35 Burst results for "Cornell University"

Cornell University To Require COVID-19 Vaccine For On-Campus New York Students

WBZ Overnight News

00:33 sec | 2 months ago

Cornell University To Require COVID-19 Vaccine For On-Campus New York Students

"For its students and staff. CBS is least Matteo has the details. Cornell University officials say all students and staff returning to Ithaca, Geneva and Cornell Tech campuses will be required to get a covert shot for the fall semester. Those with religious beliefs or medical conditions that don't allow them to receive the vaccine will be exempt. Officials say. The move will place them in a better position to resume in person classes. The New York College follows other institutions like Rutgers Universe. City who announced a school wide mandate last month. Lisa Matteo CBS News, a

Cornell Tech Matteo Cornell University CBS Ithaca Geneva New York College Rutgers Lisa Matteo Cbs News
All You Need To Know About Earthworm Castings

Plantrama

04:27 min | 5 months ago

All You Need To Know About Earthworm Castings

"Are going to talk about earth. worm castings aka earthworm poop. You know it's interesting castings as sort of a It's it's the standard term for the excrement from earthworms. It's what they cast aside. I guess that's where it comes from. It's a very interesting thing. It's like many manures and this is earthworm manure. Basically it was what we're talking about Like many manures. It has fertilizer value for plant. But earthworm castings turn out to have much more value as well. I feel like castings is a euphemism because nobody wants to say poop but there you go. I remember hearing about them. I probably ten or fifteen years ago. They're much more mainstream now. And at the time. I worried about using them in house plants and i realize now that that was an unfounded concern. Using the castings in in moderate amounts as a fertilizer is perfectly good for house. Plants isn't it. I mean this time of year. That's what people are thinking about. It is wonderful for houseplant. Wonderful for for most plant. Its first of all one hundred percent organic humus all right but the basic thing that makes it different from many other Fertilizers i guess. You'd say organic fertilizers is. There's a rich microbiological community going on in earthworm castings. That is good for your plants. Well tell me more about this microbiological community. Do you mean micronutrients or do you mean. Living things in the castings well. I mean Bacteria first of all But good bacteria right. That's number one number two. In terms of fertilizing value they are rich in iron sulfur calcium nitrogen phosphorus and potassium right but they also are believe it or not not all readily available to plant apparently in the process of going through the earthworm the castings get coded with something that makes the ingredients available to plants very slowly. Wait a minute. This is like nature's time release. Fertilizer is what you're telling me exactly. That's exact- that's fascinating. What is it nature this time. Release that is a wonderful thing. The people who have studied this and by the way earthworm castings have been extensively. Studied at ohio state at cornell. University uc davis and one study at cornell demonstrated earthworm castings suppressed damping off disease in seedlings. Wow all right. And they naturally degraded the protective covering of some insect pests so they dissolve the insect pest from the in. Yes so love that yes. At ohio state university they found that earthworm castings enhanced seed germination plant growth flower and fruit production. They curb to certain plant diseases. Including root rod and crown rot and inhibited. Insect pests including mites aphids. And mealy bug. This is like way more than just a fertilizer. Then it's kind of a magic pill a one thing you know. I wondered about is. How do you know how much to apply. And from what i've read. Apparently it's it's difficult to add too much. I mean you don't want you don't want a plant in solid worm castings but but it's something that you can apply regularly without worrying that you're going to burn the fine roots of your plants. Which is concerned with a with a commercial fertilizer. Yeah i think you know for the general rule that i use for house plants and we're thinking now in the middle of winter about plants indoors but the general rule that i use is about a quarter of a cop cop four a container that somewhere between six and ten inches in diameter.

Cornell Ohio State University Davis Ohio
The Importance of No by Chris lovett

Optimal Living Daily

04:42 min | 6 months ago

The Importance of No by Chris lovett

"No is one of the most important skills you need at work right now. Spoken to lots of people recently and the majority of them are at some extreme level of busy may be so busy that the word busy just doesn't really cut it anymore. Super-busy has become the next stage of normal and the newest superhero. That probably needs killing off stacked up against it. Chaos or more words of her recently describing individuals perceive situation. Sometimes people are so beat down that words no longer come out anymore and just a shake of the head and deep breath is all they can muster as a response to the innocent. How's it all going. What is business and yes. Culture says to me is that a lot of us are really finding it difficult to say no. At the moment we've got accustomed to playing catch up and wrestling with a million and one things to do. Maybe we've programmed ourselves to think that it's how we operate best or because everyone else is so busy it would feel out of place for us not to be in the same boat. It's quickly becoming normal to be overwhelmed with stuff to do and when you stop and think about it. That's not normal of heard of too many people reaching breaking point before their body mind or even partner forces them to stop. Do we find using this tiny two letter word. Such difficult skill to perfect most of the time we feel compulsion to say yes and accommodate wherever we can say no to others makes us feel uncomfortable. It makes us ghetto. Squirmy men awkward. Generally when someone asks us to do something. Our default in instinctive response is to say yes or fit it in saying no stirs up intensely negative emotions. Embarrassment and guilt says vanessa bones professor of organizational behavior at cornell university in one of a recent studies. A group of people reach loaned a book from the library and then instructed to face it half of the subjects recorded the fact that it felt wrong to but they went and did it anyway later. Discover that those who chose to deface. The book found it so difficult to reject the person who had asked. They just couldn't refuse william yuri in his book. The power of positive. No save the deal. Save the relationship and still say no suggests that the dilemma we can face in saying no often originates from quote an internal struggle between reinforcing our own sense of power or knowledge with a simultaneous desire to foster relationship and quote so may look like subconscious self sabotage poor actually hardwired to agree to doing stuff even though we may not want to or believe. It's the right thing to do. Humans found considerable benefits being in groups notably hunting and staying alive being a group increase chances of survival with the ability to share resources so we learnt to adopt a sense that being agreeable to the group dynamic was good for us. Clearly a was. If you are not agreeable to the dynamic of the group you were ostracized and excluded therefore damaging your ability to obtain access to the required resources needed so acceptance is seen as a survival mechanism and therefore saying no to your boss makes us think will be perceived negatively and therefore excluded this inability to say no can also come from our upbringing with parents manned engagement with teachers. I very rarely said no to any of them. But when i did it didn't go down too. Well chase up the stairs with a wind. Spoon given detention or back in the day rarely said no to authorities figure it would just be riddled with negative consequences. Plus as we've grown up. We started to connect no with rejection and disappointment. The fear of getting a no from someone held you back from ever going to talk to them or was that just me. We now swerve projecting that feeling of rejection on the someone else by accommodating all sorts of requests does is true in both our business and personal lives the people pleaser within us likes to create and sustain connections with others and anything that threatens to break that bond will cause us to worry saying no to joining a meeting. Not helping someone asked for it or turning down. That invitation creates a sense of panic. So in the end we take the easy way out the path of least resistance and then before we know it we've become buried under a huge pile of yes saying yes to something immediately removes any risk conflict. Which most of us will tend to do all we can to avoid but the effects of that yes can cause severe long-term damage to us as individuals as well as in relationships and businesses.

Vanessa Bones William Yuri Wrestling Cornell University
Byzantine Fault Tolerant Consensus

Data Skeptic

03:57 min | 6 months ago

Byzantine Fault Tolerant Consensus

"Everyone this is ted. I'm from cornell university. I'm finishing up my phd now my fifth year. I also worked part time at avalanches which is in our startup. i co-founded with adviser. Tell me a little bit about your phd work. What are your specific areas of interest. Yes so i think for the a democ- part you know as a phd. I mostly were distributed systems and that sounds like a very broad topic so more specifically within the systems i'm mostly focused on consensus and within the consensus topic. They are also different kinds of consensus protocol. I mostly focused on so called. Byzantine fault tolerant consensus protocols or t protocols. We are nowadays very hot topics. Pickus people are interested in blockchain technology and walk. Chang's need such kind of consensus in order to work. We'll definitely spend some time. Talking about blockchain byzantine fault. Tolerance is not as newest blockchain. So it's a i guess. An older theory. Could you help some of the listeners with the basics. What is bef t absolutely so. Yeah indeed. I think there has been like misconception. Many people think of b. f. Some kind of new stuff especially in that community even when we're talking about blockchain's but to me when i started my phd at cornell this of t kind of consensus as the coolest consensus at heard of at a time. And before actually dive into that world so what is not so byzantine fault. Tolerance has a weird name. So what is byzantine is. Sounds like the name of the old empire in l. a probably medieval or or some time period and the reason that this kind of protocol got his name as thanks to leslie lamport so may have heard of this research. His very well known ing Systems community clothing his works on taxes all sorts of consensus stuff. The also proposed the name for this new career of consoles protocols to be. Fd consists and beat byzantine just is part of the story if you read his paper about the whole consensus. So let's forget about the name of paying so what this protocol is usually about as maybe you are familiar with the phnom visiting kind of consensus or you know people usually call them crash fault tolerant protocols such as taxes or rafts so those protocols they work great and they're widely adopted by the current industry. Google uses passes as a core for cloud service and the reason that we need to another category of consensus protocol is because this kind of protocol a does not assume malicious behavior by the participating machines nose so that means than those can only crash build knows can only like human beings they can always say. Oh i die and then you just shut down or crashed without creating any noise into the channel into the network so then people begin to think about how we should handle the case where there some node. That could go crazy. Say i'm an node than when i don. I don't die peaceful eight. But i crave bunch of noises. The noise could be interfering the entire natural and even worse. I could be you know. Some zombie not controlled by the x. Turno attackers so i could exhibit arbitrary behaviour visit lab. I'm like a you know the insider send on by some other parties. So i'm like spying this system. So how do you handle this kind of situation in a protocol. While at the same time you still want to achieve the same goal as the noun byzantine one usually call them or crush full tolerant protocols we want to achieve the same goal but was different assumption

Blockchain Leslie Lamport Ing Systems Cornell University TED Chang Google
Coronavirus cases go up, the market goes down

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:38 min | 8 months ago

Coronavirus cases go up, the market goes down

"Yet things up it's pretty simple. Virus cases are way way higher in way more places. There is no relief package coming probably February at the earliest if at all, if everybody is honest with themselves. And that's it that all spills over into the real economy which the stock market is not thank you very much but it does reflect and so you get a cratering day on Wall Street today all three major indices off three three and a half percent all sectors got clobbered including the reason commercial aviation. We mentioned that because Boeing reported a quarterly loss of four hundred and sixty, six, million dollars this morning planes just aren't selling right now company also said it's GonNa lay off and other seven thousand people. So marketplaces and Euler gets his going with a story about a company that is a big factor in that real economy I was talking about. Boeing said today expects to end next year with around one hundred, thirty, thousand employees. It started twenty twenty with a workforce of one, hundred, sixty, thousand. Richard Otto Lafi as an aviation analyst at -Til Group historically, Boeing's been the world single biggest planemaker and the biggest single exporting manufacturer in the US. So it really isn't needle mover in terms of the broader economy and Sorta like Ge. Boeing has worked to diversify Boeing has a lot of commercial military defense software and engineering programs. It's not just building the. Big Seven, forty, seven jets of old. That's Arthur Wheaton at Cornell University. It's a pretty big corporation and has a huge impact on supply chains. He says there's a vast array of subcontractors in the US and worldwide that produce four and with Boeing. So in demand for Boeing products declines, it's felt by many of Boeing seventeen, thousand suppliers like those who make. Jet Engines and parts for wings keeping my you know these are not just people that are turning wrench. Michael Boyd is an aviation industry consultant in Evergreen Colorado. So it's not like just getting rid of couple of mechanics you're getting rid of some highly trained people that you're going to have to get back eventually when people eventually returned to flying but Richard. APPALACHIA te'o groups as his fear is that manufacturing will soon start feeling the pain of the pandemic like retail and hospitality already have and I think unfortunately, we're bound to see additional production cuts in job losses in the commercial aerospace industry along with other similar losses and other parts of the economy because as the biggest companies go so goes the American economy. I mean dealer for

Boeing Richard Otto Lafi Arthur Wheaton United States Michael Boyd Appalachia Cornell University Evergreen Colorado Consultant Analyst -Til Group
"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:05 min | 8 months ago

"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"So anyway that's lots of progress was being made in part because of well two main things one was. Increasing the size of the telescope apertures that was being deployed on the satellite observatories, and the other was improving the sensitivity of the detectors that were being installed on those telescopes like cameras that we have while everywhere in our phones and and on regular optical telescopes. Underground today. So those two. Are, really what this paper was about. Pushing forward from ground based observations and one of the reasons why it's so important to move to the ground while it's many many times cheaper. You know this morning between ten. Times cheaper than flying satellites. And a two, we can build much larger telescopes from the ground. That's why in the title, there is large aperture telescope. So one a scale of telescope that is particularly useful for these measurements. We're not talking about huge telescopes but are five. Six Meters? And the so five to six meter primary mirror apertures so you. Go. Ahead. Get a question so. The. Wind. Turbines. About optical telescopes. In this case. it's just a different kinds of concerns that affect the performance of our measurements. So right with optical telescopes the. What's often what's often limiting the performance of the measurements is Often referred to as the scene which is like the twinkling of stars due to atmospheric fluctuations. In, that twinkling actually DEF- racks, the light because of. Variations in the atmosphere up above the and makes it so that the optical telescopes CanNot. Usually achieve as good optical performance as are designed for. So in the microwave measurements. It's a little bit different. We don't see twinkling. Yet, but we do see actually emission from the the atmosphere and it ridiculous. We see emission from oxygen. And water. Atoms in the atmosphere, and so that's really what drives us to build these telescopes at very remote high elevation and extremely dry sites on earth. So we actually. Build and deploy optical telescopes at different. Where there's the typically aren't as high elevation, but there is extremely uniform atmospheric conditions versus for microwave sites we're building them as high as we can go. So these telescopes in Chile cosmetology telescope that I've been working on for almost two decades is at about seventeen thousand feet elevation and to have the new observatories were working on one. We'll be right next door, the Simon's observatory, and then there's the seacat prime. Project. that. I'm also playing a big role in and led by Cornell University that will be built at around eighteen thousand feet. Eighteen thousand nine hundred four, hundred feet elevation fifty, six, hundred meters also in Chile. And one of the driest telit higher elevation deserts on. Earth. Okay..

Chile Cornell University Simon's observatory
A new month, same ol bad economy

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:11 min | 9 months ago

A new month, same ol bad economy

"In Los Angeles, I'm Kai Ryssdal Thursday day the first day of October. Good always to have you along. Let us take stock. Shall we at the beginning of a program on business in the economy of the state of business and this economy because honestly? Could be better here are just a couple of numbers from today's news eight, hundred, thirty, seven, thousand people lost their jobs last week. Personal incomes were down almost three percent in August and related and to be clear time is running out for help from the federal government. There is no deal as of yet which means that all across the country from neighborhoods around Disneyland to the outer boroughs of New, York? City? People are facing a corona virus winter kind of on their own marketplace. Jasmine guard gets us, going from New York. At Saint Ann's Episcopal Church in the Bronx. The line to get food often wraps around the block. It's a mix of young people, children and elderly the bronx part of the poorest congressional district in the US. Many people who live here commute to Manhattan often to work minimum wage in essential jobs locals tell me they've never seen anything like this line before a man named Garrett. Faber. said he comes here once a month to get food because his unemployment check is not quite enough because you bill's pretty high and I pay rent and. Other bills, student loans he's a social worker who lost his job the bronx is the. Of the COVID nineteen pandemic in New York City the area I'm standing in Maat haven has had over fifteen hundred cova cases. Unemployment here is now around twenty five percent according to analysts that's Great Depression levels when the economy gets a cold places like Bronx get pneumonia or cancer Joel Berg is a CEO of the nonprofit hunger free. America, he says life can be very tough for many residents in the south. Bronx but covert. Has Been Catastrophic and so they're tenuous living before this when they were just at the edge of survival as a been destroyed Erica in is a senior economic advisor at Cornell University she says jobs in Manhattan create what economists call multiplier affects your how how many jobs does each job support a lot? So as Manhattan offices remain mostly empty, many janitors, Baristas, cooks, and other workers who call the Bronx home have seen their jobs disappear. Jasmine guards for marketplace lose job of course more. Than just going without a paycheck. More happens. So we asked marketplace's Eric Barris to talk to some workers who've been furloughed back in April. Monica Harris was furloughed from her digital marketing job in Atlanta area at first she was optimistic. Maybe this is the time like I need to be like doing other stuff working awesome passion projects like just stuff like that. Then her furlough was extended and her extra unemployment benefits ran out she spent the summer worrying I hope I'm I the next Brianna Taylor by fiance is not the next door floyd and now she expects to be out of work for the rest of the year last month with probably the hardest. I haven't been working that I really would feeling like Oh my God like, am I going to be okay, the pandemic, the struggle for social justice the uncertainty surrounding the election at an unemployment and stress can be overwhelming says, Goldsmith an economist at Washington and Lee University who studies how joblessness affects mental health. All sorts of insecurities undermine emotional wellbeing. And this is a classic case of that because you just don't know and employers don't know either PSA airlines flight attendant Denise Grassi starts her furlough. Today. Right next to the Philadelphia Airport so whenever. Planes. Go to land or take off often hear them and it's sad. It's very sad as not knowing whether she'll go back to work on a plane America bears for

Bronx Manhattan Faber. America Monica Harris Joel Berg Kai Ryssdal Los Angeles Denise Grassi United States New York City Philadelphia Airport York New York Jasmine Saint Ann's Episcopal Church Disneyland Eric Barris Brianna Taylor Maat Haven
Crowdsourced Expertise

Data Skeptic

04:26 min | 9 months ago

Crowdsourced Expertise

"I'm Derek Limb. Currently, going into my last year of undergraduate study at Cornell University. Very neat to what in particular you studying. Study math and computer science majors and more specifically I do work in the applied mathematics side of things in the machine learning and data science side of things very cool for me I come more from the computer science side. I have a vague sense of what applied maths means, but I will able his vague I'm curious do you have any particular methods or ways in which that blends nicely with the data science that you might WanNa share oh? Yeah. Applied Mathematics is already a vague. Term. So don't worry about that. But yeah, it's very broad term but tools that I like to use, and that are generally very helpful. Are things like numerical computing numerical when your algebra optimization and label a lot of those as applied math but it's definitely a very blurry term. Yeah. Neat areas though a of interesting research going on in that spot, the paper I invited you on to speak about is I, guess related to that but sort of unique and interesting in its own way title. Is. Expertise dynamics within crowd sourced musical knowledge curation, a case study of the Genius Platform. So maybe a good opening question here is, what is the genius platform for anybody who doesn't know? Yeah. So there's a website genius dot com to really great website hosts all sorts of different texts content mostly by it primarily hosts song lyrics, especially, rap lyrics because that's where the origin of the site came from. So what happens is you use crowdsourcing use the power of the crowd to transcribe. Song. Lyrics. Molly's different songs at an after that users also come and annotate the song lyrics. So if there's some lyrics that use some type of terminology that not everybody might know or some lyrics for which is interesting backstory that's what annotations seek to answer an annotation provide all types of very interesting knowledge and information and all types of different media to help explain what lyrics are about could you contrast the content to some of those user contributions to maybe what wikipedia users put into the Kapadia. Yes. Yes. So a lot of the annotations written with I'd like to call it like a view of culture of rap culture and they will use the slang terms and all this that rappers use I mean obviously because you have to explain the lyrics that rappers use but also they include parts of hip hop culture end generally music culture that are prevalent today such as there are a lot of twitter links and links to interviews that artists do in these annotations, and it just provides a lot of really interesting stuff when I think of Wikipedia or if we I guess rewind ten or fifteen years to win, it was getting going it seemed like every stand up comedian. Joke about you know it's going to be accurate because literally anyone can change it. But that did seem to pan out wikipedia startlingly accurate in a lot of situations. But maybe part of the advantage of Wikipedia has is the goal is to publish. You know the sort of unbiased truth that's what an encyclopedia should be. Leaks are I don't know that there is a ground truth in lyrics. Are there issues of pollution in the state of set like people who are into the Polish Dead Beatles conspiracy tagging the lyrics that They think are clues or something like that. How do they keep it clean? Yes. So there are a lot of studies on wikipedia that show in certain fields actually wikipedia quite accurate in covers a lot of information, but there's also a lot of interesting studies unlike edit wars but I have not really found instances of edit wars on genius, which is nice and maybe people don't make Super Controversial annotations but I definitely noticed when analyzing the annotations that a lot of these users are definitely putting a lot of their own. Into, these notations, and actually quite a good amount of speculation and you know, maybe the stakes aren't as high for genius as they are for an encyclopedia that a ton of people as a very important source every day. But it's also something that I think genius Kinda wants to avoid because if you read some of their like frequently asked questions, pages or things like. That they will recommend you to add a lot of factual sources but I'm sure that they definitely like the opinionated takes sometimes also not everything can be factual when you don't have the original artist interpreting your lyrics. But yeah, I don't think it's that problematic and I actually think in fact, it has an interesting twist to all these annotations it allows users to add an. Interesting twist to their own annotations.

Wikipedia Derek Limb Cornell University Twitter Molly
What happened to the Postal Service?

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:27 min | 10 months ago

What happened to the Postal Service?

"If you had the United States postal service as a partisan political proxy on your Twenty Twenty Election Bingo card. You. Win. I guess the politics of it we will assume you're mostly familiar with speaker. Nancy Pelosi is calling the house back into session legislation likely postmaster general and CEO Louis Joy has said he will testify. But as all of that plays out a detour here if we might to the postal services business model reality yes. The digital age has brought its challenges to the USPS but as Congress tries to figure out how to repair the damage. Might do well to look in the mirror for a little bit. Here's marketplace's Nancy Marshall Genzer. The Postal Service is supposed to be self funded not getting any government money, but the post office is still tightly regulated by Congress and in two thousand and six Congress passed a law requiring the postal service to prepay health benefits for retirees. Jim Campbell is a lawyer and consultant on the Postal Service resorted the postal service to pay for ten years about five and. A half billion dollars a year into this prepayment fund that thinking was paid forward. Make sure the money is there when retirees need it. But Campbell, says federal agencies don't have to make these prepayments and the post office couldn't do it. Campbell says it missed more than half of the payments to make matters worse congress capped postal office price increases for letters circulars at the rate of inflation. So the postal services kind of caught in this squeeze. Cornell University public. Policy Professor, Getty's says Congress, also still requires the post office to deliver to every mailbox in the country six days a week. So this is a recipe for fiscal problems serious fiscal problems and serious debt frank disco has been tracking that he's chief actuary at the US Government Accountability Office. He says the postal services more than one hundred, sixty, billion dollars in debt over the past decade, the dead and unfunded liabilities like pensions and healthcare have outpaced the revenues the. Postal Service takes in. So it's doubled from a little more than one times annual revenue to over double annual revenue to disco says the Postal Service has been losing money for a decade, not a sustainable business model, but the post office can't change that model without Congressional

Postal Service Congress Jim Campbell Twenty Twenty Us Government Accountability O Nancy Pelosi Nancy Marshall Genzer United States Frank Disco Cornell University Chief Actuary Louis Joy CEO Getty Professor
The Iroquois Nationals Team | The History of Lacrosse

Iroquois History and Legends

05:09 min | 11 months ago

The Iroquois Nationals Team | The History of Lacrosse

"Hello welcome to Iroquois history and legends. Today we're GONNA be talking about the history of Lacrosse and current status of the Iroquois national team. Today. We don't have just one guest we have multiple group. I'm just going to let them introduce themselves one by one if you gentlemen could just give me a brief background on who you are just a little synopsis on how you're associated with the Iroquois national team. REX LINES MONOLOGUE NATION I've been a Lacrosse player has this as long as I can remember as I could walk at sticking my hand going up on Doug a nation it's been. A big part of my my life, my lifestyle the and I was on the First Leroy national team in eighty three and. Been in three tournaments and. The program at percents. I'm Leon Nolan multiple on Gatien. My mother's Aquasonichowie Mohawks enroll visit. Mohawk will clan. Lamb. I've been involved with your co-nationals across in about early two thousands and then k back. But you're a half ago and serve as the executive, director and board member. and. Tissue late at SMU and while the across like wreck, all my life and Real honor to be a part of the organization again to help with the many challenges facing us. So, we're very pleased to have this opportunity to give him a good historical perspective in a future perspective on warmer. Had IT. For us. And David Brian from the Seneca nation and the wolf clan I grew up playing cross started off with a new toll across went off to college played at Cornell University on a couple of national championship teams. I was also on the I Iroquois national team. And I've been a lifelong participant with your coin nationals as either as a player. Executive, director or board member and I'm still in like brexit it's kind of A. Lifelong journey to have our people be represented in Lacrosse whether it's at the college level professional level or international level. I'm Randy Scott some from six nations on -Tario A maternal clan. Mohawk like these guys are saying, I've started across when. You know I gotta stick when I was born. I've been playing ever since it's a big part of my life I played professional across for. The Georgia. Swarm. the Boston cannons and at the world stage with Uruguay nationals I've been playing with Uruguay national since. Two Thousand Eight Also. Went to Syracuse University got my degree there and. You know. Like these guys are saying, Lacrosse, has been a big part of my life in it's It's awesome. Thank you very much gentlemen. That's a lot of talent and a lot of experience for me growing up in Western. New York every. Year, has a Lacrosse program. Every College in university has lacrosse program, but there might be some people in the country that really might not know what it is or what the history of it is. So which one of you mind giving me a a synopsis of Old, this game is where it came from what the basic just of the rules are by I'll take that question. Well, it's part of our creation story so. know your guess is good as ours. You know it came from the spire creation story came from the Sky World. So in in our cosmology re talk about. Across in all being played in creators land. And before it came down to Turtle Island here. So it's as old as we are as Randy said, you know your mail you're one of three things you're born. You're you're a a speaker which measure speaker of ceremonies language or a singer, the singer of the ceremony or your across Blair. That's how significant across is to our culture. And you always have the exception to the rule where somebody's all And we have real lot of examples of that but let's how important it is to are. inherently. It's part of four yards culture. It's site in part of that responsibility to share the scheme. With others which we've been very successful at. Now, I believe sixty six countries have. Lacrosse organizations within her order states. Within our borders and it's been really I. Think we've done a great job of showing the green game with the many many around the world and or looking forward to continuing that and. One of the. Mainstays who are Bruh given this responsibility directly by the. Sedition confederacy in one, thousand, nine, hundred, three. And we were given that responsibility to golden compete internationally represent the initially in that regard play fair play hard and spread this game around the world.

Lacrosse Syracuse University Sky World Randy Scott Executive Director Uruguay Aquasonichowie Mohawks Leon Nolan Doug David Brian SMU Cornell University Seneca New York Boston Turtle Island Gatien Georgia Blair
Researchers Use Artificial Intelligence To Study Elephant Calls

All Things Considered

01:51 min | 11 months ago

Researchers Use Artificial Intelligence To Study Elephant Calls

"Which is a problem If you study them, we basically have no idea what they're doing, how they're using the landscape all of those kinds of things. Peter Rag is the behavioral Ecologist at Cornell University. And he says one way to solve the problem is to eavesdrop on the elephants instead. Leads Cornell's elephants were listening project, which uses an array of microphones in the rainforests of Central Africa to record the rumbling and trumpeting of elephants. They pick up other sounds too, like the chest beats of guerillas. By now, he estimates they have gathered a 1,000,000 hours of tape. And he says, analyzing that much tape is a beast. Very, very slow, very tedious. Jonathan Jones, Selman agrees. He volunteered on the project as a teenager, hand picking elephant calls. He thought there had to be a better way. So he and fellow Stanford grad Nikita Demir trained artificial intelligence to do the job. Instead, Here's Gom Selman, we feed these models, hundreds of examples of both audio clips with and without elephant calls, and then these deep learning models of basically the overtime. Able TTO learn specific features that the people training these models don't fully know ourselves. They'll present the model next week at a virtual meeting of the Ecological Society of America. Other Wreg hasn't yet tried the new algorithm. He says. It seems faster and more accurate than earlier. Aye, aye attempts, which gives him and other scientists a better chance to decode the mysteries of elephants rumbles. This is their language. If we can start understanding that better, we know Maur. What's going on in the forest where we can't see anything because to keep an eye on the forest you got to keep in here.

Cornell Peter Rag Wreg Gom Selman Selman Cornell University Maur Ecological Society Of America Central Africa Nikita Demir Jonathan Jones Stanford
Researchers Use Artificial Intelligence To Study Elephant Calls

All Things Considered

01:51 min | 11 months ago

Researchers Use Artificial Intelligence To Study Elephant Calls

"Elephants True to the name spend their lives hidden in the rainforest, which is a problem If you study them, we basically have no idea what they're doing, how they're using the landscape all of those kinds of things. Peter Reggae is the behavioral Ecologist at Cornell University. And he says one way to solve the problem is to eavesdrop on the elephants instead. Greg leads Cornell's Elephant Listening project, which uses an array of microphones in the rainforests of Central Africa to record the rumbling and trumpeting of elephants. They pick up other sounds too, like the chest beats of guerillas. By now, he estimates they've gathered a 1,000,000 hours of tape. And he says, analyzing that much tape is a beast. Very, very slow, very tedious. Jonathan Jones, Selman agrees. He volunteered on the project as a teenager, hand picking elephant calls. He thought there had to be a better way. So he and fellow Stanford grad Nikita Dimier trained artificial intelligence to do the job. Instead, Here's Gom Selman, we feed these models, hundreds of examples of both audio clips with and without elephant calls, and then these deep learning models are basically the overtime. Able TTO learn specific features that the people training these models don't fully know ourselves. They'll present the model next week at a virtual meeting of the Ecological Society of America. Other Wreg hasn't yet tried the new algorithm, he says. It seems faster and more accurate than earlier. Aye, aye attempts, which gives him and other scientists a better chance to decode the mysteries of elephants rumbles. This is their language. If we can start understanding that better. We know Maur. What's going on in the forest where we can't see anything because to keep an eye on the forest, you got to keep an ear on it, too.

Cornell Peter Reggae Gom Selman Wreg Selman Cornell University Maur Ecological Society Of America Central Africa Jonathan Jones Greg Nikita Dimier Stanford
Nourishment for Mind and Body

Plant Strong

06:05 min | 11 months ago

Nourishment for Mind and Body

"Dr Jerick Conrad. I want to welcome you to plan strong podcast. This is season two and season two Israeli about. Welcoming people at the heart of a hero and you know and reading up on you reading your book the fragile, mind. The beautiful introduction that was given. To me of you through our mutual friend Dr. Elizabeth linings. Yes I feel really. Really fantastic about having. A very open conversation with you and let me just frame it up right now for people because obviously right now in America we have. All these conversations that are going on around racism and Antiracism and I think it's really important bit you and I can have a conversation that will bring value. To this current narratives? and specifically, I'd like to have this conversation be more around kind of nutrition and health or lack thereof. Going on in this in this country at let let me also say Jerick that I know that you you are so well educated you're a intercultural sensitivity expert and I want to say up front that if I'd say anything that is inappropriate or you know like, Hey, dude, that was not cool I. Hope you'll call me on it and then and then helped me figure out the best way to say it or phrase it because I'm I don't even want to pretend like a nuanced or or or very good at this. Let me let me let you in on a little secret as we get more. Make these words expert. You gotta take that kind of stuff with a grain of salt you know. I am studying this stuff a talk a lot about it but you know all of us are still trying to learn as much as we can about human behavior. What makes us tick and why and so same here if I never abs you the wrong way I. Hope you say what's Eric? Louis. Feels like this what are you me? Because, we don't have these open conversations than We can't move anywhere and anytime you engage in some discussions when you start talking about things like race for instance a, it can get dicey for people but but I'm always willing to take that risk because I'm looking at toward the other side of it where we can all learn and grow together. So so don't be don't be worried about that. Good. So it's okay if we get a little uncomfortable, it just allows us to get more comfortable on the road ness, right? Absolutely. All right. Good. So I I WANNA just start out by. Just a little bit about you, and then I want you to correct me or go back if anything you know. I missed something to add something. So I and I think it's important that we say it is you're a black man right and start out and to start out. And to start out. Because a lot of people are just going to be hearing this on audio and not right. is that the correct way to refer to yourself when I referenced you? So I'm fine with African American with black I I'm I've I've really been trying to think about these labels and I'm really urging people to use you know American from. Descent. Something like that because I am in some ways, I think when you put something before American is serves as a little bit of an asteroid. And it almost subconsciously makes people think that that's a different kind of American. Of American not full American so I would prefer even though I'm the only person probably saying this right now I prefer that we move away from the Asian American or African American are you know Latin x American I prefer that we say you know American of African descent I want to emphasize the fact that we have that shared experience as Americans. But on a personal note, you know black whatever. Best. That's fine. Okay. Okay. You you grew up in east Saint Louis in what's what's considered probably the most distressed I think part of town in America. Probably said yeah, right. This had some challenges. Yeah and and I want you to talk about that You are like I said, you're incredibly well educated. You've got a bachelor's degree from the University of Illinois. You have two masters degrees from Cornell University and you've got a doctor of education degree from the University of North Florida. Okay and I know you've got a lot more degrees that maybe you can tell us about but I'm GonNa stop there for now. You your family. Eat a whole food plant based diet absolutely and. We're going to dive dive into that. Is it fair to say that today are you the CEO and President of Conrad Consultant Group? Yes I am I am. So I still have I have the kind of consulting group also work a fulltime with an HR software company OATEN software that soon to Change Our Name, we've just merged with the KRONOS. So I'm the quote unquote thought leader I run the thought leadership group of for ultimate software where I get to delve into some of these issues around of nutrition. And Wellness and all of that as well. I spent twenty years as an HR practitioner So so this really gives me a chance to to go back to my roots and little bit with still think about these ideas and try to solve these. Really. Complex problems that we're we're still struggling with.

America Dr. Elizabeth Linings Dr Jerick Conrad East Saint Louis Louis University Of Illinois Antiracism Eric Cornell University Kronos University Of North Florida CEO Conrad Consultant Group President Trump
Apps like Robinhood make investing easier. Maybe too easy.

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:37 min | 1 year ago

Apps like Robinhood make investing easier. Maybe too easy.

"APPs like Robin Hood of Made Stock Market, investing easier, but at what cost from American public media this is Marketplace Tech Jack Stewart in Hollywood. Maybe. You're one of the ten million plus people who've set up an account on the trading APP. Robin Hood the company's been in the news recently as people start to take a critical look at its business model. Robin hoods the highest profile example of APPs that say they're increasing access to the stock market by making trades free. Critics say their game `fine trading with psychological nudges and push notifications, which encouraged frequent and potentially risky trades. There are few controls or limits for what could be inexperienced users in June. Twenty year old Alex, Kerns killed himself after he logged onto Robin Hood and saw what he thought was a negative seven hundred thirty thousand dollar balance Professor Vicki Bogan founder of Cornell University's Institute for Behavioral and household. Finance researches the psychology of investing. Being able to trade online is nothing new, but beyond just the. Marginal incremental convenience of having on your phone versus on your laptop. Something about some of these, APPS is that they're designed to encourage people to trade and to trade more. because. It's part of their business model. They make more money when people make more trades, and so you know when you make a trade, there's confetti in congratulations that are encouraging people to trade more, so it's beyond just the reduction in transaction 'cause it's also the way the APPS are structured to nudge people to participate more and to trade more. So I suspect what these platforms would argue is that they're just making it easier for people to access the stock market and build wealth in the way. The wealthy people have always been able to do. Is that a fair argument? Yeah, I'm very sympathetic to that argument. I actually on some level. I agree that it's always a good thing to give. Households have access to financial markets. You're exactly right in that. Participating in the stock market is. With a long term investment horizon is a way that people. Can and have been able to build wealth. But these ads cannot exist in an unregulated unchecked environment. What sort of protections would you like to see? There are a lot of things. But. The person that can Pinatubo aside as a result of seeing this negative balance was only twenty years old. And so this is a person that can't. Buy Alcohol and can trade options in a way that could get him in very serious financial leverage. And so in the same way there were some guidelines protections with the credit card act in two thousand nine limiting access for young adults with credit card to credit cards. I think we need to think about some of those types of protections as well. That's freaky Bogan. Cornell University after Alex Kuhn's death Robin Hood released a statement saying it might restrict more complicated trades from some customers with checks to make sure they know what they're risking with options trading in particular.

Robin Hood Cornell University Alex Kuhn Vicki Bogan Jack Stewart Hollywood Kerns Founder Professor Institute For Behavioral
Rare California Condors Seen In Sequoia National Park

All Things Considered

01:23 min | 1 year ago

Rare California Condors Seen In Sequoia National Park

"Big news out of Sequoia National Park Condors are back. This is all just stunning to me. John Nielsen, former NPR correspondent is author of Condor to the Brink and Back the Life and Times of one Giant Bird. The Condor is the largest living flying thing in North America, and it sounds like this. That recording courtesy of Cornell University's Lab of Ornithology and the news. Some have been spotted in California's Sequoia National Park for the first time in 50 years is welcome because condors were so close to extinction. There was a time when there were none in the wild. They were all in captive breeding programs. Zoos. The National Park Service broke the news about the birds reappearance yesterday, saying they were seen back in May. Park waited a couple of months to tell us to confirm the sighting when their numbers dropped to just 22 wild birds were rounded up. At first they didn't breed, but eventually they did and were released back into the wild. If you haven't seen a condor, and you've only heard it described Or you've only exceeded in the zoo. One of the first impressions you get, Isn't it really ugly bird mean it eats dead things. You know it pees on the walls of the caves that lives in stuff like that. But when it flies, it's unbelievable. And John Nelson says there is nothing like a sighting in the

Sequoia National Park National Park Service John Nielsen John Nelson North America NPR Cornell University Lab Of Ornithology California
Rare California Condors Seen In Sequoia National Park

Environment: NPR

02:15 min | 1 year ago

Rare California Condors Seen In Sequoia National Park

"The big news out of Sequoia National Park condors are back. This is also just stunning to me. John Nielsen is author of Condor to the brink and back the life and times of one giant bird. The condor is the largest living flying thing in America and it sounds like this. That recording courtesy of Cornell University's lab of ornithology and the news some have been spotted in California's Sequoia National Park for the first time in fifty years is welcome. Because condors were so close to extinction, there was a time when there were none in the wild. They were all in captive breeding programs ensues. The National Park Service broke the news about the birds. We appearance yesterday saying they were seen back in. In May the park waited a couple of months to tell us to confirm the sighting when their numbers drop to just twenty two, the wild birds were rounded up at first they didn't breed, but eventually they did and were released back into the wild. If you haven't seen a condor and you've only heard it described, or you've only seen it in the zoo. One of the first impressions Really Ugly Bird. Meet it eats dad things. Out Pees on the walls of the caves at lives in stuff like that, but when it flies, it's unbelievable and John Nelson says there is nothing like a sighting in the wild win kind of roars through their. Feathers because they don't sneak up on stuff aid stuff when it's dead, this condor flew down to the base of the cliff that I was standing at the top, and caught the wind currents and flew straight up right past me like ten feet away, this gigantic bird, nine and f foot wingspan, and it was. Like? Well John Nielsen says the news of Condor. Citing is great, he warns the preservation effort does not end still have huge challenges ahead. The biggest one is probably lead shot in their environment. That's because when hunter shoot animals and leave the bodies behind condors eat the animals and the ammunition which can be fatal to the condor, so keep a lookout for the three hundred plus wild condors thought to be at large in California and nearby states.

Sequoia National Park John Nielsen National Park Service California John Nelson Cornell University America Hunter
Hotels Clean Up Their Acts to Win Guests' Confidence

Business Wars Daily

03:34 min | 1 year ago

Hotels Clean Up Their Acts to Win Guests' Confidence

"If we needed another reminder of how hard the hotel industry has been hit by Covid nineteen on Tuesday, Hilton Worldwide Holdings announced that it would cut two thousand one hundred corporate jobs across the US, roughly sixty percent of hotel rooms are empty, according to research firm SDR and that doesn't include the thousands of hotels it of closed for good since the beginning of the pandemic. But summer vacation season is upon us, and Hilton is trying to convince customers. It's safe to check in again to do so. They're coming clean about their virus. Safety measures and launching a new campaign called the clean stay program to WANNA. Be Vacationers out of their homes. Hilton has assembled a virus fighting a team that includes the maker of Lysol and the Mayo. Clinic's infection prevention and control team. Team goal is to enhance existing disinfecting and safety measures and ultimately to bolster travelers confidence. The hotel is looked at virtually every area. It's operations and found ways to reduce infection risk loyalty program members can use an APP for contactless check in each room is secured with a clean stay seal after cleaning to show. It's been disinfected with the hotels. New rigorous standards frequently touched areas like lights. Lights which is door handles. TV, remotes get extra cleaning, attention and disinfecting wipes are provided for gas use common areas like lobbies restaurants, fitness centers have been rearranged for social distancing and restaurants ditched buffets in favor of safer options like covered dishes and grab and go items not to be left in the dust. Marriott is also calling in the COVID nineteen reinforcements. The Hilton competitor created the Marriott Global. Global Cleanliness Council, recruiting infection, prevention and food safety experts from ECOLAB adventist health care and purdue and Cornell University's virus fighting upgrades include hospital grade disinfectant increased surface, cleaning, limited contact and additional training Marriott has also rolling out enhanced technologies, including electrostatic sprayers, which can quickly disinfect fitness, centers, pool, areas, and other spaces, and the companies, testing ultraviolet light technology to sanitize keys and devices shared by associates. But is an extreme safety makeover enough to coax customers out of their homes. It might be the pandemic has created pent up, demand for travel also called revenge spending a June survey by destination analysts family at one in five people are already traveling with no hesitation and seven ten have plans to do so by the end of the year. As these brands try to do each other's squeaky clean practices. Third Party experts are getting in the game to the global bio. Risk Advisory Council a division of the Cleaning Trade Association Issa. Now offers the Gbi A. C. Star certification, hotels, restaurants, and other venues can earn the distinction by having the proper chemicals, equipment and procedures in place to remove harmful pathogens. The program began accepting applications may seventh Marriott and Hilton. Competitor Hyatt is the first hotel brand to commit to getting. All of its property certified the Chicago Tribune reports. Of course such change requires big investments in products, technology and training at a time when revenue is down, but new virus hotspots are emerging, and a vaccine or cure is still on the relatively distant horizon, so hotel brands are doubling down on better hygiene to get nervous trawlers back on the road. Booking those empty hotel rooms.

Marriott Hilton Hilton Worldwide Holdings Marriott Global Covid Hyatt United States Chicago Tribune Cleaning Trade Association Iss Global Cleanliness Council SDR Mayo Advisory Council Ecolab Lysol
Conversational AI with Israel Krush of Hyro.ai

Voice First Health

08:21 min | 1 year ago

Conversational AI with Israel Krush of Hyro.ai

"So I'm Israel Co harder and Seal Jairo A. M. I am roaming around and McCurry started late. Two hundred days early defensible says when was in charge of extracting considering message amounts of data for operational needs. That may studied computer science. The district says coming from a machine. Learning Beck rounds started working software engineer. I Inc than than at various start companies from cyber-security at the move the product management Was Product Manager head of of a couple of companies and then most of the state said gazillion. Mba DID MY MBA at Cornell University. This typically the new compass on woodsmen Thailand. And that's actually where I met with. My Co. founders from Cohen. Who studied at Cornell is master's in computer science? We actually met in machine learning class. Wow and do use in disband narrative Dick Campus We knew that one spin out than we actually got exposed to the polyphemus Alexa Google home divisive. And we're very excited about that. That we don't have this in Israel yet am so first of all very excited and then we got a bit disappointed by South. The use cases that it wasn't Tackle as we started exploring I the voice migrant than being dial natural language understanding market including jet right and when we understood that there is a lot to do there. I called a friend of mine. From beyond from eighty two hundred who are Scipio and Co founder and then we also a master's in computer science but he actually studying linguistics in Caroline and research. The English neighbors. We have this unique expertise in The industry it's called their competition linguistics or Google. Five years I that there could search link salmon beyond the USA and then Google Duplex which I'm sure a million happy group at at Google created spoi- suspended scheduled appointments for you restaurants in her salons headed amazing about the. That's right. I remember that I remember that very that was big news at the time wild. That's amazing so you guys really have a lot of expertise coming from different backgrounds but all very relevant to what you do in very interesting so how. How long ago was this that you all met like? How how? How does this company? Yeah so minimum. Method Cornell Tech and I know for the fifteen years but the company fall immediately after graduation so incorporated in June twenty eighth Dean so Less than two years ago. Talk about what we do but basically on on the concept had that accepted to news roundtable accelerator local leading accelerator in New York City And who went from there by developing the MVP getting our first big pilot We have something that we can actually converted to annual contract. Raised are around in a four million dollars the less July and today we're at the end of seventeen people in New York City California and Delaware. Wow that's great. Congratulations on that. So far that's amazing so to tell us more about the company for so what what is it. What do you guys do absolutely so I wrote? One sentence is a black play conversation. I blog form four healthcare providers. So let me break down. Abates conventionally I as I mentioned we're trying to focus on but also the so as long as it's natural language that we don't care about the medium actually understanding natural language in healthcare providers wanted to start with and enterprises organizations Massive amounts of data and That this data is heart navigating and maybe patients or general users. Find it hard to find. Whatever they're looking for or complete the tasks in the transaction did they want to complete and finally in that's the most important aspect of our solution is the blogging play. So why research assistant markets and the generals market. We've learned a lot of a lot of the existing solutions are based on a creation platform so Us As a company gives innovation the creation platform where they can define their intense and build workflows or conversation flows officials says X. replied with fly with another Blind we maybe Detroit Branch Users set and found it to be Embargoes There's friction at both the deployment and maintenance organization so we said we try to look for a completely blogging play approach. So what we do. Is We actually up into the existing data sources of the organization scrape them and we basically translating the the date now? Two different data structure which is a knowledge graph which is composed out of the main entities Andrew attributes and disconnections when this ended his attributes and this is our own representations of the Beta and which we can query natural language sessions. Really give them an embedded that piece of code they just copying base to their Website Call Center. Alexa Google and they have their voice assistant or Well basically the content. Yes so I'm not a computer scientist. That seems like maybe you can just explain that a little bit. How are you able to go? And when you're working with different organizations which which presumably have different ways of organizing their data take one piece of code and yet make it applicable to all these different organizations. Yeah absolutely so. I'll explain a one of the main use cases we've found valuable for healthcare provider is is helping their patients. The physician find the physician based on various attributes of this position when talked about their constructing. This nottage raffle and is a natural In this case the entity is a physician. And I can you might be a geology locations that the accepting insurance length that they accept and so on and so what we do. Is We actually go on by this website? And as all of their physicians went Beijing has been so we scrape them. And we don't care whether it's under the physicians or tens of thousands of physicians with scrape them build this knowledge graph and then on every attribute that the wasn't the data we can basically retrieve the relevant dancer. And I'll give you an interesting example show when we first deployed and we thought about you know people can ask seems like looking for cardiologists to speak Spanish. And ethnic cleansing the upper east side right location language specialities insurance men and so on so we destiny the beat and we actually gave to the first female user to death and she asked for an and that's just the use case that we didn't we didn't think of why a person would fit there by gender. Maybe you think it makes a little sense liquid even think about it was amen to recline with the relevant results. Just because the data was there it was a gender female man for each physician. And I think that's the barrel of actually being based on the data says trying to imagine a pretty finding dates. That's very interesting hot. So was essentially intelligent enough to just use the data. That was there but but bring that back so. Wow very

Google Cornell University New York City USA Beck Israel Co Mccurry I Inc Product Manager Software Engineer Cornell Tech Israel Cohen Thailand Co Founder Research Assistant
Jessie Redmon Fauset - Editor, Journalist, Poet, Author

This Day in History Class

03:08 min | 1 year ago

Jessie Redmon Fauset - Editor, Journalist, Poet, Author

"Day was April twenty-seventh eighteen eighty two Ryder Jesse. Redmond FO- set was born in Camden New Jersey. Fo- set was the literary editor of the Journal the crisis and an important figure in the Harlem Renaissance Jesse was the seventh child. Born to Redmond any faux set her mother died soon after she was born her father then moved to Philadelphia and married Bella Huff who had three of her own children together. Redmond and Bella had three more children Jesse graduated with honors from Philadelphia. High School for Girls Jesse got a scholarship to Cornell University where she majored in classical languages. She graduated from the University in Nineteen O Five. Because she was blacklisted he philadelphia would not hire her to teach in the public school system so she taught at Douglass High School in Baltimore for a year then she moved to Washington. Dc to teach French Latin at a high school for fourteen years before set began to write for the NWC PS magazine the crisis in nineteen twelve the ACP or the National Association for the Advancement of colored people is a civil rights organization that was formed in nineteen o nine and nineteen ten. The crisis was founded with W E B Two boys as the editor and Co founder published several short stories poems articles and book reviews in the crisis before she became literary editor of the Journal in Nineteen Nineteen. She moved to New York to take the position. And until nineteen twenty six. She took over a lot of do voices work at the crisis during her time there. She lectured in traveled around the

Literary Editor Journal In Nineteen Philadelphia Redmond High School Bella Huff Douglass High School Cornell University Camden New Jersey Harlem ACP DC Editor New York Baltimore Washington W E B Two Co Founder
"cornell university" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"From. Lost. We are back. Sam cedar on the majority report on the phone. It is a pleasure to welcome to the program system. Professor of government from Cornell University Jamila macadear, she is the author fragmented democracy, Medicaid, federalism, and unequal politics. Jamila? Did I pronounce your last name correctly? It's Michener Michler pretty close. All right. Well, I apologize. Welcome to the to the program. And thank you for joining us for having me. So let's start with for for folks who don't know give us a sense of where Medicaid fits in as a program in the structure of government sponsored health insurance. Sure. So we don't have any sort of universal government sponsored health.

Jamila macadear Michener Michler Medicaid Sam cedar Professor Cornell University
"cornell university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"And that's where rod used to that. Yeah. When he had a swimming pool built on his property there a couple of miles away right next to the base. It's actually an arsenal. And I used to talk to the perch master. It's like one room perched office, and I I heard rod Serling woods around here. He said, yeah, he comes in once in a while. And always wish I had met him. But I never did. But I think that's where he used to send his tape type to Los Angeles to the contrived into its TV program and. Where I you live there right on lake and and if the guy and that's not not far. So yeah. Could very well. Be and he would and he would dictate an Ithaca and some some tapes out to Los Angeles to be to be transcribed. Interesting. Steve what else do you know about him? What's that? What else? Do you know about it? Let's cool when his career started sink a little bit. He went back to that area. And he taught at I believe Cornell University down there, and he's very not far from it. It's out where it's on. What's in the little cemetery called Interlaken right on the lake? He must have loved that area. And it's wife when they first got married they had their honeymoon there on the lake her her relics parents probably owned that property and he bought it eventually, and they live there. And they always went back there on summers to right and relax. And but funny thing is he used to do a little radio promotions for people he knew in the area, like sheep, spill or whatever my feet store. I mean that was kinda cute here. Locally. Yeah. Just to help them out. Let's just to help them out. Yeah, absolutely everything which really nice guy. That's the way to do it. And. He had a heart of gold. He did he he really was incredibly generous with his time. He would do things like that all the time. He would he would marry things for for free for people people at the college or or local businesses as as Steve mentioned, and yeah, he would absolutely. And and, you know, going through his correspondence rustling kept everything you ever ever send every letter he ever wrote he kept in it there still exist, and you would think he responded to every single fan letter he ever received personally, personal letters signed and everything he took that time to do that and mazing that that you can't really find somebody saying a bad word about rod Serling. You really can't Nick we're gonna take a quick break. Then we're gonna come back with final phone calls with you. Special guests, Nick Parisi his book. Of course, it's called rod surliness life work in imagination to access the audio archives of coast to coast AM, log on to coast to coast, AM dot com..

rod Serling Steve Los Angeles Nick Parisi Interlaken Ithaca Cornell University
"cornell university" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Professor at Cornell University for nine more months before he is to retire as he described it to me Sunday evening sooner and under different circumstances than I expected. Others describe it as disgrace, an abrupt fall from a position of great prestige. The tests shadow on a highly consequential, but already widely distrusted area of science. How food affects our health when sink has been the director of cornell's food and brand lab for a decade where he studied, how our environment's determine what and how we eat. He was integral in leading the narrative that obesity and diabetes have less to do with individual willpower or flawed person hood than with psychological manip-. Relation by food industry that wants to sell as many cheap calories as possible. He published hundreds of studies that were aimed from conception through execution at changing the food environment to help make the more healthful decision easier in painting the picture of people as highly vulnerable to environmental cues. He famously demonstrated how when eating from bottomless bowls secretly replenished with soup from the inside, people tend to eat more. The active eating was apparently less about sating hunger than about completing the task of emptying bowl. And so the takeaway was that people should use smaller bowls and take smaller portions. Similarly, he reported that enormous buckets of popcorn at movie theaters can make us eat more even when the popcorn is not palatable. He also popularized the concept of health halos that certain foods carry to make them seem healthy even when they aren't. Because for example, they are marketed as gluten free. Even when they are simply brownies the popularity and apparent practicality of his work translated into implementation. His lab informed food companies implementing the one hundred calorie snack packs. You see in stores, for example, under the idea that these smaller portions would get people to eat less, he led the national committee on dietary guidelines and worked to improve the food ecosystems in public schools, the US army and Google among others on Thursday, cornell's provost, Michael Cutler cov issued a statement touted by a university press release that said, a faculty committee had investigated once think and found that he had committed academic misconduct in his research and scholarship, including misreporting of research data problematic, statistical techniques, failure to properly document and preserve research results and inappropriate authorship. The investigation is the culmination of a wide ranging inquisition into. To answer by journalists and academics. That appears to date back to a post on his blog, two years ago that many readers took as encouraging his graduate students to engage in a pervasive and dishonest practice of p. hacking manipulating data to find positive results that will be more interesting and amenable to publication. Then the results that came the hypotheses, the experiment actually set out to test this lead other researchers to ask one sink for his data, and that led to apologies and promises to redo his statistical analyses. Eventually his articles started getting retracted in February of this year. The BuzzFeed news reporter, Stephanie Leigh published a story titled here's how Cornell scientists, Brian wincing turned shoddy data into viral studies about how we eat that included emails in which when thinking, courage, the same sort of data manipulation, the emails were taken as a sort of smoking gun in already. Suspicious situation. Then last week, it all came crashing down with the prestigious journal network. JAMA, retracting six months studies bringing his retraction total to thirteen..

cornell Cornell University Cornell obesity Professor director BuzzFeed US army Stephanie Leigh Google Michael Cutler reporter provost Brian one hundred calorie six months two years
"cornell university" Discussed on Doughboys

Doughboys

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on Doughboys

"They. Off a Cornell University, they've they must give fucking diplomas to punch a fucking dip sheets. This flavor again is my least favorite of the three year. Fucking idiot. I think it's good use. Oh, you did a good job buddy. Don't let bitch get you doubt. Susser said the same thing. We were both in the same boat. We're both guys who get bullied by Mitch, it's all right. You just have to fight back. Good. It's good. It's kind of like imagined it like somehow getting it like in a little one pack like it could be like really refreshing, but it's not quite like rish enough that like I agree with you. Vanilla is a flavor. Yes, but I do also grew with Mitch that if you just had this on your own might be little disappointing. I think this would be a good one where you get vanillin you can sort of see the beans there. I'd like to see a little beans in this really, really like like lay on the vanilla flavor a little bit more Mitch was right in his original assessment which I had a negative reaction to. But this is a little. This is a little plainer than it should be. It's a little bit more like a baseline neutral ice cream versus a strong vanilla, which I would like to to get from Haagen-Dazs. But overall, the great smoothness to all three of these textures. I will say. All right, let's get into our next round of pints. So coming up next, we'll go to Ben and Jerry's. Now, Ben and Jerry's is we know these to these to Vermont, hippie men who have created this empire. A lot of them have some sort of brand tie in, and that includes one of the ones that we've got in front of us. So Susser talk through our flavors. We've got Jerry Garcia, a classic rate. Allusion to Jerry Garcia from the Grateful Dead. We've got, I don't like the music, but I like the atmosphere at the concerts buddy. I can get much to go with character doesn't like. Oh, wait loud. Hang in the parking lot and get the green green. God known would share with you. Also why we're going to day Matthews concert away. When is that again? September eighteenth mcallen can make you're going to the Dave Massey's double its content. Okay. And then we've got, I can't wait till someone Hanes. You join the concert. You flip. Cop. Sure. It's legal now. We've got the salted caramel core kind of ood. That's good. Very skeptical of the core. And then we've got the Ben and Jerry's everything, but the. This is good screen mix. Peanut butter cups, fudge cover, Tuffy pieces, and you know what I think I told you song together. Cherry Garcia..

Jerry Garcia Mitch Susser Ben Cornell University Cherry Garcia mcallen Vermont Matthews Dave Massey three year
"cornell university" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"And i can tell you i wasn't sure what the hell i was doing but i finally got orders to go to cornell university cardinal university but for to get re academic get reoriented towards academics so it so you had orders to west point but they were going to send you to cornell for a little while to prepare for it well no i had a an appointment to the kademi okay if you had an appointment in fact this is still today if you're having appointed to cabinet take you out of combat and bring you back some place safe and they brought us back give us about three hundred at cornell all from different parts of the service with army air force is back down stays of us army air corps and we were there for them to get re acclimated to academia turn your brain back on yeah thank you so that was at this point did you know did you know you want it to stay in the army as a career had you enjoyed your time in europe and he said you know what i think i'm gonna do think them to go the distance or no i had no i had no idea it wasn't until after well very quickly my appointment today kademi was an alternate point and is the principal if he qualifies the alternate doesn't get to go in my principal qualified so now are they doing me in the arm lane is great infinite wisdom decided to semi officer candidate school so they sent me down to four bill engineer officer candidate school.

cornell army kademi cornell university cardinal un europe principal officer engineer
"cornell university" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Al gore and i've written about this extensively my book gate was probably the biggest expose on al gore's life today maybe somebody's written a better one since then but that was two thousand ten we pretty much took him to task for his hypocrisy you know we're finding there was a study that was done by cornell university of michigan and so they're looking at people who are really concerned with the environment right and then people who aren't really that concerned in terms of writing checks and speaking out and that kind of stuff but the people who are really concerned about the environment you know the al gore's the leonardo dicaprio's and right on down the line these are the people who do the least in their own personal life for the environment i was gonna say all the ones that are tweeting about that from their private jets egg okay you can make a living doing that so this is a one year study six hundred participants in terms of climate change highly concerned cautiously worried or skeptical the highly concerned were most supportive of government climate policies but leak least likely to change their individual behavior so in other words they're all about what the government to be involved this is a big issue you better believe but when it comes to your personal recycling monitoring their open carbon footprint.

Al gore leonardo dicaprio cornell university of michigan one year
"cornell university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In a crowded cafeteria at cornell university eddie's the kind of person everyone at cornell seems to recognize he's involved in lots of activities gets good grades and always seems upbeat but eddie is different from almost all the other students here his family doesn't have a lot of money his mother came to the united states from mexico and works in a call center father is a us navy veteran neither went to college but they pushed eighty to study hard and set his sights high still paying for cornell is a huge stretch for them and for any i might have maybe one big mueller david i mostly snack to be completely honest it's it's something that like i've just become accustomed to to try and fit in with his wealthier classmates he wears what looks like a vintage omega watch my father gave this to me p founded in a pawnshop i don't even know if it's real that watch is kinda like eddie's entire life year cornell doesn't want his friends to think he's a charity case so keeps up appearances i read a conscious decision to have something that will make me seem presentable in that kind of fashion eddie gets some financial aid both from the government and from cornell but it doesn't go anywhere near as far as you might think that's because more and more of the money for financial aid in america is going to a different kind of student one that might surprise you higher education editor john marcus from our partners at the heck jer report bring us the story eddie's majoring in economics and on the day i visited him he's in a class on immigration there talking about immigrants stereotypes in popular culture and the professor mentions an old looney tunes cartoon character she remembers from years ago you might not know this but there used to be a cartoon character speedy gonzales no i mean back in the day like italian not anymore so back in the day when when you watch dollars.

cornell university eddie cornell united states mexico eddie america john marcus jer professor gonzales editor
"cornell university" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on Reveal

"Area at cornell university thank you fish eddie's the kind of person everyone at cornell seems to recognize he's involved in lots of activities gets good grades and always seems beat but eddie is different from almost all the students here his family doesn't have a lot of money smother came to the united states from mexico and works in a call center father is a us navy veteran neither went to college but they pushed eighty to study hard and set his sights high still paying for cornell is a huge stretch for them and for any i might have maybe one big mula day but i mostly snack to be completely honest it's it's something that i've just become accustomed to to try and fit in with his wealthy classmates he wears what looks like a vintage omega watch my father gave this to me p founded upon shop i don't even know if it's real that watch is kinda like eddie's entire life year cornell doesn't want as friends to think he's a charity case so keeps up appearances i am conscious to has something that to make me seem presentable in that kind of fashion eddie get some financial aid both from the government and from cornell but it doesn't go anywhere near as far as you might think that's because more and more of the money for financial aid in america is going to a different kind of student one that might surprise you higher education editor john markets from partners at the hacking joe report bring us the story.

cornell university cornell united states mexico eddie america editor joe
"cornell university" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on KCRW

"Message from cornell university okay that goes on for a while remember i said it was december usually college decisions don't come and till march but hickman applied for early decision at cornell if she got in she promised to withdraw her applications from other colleges it was definitely my favorite school and my first choice so i thought that early decision would be the the right decision and it's an increasingly popular decision for both students and colleges robert massa is senior vice president for enrollment at drew university in new jersey and former dean of admissions at johns hopkins with the rise of the common application and intense anxiety about getting in he says students apply to far more colleges than they used to and so that makes a very very difficult for the colleges to predict their enrollments right because of they're applying to seven or eight colleges the chances of enrolling in any one are much smaller early decision gives colleges some certainty about the incoming class the vast majority of admitted students end up enrolling in exchange massa says early applicants have an edge i mean if you look nationally students are accepted at a higher rate in early decision massa says some schools share lists of those students with other colleges to make sure the students really withdraw their applications the justice department wouldn't comment on its investigation but amherst college grinnell pomona williams all confirmed receiving a letter from the department it implies justice is looking into whether those communications violate antitrust laws that's not sepe bacillus concern about early decision early admission programs do disadvantaged students from lower income backgrounds bacilli is ceo of the jack kent cooke foundation it provides scholarships to high achieving students from low income families twenty nine percent of students whose families.

cornell university hickman senior vice president johns hopkins ceo robert massa twenty nine percent
"cornell university" Discussed on College Info Geek

College Info Geek

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on College Info Geek

"Technique in this comes from dale corson who is i think the dean of cornell university at one point and he was also a chemistry professor there's a lot of chemistry professors giving advice on studying note is about them so basically he's a when you go to your professor you wanna know exactly what you're confused on because a lot of students they come in and they kind of just say i don't get it and it's like this general statement like i just don't get it and the teacher will say what you don't you get and you know they'll say all of it i just don't get it i really don't i don't have time to play twenty one questions today exactly yeah so that makes a bad impression because it makes it look like in this is true that you haven't put a whole lot of thought into pinpointing where your confusion lies and you don't value their time you home value their time yeah failure teachers time teachers put a lot of work in and they don't get paid very much so it's crazy how much work teachers have to put in at least they get the summers off sometimes that's nice but i don't know man like seven or eight hours in school than lesson plans and grading papers and then just stay in their office trying to help extra just because they want to i think anna's mom spent like half of her time here on vacation grading papers so sounds about right it's a little sad so yeah worked to know exactly where you're confusion lies come in and pinpointed and of course says you should be able to show exactly how much you get up to a certain point and you should even be able to show if you get something after your point of confusion you should be able to show that you understand that it's about creating this exact window of where your confusion lies this makes a better impression new teacher but it also makes it quicker for them to help you and makes it easier for them to help you because it's kind of like documenting the problem you're able to show them the steps that got you where you are.

dale corson cornell university professor anna eight hours
"cornell university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"You the life story of supreme court justice ruth bader ginsburg which on the surface you might think could be boring given we're talking about a judge you're about to be surprised by this fascinating life of the second woman ever to be on the supreme court sandra day o'connor from arizona was the first and ginsburg is also the first jewish woman on the supreme court a twofer for the hour we'll be bringing you highlights of her interview with the academy of achievements terrific pod podcast what it takes she i talked about the influence of her mother my mother was a voracious reader and one gifted she gave me was loving to read my favorite memory was sitting on her lap she would read books timmy we had a daily a weekly excursion to the public library and she would leave me in the library in the children's section have her had done and then pick me up when i had my three or four books for the week ruth went to cornell university and met her husband marty there and she said that he was the very first man she dated who actually cared that she had a brain and he also cared enough to try to teach her to drive a herculean task i learned to drive in at cornell i practiced on marty's gray chevrolet i failed i found driver's test five times i'd like to get a second learner's permit so mardi heaven having infinite patience when i was learning to drive then when we were married he would never allow me to drive with if he was in the car unless he was deathly ill unless he had a gallon on june twenty third one thousand nine hundred fifty four ruth and marty got married leila married in marty's home and his mother took me into the bedroom her bedroom and said dear i'd like to tell you the.

ruth bader ginsburg arizona marty cornell sandra day cornell university
"cornell university" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Some have been what it is a a man with gone over doc children i was a little kid was when hippies as my father and mother and you know they're friends called him were protesting and our members a little kid i grew up in upstate new york and cornell university and students the ivy league schools were amongst the first to start taking over buildings and stuff and they mostly did citizens and it would draw media attention and this is in the three channel universe newspapers were king and they get newspaper coverage and we know from history we know from lbj's words and tapes of lbj nixon we know from history of witnesses to the to the same that if not for the students protests it's unclear what would have happened vietnam but they precipitated the end of vietnam they shed a light on the fact that vietnam was a disaster so i have often said and just show i've said it to you i said people don't protest like they used to it's a constitutional right to assemble and people have protests like the how annoying is it on a friday night if a bunch of people go to get get into traffic on michigan avenue or on you know let's see protests on the kennedy irony aznar all the time all the time so once again we're not talking about that kind of protests we're talking about kids kids getting it done right and having an agenda and having a point and organized even having a time limit on it.

new york cornell university lbj vietnam aznar ivy league michigan kennedy
"cornell university" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on The Pulse

"These subway mosquitoes became genetically distinct what the researchers found was a new kind of mosquito that some cold the london the mosquito it's evolution inaction and somali just laura harrington says similar on the ground the skeet host have also been found in the new york subway she's a professor at cornell university has also studied how these mosquitoes at that two cities it's a biologically fascinating question but also an important public health question this specific kind the mosquito when they live above ground the wild types they transmit west nile virus but they usually prefer to feed on birds so humans on bother buy them but the ones that went on the ground have adapted to feed on mammals that means rats and thus the new york city health department says it's pretty rare but when these different forms brite with each other you could get mosquitoes that not only transmit west nile virus they also like to feed on mammals right and they're above ground where they're coming in contact with people so i guess we could have inadvertently then by having a hand in creating the belowground type we've kind of creates a type of mosquito that's is worse for us yeah we're we're good at doing that sort of thing the next step really in the future is about bringing collaborations together with scientists who understand the mosquitoes and those who understand the urban environment it's a consideration in pest control and public health may be some they will have urbandesign is who know how to protect us from these city mosquitoes lower says that if we want to stop them and not get west nile virus one thing we might do is make sure has plenty of air flowing through outbuildings because mosquitoes are fairly weak flyers and can get blown away easily lots of researchers are doing basic science to move us toward solutions like that's in their inch.

laura harrington cornell university public health urbandesign new york
"cornell university" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"All right guys is corner with the west side of cornell university i i don't know i need to look into this will write tomorrow man thank you so much shout out to try and wyckoff with a beautiful y yes system this is this i have to promote auditors with my coupon okay any appreciable so we get rim or these might say i'll tell you what i will do guys fully i will give you a couple random thighs and will do so a readiness of asked the i get i uh um i do you think antimilitary activists respect those veteran pocket only size i feel i shouldn't if you if you real you should park adams late real by that life uhhuh we all respect the war efforts um i think the black people that on invited to the cookout do their own event that that you know when all aside the cookout they do their own like separate gathering would a food mike why potato salad him uh on season meets dumped by likening armor omarosa and stacy dashed make pumpkin pies and gop black magic brains the unseasoned target in they out they i'll go to their own instead of the cookout together code out yuma blames green beans uh kamien have armpit vaginas because we were that article is a women are worried about audit vaginas but arab i got onto his they got arms so committed have oputa jonas well it while not ashamed of my office the john i'm gonna say all right now like these my these on fat off people jonah's blue jays them isn't good pussy other these are paved with china i know that much allen lift his arm of and change a world.

cornell university stacy allen wyckoff yuma jonah
"cornell university" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Tel aviv review hello and welcome to the tel aviv review burgum dedicated to the world to the thought and to debate brought to you by the van near jerusalem institute which promotes humanistic democratic and liberal values in a social discourse in israel i'm your host cannot happen and this interview being recorded on the premises of the annual conference of the association for israel studies at brandeis university my guest today is professor political science at both in college and the author of a new book entitled rebel power why national movements compete fight and win it was recently published by cornell university press the book is a comparative study focusing on four national movements the algerian palestinian israeli and northern irish dr peter cries hello and welcome to the tel aviv review thank you so much for having me so what are these four k studies that you explore in your book with the similarities and differences tell us about the relationship between politics and violence they tell a lot of things so i pick those four cases because i'm trying to explain why some nations get states and others don't and so in the case of zionist movement they get the state of israel the algerians get the state of algeria the irish get ireland but not northern ireland and the palestinians don't have a state of palestine so i picked the cases for that purpose but in the course of looking at those cases also looking at why groups within those movements use violence or don't and so what my argument is is where you stand depends on where you sit and what i mean by that is where you stand in the hierarchy of your national movement depends on where you sit on using or restraining violence so the way i think about that is.

jerusalem institute israel ireland brandeis university professor cornell university dr peter algeria palestine four k
"cornell university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Which is he then said well okay that's all living carl let's look at some fossils he was after all the paleontologist so here's a cornell university in cornell university surrounded by iraq's around three hundred seventy or so million years old and he collected some nice carlsson there are a lot of nice coral fossils know from there and he opened up these ancient skeletons handy did the account fan hundred eighty two hundred di he was expecting hundred day three hundred sixty two three hundred sixty five sixty he then lo and behold he found four hundred between four hundred and 410 really yeah and he looked lots of specimens that number the four hundred number kept showing up what is what does that mean well that means that it's it's now reasonable to think that back in the day you know three hundred and eighty million years ago there were more days in a year and he published a paper saying more or less that and right away clam scientists said well if that's true for girls has got to be true for my animal the clam and the people that what's gotta be trooper wasters them muscle folks has got to be for muzzles this paper set off a bit of a cottage industry of folks applying this technique to other species in looking at these other species they found that the general trend is absolutely correct that when you compare modern animals to ancient animals will find they record your words more things so you go back to a time period called or division which is about four hundred fifty million years ago typical year had about four hundred and fifteen four hundred ten days and it really good of time period i work garnered the devonian about three hundred sixty million years probably about 400 so what you see is the number.

carl iraq cornell university three hundred sixty million ye four hundred fifty million yea fifteen four hundred ten days eighty million years million years hundred day