35 Burst results for "Cornell University"

Biden Wrote College Rec Letters for Kids of Chinese Exec Tied to Hunter

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:38 min | 6 months ago

Biden Wrote College Rec Letters for Kids of Chinese Exec Tied to Hunter

"Turns out there's now a piece of smoking gun evidence that ties Joe and Hunter Biden very closely together in the Biden racket. And it is an email that reveals that Joe Biden wrote a letter of recommendation for a crooked Chinese businessman who was, in partnership with Hunter Biden. So this was a political favor directly extended by Joe Biden. President Biden wasn't the president then, but it was vice president. And this is the same Joe Biden who said, I don't know anything about my son's business deal. I don't have any involvement in any of that. It's nothing to do with me, and this has been the left's mantra now. Now that they can deny the laptop, they are taking refuge in the idea well, Joe didn't know anything about it. Well, let's look at what happened here. Turns out, in 2017, vice president Ben vice President Biden wrote this letter of recommendation for a guy named Jonathan Lee ally. And this guy Lee is the head the CEO of a big company, which was in a joint venture with Biden's Hunter Biden's company, which was called Rosemont, Seneca. Hunter Biden, in fact, had a 10% stake in the Chinese guy Lee's company. And this guy Lee sends a note to Hunter Biden and his business associates, which is Devin archer and Jim bolger, and this is what Lee writes. He goes, gentlemen, please find the attached resume of my son, chrisley. He's applying to the following colleges for this year, and he lists Brown university Cornell University and New York University. And then he attaches, quote, an updated version of his son's CV. Now, what's interesting is to kind of follow this trail. Hunter Biden's associate James Bulger responds with, and he's responding now internally to hunter and Devin archer, he goes quote let's see how we can be helpful here to Chris. In other words, what can we do for this kid? And then a few weeks later, Eric schwinn, who is the president of Rosemont, Seneca. This is the Hunter Biden company. He replies to Lee. And he says, Jonathan, this is Jonathan Lee. Hunter asked me to send you a copy of the recommendation letter that he asked his father to write on behalf of Christopher for Brown university. So what we have here is confirmation that Joe Biden went ahead and as his son asked, wrote the letter for this guy and submitted it to Brown university.

Hunter Biden Joe Biden President Biden LEE Devin Archer Biden Vice President Ben Vice Presid Jonathan Lee Ally JOE Jim Bolger Chrisley Rosemont Brown University Cornell Unive Seneca James Bulger Eric Schwinn New York University Hunter Jonathan Lee
Why America Is at the 'Abyss of Infinite Insanity' With Dr. Gad Saad

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:03 min | 6 months ago

Why America Is at the 'Abyss of Infinite Insanity' With Dr. Gad Saad

"With us right now is one of my favorite guests. He's a lot of fun. Gad sad is the Professor of marketing at concordia university and former holder of concordia university research chair in evolutionary behavioral sciences. He has held the visiting associate professorships of Cornell University Dartmouth college and University of California Irvine. And he also has a phenomenal book that he has authored called the parasitic mind, and he is one of the most articulate and effective opponents of wokeism and the moral decay that is occurring in the west. Professor sad, welcome back to the Charlie Kirk show. So nice to be with you, sir. So I think it would be helpful, doctor for you to kind of introduce the thesis behind your book, the parasitic mind. A lot of our audience is new and it has been a while since we've had a conversation. Reintroduce kind of the argument you make in that book. And why you've believed that these parasites, otherwise known as kind of the woke variants, are so dangerous to western society. Right, so I face two great wars in my life. The first great war was growing up in Lebanon when the Civil War began, and that allowed me to see the dangers of identity politics because everything in Lebanon is viewed through the prism of your religious identity. And then the second great war that I faced was the one the war that was being waged on reason, science, logic, common sense that we saw on university campuses. I've now been a professor for almost 30 years. And so I wanted to write a book that documented all of these dreadful ideas which I refer to as idea pathogens, postmodernism, radical feminism, cultural relativism, the fear of using biology to explain human affairs. So all of these idea pathogens have correspond human minds, leading us to the abyss of infinite lunacy. And so I wanted to explain first the pandemic of the human mind of the viruses of the human mind and then to hopefully offer inoculation a vaccine against these dreadful

Concordia University Cornell University Dartmouth C Charlie Kirk GAD Lebanon
NY Times Publishes Essay Discouraging Transition Screenings

The Larry Elder Show

01:10 min | 6 months ago

NY Times Publishes Essay Discouraging Transition Screenings

"Did you know The New York Times published an extensive essay that argued against screening, listen to this? That argued against screening before medical transition. No screening before sex change operation. If someone says she wants hormones or surgery, doctors, according to The New York Times, should have immediately break out the syringes and prep the operating room. There's a guy by the name of Alex, I was going to say gentlemen, but you wouldn't. No. Alex marzano Les novich about doing college. He wrote the piece basically that exemplifies how the transgender movement uses misinformation to advance its agenda. Marzano lesnevich asserts that gender affirming healthcare saves lives is clear. A 2008 literature review by Cornell University concluded that 93% of studies found that transition improved trend 93% of studies found that transition improved transgender people's health

The New York Times Alex Marzano Les Novich Marzano Lesnevich Alex Cornell University
'Tipping Point' Makes Partisan Polarization Irreversible, Cornell Research Suggests

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:21 min | 10 months ago

'Tipping Point' Makes Partisan Polarization Irreversible, Cornell Research Suggests

"We're talking about this study. I just found so interesting by researchers at Cornell University found there's a tipping point where no issue that you can think of would be able to reunite Democrats and Republicans again. They say, at that point, that tipping point that they've identified extreme polarization becomes irreversible. There are predictive model for measuring the behavior of a polarized political group like the current Senate. Shows that even an attack by a foreign power or another pandemic would not heal the political divide. And we were just speaking with Chris, caller Chris from excuse me, Charles from North Carolina. And he said, can you imagine, after the Attack on Pearl Harbor that Republicans or Democrats came out and tried and justified the attack because well they're aggrieved and it's the U.S.'s fault and whatever we happen to do, that was so terrible. I mean, think of 9 11. You have Republicans and Democrats out there together. Because the people who were killed in those buildings and in The Pentagon and in the field in Pennsylvania, they didn't have D's and ours after their names. They were all Americans. But if we get to the point where we're so balkanized, that's exactly what's going to happen.

Cornell University Chris Senate Pearl Harbor North Carolina Charles U.S. Pentagon Pennsylvania
Colleges go back to drawing board — again — to fight COVID

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 10 months ago

Colleges go back to drawing board — again — to fight COVID

"Many many colleges colleges and and universities universities are are telling telling students students to to prepare prepare for for another another term term of of masking masking testing testing and and if if cases cases get get bad bad limits limits around around social social life life going going into into the the Christmas Christmas break break there there are are new new coronavirus coronavirus infections infections and and the the new new variant variant Austin Austin church church check check is is a a student student at at New New York York University University I'm I'm a a senior senior officer officer twenty twenty one one sack sack on on this this past past weekend weekend and and people people getting getting sick sick a a lot lot some some people people had had naked naked photos photos nobody nobody on on directly directly with with so so I I know know that that stops stops going going around around Cornell Cornell University University abruptly abruptly shut shut down down all all campus campus activities activities and and mood mood final final exams exams online online so so did did Princeton Princeton will will Jiang Jiang at at NYU NYU is is studying studying remotely remotely it's it's going going back back and and it's it's better better to to be be safe safe and and hopefully hopefully keep keep score score in in person person in in the the spring spring Syracuse Syracuse University University announced announced all all eligible eligible students students and and employees employees must must get get booster booster shots shots before before the the spring spring term term at at Stanford Stanford no no parties parties or or big big gatherings gatherings for for two two weeks weeks when when classes classes resume resume many many colleges colleges are are planning planning for for potential potential disruption disruption next next semester semester I I bet bet Donahue Donahue

Coronavirus Coronavirus Infect Austin Austin Church Church New New York York University U Cornell Cornell University Uni Princeton Princeton Jiang Jiang Nyu Nyu Syracuse Syracuse University U Stanford Stanford Donahue Donahue
"cornell university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:10 min | 10 months ago

"cornell university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Developed by gastroenterologists with 20 years of research more at a line probiotics dot com It's morning edition from NPR news a Martinez and Culver City California and I'm Stephen skip in Washington D.C. good morning The drastic increase in coronavirus cases in the United States has largely not been driven by the automotive until now Now it's all around us detected in 36 states just as winter arrives NPR's Allison Aubrey joins us once again Allison Good morning Good morning Steve How quickly is oma cron spreading Very quickly cases can double every two days I think what's happening in Houston Texas right now really sheds light on just how quickly it could take over for the last few months the city has had pretty low levels of COVID the CEO of Houston methodist hospital Merck boom told me they were in good shape after a big Delta surge earlier that last summer But what he has seen over the last several days changes the picture completely We've seen our positivity rates go from about 6% to 20% So there's little doubt that once this is there and spreads it spreads rapidly I mean this is replacing delta in our community at a rate we've never seen And I would expect matter of weeks only before it is all that we're dealing with his own product As of late last night 32% of positive sequenced at the hospital are now uma cron and doctor boom says even if most cases are mild and only a small fraction lead to hospitalization it could still be hard for hospitals to keep up Yeah that's the problem if you have millions of cases over time you could end up with many many thousands who are hospitalized I want to ask about a news item from New York now ethic in New York Cornell University had a quick rise in cases which is going to be of concern to anybody who has somebody that they love on a university campus somewhere What's being done to control the spread Well the university's provost Michael cough told me that they first detected Democrat cases on Sunday They did a bunch of sequencing after noting a steady rise in cases starting a few weeks back Now the campus is 98% vaccinated and almost all of the cases have occurred in fully vaccinated students We've been seeing a 50% rise in cases day over day So Cornell moved final exams online They canceled all social gatherings among undergraduates and they've told students they can go home cut lokhov says they're now seeing the beginning of a plateau because students are now either isolated or they're leaving the campus Our very many students getting sick You know there have been no hospitalizations but remember this is a young pretty healthy population and Michael cutler cough says they are keeping tabs on students who've been infected Almost all either asymptomatic or mild symptoms the majority of students have been asymptomatic that have been detected but we're isolating those students for ten days Clearly they don't want students to go home and spread it to more vulnerable family members or friends Does the experience of the UK in recent days point to where we in the United States might be before long You know we're typically about three weeks behind the UK and what happened yesterday in Britain They reported more than 78,000 new cases of the highest number of infections in a single day since the start of the pandemic The majority of cases in London are now from Omaha and during an afternoon press conference prime minister Boris Johnson announced what he called a jab athon aimed at getting people boosted We're jabbing in hospitals where jabbing in surgeries were jabbing in pharmacies and in pop up centers where jabbing in shopping centers and on high streets in football stadiums we are throwing everything at it And wherever you are will be there with a jab for you You know he's basically saying you're not going to be able to escape the shot Okay so first I'm very much in favor of the word jab athon We should find more ways to use that in the language but is there evidence that the booster shots really do help against this variant You know it's become clear that the vaccines don't offer as much protection against Omaha and that vaccinated people are vulnerable to infection but yesterday during a White House briefing doctor Anthony Fauci outlined some reassuring data from the UK It showed that when people get a third dose a booster shot protection does go way back up Our booster vaccine regimens work when you get the booster It increases to 75% effectiveness against symptomatic disease with a booster dose So their advice is get boosted and when you are out in crowded spaces mask up And Pierre's Allison Aubrey thanks so much Thank you Steve The writer and path setting activist bell hooks died yesterday or home in Kentucky She was 69 years old Bell hooks thought deeply about love what it is and why we need it NPR's Andrew limbong has this appreciation of the scholar We'll get into bell hooks work as a critic and academic in a bit but first I just wanted to read to you some of her poetry This is an excerpt from her book Appalachian elegy then it goes like this Such then is beauty surrendered against all hope You are here again turning slowly Nature as chameleon all life change and changing again Awakening hearts steady moving from unnamed loss into fierce deep grief that can bear all burdens even the long passage into a shadowy dark where no light enters I always think that part of the genius of bell hooks such as It is That's Bill hooks talking about her own writing on a talk show called speaking freely from 2002 Is that I bring together standpoints that are often not brought together in our nation The breadth of her writing was wide and it covered history sex grief religion memory and more So I'm always bringing together diverse ways of knowing Bell hooks was born Gloria Jean Watkins in Kentucky in 1952 Her 1981 book a naia woman became a foundational feminist tech as it clearly laid out the intertwined forces oppressing black women racism sexism classism But her work included her poetry was always imbued with a sense of hope In 2003 she talked to NPR about the importance of being aware of these forces but not dwelling on them Because obviously if we only fixate on any form of oppression or any pain then we really lose sight of the totality of who we are were always more than our pain One of her most popular works was her book all about love And in 2000 she went on used Diane show and explained her definitional problem with love This book is actually dedicated to an ex-boyfriend of mine who was much younger and we found ourselves quarreling again and again about love because we didn't have a shared sense of what we even meant when we talked about the term Like all of her work the book is clear eyed about the systemic hurdles to a loving each other and ourselves But it opens with bell hooks talking about a phrase.

Allison Aubrey NPR news Culver City California Stephen skip Washington D.C. oma cron Houston methodist hospital Mer uma cron Michael cough lokhov Michael cutler NPR Martinez Bell hooks United States
"cornell university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:30 min | 10 months ago

"cornell university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Had a video call this week with a woman in the finger lakes region of New York where winter is closing in Yes I mean it It appears to be a beautiful day there but is it really Everything is relative Steve today is a beautiful day compared to every other day most of the time Sally omarova has returned to teaching at Cornell University She will not be moving to a new job in Washington D.C. President Biden nominated her as controller of the currency a top banking regulator but she withdrew last week after members of the U.S. Senate attacked her writings and beliefs Don't think I've ever seen a more radical choice for any regulatory spot That's Pennsylvania senator pat toomey and this is Louisiana's John Kennedy who suggested omarova was a communist since she came from the former Soviet Union I don't mean any disrespect I don't know whether to call you professor or comrade Senator I'm not a communist I could not choose where I was born She publicly suggested soon afterward that the criticism played on her race She identifies as Asian Our conversation with sali omarova is her first interview since her confirmation died What does she make of her experience and what were the ideas that Republicans and some Democrats found so radical We started with that fact that attracted criticism Her birthplace So I was born in Kazakhstan in a small town in western Kazakhstan and I grew up there It was then a remote part of the Soviet empire She went to college in Moscow but soon moved to America She became a U.S. citizen as she continued her study of politics and democracy When I came to the United States I was just like a sponge trying to soak up everything that I could The student became a professor She worked on Wall Street and in the administration of president George W. Bush She accepted President Biden's offer to serve as a bank regulator though she says she knew she would struggle to win Senate confirmation because she favored tighter regulation Ultimately my positions are quite simple I think that our financial system needs to do better in serving the interests of the regular Americans and American businesses and the American economy the real economy It needs to channel capital channel credit into the real productive enterprise And into the hands of working Americans And I believe that in the last several decades the financial industry in the banking industry at the core of that financial sector have become diversified financial conglomerates whose main profits and main business comes from trading in complex financial institutions rather than from lending to the communities and the families that need credit the most Isn't that speculative trading as you phrase it the way that financial institutions make insane amounts of money That's exactly what it is And that's why expected them to be against my nomination If confirmed she expected to push banks to serve communities more by pushing them away from risk your investments And from that perspective who directs the policies of the federal bank regulators particularly the OCC would have had and does have tremendous impact on how banks perceive their ability to take risks and for what purpose So if the financial services industry wanted to continue doing business exactly as they have been they had reason to be worried about you They absolutely do have the reason to be worried I think the job of the regulator is generally to constantly keep asking private banks and other financial institutions with respect to the risks that the January as a public are subsidizing banks We are subsidizing in a very important sense their ability to make private profits So we have the right to press them all the time with respect to the decisions they make Now you said that you anticipated some difficulty with your nomination for the reasons that we've just discussed How did you prepare to get through this confirmation So I expected that debate and fight over my nomination would be centered around the substance of my views specifically on the ability of the large banks to engage in speculative trading as opposed to more traditional forms of relationship based landing And I was preparing with respect to kind of how to answer those types of substantive questions Unfortunately the substantive questions never really came up Instead the substance of my scholarship has been completely distorted And it's been so politicized in such aim simplified way that all my preparation for a kind of debating the complex technical questions of bank regulation turned out not to be necessary Do you mean when you gamed through all the possible questions you might be asked it didn't occur to you that someone would say are you a communist Well imagine that That I genuinely did not expect because it's been 30 years since the Soviet Union fell apart That country is gone That regime is dead That system was dying even when I was there and we all knew that so to me it was a shock that the appeal to that sort of fear of communism particularly in its Soviet incarnation could still have that much power in today's day and age in today's America I'm wondering if you think that if you talked about your ideas about banks Well they might actually be popular with people I mean if your proposition is that banks are not serving ordinary people it would be easy to get a lot of Americans to line up behind that idea Do you think they were looking for something that was less popular to say about you I think that's exactly what they did Because look you know in the right mind here in today's America would support another big bank bailout Senators questioned her academic writings She had written for example of pushing the Federal Reserve into the retail banking business something she would have no power to do as a regulator It's kind of comical that the banking lobby made me some kind of a crazy radical who came up with such a radical idea It's not that new Some key Democrats also questioned her nomination Omarova maintains they listened too much to the banking lobby but the Democrats opposition made her confirmation impossible Her withdrawal became another divisive story about race and identity though solely omarova says that was never really the issue And in fact I believe that the Wall Street lobby doesn't really care about my race or my sex or anything like that They would have loved me just the way I am If only I stood up for the interests And if only I was the kind of a control a nominee that they knew would do their bidding for them and treat them as quote unquote clients But they chose to weaponize my identity because.

President Biden omarova Sally omarova Washington D.C. sali omarova Kazakhstan America Senate pat toomey finger lakes John Kennedy Soviet Union Cornell University president George W. Bush Louisiana Pennsylvania Moscow Steve OCC New York
Author Paul Gottfried Has Written the Book on Fascism... And Antifascism

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:13 min | 11 months ago

Author Paul Gottfried Has Written the Book on Fascism... And Antifascism

"And Paul Godfrey has written a book titled anti fascism. The course of a crusade, who is Paul gottfried, you wonder, I'll tell you, first of all, he's my guest for this hour. He is the editor of chronicles. Some of you know that journal, he's an American paleo conservative philosopher historian columnist. He's a former Horace raffensperger Professor of humanities at Elizabethtown college in Elizabethtown Pennsylvania, as well as a Guggenheim recipient wow, doctor gottfried welcome to this program. Thank you for having me on. Well, it's a joy to have you on and to talk about your new book anti fascism. You had to be aware that there's something funny about the idea that you've written a book called fascism, the career of a concept followed by anti fascism, the course of a crusade. Tell us about that. Well, you know, I became interested in the subject of fascism before I was confronted by the problem of woke of the woke left, which is what we're dealing with right now. Much of my earlier scholarship, you know, dealt with political movements and movements of the right, as well as movements to the left. And I wrote a biography of Carl Schmidt, a German political theorist who influenced into war fascism. So sort of natural that at some point I wrote a book on fascism as well. And in studying the book on fascism, I was informed by a person who has become sort of my mentor Stanley Payne who's probably the outstanding scholar on the subject of fascism that the best part of the book was my treatment of anti fascism. So I was urged by Stanley and then by Amy ferranto, who was my editor at Cornell University in northern Illinois university presses. They're now merged that I should write a book on anti fascism, which I did. And as I told her, I found it much less interesting to my book on fascism because the people I was dealing with were much less

Paul Godfrey Paul Gottfried Horace Raffensperger Elizabethtown College Elizabethtown Gottfried Carl Schmidt Pennsylvania Stanley Payne Amy Ferranto Cornell University In Northern Stanley
Cornell Professor Suggests Collusion by NEA Chapters in Lawsuit Against South Kingstown Mother

Mark Levin

01:09 min | 1 year ago

Cornell Professor Suggests Collusion by NEA Chapters in Lawsuit Against South Kingstown Mother

"Now with Mrs Solis received the motion. For the temporary restraining order and injunction yesterday. She asked if teachers unions bullying moms will be an everyday thing now. Okay? Cornell University law professor William Jacobson, whose legal Insurrection foundation Has filed similar public records request to the South Kingstown School district. Wrote Wednesday that the lawsuit makes little sense on its face, He said the district is not shy. About asserting exemptions, as evidenced by the hundreds of fully redacted pages. It turned over to Jacobson's foundation fully redacted. That means like page after page after page is just black, nothing And there's no reason to believe the information that concerns union qualifies as public records. Jacobson says his initial take That smells like collusion. The South Kingstown school district doesn't want to produce records and the union is helping them out. That's what he says. At least it looks like to him.

Mrs Solis William Jacobson Insurrection Foundation South Kingstown School Distric Cornell University Jacobson
Behind the Development of the Sternberg Triarchic Abilities Test

The Psychology Podcast

02:30 min | 1 year ago

Behind the Development of the Sternberg Triarchic Abilities Test

"Great to have robert sternberg on the podcast sturm. Rick is a psychology professor at cornell university among his major contributions to psychology are the arctic theory of intelligence and several influential theories relating to creativity thinking styles love and hate a review of general psychology survey ranked sternberg as the sixtieth most cited psychologist of the twentieth century. And he's authored a co-authored over fifteen hundred publications including articles book chapters and books. And even that bios a huge understatement of all eve accomplished. Hey bob so great to have you in the podcast today. Thanks reeling having me. Thanks for inspiring me to go into the field. So i i is. It seems fair seems fair. No that will thank you. Thank you so much that means a lot to me You know in starting this conversation today. We could obviously talk about the research stuff. But i wanted to start more at your own childhood because i think it's i get a real kick out of every time i read that you created intelligence test when you were in. Maybe even elementary school. Can you kind of tell me about that story. Sure when i was in elementary school i didn't created i did poorly on. Iq tests is a young kid. In the late fifties early sixties. They used to give iq tests every year to group iq tests. And i did very poorly on them and you might ask how i know since they didn't give us the scores. But when you get the test and you only finish one or two problems and everyone else's turn the page. It doesn't take a high. You realize that you bombed so when i was in sixth grade i was sent back to a fifth grade classroom to take an easier tests that they thought would be more suitable to my ability level and because it was a fifth grade classroom my was less afraid and i think i did better i in seventh grade. I decided try to figure out why did so much trouble when he just said. I did a project on development of the mental tests and i devised my own. I teach us the very famous thoroughbred test of mental gallotti's stone. Which i'm sure you've heard of in. It's so widely used still haven't gone along with everything else from winners

Robert Sternberg Sternberg Cornell University Arctic Rick BOB Gallotti
"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"We will come back tears. Bridges stable of the oldest motion and get otis differential tation. So they the whole body rotating but it's not precisely and same gray. Different parts of jupiter may loaded slightly different rate and and because of this differentiation the generate the distortion notation of distortion. Locate a body. the body's owed blade. Pitch distortion can be can be different. And that can change. The gravitational field produced by jupiter and that can be detected by juno so that have been detected for those detection. People can't infer or this kind of things but internal competition the size of the call the notation differential rotation on the inside the inside of jupiter and a lot of progress on dick sensually. Red spot going to right so that is hundreds of years. They've hundred years. Yes is still somewhat that people think them but i don offended i the quite non tribute to understand this. The atmosphere motions quite the quite a complicated things. Excellent yes You know there's a common theme running through. All of this is menu of serve phenomenon. Sometimes there is a body out there that is actually creating this nominee will help you. Yes is indeed. Yeah while the common theme or decide. What i get that talked about the you could say well if fema newton's law but you can see this fema. We learned in high school given context. They can play in the complaint. You can do very different things. Right and samson sometimes very subtle way can do all kinds of chicks nikki creating variety of phenomena. So that's actually quite interesting so ranging from planets to black hose excellent. Yeah this is great. Thanks so much time with me okay. Great pressure talked about the thank. You bye-bye this is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations with leading academics researchers on a variety of topics. If you'd like to sponsor this podcast please reach out to in fall. At scientific sense dot com..

hundred years hundreds of years samson sense fema newton dot com juno scientific
"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Be very bad will crush under the ground. So they were worried that the moon even the moon. It's the it's very small mess. They're worried that gravity of the mu will act on. The orbit of satellite is still up. I new assistant. Well the satellite around the second round rose is a binary right. The moon is another the distant body us so the leadoff least what worry about. You know the mood gravitate. Maybe even though it's very weak over time it will change the orbit shape satellite making the at satellite elongated orbit. Saturday will crush into the into the surface of the earth. That would be very bad right. So this is covered the tech leadoff khoza effective. Jose studied also So that's the origin of this effect eastern eastern immeasurably. You said immeasurably frank. Do we actually see that well. Fortunately fortunately the satellite face the moon's gravity if thought he joined up to to push the push them that they had worry about it. Because it's it's not was not obvious right because You know johnny. You have lana time. You want to just saying you want to make sure this i mean. The satellite can last tens of years eight ten years right so at least for over this you know decades year timescale pretty safe. The moon's gravity is not enough to push push it to push the satellites in the very elongated shape that he thought that but anyway they discovered this effect right. so that's why we are basically Just different system was similar. Kind of idea. It's basically just rescale things so the about it but it's not hiding out for us to really worry about it but you'd applying the same ideas in the heart. Jupiter systems as well as the black hole mooners yes I wanted to go into a few of your recent papers ethnical. hopefully we can give. It says a one hundred mistake. Chaos in white guar fancy systems. So you say the overlap. Nonleague siegler resonances by scaling..

Jose earth johnny second round Jupiter eight ten years Saturday tens of years one decades
"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Iro in closer and closer to the stall. Okay though eventually code will be very close but then you mentioned that the problem. How do you stop it. Maybe even not by the star right and that this also had the problem. How do you in this picture. Everything will still be ordered this sleiman. Let because you've got to imagine just saying as everything in the same plane that's the stars rotating same direction so migrating duke aligned system desist so this hypothesis this will disk disk. Jovan migration can explain can possibly possibly phrases migration process but it's very difficulty this misalignment process. Right why the myth line is actually quite difficult. Distinction right So that's why. I many of us liked this other way. Basically you formed this planet planets happy sitting there and then over longtime yet with giant companion very far away Stellar companion. Sue the feet the gravity of the companion. They can do this pushing the planet into eccentric orbit elongated bit and fm time change the orbital orientation and therefore producing this myth lined the configuration that we see today so so that was a question stone so since we find much misalignment in the solar system. Enviously assumed that no big thing out there that he owns see excellent question indeed indeed that maybe indeed that maybe yeah we are. Saunas is ushered. Thought they don't have this hot jupiter author don so they indeed hot you but it's not very common appear it's a. It's a kerr. Heavens around the five percent of the stars to assistant our solar system is not one of them is not bombed them indeed. That may be you know basically. Yeah you need a special special nearby sufficient nearby companion to do this kind of things right though also so silence. I was wondering. I obviously don't know anything about. Jupiter is obviously a much smaller body company to the son in need. But they're the some of the. Jupiter system has hannity on the the mall in laws and and stuff inside Any sort of orbital frustrations that begins c. o. Indeed they can. You can indeed affected of the abbott fund the especially earliest early stage of solar system. Jupiter giant planet. Certainly play important role in shaping the sure of thorough system. All you don't see misalignment like these see in this hard jupiter system without see that right because when that's consistent with a picture with isolated picture where right in our solar system basically you have an earlier stage of the solar system you just have locating star sound surrounded by gaseous dusty disk and then out of this You knew you'd condense out all these different kinds of planets right and you don't have hot jupiter right. It was things pretty ordered moving same direction. Same playing right so that's That is That is consistent with geno pitcher but jupiter jupiter systems. Indeed unusual and they are not that common coming enough. The five percent of the of the star have hot jupiters right so when i was thinking that the jupiter our jupiter could be. You know it's it's obviously Not really big companies the sun but it has not pass and evan dig lease or so misalignment that we see on bodies inside that system. Can that the active. The do jupiter's effect I i'm actually not sure the misaligned with me. Simon mentioned that it is very orderly. But you know if you degrees of misalignment yes. Yeah the few degree things. There are many different story. We don't quite understand that few degrees things could be fluctuation and the if you want to ask the what's origin of their seven decrease sulaiman. Why the fan. What i'm talking about. Let me just be more precise since you asked right. In the solar system all the planets are in plain.

Simon today Jupiter five percent jupiter system one Jovan jupiter Iro sulaiman
"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"The axis is perpendicular to that plane. Okay now in the solar system all the otis access are more or less aligned right and sounds being access the planet's orbital axis. They're all similar if you picture of the solar system ordered. Everything's in the playing the silence Equator open the same plane ride all the excess are actually aligned within seven degrees. Not completely are seventy degrees and we're not big deal. I mean there's still a few degrees right okay. Okay so they are more or less aligned. Though in the solar system the sounds spin axis is aligned with the planet's orbital axis within a few degrees the mc very ordered so that's consistent with the general notion of general understanding of how planets and stars formed right. Because if you think that mission good briefly before right the the the basic notion of star and planet formation is that you have basically proto star total sound right spinning and then surrounded by a disk key dusty disk material right and the everything is sort of the rotating themm sense direction. So you'll form a planet out of the disc the orbital plank would be the implant epsom makes sense that everything is ordered though. That's that's what we find in the solar system now for the hukou system right. That's a that's a misalignment big discovery. It's a big surprise. Be surprising finding namely very often. You find that. The some of the laid the hot jupiter system the host star the the parents thaw is spinning one direction the opposite it in different direction. Sometimes the opposite will be called retrograde so many meaning that the star of the talk by stellar is like this spinning. But the plan is operatives. Philip opposite opposite way come company different. From what you envision overthrow system will be like so symptomatic of your what we were talking about. Before is symptomatic of the fact that these planets formed s that migrated to the saw. Well okay so. I haven't told you. What the way a. How'd you migrate yet. I'm just telling you to the puzzle. The puzzle is right first of all. You have this planet so close to the stock. That's the puzzle the second puzzle. It's this plan. It's often have a completely different direction from the spink. Excess of the host. All right so the question hold you get such a thing okay. How'd you migrate. How the how you form and foul migrate. and how do you get me slide. The configuration right. So that's okay. So that's the that's a cushion so while one appealing solution one possible peeling rushing. It's the it's what we call high interest in migration so many describe that right so what happens is said okay so you have a hot. Jupiter far away from the host star lost distance a few in the current location. Very far far away right and it's moving in the direction of the the host star ordered right now initially after immediately after formation. Everything's ordered now. Imagine you have a distant companion you know this hosta had planet but you have a neighbouring stall break. Blue binary starts binary states not unusual in johnny in the galaxy. In fact more than fifty percent of the stars in binary he's also found happened to not be in a binary system but many other stars actually coming peirce..

seventy degrees Jupiter Equator second puzzle Philip seven degrees more than fifty percent degrees first one direction system
"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Leave my good for far away of the host to the inner vicinity of the sought to be very closest on right. So that's the general idea now exactly how they migrate. It's a question de still being debated in the community. So i don't know much about this on so Sa- jupiter says a gas giant. Jupiter would really crew-start on son. Wouldn't that have any effect on the on the gasses and would actually start using. The gas is good question somewhat but not completely indeed. If you put our own jupiter at a very close distance own sound the jupiter will begin to lose smith slowly but not completely. It's not gonna lose the you know the math. We're not become basically well loosely bisness lift because you survive because you survive by the questions. The formation is hard to imagine how you can because we are you. Put the distinct so close to to the staw. Everything's so hot baking radiation. So how'd you make condense you know out of these. The you know initially the way we think of a planet formation is that initially you basically have gas and dusty disk around the star. Somehow you need to lump them. Together produce lumps and the coagulate right. So so that's easy relatively easy to do at far away distance because his code we put them so. Close the sound. it's so hot holiday. How can you bake plump out of is very difficult. So that's why the general thinking more or less consensus is said the giant planet out. They formed very far away on the host star bite and then thumb through sonko processes. The migrate inwards to the current. Very close location soon back with the paper. This is about sort of the the misalignment rate so so putting baseline What you mean by the so so so. What's enough the song. So let me let me this. Another surprise not in the solar system everything. It's very ordered right. The sound then center. It's spinning around access the being accessed right access now. All the other planets it's orbiting around it there the orbital axis each planet has optimal angelman xs rifle played the speed access a sound that it'll at excess of the planets. The excess is perpendicular to the plane. Nice of spinning. So you can actually determine the axis indeed and then the things around that we could determine the plane of that right..

each planet Jupiter jupiter angelman
"cornell university" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"cornell university" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"Experience. Alright without further ado Taylor. First of all, thank you for joining. Absolutely. I love this segment. He's all geared up. He's got his highlighter. He's ready to fool you. Let's first go to Tom. Tom. Your next with Grace and Taylor for woke his joke. Go ahead, Tom. All right, let me know what What? What? The what? The story is all right. Right. We should go ahead. Are you ready for your headline? Let her rip Alright, black holes are connected to racial blackness, according to a Cornell University course. Joke. That is wo Hmm. Not a joke. Not a joke in astronomy course at prestigious Cornell University, concerned about racism in the universe asked the deathless question. Is there a connection between the cosmos and the idea of racial blackness? Well, don lemon had brought up black holes at one point when H 1 30. Yeah, so this might be a real hot topic on his show. Conventional wisdom would have it that the black and black holes has nothing to do with race. Surely there can be no connection between the cosmos and the idea of racial blackness can there We'll have more on that. Coming up in the weekend woke on the Howie Carr Show at 5 30 that's called a tease, Tom and we're sorry You didn't win big loser today, but try again next week. Z. You're next with Taylor and Grace. Are you ready for your headlines? E I am. All right, Z. Here's your headline. Researchers find tree inequity for communities of color..

Grace Tom Taylor Cornell University next week today first First lemon Z. 5 30 one point H Carr Howie 1 30
Cornell University To Require COVID-19 Vaccine For On-Campus New York Students

WBZ Overnight News

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Cornell University To Require COVID-19 Vaccine For On-Campus New York Students

"For its students and staff. CBS is least Matteo has the details. Cornell University officials say all students and staff returning to Ithaca, Geneva and Cornell Tech campuses will be required to get a covert shot for the fall semester. Those with religious beliefs or medical conditions that don't allow them to receive the vaccine will be exempt. Officials say. The move will place them in a better position to resume in person classes. The New York College follows other institutions like Rutgers Universe. City who announced a school wide mandate last month. Lisa Matteo CBS News, a

Cornell Tech Matteo Cornell University CBS Ithaca Geneva New York College Rutgers Lisa Matteo Cbs News
US Race Relations Are Regressing Due to Liberal Nonsense

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:52 min | 1 year ago

US Race Relations Are Regressing Due to Liberal Nonsense

"But this censorship thing got its happening with so many things. He's liberal assholes and those people who believe that they get to decide what people should see and hear. They've also turned on schools and universities into one big don't fuck. Now look, I'm not really the kind of guy who likes to rock climb. It's not my thing. But if I were a matriculating student at Cornell University, let's say. You know, I wouldn't be able to sign up for a rock climbing class because Cornell right now offers a racially segregated rock climbing class for their students physical education, but no white students are allowed. It's like the job opportunities in Silicon Valley. They're saying on the job posts, no Asians allowed. Do you understand? Why don't they just stop putting up different water fountains for different people? And Asian water fat in the black one, the white would have found we're going back where regressing with this nonsense. So the class, The Rock climbing class, bipoc, BIPOC, you know, people of color that bullshit. It was originally slated to be restricted to people who identify as black, indigenous, LatinX, and Asian, or other people of color. And then after campus reform reached out to Cornell for comment about the discrimination, the course description was edited to state that the class is designed to enable black indigenous LatinX Asian or other people of color underrepresented in the sport of rock climbing to learn the sport and to feeling included, is that where it inclusion to feeling included and supported, how fuck yourself supported, go climb a rock. I don't give a fuck what color you

Cornell Silicon Valley
All You Need To Know About Earthworm Castings

Plantrama

04:27 min | 1 year ago

All You Need To Know About Earthworm Castings

"Are going to talk about earth. worm castings aka earthworm poop. You know it's interesting castings as sort of a It's it's the standard term for the excrement from earthworms. It's what they cast aside. I guess that's where it comes from. It's a very interesting thing. It's like many manures and this is earthworm manure. Basically it was what we're talking about Like many manures. It has fertilizer value for plant. But earthworm castings turn out to have much more value as well. I feel like castings is a euphemism because nobody wants to say poop but there you go. I remember hearing about them. I probably ten or fifteen years ago. They're much more mainstream now. And at the time. I worried about using them in house plants and i realize now that that was an unfounded concern. Using the castings in in moderate amounts as a fertilizer is perfectly good for house. Plants isn't it. I mean this time of year. That's what people are thinking about. It is wonderful for houseplant. Wonderful for for most plant. Its first of all one hundred percent organic humus all right but the basic thing that makes it different from many other Fertilizers i guess. You'd say organic fertilizers is. There's a rich microbiological community going on in earthworm castings. That is good for your plants. Well tell me more about this microbiological community. Do you mean micronutrients or do you mean. Living things in the castings well. I mean Bacteria first of all But good bacteria right. That's number one number two. In terms of fertilizing value they are rich in iron sulfur calcium nitrogen phosphorus and potassium right but they also are believe it or not not all readily available to plant apparently in the process of going through the earthworm the castings get coded with something that makes the ingredients available to plants very slowly. Wait a minute. This is like nature's time release. Fertilizer is what you're telling me exactly. That's exact- that's fascinating. What is it nature this time. Release that is a wonderful thing. The people who have studied this and by the way earthworm castings have been extensively. Studied at ohio state at cornell. University uc davis and one study at cornell demonstrated earthworm castings suppressed damping off disease in seedlings. Wow all right. And they naturally degraded the protective covering of some insect pests so they dissolve the insect pest from the in. Yes so love that yes. At ohio state university they found that earthworm castings enhanced seed germination plant growth flower and fruit production. They curb to certain plant diseases. Including root rod and crown rot and inhibited. Insect pests including mites aphids. And mealy bug. This is like way more than just a fertilizer. Then it's kind of a magic pill a one thing you know. I wondered about is. How do you know how much to apply. And from what i've read. Apparently it's it's difficult to add too much. I mean you don't want you don't want a plant in solid worm castings but but it's something that you can apply regularly without worrying that you're going to burn the fine roots of your plants. Which is concerned with a with a commercial fertilizer. Yeah i think you know for the general rule that i use for house plants and we're thinking now in the middle of winter about plants indoors but the general rule that i use is about a quarter of a cop cop four a container that somewhere between six and ten inches in diameter.

Cornell Ohio State University Davis Ohio
The Importance of No by Chris lovett

Optimal Living Daily

04:42 min | 1 year ago

The Importance of No by Chris lovett

"No is one of the most important skills you need at work right now. Spoken to lots of people recently and the majority of them are at some extreme level of busy may be so busy that the word busy just doesn't really cut it anymore. Super-busy has become the next stage of normal and the newest superhero. That probably needs killing off stacked up against it. Chaos or more words of her recently describing individuals perceive situation. Sometimes people are so beat down that words no longer come out anymore and just a shake of the head and deep breath is all they can muster as a response to the innocent. How's it all going. What is business and yes. Culture says to me is that a lot of us are really finding it difficult to say no. At the moment we've got accustomed to playing catch up and wrestling with a million and one things to do. Maybe we've programmed ourselves to think that it's how we operate best or because everyone else is so busy it would feel out of place for us not to be in the same boat. It's quickly becoming normal to be overwhelmed with stuff to do and when you stop and think about it. That's not normal of heard of too many people reaching breaking point before their body mind or even partner forces them to stop. Do we find using this tiny two letter word. Such difficult skill to perfect most of the time we feel compulsion to say yes and accommodate wherever we can say no to others makes us feel uncomfortable. It makes us ghetto. Squirmy men awkward. Generally when someone asks us to do something. Our default in instinctive response is to say yes or fit it in saying no stirs up intensely negative emotions. Embarrassment and guilt says vanessa bones professor of organizational behavior at cornell university in one of a recent studies. A group of people reach loaned a book from the library and then instructed to face it half of the subjects recorded the fact that it felt wrong to but they went and did it anyway later. Discover that those who chose to deface. The book found it so difficult to reject the person who had asked. They just couldn't refuse william yuri in his book. The power of positive. No save the deal. Save the relationship and still say no suggests that the dilemma we can face in saying no often originates from quote an internal struggle between reinforcing our own sense of power or knowledge with a simultaneous desire to foster relationship and quote so may look like subconscious self sabotage poor actually hardwired to agree to doing stuff even though we may not want to or believe. It's the right thing to do. Humans found considerable benefits being in groups notably hunting and staying alive being a group increase chances of survival with the ability to share resources so we learnt to adopt a sense that being agreeable to the group dynamic was good for us. Clearly a was. If you are not agreeable to the dynamic of the group you were ostracized and excluded therefore damaging your ability to obtain access to the required resources needed so acceptance is seen as a survival mechanism and therefore saying no to your boss makes us think will be perceived negatively and therefore excluded this inability to say no can also come from our upbringing with parents manned engagement with teachers. I very rarely said no to any of them. But when i did it didn't go down too. Well chase up the stairs with a wind. Spoon given detention or back in the day rarely said no to authorities figure it would just be riddled with negative consequences. Plus as we've grown up. We started to connect no with rejection and disappointment. The fear of getting a no from someone held you back from ever going to talk to them or was that just me. We now swerve projecting that feeling of rejection on the someone else by accommodating all sorts of requests does is true in both our business and personal lives the people pleaser within us likes to create and sustain connections with others and anything that threatens to break that bond will cause us to worry saying no to joining a meeting. Not helping someone asked for it or turning down. That invitation creates a sense of panic. So in the end we take the easy way out the path of least resistance and then before we know it we've become buried under a huge pile of yes saying yes to something immediately removes any risk conflict. Which most of us will tend to do all we can to avoid but the effects of that yes can cause severe long-term damage to us as individuals as well as in relationships and businesses.

Vanessa Bones William Yuri Wrestling Cornell University
Byzantine Fault Tolerant Consensus

Data Skeptic

03:57 min | 1 year ago

Byzantine Fault Tolerant Consensus

"Everyone this is ted. I'm from cornell university. I'm finishing up my phd now my fifth year. I also worked part time at avalanches which is in our startup. i co-founded with adviser. Tell me a little bit about your phd work. What are your specific areas of interest. Yes so i think for the a democ- part you know as a phd. I mostly were distributed systems and that sounds like a very broad topic so more specifically within the systems i'm mostly focused on consensus and within the consensus topic. They are also different kinds of consensus protocol. I mostly focused on so called. Byzantine fault tolerant consensus protocols or t protocols. We are nowadays very hot topics. Pickus people are interested in blockchain technology and walk. Chang's need such kind of consensus in order to work. We'll definitely spend some time. Talking about blockchain byzantine fault. Tolerance is not as newest blockchain. So it's a i guess. An older theory. Could you help some of the listeners with the basics. What is bef t absolutely so. Yeah indeed. I think there has been like misconception. Many people think of b. f. Some kind of new stuff especially in that community even when we're talking about blockchain's but to me when i started my phd at cornell this of t kind of consensus as the coolest consensus at heard of at a time. And before actually dive into that world so what is not so byzantine fault. Tolerance has a weird name. So what is byzantine is. Sounds like the name of the old empire in l. a probably medieval or or some time period and the reason that this kind of protocol got his name as thanks to leslie lamport so may have heard of this research. His very well known ing Systems community clothing his works on taxes all sorts of consensus stuff. The also proposed the name for this new career of consoles protocols to be. Fd consists and beat byzantine just is part of the story if you read his paper about the whole consensus. So let's forget about the name of paying so what this protocol is usually about as maybe you are familiar with the phnom visiting kind of consensus or you know people usually call them crash fault tolerant protocols such as taxes or rafts so those protocols they work great and they're widely adopted by the current industry. Google uses passes as a core for cloud service and the reason that we need to another category of consensus protocol is because this kind of protocol a does not assume malicious behavior by the participating machines nose so that means than those can only crash build knows can only like human beings they can always say. Oh i die and then you just shut down or crashed without creating any noise into the channel into the network so then people begin to think about how we should handle the case where there some node. That could go crazy. Say i'm an node than when i don. I don't die peaceful eight. But i crave bunch of noises. The noise could be interfering the entire natural and even worse. I could be you know. Some zombie not controlled by the x. Turno attackers so i could exhibit arbitrary behaviour visit lab. I'm like a you know the insider send on by some other parties. So i'm like spying this system. So how do you handle this kind of situation in a protocol. While at the same time you still want to achieve the same goal as the noun byzantine one usually call them or crush full tolerant protocols we want to achieve the same goal but was different assumption

Blockchain Leslie Lamport Ing Systems Cornell University TED Chang Google
"cornell university" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:43 min | 2 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on KCRW

"Did you ever In 1939. I was 22 years old straight as an arrow, and I was newly graduated from Cornell University. And was a did many things, but that is part of of experiment that was a research subject. And one Dave. Our leader said To me his name was Dr Richard Parmenter. He said. I am going to be the new director of flight research. Cornell. He ended the CPT civilian pilot training course and the CIA, a federal program. And one in 10 could be a girl. He said that and you could learn to find And I said to him, Dr Dick, I've never been in their place. Hey said, Well, let's go dry. Down to the airport in a yellow cub. Piper cub on a beautiful October day. October. 16th. Hey, took me up. Into this absolutely wonderful new world of sky and land below. And the air was full of Sunbeams. It was laying below was clean and borderless. And the lake. This glue Lake of key the water, which extended to the north and on beyond was this circle of land meeting sky. And I was just overwhelmed with the beauty of it. The Earth sky. Signed up right away. Oh, it was chosen and, uh I spent the next few months learning how the fundamentals of flight And that is important. In May 1940 I received my private pilot's certificate. And that would allow me to take up passengers. I only had less about 40 hours. I don't know how they dare go up, but they did. And so I live with this wonderful new of experience. Now. 1941 December came along quickly. And after Congress declared war, everyone able bodied was needed in the war effort. And everybody needed training. And there was a flurry in America Excitement, a a determination to fight this new enemy. We knew the enemy was there. I mean to fight. To produce aircraft. And Theo train men and Jacqueline Cochran, who was a famous American woman pilot. Had a program in mind. She sold it, General Hap Arnold. And in the program, she would train women pilots, saying exactly that the male palace were trained. And have a supply of women who could then go out and do the housekeeping jobs in America, the training and the ferrying and so forth. And she sold this but because we were is very short of pallets, and they were needed desperately as the plane for being produced in the factories. And I wanted to be nearly as I could to the fighting war. And I applied for her program and was accepted and I found my way to Sweetwater, Texas, 200 Miles west of Fort Worth. And never met my classmates of a class of 43 5. They're 18 classes altogether. So it was an early bird. And learned to fly primary basic and advanced. In our last few months of training 10 days before we graduate, I graduated my best friend, my buddy Peggy Sipe. Was killed with her. Instructor and a fellow West pilot pill Josi person. And no reason was given for the accident. It was no ceremony held. They just disappeared. And it was a heart wrenching event. And Peggy had left the garden. The only garden anyone could ever grown. And in Sweetwater, Texas. And she planted seeds in the hard Texas soil in the hot Texas sun, and it bloomed on her graduation day. Jacqueline Cochran came to give us our wings. And presented them to me. Thank me and wish me well. I was pleased because I had one my wings. More trading came into the picture. And I was sent to lot burn Army Air Base in Columbus, Ohio. And here to my astonishment were over 180 B seventeen's going B seventeen's flying fortresses, the Big four engined plane that was flying rates and over Germany with the eighth Air Force..

Jacqueline Cochran Dr Richard Parmenter Texas Peggy Sipe Sweetwater America Cornell University General Hap Arnold Dave director Cornell Dr Dick CIA eighth Air Force Columbus Fort Worth Ohio Germany Congress Theo
"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"But i think theoretically it's possible and the kind of global response we see the to. This pandemic is different from any other infection. I mean i mean the water has learned. Its lesson that lovie learn lessons had be. Forget them for this one to be honest with you. I am more excited that he'd been right because i mean i spent my career working on on infections that affect the poor. And it's very very difficult to really you know to fight for his because it doesn't affect the really rich people. This pandemic is different. It's really. I mean if you think fit any any hepatitis in this war will see this pandemic as a real enemy because it caused massive economic that the world has never seen before so so i think that that that economic incentive to to find the spend amac is very very different from all other. Actually this is. Why more optimistic okay. On you know when when when there is an interest and there is an incentive. You can see medicals this way like you said. Technology is developing quick size. So if you put your mind to it we can solve this problem. What what would you say Sort of the minimum threshold if you could see that is needed For the first vaccine plus group vaccines to be To be useful what so the minimum threshold you would see any value for the efficacy will be used for but of course what we want is sufficient. If can see each chaired immunity. He i would say. We need sixty to eighty percents somewhere over there in order to have a minimal chance of being able to richer immunity and control infection transmission. Okay so so. That is where the typical flu vaccine comes out at. Also right about about sixty to eighty percent year. Oh it's even quite often significantly less than that times. Actually sometimes even below fifty percent you know for the influenza vaccine they they thrive to produce it before actually they know exactly the circulating stream. So it's hit and miss situation you know so they. Only they count on christly activity. Latino here actually we. We know the virus and it doesn't look like it's mutating rapidly so so so. I think we have a better chance you. So that's what i want to ask you so from an evolutionary perspective. You figured an effective vaccine. Bill deadened dr mutations with Drive evolution build that drive more potent strains to to appear in the future. About what do we know about that a clearly. It will create an evolutionary pressure so there will be evolutionary patient for the vaccine to evade for the evolutionary pressure. Florida on the virus to evade the vaccine. Yes so it could. I mean in principle now but again. I mean fortunately for this virus it does not look like it's mutating rapidly. Yeah this is this. Is i think you. It's really encouraging who. I've seen one big mutation. That's actually becoming dominant which districts Fourteen mutation but but really that's more the exception rather than the rule. I mean i i but i i don't have that background. I moran eulogists book to my understanding. It does not look like it's actually. It will quickly okay. That is Denison courageous So i want to finish up with your paper on we explosion and they have seen a lot of talk around us andy task but like if implications vaccination as well as for the policy interventions again qatar data. What does it tell us about the possibility of being sections. Yes so so..

flu vaccine lovie qatar Denison Bill Florida
"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Your data appears to sort consumed that conventional wisdom them Two of the population Now i wanted from a policy perspective again There is an intervention that basically this is not an experiment beacon really realistically ron and that is if the severity and the ability to do to counteract the disease is a lot higher at lower Lower age populations then experimentally. At least you can. You can have thought experiment that says that if the younger population sixty seventy eighty percent of them are infected population immediately gets hurt immunity But the problem obviously not. An experiment began run. Just a thought experiment. Here is the problem here. I don't know if you have any insights into this that they don't really know the long term sags or call it right so I was told that the spanish flu ninety nine hundred ninety nine billion survivors of spanish flu at that time. seems to have a develop parkinson's disease ted years later. Ten years later long time later. And so yeah so then. Governments and policy professionals think about better policies. we don't really have a good estimate of the deceased bourdon rate authors. What what is what is what are your thoughts on that. You are absolutely right. We really don't know about the long term consequences of this infection and definitely as you indicated. We know that in spanish. If you'll there where actually consequences that. In fact were not even a discovery tila decades later actually be in fact they were discovered i incidentally when they disappeared all the sudden it was very evident that that population that was the cohort that was affected by this disease disorders happened to be that the cohort that lived through that so this is how we even established cuisine over there so yeah we don't really don't metrics but also. I think we should not be also exaggerating. These are talking about it. Really truly rare conditions and i think similarly here i mean it's i mean. This infection is not like a very different sort speak infection from the kind of infections we had in fact. We had civil called corona viruses. That are not very different from this infection You know we have been experiencing them for many many years. In fact i think one of the hypotheses is that one of that can include very mild corona viruses has its origin in fact in in abandoned that happened in the nineteenth century and it evolved to be very mild. Actually right now you know and only a few few the kids so eventually the covert man just joined the of those common coal khurana viruses and really doesn't appear bad this common corcoran vices Generate seeriously say or a in a high level long term disease. So i i am more on the conservative side missy..

infection ron flu corcoran parkinson
"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Because we have done actually antibody testing lots of dissing here so we found very low severity. So so for example fidelity it was only only and it's really very fast in india was only two thousand in our population. Ten thousand so it will set you would lower than What you see in traditional flu. Ah no i would say. It's still actually overall higher than okay. It is now there is an here. I why it's very low here. Because of the age structure of the booklet. Yeah we simply don't have the elderly population very small and also. This population wasn't much affected by the democ. Here we it was really well protected in our part of it because in fact the culture was support. I mean the elderly population lives In homes with their families and cutler has the highest per capita income in the war so they liberally an excellent housing congested housing and so on so the elderly wasn't really much affected. fortunately by the democrats and most of our population are so. So i if we compare these rates say to influenza in the us the are actually comparable comparable but this is not this not really fair comparison. Because you know the us you have a significant fraction of the population above six years. Age right right and so it's interesting. You have an extension under the people here H could be driving able in kobe. Epidemic trajectories worldwide. and so. he's sort of taking the qatar data. Looking across the world are to save. You can see some patterns right so so there's a steady flying. Yes so this is in fact was exactly as indicated because of our expediency. I mean what what we saw is a very different dynamic. Compared to what actually what was observed in europe and the us we simply did not have that level of severity. I mean the total number of deaths. We we had is just over two hundred thirty dollars so far and the democrat is really in in in a low incidence phase right now so it's really very striking. How how so. This really compelled us to look into into into this and indeed the throw this study when we projected that rates pair. I mean the age specific mortality rates. Apply them into different population demographics structures around the world. We make sure there must be very different mortality rates global by this infection just simply because of infraction of the elderly. And this is really why. I think we have seen. We have seen it pretty very serious epidemic. Say the us ask. And i think now it's will about two hundred thousand deaths in the us but really in countries which are ill equipped to deal with them. That i'm not seeing actually that much mortality Let me take syria for example. It's a country that's if you know in in a civil war so that must be expanding rapidly over there but actually it doesn't look like it generated much more diligent africa's other example because africa is the youngest population in the world. Democ is expanding but really mortality has been really really low. Yes so so..

democrats Democ us india influenza cutler africa qatar syria europe
"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

Coronavirus cases go up, the market goes down

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:38 min | 2 years ago

Coronavirus cases go up, the market goes down

"Yet things up it's pretty simple. Virus cases are way way higher in way more places. There is no relief package coming probably February at the earliest if at all, if everybody is honest with themselves. And that's it that all spills over into the real economy which the stock market is not thank you very much but it does reflect and so you get a cratering day on Wall Street today all three major indices off three three and a half percent all sectors got clobbered including the reason commercial aviation. We mentioned that because Boeing reported a quarterly loss of four hundred and sixty, six, million dollars this morning planes just aren't selling right now company also said it's GonNa lay off and other seven thousand people. So marketplaces and Euler gets his going with a story about a company that is a big factor in that real economy I was talking about. Boeing said today expects to end next year with around one hundred, thirty, thousand employees. It started twenty twenty with a workforce of one, hundred, sixty, thousand. Richard Otto Lafi as an aviation analyst at -Til Group historically, Boeing's been the world single biggest planemaker and the biggest single exporting manufacturer in the US. So it really isn't needle mover in terms of the broader economy and Sorta like Ge. Boeing has worked to diversify Boeing has a lot of commercial military defense software and engineering programs. It's not just building the. Big Seven, forty, seven jets of old. That's Arthur Wheaton at Cornell University. It's a pretty big corporation and has a huge impact on supply chains. He says there's a vast array of subcontractors in the US and worldwide that produce four and with Boeing. So in demand for Boeing products declines, it's felt by many of Boeing seventeen, thousand suppliers like those who make. Jet Engines and parts for wings keeping my you know these are not just people that are turning wrench. Michael Boyd is an aviation industry consultant in Evergreen Colorado. So it's not like just getting rid of couple of mechanics you're getting rid of some highly trained people that you're going to have to get back eventually when people eventually returned to flying but Richard. APPALACHIA te'o groups as his fear is that manufacturing will soon start feeling the pain of the pandemic like retail and hospitality already have and I think unfortunately, we're bound to see additional production cuts in job losses in the commercial aerospace industry along with other similar losses and other parts of the economy because as the biggest companies go so goes the American economy. I mean dealer for

Boeing Richard Otto Lafi Arthur Wheaton United States Michael Boyd Appalachia Cornell University Evergreen Colorado Consultant Analyst -Til Group
"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"So anyway that's lots of progress was being made in part because of well two main things one was. Increasing the size of the telescope apertures that was being deployed on the satellite observatories, and the other was improving the sensitivity of the detectors that were being installed on those telescopes like cameras that we have while everywhere in our phones and and on regular optical telescopes. Underground today. So those two. Are, really what this paper was about. Pushing forward from ground based observations and one of the reasons why it's so important to move to the ground while it's many many times cheaper. You know this morning between ten. Times cheaper than flying satellites. And a two, we can build much larger telescopes from the ground. That's why in the title, there is large aperture telescope. So one a scale of telescope that is particularly useful for these measurements. We're not talking about huge telescopes but are five. Six Meters? And the so five to six meter primary mirror apertures so you. Go. Ahead. Get a question so. The. Wind. Turbines. About optical telescopes. In this case. it's just a different kinds of concerns that affect the performance of our measurements. So right with optical telescopes the. What's often what's often limiting the performance of the measurements is Often referred to as the scene which is like the twinkling of stars due to atmospheric fluctuations. In, that twinkling actually DEF- racks, the light because of. Variations in the atmosphere up above the and makes it so that the optical telescopes CanNot. Usually achieve as good optical performance as are designed for. So in the microwave measurements. It's a little bit different. We don't see twinkling. Yet, but we do see actually emission from the the atmosphere and it ridiculous. We see emission from oxygen. And water. Atoms in the atmosphere, and so that's really what drives us to build these telescopes at very remote high elevation and extremely dry sites on earth. So we actually. Build and deploy optical telescopes at different. Where there's the typically aren't as high elevation, but there is extremely uniform atmospheric conditions versus for microwave sites we're building them as high as we can go. So these telescopes in Chile cosmetology telescope that I've been working on for almost two decades is at about seventeen thousand feet elevation and to have the new observatories were working on one. We'll be right next door, the Simon's observatory, and then there's the seacat prime. Project. that. I'm also playing a big role in and led by Cornell University that will be built at around eighteen thousand feet. Eighteen thousand nine hundred four, hundred feet elevation fifty, six, hundred meters also in Chile. And one of the driest telit higher elevation deserts on. Earth. Okay..

Chile Cornell University Simon's observatory
"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"See MP and other sub millimetre measurements vocal Michael Thank you pleasure to be with you. Thanks for doing. So before we get into some of the exciting things that are going on the technology side in Chile and elsewhere. I want to subside the stage for a CNBC cost microwave background So the the literally understand about this Michael be had something happened at thirteen point eight, billion years ago the was formed. don't have a really good idea what might have happened in the you know the Radi initial parts of universities evolution. But clearly thousand years. the process photons and Barry on's and at that time frame. Approximately atoms started to form and the four dollar getting bumped around they'll than would escaping as light. And they've been traveling approximately thirteen point, seven billion years now and got sort of tired I guess and. Leasing extended all the way to the microwave. So that is what we call the the microwave background radiation, right So there of history around starting in the nineteen sixties. Yeah that's right. and even a little earlier I would say. About one hundred years ago was really the. Beginning of modern cosmology when the first evidence was discovered that the universe is expanding and that we live in a dynamic changing universe. which was contrary to the belief beliefs of most scientists around that time. and so then the discovery of the cosmic microwave background in the sixties this kind of accidental discovery. Of this they I thought what pens in Wilson I thought was noise. In their telescope in New Jersey. Because they just saw this background temperature apparent in every direction that they looked, and so they cleaned all the bird poop off of their telescope thought that might be a contributing to it and and shot all the pigeons that added to that. And Like static static on the TV. Yeah exactly. It's like seeing static on the TV and actually an older. Television, some of the static that you did see when having the television tuned into. Channel without any signal on it is cosmic background photons that make it through the atmosphere and. The static in your television. So right. I mean this. Leftover light this very cold few degrees around three degrees above absolute zero or minus. Two hundred seventy degrees Celsius.

Michael Chile CNBC New Jersey Barry
A new month, same ol bad economy

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:11 min | 2 years ago

A new month, same ol bad economy

"In Los Angeles, I'm Kai Ryssdal Thursday day the first day of October. Good always to have you along. Let us take stock. Shall we at the beginning of a program on business in the economy of the state of business and this economy because honestly? Could be better here are just a couple of numbers from today's news eight, hundred, thirty, seven, thousand people lost their jobs last week. Personal incomes were down almost three percent in August and related and to be clear time is running out for help from the federal government. There is no deal as of yet which means that all across the country from neighborhoods around Disneyland to the outer boroughs of New, York? City? People are facing a corona virus winter kind of on their own marketplace. Jasmine guard gets us, going from New York. At Saint Ann's Episcopal Church in the Bronx. The line to get food often wraps around the block. It's a mix of young people, children and elderly the bronx part of the poorest congressional district in the US. Many people who live here commute to Manhattan often to work minimum wage in essential jobs locals tell me they've never seen anything like this line before a man named Garrett. Faber. said he comes here once a month to get food because his unemployment check is not quite enough because you bill's pretty high and I pay rent and. Other bills, student loans he's a social worker who lost his job the bronx is the. Of the COVID nineteen pandemic in New York City the area I'm standing in Maat haven has had over fifteen hundred cova cases. Unemployment here is now around twenty five percent according to analysts that's Great Depression levels when the economy gets a cold places like Bronx get pneumonia or cancer Joel Berg is a CEO of the nonprofit hunger free. America, he says life can be very tough for many residents in the south. Bronx but covert. Has Been Catastrophic and so they're tenuous living before this when they were just at the edge of survival as a been destroyed Erica in is a senior economic advisor at Cornell University she says jobs in Manhattan create what economists call multiplier affects your how how many jobs does each job support a lot? So as Manhattan offices remain mostly empty, many janitors, Baristas, cooks, and other workers who call the Bronx home have seen their jobs disappear. Jasmine guards for marketplace lose job of course more. Than just going without a paycheck. More happens. So we asked marketplace's Eric Barris to talk to some workers who've been furloughed back in April. Monica Harris was furloughed from her digital marketing job in Atlanta area at first she was optimistic. Maybe this is the time like I need to be like doing other stuff working awesome passion projects like just stuff like that. Then her furlough was extended and her extra unemployment benefits ran out she spent the summer worrying I hope I'm I the next Brianna Taylor by fiance is not the next door floyd and now she expects to be out of work for the rest of the year last month with probably the hardest. I haven't been working that I really would feeling like Oh my God like, am I going to be okay, the pandemic, the struggle for social justice the uncertainty surrounding the election at an unemployment and stress can be overwhelming says, Goldsmith an economist at Washington and Lee University who studies how joblessness affects mental health. All sorts of insecurities undermine emotional wellbeing. And this is a classic case of that because you just don't know and employers don't know either PSA airlines flight attendant Denise Grassi starts her furlough. Today. Right next to the Philadelphia Airport so whenever. Planes. Go to land or take off often hear them and it's sad. It's very sad as not knowing whether she'll go back to work on a plane America bears for

Bronx Manhattan Faber. America Monica Harris Joel Berg Kai Ryssdal Los Angeles Denise Grassi United States New York City Philadelphia Airport York New York Jasmine Saint Ann's Episcopal Church Disneyland Eric Barris Brianna Taylor Maat Haven
Crowdsourced Expertise

Data Skeptic

04:26 min | 2 years ago

Crowdsourced Expertise

"I'm Derek Limb. Currently, going into my last year of undergraduate study at Cornell University. Very neat to what in particular you studying. Study math and computer science majors and more specifically I do work in the applied mathematics side of things in the machine learning and data science side of things very cool for me I come more from the computer science side. I have a vague sense of what applied maths means, but I will able his vague I'm curious do you have any particular methods or ways in which that blends nicely with the data science that you might WanNa share oh? Yeah. Applied Mathematics is already a vague. Term. So don't worry about that. But yeah, it's very broad term but tools that I like to use, and that are generally very helpful. Are things like numerical computing numerical when your algebra optimization and label a lot of those as applied math but it's definitely a very blurry term. Yeah. Neat areas though a of interesting research going on in that spot, the paper I invited you on to speak about is I, guess related to that but sort of unique and interesting in its own way title. Is. Expertise dynamics within crowd sourced musical knowledge curation, a case study of the Genius Platform. So maybe a good opening question here is, what is the genius platform for anybody who doesn't know? Yeah. So there's a website genius dot com to really great website hosts all sorts of different texts content mostly by it primarily hosts song lyrics, especially, rap lyrics because that's where the origin of the site came from. So what happens is you use crowdsourcing use the power of the crowd to transcribe. Song. Lyrics. Molly's different songs at an after that users also come and annotate the song lyrics. So if there's some lyrics that use some type of terminology that not everybody might know or some lyrics for which is interesting backstory that's what annotations seek to answer an annotation provide all types of very interesting knowledge and information and all types of different media to help explain what lyrics are about could you contrast the content to some of those user contributions to maybe what wikipedia users put into the Kapadia. Yes. Yes. So a lot of the annotations written with I'd like to call it like a view of culture of rap culture and they will use the slang terms and all this that rappers use I mean obviously because you have to explain the lyrics that rappers use but also they include parts of hip hop culture end generally music culture that are prevalent today such as there are a lot of twitter links and links to interviews that artists do in these annotations, and it just provides a lot of really interesting stuff when I think of Wikipedia or if we I guess rewind ten or fifteen years to win, it was getting going it seemed like every stand up comedian. Joke about you know it's going to be accurate because literally anyone can change it. But that did seem to pan out wikipedia startlingly accurate in a lot of situations. But maybe part of the advantage of Wikipedia has is the goal is to publish. You know the sort of unbiased truth that's what an encyclopedia should be. Leaks are I don't know that there is a ground truth in lyrics. Are there issues of pollution in the state of set like people who are into the Polish Dead Beatles conspiracy tagging the lyrics that They think are clues or something like that. How do they keep it clean? Yes. So there are a lot of studies on wikipedia that show in certain fields actually wikipedia quite accurate in covers a lot of information, but there's also a lot of interesting studies unlike edit wars but I have not really found instances of edit wars on genius, which is nice and maybe people don't make Super Controversial annotations but I definitely noticed when analyzing the annotations that a lot of these users are definitely putting a lot of their own. Into, these notations, and actually quite a good amount of speculation and you know, maybe the stakes aren't as high for genius as they are for an encyclopedia that a ton of people as a very important source every day. But it's also something that I think genius Kinda wants to avoid because if you read some of their like frequently asked questions, pages or things like. That they will recommend you to add a lot of factual sources but I'm sure that they definitely like the opinionated takes sometimes also not everything can be factual when you don't have the original artist interpreting your lyrics. But yeah, I don't think it's that problematic and I actually think in fact, it has an interesting twist to all these annotations it allows users to add an. Interesting twist to their own annotations.

Wikipedia Derek Limb Cornell University Twitter Molly
What happened to the Postal Service?

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:27 min | 2 years ago

What happened to the Postal Service?

"If you had the United States postal service as a partisan political proxy on your Twenty Twenty Election Bingo card. You. Win. I guess the politics of it we will assume you're mostly familiar with speaker. Nancy Pelosi is calling the house back into session legislation likely postmaster general and CEO Louis Joy has said he will testify. But as all of that plays out a detour here if we might to the postal services business model reality yes. The digital age has brought its challenges to the USPS but as Congress tries to figure out how to repair the damage. Might do well to look in the mirror for a little bit. Here's marketplace's Nancy Marshall Genzer. The Postal Service is supposed to be self funded not getting any government money, but the post office is still tightly regulated by Congress and in two thousand and six Congress passed a law requiring the postal service to prepay health benefits for retirees. Jim Campbell is a lawyer and consultant on the Postal Service resorted the postal service to pay for ten years about five and. A half billion dollars a year into this prepayment fund that thinking was paid forward. Make sure the money is there when retirees need it. But Campbell, says federal agencies don't have to make these prepayments and the post office couldn't do it. Campbell says it missed more than half of the payments to make matters worse congress capped postal office price increases for letters circulars at the rate of inflation. So the postal services kind of caught in this squeeze. Cornell University public. Policy Professor, Getty's says Congress, also still requires the post office to deliver to every mailbox in the country six days a week. So this is a recipe for fiscal problems serious fiscal problems and serious debt frank disco has been tracking that he's chief actuary at the US Government Accountability Office. He says the postal services more than one hundred, sixty, billion dollars in debt over the past decade, the dead and unfunded liabilities like pensions and healthcare have outpaced the revenues the. Postal Service takes in. So it's doubled from a little more than one times annual revenue to over double annual revenue to disco says the Postal Service has been losing money for a decade, not a sustainable business model, but the post office can't change that model without Congressional

Postal Service Congress Jim Campbell Twenty Twenty Us Government Accountability O Nancy Pelosi Nancy Marshall Genzer United States Frank Disco Cornell University Chief Actuary Louis Joy CEO Getty Professor
The Iroquois Nationals Team | The History of Lacrosse

Iroquois History and Legends

05:09 min | 2 years ago

The Iroquois Nationals Team | The History of Lacrosse

"Hello welcome to Iroquois history and legends. Today we're GONNA be talking about the history of Lacrosse and current status of the Iroquois national team. Today. We don't have just one guest we have multiple group. I'm just going to let them introduce themselves one by one if you gentlemen could just give me a brief background on who you are just a little synopsis on how you're associated with the Iroquois national team. REX LINES MONOLOGUE NATION I've been a Lacrosse player has this as long as I can remember as I could walk at sticking my hand going up on Doug a nation it's been. A big part of my my life, my lifestyle the and I was on the First Leroy national team in eighty three and. Been in three tournaments and. The program at percents. I'm Leon Nolan multiple on Gatien. My mother's Aquasonichowie Mohawks enroll visit. Mohawk will clan. Lamb. I've been involved with your co-nationals across in about early two thousands and then k back. But you're a half ago and serve as the executive, director and board member. and. Tissue late at SMU and while the across like wreck, all my life and Real honor to be a part of the organization again to help with the many challenges facing us. So, we're very pleased to have this opportunity to give him a good historical perspective in a future perspective on warmer. Had IT. For us. And David Brian from the Seneca nation and the wolf clan I grew up playing cross started off with a new toll across went off to college played at Cornell University on a couple of national championship teams. I was also on the I Iroquois national team. And I've been a lifelong participant with your coin nationals as either as a player. Executive, director or board member and I'm still in like brexit it's kind of A. Lifelong journey to have our people be represented in Lacrosse whether it's at the college level professional level or international level. I'm Randy Scott some from six nations on -Tario A maternal clan. Mohawk like these guys are saying, I've started across when. You know I gotta stick when I was born. I've been playing ever since it's a big part of my life I played professional across for. The Georgia. Swarm. the Boston cannons and at the world stage with Uruguay nationals I've been playing with Uruguay national since. Two Thousand Eight Also. Went to Syracuse University got my degree there and. You know. Like these guys are saying, Lacrosse, has been a big part of my life in it's It's awesome. Thank you very much gentlemen. That's a lot of talent and a lot of experience for me growing up in Western. New York every. Year, has a Lacrosse program. Every College in university has lacrosse program, but there might be some people in the country that really might not know what it is or what the history of it is. So which one of you mind giving me a a synopsis of Old, this game is where it came from what the basic just of the rules are by I'll take that question. Well, it's part of our creation story so. know your guess is good as ours. You know it came from the spire creation story came from the Sky World. So in in our cosmology re talk about. Across in all being played in creators land. And before it came down to Turtle Island here. So it's as old as we are as Randy said, you know your mail you're one of three things you're born. You're you're a a speaker which measure speaker of ceremonies language or a singer, the singer of the ceremony or your across Blair. That's how significant across is to our culture. And you always have the exception to the rule where somebody's all And we have real lot of examples of that but let's how important it is to are. inherently. It's part of four yards culture. It's site in part of that responsibility to share the scheme. With others which we've been very successful at. Now, I believe sixty six countries have. Lacrosse organizations within her order states. Within our borders and it's been really I. Think we've done a great job of showing the green game with the many many around the world and or looking forward to continuing that and. One of the. Mainstays who are Bruh given this responsibility directly by the. Sedition confederacy in one, thousand, nine, hundred, three. And we were given that responsibility to golden compete internationally represent the initially in that regard play fair play hard and spread this game around the world.

Lacrosse Syracuse University Sky World Randy Scott Executive Director Uruguay Aquasonichowie Mohawks Leon Nolan Doug David Brian SMU Cornell University Seneca New York Boston Turtle Island Gatien Georgia Blair
"cornell university" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Beth Norton professor of American history at Cornell University remain in the sixteen seventies and sixty nineties was really where the action was as far as profit to be made in New England and Boston people had bought land they had set up sawmills Boston had a very vigorous shipbuilding industry that the sawmills in Maine we're providing the timber for these very well developed pines were perfect for ships masts these early Maine communities places like palm up in Casco Bay and wells York and Sacco all served as borderland between the safer realm of Massachusetts and the evil of the frontier up north more than anywhere else the settlers could think of was darkness and danger in sixteen fifty two a group of settlers in Maine decided to petition parliament back in England or the ability to rule themselves but when word of their plans got out the government in Massachusetts became worried they were getting rich off of those main frontiers men and they didn't want to lose that so they examine their own charter and somehow found a loophole that gave them authority over me Venus I know don't go assuming that the government of Massachusetts rushed in to grab control of main because they love the place no they loved the resources that flowed out of it and the wealth that pumped into their economy the main itself was something straight out of their puritan nightmares to the Puritans in Boston and Salem Maine was a godless land the settlers there rejected English communal order and we're less interested in building the puritan city on a hill that was so important to the folks in Salem Abigail Hobbs new step mother was a great.

professor Cornell University New England Boston Maine Casco Bay wells York Sacco Massachusetts Salem Maine Beth Norton Salem Abigail Hobbs
"cornell university" Discussed on AP News

AP News

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"cornell university" Discussed on AP News

"Researchers are finding some to be all bark and no bite a veterinary research from Cornell University says an astounding number of products on the shelf have such low concentrations of C. B. D. it's as though it's not there at all they're able to make it to the shelves because the federal government is yet to establish standards for CBT that'll help people know whether it works for their pets and how much to give them still there are lots of individual success stories that helped fuel of four hundred million dollar market that grew more than ten fold since last year it's expected to reach one point seven billion by twenty twenty three according to the cannabis research firm bright field group eighteen news for Friday January tenth I'm timid wire the U. S. and several other western nations say there's evidence of Ron shot down the Ukranian jet shortly after takeoff from Tehran if it's Jackie Quinn reports a pilot's wife tried to talk about a flying the plane that morning to stem the label longer with escalating tensions in the region between the US and Iran with Katerina got up and then go tell Sky News she urged her husband to cancel his shift but he said if he didn't fly the plane who would be U. S. and several allies are confident a surface to air missile struck the jet hours after a run fired missiles over the border into two military bases Ukraine's foreign minister says the pilots were on a proper course it was nothing to indicate that this this flight in danger across the globe there's mourning for all one hundred seventy six victims more than sixty from Canada including a dentist in Halifax whose husband spoke on CTV I was very very hard for all of you from the I Jackie Quinn house speaker Nancy Pelosi says the articles of impeachment against president trump will be delivered to the Senate next week house impeached drop three weeks ago on two counts abuse of power and obstruction of Congress Wyoming Republican Liz Cheney says the process is taken way too long it is not the job of the Senate to try to fix the completely faulty imply process that the house Democrats conducted over here Washington state Democrat Adam Smith yesterday called on below sea to hand over the articles now says she was right to have delayed the process to have a fair trial shine a light on the fact that which is not fair I was doing this while pelo sees delays sparked the reason strategy has a much change what's likely to be the final verdict trump's acquittal in the Senate of charges that he abused the power instruct the Congress in pressuring Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden this is a P. news the FBI making fundamental changes in how it goes about getting permission for and conducting electronic surveillance in national security cases at these my cross you with the tail FBI director Christopher ray has informed the foreign intelligence surveillance court the bureau is implementing new protocols for conducting electronic surveillance in national security cases under the changes wire tap applications will be more closely reviewed before they are submitted for a judge's approval last month the justice department inspector general issued a report that was highly critical of the F. B. I.'s handling of the Russia investigation rate plans to issue a bureau wide email Monday informing the work force of the changes Mike Rossio Washington sources tell the A. P. though house White House is considering expanding its travel ban two additional countries if there is a this is a renewed election year focused on immigration issues.

Cornell University