23 Burst results for "Coronary Artery Disease"

Is it Time to Add Colchicine to the CVD Cocktail?

iForumRx.org

04:42 min | 7 months ago

Is it Time to Add Colchicine to the CVD Cocktail?

"I think most people would consider loco to to be a positive study again. Demonstrating the positive effects. That culture scene can have on cardiovascular outcomes in looking at the conduct of the study. What do you consider to be the strengths and potential weaknesses. What concerns does it raise and does this study established culture seen as a standard of care that should be offered to most patients with coronary artery disease or just to some patients or just a limited view. Yes i'm going to go ahead and quickly Discussed the strengths. This was a randomized placebo. Controlled double blind trial. They had a large sample size around fifty. Five hundred patients were randomized. These patients were on solid background. Therapy as i discuss previously. And i think this answers are very important. Clinical question about further risk reduction in patients with cad. Yes so. I completely agree. I mean this is a a well done study with no real fatal flaws. But certainly. There's some things discuss here so i or a couple of things regarding the design of the trial. That really. Back to the generalize ability the findings so i the trial like taylor said was done primarily male patient population specifically in western australia and netherlands. So as unfortunately we see often cardiovascular literature women were underrepresented here in the extrapolation other ethnic groups may be challenged. But the. I don't see this at this. Point is a fatal flaw and i don't have any real biological reason to think that the results wouldn't extrapolate other groups next specifically the culture seem does that was used was point five milligrams which is different than the zero point six milligrams at least we have here in the us. So for some of this could be an issue in what's unknown at this point is if this twenty percent difference in concentration could ultimately impact you the outcomes whether the efficacy or safety however again my gut says it's it's probably k. We've extrapolated from some of the pericarditis data and used are kinda us doses with benefit. So with those said. I think the biggest issue kind of discuss regarding this trial is the priroda musician running phase so against dealer alluded to patients after they were enrolled went into a one month. Essentially tolerability running phase in which fifteen percent of patients actually dropped out during this phase before random ization patients dropped out about sixty percent or overall about nine percent of the overall enrollment phase was lost to perceived side effects for which about half were gi related. As you'd expect with culture scene for me this dropout rate largely for eighty are reasons. Make really me question. The finding of equal discontinuation rates between the trial arms in might skew what we might actually see in clinical practice so i don't think losing sight of shore educating patients about possible side effects from a statistical standpoint you can have the consideration that dropping patients pre random ization due to tolerability concerns. Kind of enriches your potential drug effect. You don't have those patients in the intention to treat arm who aren't exposed to the drug so possibly is looking drug effect versus placebo. Based on what you'd expect in practice you may potentially not see the same overwhelming benefit but the benefit was very strong. And i don't think adding those patients back in would necessarily change the overall Interpretation trial or the application. So really from running phases very much a A safety issue versus inefficacy issue. So alternate of. Bring that back to get back to coach. Seems place in therapy ultimate At this point. I really think lonzo to help to continue to confirm the potential benefit of colchicine in cad management. When we look at this along with other trials whether it be the local one and then probably most importantly combine this along with the whole cod study. We see it but largely consistent benefit with culture seeing reducing cardiovascular events out for those familiar with the study may also seen that at the same time the lotto co two was presented also. A study called cops was presented and this is specific australian study that looked at culture again in an acs population now. This was a negative study. But the real caveat with that is the trial was actually powered for very large difference in events so it really was underpowered to potentially detect. What we what was suggested as possibly clinically relevant differences power. Find about a fifty percent difference in. It looked like there might have been about thirty percent difference. Which is what's consistent with other studies. So kinda really negates. The ability for that trial to kind of pooh-poohed on potential benefits here and i really think ultimately what we have to ask ourselves is is this nonfatal event risk reduction enough to make a therapy part of standard therapy in will i'd say softer endpoint is at play here. It's probably at least reasonable that it's something that we can't just throw out

Coronary Artery Disease Western Australia Netherlands Taylor Lonzo United States
Diabetes Mellitus with Dr. Dennis Bruemmer

Cardionerds

05:21 min | 8 months ago

Diabetes Mellitus with Dr. Dennis Bruemmer

"Take hardy and hurts summit clear so excited for this installment of our cardiovascular prevention series with the deep dive into diabetes. Which i think you'll learn by the end of the episode is so important for us. Be attention to. We're joined by a phenomenal and true. Genuine in the field. Dr dennis brumer hughes. The director of the center for cardia met about health in the section of preventive cardiology and rehabilitation. At the cleveland clinic. Dr boomer earned his md and degrees from the university of hamburg in germany following residency training in internal medicine and cardiology in berlin docker boomer completed a research fellowship as the diabetes center fellow in the department at ucla. He is board certified in internal medicine and chronology hardy vascular disease and cardiac graffiti quite a unique combination. Dr boomers research is focused on mechanisms of atherosclerosis and risk factor intervention for the prevention of coronary artery disease soccer. It's such a pleasure to invite you to the show success. have you on. And as i invite you. I'm going to just reflect on your unique training path and we were just discussing before we started recording. Here that there's going to be a probably a lot of interest. In pursuing some sort of combined die batali cardiovascular education for court in the future. But would you mind just telling us how you got interested in really devoting yourself to cardio metabolic disease and diabetes in general. Absolutely am so first of all i. I'm super thrilled to be here. And i i'm so excited to be talking to the nerds here tonight so i. I think it's phenomenal. What you guys are doing and again. I very much appreciate the opportunity here so so i was. I'm kind of bridge between endocrinology in cardiology back in germany. I did my thesis. Actually in endocrinology lie protein metabolism. And that kind of got me interested in cardiology. I went to pursue cardiology training back in germany and then research fellowship at ucla. I was supposed to go back after that to germany. But i decided to stay and then obviously being a foreign Repeated training and i was always torn between the endocrine in preventive cardiology aspect than truecar ideologies. So i ultimately decided. I'm just gonna do both so. I did endocrinology fellowship and cardiologist fellowship by the university of kentucky. I had a phenomenal time. There and kind of still even now much of what we do in cardiology is really prevention. And that much of it. This endocrinology so i think these sub specialties really are complementary in or very closely together but let me say on behalf of everyone here at the clinic. How glad we are that. You decided not to go back and stayed here. Join us over here as a faculty because you've just added tremendous value to the program and you've been such an incredible resource for all of us. Thank you for being here. Yes dr burin. And i extend that thank you. Because you know you've stayed here. We are talking to the nerds. I think this is a totally fortunate. And i am really happy to benefit from your stay here now. We are very excited to dive into cardio dive tallahassee which begs the question dr boomer we are cardio nerds why should cardiologists focus on diabetes. I mean why not. Just refer are diabetic patients to endocrinologist or leave the to their primary care doctors. Yeah i think. I think that's kind of the common theme and that is the current care. We leave it to others in cardiology. Now i think that is sub optimal. I think we as cardiologists we see these patients all the time i mean when is ever a patient. In the cath. Lab that presents with an semi or stemming that doesn't have diabetes so we do see the far spectrum of this disease of cardiovascular complications that arise of having ama- diagnosis of diabetes. So i think we have to be involved in managing this. I think to a minimum. We should referred patients to primary care or make sure that the diabetes is. What managed or console endocrinology now as as we all know as physicians quite frequently. Not even that happens so and there's good evidence for that if you look at registries just about six percent of diabetic patients with cardiovascular disease actually get appropriate care for their diabetes and cardiovascular conditions as you know that vitas says associated with the two to four fold increase in risk it is a cardiovascular risk equivalent termed many many years ago seventy percent of our acute coronary syndrome patients have diabetes. So you you could argue. Yes we leave it to primary care but or the endocrinologist but keep in mind that endocrinologists currently see about five percent of the patient population with diabetes.

Diabetes Dr Dennis Brumer Hughes Center For Cardia Dr Boomer Germany Cardio Metabolic Disease Ucla University Of Hamburg Cleveland Clinic Vascular Disease Batali Hardy Atherosclerosis Coronary Artery Dr Burin Berlin Soccer University Of Kentucky Cardiovascular Complications Tallahassee
Protecting Your Brain from Alzheimers Disease and Cognitive Decline

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

03:54 min | 10 months ago

Protecting Your Brain from Alzheimers Disease and Cognitive Decline

"In this mini episode, I speak with Dr David Perimeter Dr, Lisa, Mosconi Dr Dale, Br Edison about why Alzheimer's is a preventable disease and the lifestyle factors that can set the stage for Alzheimer's years from. Now, we also talk about this disticts of Alzheimer's disease and its impact on women, and what you can do today today to prevent cognitive decline in the future. Let's listen in starting with interview with Dr. David Pearl Mutter, a board certified neurologist and four-time New York. Times bestselling author, we do know that a for the most part Alzheimer's is a preventable disease. This is a disease costing Americans two hundred and thirty billion dollars affecting five point four million of us. That is dramatically exploding in terms of its incidence and prevalence globally, and yet you know the notion that our lifestyle choices are not relevant is it does take my breath away. You know it's all about living a life that is less inflammatory and that certainly transcends are narrative as it relates to Alzheimer's but. Involves Parkinson's and involves coronary artery disease diabetes and cancer, and all of the chronic degenerative conditions, and you know what really is so very important and I think sort of stands in our way of getting this information to really have traction is the time table that this is effective over for example, you tell somebody wear your seatbelt that'll be good for you. They get in a car accident they're wearing their seat belt and they say, Hey, I get it that worked yesterday I was in that accident worked. But the inflammation issues that are relevant in terms of causing the brain to degenerate or narrowing the coronary arteries. These are issues that are beginning to take shape ten, twenty, thirty years prior to actual disease manifestation, and therefore it makes it very challenging for the consumer to connect those dots. Let me give you an example. In the journal Neurology, which is arguably one of our most well respected neurology journals on the planet period viewed. There was an interesting study that was published and it measured in a group of several thousand individuals who were in their forties and fifties. At the time it measured markers in their blood of inflammation and the study then came back and looked at the same group of individuals twenty four years later, the study again was just. And what it found was really quite remarkable. There was very direct relationship between risk for developing Alzheimer's disease and having had higher measurement of blood inflammatory markers twenty four years ago. So what does it say? It says that if you? Elevated Markers of inflammation in your blood today, you are setting the stage for Alzheimer's years from now and so that your lifestyle choices today whether you choose to eat low carb high carb high fat low-fat whether you choose said integrity vs physical activity the amount of sleep that you get. Hopefully that is restorative the amount of stress in your life, etc. these are all extremely important variables. Which you have control that clearly are connected to your brains Dini. This is not live your life come what may and we have a pill for you. If you're suddenly cognitively impaired is the other story. The story is that you make lifestyle choices today that will dramatically impact how your brain works to three decades from now

Alzheimer Alzheimer's Disease Dr David Perimeter Dr Dr. David Pearl Mutter Neurology Dr Dale New York Br Edison Parkinson Times Lisa
"coronary artery disease" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"coronary artery disease" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Coronary artery disease renal disease and dementia so there you go just to give you an example that in the vast majority as we see had some type of underlying condition here is your forecast travel in the west will become hazardous this Easter Sunday morning as we've got a bout of snow invading portions of the central and northern Rockies eastern Idaho southern Montana Wyoming and most of the central Rockies Denver will pick up several inches of snow today Cheyenne to Salt Lake City will be particularly treacherous in the overnight hours as temperatures fall in the snow rates pick up Billings has already been battered with several inches of snow Denver will see snow throughout the day it will only had about twenty degrees for the high today in Cheyenne Wyoming that snow will be shifting to the east today so keep that in mind for travel in portions of the Midwest where will mainly see heavy rain throughout the day same for the Deep South with some potential late afternoon thunderstorms firing up across the arklatex and down into Louisiana there's a look at your national forecast from red eye radio I'm meteorologist John trout wow TravelCenters of America download trucks more today we needed twenty W. W. B. A. P. dot com special report coronavirus update the cove in nineteen death toll in the U. S. has risen to more than thirty nine thousand with over seven hundred and thirty five thousand confirmed cases Colorado's governor wore a face mask as he greeted vice president Mike pence who gave the commencement address at the airforce academy Saturday and address the corona virus pandemic with.

Wyoming Salt Lake City Denver Cheyenne Wyoming Midwest Louisiana John trout America Colorado vice president Mike pence Idaho Montana W. W. B. A.
"coronary artery disease" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"coronary artery disease" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Coronary artery disease renal disease and dementia so there you go just to give you an example that in the vast majority as we see had some type of underlying condition here is your forecast travel in the west will become hazardous this Easter Sunday morning as we've got about of Snoke invading portions of the central and northern Rockies eastern Idaho southern Montana Wyoming and most of the central Rockies Denver will pick up several inches of snow today Cheyenne to Salt Lake City will be particularly treacherous in the overnight hours as temperatures fall in the snow rates pick up Billings has already been battered with several inches of snow Denver will see snow throughout the day it will only had about twenty degrees for the high today in Cheyenne Wyoming that snow will be shifting to the east today so keep that in mind for travel in portions of the Midwest where will mainly see heavy rain throughout the day same for the Deep South with some potential late afternoon thunderstorms firing up across the arklatex and down into Louisiana there's a look at your national forecast from red eye radio I'm meteorologist John trout one of five point nine coming down on the number of cases breaking new inside's story to get our country as soon as we can depend on it every day what happens next making progress happens here we will be back one oh five point nine W. M. A. L. the malls today okay with my last birthday presents for backstopping like tronic store and then grab a quick bite she that could leave his shopping bag looks like there's a.

Snoke Wyoming Salt Lake City Denver Cheyenne Wyoming Midwest Louisiana Idaho Montana John trout W. M. A.
Dr. David Perlmutter on 'Brain Wash'

The Ultimate Health Podcast

06:25 min | 1 year ago

Dr. David Perlmutter on 'Brain Wash'

"David how are you. Welcome back to the show. I'm very delighted to be back with you guys. That's for sure. David were super very excited to chat with you again round. Three's going to be a charm this chat here. I want to go all the way back to the mid-nineteen eighties and at this time. You're in your first year of neurosurgery training. You're going through a very demanding. Time very stressful knock getting a lot of quality sleep and you become sick so take us back there. I spoke about this this Experience in the new book and just as an example as to the relationship between stress and lack of sleep which is obviously stressful in and of itself itself and immune function and I in that year when we would get six hours of sleep. Every other night I experienced just a litany of illnesses illnesses including chicken pox dysentery and ulcer and even a mumps. It was very enlightening in terms of if that lifestyle. Did I want to continue doing that. And then it was one of the main reasons I in fact changed over to doing medical neurology and boy. The rest is history so it turned out to be a good decision and stress is a powerful player in your life in terms of so many issues. We know what we talk about in the new book is how stress and inappropriate inappropriate diet and lack of exercise lack of contact with people lack of contact with nature and not getting enough restorative sleep. How all of these choices his 'cause they basically are conspire to actually rewire the brain for things? That are really not what our goals are so for you when you were going going to school there and you switched to neurology. What other changes did you make the time before? He started feeling better. The joke at the time of his joke. But neurology at there was called. Gentlemen's neurology you know the neuro surgery. In general surgery at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami Florida was brutal. You know I think it was worse than in being in the NFL. Not that I was ever in the NFL and neurology on. The other. Hand was gentleman's neurology. We got to be read. We got to study things and explorer and it. It allowed me more time to dedicate to my health to exercise. More to get restorative sleep on. I even could have some input as to the food that I would eat one one in my neurosurgery residency during those crazy nights. Sometimes all I would eat was baby food and we'd go down to the pediatrics floor. And we'd sneak in the refrigerator. tretorn eat all the banana. Beech nut baby food and that was all there was. In retrospect I know the reason we did that is because back then baby food was just loaded with sugar you know. It was very sobering in. Its very sobering. In retrospect to think what a place I was in in the context of how people are these days who are you know. Maybe they're getting a little more sleep than I had in those days but nonetheless who are in stressful life situations and are eating inappropriate food choices prices and what that does to not just their immune function but how that affects their general health and more importantly vis-a-vis what we're writing about now how it affects affects the basic platform by which they make decisions by which they see the world around them. It's been very enlightening to be retrospective and thinking about those times. As far as I'm concerned and now where we've come today and going through this way back. When have you found yourself? Caught up in a similar situation in the future like when you started practice or are when you started a family or anything like that or did you learn from this I experience. Oh that was a powerful lesson to learn but life is all about learning And we we we make large stroke changes and then small stroke refinement says we move forward so those refinements have certainly continued with time. That was the whitest. It is net that I threw in terms of really seeing what was going on. And as you know over the years I have made continued refinements in messaging both my outreach outreach as well as what my personal choices are to further pursue health disease resistance and now a happiness not that I excluded having his from the equation before but as we've learned recently happiness and being content really goes hand in hand with planning for the future being able to plan for the future being empathetic and being able to make good decisions. We've learned that. Actually there are parts of the brain that either relates to impulsively ability and self centeredness in comparison to parts of the brain that foster empathy. Good decision making planning for the future and you know what with grain and looking at carbs and gluten and then brain maker understanding incredible role that the gut bacteria playing in terms of our health. Now with Our Son Austin promoter and internal medicine. MD writing this new book one of the main purposes. Is You know as a practicing physician over the years the for me. And also for Austin during his residency. Both of US talked about the degree of frustration that we have where we learn as much information as we possibly can and do our very best to impart that information to the people for whom we care whether it's to take this medication or more recently early in my case what foods to eat how to change your lifestyle to be prevented in terms of your brain health but the frustrating part has really been that about eighty percent scent of people. Don't really do what they know is best for them. You know we do our best to give me information. But most people read the books. They watched the programs on television. They get at the information. They know darn well. They shouldn't be eating the glazed doughnut or whatever it is and yet they can't help themselves they can't implement they can't make these decisions and what we've learned. Is that interestingly. So interestingly that the mechanism of inflammation that we've been talking about in the context of Alzheimer's coronary artery disease. He's cancer diabetes and even depression that mechanism of inflammation threatens our ability to make good decisions and stick stick with them that this time around has been absolutely revelation because if we can create a scenario where people can make better decisions and stick due to these plans the understand her good for them now. We have a much better chance at allowing people to turn things around as it relates to their

David NFL Jackson Memorial Hospital Alzheimer Mumps Hand United States Miami Florida Austin
Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn on Preventing and Reversing Heart Disease

Love, Gianna

03:53 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn on Preventing and Reversing Heart Disease

"Today I'm here with breath. Dr S Halston. The one the only we have ten questions today and one when bill this question tell us a little bit about yourself and your journey and becoming Vegan leader in the field. Also if you'd like to tell us about the books you've written or new projects you have coming up well first of all say thank NCUA pleasure to be with you and with your team and talk about Probably most of my emphasis might be on my research which is coronary artery disease. A leading killer of women men and Western civilization which the truth be known coronary artery. Disease is is nothing more than a toothless paper tiger that need never ever exist and if it does exist in need never ever progress this is a completely benign foodborne foodborne illness where I got my start was in I guess the late nineteen seventies early eighties. I was increasingly disillusioned that as is chairman of our breast cancer. Taskforce Cleveland Clinic for how many women I was doing breast surgery. I was doing absolutely nothing for the next unsuspecting affecting victim and this led to a bit of global research on my part and it was very striking to see that there were many cultures where breast cancer rates were thirty and forty times less frequent than the United States states for instance in Kenya and in rural Japan in the nineteen fifties breast cancer was very infrequently identified yet as soon as the Japanese women would migrate to the United States. The second and third generation still japanese-american. They still now had the same rate of breast cancer there Caucasian counterpart And even more striking perhaps was a cancer of the prostate in the entire nation of Japan in nineteen fifty eight. How many autopsy proven doing desk where they're from cancer of the prostate eighteen in the entire nation more nineteen seventy eight? They were up to one hundred thirty seven which still pales in comparison to the twenty. Eight thousand will die this year in this country so at about that juncture. I thought we we get more bang for the buck if if we could deal with the leading killer of women and men and Western civilization which is our disease coronary or your coronary artery heart heart disease and so the dream has worked out. Was it if you could get people to eat to save their hardt also say themselves in the common western cancers breast prostate colon and perhaps pancreatic. That's the background. What what are your thoughts on a low carb Paleo and kitone Diet Kito service versus Kito acidosis and what are the dangers of of each I think that those are some interesting questions. I think that you might start out looking at the epidemiology analogy of of heart disease. And it depends what your goals are if you want to slow the rate of Heart Disease Development The Mediterranean Diet is probably the second the worst of course is the typical western American Diet. Fill with dairy and meat and cheese and Bacon pork possible oil and it just absolutely ravages the Guardian and the life checking of our blood vessel which happens to be that delicate innermost lining of the artery the endothelium which manufacturers absolutely magic molecules of gas that nitric oxide that protects us all and nitric. Oxide has some absolutely marvelous functions keeps to sell your elements in our bloodstream flowing. I tough lawn rather than velcro

Breast Cancer Dr S Halston Ncua Japan United States Cleveland Clinic Vegan Leader Chairman Kenya
1 person has died of Legionnaires' disease after Atlanta hotel stay

Atlanta's Morning News

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

1 person has died of Legionnaires' disease after Atlanta hotel stay

"A Decatur woman is believed to be the first death linked to a legionnaire's outbreak at the Sheraton Atlanta forty nine you'll cameo Garrett died July ninth of coronary artery disease which the cab medical examiner says was aggravated by Legionella Garrett stayed at the Sheraton for a conference she's one of twelve confirmed legion air's cases and there are sixty one probable cases the hotel's been close since mid

Sheraton Atlanta Legionella Garrett Decatur
"coronary artery disease" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"coronary artery disease" Discussed on 710 WOR

"There is diabetics are prone to damage the little blood vessels in the back of the eyes. It's called diabetic retinopathy is very common and diabetics who've been sick for more than ten years, and this can make a go blind rest virtual house protect little blood vessels in the back of the is. So what does a lot of good things for diabetics? And also when people on statin drugs the human clinical trials show at helps to and drudge work better. How? By reducing inflammation, in the blood vessel walls. She a statin drug is lowering the bed cholesterol, and that's good because bad cholesterol's and fought with about half of all heart attacks, but there's plenty of people with low cholesterol out of having heart attacks because there's another evil twin, hold inflammation in the heart. The rest virtual helps Lordy inflammation, the rest virtual helps to good cholesterol, work better. Good cholesterol. Biz involved with reverse, cholesterol, transport, good cholesterol, HDL efforts in the right form. The apple like protein form goes into your circulation, and sucks bad cholesterol out of the walls of your heart out of the artery, walls, and your heart. So it doesn't narrow the arteries of narrows the arteries, you can have a stroke or a heart attack. It's called heart disease. Coronary artery disease biggest killer on the planet. So rest virtual packs HDL with more apple Weipa protein. A so it's better at sucking, the bad cholesterol out of your blood vessel walls. That's one thing that does it also makes the bad cholesterol.

heart disease Coronary artery disease apple ten years
"coronary artery disease" Discussed on Nutrition Rounds Podcast

Nutrition Rounds Podcast

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"coronary artery disease" Discussed on Nutrition Rounds Podcast

"Going to benefit from that. You know, I I wanted to be appropriate. Also mentioned Wyatt is that somebody who has typical coronary artery disease, and let's say that appeal audience we ought to find on the fine term about to use the coronary artery, which goes to supply the heart muscle. We think of the EPA cardio portion of the heart artery as riding on the surface of the heart. I mean, the EPA cardio coronary Arctic that gets all the publicity about stance and bypasses, but where those arteries go they all eventually died into the heart muscle. And I have a wonderful slide that I use in my presentation that is a picture of the heart without a scrap of muscle. It is just all vessels. And when you see these vessels once they died into the heart muscle. They also into digits and they're literally. On this slide there thousands of these vessels and use this to explain why it is that patients who go on type of program, let's suppose that they have a plaque in their EPA cardio artery. That is made. It's no one made of scar fibrosis accounts, the Asia, and this plan probably is not going to diminish very much at all even with limpets nutrition. That's about a quarter of patients when they plaque is new in young, and has made up of inflammation, fat and cholesterol. By does a remarkable job regressing it and yet I maintain that even those patients with plaque maybe remodeled very little infant any with very little effect at all on the cardio Clack yet. Those patients also can return to full activities of daily living without restriction. And here's why the book on my book in in the section. Pictures. You will see a pet scan pet scan that baseline if it's of the artery. She'll be the heart muscle is orange or yellow, and that's normal. But that little green patch is an area where there is very poor circulation. So we cancelled that patient at the time of that pets can and then three weeks later when he comes back repeat pet scan. Now, the green is gone. It's all refused. Now, look, we know that we have never washed out a plaque in the epithelial coronary artery, but in Sweden, and yet here that ardour that muscle is being rape refused..

EPA Wyatt Asia Sweden rape three weeks
"coronary artery disease" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"coronary artery disease" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"It is like broken glass inside your arteries that triggers plaque rupture clots form and creates the sudden crisis and sudden death and nicotine is one of the most lethal risk factors. I I recognize that it was up there. I had no idea that was that significant that it that is huge. And while we've made a lot of progress on smoking getting people to stop smoking. Now, we have all this stuff, but that's still nicotine. Yes. It certainly can be. And we don't know what those ingredients are if it's not nicotine. There are a lot. Chemicals. We're ingesting in our body that like nicotine is like broken glass and the whole theories about inflammation. If we adopt the anti inflammatory lifestyle, we can reduce our number one threat by a significant amount. And to your point with the nicotine, suddenly heart attack. We can lose our legs. So we can have strokes and many times, we don't die from this stroke, but our life certainly isn't the same as it was no Assad and then. Let's talk about diabetics because they're at huge high risk in the same type two diabetics. And then, you know, I've got a neighbor type one diabetic that. Unfortunately this year lost one. A large part of a foot. Okay. 'cause they weren't paying a lot of attention to the issue. And it got out of hand talk. About diabetics in the risk of stroke and heart attack to them. Diabetes epidemic as well. A lot of it is lifestyle. Most of it is lifestyle in adults. And when sugars are uncontrolled that irritates the lining of our blood vessels, constrict causes all these nasty risk factors that lead to our number one threat. So it is so important to create lifestyle strategies that reduce your blood sugars, even if you don't have have a history of a heart attack. But you're diabetic that's coronary artery disease equivalent. That you know. It's important for people to understand that interact and obesity and type two diabetes. Go hand in hand. So if they've got one there either at risk for number for the next one where they've already got it. Okay. And so you have to I think the most important thing that people take with mistake MS recognize the issue. None of this is rocket science. Okay. You don't have to kiss. Hi. I'm in the gym three times a week doing yoga apply. You don't have to do that. You can go walk. Take your dog out and go for a walk three or four times a week. Right. Right. You don't have to run a marathon here. Right. And if you think Arthur choices account for a third of our healthcare crisis. We have to be smart with what we're putting in our mouths, and that doesn't mean you can't have that -cational cheeseburger, even though doctor wants us when I say that. But you, but you have to pay attention. Okay. And you can't there can't be a steady diet of that stuff. You know, there has to be a diet that makes sense along with exercise in all the rest, but we come back from the break. I'm going to talk about what you should do. What are the symptoms? How often should you see your doctor about this at and where do you go? If you think you may have an issue..

nicotine Diabetes Assad obesity Arthur
"coronary artery disease" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"coronary artery disease" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"It is like broken glass inside your arteries that triggers plaque rupture clots form in creates the sudden crisis and sudden death and nicotine is one of the most lethal risk factors. I I recognize that it was up there. I had no idea that was that significant that it that is huge. And while we've made a lot of progress on smoking getting people to stop smoking. Now, we have all this vaping stuff. But that's all still nicotine. Yes. It certainly can be. And we don't know what those ingredients are if it's not nicotine. There are a lot. Chemicals were ingesting in our body that Mike nicotine is like broken glass in the whole theories about inflammation. If we adopt the anti inflammatory lifestyle, we can reduce our number one threat by a significant amount and to your point with the nicotine, heart attack. We can lose our legs. So we can have strokes and many times we don't die from this stroke, but our life certainly isn't the same as it was thought. Let's talk about diabetics because they're at huge high risk in the same type two diabetics. And then, you know, I've got a neighbor type one diabetic that. Unfortunately this year lost one. Large part of the foot. Okay. Because they weren't paying a lot of attention to the issue. And it got out of hand talk. About diabetics in the risk of stroke and heart attack to them. Diabetes epidemic as well. A lot of it is lifestyle. Most of it is lifestyle in adults. And when sugars are uncontrolled that irritates the lining of our blood vessels, constrict causes all these nasty risk factors that lead to our number one threat. So it is so important to create lifestyle strategies that reduce your blood sugars, even if you don't have a history of a heart attack your diabetic, that's coronary artery disease, equivalent know. You know, it's important for people to understand that interact and obesity and type two diabetes. Go hand in hand. So if they've got one there either at risk for number for the next one where they've already got it. Okay. And so you have to I think the most important thing that people take with mistake segments recognize the issue. None of this is rocket science. Okay. You don't have to. Okay. Hi. I'm in the gym three times a week doing yoga apply. You don't have to do that. You can go walk. Take your dog out and go for a walk three or four times a week. Right. Right. You don't have to run a marathon here. Right. And if you think our food choices account for a third of our healthcare crisis. We have to be smart with what we're putting in our mouths, and that doesn't mean you can't have that -cational cheeseburger, even though doctor wants us when I say that. But you, but you have to pay attention. Okay. And you can't there can't be a steady diet of that stuff. You know, there has to be a diet that makes sense along with exercise in all the rest, but we come back from the break. I'm going to talk about what you should do. What are the symptoms? How often should you see your doctor about this? And where do you go? If you think you may have an issue..

nicotine Mike nicotine Diabetes obesity
"coronary artery disease" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"coronary artery disease" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"You've ever had a heart attack or stroke quarterback coming you take, daily aspirin But sometimes you can have, side effects such as Heart bleeding GI bleeding, irritation of the stomach lining could affect your kidneys So let's, talk. About why aspirin is good so aspirin interferes with your blood clotting ability And so when somebody has a heart attack Many times what happens is there's tearing of the, wall of a blood vessel, feeding. The heart either the plaque rips off etc and so your body tries to stop that bleeding. Of the inside of the wall with platelets, so if you block some. Of your platelets it doesn't make that. Plug that's that later caused a blood clot the other thing also is your blood is a, little thinner when you do have clogged vessels the blood may. Be able to slip through a little bit So aspirin reduces the. Clumping active platelets preventing heart attack baking blood a little thinner So according to mayo clinic you need to be, on daily aspirin if you've had a, heart attack or stroke hands, down your risk if you haven't had a heart attack but you, have a stent put it to keep that coordinator, or if you've had bypass surgery if you have chest, pain to coronary artery disease if you have, angina if you've never, had heart attack, but you're at high risk because, family history if.

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"coronary artery disease" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"coronary artery disease" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"Welcome back welcome to that's top utrition talking about this standing debate between it's called the lipid hypothesis and it's a medical theory that asserts that a link the search a link between blood cholesterol levels and the occurrence of heart disease this has been going on for decades now a summary from one thousand nine hundred seventy six described it as measures used to lower the plasma lipids and patients with hyper demia will lead to reductions in new events of coronary heart disease close quote so in other words if you decrease the cholesterol decreasing blood cholesterol will will statistically significantly decrease or reduce your risk of coronary heart disease that seems like a reasonable hypothesis doesn't it now there's a accumulated evidence has led many to believe that the that the hypothesis is correct and many studies have confirmed the hypothesis many in the medical community believe that the hypothesis is valid although there are a minority or other group other people another group of people some say minority i don't know how many but contend that the evidence doesn't support that that mechanisms independent of blood cholesterol are responsible for heart disease well they're right about that in part there are many variables other than cholesterol high cholesterol that can cause heart disease high homocysteine levels for example high levels of stress alcohol tobacco i read my articles i wrote a ten part series on coronary artery disease coronary heart disease there are numerous modifiable risk factors and they're quite a few non modifiable risk factors age for example being one of them even ethnishity and your genetic inheritance so there are modifiable non modifiable risk they're right.

heart disease coronary artery disease
"coronary artery disease" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

The mindbodygreen Podcast

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"coronary artery disease" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

"And other conditions including many outside the brain like cancer diabetes coronary artery disease etc so i took a step back and ask well what is this sudden cause of inflammation in humans likely that hasn't been present in the past because clearly if we had experienced in our ancestral times the degree of degenerative conditions that we're experiencing now likely we might not be here to tell the tale so when we discovered that there was this unifying principle of inflammation from the latin inflaming meaning basically to light on fire underlying neurodegenerative conditions and for me that the neuro degenerative conditions like alzheimer's at cetera really made up the bulk of what i was doing took a step back and said well what is the literature that would help us understand what might be causing inflammation in humans and that led me to the understanding that i the most important shift in in the human lifestyle choice a paradigm over the past couple of hundred years has been a shift from diet that was fundamentally deriving its calories from fat protein and fiber to one that was focusing on higher levels of carbohydrates with the introduction a couple hundred years ago of more simplified or highly processed carbohydrates could that be playing a role in fanning the flames quite literally of inflammation and it began to look at that and realize that in fact when carbohydrates simple carbohydrates are ingested one would expect it to raise the blood sugar each sugar you're going to raise your blood sugar and in fact that is certainly quite evident what is the connection then between this elevator of the blood sugar which is now pervasive and this process of inflammation and i noted that there was lots of research going on.

alzheimer hundred years
"coronary artery disease" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"coronary artery disease" Discussed on KGO 810

"Mean biathlon again i'm crosscountry skiing and shooting alive shoes thirty awesome right curling you have this giant rock yeah and you're on ice and it's a little bit like horseshoes in that you're trying to get it is close to this one spot but then you've got this guy with like a brush or gal excuse me i'm not trying to be genderspecific here but a person who's trying to make them they're blue like wiping the ice to make a move faster they're trying to slow down they scrubbed the ice to make it a little rougher to slow it down i love curling sex shuffleboard on ice yes any thing to watch it's just weird right but do you ever whatever your these are not this is a sport a little bit like billiards where it's it's a lot of mental and there's a lot of kind of fine skills right it's not like weightlifting gross motor skills these are fine bitter skills yes so why would you used performance enhancing drugs why would you dope us medal count man you're the one who said that that was so important but how does doping help you with i i mean does do more than at improve your strength i mean i don't know that much about it but i'm sure it helps and other ways i mean that would be like you know amphetamines or something that you would maybe accounts as doping rv energy so that they could train longer or something like that but in this case this russian is accused of using mel doniama which is barely manufactured by a lot vehen pharmaceutical company according to according to a wicket pedia is posted his normally used to treat coronary artery disease so it helps with blood flow i'm.

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"coronary artery disease" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"coronary artery disease" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"To talk about it it's something called the calcium paradox and some people are an evil to properly distribute calcium to the bones and as a result calcium builds up in the arteries if you don't have vitamin k 2 you're going to accelerate coronary artery disease and bike celebrating coronary artery disease you are going to affect your heart it's going to lead to high blood pressure sure uh because not only does it affect the arteries of the hottest affects the arteries of the personal circulation as well so it deficiency in vitamin k 2 will absolutely cause you to develop accelerated atherosclerosis it will increase your risk of high blood pressure and those two things will undoubtedly lead to a term cold congestive heart failure where your heart will no longer be able to keep up with the demands of your body as you age and that will obviously lead to things like pulmonary hypertension pulmonary dima and and situations that can not only affect the arteries of your heart muscle your heart the blood vessels via body but think about it the process of aging vows with within our heart and there's something called a order stenosis for senile edict snow ceci order to notice that develops as we age it is a towel sophistication that harden's are valves leading to now one of the most concerning things because our population is reaching '70s and '80s '90s and and i gotta tell you the problem that happens to the heart if you don't develop a heart attack is an accelerated hardening of the valve apparatus with the aorta valve or or the mitral valve caesar valves in our hearts that need to stay pliable just like our arteries me say probably but we don't think about our vows as deteriorating as raging but if you don't keep those uh those uh valves actually pliable you have to then undergo things like the audit valve replacement are open openheart surgery and who wants to have.

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"coronary artery disease" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"coronary artery disease" Discussed on WDRC

"Family history of premature coronary artery disease uh a big waistline otherwise known as central bc higher body mass index high cholesterol smoking will these were all predictors of gordon urgency coronary artery disease but to a lesser extent than male pattern baldness premature greying followed by obesity so wha wha wha wha wha how you know for forget all it it's rotation blood tests imaging uh just look at a guy and uh you know bald is beautiful one guy shaved their heads kind of a fashion statement above years gray and your balding early it would it not necessarily that you're going to have heart disease but you have a much higher risk of heart disease so perhaps who you need a checkup and check it out all right uh this is an interview that too i did this week with professor robert dieleman mushrooms are full of antioxidants the may have antiageing potential uh this guy is professor emeritus of food science director of the penn state senator for plant and mushroom products for health what a concept there's an entire universitybased center for study of the health benefits of mushrooms and this guy is a mushroom maven we interviewed him for a podcast that will probably post next week you can downloaded from dr hopping dot com or from i tunes stitcher your favorite i toot service as image last hour week crossed a huge milestone or thanksgiving uh we reached.

body mass index obesity director senator gordon professor robert dieleman food science
"coronary artery disease" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"coronary artery disease" Discussed on WDRC

"Cover this hour uh the fda cleared his first medical device accessory for the apple watch and it's really a duisi share that with you in just a moment and a new technique for dealing with gird and no it's not a supplement it's a natural way of effectively dealing with gird and you never suspect you'd never suspect with that is but before we get to that interesting study out of india which suggests that you can just look at a male and determine their risk for cardiovascular disease and no one not talking about looking at their waistline hey it's from the neck up male pattern baldness and premature grain were associated with the risk of early heart disease what's interesting is that yell v city as a risk factor for heart disease clearly but turned out the mail pattern baldness independently but particularly when simultaneous with premature greying was actually the best predictor of cardiovascular disease before the age of forty according the study male pattern baldness and premature greying or says he with a more than five fold risk of heart disease before the age of forty um flu researchers analyzed the correlation between premature gray hair and balding with the complexity and severity of angiographic lesions followers words they didn't ngo grams to look at how much gunk was in a coronary arteries of these guys and what they found was that uh young men with corner artery disease had a higher prevalence of premature grade half of them had premature grain versus thirty percent who didn't have coronary artery disease has a.

india coronary artery disease apple thirty percent
"coronary artery disease" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"coronary artery disease" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"The traditional risk factors family history of premature coronary artery disease uh a big waistline otherwise known as central be city higher body mass index high cholesterol smoking will these were all predictors of gorter arges coronary artery disease but to a lesser extent than male pattern baldness premature greying followed by obesity so wha wha wha wha wha how you know for frigate all it it's rotation blood tests imaging just look at a guy hey on uh you know bald is beautiful god knows jp their heads kind of a fashion statement above years gray and you balding early eight year old is not necessarily that you're going to have heart disease but you have a much higher risk of heart disease so perhaps you need a checkup and check it out all right this is an interview that uh i did this week with professor robert bilman mushrooms are full of antioxidants to me of anti aging potential of this guy is professor emeritus of food science the director of the penn state senator for plant in mushroom products for health what concept there's an entire universitybased center for study of the health benefits of mushrooms and this guy is a mushroom maven we interviewed him for.

body mass index obesity food science director senator professor robert bilman eight year
"coronary artery disease" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"coronary artery disease" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"And lots of stories to cover this hour the fda's cleared his first medical device accessory for the apple watch and it's really a duisi share that with you in just a moment and a new technique for dealing with gird and no it's not a supplement it's a natural way of effectively dealing with gird and you never suspect you'd never suspect with that is but before we get to that interesting study out of india which suggests that you could just look at a male and determine their risk for cardiovascular disease and no one not talking about looking at their waistline it's from the neck up male pattern baldness and premature greying were associated with the risk of early heart disease what's interesting is that yell be city is a risk factor for heart disease clearly but turned out that meal pattern baldness independently but particularly when simultaneous with premature greying was actually the best predictor of cardiovascular disease before the age of forty according the study male pattern baldness and premature agreeing or associated with a more than five fold risk of heart disease before the age of forty flu researchers analyzed the correlation between premature gray hair and balding with the complexity and severity of angiographic lesions other words they didn't ngo grams to look at how much gump there was in a coronary arteries of these guys and what they found was that the young men with corner artery disease had a higher prevalence are premature grade half of them had premature grain verses thirty percent who didn't have coronary artery disease has as a significant difference.

fda india coronary artery disease apple thirty percent
"coronary artery disease" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"coronary artery disease" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"A l i what is interesting they say people was certain blood types are increase risk for a heart attack from pollution they say people with coronary artery disease waft led the blood or aig blood types are more likely than those with all plus type they have a heart attack one of the deposed levels of smart small tick particulate p m two point five air pollution evidently that's described by the us epa as inhalable particles with the diameter of two point five micrometres or smaller they said most people won't have a heart attack unless have coronary artery disease and that's where we have the clogging of the arteries with arteriosclerotic plaques in a uh uh fat in calcium build up and fiber build up that make this plaque along the into balinese so you're not going to have a heart attack on the blue they say they'll give you have coronary artery disease you can't and they say he'll have to have other characteristics for coronary disease progress to a harder to us but the association between heart attacks of pollution in patients with a non old blood is over it's something to be aware of now remember there was the american heart association annual meeting that's been going on in anaheim california this was another study that came out of that we begin a lot of needles cooper on hearts and heart attacks in fact one of the american heart association presidents from set a heart attack while he was at the meeting and had to get a stent procedure put in a stent put in to keep the art reopen he said he's don't find is with his family's doing fine but wild so they say research present at the meeting should be considered and the american heart association has more the health effects of air pollution but.

coronary artery disease american heart association anaheim california epa five micrometres
"coronary artery disease" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

WVNJ 1160 AM

02:35 min | 4 years ago

"coronary artery disease" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

"And what happened was a decrease in serum levels of triglycerides and ldl cholesterol and this time it was not in healthy people it was in people that had coronary artery disease so we've talked about long healthy people we've talked about older people some healthy some not and now we're talking about people that actually have coronary artery disease and the benefit was reduction of triglycerides and ldl cholesterol so this is something that is uh uh really important it was a hundred people and they had metabolic syndrome and it was a thousand milligram dose of curcumin and it was an eight week treatment period so this was done in a hospital it was only thirty three people um but they all had coronary artery disease and there is a significant reduction in serum levels of ldl and triglycerides there is also decrease in something called the l d l or very low density lippo proteins that are arguably even more dangerous than ld out so what we're talking about here are benefits to the health of the lining of the blood vessel benefits to enhancement of the the arteries to be able to dilate expand in response to pulses of blood flow because that's what we're talking about when we have arterial stiffness we end up with high blood pressure because what happens is bofill trying to push the blood through but if you've lost the us gift city then the blood vessel doesn't dial late and with each beat of the heart this pulse of blood volume is coming through pushing against these stiff blood vessels the heart work harder when that happens blood pressure elevates when that half pence so when you have a good healthy blood vessel when you have good healthy tissue lining the blood vessel you're less reactive two stressors on that i mentioned that high fat meals the double cheeseburger with.

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