to think about that kind of structure and if they can't have one that sits within the organization because you want someone who's thinks from that perspective executes from that perspective. So that's just been. My experience is I've worked with different organizations. We talked about how not every deal is the right deal and maybe that's the best deals in one that we have done. So why is there so much focus on deal sheets and the number of deals that you've done and how much of the executed. It's an oxymoron I find that interesting. So any thoughts on that? Those are the trophy and everybody in every profession likes to have their fees died and it used to be used to get an actual trophy on. The tombstone. Of A lot of those under pretended says something guess by yourself I I'd I don't know I I don't think it's anything more than now when I found myself interviews job jove's years I often talk much more about you know he can't say can't give details about deals at never happened but I do tend to emphasize that you know despite the fact that I've done about a hundred deals, it might career closed deal. There is probably three four times that I've gotten very far down a path evaluating, and those are just as the additives to my experience as the ones that close. I don't think it's anything more than just you know its metric point This is just been my experience I find that people that ask for that metric. It's usually because organization haven't had a corporate development function and it's one of what they think should be the criteria. In fact, it actually tells me a lot more when people tell me the deals they've done, and I'll give you an example if somebody says to you that I've done forty three billion dollars in deals in your I. Don't know in your mid to late thirties that says a lot to me. Right. It says about what you actually did on the deal and so in fact, it can work both ways. I would caution people to really think about what you put and to have the backing for everything that you put on your resume, its very critical, your credibility and you'll long-term professional success. So I'll just close on that topic as close. I'd love to leave people with thoughts that they can ruminate on about corporate. Development and I'm GONNA, give the states to you. Both I'll say when you come in to the funk shame, you have a lot of excitement yourself about getting it off the ground and again for all the reasons you guys, there's a lot of excitement around the organization about the fact that function being established and therefore signaling that we're GonNa, we're GonNa do deals, and that's exciting. But as the leader in the middle of setting it up, be humble be collaborative understand you're not going to. Be. The savior the turns company orbits around or helps it hits different trajectory in frankly you're not going to be viewed that way and there's probably many skeptical folks around the organization as there are people or be excited. So like any other thing of value, any other endeavor value note that this process and and to have an impact, it needs to be a process and the vast amount of collaboration is or is be needed across the organization you should. You should make the priority.

corporate development Jeremy Israel official jove
"corporate development" Discussed on M&A Science

M&A Science

07:44 min | 2 months ago

"corporate development" Discussed on M&A Science

"The CEO Actions we can ask of the deal sponsor to make sure they've thoughts all the risks the guy they're willing to sign up for their arrests. That's their decision. It's our job to make sure that they've been identified. Help them flee things those rats. That's pretty cool. I like how you dig in for the internal friction is there any like key person or you in thing to ask to help identify that where where do you think about the CEO and people are kind of like You know and that's one of the things. It's not only something to ask its million dynamic that you can often see in the preliminary diligence. In around when there are a lot of questions being asked especially in the technical sessions which have the time I don't understand anything that's aides said. Because there. So technically deep I'm not super technical, but you can observe who's answering the questions. The CEO jumping in and answering things kind of gloss over high level, and you can sometimes see that in the like BP engineering, the CTO, getting frustrated or saying contradictory things or when you can kind of see the tension arise I think sometimes tension rising those technical deep dives that super interesting but his engineers to debate. Cute. So oftentimes, that's where the meat of the lake. Debating those on in terms of the technical stuff, and sometimes that's where I see it come out. It's not really a question. You can ask it's more just essentially as really cool into the details look for signs. Looks like in one of the chats, there's a question on navigating a situation when the target may have executive or senior leaders who may be stronger than you have internally like have we had to deal with that. I would say yes. And I think it's you know there's lots of work of when a deer we that ends up reporting into. We have some party leaders who have lead new business. So that is absolutely a situation that we do it and it does take we typically will have. Conversations on either side of how setting up for success, but it can be challenging or duly Berry will knows that they're bringing in this person to help them grow and the business, just the best situation. But that doesn't always aligned easily at the beginning interesting point because I was Gonna ask about leadership when you start seeing a signs of a bad fit and sort of how do you manage that because if it's strictly in leadership, you have a plan around it or is it purely? At becomes a deal breaker, and then in your case that you just mentioned where a lining it with how gonNA fit host closes well, I can lead it. Often I think Kim can probably answer I think that where we really think a leader is not fat again, it's better to be transparent upfront. If we're clear this many by we, I, mean related the sponsoring engineering team is there are times where I might. You might think together we think versus earn elastic Microsoft our engineering leaders wing late, the match he answer had a role for them but but there is You know if the everyone's aligned that there is a percent, the target, it's not a fit. Your position makes sense in there are other strong leaders just be up front about that as much as you can have obviously delegate again when we can human, I can can do the messaging and have the right conversations and oftentimes that person that needs to be somebody who will have for a transitional period but isn't necessarily going to be long term and Microsoft, and again, it might align with what they want to because it's not that they're like bad apple or not a good fit. They're not a good fit because they're not somebody who doesn't want to be at Microsoft long term so might work out the this is really just whatever he wants and rather than Dan's around it just yet fry early on and received with that knowledge rather than trying to make it something off the radio said it will I mean I think the leadership on both sides if we identified the leader is going to be moving forward we do like rely on having those conversations. Setting up like is it a time bound transitional role that they're there to help transition the team, and they can kind of exit to their next thing or and Redo ensure that than our business leaders already to have this conversation entrusted gaps on expectations so that they're aligned and they know when they're coming on, hey, they're going to be over three to six months. Here's what they're going to accomplish men. If they're looking for other things with Microsoft Account, we can help support that. I think leadership on all sides is critical and I think the transparency on what that's GonNa look like is the best way to cut work through that. You don't WANNA leader to command big in they're doing something until the team with they're doing it that doesn't work longer term. Right up on theme here. Think long-term. Order the biggest concerns for the company you're acquiring during negotiations, and as you progress through integration price obviously is ever biggest concern. Obvious. What are they getting from the? Speed of execution in certain diplo's are always very important thing. So short-term things, I'd say you're obviously the RICOTTA negotiation terms violence say are often critical to founders in their investors is what am I getting and how long is it GonNa take to do this because it's it's uncertain. They are running a business need to know whether it's focus in his me like to do a good amount of diligence before we get shorter term sheet to make sure we can stand behind not on the certainty when I usually like to walk through the idea that we do some work Hopefully, that means we're pretty certain to close a transaction outweigh. The other big piece is going back to the first question on what she lookout for is people are really concerned about what are they going to be doing? What's the role GonNa? Be I find that that comes out a little later and that's why advise people asking earlier If I met having found For advice outside of the devote enroll and they said, they've been prescribed combination ask those questions early because I find that what companies tend to do is they focus on those key things like price etcetera, explicity jury, and how am I going to get the transaction done? Nice Star signed a term she really like what's my role going to be with my level going to be how many people are going to be reporting to me etc in. So those are the things that I find are the next level. To Cam like the next hardest thing than initiate after you know the ordeal germs is employment offers and that's what he gets super super concerned about I find in the second phase of the transaction between archie definitive agreements there. Obviously other things along the lines of close like closing conditions etcetera. That are hot button issues. Leading employment offers is where I think a lot of the contentious conversations come up. Which is why Kim and I need to work. So Leslie together so that we're aligned in there is no ability for anyone down like a divide and conquer strategy to try to extract more value out of employment offer. They don't feel like they're getting meeting the dealer race. I ask those are the things that people tend to be concerned about in my experience Kim Yeah I mean I'm aligned with you of. All of those things kind of how do I am right now like how do I get work done within this new system and still have expectations deliver they still have customers navy to keep happy keeping product on track and onboard Microsoft. It's like a team that comes with work but do different differently. So I, mean I think that can.

Microsoft CEO Kim archie executive Berry apple BP engineering Leslie CTO diplo Dan
"corporate development" Discussed on M&A Science

M&A Science

08:06 min | 2 months ago

"corporate development" Discussed on M&A Science

"Speakers are he's Patel Sione founder of deal ru developer to she director of Corporate Development at Microsoft Kim Jones Senior H., r. m., and manager at Microsoft job. Our Rights. Joining me today, Devorah VERTUCCI director of corporate development at Microsoft Evers experienced emanate professional with the background in finance law and a passion for technology media. Also, joining me today is Kim Jones senior HR manager Microsoft Kim conducts due diligence research and all HR related immigration activities as part of Microsoft's emanate programs. Today. We're talking about making an acquisition successful in creating value for both sides isn't easy. There needs to be a partnership with corporate development and integration that drives negotiations to structure a deal for success. For this panel, I recruited to industry professionals, share how they collaborate and explain why negotiation sets the tone for integration. Can each give some background on your involvement in a at Microsoft. Davila kick off. So I, am a director for Development Group, and I've been in this group since two thousand eleven and as a corporate development professional I lead transactions and ended Microsoft in terms of both evaluation execution on execution size part of the process I lead negotiations from term, she all the way through definitive agreements and I work closely with a lot of different teams across. Microsoft are on the evaluation and execution in one of those words that I work with is the integration team at one of the most important functions they were mostly within that team is hr I'll pass it off to him with that lead in. Thanks Deborah I've also been Microsoft. Ten of focused on the people were extreme for in this team for the last five years, and we as ever said we were closely with Cordova and great about getting a jar Magden early in the process so that we can really help identified confirm like talent as a deal value driver kind of how talented culture play a role and really start to build the relationship with target leaders in collaboration with with for Dove I think all this kind of a cruise to certain like our talent decisions are reflected in our cost analysis in the final legal agreements I think. One of the things that we really partner on is the discussions with the CEO in the target leaders depending on who we're working with and of identifying styles and communication methods that we leverage in the negotiation is I think it's that connection of staying in touch bringing people along in the conversation that related makes a difference in kind of ensuring that the leaders are playing us off each other or that were really aligned on kind of what we want to help Bush I want to ask how come you guys don't hate each other where breakout but we're going to get into that. We're GONNA get into that. Things early stage companies should think about if they're considering I've been a one of the things I always say when I'm working with turrets visit Microsoft announced that it might result they do spend time working with entry, pass the in with various organizations when I tell them if they're approach by a company or thinking through the process at Microsoft, is you really have to have a wind vision and a shared understanding of goals between the target of the acquirer. In most situations. This means a shared view of how the product will be integrated with the vision for that product is ill any wire. And how will the people work together to achieve those goals? Integrated Planning doesn't get flesh out fully until after the deal is, but I think having that initial as what was our arguments to thing because it's about setting expectations it's when those expectations differ between the and the acquirer and nobody's talking about that. Then I think things can go wrong. So as they think about that one cut deeper into that but I often tell powders. More. So when I'm in a mentoring capacity than when when I'm in a Development Role, but I I will tell founder is an injury. As a lot of questions about what you're going to be doing one sure acquire ask what your role is going to be asked for you're going to be working with adequate. Not Now will be getting a bigger team at all those things you think of unwanted people maybe say while find out later afraid to ask is the warming your work, the desert, the things that are going to make a founder happy on a day-to-day basis. Similarly, if it's a founder doesn't plan to see themselves long-term at a big company in their wake a serial entrepreneur I advised to be upfront about that, and frankly when we're doing acquisitions to open up that conversation early on say, Hey, what are your roles to to the target is again, not something like if the person's super important to us and they're not planning this day better-defined that out early on and again that. Goes to the big share vision like what's division working together in what's the ultimate vision for this acquisition the product strategy yeah. Adding on I, totally agree a DEVORAH. It's the overall goal alignment that's really important and clear on which is an exit strategy for those leaders. Are they really looking to grow the product a team? Within Microsoft I would add to that like inky are they really aware of the time commitment that it takes to go through an acquisition and run the business that can be really intense even financially is their money to get through the process or will that influence negotiations at stress to the time Ryan, you know kind of really impacts of what we're driving for. I would say kind of people side can of having strategies for ensuring remain. You're talented team along the process like when you bring them in, you need re ten special retention just to get to not point in the resent asking questions like what's the? Microsoft's culture like a line, and if it isn't then is that something that is a deal breaker or even works. Is Some great points I'm hearing thinking long term and putting some of those considerations of Franz just being upfront in general if you're not gonNA stick around and make sure your line there and I think him just made a good point about what it actually takes to do a because a lot of time at sort of underestimated. The negotiation stage your favorite I used to be aware that likes to debate in our. That that's kind of a humorous answer I was both strategy affect negotiations. So long lines of debate. In having a strategic discussion. The masks activated I finally really on its. Part of my. My job I also really love it because I love relationship dull day for me in order to have a successful negotiation as appropriate evolving professional there's a lot of releases because you have to remember. Keep in your mind that. It's not just about winning the negotiation across for Microsoft. Obviously, my job is to do the best deal for Microsoft that while some of it is getting the best price in the best terms, and obviously I really enjoy doing that at the same time keeping in mind that the company in the people at the company or Harper's. So you have to think of it all in that frame of okay. Why negotiating against somebody but negotiating if somebody who's eventually going to be on my? So the relationships you build with a person and making sure that you're building transaction outcome that split for not only Microsoft but everyone such that you're gonNa have a happy productive successful team of people that come into Microsoft at a layer of complexity that I enjoy in and I really enjoy getting to know the people at.

Microsoft Corporate Development Microsoft Kim Microsoft Evers founder director Kim Jones Devorah VERTUCCI HR manager Patel Sione Deborah Davila Cordova Development Group partner CEO Franz Harper Bush
"corporate development" Discussed on M&A Science

M&A Science

04:41 min | 4 months ago

"corporate development" Discussed on M&A Science

"Maybe that is sort of helpful and be interested to hear your perspective on that. How that benefited? You can't Kinda SORTA moving in from. Being the attorney to heading equipped f function, but maybe what would be the ideal profile because? I personally don't think it's a banker gotta be careful here. I got a lot of good banking friends and and friends in the world that are not emanate attorney. I you know I just say this about having a background is in emanate attorney. You do have to have a very broad understanding of every aspect of the deal, obviously the legal right, that's the default you need to understand the legal risks, regulatory risks associated with a target company, their business, and your your clients owned business, and obviously the the legal appeasing sees in the documentation of a deal. That's right. That's why you're hired in the first place, but in order to you know. Evaluate. Dude, that's part of the your job effectively you also have to really understand the business deal, and what's most important to the client from a business perspective, and you need to understand the numbers you know you need to understand the targets today, actual statements and the dynamics at play in the targets financial, the financial that the the financial plan that the acquirer has going forward, so what the? Metrics and goals. You're trying to achieve and make sure that you're not doing anything from. From a deal terms perspective that's at odds with with those. Objectives and then you need to understand kind of the go forward business model how a company the combined is going to operate, so I'm referring to integration aspects, so you really need to have a broad. View of the entire. Transaction. And especially you know if you're a business, minded attorney, which will give myself a bit of pat on the back for some. Clients like me when I was doing that, that was a business major undergraduate school so I had that kind of background coming into to my career as an attorney and I i. I think it's a broad perspective that makes. FAMILY ATTORNEYS For the role of corporate development, if and when they make that transition, that's that's and I you know I can't be i..

attorney corporate development
"corporate development" Discussed on M&A Science

M&A Science

05:28 min | 4 months ago

"corporate development" Discussed on M&A Science

"External, establishing your extended transaction team for GonNa, be dedicated to Ama function outside of corporate development, and then establishing your your your processes processing your templates, actually do the work. Okay this is good stuff so when we look at internal people and I like the view of rope it in the business leaders, because obviously they're gonNA have a view in terms of where the gaps are in the business and opportunities and so forth. What's that conversation like? Break Down for me in terms of how you would approach him and be outlined that conversation to frame it in the right way and get them thinking about sort of what you're trying to get out of them. Yeah, I mean it starts with you, know I I go in with the attitude of you know this is about you. It's not a it's not about me, and then that's that is the right attitude. How can I help? But she help you achieve your business goals through. Amadeu transactions or other strategic transactions. This would apply to you know partnerships or making investments. Strategic investments in in in partners as well performance tighter bond with those companies. and. It's really about getting into a dialogue of what their priorities are. What what their history has been in either meeting. Those priorities are where you know they. They've fallen short under getting an understanding of you know the reasons for for both the successes, and the and the you know areas where they've fallen short, and then explaining to them, you know how I can help given given all given that as the backdrop you know given their perspective as the backdrop. Explaining to them how I can help them as as a corporate development leader, and and you know through through strategic transactions into as a tool to help them meet their objectives. Are you. Stay in touch with the top of mind. Yeah a lot of its informal, and that's why you talk about building the network. Some of it is just you know striking up personal relationships with these with these folks, so it's a charge..

corporate development
"corporate development" Discussed on M&A Science

M&A Science

04:15 min | 4 months ago

"corporate development" Discussed on M&A Science

"They knew my background, and and you know I brought that same spirit of collaboration when I got to answer. So wasn't a case of you know. Hey, I got here have a lot of experience. We're GONNA. Do things my way, but you know over time in in collaborating meeting with other folks throughout the organization and just kind of explaining you know what I've done and kind of why I did it that way and learning. How would fit in with the way? It's been pretty like say quick and easy fit here. What would you say are the top three priorities when establishing a corporate development practice from scratch? Yeah, I, yeah, if boiled down to to to thing I've got. There are three priorities that I would have on my list if I was starting the function from scratch, but it really comes down to people in processes so first of all I think the first priority you gotta you gotTa Bring Deals House to have the deal. Practice right, so I think you know I established both an internal and external network of people on when you're talking externally firms people at firms who are going to be critical. You know in carrying out the function so. Establishing strong contacts within the organization and among the line of business leaders in the influencers at your company. These these are the colleagues that are closest to your business, its strengths and weaknesses. What your customers want where the market is where it's headed what your competitors are doing, not surprisingly, all of those things make those those colleagues, the best source in evaluators of deal opportunities, and then you know external parties are also an important source in deal opportunities and they. Can help provide an even broader perspective on what's happening in your market. What competitors are doing and how macroeconomic conditions affecting? The market today, and in the future which you know in the current environment that we all find ourselves in is extremely important to have that that broader understanding, and so you also need a strong bench of Goto advisors to assist you when you get to the point where we're actually doing transaction, so investment banks accounting firms law firms. To, you gotTA. You GotTa have that internal network to really get going. Get traction with you. Know doing deals identifying deals. You you also still on the on the people topic second priority I'd say is identifying specific individuals. In your company from each of the major functional areas across the organization, whose job it will be and should be to focus on strategic transaction so. Specifically these the team members that are going to need to focus on transaction, be diligence and the evaluation of a target company. Help you assist help, assist you with addressing issues that come up in diligence to their functional areas, specifically and helping to develop a an integration plan that affects their functional area he. Corp Dad's. Leader. You can't know everything. You're not an expert in all areas across the organization, so you really need. An extended team of people to help you. In your work, and then lastly on the process front, so you need to develop repeatable processes and templates. For each stage of the transaction life cycle, and they should be developed again getting back to that collaboration point. They should be developed in coordination with the transaction team members and stakeholders internally. They should be tailored to.

TA corporate development Goto
"corporate development" Discussed on M&A Science

M&A Science

02:33 min | 4 months ago

"corporate development" Discussed on M&A Science

"The volume and variety of the deals that they're constantly working on, and and we had the luxury of carrying the sap business cards, so everyone was willing to take our calls and spend a lot of time talking shop with US I'd say we're pretty diligent especially in the early years after forming the group about. Meeting really routinely with service providers like banks, law firms, accounting firms to discuss both you know major aspects of corporate development that I mentioned deal, execution and emanate strategy, and we're trying to get their own opinions on best practices as well. As, get a sense of what their other clients were doing to manage these functions, so you know combining a lot of different perspectives and approaches is a great way to develop a comprehensive set of best practice, and that's how we did you. Just you need to make sure that you mold and customize those practices. To fit the specific culture and dynamics of the company. There's no one size fits all of course, but but you know you can figure out the common females. The broader set an perspectives that you get when figuring out how to do you know how you should be approaching function you learn. Firsthand just the hard way, then you also learned it by being collaborative and getting input from other practitioners. How did you bring those practices over to and? I've been an answer now about two and a half years. We've instituted a lot of the same best practices at ads. Is there just a willingness among everyone? Touches emanate antics from the senior leadership level all the way down through the organization. All just stakeholders again volved. With our acquisitions to ensuring that our practices than our processes related to a or best in class, the answers had done quite a large number of acquisitions in its history. Before I got there. The company's been around fifty years I, got there and year forty seven they had done I don't know fifteen or so deals in the part time, so they weren't completely new acquisitions, but the the corporate function was not well formalized when I joined and I think there was a recognition about that and and and emanate is a clear stated part of the company's growth strategies, important part of the growth strategy, and so we just had support all up and down the. The Organization for making sure that you know we were doing things according to best practices, and and so it's kind of an easy fit..

sap corporate development
Marne Levine From D.C. to Silicon Valley

The Strategerist

12:53 min | 1 year ago

Marne Levine From D.C. to Silicon Valley

"Of our favorite things to do on this podcast pick the brain of people whose careers have really taken some unique turns and who tackled big jobs which brings us is to mark. Levin who is currently the vice president of Global Partnerships Business and corporate development at facebook previously serving as chief operating officer at Instagram and before that was in the Obama administration straight as chief of staff of the National Economic Council and Special Assistant to the president for economic policy. We can keep going back but we only have so much time Marnie. Thank you so much for doing this. Well thank you for having me. Those titles are mouthfuls. I started. I took some notes on paper. I've got just lines that that make sure I get those right but took an entire sheet. Almost it's great to be here in the Great State of Texas or we're glad you're here visiting from the Great Silicon Valley which will cover here a little bit but your career began in the great city the city of Washington DC at the Treasury Department. So how did you get started in policy in government actually think my career began in Cleveland Ohio. Which is where I was raised raised growing up I was always really interested in politics and policy and then my senior year of high school I got a job working for it was an internship working for the county commissioner. This woman named Mary Boyle who is a real fireball and that's it's really where I learned about. The role that government could play in people's lives and I was hooked immediately and my job there was to new research different proposals and to help work on casework and provide access to different kinds of get that people access to different kinds of social services that they needed which was great they also had me working on a solid Waste Management Plan. I got really into that as does so much so that I was nicknamed. Trash Queen Levin those a fortunate said of rhyming right exactly so that was the that was I think the kickoff to the career that sort of where I got the so-called bug for politics and policy and so oh then after college I moved to Washington. DC AND I ended up getting a job at the Treasury Department. This was before the Internet so so I didn't really fully understand or appreciate what the Treasury Department did but I knew that I wanted to have an impact on people's lives lives and I thought that you know government was the best road to be able to do that and that policy was kind of the best vehicle Kohl for doing that and so working at the Treasury Department where we could work on low cost basic banking accounts financial privacy things like that. I thought we could help help improve people's lives and was a great start in Holly. You spent a long career. Government is well I did I did yes thank you for pointing uh-huh and so did Hollywood you kind of have a similar experience to that in your desires yeah and you know I had a little bit of a similar experience. It was slightly later later for me where I really had not been exposed to politics. Policy is a kid that significantly other than what you just read in the news and and and learn in school and then when I was in college I interned in Congress and that kind of bug is what really turned me on to and got me into policy work as well yeah and you were you legislative affairs right I did I did policy work and then I ended up doing legislative affairs at the end because I had worked in Congress so once she working Congress they figure you know how to how to deal with members of Congress. At the Treasury Department. I started in the chief of staff office but then I would see people running up and down the hallway all day running back and forth back and forth back and forth and I would hear the click clack of heels on the on the marble floor and I thought what are they all doing and then I realized that it was negotiations with Congress and so I thought that's where I wanna be like that's where the action is working on working from the Treasury Department with people in Congress on different kinds of legislation and so that's eventually where I moved to yeah yeah it was fun because I had worked on Congress and worked on legislation that I then had to go into the administration and implement seeing both sides of in writing it and then implementing it was really interesting and not a lot of people I think have that experience of actually writing it and then having to go put it in action and figuring out what we did well and what you didn't do so well when you wrote a piece of legislation different skills knowledge and a different level of detail yeah yeah so then in two thousand eight after you're spending some time in the Treasury Department he joined the Obama Transition Team from the Bush administration Bamut Ministration and wrote about the the kind of exciting being difficult decision to take a position that really was going to suck away a lot of your time. How did you balance that in your life. Well I had worked in the Clinton administration in and I was in my twenties then and I knew how all consuming it was so I was in a very different place in my life. When Obama was elected I was married worried. I had a three year old child and then I had I had just had a baby and so I was really interested in serving and and I was very grateful to even be given being given the opportunity to serve and I wanted to play some small role in helping to address the great recession and the financial crisis that was going on so I had a conversation with my husband. He said we'll make it work work and I thought I was but what happened was pretty interesting for me. One morning I had to go into the White House late because I had to take my then three year old son to the doctors and we were driving home from the doctor's appointment and he and he said where are you taking me and and I said well. I'm going to drop you at school. You're okay and then I'm going to go to work and he said. Did you know that Matthew's mother drops him at school every morning and I said well. I don't know that Matthew's mother does that every morning but I try to take you when I can now there was at the White House. There's the seven thirty. AM senior senior staff meeting and then there's the eight fifteen am meeting which is the extended senior staff and that was the meeting. I was supposed to go to but that conflicted with taking my son to school unless I took them really early in the morning and so Monday morning rolls around after we'd had this conversation and he marches into our bathroom threw him and he says he says to me and my husband so who's taking me to school today looking straight at me no pressure and I said well. Daddy's GonNa take you to school school and he said do you remember our conference on Friday when I told you that. Matthew's mother takes him to school every morning and I I said I do remember. That husband looked at me and he said well what are you gonNA do. I said you know I think I'm going to need to take him to school in the morning. So it's interesting who your teachers are in life and in this case it was and what he was saying is. I need you in the morning and not in the evenings. which is what? I thought I he needed me dinner any we needed me for bedtime but he really wanted me first thing in the morning and so I march into work that day and I told one of my colleagues that he would would be attending the meeting he was thrilled and I started taking my son to school and when I think what I learned through all of that is I could make it work but but this was much more about quality over quantity of time together and that I really needed to listen to the feedback that my kids and my husband we're giving me about what they needed. Specifically and once I was dialed into that I was able to kind of make it all work I got into the White House. I would get there every morning at about nine fifteen in the morning which is late for ready late but the world's still turned into L. worked out Yup so Marnie after your timing government then went out to Silicon Valley and I'm curious how you found that transition. There are two very different worlds. They're different and and then there are also similarities so let's start with some of the differences. The obvious ones were the dress code I went from suits to hoodies and that was a real transient wearing jeans to work in that was that was definitely but I've now adjusted and I would say there was a difference in language to in in the government we would always say I'm going to write a memo advice. Good memo oh right away and it facebook. There would be something that would look like a memo but we would call it. A plan and there was in Washington. There was a lot of talk about fail failure legislation that had failed or didn't pass and in Silicon Valley. There was lots of discussion about pivoting okay right so there we're differences there were there are lots of differences in that regard and I would say the glaring difference was that in Washington there is a love of paper and big binders full of paper and in Silicon Valley. There's not a lot of paper around I personally brought my love of paper with me to use Silicon Valley and get teased mercilessly for it but I I would say that the similarities are as follows there are I feel like in government is a collection of best and brightest and it is a collection of people who are very mission focused and focused on doing good in the world and bringing about change and I think that in Silicon Valley there's a lot of that as well a collection of really smart people who are mission driven ribbon and trying to do good in the world affect people's lives and positive ways. I think the things that I brought with me from Washington war for you know being able to peer around corners and identify risks. That's a skill that one develops in Washington and also when you're trying to get something being done in a vast government is that you need to have process and you need to bring all stakeholders to the table and have conversations and be able to synthesize emphasized that to come up with the best policy recommendations in Silicon Valley things move pretty quickly and in scaling organizations what you WanNa do is apply just enough process so that you can get the best of thought from everybody but not so much process that you really slow everything down and I think I brought some of those skills from Washington continue to facebook when I started there in two thousand ten you obviously very senior woman in silicon in valley and you and your friend and colleague Sheryl Sandberg have really been a promoter of women in the C. Suite Talk to me about that issue and why you're you're passionate about it and what you encourage other women to do and how how to how to think about their roles well I think for me. It's all about connection community among women from the earliest days. I've always really enjoyed getting together with women and I just I've I draw strength from that and I've seen what happens with other women when they are connected. When I was in business school early on there there was a woman in my section we all didn't really know each other very well and she had just gotten engaged in so I suggested hey why don't we all get together and come over to my apartment and will toast Christine but at the same time you know we'll get together and talk about things and get to know each other and what was so interesting we made up at that the point I think less than twenty percent of the of the class of our group and when we when we came into the classroom the next morning there were a a lot more women who were speaking up a lot more women who were building off of each other's comments and they felt more confident as though I think that was one of the Times where I really saw or how that connection and feeling of community could be empowering for other people and then things like my book club where we actually would read the book and discuss it would also became kind of my leaning circle that Cheryl started the lean in circles and that's really about relying on one another connecting acting sharing and helping each other make important decisions in in one's

Treasury Department Washington Silicon Valley Congress Facebook Barack Obama White House Queen Levin Matthew Marnie Chief Of Staff Great Silicon Valley Mary Boyle Vice President Of Global Partn Senior Staff Cleveland Chief Operating Officer Texas Ohio
"corporate development" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"corporate development" Discussed on Recode Decode

"I'm passing the microphone to Recode senior finance editor teddy schlieffer before this week's midterm elections. He sat down with Rev up CEO Steve spinner for fascinating, deep dive into the art of political fundraising. Let's take a listen. Thanks car. I'm here with Steve spinner, the founder and CEO of Rev up software. He's the campaign chair for congressman Roque Kana and he previously worked as a California finance chair through Bama, Biden twenty twelve campaign. Steve welcome to Recode decode nice to see a teddy. So we're here to talk about Steve's background and kind of political fundraising. Obviously a lot of listeners here might be kind of more familiar with startup fundraising. I used to cover in my old life campaign, finance and donors known Steve. But for folks, you don't know who you are. I want to start with. How'd you get to Silicon Valley? You're you're not from originally like so many people from California they come from elsewhere originally. Sure, I am definitely like that. I was born and bred in a Long Island New York to doctors family, and we're in New York Long Island, or if I'm supposed to correctly pronounce it Long Island, Vince island a awhile since I've had that accent. And I broke my dad's heart in college when I took economics and fell in love with that and told them I wasn't premed and ever since then worked on the east coast and worked a lot internationally in my twenties, so arcton Europe and then in Asia and then worked in Atlanta for the Olympics. And and then went to business school up in Boston. And then worked at NBC in New York at thirty Rockefeller plaza did that in late nineties when it was owned by General Electric for a number of years and what we're doing business development corporate development. So is there when MSNBC was was formed and was involved in all the internet activities that they did had a fantastic. Time there and did that for a couple years in New York City, and then an opportunity came up that if the deal happened, I knew it was going to ask me to leave the bosom of thirty Rockefeller plaza. A wonderful wonderful building to work in overlooking. The the Christmas tree sure, even though I'm proud you. And I love you could still go ice skating now that that's the, you know, there's there's some I'm not very good on skates. So, but I love the office, and then the opportunity came up and that had me come out to Californian, and I've never looked back. I still want here still with NBC then. Yeah. NBC initially was there for a number of other couple years had a wonderful ride there, and you know, had been doing business Veldman turn me into general manager, turn me into an executive and really formative years professionally for me in my late twenties early thirties, and I've been here ever since I've been here for twenty years and have done a number of startups out here have done things on the investment side. But yes, dead. Definitely get involved in politics..

Steve spinner Long Island New York New York Long Island Rockefeller plaza founder and CEO NBC teddy schlieffer Rev California CEO editor MSNBC Boston congressman Roque Kana Vince island General Electric general manager Europe Olympics
"corporate development" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"corporate development" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"So that is somewhere i try and be up front with founders that it can be difficult it's not necessarily easy but it's not intentionally difficult it's not designed as a meat grinder to sort of grind down the will of startups i think the reality is is that an acquisition is a big deal even small acquisitions is a big deal for any company so when you're bringing a company in there's a law that you need to know about what you're bringing in both from a risk allocation in risk management piece but also from mostly from an integration piece not make sure that when the company is brought into the acquirer on a real chance for success but as a result there will be a lot more people on my side of the table than on your side of the tables around there and that just out by itself i think is what creates that sort of quote unquote grueling environment that policy talking about because i'm gonna roll out even smoke square somewhere between six and ten people are going to be involved in a deal process in all going to be asking the ceo founder for stuff and so it can be pretty overwhelming i think my job is a corporate development lead on the deal is make sure that i manage that firehose in a way that it doesn't completely overwhelm the company but still moves us quickly towards it towards the end of the process because if it's going to be grueling it might as well be fast grueling and slow sounds awful right so i try and at least make sure that we can move through the process quickly and we get what we need but not more and that we sort of respectful of how much more firepower we bring to the table than started is going to be up to canals what would you have found is going through that process.

founder ceo corporate development
"corporate development" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"corporate development" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"The investors inch introduced to the companies to the coupe deaf teams i'm intrigued how do you like to rebuild the relationship what design process in florida like to you in an ideal world so i think there's a high level where i loved to spend time in talk to the venture capital community not necessarily to go and be like what part of your portfolio can i buy up of more just because what i saw it in recent is that you really are seeing the pulse inflow of what is coming in what the trends are and so for me it's absolutely invaluable to have like a good back and forth relationship with pc's on what are they seeing what's interesting what's real what's not real and i think that that is the first level of value and i'd like to think that i can give the point of view of a large corporate end sort of what we're seeing in the marketplace in what we think is going to make it up to our size and i think that there's a great back and forth there because i think that when you create that dialog and they understand what we're doing what we're looking for and i understand the trends they're seeing that's when you can actually come up in synthesize an idea that eventually could turn into an acquisition and it's much better than sort of here's my portfolio and here's the two that irrelevant your space and here's whether you could buy them or not and i think most bc's no that to most of my interactions aren't like that on venture capital side and so i think that's the first layer of how do you have a good interaction between corporate development nbc's jim so one of the twelve hundred gp's has recommended squad by the twenty minute vc it's exciting time say and we're going to progress through pipe grime said that it's a grueling process i'd love to hear your thoughts on this is a farah sas ment of the process wants to talk he's helping identified how would you respond to them how do you think about the process.

florida pc bc nbc corporate development twenty minute
"corporate development" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"corporate development" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"Facebook and google are small compared to the opportunity set that they're evaluating there's just so many companies out there all the time to evaluate and if you're even at square we have a broad set of product lines and that means that the universe of startups that could be interesting to us is massive did runs the gamut from payments all the way through lending and consumer finance and so we're always overwhelmed every team is always overwhelmed by the number of startups that are out there and so it behooves you as a founder or ceo tack company to build those relationships to get yourself on the radar of the teams that matter to you and whether resulted in acquisition or whether it results in a partnership or even whether just results in some mixing and sharing of ideas between the two companies i think it's really valuable for those tech companies to build that relationship and engage with corporate development and i think that's where i disagree a little bit with all vice about the sheet number of signs ancient operationalize the tracking king of such a busy in proliferated landscape we approach it from two different ways at square building the first thing we do is we narrow the lens by really digging in spending a lot of time with our product teams and understanding what's important to them what's on their road map where we think we can help accelerate that and that helps us narrow the lens a little bit to say all right like we've talked to this team it's not everything they're doing it's a couple of spaces within what they're doing and then we can take that and bring it onto the marketplace and so that's what i would call the bottom up approach to how we narrow things down and then i think there's a tops down approach which is to make sure that we're keeping an eye on evaluating new business opportunities for square and that's a little more free form i think we spend a lot of time talking to venture capital firms who spent a lot of time talking to influential founders spent a lot of time reading logs in news and just trying to understand what the trends are with the forces are that affect square and so that we can identify and see new and interesting areas.

Facebook corporate development google founder ceo
"corporate development" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"corporate development" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"Tech companies in particular is incredibly difficult especially i spent most of my career in consumer internet you're buying a lot of companies where you're looking at talent and technology are the main drivers and soothe he can't sort of build a model directly related to the company's existing revenue or profit in the hundred percent sure on price i haven't personally noticed prices going up the factors i just discussed are certainly factors with new entrance in the market on driving price up one factor that i think has moderated prices a little bit is that emanate has become the absolute primary not that exit you've seen far fewer ipo's of the last five years i've given that reduced itself as an option in ipo is often your primary competition when you're doing an ideal especially for a significant in large company the company will be looking at an ipo as option to an deal and that's when pricing becomes difficult because you're sort of competing with the public markets so i haven't seen a ton of price increase but i do think that's because in my view even though you've seen new entrance into the market there's been softening at the other end of the market from the google face facebook apple amazon and you said about kind of emanate being the primary accent roof i'm really intrigued then how would you respond to pool grams of tastic titled essay don't tool to coop to have what are your thoughts on this and maybe when and if the right time to have conversations with cooped teams is given that now it is the primary exit bridge paul is very very smart guy and i think that his advice in the article is much more nuanced than the title of his article and so i would say i i disagree with the premise that the title of the blog post gives which is that you should never talk to corporate annulment i think the second premise which is you shouldn't do that because you should be focused on building or company is a great sentiment and so i think the balanced companies have to find in between those two factors is back to my previous statement about companies being bought not sold is building a relationship with companies that may someday be a potential acquirer is a really important part of making that option reality corporate development teams across silicon valley in including.

amazon google facebook corporate development hundred percent five years
"corporate development" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"corporate development" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"Of acquisition world a lot more than i did the legal part and so i had an opportunity when one of the people i worked with a lot at google wasn't orissa and when she went to yahoo to be the ceo an opportunity to move over to the corporate development side of yahoo another great experience who we did a bunch of deals in the two years i was there i did a lot of interesting things for the company but then i had an opportunity then to go and work at injuries and horowitz on their operating team in their corporate development group and it was such a great opportunity for me because i had done so much what i would call by side google on yahoo that it was a great opportunity to go and work with both the venture capital in the founders to see what their viewpoint on and as sort of world laws who was a great experience i think it really rounded out my sort of the world i did what i think most people want to do and i took a jump at at going into more operating focused role went to work at a company called s t ax which is we city done la it was hard on my family travels i decided to sort of as a lot started things do it didn't work out for me degrade thing for me is i then consulted for most of the year doing the same thing i'd done injuries in but just getting more time getting more embedded with some founders i had worked with an injury since and after done it for year square came calling with an opportunity to come run their corporate on the team and when i looked at the opportunity that was in front of us at square just for the amount of runway we have for the really mission driven culture starting at the top with an amazing ceo jack and really facing one of the more interesting times in any company can have where you're you say you have a lot of resources you have scale but you still are small enough to maintain that mission driven culture i just left out it was just too opportunity to turn down and i've been about this for about a year i don't agree i mean would not i'm interested before we dive in state.

google yahoo ceo horowitz jack orissa corporate development two years
"corporate development" Discussed on WWL

WWL

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"corporate development" Discussed on WWL

"We just didn't find ourselves here one day at a deep plus note uh we we we somehow as a nation became the what what what we have uh our corporate development interstate though for example started with eisenhower era and it was a great deal of activity and seventy and even lovie ad and when you look at the infrastructure in those days well it was brand new we would we were riding on good roads and and and we were riding on safe roads embe had interstate that we didn't have before so we we as a nation with some hall became a comfortable with it and and and didn't pay much attention but like everything else the infrastructure gets old and you'll roof gets all been solved he can build highways good old and media yup potholes and you have you have you have cracked saying you have problems and and that's what has happened in in the country so as we came became comfortable with what we had before god that we need to take care of the system we need to invest what we need to do and and take care of it uh you guys in several civil engineering business when when y'all developer project y'all know what the life cycle of the life span of a bridge of this her that's going to be with maintenance and pretty much no the doug degradation at widow take place without maintenance right absolute absolute however uh it making process is not on life cycle on life cycle colston unfortunatey the decisionmaking process and the regulations the federal and state regulations are based on the initial cost so more often rather than making a decision on the lifecycle costs of the new infrastructure and how long is going to act on what's going to take to to maintain it we make a decision on what the initial cost days we take your bid and we get it done so that is where the problem has been in a as a maverick american society soon engine is very much recommending that we change our way of doing business and we start looking at the livestock of cost the infrastructure rather than the.

corporate development eisenhower lovie developer one day
"corporate development" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

Wall Street Oasis

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"corporate development" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

"Movement on for new ship so i felt like quitting my job in corporate development and going into business school would allow me this to twoyear timeframe where i could focus on trying to build a business and also get a formal business education just because i didn't have one had engineering background in so i figured gangs and business knowledge would into wouldn't be too bad for me and so i just graduated this past that may just as you said firm from harvard and now i'm working to launch a media company called a news going that is so cool so there's a lot there had a lot of cool jobs i'd love to get into them may be tell us quickly what what news bling is and then we'll go we'll go back and in a sum of eur some of your path yes share so so news going is immediate company that i'm launching that's supposed to target of the white space that i see opening up in the in the news media space so i think prior to you know the last decade or so it will when you think about news media that the news organizations that kind of fall in the center and are reporting the news quote unquote like accurately you know at least towards the public perception would be companies like cnn companies like new york times cetera and over over the last couple of decades or so organizations have it of figured out that you know it's it's more advantageous for them to target their audiences based on either political views or or or what their audience wants to hear and and and i think the the genius behind that.

corporate development harvard media company news media cnn new york times twoyear