40 Burst results for "Cornish"

Fresh "Cornish" from All Things Considered

All Things Considered

01:02 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh "Cornish" from All Things Considered

"Donate before October 1st to meet automatically entered to win. Go to K c r w dot com slash Give All right. 6 49 at K C. R W Left Right and Centre is up at seven o'clock this evening on the show. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg leaves a legacy as a liberal icon from her time litigating for equal rights and later from her 27 years serving on the bench. Republicans intend to replace her with a conservative, which will shift the Supreme Court firmly to the right. And so how would this affect American law in the long run, and, more immediately the challenge to the affordable care act that the justices intend to here right after the election? Into the Supreme Court and its individual justices have this much power. We're going to talk about that and more on left, right and center in about 10 minutes here on K C. R w Let's take a look at your roads on this Friday. Sherman of 21 South bound on Cold Water Canyon. Earlier stalled car moved at Elaine's traffic still slow from the 405. In L. A one on one south out of Martin Luther King Jr Boulevard got a stalled car in the middle lane there of traffic is backed up to the 10. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Sasha Fiver, and I'm Audie Cornish. So far, the creek fire. The biggest single fire ever to burn in the state of California is.

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Audie Cornish Sasha Fiver Martin Luther King Cold Water Canyon NPR Elaine Sherman California K C. R W
Fresh update on "cornish" discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

02:42 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "cornish" discussed on All Things Considered

"L L see clouds and fog Later on this evening, we'll have lows in the fifties and sixties seventies at the coast tomorrow eighties for Metro Allah and Inland Orange County will see a nineties for the Valley and inland Empire. This's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Sasha Fiver in Cambridge, Massachusetts. And I Maudie Cornish in Washington President Trump is preparing to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court. NPR has learned that Republican Republicans expect the president to choose federal Judge Amy Cockney Barrett. Trump will announce his decision tomorrow one day. One day after Ginsburg was honored as her body lay in state at the U. S. Capitol, NPR senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro is with us now and medical. Let's start with the fact that Amy Cockney Barrett has been the front runner in this process. Can you help us understand why Yeah, almost since the moment that this became ah, vacancy. She's been the front runner. And the reason for that was because she was a runner up last time when Brett Kavanaugh got the seat on the Supreme Court, you know, And that means that she's vetted, which is really important for getting someone threw at the sort of speed That Republicans and President Trump are looking Teo get her to do right now, You know, she's a favorite of social conservatives and she's 48 years old. That means that she would be the youngest person on the court currently serving. She could serve on the court for decades and helped shape social policy for generations. If she's vetted. What argument should we expect against a specific nominee in this case? Well, first, we should note. I mean, it's pretty unlikely that Democrats would be able to derail her based on the numbers. You know, she's qualified first and foremost, which would be the main thing that could blow something like this up. I mean, remember Harriet Myers, who is the counsel to President George W. Bush wound up not going through. But that was mostly because Republicans didn't think that she was qualified and didn't want her to be the nominee. You know, Democrats don't like that. She's pretty conservative across the board, whether it's on abortion or guns, take your pick of any issue really, very different from who she would be replacing the late Icon, liberal icon Ruth Bader Ginsburg on abortion. In particular, She's argued that the core of the ruling Roe v. Wade would likely stay in place, but more restrictions would likely be added. And she said that before President Trump was elected, and before conservatives held a majority on the court, so we just don't know how far she would actually go. You know, s O. In the past, Democrats have also questioned her religion. She's Catholic. Devoutly Catholic, was a professor at Notre Dame, they said. The dogma runs deep in you was what Senator Dianne Feinstein said about her and Republicans accused Democrats of anti Catholic bigotry. Which is something you'd expect to hear again this time. If they go there. Given that this is coming so close to the election. What's the larger strategy from each side in this fight? You know, I mean, Republicans are going to stress her record, you know, and again could come back Tio some of the anti Catholic bigotry that they've talked about last time. If Democrats go there, you know, and they're going to say, Look, it's President Trump's right. To appoint somebody that she had bipartisan vote the last time that she was confirmed three years ago to be on the federal bench. You know, there were 55 votes for her, which included three Democrats. On Democrats are going to push health care. They're going to say that the affordable care act is on the ballot. Amy Cockney. Barrett has criticized John Roberts logic in getting to his ruling that upheld the law, saying that a mandate was attacks instead of a penalty. She's a pretty strict originalist and textual list, and she says if it says penalty, it's a penalty, not attacks. President Trump is that he wants the Senate to confirm his nominee by election Day. How likely is that? Yeah. I mean, we're talking five weeks from now, That would be very fast. But Republicans have the votes and could do it. They control the agenda and can move it along pretty swiftly if they want to, and they likely do want to you know they could have hearings in mid October. Democrats really have very few options to delay this process, and it could be, you know, either now or in the lame duck session, frankly, but this is why Republicans have overall stood with President Trump. I mean, They for all of what he does and what they want to ignore. Getting three picks on the Supreme Court is huge for them. I mean, take a step back. This is the most conservative court. In three quarters of a century, and it's about to get more so. That's NPR's Domenico Montanaro. Thank you. You're welcome. A recent NPR PBS NewsHour Marist poll showed that the top issue for Democratic voters this election is climate change. For Republicans. It barely registers, but there is a divide within the GOP on the issue. Other surveys show that younger Republicans are more concerned than their elders by nearly 2 to 1 margin, NPR's Jeff Brady reports. Benji backer started the American Conservation Coalition in 2017 while still in college, he says his love of nature comes in part from his family. They're autobahn members Nature Conservancy members, but they were conservative and I grew up, not thinking that the environment should be political at all. Yet thes days environmental politics dominate his life from now until Election Day Backer is driving an electric car across the country, talking about his group's climate agenda and posting videos along the way we are in the G Time National Park about to kick off the electric election road trip. Backer, is promoting his group's American climate contract. That's his conservative market focused response to the Green New Deal. Backer is critical of fellow conservatives who ignore climate change. He's praised Swedish climate activist Greta Tune Berg and says he wants to work with liberal climate activist to pass legislation. So how will he vote in November? If President Trump wants to get my vote, he's going to have to prioritize climate change in a way that he has not done over the past four years. Backer says he's undecided So far he was disappointed Climate change wasn't even discussed at the Republican National Convention. The Trump campaign says in a statement to NPR that the president has proven you can have energy independence and a clean, healthy environment. But the statement doesn't even mention climate change. Young Republicans are Light years ahead of their elder counterparts on this issue. Kira O'Brien heads young conservatives for carbon dividends, which supports a carbon tax to reduce greenhouse gas emissions..

President Trump NPR Judge Amy Cockney Barrett Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Benji Backer Domenico Montanaro President George W. Bush Inland Orange County Massachusetts Sasha Fiver Amy Cockney Maudie Cornish Harriet Myers Brett Kavanaugh Washington
Fresh "Cornish" from All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:44 sec | 17 hrs ago

Fresh "Cornish" from All Things Considered

"Programing block will get a rundown of the show's in a review just ahead come out next door. The governor of Kentucky says his state needs to do more to prevent the deaths of people like Briana Taylor and he Bashir will talk about the grand jury decision to indict. One of the three police officers involved in that case, looking at your roads Now on this Friday afternoon in south L. A. The 1 10 north bound at the 111th Place, got a stalled car, blocking the second lane from the left. I've got to slow from El Segundo Boulevard in Covina. The 10 eastbound at eastbound at Barranca Street, a crash in the left lane there, and it's slow from peck robe and also have the SIG alert. Fullerton 57 South atyour Belinda Boulevard. Gotta crash Taken up the three left lanes there. This's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Sasha fiver. And I, Maudie Cornish. So far, the creek fire, the biggest single fire ever to burn in the state of.

El Segundo Boulevard Maudie Cornish Sasha Fiver Briana Taylor Kentucky Bashir NPR Fullerton Covina
Fresh "Cornish" from All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:38 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh "Cornish" from All Things Considered

"Budget deficit. Inside climate news reporter Christopher Taek says that means communities in Queens and on Long Island will lose out on funding for projects that would protect against future flooding. We're talking about like seawalls that would go around certain neighborhoods that are really flood prone and then re establishing natural wildlife that would help mitigate storm surge and they're sort of flooding. Homo says he's postponing the referendum until 2021 lawmakers will have to sign off on it again in next year's budget. Tonight. Showers are possible. If we do see it'll probably after midnight will have temperatures in the mid sixties tonight. Right now, though, it's 69. Partly cloudy in lower Manhattan. You're listening to W n my sea at 7 35. Support for NPR comes from W. N. Y C members and from C three c three dot Ai ai software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence and enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable business problems. Learn more at sea three dot the I and Fidelity wealth management. Providing perspective on a client's entire financial picture, Investment minimum supply, Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Sasha Fiver in Cambridge, Massachusetts. And I Maudie Cornish in Washington President Trump is preparing to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court..

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Fidelity Brokerage Services Ll Homo NPR Sasha Fiver Maudie Cornish Long Island Christopher Taek Queens Reporter Supreme Court Manhattan Massachusetts Donald Trump Washington Cambridge President Trump
Fresh "Cornish" from All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:50 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh "Cornish" from All Things Considered

"More convenient on the Web at optimum dot com slash California. All right. Welcome to a Friday afternoon edition of all things considered up ahead on the program you're going to hear from a youth organizer who advocates voting at age 16. How he says Lowering the voting age could improve generations ease turnout at the polls. Jen's E. Also known for taking to the streets but not always showing up at the ballot box. That group born in the mid nineties, too early to thousands Also ahead on the program. Thousands of Mourners paid their respects this week to Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the Supreme Court. What drew them there and what the late Supreme Court justice meant to them. Personally, you're going to hear from some of those folks coming up on the program. As well. Right now, Let's check your roads. Sig alert in l A. This is the five North out at the 1. 10 got a stalled car blocking the two right lanes and the five now backed up to the 17. So a bit of a slog for sure. In Lynwood. The one or five westbound this at Long Beach Boulevard. A crash taken up the right lane. Traffic is slow from the 17 in L. A. The 10 westbound at the five got a stalled car blocking the middle lane there and you're slow from Soto Street and awesome slowing right now in the 10 eastbound from Cloverfield over too. Aboutthe 1 10 Freeway. It's for 10 or 20 at K C. R. W tha This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish, and I'm Elsa Chang..

Supreme Court Ruth Bader Ginsburg Audie Cornish Long Beach Boulevard California Elsa Chang Lynwood NPR JEN
 Pope Francis: our health depends on health of others, not exploiting

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last week

Pope Francis: our health depends on health of others, not exploiting

"Before pope Francis he got to Japan's says top the corona government virus job officially pandemic Yoshiki has shown Daisuke there's a link all between was known people's as health a shadow and prime the state minister of the environment on the right hand today man for many the his vita long serving predecessor Shona into Cornish when Shinzo Francis abeka speaks nonce about last the interconnectedness month he would resign due of to people ill health on the planet his chief cabinet during his secretary general sugo audience said he held would come in a Vatican forward court to pursue yard a with base the unfinished faithful spaced work out now to limit the self contagion made politician he tells is elected the crowd by parliament abusing as the ecosystems Japan's new prime that god minister created two is days a grave after sin he succeeded and Ave we can't expect as leader of to the continue ruling to grow liberal on the material Democratic level Party without sued taking us low care key image of the coming from home government briefings but welcomes us contrasts from with his his ads behind the exploiting scenes work nature admonishing ultimately bureaucrats means exploiting and pushing other policies people I'm I'm Charles Charles the the Ledesma last month

Pope Francis Japan Daisuke Shinzo Francis Abeka Charles Charles Ledesma Shona
"cornish" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

The Adam Buxton Podcast

04:20 min | 3 months ago

"cornish" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

"Odia, how side? He was he would say in various different ways in every program and it would always set mom off. And she would oh, he's so awful. Mom also loved going to the movies and I have fun memories, some of which I write about in my book. Of Her taking us to see star wars, which he really loved, maybe even more than us I think. and. She got me all the action figures. When I begged her for them that ended up using years later in the Adam and Joe Show. For a little toy movies. And we saw et. And I was freaked out because afterwards, she was just crying and crying. She was in bits. But the comedy film that made the biggest impression on us both pot from airplane. I mean there were lots actually, but I do remember very clearly watching Monty Python's life of Brian with mom. When we can. We rented it on video. And I. Have it in my diary January, nineteen, eighty five. When I was fifteen. And I remember hooting right the way through which was very exciting, because it was eighteen and. it was it felt a bit sit of risque to be watching this kind of thing with your mom. And then to find that she liked it, so much was just terrific She loved the Xalapa Michael Palin ex leper and released warwick. she would quote quite a lot and most of all, though more than anything. Always. Look on the bright side of life. which was certainly her philosophy? And I remember dad coming in while we were watching life of Brian and the end. And he didn't. He didn't like it. He shook his head. He didn't think crucifixion was really a laughing matter which. To be fair, it isn't. But mom was able to see the bright side. Anyway. Parents. Family It's always complicated. Whoever you are. But. I'm very grateful. To have had a moment of dad that loved me. Did the best for me. Whenever they could. So thanks, mom. Thanks to shameless and Matt for their help on this episode. Thanks to Joe as well. And thanks to you podcasts. For Tuning again. And for the next few weeks. Put out a few more podcasts. Before taking a break for the summer, because I was going to do a slightly longer run, and then it got interrupted when all this happened. A few weeks back, so I wanted to resume for a few more episodes. I. Don't know like three or four thereabouts. And then? Break for the summer and then. Start up again in In the autumn I suppose. All right. Look. I hope you will doing okay out there. And till next time. Make sure your mom and dad. You love them if you do. And if you don't I dunno pretend. They love you. Maybe they just not good at showing. Whatever! I love you. then. Her Thumbs. From. West..

Brian Odia Joe Show Michael Palin Adam Matt warwick.
"cornish" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

The Adam Buxton Podcast

07:25 min | 3 months ago

"cornish" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

"Six very good in the kitchen. A little reflective pots and pans I should have sent you A. Mike Cover. Yeah one of these because I heard you complaining about your Sidland tones on a movie podcast. I got a lot of kickback for that because people thought that Louis had complained about. The free microphones you send out as well and so. A lot of people accused blue in I've piling on to you. On generous fashion when you'd so generously given us both Mike Free! Mike's that's good. I'm glad. How wonderful to be the beneficiary of pylon rather than the subject of it. No, that's ludicrous. Obviously, it was nothing to do with the mics. Evidently, the Mike was completely fine for and I'm sure it was for you. It sounded great when we did the audio book. I think the reason. It sounded siblings for the guys you did up. Movie podcast with was that they recorded the zoom feed, so it was quite compressed, so that was that was something that they needed to pay a little bit more attention to the Aaron, but I don't want to start a pilot riding onto them on the. Minutes a game show with the kids in the swimming pool in the seventies. runaround we other to knock out. We have a channel. How did the theme from? We are the champions go. We are the champion Touchette. Today we are the champions. Cough didn't say that that was the late night version of it. So, very good tune, it was non musically. It was just chanting in a playground manner. You remember it sort of A. it always seemed a little bit too rough for me. It was very rough and the end there was a brilliant bit in the swimming pool with inflatables, especially to be a fun competition school kids, but it was very competitive, and you could sense this undercurrent of like brutal vicious of playground hierarchy going on into school rivalry. He was in the seventies when yeah, when it was a spoke guy show. Yeah, that would also have liked. Broken bottles just, off, camera. And Shifts. In the back pockets of Jesus, I'm surprised that you will watching Chivas sure it's well. We're GONNA. Be Talking about prisons later on Oh craze. Yeah! When I was in prison, one of the first things I learned was how to make a shave. Was your shift made out of we started off with pointed words, and then used a whittled toothbrush hozeal sharpest word. It was a phrase was and it was shame on you. Oh, that is. The. Particularly aggressive in a context of a prison. How would you say it? Shame on you really shame on you like that. Shame on you. You didn't go for the FRENCHACCENT. Like how shame on you? Why is that better? It's just vicious because its most sophisticated. What's the French for? Shame on you? It's if if you sit in the original French. Don't boop. Just don't. Don't Boo! Colloquial bullshit left it. Shame on you. In French. Because that would be good to know when I if I have to go back into prison. On at Trois what were imprison full? I was in prison for being. Dangerously funny. Right You just leaving it at right, yeah! No that's entirely possible. I'm interested in what you made a Shiv out of well. I've never been to prison. Like you know, but if I did go to prison, I would probably fashion ship out of one of my nails. You know sometimes when you see guitar players or even just celebrities in the seventies. They've sometimes kind of cocaine fingernail. Is that what it is like one very long fingernails? You notice that yeah, when I'm in prison I'm going to have a very long fingernail. Yeah because then you could with it into the shape of a key. Yes, that would be the other fingernail, basically a bit like a Swiss army knife on my fingers. One would be nail file I just rough down the surface of one of my fingernails as you say, the other would be a key, but like a skeleton key yet could get into any lock. The next one would be toothpick. Toothpick and then the other would be just little hook shaped to clean up the from under my nails. And what about the one forgetting stones out of horses hooves? That will be on my left hand so when Cornish came at you with his long fingers. UNDULATING. You wouldn't know what you were. GonNa get where you can get a hand cure, so cool a manicure, or you can get shipped up in the house in the neck in the prison. Or risk owners just GONNA. Open your beer for you. Yes, always see just going to file your nails or get the stone out of your horses shoe. If you grew your thumbnail, really long and wide. Then you could implant a magnifying disc in the middle foot for the magnifying glass. Right you could. Out The center of a lens from a pair of specs what to focus the sun burn through something, sure or just for eating out for me whatever you would use the magnifying glass. With. Army knife for well I think you're right, but if you just highly polished one of your overgrown fingernails. To An you could probably sculpt operated as Lens. But this is a really good idea because you could. You tied it from the the screws. A severe prison terminology you. Having served time so anyway. Yeah, but you could just clench your fist and hide your nails. or You could wear finger puppets. Joey. Joey Long shanks the finger puppet guy. Don't mess with him. WHO Put you or something I dunno, the Gods just charmed by the finger puppet. Yeah, whenever they whenever they get suspicious about them Ugo Hulu. And little chats between the finger puppets. Hey, you guys thought to look underneath those Goddamn finger puppets that in make cornish. Jobs everybody with the guy from finger boobs go through his prison time Yawovi your. That's how y'all divide in the in the slammer. Do you know that Expression Slam it? You probably do because you serve time. You know all this lingo, slammer and screws. We used to call it the big house. In intonation. The Big House. House 'cause. It's like a big house. Bedrooms. It's very valuable real estate. Yes, you can cater for many guests. Is this because you've been watching escape from Dan Amora? Yes, it's good, isn't it? Well, I wanNA talk to you because I'm not going to give you a unqualified, yes. Should we tell the listeners what this is yet? Go and set it up. It's a limited series. Directed by Ben. Stiller starring pulled down you and Benicio Del Toro and Patricia Cats based on a.

A. Mike Cover Big House Joey Long Mike Free Cough Louis FRENCHACCENT Chivas Touchette Aaron Benicio Del Toro cocaine Dan Amora Cornish Stiller cornish Patricia Cats
Bill Noble on Garden Design

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

03:48 min | 3 months ago

Bill Noble on Garden Design

"Now. You were not a garden designer. Then and here you came to this place, and there's views of mountains and feels, and it feels like a big open place, but. You weren't a garden designer. SORTA figured out how to make a plan. And you speak about in the book about measuring the House and measuring the distance to things and kind of drawing and taking photos and kind of pinning up that and some inspiration on almost like a mood board to get started like you know to figure out what you were going to do, yes. Yes I came here not as a gardener. But I felt that I needed to learn really quickly. And and the way I learned was that. I had been farming and. As I. Tell Maybe in the book I made. Five thousand dollars at it. My first year felt great, and I made five thousand dollars at farming my last year and I'd had enough. And I landed a seasonal job restoring a half miles worth of white, pine and hemlock hedges at the Saint God's national historic site, in Cornish, which was the garden of Augustus Saint Gaudens and was part of an artist colony that included architects, landscape, architects and artists. Like Gerald Plot and Ellen Shipman And I really immersed myself. In the Garden Gardens, but it, but then in learning about the gardens that those artists had made. A really came to gardening? As an art form I. And then I had to learn. How to draw. and. Deal with hard scape, which still not very good at. but the National Park. Service was great about supporting. It staff. By providing training and I spent a couple years running down to Boston to Cambridge to the Radcliffe Institute and to the Arnold Arboretum and guarding the woods and learning the trade there. Okay, I'm applying it. on the job at Saint Gaudens and here and in some of the other Corner Gardens. I see so. One of my favorite parts of the book, besides all those big leafed plants in that was seventy foot, long border or something. It's just magnificent. Is that you make a list in the book that I find especially helpful I think you call it guiding principles and and I know this was after the fact because you started making the garden in nearly thirty years ago or twenty years ago, and you wrote the book just recently, but but it's good for those of US making Gardener Getting Ready to find tuna. Revise our gardens to think about guiding principle so is this something like this sort of self assessment? What do I really care about? Is this something you do with clients when you first visit there places? If the let me get away with it, yes! And, sometimes, sometimes more successfully than than others. Yeah I don't have a form. That I had a a client, but I I WANNA. I as a designer WANNA be able to understand the context. The built context, the living context the landscape context. And the social context as well as how the Oman Gardner is going to use the US the space use the garden, and what their what their goals

Garden Gardens United States Augustus Saint Gaudens Corner Gardens Wanna Ellen Shipman Saint God Arnold Arboretum Oman Gardner Radcliffe Institute Cornish National Park Gerald Plot Boston Cambridge
Chicago Bulls tab Nuggets GM Arturas Karnisovas to lead basketball ops

WGN Nightside

00:08 sec | 6 months ago

Chicago Bulls tab Nuggets GM Arturas Karnisovas to lead basketball ops

"WGN sports Chicago Bulls reportedly finalizing a deal to make Denver Nuggets GMR Turrell Cornish abyss the bulls next head of basketball

Chicago Bulls Basketball WGN
"cornish" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

09:50 min | 6 months ago

"cornish" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"You can hear conversations and stories from NPR journalists who are covering the pandemic the public health fight against it and the world is coping. I'm your host. Kelly mcevers listen and subscribe to corona virus daily from NPR. We are back. You're listening to. It's been a minute from NPR. I'm Sam Sanders this episode. We are focusing on the funny featuring my colleague Audie Cornish. She's talking about a series of conversations. She's had with funny women. Comedians who were rule breakers and have pave their own paths in a very dude centric. Comedy World WanNa share now a bit of a conversation that already had last year with the comedian Jenny slate they both spoke before a live audience in Washington DC. You may know Jenny slate from the movies from her time on. Snl from her comedy specials. But I I got to know her when she did the voice of Marcel. The shell with shoes on. Was this really cool. Youtube skips time. It just made me love. My name is Marcel and I'm partially Shell as you can see on my wate but I also have shoes and a face. So Marcel was stop. Motion Animated Talking Show. It was so weird and Quirky and poignant just like Jenny slate and her comedy. I'm excited to share this chat with you. All audie talked with Jenny slate right around the time Jenny. Released her memoir. Little Weird's and Netflix. Special Stage Fright. Audie says that Ginny is like lemonade their sweetness but quote acid as well. All right here's their chat. I think you'll enjoy it a often find when I've told people I'm doing this. Show they go. Oh Yeah I know her. And then there's like pause where they can't explain maybe the funny thing or how they know your funnier whatever it is so I wanted to talk about your origins as a writer. Okay because your dad is a poet yes and I hear you have a degree in literature from Columbia. Do so you didn't just sort of sit down and you know dabble in the writing of books. How did you come to it? That's true I read a lot of books before I decided to write one interesting on many people do so I knew what they were just like fine paper and try to draw then right words and be like. I made a new thing. I Yeah I knew what books were. Yeah get to that point. I don't often do this. And say like on the back of the booklets as an interviewer and makes it look like. You haven't read the book however this is a very good back of the book describes the book as a of the many things you learn about the ghost of captain of French Kissing Rabbit Birth death and a vagina singing saddled songs. Yeah I put both a question mark and an exclamation point there. I don't know how I expected to convey that on saying. But it's an interesting kind of comedy and like. How did you come to the funny in your writing? I mean if we can go back a little bit to you as a kid where where was the funny. Where was the writing? How did they intersect? I think that I I very animal human and so I feel happier when people smile at me. I think it's very easy. It's an easy reaction and I think from a very young age. I knew that I felt happier when people are smiling and powerful. I could've caused that and that. If they smiled it meant that I could also make myself be happy. Obviously that's like a dangerous thing is GONNA say. Ding your your happiness in the hands of other people in that way right 'cause now you're waiting for them to respond to you well. It looks like you zoned in on my lifetime struggle as Laurie like yeah. It's not that hard to figure out what makes me tick or what pleases Mir hurts me. I guess but you know what I yeah. I've been thinking about this a lot. I was never like a class clown. I don't think I am. It doesn't seem like this would be true but I think I'm chatty as a way to get over shyness and I do I do feel shy. I think I was like obedient in school. I was never trying to like get attention but it was about joy it really was always about joy like making my grandfather laugh as a little kid just yielded so many wonderful results for me were kind of jokes. Made him laugh. I used to call their their landline. I mean we only had normal phones then and I used to do a voice and say like hello this is like Bagel Manoukian calling from combined. Jewish philanthropies you left your trade either parking lot and like he just loved it and he laughs so hard and it was like I always come from like a Jewish organization called in he just loved it and and it just felt legit to me because I used to you know. I watched him watched. Tv and laugh and like very early on new how to tell the difference between a fake laugh in a real life and when you can get that real nece from an adult for me it just made me feel like. Oh I'm real too and I am like I'm just as substantial as Nanan Papa. You've talked about a Gilda Radner as one of your comedy heroes. Can you talk about? Why like what what aspect of her work she would be. You know you would be quite young when she like was yeah. I don't think I wasn't born when she was on I was born in eighty two. You'd be encountering her work kind of later. Well my dad got these. Vhs tapes that were like a history of SNL and he like explicitly was like. You're like this. This is like you should see this because you're not like a cause. I also got as much as I did not. I was not a class. Clown couldn't pay attention in school and a lot of my comments. That would come back. We're like she's does not care to listen you know she doesn't care to listen. I think that I felt for a while. Like I wasn't smart because I couldn't listen. Traditionally and people were mad at me for it and my dad brought in these tapes of Gilda radner and new sort of like no. No No. You're just you're like this which is first of all a great honor for an feel that way when that tape I went in recognition or. Oh my God Dad. Why did you say this no it was? It was a huge honor and then it was just like how can I get? They're not how can I get that energy level or the urge to perform the? There's a sketch that Gilder does where I think it's called the Judy Miller show she shan? She's like a little girl Scout Brownie and And she's like jumping up and down on her bed in her room and just like playing with the whole sketches and she freaks out this woman alone they gave her the whole stage just freaks out for like seven minutes and she's exhausted she's out of breath and it's like it's like a silly silly sloppy ballet and I remember seeing that thinking like oh I don't want to be a ballerina. I WanNa be a funny thing like this and I just I just always kept myself angled in that direction at least even in my mind time for one more break when we come back Jenny slate talks about what actually happened at. Snl that leads were firing. I just think culturally like so regressive. I think that's what happens when you you have a creative vehicle that is helmed by someone for forty years. Brb This message comes from NPR sponsor. Discovered did you know that discover matches all the cash back? You're on your credit card at the end of your first year off with no limit to how much you can earn or how much they'll match plus discovers accepted at over ninety five percent of places in the US that take credit cards. So when you use your discover card get used hearing yes more often. Learn more at discover dot com slash. Yes Twenty Nineteen Nilson. Report limitations apply. Hey parents mindy year from wow in the world. Npr's podcast for all ages with schools. Out We are all looking for fun ways to educate and entertain our kids. Wow in the world has over one hundred science film scream free episodes to help them laugh and learn if Khartoum for their brains. Wow in the world from tinker cast and NPR. So fast forward and you actually.

Jenny slate NPR Audie Cornish Gilda Radner Snl Marcel Sam Sanders Kelly mcevers Washington DC Youtube Netflix US SNL writer Nanan Papa Nilson Columbia Khartoum Mir
"cornish" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

07:24 min | 6 months ago

"cornish" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Actors and again there are exceptions to this of course because there were moments in which we all got moments to shine but they were not as frequent as the man. It was like banging your head against the wall to be sort of get anybody to pay attention to write material for you and I came away from that show thinking to myself. Okay look if this is what it's going to be then. I don't think I'm going to do it so it's always been important to me to have a very happy supportive set to hire people who are fundamentally kind and generous and from that comes just so much fun. It's interesting hearing that clip audie. 'cause I feel like it speaks to a thing that women or minorities constantly have to deal with like it's not enough. Just be allowed into the room to get a seat right the table if the table if the room is inherently hostile to WHO? You are as a person based on how it's set up. What good does it do you write an obviously? Snl We've seen women on that show really flourish in the last decade or two I can imagine maybe Black and Brown comedians. Probably go through the same thing that she's talking about to your point. It's often also not about hostility if you're in a business in which the top benchmark is subjective and one of the contributing factors could be. Do we think this person is funny? Can I write something for them? do I know enough about who they are without writing something that doesn't come office racist or sexes or caricature You can really be stuck. Yes and to hear her saying no no no. I'm GonNa go through life creating the environment that works best for me. I can do my best one really shows not just ambition but someone understanding their power in saying this may have been a rough. Gig For me but I do have some power. And here's how I WANNA use it going forward and that gets to the final person I want to mention. Which is Margaret Show? She's another person who grabbed the brass ring right especially of the nineties. Having your own Sitcom this was the peak. It was because she was she was making history when she was very young. It was like the network. Sitcom led by an Asian woman. And she was what like maybe in her twenties. Exactly it was a big deal. It's a huge deal. She had this really acidic sharp West Coast intense sense of humor. And so she was being slotted into a TV show. That was literally all American girl. You know the premise. Being even though she's Asian she's just like you like that's literally the approach of the show and she is just a completely different creature so just to give you an example of her more. Typical Humor Here we are talking about one of the jokes that she still tells. Sometimes you'll see like a really beautiful Asian woman and she's with the most broke down busted white man and I'm just like is this small I think as an Asian American woman in your Lino like we're really fetish is by white culture and white men in particular and so there's this thing that we sort of gain power through having relationships with white men and that kind of thing is like it's almost it doesn't matter like our own of value pales in comparison to the value of Whiteness. So that's really what the joke is trying to say and trying to talk about the joke kind of crawls inside of the Stereo inside of the stereotype and inserted. It is like a fortune cookie. Wow you don't try to put her in a family. Sitcom bucks she is not cut out for. Abc nightly television. She's just not she is not. She's not but you know what you grab that ring. She found out it was tough. She had a hard time she said in the in her own writer's room and it's because she couldn't feel her own power now she came to it later in her career but now without a lot of ups and downs you know she's struggled With addiction and other issues and the person you see on stage in her today is someone who's really comfortable in their own skin and a lot of ways and she has found a really beautiful career and it's just really to me fascinating like how people pick themselves up. How people find their own path in the public even when it seems like they're not an easy fit 'cause like just two coats which out of all things considered host voice for a moment when she told that joke. I was like. Oh no girl. I can't laugh at that. I don't need the twitter hordes coming after me like this is not cool at all. I'm not even sure like is the kind of joke. That was funnier in the nineties. When I didn't know any better and now I just feel the side of the street I wanna be on me. I had a lot going through my head really. Just why put it on air? Because I'm like America. I love it speaking of things going through your head so you end up talking with all these amazing women making comedy did anything change for you. After these conversations in terms of how you see women in the workplace in comedy in the world in terms of how you see yourself as a woman working woman in comedy I feel like there are so many avenues to break into it now. that that is really great. Yeah there's so many ways for people to find an audience and be funny. That doesn't make it easier. I mean you will still right now. You can google a bunch of articles about like how it's hard to do x y and but I think there's an awareness now that like something that is funny doesn't have to be funny to everyone in the entire world for it not to be a value in good. I I mean like you can still be room for different voices. Yeah and I think. Lastly I've been really encouraged. By how in the end these women just embrace their own personalities as women like that. There's no more kind of apologizing. Nobody's funny for a girl anymore. I think that's really great. I love it audit. Thank you for this series for talking with me about all this stuff for being funny woman in the World Yourself Appreciate it thank you. Thank you so much. It's so great to share these with you. I really appreciate it. Oh Yeah I love stuff. Thank you all right time for a break. When we come back you will hear audie. Cornish live in conversation with another funny woman. Comedian JENNY SLATE. That is after the break. Brb Now this message comes from NPR sponsors story point one semester of story points a new wine brand who believes that wine and storytelling are the perfect parent much like a good story point builds layers of interest into their wines to create a bold velvety taste profile and everybody discover why story point received wine enthusiasts best buy award visit story point winds dot com slash minutes purchase as a special offer to NPR. Listener shipping is included in your online or the corona virus. Pandemic is changing everything really fast so we have created a podcast where.

"cornish" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

09:40 min | 6 months ago

"cornish" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Listeners this episode. We're going to give you another side of a voice of a person. You probably think you already know very well. What would the I joke in the Audie? Cornish comedy special be. You've thought about this for now. It's it's usually something like hey you don't look like what I thought either. A works every time. Yes that is the audie cornish one of the hosts of NPR's all things considered she my guest today and she is talking comedy. What were the name of the audie cornish comedy special not safe for work with AUDIE CORNISH FROM NPR? I'm Sam Sanders. It's been a minute for the last. Few months has been interviewing some really amazing and funny women for a very special. Npr series called. She's funny for this series. Audie interviewed Margaret. Show Nicole Buyer Julia. Louis DREYFUSS APARNA non churla Hannah Gadsby and Jenny slate. I WanNa talk with audie about the whole experience and also share a bed at one of those conversations. So you'll hear two things in this episode. I show breakdown all these funny women told her and what she learned from those talks. And then we're going to give you a nice long cut of one of those jets. You'll hear in this episode. Audie in conversation with Jenny slate the comic the movie star the former. Snl CAST member. All right let's get to the laughs chaotic Sam Sanders. Thanks for having me. How's it going good? I am excited to have you on to talk about this. Pretty cool series. You just did on women. In comedy you talked with Amazing Guests Teller folks what that series was and what you did well. Actually when we started out I thought Who Can we talk to? Who can hold the stage right because a lot of these are based on live stage interviews that we did and I also had in the back of my mind the turning the table series from NPR which was a series about women in Rock and pop and music. And I thought wouldn't it be great just to have a series of Comedians on? They can all be women. We won't really tell the audience that it's going. I'm in and the point is that why shouldn't they be spoken to about craft and ideas and what's going on in the culture in the same way men are and of course their femininity in how they operated within this mostly male kind of comedy culture came out so it ended up being like a central theme of the conversations. How they are rule-breakers. How they pick themselves up when they fall And how they think about trying to make an audience laugh without making themselves the butt of the joke if that makes sense. That's hard to do. It is so ati I really want to give our listeners of feel for the series of amazing conversations after the break. We're GONNA share a kind of longest version of your chat. Which any slate. But before that I wanNA give a little snippets of some of the other chats. The first person we spoke with Hannah Gadsby who made a huge clash with her Performance called net. And the reason why it was a big deal is because people were unsure like what's this funny with monologue was this stand Work is there's this moment kind of like towards the end where this funny comedy set in the spirit of funny comedy specials. She gets really dark and really serious and it becomes a totally different mood than your typical comedy. Show right and I have heard dissect that moment here. Okay when I was in Tasmania at a bus stop than I go make stumping a man's rage. I tell the story in the show at first like it's a joke and then I stripped it back so I do. What's known as a coal back? He was a bit of an idiot. Drunk idiot who thought I was a game and trying to hit on his girlfriend from Gopher and she's sticking on wall stop. It's a girl which still amuses me. It's like Dude. That's not how it works is not what this is really me and now. I'm like oh I'm comfortable I. It's a funny trope and it's also laughing at the country bumpkins you know. They're the homophobic and then later on in the show he beat me up ahead of me and nobody stopped him and I was sort of stuck in that trauma and I realized it was because I've been stopping short whenever it tell the story to the world and the world's going this is an acceptable narrative. A stranger whose dumb who from the country whose homophobic right and also? She's fine. Yeah Right. That's what allows us to laugh. Hey she's fine the all to easily laugh at country bumpkins but where I'm from. There are people like me living there trying to grow up in those places. The stakes are much higher than people realize. Really Yeah because you mock people they take it out on vulnerable painful so you taking on these issues caused a lot of Let's say consternation in the comedy world a lot of discussion about whether you're even a comedian. I mean what's incredible about that for me is that that's what they took out of the show like it seemed like people were saying. Look there are rules. This is what comedy is. This is what comedy is not are the rules and has a lot of your comedy been about just breaking them. Well if they no longer makes sense I don't mind breaking them and I'm a student of art history as well. I've seen this patent people break rules. They get accused of not being actual artists. And it's like this is. This is old news. I remember audie watching that special. She's talking about when it kind of takes a turn towards the dark and I recalled saying to myself on my couch in front of my TV. This shouldn't be happening this is. This is weird. I don't know how I feel about this. This feels uncomfortable. Did it feel the same way for you watching that special and did talking with her about this change? How you felt about it You know I did actually see the show and so I kind of felt that in the audience I felt that shift is people tried to understand like we can. I laugh at be laughing at this and I mean two things are going on. They're not to get. But as an interviewer. I wanted her to dissect a joke. I think it's very easy to ask someone like that. A question like what's it like to meet? Lbj Take care about right instead of just saying how do you write a joke about an extremely painful experience? Yeah that you know. The audience is not going to understand how to react to and you can hear. She really is a very She's someone who intellectualize things so she has broken down every sentence of that in and how we're going to feel and I really wanted to showcase that intellect the interview and the other thing is when she talks about the cycle of rule-breaking. You know that I. They say this isn't what it's supposed to be. And then they say you're not even an artist and then and then maybe you get that critical acclaim and I think so many of these women have that in common where they start doing a certain kind of work and then everyone's like you're not doing it right in fact you're not doing it right so much. I don't even think you really know what you're doing. Maybe you're not cut out for this. And then they pick themselves up and choose a new direction. Creating Your own art that is Born of you and your identity isn't always about doing it. In opposition to the way white men have done it And that can be a very difficult thing. Artistically creatively to find your way to that it's not about saying well they would do it this way so. I'm going to do it this way looking inside of yourself and saying how would I do this if I were totally free to do what I wanted to do. How would I do it if I was totally free to be an individual and be treated as such what do I think is funny and I think that is an intriguing part of hearing them? Each kind of articulate how they reach that moment yeah. Is there another moment? That kind of gets to that idea of. I'm just going to do it how I WANNA do it. Forget the systems in the patriarchy. I think if we could talk about Julia Louis Dreyfuss for a moment just do it. Because she's a good example of someone who really right. She's been in this system. You can't get bigger than Seinfeld and then you can't get bigger than V exactly. It's actually always been good and she joined snl when she was just a teenager. I didn't know that ought to her. Yeah Yeah it's a really lovely moment I WanNa play that for you but going into it. Just think about this everyone who goes on? Snl they're really only trying to make one guy laugh. Lorne Etienne guys you taming. Who is very hard to read? So you have. This is the context And here's what she had to say. When we kind of brought her back to those early days there was a culture in which the writers who were mainly male would only right the really meaty funny stuff for other male.

AUDIE CORNISH NPR Sam Sanders snl Hannah Gadsby Julia Louis Dreyfuss Jenny slate Amazing Guests Teller Nicole Buyer Julia CAST Louis DREYFUSS Tasmania Gopher Lorne Etienne Seinfeld Margaret
Romney's vote surprised Trump impeachment team

All Things Considered

04:33 min | 8 months ago

Romney's vote surprised Trump impeachment team

"From NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm Audie Cornish and I'm very that was Kelly the impeachment trial of president Donald J. trump is over it is therefore ordered and a judge that the said Donald John trump be and he is hereby acquitted of the charges in said articles the Senate has voted to acquit Donald Trump the votes on two articles of impeachment came after two years of impassioned speeches from senators from both parties justifying their decisions acquit or convict and while most fell in line with their own party's position one broke away creating bipartisan opposition to the president NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey snow has been following it all from Capitol Hill she joins me now he kills hi there so it has been abundantly clear since before this trial began that Democrats were not going to have the sixty seven votes they needed to convict president trump what struck you as you watch this final historic day play out today was very somber very quiet the senators and all of their staff or just simply exhausted it was really interesting to me that the gallery of the public areas where people can come and sit and watch were as full as I have ever seen in my ten years up here in this was nearly a party line vote as he said and we knew what the outcome was but people are really interested and you know the person that we watch so closely through all of this was Mitt Romney of Utah and he went to the Senate floor earlier today and broke with his party on the first article of impeachment abuse of power and that really kind of set the energy back in play around here where there are protesters everywhere and it kind of give a break to the shuffling through of speeches that kind of brought us to the end of this trial thank you senator honest decision on that to vote on that one count against the president we were all watching for it it still was quite dramatic to to to watch him actually vote for it on the Senate floor just walk us through how he explained his vote well it was very dramatic because he is the first in order to vote to convict the president of their own party and he delivered this very emotional speech where he repeatedly tie this decision back to his religion I am profoundly religious my faith is at the heart of who I am and then he took a very long pause and composed himself and his voice broke several times when he was explaining that he took an oath before god and knew that making this judgment would be one of the most difficult he had ever faced but he said he was convinced that the president was guilty of what he was accused of and he did meet the threshold of high crimes and misdemeanors he says he knows will be pilloried for it and he didn't see any other choice this is what he said I'm sure to hear abuse from the president and his supporters does anyone seriously believe that I would consent of these consequences other than from an inescapable conviction that my oath before god demanded of me Kelsey is he hearing abuse what's been the reaction to mit Romney's decision well Donald Trump junior says he should be kicked out of the party but the Republican senators I talked to basically don't agree with that as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell was asked about this repeatedly after the vote today and he said he was surprised and disappointed buddy said rami still works with the party and there are no dog houses in the Senate but I will note that Romney was the first senator out of the chamber after he shook hands with his desk mate hi what about on the other side of the aisle there had been some suspense that maybe Democrats would cross party lines in particular three Democrats who represent states that president trump one in in twenty sixteen that that didn't happen it didn't happen they were all United and a senator Joe Manchin in particular of West Virginia was really lauded and and celebrated when they came to the Senate floor before the vote he had basically a receiving line of people coming to give him a hug it's important because president trump and no longer can claim that there was bipartisan opposition to his impeachment like that he could claim in the house yeah so impeachment the trial is over but is the Ukraine drama over on Capitol Hill it doesn't seem like that a Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says it's all in the rear view mirror but he doesn't control of the house and over in the house house Judiciary Committee chairman Jerry Nadler said a subpoena could be coming for former national security adviser John Bolton and they're still that book that Bolton has written and should be coming out shortly so there is still drama around impeachment even if the final votes are cast NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey smell speaking to us from Capitol Hill thank you Kelsey thank

Audie Cornish NPR
An deep dive into Trump’s 2020 State of the Union speech

Q

12:10 min | 8 months ago

An deep dive into Trump’s 2020 State of the Union speech

"I'm Audie Cornish in Washington earlier we heard from president Donald Trump and we just heard the voice of Michigan governor Gretchen Wimmer who presented the democratic response to president trump stated the union speech we have several folks here tonight to do some analysis about all that we heard we're gonna start within the within eighteen L. Shammi who was the chief of staff to speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi and Brendan Buck who was a spokesman for the former house speaker Paul Ryan bring you guys both in for your expertise how what we heard tonight now if you're on Twitter there were a lot of conservatives you you're you're using a lot of exclamation points and saying this is the best thing that they've ever heard Democrats not saying the same I want to start with you Brendan what did you make of the president's focus tonight how we deliver that yeah and this is certainly a confident president in a way that you know you might expect a president who's at his all time high in in the latest Gallup poll who is just really defeated impeachment and have the Democrats sort of in disarray he started off with all of those economic status just making the case that things are going well in this country talk about how we're we're not gonna turn back and really was just riding high right some of his quotes it insane three years of my administration three and a half million working age people of join the work force in leaning really hard into that at the top in it and it was a lot of job well done on my part and very little agenda going forward I counted this is not an official count but I counted only ten things in which he is calling on Congress to do anything in a lot of those were relatively small ball usually a president comes in with a big agenda here's all the things I want to do and you really have to dig in there to find them some of it is funding neo natal research funding a child tax credit sanctuary cities sending Americans to Mars things like that that don't really come together in a real way but another take way as as sue was talking about from the room if I've seen a lot of state of the union this was as divided and cold as I've ever seen you could almost hear brewing from some of the Democrats and that is just really stark and the Nancy Pelosi interactions yeah she she tried to shake his hand and he did do it she actually tore up his speech at the end that that's remarkable I've never seen anything like that the team let's have you jump in on your former boss there people were watching her and her behavior very closely but first your reaction to some of the things you heard tonight shoring it was a fascinating speech the king can I give you a look into president trump's mine and that we were hoping that he would meet the commander in chief test but then said that I believe he produced a speech that was made for TV made for TV moments and Brandon is exactly right some of the big issues bi partisan issues that he could work with Democrats on infrastructure he had two lines and infrastructure of prescription drugs he really did not go into specifics as to get me a bell and I will sign it these are opportunities lost a lucky get a showing at age she has to do is to tell Democrats thank you for working with me on U. S. M. C. A. and he didn't right you mentioned that it was signed by it was that yeah and and I and also in terms of I've I've seen many states to the union I've been there and I think this is stands up to when president Obama was to during the ACA negotiations and trying to get the bill passed it was it was that same feeling that you had in those to complete the process I want to take a moment now to fact check some of what we heard both the president's speech in the democratic response NPR's Scott Horsley is here to help us do that welcome Scott they do with it this speech was kind of the theme of it was the great American come back the president spent considerable time talking about the economy both his and the prior administration's but here's a sample of that in just three short years we have shattered the mentality of American decline and we have rejected the downsizing of Americans destiny we have totally rejected the downsizing we're moving forward at a pace that was unimaginable just a short time ago and we are never ever going back Scott who was Anderson economy were looking at the one the president's describing characteristically here Donald Trump exaggerates how strong the economy is now and how weak it was when he came into office the fact is the economy was pretty good in twenty seventeen and it's still pretty good now the economy last year grew two point three percent that is exactly the average for the last decade the U. S. added six point seven million jobs in the first thirty five months after trump took office pretty impressive but not unprecedented in the previous thirty five months the U. S. added nearly eight million jobs so really less of a comeback than a more less straight line continuation a lot of people also measure the economy by the size of their own paychecks right in this president described this as a blue collar boom after decades of flat and falling incomes wages are rising fast and wonderfully they are rising fastest for low income workers who have seen a sixteen percent pay increase since my election Scott Horsley is our chief economics correspondent and of course was a long time White House correspondents so to help us understand how he's trying to frame these specific numbers wage wages have been rising faster than inflation that's good for workers there read real purchasing power's been going up but wage gains of actually moderated in recent months in the twelve months ending in December average wages rose just two point nine percent compared to three point four percent earlier in the year and that deceleration in pay hikes is a little surprising given the very low unemployment rate we have now is encouraging as the president says that wages for people at the bottom of the income ladder have been rising faster than those the top that's partly because a lot of states have raised their minimum wages the present also talked about the very large stock market gains that we've seen since the election of twenty sixteen it is way up not seventy percent as he said but the Dow's up fifty seven percent stock ownership are is heavily concentrated among the rich eighty four percent of those gains have gone to just the top ten percent of earners and forty five percent of Americans don't own any stock at all I want to pause for a second and go to Ron Elving because when you think about the last impeach president he was giving a seat at the union is also the person we attribute this it's the economy stupid kind of sloganeering and so is this something that the president should lean hard into especially given what his democratic rivals are talking about why would he not why would he not take credit for where the car a condom use today presidents have suffered when the economy was poor even if it wasn't their fault and even when it wasn't really that bad and even when it was recovering I'm thinking here by George HW bush in nineteen ninety two very short very shallow recession and yet he was pummeled with it and that has happened in other occasions and we've also seen presidents come and office riding on a long recovery such as the one from say about two thousand nine two thousand ten forward into two thousand seventeen and tack on a few more years with policies and there's no question that this president has cut regulations and cut taxes what particularly for a corporations and to some to be wealthy individuals which has juice the economy if you're further but he did come in riding on a long recovery which may be slowing down a little bit now but he basically takes credit for all of it and says that when he came into office it was a situation of American carnage I want to come back to Scott Horsley here because another issue one of factcheck health care promises the president spoke about also Michigan governor Gretchen Widmer who delivered the democratic response here's an example of something the president spoke about one hundred and thirty two lawmakers in this room have endorsed legislation to impose a socialist takeover of our healthcare system wiping out the private health insurance plans of one hundred and eighty million very happy Americans to those watching at home tonight I want you to know we will never let socialism destroy American health care members we talk about the language is using their this is obviously divisive issue even within the Democratic Party some of the presidential candidates on the democratic side Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren have favored a single payer plan that would eliminate private insurance in warrants case over a period of time other Democrats though want to preserve a role for private insurance for those people who want it we should also point out the president did make what he called an iron clad pledged to protect patients with pre existing condition did he explain how we do that he he did not in this this is surely the biggest Whopper in tonight's speech the president knows a protection for patients with pre existing conditions as popular so he pays lip service to it but if anything his administration has has whittled away at those protections and of course they're they're fighting to overturn the affordable Care Act which is where those protections come from I want to talk about another big issue border security the president talked about this one even before he you know what it was the nominee and hit that thing again tonight my administration has undertaken an unprecedented effort to secure the southern border of the United States this statement seems vague but it's got I believe you've kind of dug into it what do you know the administration has made a series of sweeping changes to limit access to asylum seekers at the border I'd sent tens of thousands of migrants back to Mexico to wait for their day in immigration courts and administration credits those policies for a very sharp drop in the number of migrants who are being taken into custody the border in a last may we saw that number peek at a recent high about a hundred forty thousand last month the number was down to around twenty nine thousand so a drop of about eighty percent our allies in this gets at some of what we would call kind of red meat or culture were issues that we heard the president talking about he said he was calling upon members of Congress to pass legislation banning late term abortion of babies he talked about the idea of a sanctuary cities and kind of going after sanctuary states how did he balance this part of the speech with what we heard about the economy well I think those are the two parts of the president's campaign message one is to say you're better off now than you were four years ago the economy is great he said it's greater than ever before in American history but also the president is at heart a culture warrior and he believes that cultural issues are more powerful than economic ones and there is some evidence that might suggest he's right for instance the parts of the country that are reaping the most benefits from the trump economy are the ones where his approval ratings are the worst and the parts of the country that are not reaping the benefits that are doing badly record farm bankruptcy is a manufacturing recession those are the parts of the country where his numbers are the highest why I think because of the cultural issues he's pretty face the voters in those places think he's protecting them against criminal immigrants he talked about those he highlighted once again this is a staple for him a family whose family member has been killed by an undocumented immigrant so these are the two parts of his message one is you never had it so good and the other is you know the Democrats want to ruin your your way of life and that's the message to the public we want to talk about what it was like inside the capitol congressional correspondent kills the smell is there tonight moments ago she spoke with the second highest ranking Republican representative in the house that Steve Scalise we did see a pretty tepid response from Democrats on most things including things other were bye bye things that should have been bipartisan that always have been bipartisan it almost is is like they have this personal hatred against the president and they're letting it see through where they're opposing good policies and you should always put your personal differences on the

Audie Cornish Washington President Trump Donald Trump Michigan Gretchen Wimmer
Federal Financial Aid Form Causes A Stir — Over Selective Service Question

All Things Considered

00:12 sec | 9 months ago

Federal Financial Aid Form Causes A Stir — Over Selective Service Question

"The selective service question on the fax the form caused a stir on social media over the weekend All Things Considered has the details from NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm ari Shapiro and Ahmadi Cornish another bit of fallout from the U. S. strike against Iran a burst of social media memes from young people worried about checking off the box for selective service on the federal financial aid form

Iran NPR Ari Shapiro Ahmadi Cornish
"cornish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:48 min | 9 months ago

"cornish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Ability Cornish Hey U. S. you started it we will end it those words were printed on science Kerry to turn around today as the casket of an Iranian general made its way through the streets hundreds of thousands of mourners came for the funeral of general Qassem Soleimani people when they beat their chests so money was killed in a U. S. drone strike in Iraq last week Iran is going hard revenge president trump is going destruction inside Iran if its forces target Americans narcos meri Lee's Kelly is one of the few American journalist on the ground inside Iran today she joins us now on the line from Tehran please can you tell us a little bit more about what this was like I mean we're talking about people here openly weeping in the streets we are and we're talking about in less enormous just wall to wall masses of people in the street sweeping not just men but women and children were babies in strollers the streets were just packed all of the women that we saw our most of the women in the traditional head to toe black mourning garb many people carrying photos of so many many people carrying banners carrying flags one flight that we saw over was this bright crimson flag with the words hard revenge written down at one woman had taken it and draped it over her black head scarf so she moved down the street this crimson flag with the revenge word is is rippling behind her and you know we don't know what form not revenge will take what exactly around may choose to do to retaliate we do know at the funeral today sue the money's daughters a knob spoke I wanna let you hear of just a little bit of how she sounded.

Kerry Iraq Iran trump Kelly Cornish Qassem Soleimani president meri Lee Tehran
Lebanese Reaction To Nissan's Ex- Chief Fleeing Japan For Lebanon

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:43 min | 9 months ago

Lebanese Reaction To Nissan's Ex- Chief Fleeing Japan For Lebanon

"It's a Cliche to say this next story. Sounds like a Hollywood movie and yet former Nissan Chairman Carlos Goan had his passport seized. He was under twenty four hour. Our surveillance in Tokyo he escaped from Japan and then turned up in Lebanon. This means he will likely avoid going to trial in Tokyo where he faces financial misconduct charges charges. And it seems that Lebanon's government has welcomed him. So how did he get their Khloe. Cornish with the Financial Times is reporting out this story. She's on skype from in Beirut. Hey chloe I know so. You've been talking to people who have been talking to Carlos Jones family. Are we any closer to solving the mystery of how this man got Out of Japan. What are they telling you? I'm not I really to be honest at this point. Able to say how he got out of Japan and what what we do know at this point that he had a French possible in his possession which he was able to use what we do also know now this morning learning is that Turkish authorities are looking into how he was able to transit through techie on his way from Asaka in Japan to Ebanon which is what he seemed to have done. Sexual therapies at concerned that his entry and exit to the country wasn't registered That's interesting you also found out that he hired private investigators instigators right. What was their role in this so I just just to be fair? I didn't find that out but the so it's not private. Investigators I am but it's believed that a private security company was used to help orchestrate this this escape flight from Japan which clearly like took a lot. Uh Planning right as you say. Twenty four seven so they events you also reported that Lebanese officials had been pushing for his release. And I think this is one of the really interesting things things about Carlos going. This is what you might call a worldly man Can you explain to people why Lebanon is so interested in him in particular he has family roots roots. There right. Yes so call US Lawson which is how you pronounce? His name and Arctic is a Lebanese citizen. His his family are from Lebanon. He spent quite a large chunk of his childhood in Lebanon. He was he was born in Brazil and he has business interests here as well just sort of small business interests on the side of being one of the world's various automotive moguls and he's part owner of a winery and He he holds a Lebanese passport and the Lebanese government which which I found out yesterday had actually requested his extradition from Japan back in November last year in the formal formal letters to the Japanese government. And this was a request that was reiterated. Actually just a week ago in kind of coincidental timing When the Japanese foreign minister made an official visit to Beirut on some of the twentieth so at a meeting with The Lebanese beneath President and the Japanese far far Minnesota this file was was raised again. This request of Mr Corson's extradition was an for him to face trial in Lebanon rather than Japan was was raised again. I see in very quickly. What do Lebanese people ordinary people think of him for a long time on call us? Washington has been seen as a sort of August of successes. Eleven expatriate Lebanon has a very strong business culture and also has a huge population relation. But it's fair to say his is dimming. There's another I would think. Maybe he's maybe he is guilty. They don't they don't know financial supporter. khloe corners. Thanks so much thank you.

Lebanon Japan Carlos Goan Mr Corson Khloe Corners Lebanese Government Beirut Tokyo Carlos Jones Financial Times Carlos Hollywood Chairman Nissan Us Lawson Cornish Asaka Ebanon
Putin meets with Ukraine leader Zelensky for the first time

All Things Considered

00:59 sec | 10 months ago

Putin meets with Ukraine leader Zelensky for the first time

"From NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm Audie Cornish and I'm ari Shapiro the leaders of Russia and Ukraine have just wrapped up talks in Paris it's an attempt to end the war in eastern Ukraine where thirteen thousand people have already died this is the first time you cranes new president Philo demerits Lynskey has met with Vladimir Putin the two leaders talked about the outcome of the meeting in a joint press conference and we're joined now by NPR's leucine Kim who's been watching from Moscow hi Lucy in a R. E. this was supposed to be peace summit in hopes of resolving a five year long conflict between the two countries that were there any breakthroughs no this was largely a confirmation of the status quo of the peace process called the Minsk agreement that started in twenty fourteen this process has been completely frozen for the past three years so in some sense it could be considered progress that the lens can Putin even met the less he said going into this meeting he was looking for a lasting ceasefire along the whole front line and an exchange of all prisoners

Audie Cornish Russia Paris Ukraine President Trump Philo Lynskey Vladimir Putin NPR KIM Moscow Lucy Ari Shapiro Minsk Three Years Five Year
Democrats, GOP prepare for public impeachment hearings Wednesday

All Things Considered

03:56 min | 11 months ago

Democrats, GOP prepare for public impeachment hearings Wednesday

"Cornish White House aides diplomats and Pentagon officials have spent hours behind closed doors in the house impeachment inquiry they have answer lawmakers questions about president trump and Ukraine and those lawmakers have since released thousands of pages of written testimony and now we get to hear three of those witnesses in their own words on Wednesday it's the acting ambassador to Ukraine and the Deputy Assistant Secretary of state for the region then on Friday the former ambassador to Ukraine testifies in the impeachment inquiry NPR's ten Mack joins us now for preview welcome to the studio Hey there before we get to the week ahead I understand the house intelligence committee has released several new transcript of their clothes store depositions one in particular jumped out at you whose is it what do they say so the one that jumped out to me is the transfer for Laura Cooper she's a Pentagon official in charge of the defense department's policy toward Ukraine she says the Pentagon certified that Ukraine's military met certain anti corruption benchmarks that were required for their portion of the aid to flow that's the Pentagon's portion of the aid to flow what's interesting about this is that it kind of undercuts the president's own argument which that he held up a because he was concerned about Ukrainian corruption in fact his own department of defense had said Ukraine was meeting U. S. benchmarks on corruption now I want to talk about the public hearings what exactly will happen during these next two days so usually committee hearings are kind of you've seen them there five minutes for a Republican lawmaker and then five minutes for democratic lawmaker but the house recently passed rules for the impeachment inquiry and this allows for longer periods of questioning Republicans and Democrats will be allowed to ask questions for a street forty five minutes each that I can only be used by the chairman that's German Adam Schiff or the ranking member that's Republican Devin newness or the lawyer on the committee that the does that day the logic behind this is that there are complicated issues here at play in these hearings and the five minutes just isn't enough to establish fact patterns or get deeper into some of the important issues that they're trying to discuss as though there's gonna be at least one initial round of this poll long questioning and then we move into this more typical five minute back and forth of lawmaker questions so even though we've seen some transcripts from some of these witnesses the senses were gonna learn more from them in public testimony yeah I think that the logic is very similar to bring Robert Muller before the committee after the mall report came out that it's one thing to read testimony it's another thing to hear people who were present during the events that were looking into actually talk about why they think there might have been presidential misconduct why they felt the way they did as one sign of the high stakes Republicans are swapping in one member of the committee for another congressman can you tell us about them congressman Jim Jordan is going to be brought on to the committee he's a Republican who is the top Republican on the house oversight committee he's an ardent defender of the president at the ranking member of the house intelligence committee is Devin newness he's been pretty hostile towards the press generally he doesn't really do interviews outside of conservative media but Jordan has been very vocal he's been in all the closed door deposition and he speaks to the press which is one of the several reasons why Republicans have tapped him to do this role and I understand Republicans have their own list of people they want to testify who are those people will actually testify well over the weekend they basically released their wish list the names they put out include vice president Joe Biden's son that anonymous whistle blower who filed a complaint that started this whole process off a former Democratic National Committee staffer people like that but Democrats will need to sign off on any Republican witnesses that's part of the rules that they passed in the house so it's unlikely that Republicans will get many if any of their witness requests that's an pierced him mac in this week's open impeachment hearings will be hosted live gavel to gavel on many NPR

Donald Trump Ukraine White House Pentagon President Trump Five Minutes Forty Five Minutes Five Minute Two Days
Change Starts in the Kitchen

Farm Small Farm Smart

05:54 min | 1 year ago

Change Starts in the Kitchen

"The more you know about the food system the more you're you're impulse begun becomes to take take charge of your diet and take charge of your eating and then the more you realize that the only way way to do that is to cook your own food. When you cook your food you're able to buy directly from farmers otherwise you're not. It's it's all part of shortening the food chain and knowing more about what you're putting into your body. It's hard even if you're letting restaurants. Cook for you. You have no idea what kind of oil they're using when they're frying food. No idea the standards of you know the quality of the ingredients they're using so there's only one way to know all that which is to cook the food yourself or have you know have someone you love or or if you're wealthy up enough someone you employ cooking your food for you so. I think that it's all of a piece and that's one of the reasons I wrote that book was I came to see that this this movement to to kind of take back control the food system was GONNA top out pretty soon if people inclined to cook because as long as we're outsourcing those decisions to corporations we're not going to have the knowledge we know and also frankly when we outsource cooking and that's when we get industrial agriculture. Those two things are very closely related. It's really when we started moving toward fast food that we started moving toward these very we big monocultures and this industrialization of animal agriculture because those companies want very uniform product exact same variety you know are they wanNA. Cornish Cross chicken and they wanNA rested Burbank potato and they want corn fed beef and and there's no room for diversity so monocultures in the Diet produced despite outsourced industrial cooked food lead to monocultures in the field and that's why I decided that writing a book that would encourage people to see the the importance of cooking as as an agricultural act as a political act was really important and that's really what launched me on that process and then I discovered all these other wonderful benefits of cooking that I didn't know but you know the importance for farming. What we've seen over the last seventy five years is we've industrialized system system is that a smaller and smaller percentage of the food dollar goes to the farmer as you let corporations process and package and ship up your food so we're down around? What is it ten about. Ten percent of the food dollar is is is reaching the farmer now but if you're cooking for yourself off that number goes way up because you can then shop at farmers markets where farmers recover you know over ninety percent of the cost of the food or you can buy directly from farmers. If you want to join us say all these things don't work if you're not cooking. I mean you know what do you do with the CSI box. If you're not cooking you know unless you're getting off route. The two things are just intimately linked the practice of everyday home cooking almost everyday home cooking in supporting this a vibrant agriculture and and the longer the food chain the less of the dollar the farmer's going to get in the industrial food chain today the people who make the packages make more take more of that food dollar home than the people who grow the food and that's you know that's an argument for disassembling that system to the extent we can to keep performers healthy when you also have these open lines of communication between farmers and consumers and not a lot of middlemen the consumers able to signal farmers what they want and what they like and and and that they're willing to pay a premium for food the taste better for example and vice versa. I mean the farmer can communicate with the consumer to and explain what he's doing and why what she's doing and what and it's that that openness of along food chain and treating food is commodities carousing as culture that leads to indifference because you know there's so many farm. I remember asking George Naylor once who was a corn and soybean being grower that I profiled and Omnivore Salaam I and I was curious to know whether he had any sense of the eater at the other end of the food chain and I said so who you growing all this food for four and he didn't skip a beat. He's in the military industrial complex and you know small farmers you know tied into a local food economy. Never I say that they know who they're growing. They met these people. It's not an abstraction but food is becoming an abstraction industrial system. It's a commodity it's number two commodity corn corn as long as it hits basic standard. Nobody cares how you grew it. What pesticides used how you treated. Soil doesn't matter all that gets lost so part of it is is reattaching all that information to food which say all the indications of quality and our food system is or has been organized organized around quantity rather than quality and that's a big part of our problem. It's a big part of our health problem with food. I mean I think one of the problems with agriculture in this country is is a morale problem problem and one of the things that people get from participating local food economy is this level of recognition and appreciation and we all like that in our work we all need that in our work and the other thing too that farmers really benefit from having more than one customer so many people growing commodity crops they sell to the elevator and they take take the price at the elevator dictates and that's it and they to lose control and farmers like nothing better than having a choice of who to sell L. Their food too and also being able to name their price and not just be a price taker so there are many benefits of the food chain. I think the farmers now. There's also more work as a farmer. You then have to become a marketer also and you have to spend that time at the farmer's market or putting together U._C._S. boxes. There's no question that it's more work but for many farmers. It's a lot more rewarding as well.

Burbank George Naylor Seventy Five Years Ninety Percent Ten Percent
Trump's whistleblower complaint

All Things Considered

05:02 min | 1 year ago

Trump's whistleblower complaint

"From NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm ari Shapiro and an Audi Cornish ridiculous that's how president trump is describing allegations that he had improper conversations with another foreign leader they're reportedly at the heart of a whistle blower complaint from someone in the intelligence community that complaint and the acting director of national intelligence is refuse refusal to share it with Congress has resulted in a stand off between the executive and legislative branches of government president trump says there's nothing wrong with how he talks to other world leaders during a news conference with Australian prime minister Scott Morrison today I've had conversations with many leaders that always appropriate thanks god can tell you that always appropriate at the highest level always appropriate and anything I do a fight for this country I fight so strongly for this country it's just another political hack job speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi doesn't see these accusations as a political hack job I sat down with her this morning in a conference room just offer office along with NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis who begins this part of our conversation I'm sure you're aware of the reports of a whistleblower raising questions about actions the president took his personal attorney Rudy Giuliani said he spoke to the government of the Ukraine asking to investigate the Biden family just this morning president trump said quote someone ought to look into Joe Biden quote your reaction just another example of the lack of integrity decency and patriotism on the part of this administration we don't know the facts we don't know if the Ukraine is the country that is the subject of the telephone conversation that remains to be seen but what is the fact is the law and the law says the director of national intelligence shall not should not may we encourage shell convey the whistle blower information to the intelligence committees in the Congress and right now they're breaking the law. to that end if there is evidence that there is law breaking or if there is evidence that the president is trying to interfere with the twenty twenty election by asking a foreign entity to investigate political opponents does that change the calculation on impeachment we've always been in search of the fax and that is the calculus is whether the facts were in court on four cases right now whether it's the president's taxes whether it's his bank accounts whether it's as accounting and his emoluments this case has a national security piece to it that is very alarming because it inspector general is appointed by president trump if in fact it is as is described described this of urgency enough concern and again the law says this director of national intelligence shall send the information you refer to a lack of integrity decency and patriotism by this president you are as different station in the path of them on the blanket you're describing potential acts of lawbreaking and many people here that and say if Congress does not pursue impeachment does it forever change the standard of what is acceptable behavior by any president I don't know about lawbreaking and said we don't have the information of immense suggested I said that because we don't have the information and I while others may speculate I have to go on the basis of the law and the facts and that's where decisions will be made our founders could never suspect the president would be so abusive of the constitution of the United States that the separation of powers would be irrelevant to him and that he would continue any president would continue to withhold fax from the Congress which are part of the constitutional right of inquiry so this is in a different class in terms of his behavior but again the facts and the law I do think that we will have to pass some laws. that will have clarity for future presidents president should be indicted if he's committed upon doing any while in office any presence there is nothing any place that says the president should not be indicted as if it's the justice department interpretation by the president's lawyers that's what that is so that people will steal okay well if he does something wrong should be able to be indicted the president should not be able to interpret the national security act as something that gives him free reign to do anything he wants by his personal declaration that something is an emergency and it behooves Congress to make sure whether it's trade agreements that he says he has the ability to do this that and the other thing Congress has to retain its power in all the days of rain but hasn't he proven the point that Congress is not very strong right now and not very effect but he's at thirty eight percent in the polls I think the public is making some judgment about him and it will remain under fifty percent in the polls four five R. can it's beat him when they we haven't even decided who are can

Donald Trump NPR Ari Shapiro President Trump Thirty Eight Percent Fifty Percent
"cornish" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:22 min | 1 year ago

"cornish" Discussed on KCRW

"Audie Cornish for decades California has had a powerful tool and its fight against air pollution that's the authority to set its own rules for auto emissions rules that thirteen other states currently follow but the trump administration says there is no reason California should have this ability and by revoking the state's authority to set these rules president trump argues that cars will become cheaper and safer for everyone and create more. now this sets up the latest of many legal fights over the environment between California and the trump administration California Attorney General heavier but Serra says the state is ready for it. we like them I have looked at the law and the facts and know that what you're trying to do would be a violation of law you know one of the things the president tried to argue on Twitter today is that he said that that there wouldn't be much of a difference between the California standard in the news U. S. standard and he's also trying to make the argument that somehow this would make cars safer and less expensive because they would be produced more cheaply under uniform standard well if you don't believe that climate change is real then of course you could say that but the wild fires and droughts the floods and mudslides so to start for you the the California standard in the U. S. and are too far apart the California standard and the U. S. standard are the same and the trump administration is trying to backslide from those standards they're also trying to California that we can continue to do what we've done for nearly five decades and that is to do what we must for our state to make sure we're cleaning our err the EPA administrator and Wheeler has said federalism does not mean that one state can dictate standards for the nation can you make the case why California it should and not just a case based on historical precedent we're moving the way Congress permitted us to move the clean air act provides for this waiver authority the consequences have been great for everyone in that not only have we been able to keep California cleaner when it comes to our but the rest of the nation is also benefit with cleaner cars step cleaner air and the kind of economy and healthcare system that allows us to let our people live longer. back in July the state made a deal with vehicle manufacturers on fuel economy standards and the ministration says they think that might be illegal the department of justice has launched an antitrust investigation into this deal is an example of antitrust violations the word that comes to mind is ludicrous and it's unfortunate because the American public is being treated to the type of circus that comes when you use the weight of the oval office to try to threaten an industry to do what you want them to do even though they're signalling clearly that they want to move in a different direction after the announcement from the White House have you heard from auto manufacturers are they gonna stick with you the interesting thing is you haven't heard the automatic sector saying anything about being with the president there is not an automatic section that I know of that has publicly articulated a position in line with the trump administration so right now you're taking that silence as a kind of tacit support I think the trump administration recognizes that that silence is a clear sign that industry is hoping that the trump administration will pull back before we dive into this precipice because the industry understands that its ability to prosper requires us to be able to move together towards cleaner burning vehicles the state has to the trump administration I think more than two dozen times on environmental issues alone and you say that you will be challenging this one in court so you lose we don't say well those we seen this movie before it was a P. rated movie the first time administration tries to stop us from moving forward and we won we have the facts the science in the water behind California's efforts it's the trump administration that continues to delay its release of its proposal one because I think they realize they can't square the facts the science in the wall behind what you're trying to do so we feel pretty confident that not just a lot but the entire American public wants is to move towards cleaner burning vehicles if this is tangled up legally. what does that mean for your attempt to move quickly on this issue we're gonna keep moving we're not stopping the authority right now is for California to try to clean it's here there's no legal authority there's no legal order telling us not to is the administration it that's trying to put the brakes on this progress we're not going to backslide and so we will continue moving forward have you heard from any of the other states that had planned on joining you in similar standards we've had some great partners throughout the country on this and they are ready to go as we are and so that was thirteen states and the district of Columbia you're saying they were going to join you and a legal challenge to this we have our partners ready to go with us that's California democratic Attorney General heavier but Serra thank you for speaking with us thank you. secretary of state Mike Pompeii landed in Saudi Arabia earlier today he's there to meet with officials about the recent attacks on the state owned oil company Saudi Aramco Saudi officials say those attacks were unquestionably sponsored by Iran the U. S. has the same view Iran denies involvement the way the US response will be guided at least in part by president trump's complex relationship with Saudi Arabia and its leaders and yes Jackie north has followed that relationship for years and she is here in the studio to walk through how to multi Jackie hi are you begin with from before he was president today he seems really committed to standing by the Saudis but that wasn't always the case right now certainly not for years he spent a lot of time complaining about the Saudis basically odd that they weren't paying the way the US was protecting the kingdom at all times and that the Saudis were only paying a fraction of what they should have been paying it out she went to a some point back in nineteen eighty seven he took out full page ads in several major newspapers around the US just laying out these complaints saying that it was costing us too much money and that they need to start carrying their own baggage anyone even went on TV making this same complaint Japan Saudi Arabia Kuwait who's very very wealthy countries that we're protecting should pay for their own defense they should pay us for the defense what they should defend themselves and then I started to shift as he was running for president in two thousand fifteen two thousand sixteen right yes certainly his tone became friendlier towards Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia.

Audie Cornish California five decades
"cornish" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

The Adam Buxton Podcast

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"cornish" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

"Have you yeah very useful. It's going to work with the Audio Book but people who writes I wrote Joe then deployed his contemptuous pony noise and hoped that people would imagine it but that's what it is by the book and you're wondering <hes> so Lou one thing I've been trying to build is a <hes> <hes> Louis through on desert island discs sampler see if it works my friend Joe Cornish well. I've wrapped among friends. My friend Joe Cornish that was the best bit has the best bit. That's a good noise. That's one of your size. What was that in re in response to don't very probing question that was laverne really touching deep psychological cord? That was me digging deep. You did a lot of Sun. There was breath on the a desert island discs interview so here's the thing about doing island discs. The first thing is they asked me a year before so I had a year to think about going on it. The other thing is like for everyone I had in my mind wind kind of fantasized about what if you were asked him. What would you choose as your records and and then when it happened I kinda built up an and I suppose it also always thought Oh if we ever asked only do it if I'm ready to do it in a spirit of bringing delivering the goods opening up and and talking about personal things so I may even have gone overboard because I think you could also go on? It not talk about personal stuff but I think I thought that's the price of admission is a little bit of spilling your Gotz so when I went on I just had this feeling of our felt very almost divider this fever. I'm really excited to do this is great. It's very flattering thing to be asked to do and I'm going to talk about personal stuff which are not excited about doing but I have to do it so it was almost like seeing these questions come in quite difficult questions. One of the questions I think was what in your life making documentaries has changed you and is that feeling of like I'm going to have to actually dig can be introspective and go to a dark place so I was trying not to be Glib and it was expressed as a sigh. Why a dark place I don't know I think it was because changed you in fenway a nice? Maybe I don't know that's a great question for some reason. I think I wanted to talk about because I I think happy things. Maybe don't change you as much or sunny. Don't leave as much of an imprint right okay. They said if glide off you that's the brain is like like Teflon for positively and Velcro for negative. I disagree. I disagree I think because I think happy things are fantastic but do they. You remember them. Yeah Yeah and you want to get back there. Don't you you you WANNA keep having that hit of happiness Alexis. Yes yes to this feelings of great happiness I do. I remember those moments of uniquely. Yes and I tend to bury the to you the. I think I'm slightly the opposite. I'm proud of it making noise for noise. See if I've got a noise on the sampler just to brighten the mood here we go. I've got this one. I've got to you did too sexy frog noises those noises more frequently in your television book. I think I will now that. I know that I can do. I never heard you make those nights. I was very over tweaks like I had this feeling of. I think I was quite nervous and I think I thought that I would just aware of I had a sense of occasion. I began talking in a way that I do normally talk quite enunciate. Can I let you off the hook because do a lot of radio not. That must you're talking to to raise bedrose and it's very revealing medium for the voice. Isn't it <hes> stomach noises. Oh very very difficult. Also when you start listening to yourself that can be very very difficult. You can't get panicky in terms uh-huh of forgetting how to breathe and stuff like that. It's quite a little psychological minefield especially the atmosphere of studio one of those weird. At least you're clearly..

Joe Cornish laverne Lou fenway
President, Chuck Schumer And Nancy Pelosi discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:59 sec | 1 year ago

President, Chuck Schumer And Nancy Pelosi discussed on All Things Considered

"Cornish. Believe it or not a bipartisan deal may be in the works in Washington. And it's on infrastructure. We just had a very productive meeting with the president of the United States. House speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer made the announcement earlier today, we agreed on a number which was very very good two trillion dollars for infrastructure. We'll have details on that meeting from our correspondents in a moment. First reminder that infrastructure is a favourite talking point for the president infrastructure. We're gonna start spending on infrastructure Biggs. A one trillion dollar investment and infrastructure. Easiest thing is infrastructure. They want it. I want it. Today's meeting was the first on the topic since Democrats control of the house in January both parties have talked a lot about infrastructure as a theoretical point of compromise. But there hasn't been a lot of action Trump released an infrastructure plan early last year, but it's. Gone nowhere in congress. And that's meant no movement on bridges

President Trump Chuck Schumer Nancy Pelosi Donald Trump Congress United States Washington Cornish. Two Trillion Dollars One Trillion Dollar
Dozens Of Nonnative Marine Species Have Invaded The Galapagos Islands

All Things Considered

02:52 min | 1 year ago

Dozens Of Nonnative Marine Species Have Invaded The Galapagos Islands

"Cornish. The Galapagos islands are like a biological arc in the eastern Pacific Ocean. There giant tortoises and swimming iguanas and numerous creatures found nowhere else is one of the world's most protected places. But scientists have discovered that dozens of exotic species have invaded the Galapagos underwater NPR's Christopher Joyce reports on this unexpected finding marine biologists James Carlton remembers when he first got to thinking that the Galapagos islands may not be as pristine as people thought on my first visit to the Galapagos collected some samples from both bottom barnacles sponges and other hitchhikers that was nineteen eighty-seven Carlton didn't know if those creatures he found were native or not so four years ago he and a team of scientists decided to return and take a closer. Look, we didn't know quite what to do. Expect what they did know was that on land. There were lots of invasive species species that are not native to the islands, but in the surrounding ocean. Scientists only knew of five invaders everything else presumably was native when Carlton's team looked underwater. However, they found a hoard of invaders and now we have fifty three which is a rather stunning increase marine biologist. Gregory Ruiz says they found exotic species on pilings docks and mangrove roots. They hung plastic plates underwater in all sorts of alien invertebrates latched onto them at the Smithsonian environmental research center in Maryland, where he works Ruiz shows me, the invasions lab, researchers here track invasive species around the world, this is a organism that we've found in the Galapagos tuna could also known as a sea squirt a tiny tube-like animal. He has more invaders in glass bowls filled with alcohol barnacle. Nls LG, CNN enemies. They're described in the journal aquatic invasions recess rising tourism in the Galapagos means more boats, docks, pilings, transportation and homes. For invasive, these organisms aren't just footnotes in the biology. Text zebra mussels invaded the Great Lakes and caused havoc the tiny parasite called MS X has killed millions of choice tres in the Chesapeake Bay on the east coast James Carlton now, professor emeritus at Williams. College says tracking invaders helps authorities stem they're spread he expects other tropical areas or heavily invaded as well. And in a protected place. Let the Galapagos he says their presence means something's been lost. We value a world that we think represents nature before we began altering it before we began removing species, Abby species and changing the abundance of species, even in the Galapagos that were. World is

Galapagos James Carlton Cornish. The Galapagos Gregory Ruiz Pacific Ocean Williams Christopher Joyce Smithsonian Environmental Rese Great Lakes Maryland Chesapeake Bay NPR LG CNN Professor Four Years
The uncertain fate of defeated Isis fighters

FT World Weekly

11:51 min | 1 year ago

The uncertain fate of defeated Isis fighters

"Looking at the dilemma facing European governments as they debate whether to take back hundreds of former ISIS fighters and their supporters who European nationals and want to return home after the near total collapse of the ISIS caliphate. This issues coming to a head because ISIS last stronghold in northeast Syria is on the brink of falling. One of the military groups backed by the US. There says it's already holding eight hundred two thousand foreign fighters in prison, including Britain's French and Germans Donald Trump has called for those to be repatriated immediately. But the UK France and Germany have many reasons to resist to talk about all this with me on the line. From Brussels is Michael peel, the F T European diplomatic correspondent, I'm from Beirut. Khloe Cornish, the F T Middle East correspondent, so Michael. Let's start the discussion with you. There's been a lot of attention in the UK in recent days on one case a lady named Shamima begging who left London as a fifteen year old school go to. Join ISIS in Syria, and now wants to be allowed back to the UK with her newborn baby. Tell us a little bit about the significance of that case. Well, this has become very contentious because this week the secretary of the UK tried to strip this big of her nationality is out of his policy of saying that he would make it difficult as possible for his come back. And then that sparked a huge debate of whether this is fair or even legal, and it really highlights the very difficult situation that European countries in with these places that are that citizens and now that leaving Syria or thinking about coming home as the coalition closes in on the group's last stronghold. And this problem has several dimensions one is the legal aspect that. If these people come home, how would they dealt with can. And should they be prosecuted if they aren't prosecuted their questions of evidence? The obviously the Syrian battlefield. Field is not an easy place to get evidence from that would spend up in a western court. And then there's the question of if these people are not jails and come home and free in the home countries is there danger that they might be involved in terrorism in their home countries in which case, they need to be monitored. And then those all the resources and legal process risks though around that and then on the other side, there's also the point that should European countries. Have the right just to wash the hands of their own citizens because they seen as difficult cases to handle in. Of course, if people like, miss bedroom, don't come home. They remain the problem of Syria, which is a received country that is war wrecks and has suffered hugely at the hands of ISIS. And therefore some people say, well, how is it fad? That's rich European countries. Whose citizens have been recognized home often should put it onto a country like Syria to bear responsibility for what to do with them. Now, we've talked about the UK. Case. What have we heard from French and German ministers about how they're thinking about this dilemma, well, there's some resistance from everybody expressed more or less explicitly in public the idea of people coming home and the castle is for this is being President Donald Trump over the weekend tweeted that European countries should take back their nationals? Otherwise, he said they might have to be released those of them are in custody of US-backed forces. So that's bringing the issue to a head. But no European country is keen to take these people back. So the reasons I've described but then again over the years, many fights have gone back and have been dealt with in different ways. Sometimes by prosecution of the times north now khloe, let's turn to you. Tell us about the situation on the ground in northeast Syria. Where is this is as I mentioned in the process of losing control of its final bastion what's happening there. And what's happening to the people who live in that area been reduced to about three hundred fighters from what we can see from. Central basically in a bunch of tents in the cool behooves in northeast Syria. The UN is said dot I was holding hundreds of civilians in this area as human shields, but news agencies have just reported, the truckloads of people being brought out of the sillage the US box Syrian democratic forces who are fighting ISIS say they've been trying to secure the safe reduces to the ensure while or one civilians are out here in democratic forces say they will attack the final few ISIS fighters, and they really bottled very viciously so far it's a kind of surrender or die situation. So the caliphate in its territorial integrity what they called the caliphate is nearly completely extinguished at this point. But I will live on in other phones and does live on another phone. There's a big camp full of displaced people who were living in this last ISIS stronghold which was developed cooled our whole count, which is close by. We think. About forty thousand people actually who are living in that comes down. He's in dregs, and drives of been coming out is the area since December quite lots of children have been killed from hypothermia and other complications because they conditioned there reported to be really very dire. And it's been very difficult for them in the journey from this last village while I was holding to these Cam. So you should name a bag on the other foreign nationals who commanded this last part of the self declared caliphate found themselves in these Radi. Very dry conditions in this camp on the outskirts of this last bustle, understandable, why people you can see a root out wanted. Try and take it Michael coming back to you. That's talk a little bit about the politics of this in Europe where refugees emerging from Syria and Iraq have obviously been a massively political issue in recent years, you've just been to a big security conference in Munich where this issue of the phone fight. Of very much on the agenda there. What did you learn about how the politics of this playing out in different parts of Europe security conference in last weekend revealed a lot of tensions between the US and European powers over Syria and part of these as we talked about is over what to do with the former ISIS fighters and camp followers who are European citizens. But another dimension is that the US is putting pressure on European countries to devote more resources to Syria care, whether they want European boots on the ground. But certainly they want Europeans become more involved, especially as President Trump has announced that the US will be withdrawing its forces. Although it's still not clear to what degree and when that will happen. But it does as you say play into the whiter crisis in Europe, which is a political crisis as much as anything else about borders and about what critics say is fortress Europe that's been created. Where Europe is becoming more and more reluctant to let people in even when as in this case, the could argue that it has destroyed responsibility to deal with people who are after all citizens over its own countries. And are we seeing any European leaders come under pressure from opposition politicians or indeed media in that countries to either take a very tough line on these foreign fighters ought to be more lenient is that becoming part of the debate. Well, bedroom case in the UK Kili distills, some traditional outlines between a hardline approach which says, well, these people have made that bird, and they need to lie in even if as in the case of miss Bigham met she was only fifteen years old when she left and others who say, well, no, we need to observe all legal and moreover responsibilities to deal with these people in whatever way. And then another strand is those who say, well, if these cases are dealt with in adept way, the results could be that. These people who perhaps could become very powerful advocates to warn people in my otherwise be radicalized in European countries against following the same path. In other words, I made a huge mistake to do the same thing. Absolutely now khloe back to you there, obviously, many more ISIS fighters and family members who do not have European possibles than do. So there are many more thousands of people whose fates up in the air. You recently spent time with some of them in northern Iraq. Tell me what do you think the future holds for them? Yeah. You're right. Because I think he's self declared caliphate stretched across I consider it. And it was thought to have about seven million people living in a one point. So there's another people who are the work twin ISIS or maybe became accidentally associated with them. I think it's very much worth pointing out. There's a lot of grey areas in all the very very difficult to know exactly what being an ISIS member, really meant. Now. The Iraqi government is pursuing a sweeping crackdown on people suspected of being ISIS, fighters or members tens of thousands of men who came out of the territories that were being held by ISIS had been jailed in Iraqi prisons, and there's lots of criticism of this process. Human rights groups said just this is not actually being done a lot of beaver wrestling done based on rumors rather than evidence or base, even on torture confessions. So there have been many executions of people convicted devices membership to this point. But we'll never probably know. Whether or not people were actually ISIS members. I mean think it it'd be difficult to make some of the evidence used in these trials admissible in Mike European corporate? For instance, many families of suspected or confirmed by suspended are living in camps across Iraq. Some of which are reportedly like open at presence because they're not really allowed to leave one of the issues. I notice when I was visiting a couple of days ago was that people lacking in documentations, the con- actually leave the come because there's so many checkpoints around that they'd be stopped intended by anyway, even if it's not an official detainment camps. You can end up being detained by Dennis no having the right paperwork. So these families are largely unable to go home back to the places that the from either because they fear that they will be ostracized and persecuted by people who have gone back weren't isolated or their houses have been destroyed or in the case of a huge majority of people. Was trying to because the men in the family have been detained. Now, the family is being headed by women, and they consider not a safe and secure thing for them to do to actually try to go home. So it's a pretty desperate situation really for them. I mean, they're stuck in limbo. No one could give me a good answer about what's going to happen to these people. You can't prove say or been a affiliate so ISIS members. But they on in a position where they can return back to their homes at the moment. So they're living on aid incomes, and it's very tough conditions. And the scale of this detainment is quite striking in the come. I visited in neno which is close to moso about twenty people came up to tell me members of their family had been detained then hood anything from them for a year and a half or so as long as that. So they've got no idea where they are whether the dead or alive, and a lot of experts have warned that these kind of situation where you build up. This resentment amongst the community that ready spent a lot of time living. Into isis. You encourage them to see the government in a very very negative light dot is sowing the seeds for another confrontation between these kinds of communities on the Iraqi state in the future. Okay. Thank you, very well. It's clear that the war against ISIS may be coming to an end. But the consequences of that war are going to be with the people of Syria and Iraq and indeed with the rest of the world for a long time to come.

Isis Syria UK Iraq Isis Caliphate United States President Trump Khloe Cornish Europe Michael Peel F T European Brussels Beirut London Britain Shamima UN F T Middle East
U.S. backing of Venezuelan opposition comes with risks

All Things Considered

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

U.S. backing of Venezuelan opposition comes with risks

"New York advocacy group. He says his family scattered around the world because of authoritarian President Nicolas Madura rose regime. We have some family members in the United States is paving. Chile Argentina Colombia. No, we all feel that this moment will be key to that dream of like getting back together. My daughter was reelected in a vote that was widely seen as rigged. And as you've been hearing Venezuelan opposition leader one Guido was has declared himself the interim president this week. Our coverage of the situation in Venezuela continues after news headlines, New York City health officials are pushing members of the public to cut sugary drinks from their diets a new ad campaign. Pointing out that the not so sweet effects that can come from soda, sports drinks and fruit punch can be detrimental to your health and WNYC today city health Commissioner oaks IRAs Barbaro said that the list of health risks starts with cavities and obesity. And then the dominoes start falling in terms of increase risks for diabetes, heart disease, and the the contributions that those conditions have to ultimately things like cancer. The health department says New Yorkers have been drinking fewer sugary drinks since two thousand seven but about one in four adults and one in three high school. Students still drink one per day. And the MTA board is delaying its vote on possible fair and toll increases until next month at its meeting today. A board member said the agency needs more time to consider options the MTA had planned and approximately five percent fare hike to go into effect in March. It's unclear whether that will happen for every month that postpones the fare hike. Transit officials say they lose thirty million dollars. Currently fifty six degrees raining in central park at four zero six support for NPR comes from creative planning an independent wealth management firm whose advisors are fiduciaries legally bound to act in their clients. Best interests, more, creative, planning dot com slash NPR, wealth management redefined. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Mary Louise Kelley today is the thirty four stay of the longest government shutdown in history and in congress. The Senate took their very first votes on bills to reopen. The government one Bill backed by President Trump would have reopened the government in exchange for five point seven billion for a border wall. The other backed by Democrats would have opened the government for a short time to continue talks about the border both bills failed as everyday people across the country are coping with the shutdowns of fact like in Huntsville, Alabama where the greater Huntsville humane society gave free food to more than one hundred pets for Lord furloughed workers yesterday. Some people asked for a month supply and at the Salt Lake City international airport where the Utah food Bank set up donation bins outside TSA checkpoints for workers a room. There has been cleared to hold the items. NPR's congressional reporter Kelsey Snell has been following the politics of the shutdown. She joins us now from Capitol Hill and Kelsey as we've talked about for the last thirty plus days, roughly, eight hundred thousand federal workers will miss a paycheck. What is congress finally doing about this in short and they're not doing anything right now? Both Senate bills needed sixty votes. And both of them came up short six Republicans voted for the Democrats Bill and only one democrat Joe Manchin of West Virginia voted for the president's plan. Now, there's a lot of support for just opening the government, but we're in the same places we've been for weeks, nobody in the capital want the shutdown to last, but they simply can't figure out how to pass something that Democrats support and the president will sign so it's starting to feel like the same thing over and over the perception has been that Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell was on the sidelines throughout all of this. And now the Senate is engaged, right? Or congressional Republicans feeling pressure to end the shutdown. It would be an understatement to say that people are getting irritated. They just simply want a deal. I was talking to a lot of people including Republicans, and I think one person. Who described it, really? Well, was Ohio Republican Rob Portman? He told us that there shouldn't be so hard to get a deal. And there is a deal to be had. Here's what he said. Shutdowns are always stupid. This is one because the underlying problem is one we can't resolve we're not that far. This is not healthcare. He went on to say, it's not abortion. It's not one of these big social issues that people are used to fighting about. But they just can't get there. And, you know, Senate Democrats are pretty angry to this whole place is kind of a tinderbox. And there was this big fight on the floor between Michael Bennet from Colorado, a democrat and Senator Ted Cruz Republican from Texas and cut reheated. Here's what he said. How ludicrous it

Senate Rob Portman NPR President Nicolas Madura Congress MTA Kelsey Snell Chile Argentina Colombia President Trump Huntsville United States Interim President Diabetes New York Audie Cornish New York City Venezuela
Nancy Pelosi on Record Number of Women in Congress

All Things Considered

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Nancy Pelosi on Record Number of Women in Congress

"Under a partial shutdown. She called on members to respect each other and the truth in dealing with one another Don gonyea, NPR news, Washington. Members of the US. Congress are a largely religious group, or at least claimed to have a faith NPR's. Tom gjelten says about nine and ten say they're Christian with Catholics the most popular denomination. Among the members the religious profile of congress comes from the Pew Research Center based on how members describe themselves across congress, just one member democratic Senator Kirsten cinema Zona reports having no particular faith, among all US adults one in force has that one explanation for that disconnect. Maybe that candidates think voters won't approve of someone who's unchurched. So they're reluctant to describe themselves that way, no matter their actual beliefs. Thirty percent of members say their Catholic of the Protestant members Baptists have. The largest share more than six percent identifies. Jewish three times the share of Jews in the US adult population. Tom Chilton NPR news, Washington, Mexico's foreign affairs ministry says it's calling on the US government through its embassy to investigate a January first incident in which US agents fired tear gas into Mexico agents said they were attempting to disperse a group of rock throwers in the first hours of new year about one hundred and fifty migrants attempted to breach a border fence in Tijuana was financial markets plunged again in the second trading day of the new year all three of the major US stock market indices closing down more than two percent stock market jitters were prompted by Apple's warning showdown in China admitted escalating trade war between the US and China. Arthur Dong is a professor of strategy and economics at Georgetown's McDonough school of business overall, the United States economies far less dependent on exports. We are very heavily diversified service based economy, and so on that respect the United States. You know, is is I think sitting. In a in a better position overall. But it certainly will be some some repercussions felt apple stock dropped almost ten percent today racing more than seventy four billion dollars in market valuation. The Dow was down six hundred and sixty points. This is NPR and you're listening to WNYC. I'm Jamie Floyd. A federal judge is blocking implementation of a New York City law that would have regulated Airbnb home hotel business. The law would require Airbnb and other short term rental platforms to divulge the names of hosts and addresses of rentals. But the court said the amount of information amounts to unreasonable search and seizure. The law was to go into effect early next month will now be put on hold while the lawsuit moves forward, mayor de Blasio had championed the law saying it would it make sure the city's precious housing supply could be devoted to New Yorkers rather than tourists. A special election for New York City. Public advocate is set for February twenty six it's the first citywide especially election since nineteen fifty and WNYC's bridge Bergen reports the rules are unique for this race. You won't see anyone running as a democrat or Republican to actually appear on the ballot candidates must create their own party name. And collect nearly four thousand signatures from registered voters. And there's another quirk, Melissa Mark Viverito. Former city council speaker running on the fixed the MTA party line explains. The other interesting thing is that unlike a primary here whoever files I their petitions is first on the ballot Merck. Marito is vying for that top spot. Among nearly two dozen declared candidates turning in her petitions just one day after candidates were allowed to start collecting them. New Jersey is one of the state's least affected by the partial shutdown of the federal government. That's according to a new study, which says the Garden State will be hard hit by delays in process. Messing federally financed mortgages, but less so in other categories, New Jersey ranked forty four th out of fifty states and the district of Columbia the study by the financial website, wallet hub, ranks state based on the number of federal jobs contracts, real estate activity, national parks, and percentage of families receiving food assistance. New York ranked thirty fifth on the list in part because New York is among the five states, receiving the least money in federal contracts. The district of Columbia, not surprisingly is most affected by the shutdown. Currently forty two degrees. Partly cloudy at six oh, six support for NPR comes from the Walton family foundation where opportunity takes root more information is available at Walton family foundation dot org. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish, and Mary Louise Kelley the government shutdown grinds on over funding for President Trump's border wall. But meanwhile, the Trump administration is moving ahead with plans to construct or upgrade border fencing, some one hundred sixty miles along the Arizona and California borders with Mexico, active duty military will take up the task here to tell us more is NPR's Pentagon. Reporter Tom Bowman and Tom what exactly is the task with? What is the Pentagon going to be doing? Well, I'm told this fencing said likely combat engineers for the fencing portion of this effort, but it goes beyond that homeland security's requesting medical units, of course, two children died along the border with in the custody of US officials at the centers they need additional help for the migrants coming through and also told aviation units would be part of this as well. They provide surveillance along the border to help customs and border protection, monitor any movements. And again, this is so. Support for that effort. Active-duty troops can't get involved in any arrest or detention of any migrants, it's against the law and to be clear. This is something new. This is on top of the existing troops already deployed to the border. Right. So this is new this is just coming out. Now this request was made from homeland security. How many more we talking? Well, we don't know at this point. I heard some one official said maybe thousands of troops and other said, well, the existing truce might be able to help. There are now twenty three hundred act of troops there on the border along with twenty one hundred guard forces they could provide some of this effort, but clearly they're going to send additional troops. They could change them out or some could be extended but acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan hinted about more support at a cabinet meeting at the White House yesterday. Let's listen restoration of the fences building out and additional mileage from the law. The army Corp. Engineers is dialed in on doing this cost-effectively quickly on the right amount of urgency as to where we built additional stand up walls quickly get after the threat. The threat is real. And he goes on to say that he'll provide assistance to homeland security secretary Kirsten Nielsen who's making the request to the Pentagon anytime line on how long these duty troops might be there. No idea. I was told it could be months to construct the fencing or shore up existing fencing, you know, we're talking one hundred and sixty miles or so now fencing right act of troops were supposed to end their deployment, by the way at the end of the month. So some could be extended maybe other units could take their place. But what we don't know. Right. Will the Pentagon is working on the specific? So we don't have a lot of detail at this point. Let me insertive skeptical question here, the president has said if he doesn't get money for a wall from congress. He might just order the military to build it is that what is going on here. The president doing something of an end run around the border standoff. That's quite possible. At this point, the talks with congress, the Democrats in particular appear to be going nowhere. The Pentagon the president wants five billion dollars for the wall. The Democrats saying that's far too much. In the standoff continues the government shutdown. But of course, a Pentagon has not shut down. And they're ready to take orders from the commander in chief. Thank you. You're welcome NPR's. Tom Bowman one person. And we'll be looking at the Trump administration's immigration policies is the new chairman of the House Judiciary committee, New York, Democrat Jerrold Nadler, welcome to the program. Thank you. Now. Your committee has oversight over many key areas. Right Justice department, voting rights and an immigration as we mentioned on that last issue. You told CBS that the zero tolerance policy that led to the separation of migrant families on the border was a deliberate creation of the White House that they're trying to make things as miserable as possible. In quote, if kids die there apparently willing to have that. Yes. To investigate the deaths of those two migrant children. Yes, we are. We're going to investigate the deaths of those two migrant children and the entire family separation policy. And there are a lot of questions. How could they for example, deport parents to foreign countries? He's making no provision to give the kids back I or even to figure out identification for the kids. So we have kids now months later that may never find your parents again. State-sanctioned kidnapping. Does it feel like investigative actions and oversight? That's really the only recourse. Democrats have right now. Does it feel like you have no real ability to change Trump administration policies? No doesn't feel that way. At all. And you can't talk about that the first day of democratic control, and the new congress, we have a we have leverage investigation, and, publicity, and and oversight is a major constitutional responsibility. And ability that we have the number to the power of the purse, you can't pass a budget without the house as well as the Senate, and we can put requirements in that budget. We can put limitations on the use of funds we can put requirements for the use of funds and so forth. So even if you cannot pass. Subject matter Bill through both houses of the president would veto it. They can't pass a budget without the house consent. So we have considerable leverage. You've also on another topic. You've sponsored a Bill that would protect the special counsel office. Robert Muller was investigating interference in the two thousand sixteen election introduce that Bill today, and you've also threatened to subpoena acting attorney general Mr. Whittaker what do you hope to learn from him? We are very concerned about a massive fraud. And the American people by the president by his campaign in order to obtain office through fraudulent means hush money payments to women Michael Cohen working with the Russians plus obstruction of Justice in the investigation of that we have to look into all of that. And the special counsel is looking into that or into some of it insofar as they may be crimes, but we have to look into all of that to protect the integrity of our elections and the integrity of our democratic system and to protect the American people from being defrauded by by the Trump campaign Ovalles future campaigns for that matter. So that is the prime thing that we have to do we have to put an end to Republican efforts over the last two years to interfere with an undermine the special counsel's investigation. If the Muller investigation uncovers evidence of high crimes and misdemeanors are you prepared to pursue impeachment? And even if it's politically unpopular it's too early. To talk about impeachment. But what is important at this point is to follow all the facts where they lead to make sure that those facts are public and to make sure that they're not interfered with by the Trump administration. So if a special counsel issues report, we have to make sure that that report is is it becomes public. If necessary we'll subpoena it necessarily will quote Muller to testify in front of the committee about it. We have to make sure that it's not varied by the Trump administration. Bye bye Whitaker or by bar. The President Trump has been implicated and campaign law violations. As part of Michael Collins plea, something like that an impeachable offense. It could be that. I don't wanna get into impeachment now. 'cause it when we're not prepared for that. At this point. The some of what he's been accused of could be impeachable. Offenses. But the real question now is to find out what happened to find out. What frauds were committed but frauds against American democracy. And to make sure the public knows that the public can judge, and we can judge in the judiciary committee instead of where we should go from there whether to be impeachment whether it should be protective legislation for the future. Whatever it may be. And you were earlier you were speaking about William bar, the White House nominee for attorney general. Yes. And and the acting attorney general Mr. Whittaker is it possible that you will overplay your hand.

Trump Administration NPR United States President Trump Congress Pentagon Washington Apple Tom Gjelten Robert Muller New York City Mexico Tom Bowman White House Tom Chilton Don Gonyea New Jersey
Isis returns to its insurgent roots

FT News

11:04 min | 1 year ago

Isis returns to its insurgent roots

"ISIS is returning to its insurgent roots having been driven out of almost all the territory it once controlled in Iraq and Syria four years after ISIS controlled as much as a third of Iraq declared a caliphate. It is retrenched, but it's still the power to carry out kidnappings killings and bombings. Khloe? Cornish took to Andrew England about the continuing threat posed by the group to stability in the region. In two thousand fourteen ISIS notes the blitz across Iraq and Syria. And at one point I think they control about third of Iraq and major cities in both countries. What's been happening in the last couple of years since the caliphate will the self declared caliphate has been defeated all the situation being in terms of how they've been pushed back from their strongholds. Rockford. It'd be Iraqi government declared a military victory over I his about this time. I should having won back control of major urban areas. Which I is it invaded include the northern city of Mosul Iraq's second largest city. So that was a fight that nasty three and number players involved. That's the fighters from the Iraqi army which had initially kinda crumbled in two thousand fourteen faced with the ISIS insurgency, you have Kurdish vices mcken fun region. You also had low of shin initial groups who had formed pretty much in response to the ISIS threats that was facing Europe. It was big big movement to mobilize additional fighters to protect the country. And a lot of those groups actually have a radian bucking. So all of these people working not always very well together. There was also west and involvement as well. Intensive ashtrays on ISIS targets in Iraq. So that's how that fight with paying out. And then in Syria, the situation is actually more complicated because the fight against ISIS is just one really the much larger civil war. So in Syria, ISIS territory was concentrated in the north east of the country on the big cities rocker and data which probably will be familiar to people. Now, you will probably see the social glasses destination of those cities under the weight of US leda strikes. So in Syria, ISIS is in fighting on the one hand Russian-backed pro regime Syrian forces with Iranian involvement and on the other hand US backed Syrian rebels. So it's actually been facing kind of both sides of the civil war and Russia and their Resor fell from ISIS control this year amid much lodge. Hush by the feeling of as well, so retake areas in the south the country. So there was basically a big effort by local and international forces to push them back in both countries. What do we know about what remains in terms of the ISIS fighters? Isis supporters across these two companies. At one point in August, the US apartment defense was saying there about three thousand ISIS fighters in this pocket in Syria, the this territory they control, but it's very important to be cautious about them. The I think it's very hard for us to know, exactly. How many fighters they're all lest and how many schools is they have across Iraq and Syria. But we do know where I this is holed up in Iraq. They've got we think they is in the hammering mountains, which a very very Thakin offense mountains kinda the middle of a rock, and they don't say tax from that. And then they will they will have more bases a more positions in northerner as well. And there's continuing worry about sleeper cells of ISIS, fighters and other parts of the country as well. You mentioned the being pushed out of the major cities they controlled in the major church they controlled house they adopted the way the carrying out attacks. Because they do continue to pose a threat as we've mentioned. Yeah. Absolutely. I just thought it at a terrorist insurgency and then gained these huge swathes of territory. Very frightening. Modern two thousand fourteen and what they've done is returned to the insurgent route that they came from much smaller terror attacks people just disappeared into the desert rose and trying to hold her Trie. So that seems to be the strategy now is to continue to destabilize these areas with smaller hit and run attacks, but still deadly unfortunately for civilians and officials who have against targeted in Iraq. What impact is that heaven? I mean, obviously in Iraq this chiefs ways the county Sedikh control, which has to be rebuilt about reconstruction. The need to get people who were forced out of the homes back and these areas which always felt very marginalized slightly by bike dad and was a new government in Baghdad. What impact is it having? Terms of Iraq and Iraq's ability to build on the security gains. And then in Syria where we're seeing the civil war is winding down as prison. Bouchara sats voices have reclaimed control of most of the country and get mentioning just how much progress hasn't Nate unsecurity interactions on his was holding touchy. Yes, they all these kinds of attacks. But the Iraqi security forces constellation is vice is happening execution type outweigh. However, you know, is people continue to feel threatened by ISIS attacks that really undermines any kind of official assets to restore stability in the sense of security as well in these places. I think it called me stress. Just how dangerous life can still feel. I think in face it might be better than before. But if I this is coming to your village and killed the most important tests and in that village issue the local chief, which is confident analyst of seen them doing. That contributes to a sense of instability in Syria. This is the of most active fighting still in Syria to try and expel ISIS from the last pockets territory, and so you have continual battle casualties that. But of the overall civil War, I suppose, the American involvement there is the most important thing because America's said it's in Syria in order to ensure the enduring defeat of ISIS, and so obviously the longer that they have to fight. I enjoy the longer they're gonna be there they north. They started to link that crisis in Syria to Iranian presence as well. And they want to be honest to see Iranian forces in Iranian proxy forces also being expelled from Syria. But the continuing bustle against I means America continues to have military presence into it as well. At one point when they controlled large areas in Syrian Iraqi Lee had oil resources that smuggling results the customs, they had taxes, etc. How they survive today. Does this indicate that perhaps they still have certain areas where they still have support. What do we know about what sustaining them? I guess it's important to stress how wealthy ISIS was at one point. It had opened up by volts that had huge oil revenues, and they invested some of that money into companies anything for money exchanges car dealership, and I think it's pretty hard for the authorities actually pinpoint which companies they beat in order to to function or stop them from operating. So what we understand believe that they get revenues from these companies, they also can stop and extort trucks on roads, and that kind of thing, so certainly they've knees are much much diminished. They are much much week before the nab were, but they do still have revenue. Streams coming in one of the notable things about twenty fourteen was her the Iraqi security forces, which the Americans have spent billions of dollars rebuilding of the invasion in two thousand and free melted away when they were faced with the fruit of ISIS, how it quits to the Iraqi forces. Forces to continue maintaining the offensive against ISIS and prevent a resurgence. I mean that would seem to be one of the critical things going forward. I think we'd have to say that the Iraqi forces are stronger than they were full. However, the US department defense expect to general recall, I said, I've how the fight against ISIS going. Deep highlight socks. They didn't think Americans would be able to leave Iraq anytime soon intensive needing to keep providing support to the Iraqi security forces one of the things that diplomats stress here as well, which they sometimes feel like they're not being heard back in their home capitals. Is that I it is not done thing. He's quite far off didn't thing in the and in that regard is going to need to be continuing the just ical and probably material support full voltage contracting. Is it not an easy thing to do counterinsurgency is in some ways. Much harder execute than ground offensive in love wage. You know, you don't know coming from. It's a difficult thing to do. And certainly the Americans in fact that the Iraqis are going to need help with it for the foreseeable featuring ever since the US invasion in two thousand and free ousted Saddam Hussein the have been sectarian shoes and publicity extremism in a country, which is now run by the Shia majority, people would say that's helped fuel the extremism that ISIS has been able to tap into. Do you think that those issues have been tackled have been dealt with? And how important will that be going forward when the new government in Baghdad looks to rebuild and reconstruct areas that came under ISIS control? I mean, exactly as you say they'd been real continuity in fans is a long-standing trending towards extreme in amongst some communities in Iraq sent doesn't three hundred before is well and the government now needs to do. It can to restore service days and its authority in some of these areas happen just so badly damaged by war. But we're also neglected before the ISIS insurgency and before people decided to join you can see. So, you know, it was just politics and conflicts, very localized in Iraq. But you can see there was a broader trend towards any extremes. And I think actually that has been a swing by though. I mean, I was just so brutal. That polling suggested the obscene. He's actually will let in favor of more hardline version of is not not the people. So I did. So in some senses, they lost support that says to me in a country where there have been real kind of weaponization and sectarian identity. This is not a problem. That's going to go away without tackling some of the courses.

Isis Iraq Syria United States Iraqi Government Iraqi Army Baghdad Mosul Khloe Rockford Cornish Europe Russia Thakin Nate Unsecurity Andrew England Saddam Hussein
President Trump, President And President Putin discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

President Trump, President And President Putin discussed on All Things Considered

"With the president of China this weekend. Both are locked in a multi-billion dollar trade war. Civil rights leaders say the indictment of four Saint Louis metropolitan police officers reveals a troubling mindset. Inside the department Saint Louis public radio's Rachel Lipman reports. The officers are facing federal charges for their roles in the assault of an undercover officer during a two thousand seventeen protests. The charges include excessive force obstruction of Justice and lying to a grand jury four officers have been suspended without pay the undercover detective was among hundreds of people arrested at downtown Saint Louis in September of last year. It was the third day of protests after a white for a police officer was acquitted of shooting and killing a black, man. That's Rachel Lipman reporting. This is NPR and I'm Jimmy Floyd for WNYC. Some New York City council. Members are introducing a Bill to make the government bidding process with corporations more transparent. The new law would prohibit officials from signing nondisclosure agreements with companies as happened in the Amazon deal councilmember Brad Lander says he feels that level of secrecy should not happen again. If the law had been in place, the city would have had to say we can't sign a non disco. Agreement. So there's two choices. We can make a bid, but it has to be public and people would be able to see it. The Bill is cosponsored by council members Monty Williams and Jimmy van Bremer atop regional Federal Housing administrator is calling for the arrest of three Niger officials after a report found they regularly lied about elevator. Inspections. Lynn Pat overseas region, two of the department of housing and urban development, which includes New York and New Jersey yesterday. She tweeted that the Niger employees should be jailed after they were charged with dozens of felony counts. For falsifying inspection reports. Daily news reporter, Greg Smith says Patten has little authority to pursue the case herself. She has almost nothing to do with this. I guess it's well intention that she does ask a question that is important. And that is did anybody higher up the ladder condone this behavior that isn't really important question. That's the most important question. Smith says the case will be handled by. The district attorney, and Shirley Chisholm story is coming to the big screen and Oscar winning actress viola Davis is bringing it to life. Davis is set to produce and star in a new film about Chisholm for Amazon studios called the fighting, Shirley Chisholm Chisholm, the first black woman ever elected to congress represented New York's twelfth district in the house of representatives from nineteen sixty nine to nine thousand nine hundred eighty three. She was also the first woman to seek the democratic party's presidential nomination in nineteen seventy-two Chisholm died in two thousand five at age eighty and we'll have a retrospective later on all things considered tonight. We've got a twenty percent chance of light rain, otherwise cloudy with a low around thirty four degrees. Currently forty two degrees and cloudy at four oh, six support for NPR comes from farmers insurance committed to helping people understand the ins and outs have insurance. So they can prepare for lives ups and downs. Coverage op. Options and more information can be found at farmers dot com. This is all things considered for men. PR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelley, and I'm Audie Cornish all is run. President Trump's first day the twenty summit in Argentina. He's working his way through a series of meetings. There Trump's visit comes on the heels of a big development and special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation a guilty plea by his former attorney Michael Cohen, and what it revealed about Trump's efforts to land a business deal with Russia during the two thousand sixteen campaign NPR White House correspondent tamra Keith is traveling with the president and joins us now from when his IRAs their town. Hey, ATI sometimes when a president goes overseas. The White House is trying to leave all the domestic troubles behind is that the case this time, the answer would seem to be no. And and the reason I say that is that President Trump was supposed to have a meeting here with Russian President Vladimir Putin, he abruptly cancelled that on the way to Argentina via tweet saying it was because of Russian aggression against Ukraine, but then this afternoon there were. Reports of a possibly an informal meeting happening between Trump and Putin. Those reports were being pushed from Russia and the White House put out a sort of an odd statement referring to the Mueller investigation. Sarah Sanders sent this along she said the Russian witch-hunt hoax, which is hopefully now nearing an end is doing very well. Unfortunately, it probably does undermine our relationship with Russia, which was not entirely the answer to the question that we were asking another way that we know that the president's thinking about it is that he's been tweeting about it from here in Argentina a little while ago. Reporter's got to ask the president questions, and and one of the questions was about why he cancelled his meeting with Putin. He insisted it was because of Ukraine, hopefully, they'll be able to settle it out. Flowers amazing with president. The basis of what took place. With respect to the ships, sailors that was the. In the meantime, what else has been going on at the g twenty one big thing that happened today was before the g twenty started a signing ceremony at the president's hotel with the leaders of Canada and Mexico signing the US MCA that is the trade deal that will replace NAFTA. One interesting note is that during remarks, President Trump and president Pineyro of Mexico. It was his last day on the job both referred to it as the US MCA, which is the preferred title that President Trump likes, but prime minister Trudeau kept calling it new NAFTA, even though President Trump does not like the term NAFTA at all. But you know, this is a notable moment because this is a step in the process of President Trump, keeping a campaign promise that said congress and legislatures in Mexico and Canada still need to sign off on this on another subject. The Saudi Crown prince Mohammad bin Salman is there. He's of course, been under scrutiny since the killing of journalist Jamal kashogi has he actually interacted with President Trump yet. So a White House official says that they just exchanged pleasantries that there was no discussion. This comes in pretty big contrast with a video that's been circulating of Russian President Putin, and m Bs exchanging sort of an intricate high five that looked very celebratory the president is under some scrutiny about this because he has questioned the CIA assessment that NBS ordered the killing of Jamal kashogi. That's NPR's tamra Keith tamra. Thank you. You're welcome. And we're going to start right there with the g twenty talks in Argentina for our regular week in politics chat. We also need to take stock of another wild week in the Russia investigation. David Brooks of the New York Times is here in the studio as he often has on Friday, David with you and Susan Glasser. The New Yorker, welcome to you. Thanks so much. So President Trump signed this new NAFTA deal today, except as we just heard we're not supposed to call it NAFTA anymore. That's controversial. We are referring to the United States Mexico Canada agreement the US MCA, Scott, I'm tempted to call it also maybe prospects for a trade deal or some sort of agreement with China that may be coming together down at the g twenty Susan. Let me start with you does this count as progress in a year where we have spent a lot more time talking about trade wars than trade deals. Well, look, I think President Trump made a decision to sort of pull back from the brink and to declare victory with the reincarnated NAFTA. Whatever you wanna call it, most experts, and I'm not one on this subject. Do believe that it essentially is a reincarnated NAFTA that it builds on the foundation substantially of the original went and by the way, it's not attend deal. I should point out that there's going to be a real political fight. I think. Up here in Washington on Capitol Hill over approving this. So it's not over. Although President Trump was was taking it as a victory lap. Today was also strengthened by government coming in Mexico, which will inherit the steel by a president on his last day there. That's right. And and I thought you saw the lasting hard feelings as a result of these very tough negotiations with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau who did appear at the last minute was uncertain at the signing ceremony today in Buenos Aires. But had some strong words for President Trump, and you've had this amazing spectacle. What have we taken to get here of the United States going after candidate one of its closest allies, David your takeaway, so far from the g twenty well, so far the image of Muhammad bin Salman and Putin doing an end zone dance together is the big takeaway video circulating of them doing a hi fi. Looking very cheer an image. It's a symbol. It's a symbol of an era in which the wolves of the global international order are on the March and undeterred because there's no one. Deter them. And so that's one thing. The second thing I think is the China US relationship and this thank heaven is not a Trump related story to me the big change in US China relations is that we used to have people who were friends of China somewhere, foes of China and the foreign policy establishment sort of split. That's no longer the case. Now, everyone sees China as a challenge, but as a foe Hank pulse in the former treasury fare gave a speech in Singapore recently in which he laid that very clearly and he was very much in the camp. So when Trump talks tough on China trade, he now has a lot of people who are not normally his friends actually thinking he's doing the right thing me loop.

President Trump President Putin Nafta NPR China Donald Trump Mexico Argentina Us Mca New York Shirley Chisholm Chisholm White House Russia President Pineyro Congress Robert Mueller Jimmy Floyd Rachel Lipman David Brooks
"cornish" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"cornish" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"This is a cbc podcast discover what millions around the world already have audible has canada's largest library of audiobooks including exclusive content curated by and four canadians experienced books in a whole new way were stories are brought to life by powerful performances from renowned actors and narrators with the free audible app you can listen anytime anywhere whether you're at home in the car or out on a jog the first thirty days of the audible membership or free including a free book go to www dot audible dot ca slash cbc to learn more all right let's play a little game i'm going to play you a song and i just want you to take a listen in tell me what you think is about any ideas no you're hearing cornish it's an old celtic language from cornwall in the southwest of england and it's okay you didn't know that by the way it's only spoken by about six hundred people tops but it's enjoying a rare moment in the spotlight right now thanks to an artist by the name of winnow she's just put an album of psych pop sung entirely in cornish it's called lacob which means the place of memory maybe the idea sounds a bit novel to you but you're about here that it's anything but for no gwen owes the daughter of a cornish poet and a welsh language activist and she's going to tell you what it's like to grow up in a house that absolutely shunned english anglo american culture in how despite all that she ended up working in las vegas talk about a culture clash but first let's have some more of this cornish bike pop.

cornish cornwall england gwen las vegas canada thirty days
"cornish" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"cornish" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"This is a cbc podcast discover what millions around the world already have audible has canada's largest library of audiobooks including exclusive content curated by and four canadians experienced books in a whole new way were stories are brought to life by powerful performances from renowned actors and narrators with the free audible app you can listen anytime anywhere whether you're at home in the car or out on a jog the first thirty days of the audible membership or free including a free book go to www dot audible dot ca slash cbc to learn more all right let's play a little game i'm going to play you a song and i just want you to take a listen in tell me what you think is about any ideas no you're hearing cornish it's an old celtic language from cornwall in the southwest of england and it's okay you didn't know that by the way it's only spoken by about six hundred people tops but it's enjoying a rare moment in the spotlight right now thanks to an artist by the name of winnow she's just put an album of psych pop sung entirely in cornish it's called lacob which means the place of memory maybe the idea sounds a bit novel to you but you're about here that it's anything but for no gwen owes the daughter of a cornish poet and a welsh language activist and she's going to tell you what it's like to grow up in a house that absolutely shunned english anglo american culture in how despite all that she ended up working in las vegas talk about a culture clash but first let's have some more of this cornish bike pop.

cornish cornwall england gwen las vegas canada thirty days
"cornish" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"cornish" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"So at lee will always landon from my leg at comparing them to spins in talks with your wrong lack of bay may danny we could be saved as we mentioned gray kenya was for decades straining some limits processed ride in one minute jae an often in a country that could be a whole jayhan's if you live in handke evan breathe in and bring it you know what i would love i would love abbie cornish to wrap as moliro harden danced along and timothy shall of maylike comes in for a feature of a laura harden song with a special featured rap by a corner of here to the say same engines abed which is in what they shall may is far too famous to appear on the laura oh is he i think abby corners where he is right now i mean i'm curious though like what australians what is abby cornish to you who is abby cornish to you seems completely fine seems cassim like you're probably behind with her presumes like you probably don't care that much about ryan philip i think that's probably the answer i think it's like oh we forgot about her but like what how her oh her g anyways um there's another actor in a three bill birds in like fart town usa that called so when he play that call to ellia for attempt usa to rebuild words outside parktown us today is really funny that's very funny okay hi who weekly refer julia offer mine long time i got back harm being three billboard in our outside of abbey but very whatever it is i like lindsey had a lot of uh but one of them being who were.

lee kenya abbie cornish ryan philip usa lindsey landon timothy laura harden abby one minute
"cornish" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"cornish" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"The united constantly nevertheless latin vietnam you didn't like it as much as now you're gonna like kind of urinate years going to do you're going to do pro because like guy like on i i liked it okay i there were there were the things that the thing is though there are there are there are things about three billboard that i like despise yeah like abby cornish his accent first of all so this caller is so spot on because literally this woman shows up as woody harrelson 's wife in this like small town and for no reason she has an accent that is so unbelievably unplayable that you spend half the movie being like where she from they don't say the first time you hear her talk she doesn't have an economic every time it's different accent and then you're like wait a second who is this and also why she woody hurled no clue of all the clinton you could have cast as well girl wife why did you pick abby cornish it doesn't it doesn't make any sense and this is just one of and i won't even get into all the things about this movie that i despise but it's just one of the small things in this movie that makes so no sense that it distracts and really polls down the rest of the film if these little details that are just not fought out movie the movie a a thing that i love when movies do like there's a there's a there's a particularly dramatic scene and three billboards upside ebbing missouri during which addi cornish like wales like has a brave him but they do that thing where they silence it and they play like music over it so you just see her like fall over and scream and it's like thank god i do not want to hear this i also have you ever heard abby cornish wrapped i play some please place them i've never heard it.

woody harrelson clinton missouri wales abby cornish
"cornish" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"cornish" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"Very concerning to me just because we will be cornish and who i don't even know who she is has route herta apparently she opened in australia ford off on his own tour which is two thousand gandhi for our and completely ridiculous so if we could learn a little bit more abby corners that were decree image you a gift and could be a who would allow like could bog worth always lake the worst part of every good movie or is she didn't look like i would just like to know anyway thank you the farm bill if our cornish who shot and she sees abby cornish is like yeah what was her like most what was like the the roaring the story which was uneasily rights or is one of my favorite movies and she's street in it you're right it is good but but the reason the reason abby cornish is like a long time is longtime member of the who can then is because abby cornish is allegedly the reason ryan filled it be left reese witherspoon that's wet heavy cornish is anyone and that's also sort have eu regardless of how you feel about abby cornish abby cornish his reputation was ruined because of that i really do think of as one of the main reasons eddie cornish didn't happen was because she she was the reason that that marriage broke up or according to the tabloid she was on i think it kind of rector reputation for a little bit and most people have forgotten she has that like she has that like cnn miller about her where cnn miller's like good objectively good like she's probably good and everything she does but i will only serve i will only remember her for like her dalliances with jude law like i will you know it just it sucks like but i will only remember that way and and addi cornish especially because she's australian so now she's getting looped in with like you know margo roby and like all these other like act australian actress says now she's kind of like falling to the even more bottom of europe she's also one of the people of the file you cheat acts pretty consistently she's around it's it's so you're comparison dose yana miller spot on like she's she still around she's by no means on everywhere us fall and we haven't even some giving gotten to a three billboards and without lou.

ford abby cornish cnn miller margo roby lou cornish australia ryan eddie cornish cnn
"cornish" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"cornish" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"Getting dressed can be a drag when you've got a closetful clothes you wish you had an bought or i'm only worn once unlimited is rent the runways new subscription of fashion that gives you the keys to rotating dream closet for work weekends and everything in between enjoy the thrill of new clothes that the commitment closet space or buyer's remorse i've been using around the runway limited for a few months now and it's been super fun get a trail new fashion trends like me honor mashan when it doesn't work they literally just advise me what to wear nothing is more exciting than the opportunities you less laundry and spend less money online shopping round the runways bags and jewels and close make things like weddings one hundred percent less stressful when you know you don't have to find anything brand new it's a truly them experience like having your own personal shopper or someone to drop off your dry cleaning visit rent the runwaycomunlimited or download the iphone app and enter the code who at checkout to get 25 percent off for your first month that's rent one waycom slash on limited or download the iphone app and use our code hill paired her weekly wonka with mercosur crime caller from richmond virginia editor mosop uh three billboards that part of i think missouri uh whatever i don't remember it was you know you can take it or revert is fine and there was one cares as it stood out to me it was woody harrelson wife played by abbe cornish and to say that she had undistinguishable accent is like overstating how bad her accent once in the movie but i do hold her as she actually is australian can was like she is australian but also bad at her own access i'm not exactly sure how to deal with that but anyway i look it up very briefly in apparently she has a uh wrap cool uh under the name gus um which.

online shopping iphone app abbe cornish gus um richmond virginia editor missouri woody harrelson one hundred percent 25 percent
"cornish" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"cornish" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"Support for this podcast in the following message comes from the ups store who knows small business owners don't get to take days off so of you need help with shipping this upcoming holiday they'll be open the ups store franchise locations are independently owned and operated services prices in hours may vary see sensors for details hi this is guy rise and i mini thomas and together we bring you wow in the world npr's podcast or curious kids grow now and we're back with all new episodes new scientific adventures boats and after this world find wow in the world on npr one apple podcast or wherever you get your podcasts hey stephen for low linda stephen what is the best piece of pop culture advice you ever got you are fishing i can tell it is definitely a piece of advice you gave me i'm going to say off the top of my head any time you have advised me to watch a show run by michael sure that is good advice that is good advice but you have to get by on just my advice and your we figured that everyone out there should have access to good pop culture advice and we remembered that when we were on tour in 2016 out in seattle we sat down to give some pop culture advice and with us not only was our buddy my mouth and but also our friend audie cornish so right after this it's pop culture advice with pop culture happy are support for npr and the following message comes from little passports every month kids can explore a new country when packages arrive in the mail filled with activities souvenirs maps speakers and poor or try science expeditions which delivers exciting handson experiments and stem activities every month little passwords has subscriptions and gives were kids of all agents find special offer is for our listeners a little passports dot com slash pop culture.

npr michael seattle audie cornish apple
"cornish" Discussed on Another Round

Another Round

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"cornish" Discussed on Another Round

"But keep doing and millennials t keep tumbler it and everything libera my group you know i'd be in that light police i wanna one like telling some other student like this happen in that have any you don't see it and they just be like i don't know rotc race i'm like we had to just keep that to ourselves in grey back to the likely grow dorm and lang you guys get to be like well that stupid in you know you like have these conversations out and people right think pieces and everyone's like coltan obscene owing two terms of paying bank of thing and i admire the the the discussion that can happen in its place having you don't know how good you have it it's like a bad signal flashing witted up there were either though i love that book i weather oh my gosh yes please you so much fun you're doing so well you're doing so well and i just wanna say to all the people listening who are like into podcasting that i'm glad when all of your challenging questions your why is it this way why is it that way like bring it on we want more and more people listening and it's just been a pleasure hearing folks like yourself like you people like you especially you tracy 'cause i know you're like i don't know about this this world you're very do go to your graze a is like it's been fantastic sal thank you for having me i will cry crimes right out on last request years yeah you can use say this is another round and i'm audie cornish in uranium in your radio with my review in your voice hearing go.

audie cornish
"cornish" Discussed on Another Round

Another Round

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"cornish" Discussed on Another Round

"But keep doing and millennials t keep tumbler it and everything libera my group you know i'd be in that light police i wanna one like telling some other student like this happen in that have you don't see it and they just be like i don't know rotc race i'm like we had to just keep that to ourselves in grey back to the likely grow dorm and lang you guys get to be like well that stupid in you know you like have these conversations out and people right think pieces and everyone's like coltan obscene owing two terms of paying of thing and i admire the the the discussion that can happen in its place having you don't know how good you have it it's like a bad signal blaming witted up there were other i love that book i weather oh my gosh yes please you so much fun you're doing so well you're doing so well and i just wanna say to all the people listening who are like into podcasting that i'm glad when all of your challenging questions your why is it this way why is it that way like bring it on we want more and more people listening and it's just been a pleasure hearing folks like yourself like you people like you especially you tracy 'cause i know you're like i don't know about this this world you're very do view that oh graze a is like it's been fantastic sal thank you for having me i will cry crimes right out on last request years yeah you can use say this is another round and i'm audie cornish in uranium in your radio with my review in your voice hearing go.

audie cornish