23 Burst results for "Cornwell"

"cornwell" Discussed on No Laying Up

No Laying Up

03:18 min | 2 weeks ago

"cornwell" Discussed on No Laying Up

"I mean probably so Again this is just me. Speculating really I think that more people would have gone to stanford had it not been for covid. I really do. I think that there are a lot of people who were who had been talked to about having positions and then that number when cova kit just kept getting smaller and smaller and smaller and smaller and it really is a very A small step. But i you know a lot of people who because of that. I think lost their jobs in terms of the financial decisions behind it again. I i was so out of the loop all of last year. Even though people kept saying oh i you know i saw you on tv. I feel like i see you on. Tv all the time. It was the most out of your that. I've ever had. Because i only work ten events and i was never in the building so i wasn't part of the normal discussions that i would have been before just because of the demotion from full-time To freelance i know i did a really bad job because i just wish that. I wish that i had number one m More insight and maybe a little bit more intellect to be able to to go into the economics of it. That i you know they're obviously the move to stanford and consolidating everything Yeah i mean look the rights. These are through the roof i mean. Pga tour sees value and there is value so yeah. I think that that that had a huge impact. Well no it was. It was on my list of something to ask you about and but it also speaks to like you said the kind of being checked out within this past year or out of the loop it. It all fits into a lot of the other stuff that we've covered tonight but on that. No i'm gonna. I'm gonna let you guys out of here finally i. I really really appreciate you taking the time answering all our questions and sharing your story and i i we will have to do another podcast in the future. That's a more fun. Perhaps we can just talk tiger wood's stories so yeah well christmas slamming first of all you've get a meal out of space to talk so thank you for that and I really you know. I haven't been that connected with you all before but certainly have always been a fan from the sidelines and even bigger fan. Now i have a lot of a lot of respect for you so reaching out to me i. I can't tell you how much it it means to me that you gave me a platform to share my story. It's speaks volumes about you. Speak volumes about no laying up and and how much you all have invested in the game and you should be proud of that. 'cause i'm i'm from club beater right club today. That's better than most about. It is better than most most expecting..

stanford
"cornwell" Discussed on No Laying Up

No Laying Up

05:33 min | 2 weeks ago

"cornwell" Discussed on No Laying Up

"Talk about some of the highlights of your time of golf channel and specifically interested in reading and stuff hearing about your affinity one for nancy lopez to someone like nick faldo. Faldo's well i guess what. What were you know some of the highlights of of this job in terms of things you've gotten to do and and the things that you look back on the most fondly. I mean they're alive being an outside observer and a and a little girl who loved the game so much and wanting to be like these people. That's all that i drain about. When i was a kid not to be talking about golf the plane it so you know to go to dinner. And as you mentioned next to nick. Faldo who after. Nancy lopez when i started taking lessons from better Nick was in his prime and he was taking lessons. From ledbetter and nick price. I still say the best iron player i've ever seen in person to you know jam. Stevenson was taken from ledbetter. David frost i mean david. Would you know this is back when ledbetter had a trailer late known i didn't even have a full complex because he was just getting known and the gulf world and you know to really sort of dive into that world and get to know those people who you idolize for so long it'd be able to pick their brains. I mean a funny story. And i love curtis strange now but we were in a. He was working to see me group tour championship. I believe for espn and we had golf. Channel had the early taverns. Espn had the later coverage. And i'm in a trailer with curtis and my only background with curtis strange was when i was i think. Thirteen years old in that says and he was on the putting green played horribly. That day. i didn't know you know. He was frustrated. I asked him for an autograph and he said he said no. And i joked with them in the trailer said you know. You're the only person i've ever asked for an autograph. And they said no and they asked me that day. If i wanted it and i said yes i said yep you know maybe autograph give it to me and it's just stories like that you know i mean just these people you look up to and admire so much and then just being able to talk with them. Yeah i just didn't see your your. I think your twitter pictures you chatting laughing up with tiger woods is the things you do you know in this in. This industry is Can be can be kinda shocking. I wanna say this. 'cause i you know. Tiger grew up and we were really good friends and loved his data. Love colonel woods. And i'm so proud of him i mean. I'm glad that that photos on there. 'cause you know shows us laughing but i just want to say this out loud even during tiebreakers tumultuous days when those things were going on to watch where he is now from what he went through publicly having to deal with everything and you know owning it and becoming a better person i to this day. He's one of the people with a list of people in this world that i'm the most proud of he would be top five on that list and that that photo always takes me back to childhood because it's just two friends sitting there laughing and i'm so happy for where he is. I'd like to think that i'm i'm usually very well prepared for these things but i had no idea you guys were you guys. Were childhood friends. I need to think i to the origination of that. Well i'll tell you this story entire and our laughing about it a year or so ago and it was because aj jay we played on cannon cop and quite a lot of these team events that tiger and i would play a lotta practice rooms together. And a lotta times we would get in late. And i you know one of the memories best memories my dad and i. I'm hoping arkansas at my parents house. I still remember the skinny kid wearing these yellow walkman. You know back in the day and drinking diet dr pepper but we were in the window ones texas and we played a nine hole practice round together. It was late everybody else's practice we're on the range and we're sitting there hitting balls and all of a sudden i feel the stump on my back and i went back and colonel woods is there and you know just sitting in his little foldout chair that he always had so i hit another shot and tiger hits the shot and i feel the stump again and i look back at colonel woods. And he's just kind of looking at me and you did not. I mean i would not want to get in a staring contest with colonel woods. So finally i kind of whispered to tiger. I said i think your dad's sterling time comes at me. Any looked back at his dad. And he goes yeah. I probably doesn't like how you're practicing. So i just. I went back to curdle. Woods that i was like. What am i doing wrong. And he was right he i was. He thought that was hitting balls way too fast and so he was trying to get every shot matter and he had this. Long talk with me is like watch tiger watch. How does this is like i. You know. I have to teach all you kids how to do it but he was great and you know just memories like that that are forever ingrained in you. It's meals always be a kid. Well no i. I think we maybe part. Two of this podcast. Be all your all your tiger wood's stories that you can that you can tell us a quick break here to remind you that this that this weekend is the first golf tournament of the new year. And there's no better place to get in the action. The draftking sportsbook. America's top rated sportsbook app in addition to this weekend's golf tournament..

nancy lopez colonel woods Faldo ledbetter curtis golf nick faldo nick price David frost Stevenson aj jay espn nick Espn Nick david twitter dr pepper arkansas
"cornwell" Discussed on No Laying Up

No Laying Up

06:02 min | 2 weeks ago

"cornwell" Discussed on No Laying Up

"Podcast features and interview with lisa. Cornwell formerly of the golf channel. Lisa's made several tweets since her employment ended at golf channel. Alleging mistreatment while being employed there. us here no laying. We followed along golf. Channels made serious changes over the past year or so and we often comment a lot. On telecast and golf is presented to fans and found this to be a permanent story for our listeners. Joining lisa on the podcast is her attorney. Tom marrs. Tom doesn't speak Until late in the interview in lisa asks him to speak specifically on a few legal matters. within the case. You'll hear those answers on the back half of this episode. We'd of course like to note that this is one side of the story. This is lisa side and considering the nature of the statements made by leeson tom. We reached out to golf channel and offered them the opportunity to comment. They declined to comment understatements based on how i summarize them in email. And lastly before we get going. I'm sure you saw the news today. one of the worst kept secrets in golf. Is that jon. Rahm is joining the callaway golf professional staff number two ranked player in the world. He will officially make his calloway. Staff debut this week at the century tournament champions with callaway prototype woods prototype irons jaws forged wedges and a chrome soft x golf ball in his bag. Neil whitest did make the press release. But neil and i are getting ready to play tournament right now with the same exact golf ball. Rahm actually used calloway and odyssey equipment at arizona state where he won eleven tournaments while playing for head coach. Tim mickelson second most wins in school history behind fellow. Calloway staffer phil mickelson. Rahm says i have a huge amount of confidence with my new clubs especially the golf ball which has really impressed me during the testing process. So join us. In welcoming jon rahm to the callaway golf team. For more information you can go to callaway golf dot com slash. John dash rom. That's callaway golf. Dot com slash. John dash rahm without any further delay. Let's get to our interview with lisa. Cornwell all right. We've got a lot to chat about today. lisa. I want to know i though the super tough question of course we got to hear about your background in golf. How you and how you ended up at the golf channel Welfare smokers. Thanks for having me Guys have done a great thing in golf different stuff which. I think everybody appreciates my background. I mean how long do you have. I keep getting older so the story. The story keeps getting longer I started playing golf at five. And you know like so. Many people just threw up at a little club. That in arkansas and fell in love with the gang mean. Get there early in the morning and stay until after the sunset. The put the headlights on the car. And sit there and putt. Unfortunately it didn't make me great putter. You know we did everything that we could. I grew up playing age aga People are still my really close friends and you know. I've seen a lot of my friends that i grew up playing with great success. Which been really cool. And you know it's interesting. I've always been a sports fan Two point where. I got really burned out and honestly hated the game which i never thought would happen. You know from where i was especially in my mid to late teens but there was something about you know try after. I always wanted to be professional golfer in trying to figure out what in the world i wanted to do with my life after. I knew that was gone because that love wasn't there anymore. I always kind of equate. It was going through a divorce in a weird way. I went through a divorce when i was eighteen years old. But you know as i was a pre law major i. My sister and my dad were in sales. My mom's in the medical field. And i have absolutely no idea what i wanna do in my life so i i dabble around with things and make a long story short. I had friends who worked in a local the local tv station in little rock arkansas. And i went into that environment and just the camaraderie and the time crunch and the pressure the adrenaline all. That reminded me of playing sports. And i thought. I wanna do this so after already gotten my degree in pre law went back and got a minor burqa journalism. My family thought. I was crazy. 'cause i took a forty thousand dollar pay cut. I mean i'm in my late twenties. And i go to columbus mississippi making eighteen thousand dollars to start this crazy career sports. And i go there. I'm in knoxville tennessee. Cincinnati ohio the big ten network starts in close proximity. So i'm with them for many many years on my many. That sounds great. I was five years so it wasn't many years and then all of a sudden move back to little rock and got back into college football and doing some things and got my love for off fact and i never thought i'd worked at about channel i never wanted to. I hated the game. That much of it is just so disinterested in it. And i finally hired an agent and he said this jobs open and started playing golf again and i was ready and it just happened and the timing worked out really well. Well i wanted to but in about five different at different times there. You're moving too fast onto the tv. And now i want to hear more about this dolphin burnout thing. That's interesting perspective. I feel like. I hear the words burn out a lot when it comes to junior players. Top junior players. If i may say you were a little a little humble about you know your accomplishments in the game of golf at a young age but burnout is not an uncommon thing. I guess to say say hated the game though. I feel a bit something that people aren't willing to say. But i'm curious as to if you have any kind of looking back at it. What caused burn out. You know you hear a lot about people. Recommending young junior players play other sports and whatnot to help encourage that not to happen. But how did you end up hating the game of golf. You know chris because the weird thing for me in this job and you know 'cause you guys are out there and you get to meet a lot of these people that.

golf lisa Rahm Cornwell Tom marrs leeson tom Neil whitest Tim mickelson jon rahm John dash John dash rahm calloway phil mickelson Calloway callaway Lisa arkansas jon neil Tom
John le Carre, who probed murky world of spies, dies at 89

Sunday Standards

00:29 sec | Last month

John le Carre, who probed murky world of spies, dies at 89

"John Luke Array has died in England. The Curry's books include the Spy who Came in From the Cold, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier Spy and Smiley's People. He wrote tales of espionage because he actually was a spy for the British intelligence. His real name was David Cornwell. And he wrote under the name John le Carre because his employer told him he had to publish under a pseudonym. Caray once said he did not write thrillers. He just wrote about what he wanted to write about. Marty's Szaroleta and cool Akari was 89.

John Luke David Cornwell Tinker Curry Smiley England John Le Carre Caray Marty Akari
Agent: Master spy writer John le Carre dies at 89

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last month

Agent: Master spy writer John le Carre dies at 89

"Novelist John le Carre has died in Cornwall in southwest England after short illness unrelated to covert nineteen he was eighty nine I marches are a little with a look at his career John le Carre's books include the spy who came in from the cold Tinker tailor soldier spy and smiley's people he wrote tales of espionage because he actually was a spy for the British intelligence his real name is David Cornwell and he wrote under the name John lecarre because his employer told him he had to publish under a pseudonym the Caribbean said he did not write thrillers he just wrote about what he wanted to write about

John Lecarre Cornwall David Cornwell England Smiley Caribbean
Rippers Left Hand

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:34 min | Last month

Rippers Left Hand

"I'm your host kit crumb. today jack. the ripper left hand. There are certain mysteries stand out and remain known. Answer what happened to amelia earhart. How did panamerican huge flying boat. Hawaii clipper disappeared without a trace. And who was jack. The ripper between august and november eighteen eighty eight. At least six women were murdered in london's white chapel district but it was the gruesome nature the murders that brought about panic and fear in the area for months finally spreading like the plague across london. Where the press picked up on the cereal aspects of the deaths and dubbed the killer. Jack the ripper. There are currently dozens of organizations that debate the evidence surrounding the eighteen eighty eight white chapel murders attributed to jack the ripper. There is speculation that there were two killers. Some experts attribute six victims to jack. The ripper others say eleven the list of suspects exceeds five hundred ranging from royalty to doctors and one jill the ripper as of this writing the number of nonfiction books on jack. The ripper is closing in on two hundred and that's nonfiction without a doubt the most highly publicized rip book to come out in recent years was written by patricia. Cornwell portrait of a killer. Jack the ripper case closed cornwell claims to have found dna evidence linking walter skirt to a small number of ripper letters. Her book rapidly climbed the bestseller list and was the subject of numerous radio and television programs around the world. Cornwell may have found evidence to suggest that walter skirt hoechst one more ripple letters but the fact remains said skirt was in france on the night of at least four of the five ripper murders. He was not jack. The ripper. cornwell use twenty-first-century technology including dna to come up with skirt as jack the ripper. Even though as mentioned he was in france during a number of the murders on the other hand james tully author of the book prisoner eleven. Sixty seven. The mad man. Who was jack. The ripper spent over thirty years investigating the white chapel murders totally poses many questions about criminally insane inmate. James kelly who escaped from broadmoor criminal lunatic asylum and evaded capture for over forty years specifically question. Why prisoner eleven. Sixty seven's government files are still classified and will remain sealed until twenty thirty. That's an interesting secret. Finally no collection of books on the why chapel murders would be complete without the thousand nine hundred ninety five volume jack the ripper. Serial killer this highly research books speculation. Jack the ripper may have been an american. Dr francis tumblety who had a criminal record and both sides of the atlantic and in fact was arrested. Eighteen eighty eight as a suspect in the white chapel murders. Their theory is based on a recent discovery of a letter written by a scotland yard. Inspector authors stuart evans and paul gainey claim that jack the ripper died in nineteen three when tumble tease heart stopped. Shortly after i finish the research for the story. I received a letter with a fingerprint. At the top that the author ledge was taken off one of the letters received by scotland yard and determined to be from the thumb of the left. Hand of jack the ripper. He claimed the original was among the files of broadmoor criminal lunatic asylum prisoner. Eleven sixty seven which would remain sealed until twenty thirty. The letter was signed anonymous and curiously there was no postmark. The letter seemed validate author. James tolleys assertion. That james kelly's files were classified. But if at the time of the murders scotland yard had acquired the killer's fingerprint. Wideout make an arrest if however the print is that of james kelly. Why not say so.

Jack The Ripper Jack Cornwell Hoechst Amelia Earhart London Walter James Tully White Chapel Broadmoor Criminal Lunatic Asy Plague Hawaii France James Kelly Jill Dr Francis Tumblety Patricia Skirt Stuart Evans
"cornwell" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:43 min | Last month

"cornwell" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"To the business anywhere, So I finished one with the song. Keep running because this is kind of how we feel tonight. So, Yeah, um, anyway, Well, if you want to send us questions, you have any comment You like to make Um, about what we talk about her like this, And it's a story. We always of stories and like hearing people, you can send my get a good one. You could send them to actually business people show dot com Or you can go to our website business. Beware show dot com and see some Oh, a bunch of stuff. I'm not even going to list. Not even staying at least love up. Yeah, exactly. Well, you know, Speaking of love ups This might be one s O. This is a former Marine that was fired from a job for lowering the flag on Memorial Day. So basically he went to put the American flying half staff Moral today a memorial day, Alan Cornwell 29 was thinking about his best friend, a former Marine who had said he killed himself two years ago when he returned from the U. S. And so Basically he put the flag down. I believe he worked for Time Warner Cable something so right? Yes. Yeah, And so am I. But they Ended up firing him. Over that. It's just I'm really don't even know that I really have words for that. I mean, honestly, like I read this and I think. Oh, my gosh, This is crazy. Well, then you're telling me that this is the first time it's happened? I'm going. Why? Why is this fine lot of keep happening, You know. You know, and You don't get me started on this. You know, we live in a country where.

Time Warner Cable Alan Cornwell
A Big Publishing Plot Twist: Penguin Random House to Buy Simon & Schuster for $2.2 Billion

Business Wars Daily

05:09 min | Last month

A Big Publishing Plot Twist: Penguin Random House to Buy Simon & Schuster for $2.2 Billion

"Biggest news to hit the publishing industry this year. Possibly several years happened last wednesday. And we're betting that you missed it after all. You were probably contemplating cooking a turkey for two and planning zoom thanksgiving dinners with relatives right so just in case here. It is again the parent company of penguin random house's buying simon and schuster for two billion dollars penguin random house or pr h has already america's largest book publisher according to the new york times. Should the acquisition go through and there are some caveats which will get to pr. H will be. The industry's first mega publisher. The times claims. Let's delve into this just a little bit as we've talked about here before simon and shuster is among the oldest of today's big five publishing houses and one of the most distinguished dick simon and schuster founded the company in nineteen twenty four. The partners first product was hardly a literary masterpiece. It was a book of crossword puzzles. And according to simon and schuster's corporate historian it was a runaway bestseller today. Almost one hundred years. After the lowly crossword puzzle got the entrepreneurial venture off the ground simon and schuster or s operates in a different stratosphere. Today it is america's third largest publisher over the years it's published scads of famous even legendary authors including ernest hemingway and f scott fitzgerald also political figures from both sides of the aisle including jimmy carter hillary clinton and donald trump and contemporary authors. Like bob woodward stephen king and anti prue as well as judy blume s prints and authors have won fifty seven pulitzer prizes and innumerable other literary awards including several caldecott medals one of the highest honors given to children's books the company now sells about two thousand titles annually all told s and s takes in close to nine hundred million dollars a year but early this year. Parent company viacom. Cbs decided to go all in on streaming video in sports looking to cut close to a billion dollars in operating expenses ceo. Bob bakish announced that s wasn't what he called a core asset hence the sale in march the rumored price for us and s was one point two billion dollars a bidding. Were hike the final price to two point. Two billion dollars among other contenders america's second largest publisher harpercollins also vivendi. A french company. That owns a stake in. American publisher has yet and rupert murdoch's news corp clearly penguin random house's parent german media giant bertelsmann was willing to pay top dollar for s and s one reason in addition to the competition between publishers for blockbuster bestsellers the big five face. A formidable rival in certain amazon and when it comes to fighting off amazon size matters since two thousand nine amazon has been a publisher. Not just the world's largest both retailer today. It has sixteen imprints that publish everything from thrillers. To romance novels it signs. Top selling authors like dean koontz patricia. Cornwell taking them and their millions of sales away from traditional publishers in two thousand seventeen amazon published more than twelve hundred titles according to the wall street journal if those numbers have grown in the last three years amazon could well already rival simon and schuster for the volume of new works. It's producing what makes amazon such a tough competitor is a book publisher of course is it status as a bookseller. Moreover it has a number of marketing weapons that traditional publishers. Do not such as the ability to easily promote low priced e books to millions of amazon prime members and kindle owners. The wall street journal reports that along with oodles of cash to lure away big name authors as the largest american publisher penguin. Random house has the clout and logistical network to compete successfully with amazon. The merged company would have annual revenues of three billion dollars according to book industry bible publishers. Weekly but we should note here. The acquisition faces obstacles worthy of an epic novel authors and agents represented by the authors guild. Say such a deal will make it even harder for new authors and so called mid list writers to get published meaning. If you haven't written a blockbuster or a solid backlist title your chances to get published and your earnings could shrink. Pr h says. Simon and schuster will remain editorially independent and both publishing houses say they remain devoted to readers and writers still publishers weekly reports that by blending s. npr h german-owned. Bertelsmann would own about one third of the us book market. That's the number that could trigger antitrust. Investigators to closely scrutinize the deal. According to the new york times but those market share numbers are in dispute in both directions. The authors guild which causes tie up says a combined. Pr h. s. would wind up publishing half of all trade books in the us. Meaning not textbooks penguin. Random house's leadership argues not true and says future market share would be less than twenty percent and that an antitrust investigation is unlikely what happens next will likely hinge on which of these numbers comes closest to reality

Penguin Random House Schuster Amazon Dick Simon Simon F Scott Fitzgerald United States Bob Bakish News Corp Random House Shuster Judy Blume Bob Woodward Dean Koontz Patricia
Jacks left hand

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:34 min | 7 months ago

Jacks left hand

"I'm your host. Kit, crumb. Today. Jack The ripper left hand. There are certain mysteries. Stand out and remain known answer. What happened to Amelia Earhart? How did Panamerican huge flying? Boat Hawaii Clipper disappeared without a trace and who was jack the ripper. Between August and November eighteen, eighty eight, at least six women were murdered in London's White Chapel district. But it was the gruesome nature, the murders that brought about panic and fear in the area for months finally spreading like the plague across London where the press picked up on the cereal, aspects of the deaths and dubbed the killer Jack The ripper. There are currently dozens of organizations that debate evidence surrounding the eighteen eighty eight white chapel murders attributed to Jack. The, ripper. There is speculation that there were two killers. Some experts attribute six victims to Jack The ripper. Others say eleven. The list of suspects exceeds five hundred ranging from royalty to doctors and one jill the ripper. As of this writing the number of nonfiction books on Jack, The ripper is closing in on two hundred and that's nonfiction. Without a doubt, the most highly publicized rip book to Come Out in recent years was written by Patricia Cornwell portrait of a killer Jack The ripper case closed. Cornwell claims to have found DNA evidence linking Walter Skirt to a small number of ripper letters. Her book rapidly climbed the Bestseller List and was the subject of numerous radio and television programs around the World Cornwell may have found evidence to suggest that Walter Skirt hoechst one more ripple letters, but the fact remains said skirt was in France on the night of at least four of the five ripper murders was not jack the ripper cornwell use twenty-first-century technology, including DNA to come up with skirt as Jack. Jack The ripper even though as mentioned. He was in France during a number of the murders on the other hand. James Tully author of the Book Prisoner Eleven Sixty, seven, the mad man who was Jack The ripper spent over thirty years, investigating the white chapel murders totally poses many questions about criminally insane inmate James Kelly who escaped from Broadmoor criminal lunatic asylum and evaded capture for over forty years. Specifically question why prisoner eleven sixty seven's government files are still classified and will remain sealed until twenty thirty. That's an interesting secret. Finally no collection of books on the why chapel murders would be complete without the nineteen hundred ninety volume Jack The ripper, first American serial killer. This highly research books speculation Jack The ripper may have been an American doctor Francis Tumblety who had a criminal record, and both sides of the Atlantic, and in fact was arrested eighteen, eighty, eight as a suspect in the white chapel murders. Their, theory is based on a recent discovery of a letter written by a Scotland Yard inspector. Authors Stuart Evans Paul. Gainey claim that Jack The ripper died in nineteen three, when tumble tease heart stopped shortly after I finish the research for the story, I received a letter with a fingerprint at the top that the author Ledge was taken off one of the letters received by Scotland Yard and determined to be from the thumb of the left hand of Jack the, ripper, he claimed the original was among the files of Broadmoor, criminal lunatic asylum prisoner eleven sixty seven, which would remain sealed until twenty thirty. The letter was signed anonymous, and curiously there was no postmark. The letter seemed validate author James. tolleys assertion that James Kelly's files were classified. But if at the time of the murders Scotland Yard had acquired the killer's fingerprint wind up, make an arrest. If however the print is that of James. Kelly was not say so.

Jack The James Kelly Walter Skirt Patricia Cornwell White Chapel District Scotland Yard White Chapel France Broadmoor Amelia Earhart London Francis Tumblety James James Tully Stuart Evans Bestseller List Atlantic Gainey James.
"cornwell" Discussed on Heartland Radio 2.0

Heartland Radio 2.0

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"cornwell" Discussed on Heartland Radio 2.0

"Don't think they're going after. That fucking lady called me now across from prison stupid the Patricia Cornwell just like that. I looked at Pitcher Cromwell. Why would they call you that? I don't know damn it had something you did get Cornwell do know them. Do you still talk talk to them. Yeah well it's called my brother's call them too big call right now and it gives eat the number on Sunday. I don't think they're up. I understand that these guys are night. Owls they you know I just got off at fucking Boston sand and gravel take the local fucking silly Cornell idiots yeah again I just don't think they're named after some female author but we can go okay all right. So what's your what's your better explanation. I don't have a fucking guys just made up. A woman's name started callers last last name. Patricia Crow oddly similar to Patricia Cornwell. I didn't even know who Patricia Cornwell was it for Matt Patricia. Now this before did they combine two names to other people. I've got to figure this out. Now I'm fucking curious. You're curious I I natty for years for all of our school participated on the team trailing way before the way before I call it team nick nickname not once nicknamed.

Patricia Cornwell Patricia Crow Matt Patricia Pitcher Cromwell Boston nick Cornell
"cornwell" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

14:12 min | 1 year ago

"cornwell" Discussed on Amanpour

"NFL mccown find the body can we get to why you think one pitch struck one swing of the bat and turn to ties of October tbs is the home of the two thousand Nineteen National League postseason we're going to turn next to a very timely new book this one a novel and a short fine new hit by the much-loved Crime Writer Patricia Cornwell Nope Coldwell is best known for her hugely successful series featuring the intrepid medical examiner case Scoppetta but after writing forty yes in three decades with two thousand nine New York Times bestsellers the American author was ready to walk away from that lucrative career until inspiration Russian for a whole new series sparked by the idea of female James Bond lowered cornwell out of the morgue and into space after two years typically arduous research plumbing every corner of the highly secretive NASA facilities across the country Cornwell is out with her first book of the New Frontier. is featuring aspiring astronaut and cyber investigator captain Kelly Chase it is called quantum and when we spoke here in London she shared with me how about finding a whole new story to Tell Patricia Cornwell welcome to the program it's my great pleasure to be here when you have this whole new franchise onto the title of your latest book and it's about space and it's a departure of e from the subject matter of your previous books but I form is at this stage in your highly successful yeah something like more than one hundred million books sold in more than one hundred twenty countries around the world you could be relaxing taking in the royalties white again now why are you starting off again well it takes one to know one because I think people like US everywhere we go there's a story to be told and I think some of us were put here be the ones who tell those stories who put a face on something like you when you go to all these far flung places that I'd be scared to go to and you put a face on it if I go into space right take you in the org when the forensic labs I'm putting a face on these things and that is what we're here to do because if we don't do this who's going to do it and if we don't have stories we don't know who we were are we don't know who we are and we don't know how to behave you are actually known for the incredible amount of research you do I think you said it's also scary I mean this this process was a bit scary you well it's it's mind weathering because I always tell people never forget I'm an English major you know I dropped science I couldn't I can't do math I have no sense of direction yet I'm a pilot I'm scared of the water but I'm a scuba diver you do stuff because you have to learn these things but it is mine withering these people are so freaking smart that work in these fields and they're dealing with things that are very abstract it's hard for us to comprehend that we live in a world we're almost anything can allow you to be spied on and furthermore that you can remotely do catastrophic damage talks about your protagonist Kelly tell me who she is how you come to Kelly chase a captain chase works at NASA Langley she's in charge of cyber investigations for their police but she's not curricular cop a main she's a quantum scientists quantum physicist and a test pilot she was gotten to the cyberworld and military police but the thing with with Kelly and her twin sister is from the get go they have been raised by these NASA parents and this guy who ends up being the commander of Space Force they've been groomed sorta be the ultimate new kind of James Bond type thing S- people who go into space but it's militarized because it's going to be we're already headed that way and you're dealing with the unseen world of electromagnetic energy radio waves how satellite communications stuff that may sound boring but you think it doesn't affect you try to get up tomorrow morning with GPS knocked out all over the world and see how things go for you let me just play this sound bite is actually you basically the institute during some doing some of the research we're going to display this.

Nineteen National League NFL three decades one pitch two years
"cornwell" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

19:51 min | 1 year ago

"cornwell" Discussed on Amanpour

"Hello everyone and welcome to on for here's what's coming up one year later what have we learned about who ordered the brutal killing of Jamal Kashogi very believe with medium to high confidence by the Saudi crown prince probably I said I'm not doing any more books Patricia Cornwell joins me one of the world's most successful writers jumping back into the fray and outer space and from Syria to Benghazi to Russian election interference former national security adviser Susan Rice on trump and unsolved problems. left behind by President Obama welcome to the program everyone.

Jamal Kashogi Patricia Cornwell Syria Benghazi Susan Rice President Obama one year
"cornwell" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

10:56 min | 1 year ago

"cornwell" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"What do you think you'd find they've actually done and they've actually done a number of studies looking at violent criminals and psychopaths and to simplify the results a little bit what has generally been seen is usually one of two basic kind of changes. We have a very strong emotional center our limbic system and we have our frontal lobe which helps to control it so when people are psychopaths or when they are violent highland criminals either they tend to have a overactive limbic systems meaning that they their emotions run away with them and they can't control what they're doing because of that or they're funnel lobes are not working well so even though they may have relatively normal emotional responses. They're just not able to control them well but it seems to have something to do with breath how they respond to their emotions which then allows them to kind of. Commit these crimes now. There's there's I mean there's it's not absolute and there's certainly certainly plenty of people who have Olympic systems that run away with themselves and don't kill people so we you know we have a long way to go in terms of truly understanding but we're we're making some inroads into it so her novels novels center on Forensic Science Fine Branch of all of science but I had to ask her thoughts on the wave of science denial in America is something that I encounter encounter in my everyday life and in my presence on social media so just want to get another perspective on checkout to me. It's like a virus or a malware that gets into human nature that makes people persistent believing nonsense like the flat earthers or believing that that you know photographs taken it the gantry back in the sixties that that was really the moonwalk that we didn't go I mean what does it take to prove if you know I guess unless you put your hand in fire and get burned earn. Maybe then you'll believe it's true so I just feel this is a matter of life and death that I have got to do something to get people to wake up up to the importance of science and telling the truth and do exactly what the word autopsy means. If you go to the Greek root it means atop SIA which means needs to see for yourself. Science makes you see for yourself concise up next my good buddy bill nye. The science guy gives his take on the power of forensic science to solve a crime when star talk return it is start start fought from the American museum the Natural History Right here in New York City. We've been exploring the science of solving crimes and my Buddy Bill Nye the science guy as a dispatch batch for us from the forensic science lab. Check it up. Perhaps because life is so short many gave us are afraid of death and a great. Many of us are fascinated with murder. Now a forensic scientists can't always just tell why someone would kill someone else but using the modern tools of chemistry and biology especially forensic experts are able to determine who what where ear when and how a crime was committed the word forensic derives from the Latin to make public or get out in the open this works because almost any place you go in the present crime scene especially is loaded with clues about what happened there in the past so nowadays forensic experts can pretty much tell who done it so rebecca. How hard is it to get away with the crime these days thanks to the modern work that you do. It's harder than it used to be. because we do have tools like DNA but you could probably you've always said that at any time there was oh well now. We can use fingerprints. That's a new discovery and we now. It's harder than ever before so so. Is there a point where you you say okay. We're we're plateauing here. It's not gonNA get well. I mean we haven't reached one hundred percents solving of every crime. So Do you feel like thank you could commit a perfect murder given what she knows. What's good question. Ah was that a yes or no well. I would never be inclined to but yes we need turn interpreter for her under these situations so Andrew. What do you think in the future like neuroscience could be used to help prevent and maybe and even solve crimes well theoretically. It's possible to do a better job. You get some very interesting ethical neuro ethics. They referred to a you know. Could you put a little cameras in our in our brains so that we can actually see you know they have cop cameras. Now I mean could we all have something like that in our brain maybe but is that okay. Is that okay to do you that would allow someone else to see through your eyes what you're doing right. That'd be a little invasive. How about a chip that prevents whatever neuro synapses I would make you commit murder from actually firing such a thing right. I mean you know it's a fascinating. I think about this a lot. You know why can't you go into to the jails and go unto death row and you know do some kind of trans cranial magnetic stimulation this new thing where you can try to say it's not art. I would never do that Man Trans Cranial stimulator off your utility about Batman believe it or not and and they're using it to help people with different psychological issues so you know is it possible you could turn off those it was emotional centers of the brain but now how comfortable would we all feel. I mean what if you could do do some kind of chipper surgery on Adolf Hitler and say okay. Let's we're GONNA. Just send them back out into the world. I don't know how comfortable everybody would feel. Even though we you can prove scientifically that we may have changed the way the in prison people to punish them or do you imprison them so that they don't commit that crime again and also who gets to decide who has has criminal intent to that. That sounds like it's very open to the guy. Criminally we'd better put the chicken well like. I said there's a lot of very big neuro ethical questions for us to deal with but but they are Fascinating Crime Author Patricia Cornwell is working on a new series about solving crimes in space sir so ask her about her process of writing stories by seeing for herself story about space. How are you gonNa see that for yourself. She likes being there so I just had to get in that. Find Out. Let's check it out. I was on a rocket pad a couple of months ago wallops silence and you know what those things look like. They're just a bunch of grading and all this metal right and in when I was standing there in this bitter cold wind I realized is why you always have to show up because I was hearing the sound. The wind was making through the metal and it was playing like space music all this eary's noises and if I had not been Nair and stood there. I would not have been able to tell the full story of what it was like to be on. That launch pad is this is my method. I have to sort of taste touch. Feel smell what it is. I'm a primitive personnel. Pick it up. Shake it and hit something with it and smell it and taste it and then realized it's arsenic and I shouldn't have you know put look after the fact so but that's how I do things I it's. It's like my world is laboratory. In my job is to be like Cassini probe. I just GonNa taking the data and fire it right back to mission control. Only my mission control was the story it tells the when I think of dead bodies I don't like thinking of dead bodies but uh no one wants to die really and why is that could it be because we fear death because because we're born knowing only life and okay for me personally when I die. I fought this through. Don't cremate me. No there's an energy content of your body when you were burned that energies released just from the molecules of your body molecules have energy contained within them to burn is to break those bonds and release that energy urging you then the air air then radiates to space. Your energy is still there. It's just scattered into space and nothing can really use it after that is in the lowest form of Energy Gee. There is radiative heat so I say to myself I've spent my whole life dining on flora and fauna as an Omnivore so for me when I die. I want to be buried buried. I want to be consumed by the flora and fauna I had spent my life dining upon myself and in that way I give back to the world that had given me life and sustained that Kuzmic perspective. You've been walking. I want them your focus. Your host Neil Degrasse Tyson you keep looking up the start reading as much as you one from over one million books on kindle switch between reading and listening with over five thousand audio books to choose from or a rotating rotating selection of popular magazines books may be added or removed at any time but you can read titles like Oh I don't know accessory toward the unspoken alliance between astrophysics and the military by this little known scientists named.

murder bill nye SIA Neil Degrasse Tyson American museum America New York City Adolf Hitler Patricia Cornwell Omnivore Andrew Nair
"cornwell" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

13:25 min | 1 year ago

"cornwell" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"To Earth. You're listening to start the along the American view of that repre- for my interview with bestselling Forensic Crime Novelist Patricia Cornwell and I asked her about the creepy research facility in Tennessee called called the body farm. Check it out well. It's not a health spa. You don't WanNa go. The body farm is two acres of land outside outside of University of Tennessee near their hospital there that pope people donate their bodies to science and they let them decompose out there and high sorts of a special on this. It's been around for about forty years. It's a huge dead body laboratory and why do we do that mostly to answer time of death questions now the words that is is the biggest alibi in any murder trial is. Could you have committed that crime in the period of time. It would have taken you know what. When did this person die time of death at this very tricky. It's like quantum computing every time you ask it. It gives you a different answer and depends on the wind and the rain at how close your body fat you have. I mean everything is dependent on something. Dramatically changed your answer so this is this land and just dead bodies out. There might be one in a car. There might be one in upon there might be one buried in a casket. There might be one hanging from a tree with maggots all at the nature come take camera setup and yes because we the art lunch for these people okay so to me and burn. Oh your body to the body for him now. I don't I listen be honest with you. The body farm is I mean I think it's I think it's a great utility for some of this stuff but but the probably other ways that we could learn some of these things. Becca seems like an awesome way got to get all the data you need but she's talking about otherwise. What other ways might you gather these data well. We basically see these kinds of cases of pretty much. Every day. Except you get a body that's partially decomposed. That's brought in but you don't know when the body started to decompose which the body form form well no because they know when they put down the body to they have data that you don't have that's right but that from those kinds of data we extrapolate to our you know our cases is but what kinds of data that we often do have are things like if someone has died in their home we may have their newspapers piled up in front of their house and we'll know how how far back that is. We'll have their mail. We may have the expiration date on their milk in their fridge. I mean these are things that we use them. We correlate so every day. We have those this kinds of data when the last person who saw them saw them you know who got a text from them so we have enough data to often fund make those kinds of conclusions. That's a little weird now now. They're going to be looking at my refrigerator at my milk expiration date. I don't know I've got some old stuff that I I think he died in nineteen ninety six so I don't know going back to met. Would you donate your body. I I would like to donate my body to science. I WANNA find out more about that from you off to the taping not much of a meal for the maggots. We'll have some scientists have some fun with him. I think the main main thing I want to do really is have some fun with scientists. I'd rather try and confuse the coroner's like like I think I WANNA die with a list of my pocket with a list of names Christoph awesome minds in the middle of that list. I want to be coveting gasoline but not burnt and clasping lockets next to a broken birdcage and dresses essential so that's my plan. It'd be like work it out. See what you can. Wow okay. Well you publicly. We announced this so we got you now. That's the first draft I'm GONNA switch it up for the real deal. Try match that something in the Tennessee body farm like okay you know we actually have that exact uh-huh comedian trying to screw with us we a we did a bit of research though I found out there was another cool things you can do with your body of the these as a real real things. Go on these interesting ways to donate your buddy. You can be buried in a suit made a mushrooms and composting. You get turned into a tree. I think that's quite a nice this green thing to do in life but immediate you can turn your buddy over to medical experiments either officially or just find a well meaning medical. Oh Person Online and say give me your best shot. You can be turned into a diamond. I don't know if that's something that appeals to as a scientist in fireworks I don't know whether you'd rather have that you can become an exhibit body worlds touring what he exhibits. Oh Oh and that way you you around for awhile right you can be turned into a vinyl record which sounds a lot better than being turned into an MP three a cryogenically frozen. You can be launched into outer space. I don't know if that's something that I wouldn't watch what they would like. Take bits of you or or totally cremate you so you're lighter rights. I don't think they put the full Balkenende. They wouldn't underwater weight or something right so you can be put into a haunted house or regular house that just becomes hunted because of those those are all different options diamond one. I think pressure and time plenty of carbon our body and diamond is pure carbon so how would that they. They presumably a mixture feats and extreme compression. You have to break every single chemical bond in your body carbon behind and then there's just this pile of carbon and then and they turn the carbon and diamond yeah. That'd be cool so you can wear your dead spouse on your brain. You know what creepiest thing you've heard today yet. No I don't think so definitely get some strange facebook post that picture. I know what you think Rebecca. What are their stages of decomposition that you that you've broken. Open it up into parts yes more or less. I mean it's a it's a biological process us. How long does the whole prostate it varies. A lot with the conditions depends depends on the heat the humidity if it's dry environment if you're in water that sort of thing but pretty much the human body is is skeleton is used by about six to six months to a year after death again depending highly deferred rolled offer time so I asked Patricia Cornwell what it's like to on a personal level emotional level to visit a place ace wake the body farm and so AH check it out. It is surreal because you think you're on a battle field because there's all these dead bodies everywhere some some of clothes some of them not some of them are just the way they came from the hospital and their gown one guy had committed suicide but he had donated his body and and he was he was dressed in the suit that he killed himself in. It was just flying there on the dirt and that's yeah it's real that he addressed up to take his life. That's what I'll never forget. You see what I mean. That's that's where the heart comes from is. If you don't go and visit with these folks the dead you don't deserve to write about them and so I had to do that for years going in the morgue and you know not just want to work there but the research search that kept going on and on and on and I have to tell you I wouldn't wish sat on anybody. It's really hard to do. It's hard. I mean I could start crying. If I think about it too much. It's hard hard some of the stuff and you know I've I've. I've shown people what that is and I sure as hell of shown them what it's not and it's not all the fakery and it's not pretty and when you see you know ooh. Shelly's sculpted sculpture and university college at Oxford. The drown poet news all beautiful with flowing hair. That's not what you look like when the fishy out sorry it's awful but I learned such an important lesson because one day I was going down. The elevator was decomposed. A Guy who'd been fishing with his little boy alway fell overboard probably had heart attack and he'd been in summertime and he'd been in the water for about a week and I'm telling you the minute I got to that building. You could smell it on every floor. I'm on elevator going down because this medical. San Was Gonna get going to do this case and I'm already dreading it because I said to her. Sometimes I don't know how you do this and she said I tried remember them before they were like this and suddenly I saw that man in the boat with his little boy on a July morning fishing on the James River and I thought he would be mortified literally if he knew he looked like this right now so give it the poor guy break you can't help it and I stood there the whole time and I described notes and did my job with but I've always tried to remember that look beyond what's in front of you. Look at the person person inside that person who's not there on that table anymore and this is what he's left. This is bloated. Stinky spacesuit was see what we can find out about. That'd be respectful BECCA. What is as Patricia noted. How how important is it for. Maybe for your own psychological stability to be respectful of the dead. Oh absolutely they are our family members. These are community members and it's really so much father mother sister brother. We're the last physicians to see them and that's part of our commitment to society to see every three days so many times a day to does wear on you do need to put a a layer of distance between your emotions shins and what you're experiencing somewhat but we more often support one another and help each other people in the other. Yes our our colleagues in the field and for me personally. I'm a Buddhist and it's it's a it's a lesson in compassion for me every day and when I see them like you were saying before it does feel like it's a level of everyone. Everyone ends up like this ever the same on the table. We're all the same changed your perspective of death. Yes absolutely I I don't bracelet more. You'll feel it. I don't fear it. It's a normal part of life. you know it's it's impermanent is what we have to deal with. Do you get to choose who would do your autopsy. You know like like the way like the best so I want to have him to. My people do do that. You know for their funeral hairdos produce and that sort of right sure oh no we I've had colleagues who've specified these kinds of things absolutely or something Marco up next the scientific search for the afterlife. This is start star talk from the American Museum of Natural History. The we're discussing the death featuring my interview with Best Selling Crime Novelist Patricia Cornwell. Check it out science show that we really can't get rid of anything can wait turns into something else with right so it degrades but it's something something yet not. All things are equal but it does go somewhere else right. When you die your body temperature take notice radiates to the air. The air will radiate to space that energy that was once you still summary and I believe infinity. I do not believe we end and I would bet you my life on that now. I know my flesh is going to end and it's reminds me of every day because as I get older like I don't know how time goes so fast and I've seen so many dead bodies. I can't even count and one of the things that I was struck with year. After year. People go their whole life. Never seen I've seen thousands thousands thousands of the worst thing imaginable and I've seen people who are that literally was just unstrapped from the electric chair driven right over to the more than their body temperatures one hundred six degrees and.

Patricia Cornwell Tennessee murder University of Tennessee facebook Becca American Museum of Natural His scientist Christoph Marco Rebecca James River Shelly San Oxford milk one hundred six degrees forty years six months
"cornwell" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

13:19 min | 1 year ago

"cornwell" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Jefferies show excellent yeah as a fun game. I like some of his jokes. No one's you don't like our other people. Also joining us is forensic pathologist Rebecca Fulcher Rebecca Beca you work at the office of the chief medical examiner of New York City. We specialize in brain green trauma pathology too so you know just in advance anyone from medical examiner's office has always just a little bit creeped me out just good reason yeah. We need your expertise tonight because we're featuring my interview with bestselling crime novelist Patricia Cornwell she wrote her first novel apost-mortem back in Nineteen Ninety while working in a morgue and she went on to write twenty four New York Times bestselling books folks and sell more than one hundred million copies over forensic science novels think the Bible is only sold a few more copies than that so this is pretty serious area yeah and how many mysteries is the Bible sold so I asked her what sparked her interest in science so check it out. Do you know my chemistry teacher in high school with somebody that I've never forgotten because she was. She was the real deal she loved it and she. She cared about science. She also was very patient with me because I was no good chemistry. See I fled from the sciences and school fled from all of them. I couldn't do math I you know when I did astronomy the only way I couldn't get the relativity math problems got every time I get it wrong. Interviews over Atkins I mean me. This is what I do for a living and and I skipped science in school because first of all girls didn't do science they didn't and my my brothers did science but I didn't do science you know and I wasn't wasn't encouraged to do science and how I ended up falling in love with it. I'll never know but it is to me. It's everything all right so the correctly you worked in award went to work at one for six years old. I started there in my late twenties completely creepy. Yes okay like more. The people think I love. Moore's I hate morgues which is really cool. I mean they're depressing in. It's hard work in its gross and there's nothing pretty about it but it's just what I had to learn and technological study hanging out in labs learning about anatomy learning about human nature learning everything what I call the you know the overview effect. Oh that's the effect. The morgue people know about the overview effect. It's it's come. It's come come of age and the era of astronauts. You don't see national boundaries. You don't see ethnicities religions. You just see sort of ocean land. Eh clouds overview effect so so rebecca. Tell me about the interviewer effect would you would you agree with this. I think that's tremendous. Indus concept the under view factor but it what's interesting to me is that I think it brings us to a similar place as the overview effect because the the overview effect here the astronauts out from far far away looking at a tiny planet with eleven billion people on it and we sort of apprehended yeah we're at the opposite end where we're looking at one individual and then looking with the microscope but there are cells trying to figure Rault what's going on with them and it gives you this sense of Sameness among human beings and a really sort of a a wonderful humanitarian feeling to me so I guess we and you book and the Human Experience Yes. I think so and so I I like the idea yeah that we're looking at it from so far distant but we're kind of ending up in the same place. I do have to us because when when Patricia said in the clip the no mortar creepy she doesn't like working. There was a moment I just call your expression where you're like. No it's not no it is creepy. It is but what you actually do well collect bodies and pull them out is like in the movies like the big drawers frigerator sort of like that yeah okay yeah but what we do we're medical doctors and these people are patients where the last doctors to see these people take the hippocratic oath and who say above all else do no harm when you get a dead body you pretty clear on that one right well yeah. We don't so much to worry about that but but we're trying to figure out what happened to them so that their families have answers and there are right ways and wrong ways is back going. What's the procedure. The body comes in he comes in. We examine it from head to toe is rather like a surgical procedure. It's just more involved and of course we're not fixing anything. We're just documenting everything that's there but we use many the same tools that a surgeon uses and as I say or a medical professionals and so it's it's done in a respectful way. Just curious to me is that forensic science has become pop culture answer. I think in part because of Patricia Cornwell I think she's if you're on the best seller was talking about this. People are talking about you and so so. I asked what her impression was about. The role of her books is sparking public interest. Let's check it out. Well what I did is. I inadvertently inadvertently made forensics accessible to people and it had not been before. Nobody knew what happens when somebody dies they really didn't it wasn't part of popular alert culture but you want to know how that happened. Though you know what what got me interested it was one thing that somebody said the first time I had a tour of the morgue after our sold scrubbed and host off so it's nice and clean and sparkly shiny steel lovely warm place to be and this medical examiner she starts telling me I what's new. What's coming down the Pike for you guys because you know you've been doing autopsies for hundreds years been changed very much. She said well. There's this thing called. DNA that they're just starting to play around with and also we're starting to use lasers to look for evidence on bodies. Ooh DNA. I don't know what that is sounds interesting lasers now. You got my attention that that was what hooked me. It wasn't the dead people. It was the science. She told me this was nineteen. Eighty four they would not use DNA told for several more years but that and so I just arrived just an all this stuff was starting to happen and I was just intrigued by using science to tell the truth troops what happened to you. Jean Example Reggie scientists well all science itself is the business of uncovering the truth that's correct yeah and so we're just applying it to the human body and especially in a you know criminal justice setting our motto at our offices science serving justice and doing so what were some of the earlier methods and tools well afford. DNA Y Y Gosh well yeah as Patricia said Dina's relatively recent recent development. We do rely on it a lot but time honored tradition is the autopsy and that's how we as I say we get to the bottom of things we're we have to see with our own eyes direct observation what happened what natural disease was there. What the pattern of injury he is so you could miss something. If there's a chemistry test you could do but don't think to do yes well. We we have guidelines for running toxicology on cases just for that reason so we don't miss them. So is that reliance on what the police officers this. Who've done the initial investigation. Will they then tell you hey we suspect this might be going on. You might WANNA check for its or do you look for other independent. What about the police say it's boasts. Oh so I mean we have the evidence that the medical legal investigators and police say we found drugs exactly we have that we can see for ourselves if they have evidence and self injection and we can see changes in the body that are characteristic for example of drug use but if you're talking about poisoning we we have to have you know more suspicious specific suspicion of that to test for things like arsenic or whatever but it comes it comes up and and some poisons have other evidence manifest in changes in the brain different things. We might that might clue us into hey. Maybe maybe that's what's going on here. You're one of those people that the brain on the on the meat slicer slicer brain now. We know back it. We've all seen that we all knew exactly what you're talking about me and so I don't know about this also but this is where the TV and the movies have it wrong because for for us in neuro pathology it's we are very particular about how examined the brain and we do it freehand so that we can tailor it very carefully to try to get the most out of what we're looking at. ooh. On the outside. Yes you have to be extremely careful. You don't WanNa destroy anything and you want to be able to look through the microscope but the tissues he's later if you need to so when DNA came on the scene. What's the biggest change that it introduced well I would say it's had a huge impact? In a couple of ways identification identification of remains is a very important for individuals who don't have identification on them or who died in circumstances where it's not possible to ask their family members so we do about one hundred such missing cases missing persons cases per year but in the day when they say let me dispose of the body but I removed the head and the fingerprints and now you just have a headless body with no fingers and that doesn't matter the DNA will still get we. That's another circumstance in which we use it dismembered dismembered bodies out sort of thing yeah and for example question but let me put it in another context after nine eleven our DNA ella was one of the a at the forefront of trying to identify all the remains in our chief at that time Dr Charles Hirsch pledge to the city of New York that we would identify every last human remains through DNA testing and we've been doing that. You couldn't have otherwise done that otherwise otherwise been for months as they slowly covered the out the site yes e- even now now. I mean we still have a permanent presence down at the at Ground Zero our office that staffed by forensic anthropologists for this kind of thing so this is where DNA has. I don't immeasurable service to families is dental records still a thing. Do People still do that. Yes dental records are very important especially. If you have an unidentified person is Yeah Okay so Patricia Cornwall's books they really birth an entire generation of TV shows like CSI and bones and I'm just curious. How authentic is the forensic science in those TV dramas. Those are highly praised dramas. One see even became a traveling museum Ziam exhibit where you would go in and for for school groups. We're going to try to solve a crime using the scientific evidence. So how authentic is it. What what agreed to give it. I would give it about a B plus. That's good. That's got all the tools they're using. They described them with great accuracy and they're certainly the same tools that we use and Patricia uses them. A lot refers a lot in her novels and I actually appreciate that she's in fact been a great friend to our office over the years and and I think it's fabulous that the public is this getting to know a little bit about what it is that we do up next. We're GONNA explore the science of decomposing bodies. When Star Talk Returns read as much as you want from over one million books available on kindle unlimited that's right go ahead and just read to your heart's desire. Kendall puts over one million e books and five two thousand audiobooks at your fingertips so you can easily switch from reading to listening when you're.

Patricia Cornwell New York City Bible Jefferies Rebecca Fulcher New York Times Nineteen Ninety Atkins Rebecca Beca Rault Moore Dr Charles Hirsch Ziam Kendall Jean Reggie Dina six years
"cornwell" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"cornwell" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

"Give one hundred forty five. We should note to that. Halley foam did pass the coal L Blad, and is now in the top ten on the all time rebounding list next up for her is Abby Currier, she needs sits boards to pass Abby and get into ninth on the all time list. Out of the time out Michigan with the aero begins the second quarter with the basketball goes back to its starting five Oakland's got a mishmash lineup. We'll tell you about that. In a moment. Meanwhile, here's deja church straight onto Munger left-wing for Dokic catch shoot three. It's an air ball short. Some short shots for Michigan. That's the third we've seen basically be a short airball from the three point line. Here is a corner. Three from talaysia dean, and that's good. Initiative. Like, I said they have to know that not the best at drive or finishing at the rim. So you have to get into them and run them up the three point line and make him put it on the floor. Nice work by Michigan there. They got Halley film quickly, and she was able to tiptoe the baseline around. And put in her second field goal of the game. Agua Niro, greedy. Tell us furred dean and Cornwell Cromwell rather the five on the floor. Here's Mike Cromwell driving to the basket, and she is able to finish. Her first points of the game twenty nine nineteen wolverines by ten days in the corner labs inside for thumb double team, good pass, Amy six footer in the lane. No offense rebound Haley Brown. And it's going to be a foul from behind. I think it's going to be on Agua. Niro, it will be. It's gonna be her first. And the teams I in this period. I.

Agua Niro Abby Currier Michigan dean Halley Cornwell Cromwell Munger deja church basketball L Blad Haley Brown Dokic Oakland Amy ten days
"cornwell" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"cornwell" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"I hope you enjoy that conversation with ellison cooper i certainly did not i don't think you're going to be able to find many people who are able to talk so well and so forcefully and so intelligent about archaeological diggings in the mind civilization like and and she's written a great new a mystery murder mystery novel caucasian that's going to be out later this week to ellison cooper i mentioned just briefly because you don't want to talk to manipulative ly about another author when you have one on see the they feel uncomfortable have to defend each other so the speak but i was always a big fan of patricia cornwell and after a while i just realized her novel searches all unremittingly bleak you know the there's a little darkness it's a part of human nature but they would just so bleak in just so grey and after a while i just i i that's not what i want to read i wanna read something that's going to be interesting and he sure have some dark sides and the like but they have some good moments some fun moments happy moments that make life worth living as it were and in the book caged i think ellison gets the the balance just right as i said it's not nearly as bleakest as patricia cornwell there are moments because of the nature of the plot line but she also does a good job of balancing off with some lighter things as well too which is which is what i liked so much about the book and why i would recommend it we gotta take a break for news in just a few moments we come back talk a little bit about excerpts from cage give you an idea of the flavor of the book and then talk a little bit about my time in beliefs and she spoke about course i didn't spend nine years intense and beliefs and learn to avoid the for dylan's as they call it the two tips to step snake because when a bite you you get two steps and then you're gone but actually i was spending time in a believes and i think it's a place while we're visiting an interesting tale to about my trembling out to look at the mayan ruins as we may talk about that in the next half after come back from the news so a quick weather and news update and then on with the show here wbz newsradio ten thirty news update after more than two weeks trapped deep inside a flooded cave in thailand twelve young boys and their soccer coach now hope to be rescued a complex risky diving operation is now underway navigating dark and tight passageways filled with muddy water and strong currents leading this operation confirmed that today is d day the conditions will never be any better than they are now it is a very difficult and very dangerous mission they're carrying out thirteen expert international divers will need the operation supported by five thai diva's so few long of the bbc points along the way that they will be able to assess the boy's health see how they're doing they will be able to rest the dive back we know is five hours for these divers who are used to diving expert diva's which hold that aid rescue will take eleven hours meaning the full operations expected to take several days everything subject to weather and water conditions cbs news update i'm tom foty this summer take advantage of long route things red hot shingles sale at long roofing dot com.

eleven hours five hours nine years two weeks
"cornwell" Discussed on Thinking Sideways Podcast

Thinking Sideways Podcast

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"cornwell" Discussed on Thinking Sideways Podcast

"More exiled he got in contact somehow with paul cornwell and paul told them a few things see he tracked down florida's parents presumably in germany who told him that they had not actually heard from him since nineteen eightyeight yeah paul also clarified what jane doe said about the smuggling thing he said it was really actually mostly conjecture on her part and he said he's spoken to the families of at least some of the haitian crew members and those guys have not been heard of since nineteen eighty eight km lastly paul told no more that there was a saturday of the free done by somebody in the us navy recently date date unknown but apparently sometime since my two thousand ten that's a huge time for it to disappear and reappear especially something as old and crusty and rusty is that thing saying yes i'm gonna i'm taking that one with the big old grain of salt one person in the us one person in the us navy and how how does he find out i presumably some guy contacted him and just today i was in the navy and the audio yada saw who sent him a random email yeah could have been yeah there's also a rumor rocketing around the internet will not rocketing sort of puttering around the i guess but there's a rumor that the free dawn has been renamed the free lions and that it's still roaming the high seas is that like freedom free free lion the french fries freedom fries yeah i guess they wanted to save money on paying i guess they didn't want to yeah this is again nobody nobody who republish is this claim ever says it ends a substantiated explains how everybody says they're maybe the freeland now but it's unsubstantiated so who knows so that's the extent of the story so lisa and the free don lee by and eighty eight nobody is ever seen again including the ship and people want to know what the hell happened yeah all right i do too yeah we all want to know so we got to answer that next let's start talking about what possibly might have happened to lisa floor and in the free time and those other seven dudes and the other dudes great again into our cool theories and they're actually quite a few for this one theories behind why seven patients and two random other people disappeared i know what it is you know what it is it's mel gibson mel gibson he realized that this this ship was floating around it was going to screw up the movie that he would put out in a couple of years called braveheart and everybody was gonna get confused if he said the line wrong you can't take my son cast and crew or look at him like what the hell are you talking about this time now think oh wait there and he took that yeah no that's a little known fact that yeah when when he when he screams freedom at the end originally it was misspelled in the script that he did scream freed on yeah all right real oh yeah for real okay back to our theories well first one is the obvious one of course bermuda triangle of course to the bahamas yeah yeah and so they would be kind of like off in the westernmost tip of the triangle there but yeah they could've like sailed enough into it probably to meet some mayhem inter dimensional time work kind of thing he seems unlikely okay well you guys don't want to go into that any more deeply no i really don't want to talk about how he was transported back to nineteen forty two and sunk by.

paul cornwell florida nineteen eighty eight km
"cornwell" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"cornwell" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"Late nights of a one seven two four three well said sir my guess my wingman for the rest of this hour matt tapping and his dad and docked tapping who served in world war two as a medic recipient of the bronze star doc i just wrote an article about a documentary that i saw him sports i watch a lot of sports documentaries i love sports the documentary was about the rivalry between the lakers and the boston celtics between magic johnson and larry bird and like it was about race and about how the lakers were the black team because magic johnson and the celtics were the white team because of larry bird wait a second i wrote my my column the coach of the lakers the black team the white guy pat riley the coach of the celtics they the the white team at the black guy named casey jones in many of their stars on the celtics were black cedric cornwell maxwell with black their guard gerald henderson with black another guard dennis johnson was black me won the lakers you had white stars like kurt rambis the black team so we didn't where did that come from i thought it was just two guys trying to win a game i've got the idea here when i was real young my dad worked in a row school trish story los angeles and we couldn't wake today till my mother to come to the school and say i want my kids and she would take on the big red car and downtown la and and we'd go to the to the the main station and we get off the big red car and and the three of us ten walkout and someone would pick it up it didn't matter what black why didn't matter just three kids.

matt lakers boston celtics larry bird pat riley casey jones gerald henderson dennis johnson kurt los angeles cedric cornwell
Barbara Bush is dead at 92

The Sports Zone With Pete McCarthy

01:35 min | 3 years ago

Barbara Bush is dead at 92

"Riedel in the morning on the voice of new york seven ten w r good morning everybody coming up at eight twenty five a quick update on first lady barbara bush we were talking about your yesterday she in failing health and she went into what's called comfort care but her family saying that she's in great spirits and is feisty and a fighter so well barbara bush ninety two years old is still good silver fox is still with us good we we always say well i don't think there's anyone in the world who doesn't love barbara bush so hanging there hang in there babs boy a binghamton now you think binghamton suny binghamton would be sleepy campus upstate they're very pretty part of a of new york state by the web and up to binghamton many times but there have been two murders on that campus now just the other day up poor nineteen year old freshmen from brazil named joe souza was stabbed to death and they have they have somebody in custody now michael rocque twenty has been charged in the killing of the nineteen year old freshmen roque has pleaded not guilty and i believe he's from massa recipe kwa and the young lady who was killed even though she's a brazilian she some right brooke she went to school right here in westchester so right local connections on the story but the district attorney says that and his name is steve cornwell says this this wasn't just some random act now we absolutely believe that this was a random act and suspect is in custody yes.

New York Barbara Bush Binghamton Binghamton Suny Binghamton Brazil Joe Souza Roque Massa Recipe Kwa Brooke Westchester Steve Cornwell Michael Rocque Nineteen Year Ninety Two Years Seven Ten W
"cornwell" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"cornwell" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

"That they've got you know donald cornwell state toast you have to understand that you know they're going to take hits obviously you want to avoid down but you can't be thinking about that you can't be thinking about the rushie gotta be thinking about making the play and i thought that first drive against michigan state i really thought that was how the rhythm of that game was going to go and that quickly chain i'm not sure what letter was go in that way into they've until they punched the phone boil it chris again even the you know we march down we get the field goal on the first possession and then we get the ball back we're we're doing the same and then the bug gets punched out there that completely soaked to win that of like you said jameel only took the building selfinflicted i mean really just be errors or and you know i keep making the common people are like oh come on but he reminded me of a nascar he knew the rain was coming you knew when it was going to hit and arbor and any kind of a crew chief when they see that you know your whole goal is to get out front bath and and stay there because when their incomes everything changes either the racist called off or a you know you have to wait and that's what was going to happen here and and michigan state did that it got out ahead it took advantage of uh of michigan's her half errors and i thought ultimately when they didn't get a touchdown on that first dr mad i i really started making some i it didn't bother me as long as well because we kept for me as long as we kept moving the ball is like all right we got points on the board and as long as we continue to move the ball like that i was fine with 'cause i figured that we're going to punch one in here soon enough and then we were and then the ball punched out thinking more about them right so calls we get it remind me of.

jameel nascar michigan donald cornwell
"cornwell" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"cornwell" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"And the official sponsor of the boise state broncos home team here's paul j schneider night very much round amount whereas stem not having a great year not yet is to have not yet one team is undefeated san diego state they are to ano and the only undefeated team a foreigner excuse me in the only undefeated team in the conference um krisno stay one into unlv one two nevada oh and foreign quarterback walked out on him uh david cornwell who made his nevada debut two days ago is left the wolf pack football programme i quick stay for the alabama transfer through fifteen passes and as they say was there have been plans and he is outta there let's commented gurria boys on the voice stateside the mountainside utah state boise she stayed wiome in colorado's thing in new mexico all two two and on air forces one in two and at times of look like the best team in the west or in the mountain yeah some we'll have to see unbelievable stuff for the boise's state broncos i own they'll get it when the boston celtics ramped up fair media they'd yours yesterday players boarded two oversized yellow buses thanked supersized school buses with wifi comfy seats and in south for tuesday's first day of class and sao now regina university in newport rhode island the goal of this rare threeday training camp yet it together uh you had to play together spent ten years since the last time the selig's acquired to allstars in an off season in the summer of two thousand seven president of basketball operations danny ainge turned a quartet of fire paint bong balls and derail aiming kevin garnett solvents in that big three garnett and alan joining paul pierce made a preview team pretty good for you and you're right they did win the champion jim they won the championship they won sixty six games navigate it a fascinating postseason in a culminated with raising banner seven theme after breathing the lakers and six games so scotia brad stevens i'm trying to repeat mmhmm i dunno cleveland so much better i think and to have the success that he had in college yeah face abc raise brad stevens kboi news time 738 nate.

official alan big three kevin garnett president of basketball operat regina university alabama nevada unlv san diego paul j schneider broncos david cornwell brad stevens lakers paul pierce danny ainge selig newport rhode island boston celtics new mexico colorado boise ten years threeday two days
"cornwell" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"cornwell" Discussed on WJR 760

"You grab we're cornwell you're all communications director y pursuit of are your core exit frenda who are oh avantgarde okay that's how she got into the trump family announced uber dot your communications director urge twenty won't your call i don't know early noah parker but if this is a sign of it right goram appeal removed area it let's do it this way let slip this way where the constitutional conservatives the reaganite if you well in this administration or are they are they talking about on the policy side are there any in the upper senior circles that i'm aware of mr von own bob baffert by mind also where are working to i mean when it comes to consider revision i heard attack remain unclear how it it it boggles the mind but going back to my mundia what they're going right now gootia may be waived because but look away separated base from home from the beginning part you do it if you try to apply to the rule yet on the democrat in order to get that one way he's got a it memory back america to a couple months before the next election the congressional elections are used in a beria macron annual like you said earlier they hate up native got they hate us now and but if they play around nightly river that rapid growth of new i you know i would encourage the president and his senior staff to take a look at the nixon administration john exact parallel but it's good enough nixon caved in cavegn k b game what they wanted the epa osha affirmative action i can't think of everything but it's numerous and they took everything they could get from him as i mentioned because was last week they took everything they could get from him and then of course uh they did everything they could to be rid of them now if the democrats take the house of representatives i'm telling you right now and the back benches may want to pay attention to this too they're gonna impeach him or they're going to try to impeach and the more he props up these democrats the more he props up the people who are going to destroy if he's concerned about the republican establishment dammit and take him by the.

cornwell noah parker bob baffert beria macron president senior staff the house director america nixon administration nixon