20 Episode results for "Cornelius Vanderbilt"

Midday News Brief for Monday, June 17th

WSJ Minute Briefing

01:34 min | 1 year ago

Midday News Brief for Monday, June 17th

"Here. The extraordinary secrets of how to thrive in disrupted world, the old rules of management are not ready, correct anymore. So what works making a wise, pivot, pivot to the future, will I am Omar Abba, subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. I'm Jay are Waylon and the newsroom. At the Wall Street Journal in New York. Iran says it will exceed limits on its enriched, uranium stockpiles as outlined in the two thousand fifteen nuclear deal before the end of the month. The move comes days after the US accused Tehran of being behind a second set of attacks on tankers near an important global shipping route. It would also cast doubt on European efforts to save the nuclear deal that President Trump withdrew from last year. Pfizer has agreed to buy a Ray bio pharma for almost eleven billion dollars in cash. It's an effort by Pfizer to expand its pipeline of cancer therapies arrays portfolio includes Braff, tovy, and MEK tovy, which have received approval for combined use in the treatment of metastatic melanoma and tumor related diseases such as metastatic colorectal cancer. And Gloria Vanderbilt has died at the age of ninety five she was the mother of CNN anchor Anderson Cooper and the great great granddaughter a financier Cornelius Vanderbilt. She's best known for being an heiress at the center of a scandalous, custody battle in the nineteen thirties and was a successful designer jeans icon in the nineteen seventies and eighties, she'd been suffering from advanced stomach cancer. We have details on these stories and other news of the day at wsJcom and the WSJ app.

Gloria Vanderbilt Pfizer Wall Street Journal metastatic colorectal cancer Omar Abba Cornelius Vanderbilt metastatic melanoma Iran Ray bio pharma Jay Anderson Cooper New York CNN President US Trump Braff Tehran eleven billion dollars
A shooting in Dallas and the death of Gloria Vanderbilt: Reading the world through God's word

The Daily Article

04:49 min | 1 year ago

A shooting in Dallas and the death of Gloria Vanderbilt: Reading the world through God's word

"Really? Shooting in Dallas in the death of Gloria Vanderbilt reading the world through God's word this is Dr Jim Dennison's daily article podcasts for Tuesday, June eighteenth, two thousand nineteen. A gunman opened fire on the Earle Cabell federal building in downtown Dallas yesterday morning, according to the Dallas police department the heavily armed masked suspect was shot in an exchange of gunfire with federal officers. He was reportedly taken to a local hospital where he was pronounced dead. Authorities identified the suspect as twenty two year old Brian, is it, CLYDE, a bomb squad? Also examined, his vehicle later, detonated device in a controlled explosion as of this morning federal authorities leading the investigation have not offered a motive for the shooting. The bad news is that another shooting occurred in a public space. The good news is that no one, but the shooter was hurt, we can carry this bipolar theme into nearly any story. In today's news, for example, Wayne Cordeiro. Well known Hawaiian pastor met recently with twenty two Christian leaders in China eighteen had been imprisoned. They told him that the Christians headed. For prison smuggled in pieces of paper with portions of scripture on them that they later memorized, even though they can take the paper away. They can't take what's hidden in your heart one told Cordeiro, we should grieve with and intercede for our sisters and brothers suffering such horrific persecution. But we should rejoice in their faith and choose to emulate their courage. On the other side of the news Gloria Vanderbilt died yesterday at the age of ninety five she was the great great granddaughter of famous financier, Cornelius Vanderbilt in the mother of CNN news. Man. Anderson Cooper hers was a story of remarkable fame in financial means, however, her father was a gambler in an alcoholic dying of liver disease when he married. Her mother, Gloria was one year old when he died. She was married four times divorced three. She witnessed the suicide of one of her four sons when Carter killed himself, the age of twenty three leaping from his mother's. Fourteenth floor apartment as she tried to stop him. Anderson Cooper said of his mother, Gloria Vanderbilt was an extraordinary woman, and she loved live in lived on her own terms. We can be grateful that the supreme court threw out a ruling yesterday against two or it can bakers who cited their religious beliefs in refusing to bake a wedding cake for a lesbian couple. But we can also lament earlier rulings that cost them one hundred thirty five thousand dollar judgement and caused them to close their bakery. We can be grateful that Delta Airlines will not take sides in the debate over Georgia's new pro-life legislation it CEO explained that the company cannot take one group and put it over another group. When you've got such an emotional somewhat say, religious view as to what the right answer is, but we should also note that the numerous other companies boycotting the state do not agree, what people think of biblical truth does not alter its status is truth, the tragedy of racial. Prejudice. We discussed yesterday does not change the fact that God loves every person of every race in directs us to do the same. In fact, his word assures us that heaven will be populated with a great multitude that no one could number from every nation from all tribes and peoples and languages, the rising persecution against Christians around the world in opposition to Christian morality in our country. Do not change our status in God's kingdom, Paul was imprisoned in Rome, when he wrote a Fijian's and Colossians but he was still an apostle of Christ. Jesus, by the will, of God, the key to maintaining hope while living in a broken culture is reading the news through biblical filter. While looking for God's spirit at work in the world, ten thousand millennia after the communist government in China's no more. The believers it is persecuting will still be rejoicing in heaven long after crusades against biblical morality or forgot. Even the word of our God will stand forever as says, and is Ahah forty eight. When we must choose between culture in Christ. Remember this fact, some who are lost will be I in some who are first will be last as it says, in, Luke thirteen thirty choose wisely. If you like what you today. Please leave a rating and review for the podcast. Thank you for listening. Today's daily article.

Gloria Vanderbilt Wayne Cordeiro Anderson Cooper Dallas Earle Cabell federal building Dr Jim Dennison Cornelius Vanderbilt Brian liver disease Delta Airlines China CNN Carter Gloria Luke communist government China CEO Paul Georgia
William Walker: Filibuster and (Fantastically Bad) President

Ridiculous History

44:13 min | 2 years ago

William Walker: Filibuster and (Fantastically Bad) President

"Hey, everybody, this is no one. You know that I typically keep a pretty healthy and thick beard on my face. But when I need to touch up Majali's and you know the occasional next shave or what have you. I used Gillette and that's because Gillette offers options for everyone from your fresh-faced clean-shaven Hollywood boys to a little bit more of the mountain. Man Williamsburg look like. I typically sport Gillette you see offers a variety of shaving products for every single guy, regardless of personal style skin needs, or budget or the you want three blades or five blades, the new Gillette three Angeletti five razors. Have you covered all under ten bucks? I myself rely on the formidable yet delicate Gillette mach three for guys looking to get Gillette performance delivered to their door. You could find Gillette five at Gillette on demand dot com subscribed today. Welcome to the show. Fellow ridiculous historians run to open today with a question and I don't know the most diplomatic way to phrase this, but what's the ballsy is thing you ever did bent today's episode all about diplomacy. You really set the tone properly balls you asking the audience? Yes, can me I'm asking the audience innomax. Can you know ballsy thing did and super producer. Casey peg REM. Feel free to chime in again for the three of us that might be a little bit different because we have a caveat. We're saying the the ballsy is thing we ever did that we're willing to admit on that narrows the pool little bit. I dunno, I want, gosh, when you put it like that, but I don't have a good answer. They really makes me feel like I've squandered my life no way we're. We're living lives full of strange ridiculous adventure, although it always does feel weird to save ridiculous on this show little on the nose. But the reason we were thinking about this off air is that today's episode is about a very, very, let's say, self confident guy. Full of shuts buck who played an instrumental role in American history. When we say America, we mean the continents, South American North American history and. It's a guy that a lot of people don't know about. I didn't know about him. I know. I know I knew I knew of his his type toe. His type. Yeah, you know, imperialist swine, right? Yeah. Expansionists soldiers of fortune. Yeah, because they're apparently was a time where you could just kind of take it upon yourself to, you know, go forth and conquer other countries gab with nothing, but a, you know, a wish an dream in a posse. Oh yeah. Like minded reprobates factly we, I was thinking about that too. So imagine if you would have you ever been on vacation somewhere and thought? No. What I'm just going to take the flag of another country, post it in the ground here and declare myself in charge. Have you ever thought about that? I've never seriously thought about, you know, doesn't seem like those rules apply any more. I think there's a little more paperwork. Yeah, yeah. But back in the time of William Walker, there wasn't really, that's the subject of today show. William Walker. Could you give us a little introduction to this guy? No. Yeah. He grew up in a pretty affluent family in your neck of the woods Ben in Nashville, Tennessee, or as they say round those ways Nashville. I right, yeah, yeah. And he did everything from like, he studied fencing, I wanna say, and he went to the university of Nashville where he graduated at the top of his class by the age of fourteen, which is nuts. And then he earned a degree in medicine. And then he also had as if that wasn't enough, he got a law degree and he was technically not technically an actual facts. Both lawyer and a doctor law, Dr. Mom and dad were proud. Let's just put it that way. Right? And he did as I think we may have mentioned, come from a prestigious family. One of his uncles was John Norval is Senator from Michigan founder, the Philadelphia Inquirer. He had sort of silver. Spoon life, but he was also a very smart guy. And the thing was he was very self assured. He practiced law, but not for very long time because after was practicing law in Philadelphia, he quit and he moved to New Orleans where he became the editor and co owner of an outfit called the New Orleans, crescent, a paper of note, and then that's still wasn't enough. So he moved to San Francisco and in San Francisco, he was a journalist and his fencing also came into play. Is that right? Well, sort of a pretty sure he, he shot people, but he was three duels. Oh, that's that's right. Because he, he was a bit of a notorious trash talker. Wasn't he? Yes, he columns and there were a few notable figures who got into some pretty serious beefs with, isn't that right? Yeah, yeah, he was. He was quite a bantam figure because he was only five. Five feet two inches tall, but apparently he would fill a room one of his duels that gained national attention. The first time he really broke out in the public sphere was when he had a duel with a guy named William Hicks, Graham on January twelfth, eighteen fifty one in San fran-. Yeah, I think Graham was known as something of a gunslinger. Yeah, yeah. So at the time, Walker was the editor of the San Francisco herald. Graham was technically day job. A clerk employed by judge are in Morrison, and the thing is, as he said, no, Graham was also notorious gunslinger which you could do that back in these days. You could be in the eighteen fifties. Both a clerk for a judge and a well known guns. Mun guns. Men is a word I just made. I'm into Ben. I'm support that. So so what happened with this so Walker as the. Editor of said newspaper of no was talking trash about this. Judge Aren Morrison and dueling. This is you gotta remember this is the time of the California gold rush and like, you know, deadwood and stuff like that. Right? Yeah, you know, this is also I mean it says explicitly in books that we checked out for the show like age of the gunfighter at the time. Duelling was a popular means of settling disputes in California though. Not technically legal, right? I mean, we're pretty far out west at this time. That's true. That's true. But so this is the funny part. It was such a popular thing that the judge actually had his clerks draw straws to see who had dual on his behalf to defend his honor. They were beefed up. Yeah, that's just seems really cowardly. But I guess, you know, I I wouldn't do that for for my boss. No, I don't. I don't think we're in very pro dueling environment. Well, again, Hicks was a, you know, he was fond of this. Pastime, right? Yeah, William Hicks. Graham had already taken part in numerous duels in the time of the olden wild west and Walker had had some duels before, but the kind of duels he had were duals where use a single shot revolver. And so you can, if you just want to defend your honor, but not hurt someone not going to say where where this phrases popular from, I don't wanna spoil the musical for everyone, but you can't just throw away your shot shoot in the air with a single shot firearm. But this fight was a little bit different because it was waged with revolvers colts specifically. Yeah, and they had five shots, and all of them were fired. And Walker took a bullet through thick. It actually injured him, but it went through the la- as this as a book describes the leg of his pantaloons and then he also got one. He did get one in the. And the funny thing is that Graham got charged with aggravated assault because this was in fact illegal activity. Yeah, he was later found not guilty in no small part. I think because while Walker was shot, he was not seriously injured, right? That's what that's what I found. Also, he from what I understand Graham walked away without a scratch, they key. He had two shots off and Walker didn't even manage the fire a shot at Graham. And so when he was wounded Walker eventually conceded. And as you said, no, Graham was arrested but found not guilty. And one of the strangest things about this. I, this research may be wanna trace the life of William Hicks Graham because in the books we're reading about this dual Graham goes on to fight other duels pretty much like immediately. After he gets the not guilty verdict. Oh yeah. He's he's thirsty for these. And it sort of shows the kind of attitude. This dude had about going out and conquering stuff. You know what I mean? Oh, and I want to correct myself there because I said he wasn't seriously wounded, but I found conflicting reports reports of the time described as a trifling wound, but leader, historical reports described his very serious wound. I've always assumed a gun shot as a serious wound. I would assume some well, the sumptuous aside. One thing that is great about this dual is despite the fact that he lost the duel, William Walker, as we said, becomes known in the public sphere. He's in the papers. You know what I mean? Lawyer dualist William Walker, not walking for a while. Cute. Mun it's very cute papers at the time. So this is just some backgrounds about this guy. He's well off. He's a hot head. He's also. Not shy about his opinions, both his opinions on slavery. He's very much in favor of it. His opinions on the expansion of the United States and his opinion on how to apply his patriotism Yan. He got a little bit of inspiration from some stuff that was going on in Cuba. There was dude named Narciso Lopez who was born Venezuela, and this is an eighteen fifty by the way, and he gathered up a band of mercenaries to basically try to conquer part of Cuba and the make it part of the US make it part of the US. Is that annexing and what does that that that would be an if it were an authorized state action. That's the thing. This guy is kinda took it upon himself. Yeah, to do it and Walker, like like the cut of his particular Jim and said, interesting. I. Want to try something like that. And this was known as filibustering for a lot of a lot of us listening in the US right now today twenty teens, we record this in case you get listening, three thousand years in the future. For a lot of us filibustering today only describes the political practice wherein a congressperson will try to put off certain voting actions by just talking forever. Yeah, like we do. And this podcast. We're getting. We get to the point. We know we do, but we're, we're, I feel like I could be commenting so much stuff. I wasn't always talking into a microphone. I mean, you could say that about anything. Hours a day we spend sleeping. That's fair. Thirty your life. You put it like that. But these weird statistics aside and the strange definitions aside filibustering at the time described this specific practice illegally going into a foreign country or land and taking it over by force with a usually with a posse mercenaries or like minded people native to the region, and then declaring that land part of the United States. One of the big inspirations for this is the state of Texas the broken off from Mexico few years before, and they were held up as an example of the practice of Americans going out taking over Neria and then later making it a state and filibustering, although illegal in the US had wide popular support because we have to remember this is full on expansionist mode. You know what I mean? Sea to shining sea manifest that destiny right. Young man. So where did where did Walker go? Yes. So Walker set his sights down Mexico way, specifically a couple of states, one of which was Baja California who, which was actually in Mexico and Sonora, and there weren't a ton of folks living there at the time. So he gathered a posse of, I think around fifty men, right? Yeah, yeah. Yeah. And just, you know, marched his way on in there and he was able to take lapaz, which is the capital of Baja and he raised his own flag that he designed himself, which I think had three parallel stripes on it, and, and yeah, and you know, he is, like you said earlier, you sort of put down his his his flag and and say, this is my now, the CIA alone. Yeah, he named he renamed the area the Republic of lower California declared himself president. And then said the new legal system will be we'll, we're just gonna use the laws of the state of Louisiana and less. You think he is some sort of Indiana Jones type lovable, rogue character. We should mention that there's a reason he wanted to use the laws of the state of Louisiana wanted to use those laws because they included legalized slavery. He was again, very Pru, slavery and word spread in the US. Just imagine people saying, you know, remember that editor that hotheaded editor from San Francisco who disappeared for a while while it turns out she took over Baja California for the US and he had this massive wave of public support. People would read about this story and then go volunteer to join him as a member of his military force in the Republic of lower California. And this is where he got a a really. Weird nickname talking about the gray eyed, man of destiny. Yeah, doesn't quite rule off the tongue. I think it's great. I would. I would love people call me that gray, I'd man of destiny. It's it's a lot to say. It feels like it's good to read it in print. I just said it twice and I love the way it sounds. So I respectfully disagree with you. Ben, of course, of course to each their own end noted, I don't think his vice president got a nickname that was his former law partner, Henry p Watkins. We should also mention that when he was filibustering in Mexico, he didn't just try to take over the Baja California territory. He took over another sparsely populated area, the Sonora state, and I wanna say speaking of diplomacy, he did start off this whole thing by asking the Mexican government to let him make a colony in these areas that we're kind of sparsely populated and he he referred to according to this article from history is now magaz-. Gene that he wanted to create a buffer zone between native American and American territories. So Mexico's said, no, and he decided to go forth with his wild plan hand like a Gregor MacGregor from our earlier show, he funded his project by selling scrip that was redeem -able in the state of Sonora a wow, he would create. So even more balls existing seriously. Hi, I'm Daniel and I'm and we're here to tell you all about our brand new podcast. Daniel Daniela Horry explained the universe in this podcast. Gonna talk about a lot of things mostly about physics and the universe. All those big mysteries scientists. A lot of things left to figure out even pretty basic stuff. Like what is space? What is time? What is stuff made out of which movie gets time travel, right? That's an important question scientists folks. Are we alone in the universe? What is a black hole anyway with inside a black hole. That's what this is about. It's mostly me and hor horrific on stuff. We find fun and fascinating and hilarious. Look for Daniela, hey, explained the universe. We'll try to cover just about everything in the everything. Everything dullish the whole shebang from cats to planets, two black holes and tiny parties. So, yeah, he, he's staked his claim in the pas and also in Baha and also in Sonora and it didn't all go smoothly. Obviously, he moved his headquarters twice over the next ninety days or something wants to Kabo on Lucas. And then once a little further north insa, NADA because he knew that it would be a really close fight if the Mexican government was able to raise forces to attack and he actually didn't get control of Sonora. He just sort of started saying that the Republic of lower California was part of the larger Republic of Sonora even though he didn't actually control it. It's kinda like it's like, imagine if we declared ourselves the emperor's. Of Birmingham, Alabama, despite the fact that we're not in Birmingham, Alabama. That's kind of what happened. Yeah, but sounds about right. And there was a notable series of attacks that he lost, which further adds knoll to the one of the themes in this guy's life, which is talking big game and then getting his Kista handed to one of those relocations he took was a consequence of him losing a skirmish to general Manuel Marquez delay own. And so he was eventually forced to retreat from Mexico entirely. So it's eighteen fifty four and the gray eyed man of destiny has sort of rallied some troops to support him. He actually was able to get around two hundred Mexicans to back him up along with another couple hundred folks from San Francisco who thought this scheme of his, you know, had had legs, but you know. As megalomaniacs often do he. He didn't really plan this thing out very well. They didn't have enough supplies, and you know the folks that were helping him started getting restless and the Mexican government wasn't having it, and they were able to really make things pretty uncomfortable for the occupying forces there in the pas rights. So at the same time, this is getting domestic support in the US with hundreds of people wanting to join the expedition, raising the flag of the Republic of Sonora in different streets in the US things are getting increasingly Harry for Walker and code down there in Baja, California and no, you mentioned earlier that the supplies were issue, right? There's a, there's a strange thing that happens. He has a ship named the Caroline, the supposed to wait on shore or bring him the ammo and the and the food stuff. Needs to continue surviving the conflict and this ship sails away with most of his supplies. And then when two hundred more recruits arrived from San Francisco, his supplies are already so low. He can't feed them. He can't arm them wait. So they just bailed on him with with stuff ship just left. So it was like they were deserting. Basically, they were like, this is this is we're done and we're taking your ship and your supplies, and you know, go after yourself. So the most diplomatic way I found it was in an article from the virtual museum of the city of San Francisco by fanny Judah. That says, for some unknown reason, his vessel, the Caroline sailed away with the greater part of his supplies. So when these people show up, he sends a group of them toward TOTO. Sundell spe on a foraging expedition, and he says, you know, find us some food to eat, find some cattle, etc. They get no fight with. The natives. This band does because those people don't want to give up their stuff in return for scrip again, the fake money that you can redeem in Sonora which does not control. And since they were running low on food, they couldn't get their plundering done successfully. The men began to desert Walker starts arresting them, he shoots two of them. He has to others publicly flogged, and this makes him even less popular so much so that he only had one hundred men when he started walking for SNorre removing on SNorre. And by the time they reach the Colorado river. There were only thirty five people with them. He's Hemmer, jeans, support staff, just dropping like flies man and not a good look, not a good look for a leader in conqueror, right? Which is why you know, I think re I managed destiny is a good nickname. I just don't think he deserves it. Here's the thing though. Dan, I didn't realize this. I mean, we're talking about how the. The laws were different than how it was a little bit easier to kind of like go forth and conquer, but it wasn't fact legal just like dueling who it was. It was it was widely done and I guess you know, if you don't get caught, but filibustering was illegal and after this debacle and he returned back to San Francisco, he and his remaining ten dudes or whatever got arrested by the army, right for violation of US neutrality laws. Exactly. So how did this? How did this trial actually go? I wonder if he was able to represent himself. He was a lawyer, right? There was a doctor lawyer lawyer dualist. Imperialist Gungor man, his business card, most of extra long. Do you think it was bone? Oh, yo with owner watermark? Yeah. Phone line. So the thing is, yes, he is arrested. He's tried for these multiple violations of US tragedy laws, but in the US the population is still supportive of him. The trial goes to a jury. They list all the charges. Prosecution makes argument defense makes argument to your point knoll. I would be fascinated to know whether he represented himself and the jury leaves to deliberate, they come back eight minutes later. What do you think happened? They let him go, right? Yeah, acquitted of all charges. He's a true America. I think it's because of the chutzpah. You keep talking about anything that you were just like, you know, this guy is a real American. Why would we put him away for just doing what Americans do, which is you know, going out and conquering the wilds. I think it was, you know, I think there's something to it honestly, because I believe that the public support for manifest destiny expansionism was at. Such a fever pitch that people were maybe having conversations where they said, well, there's a difference between what's right, and what's legal sometimes. Right? And so after he gets away unscathed through this adventure attempting to capture Baja California and Sonora he says, you know what? I'm going to go back to practicing law a little bit of gotta reputation. Maybe I'll just go be a lawyer and that last a little less than a year. Oh, I'm sorry. I just want to interject really quick. Then I remembered something. The reason we don't hear about him practicing medicine is because as a right out of medical school, he saw his mother die. Oh, very horribly trauma. He was traumatized and turned away from ever practicing medicine. So that's why the whole doctor lawyer thing didn't didn't work, didn't really can really do the combo there tragedy. Please go on. Well, I'm setting up to tell one of the strangest turns in the story, right? He got away unscathed. From his ill-fated adventures in Baja Californians Nora. And he says, you know what? I'm gonna go practice. Logging now lasts for about a year, and then he gets that each that conquering which yes, he gets filibuster h. He's needs to be filibustering everyday filibuster. And so he sets his sights on Nicaragua weird. It's really, really far far far, far away from San Francisco. You know, Mexico made sense on the border, and it's sparsely populated. He also by the way he gets a lot of public support because he's saying that he's setting up this buffer colony to protect people from the Apache. That's right. That's right because it was during the goldrush and there was a lot of these sediments there and Indian attacks and the like, but not the case with Nicaragua for this. This was purely exploitation on his part because Nicaragua was having some serious problems. They were like in the absolute throes of an of horrible civil war, and they were these factions that were trying to control the. Government of the country, and they were the leonie's and the Granada NHS leonie's were more liberal and the Granada's were more conservative. And if I butcher that pronunciation. I don't even care anymore. I'm Ben. You're good care. Hey, Chit manual, good. I just, I just really, you know, pronunciations be damned well, so English is a living language. That's just that's just thing. Dumb people say that mispronounce words, are you know that you're just trying to make me feel better? Oh, no, it is. It is a living language. I mean, look, when's the last time you heard filibustering described in this way? That's a very good morning. This changeover have never heard it actually. 'cause we, I mean, it's not even the the Webster's definition. We're, we gotta bring it back. I've going to start filibustering places. Yeah, like our local bar off the streets, hang out for a really long time. I think the don't leave. I think the main thing is I need a flag. It seems like flags or really key here I need. So if you're good vex Allah gist, which is the fancy word for flag lover back, solid gist. That's vex Silla Logist if you are vex Lalla gist one who is very familiar with. Study of history symbolism and usage of flags, then hit us up and let us know what kind of flags we should have. I'm open to ideas. Are you on board with this? I don't wanna pigeon hole, you know? No man pigeonhole away. Okay. I'm malleable. I will bend to your whims. Your agree. I'd man of destiny. That's you buddy. I wouldn't. I. I will follow you to the ends of the. I would much prefer that you take the nickname grey eye MandA destiny over this Walker character very kind. You can be the power behind the gray. I'd thrown. I just wanna filibuster which sells like we haven't learned our lesson. We're mostly joking, except, you know, let us know if you have a good idea for flag. So Walker is aware of this situation that no, you just described in Nicaragua the Granada faction. The more conservative faction is at the time winning winning so hard like winning the Instagram and the leonie's seem set for. Defeat, walkers, season opportunity in this chaos. And this is again, we have to remember these are the days before the Panama Canal. So a lot of shipping went through Nicaragua. It was a, it was a tremendously important crossroads for trade wasn't this kind of masterminded by Cornelius Vanderbilt who was like the the railroad tycoon that trade position will he, I think he's sort of had the idea of building this canal and he wanted to connect, you know, the Caribbean with the Pacific Ocean and so-. Walker, knowing this saw what strategic stronghold economically Nicaragua was and decided to roll the dice and offered his assistance to the leonie's. Right? Yes, he's he offered his assistance any did it with very sketchy support from the US government. So he says, I'm gonna get down. There get with the leonie's use them to augment fighting forces. We're gonna take over Nicaragua for America who's with me who's with me, kind of like that scene in half baked ham, anywhere with them and sixty sixty. People said, well, I'll do it. Is that enough? That's not enough. I'm no, you know, master of war, but that seems a little on the light side. We have never affect purposely filibustered, but just ballpark in this seems yeah, seems low. So here's the thing though. Here's what the sketchy support was. He's got sixty people and says, okay, we're going to set sail. It's eighteen fifty five by this time and the United States marshal tries to prevent Walker and his men from leaving. But the federal officials who earlier tacitly supported him in his quest to take over parts of Mexico. They're still on his side. In fact, before he set sail Walker meets with a guy named general. Will who is the military commander of the Pacific coast and wool had special powers granted from the president to suppress all filibustering expeditions. But this guy, this guy meets with Walker Walker says, yeah, I'm gonna. Go take over Nicaragua for America. I'm gonna make it like its own thing, I, but then I'm going to hand it off to the US and the general, here's this plan and he says, you know what? Not only my not going to interfere break leg buddy. I wish you well, yeah, totally out of question for even and all of this house. He benefiting like c. c- cashing in on all of these exploits like eras, he just totally power mad and just wants to like be the king of a country. Yeah, it's it's tough for us to ascribe motive. We know he didn't come from impoverished means. I think he was obsessed driven and like just like of two completely self destructive level. Yes. I think he just. Really dug power. Hello, Philadelphia. Have you ever wanted to see stuff? They don't want you to know live direct and in person? We hope so because we are coming to your town very soon. Yes, Ben Nolan, Matt, that's me. We're going on tour in October specifically October twenty six. We will be at the world cafe in Philadelphia. So come check out our first ever. Philadelphia live show on October the twenty six at the world cafe. You can get tickets now going to stuff, they don't want you to know dot com and clicking on the live shows tab at the top of the homepage. We'll see then Philly. So I think you are right? I think you're right. I think he was about the power for him. It was about the drive to conquer into rule as soon as they land in San Juan, they'll sort. He starts to flex his muscles. He's got his sixty people with him as got those leonie's troops, and he starts fighting the Granada faction at the battle of reverse. And because he wins the day for the leonie's wins another title. He, he other. Not not. A nickname says, this is almost an official title generalissimo generalissimo and he's a white man. From from Nashville. Right? Right. Imagine it's so crazy how he found himself in this situation. I don't understand like the impulse to do. Maybe just my brain doesn't work like this, but yes, so he's generalissimo now and he declares himself to be the new president of Nicaragua hotspot for days yet, and the population of the US hears about this and they love it and soon pro slavery. Advocates begin trying to recruit more people to help with this. 'cause in Nicaragua large, southern cities host public meetings and fundraisers and Walker begins to really settle in and make himself comfortable. And this is where he makes a powerful enemy Nolan. So glad you mentioned this earlier. We had a little foreshadowing. Yeah, this Vanderbilt character does not play because I believe. That generally sumo l.. Presidents Walker? Yeah. Did not allow his ships to travel through, like we were saying before he saw the strategic power of controlling Nicaragua. So I guess there was money he he was getting. He was come on. He had to have been cashing in on this note question about it because he had such power that he was actually able to revoke the deal with Vanderbilt's company. Yeah. The Vanderbilt steamship commits right to allow them to travel through that very important region for getting from the Caribbean Pacific Ocean. This is before the Panama Canal, right? Yes. Yeah, four, the Panama Canal and dad insult to injury. Walker gives that right of transit to a guy named Edmund Randolph the competitor Vanderbilt's for a term of twenty five years. And then soon as he's consolidating his power, he reverses the anti-slavery law. Ause that Nicaragua had for the last thirty two years. And because this guy's essentially re-instituting slavery revolts begin to break out. Also, there's a, there's a puppeteer helping strengthen and augment these acts of revolt. It's Vanderbilt the owner of the steamship company. This has become a proxy war for him. Dang, sca- making waves. He is. He is and Costa Rica, declares war against Walker as well. Things just go the go to pot. They go pear-shaped pretty quickly and you, you know, it's not hard to see why if somebody came in and took over a US state and reinstituted slavery, right? And then angered the largest corporations in the area, of course, things would be incredibly unsustainable. And so after about two years, as a result of these various conflicts in may of. Eighteen fifty. Seven Walker has to surrender yes, to leave. Nicaragua until that is. He convinces people to join him on his second Nicaragua campaign. So he's in mobile, Alabama, and he organizes the second Nicaragua expedition. How do you to mobile? We're that come into play. It's when he left Nicaragua used to be lined for mobile. You went back to the states. He was forced by Central American armies and the government of Costa Rica to surrender to US navy commander, Charles Henry Davis. And so he was taken back to New York City. And then when he got to New York at first, there was fanfare, you know, imagine the confetti, the applause people like this guy's a real American hero, but then the public turned against him when he said the only reason I lost because of the US navy. Also, he was using very dirty tactics in the war. He was. Purposely contaminating water wells with corpses. Yeah, he's waging biological wards awful caused a cholera epidemic on a guy, what a guy. And so now the the US public is starting to turn against him. He goes from New York makes his way down to mobile. Alabama starts his second Nicaragua expedition, and then he gets arrested by the US navy. Under the command of a guy named Commodore. Hiram polling gets returned to the US. Again, writes a book Warren, Nicaragua publish, eighteen sixty, and then he goes back. But this time he says, you know what? If Nicaragua didn't work Baja, California didn't work. There's another place I can try child Honduras, hold onto old Honduras with the same. You know the same designs in mind as he's had the whole time skies just got like stars in his eyes about conquering. I, I still wanna know like, how is he how how's he benefiting from this. She was like, he's putting himself in harm's way, you know. I think he made me just got off on the on the k. on the chaos. I guess this is very interesting. Interesting character doesn't seem like she was doing much to institute sustainable government after he took over now or even had any real plans on how to do it. He doesn't wanted to declare himself the president. He just wanted to be important. You know what I mean? But all this bad behavior finally caught up with them in the form of a firing squad. Yeah, yeah, that's right. So after he's organized, this other expedition, put it together, New Orleans set sail for Central America. He lands near Trump's yo in Honduras and east thinking, you know what, eventually I'm gonna get to Nicaragua, but his men probably thinking we have heard this before they desert him so venture as he is probably trying to take over Nicaragua. He has to surrender himself to the captain of a British naval vessel that was nearby off. The coast, this guy commander, knoll, salmon, who would later become Admiral, Sir. Knoll salmon for reasons that aren't completely clear, decided that instead of returning Walker to the US. He was just going to deliver to the authorities of Honduras along with his chief of staff Colonel af rut. Ler Rudler was sentenced to four years, hard labor in the minds, Aaron, Honduras, which many ways was death sentence. But as he said, Walker, met a different fate. Yeah, and we've got a really good account of it from the New York Times published in October. Fifth, eighteen sixty by Johnnie Norval and this is how you describes. He marched from his cell to the place of execution with a steady step. And unshaken mean a chair had been placed for him with his back toward the castle having taken his seat. He was blindfolded, three soldiers stepped forward to within twenty feet of him and discharged, their muskets. The. Balls entered his body and he leaned a little forward, but it being observed that he was not dead. A fourth soldier. Mercifully advanced so close to the suffering. Man, the muzzle of the musket almost touched his forehead and being their discharge scattered his brains and skull to the winds, thus ends the life of the gray eyed, man of destiny and have to make this joke. Ben were using musket balls you live by the balls you dials. That's so good. We planning on that just just just after notice. Great, a man I had that's going to give it wings. Yeah. Yeah, let it fly. And so this is the conclusion of the story of the the man the myth, the monster, William Walker side note, I don't know if we mentioned this to, you know how old he was firing squad. Got him. No, I don't. I didn't see that here. Thirty six years old. She did all these terrible things in thirty six years just turned thirty five. I know man never conquered a country even have successfully. Hey, neither is e. Was half successful. I don't know. I raised a ruckus. Okay. And then he was never legally recognized by another country, but you know what? We've still we've still got time to start countries of our own, maybe on the moon when SpaceX gets his stuff together, but that's a story for another day. Thank you so much for tuning in. We hope you enjoyed the tale of William Walker and stay tuned for our next episode. When we break down the story of what are they know, monkey hangers the Hartlepool monkey or why Hartill poodle liens are known as monkey hangers that's happening at happening with vengeance. My friend, it is inevitable. In the meantime, hit us up on the internet. We are ridiculous how stuff works com. You can join our Facebook group. Ridiculous historians on the Facebook. All you gotta do is name one of our names. It's it's pretty low bar at the magic entry question. What if you don't know, are you say something clever. We'll let you. Yeah, we like jokes, you're no, I'm Ben Casey, that's us. Yeah. Oh, and we want to think Casey super producer, Casey paranoia thing. Alex Williams who composed the track, our research associates Christopher hoc- yoda's Eve's Jeffcoat MSG importantly you out there and podcast land civically and YouTube. Bill you really, you really carried me on this one. I gotta say pre she ate, man. Oh, last thing, please? No, serious cintas, flag designs. If you have. Yeah. The rumors are true friends and neighbors. We are getting out of the podcast studio and hitting the road to visit a town near you on Tuesday, October twenty. Third, we're going to be at the armory in Boston on Thursday, October twenty. Fifth, we're going to be at the Arlington cinema draft house in Arlington, Virginia, that's near DC. Then Friday on October twenty six. We're going to be the world cafe live in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Sadak twenty-seventh. We will be get the bell house in Brooklyn New York. It will be returning to Atlantis Sunday tuber twenty eight for very special show at terminal west. No spoilers. But this is going to be a little bit different is going to be very much weird and we'd love for you to be part of the show, get out there and get a ticket while you can go to stuff, they don't want you to know dot com. Click on the live shows tab, and you'll see where you can get tickets right down there, get them. Now you better get quick.

William Walker United States Nicaragua San Francisco California president Mexico Sonora William Hicks Graham leonie Mexico America Philadelphia Cornelius Vanderbilt Baja Nashville Ben Casey Gillette university of Nashville Alabama
246 | Crummy Food

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

11:17 min | 3 months ago

246 | Crummy Food

"Welcomed. Aaron monkeys cabinet of. Production of Heart Radio and Brim and mild. Our world is full of the unexplainable. and. If history is an open book, all of these amazing tales right there on display just waiting for us to explore. Welcome. To the cabinet of curiosities. Anyone who has waited tables or cooked in a restaurant has dreamed of it. The chance to get back at an unruly customer the kind who sends their playback because they're green beans weren't hot enough or their burger was a little well done. Or if you're chef George, SPEC because the French fries you made were too thick. SPEC. Born in eighteen twenty four grew up with his sister Caroline Wicks in upstate New York. He'd made a name for himself by working at two restaurants in Saratoga County. Kerry. Moon's lake. House. On Saratoga Lake and the sand succi hotel in nearby Boston SPA SPEC had come to know his regular customers at moons especially when Cornelius Vanderbilt the Third Vanderbilt was eight trust fund kid who had been given the finest things in life he'd grown up in New Hampshire where he attended an exclusive boarding school after which he'd gone off to Yale for a bachelor of. Arts degree. Vanderbilt was a man who always got what he wanted even when it wasn't in his best interest after marrying the daughter of a prominent banker from New York guest his father's wishes he was cut out of his parents will when his father Cornelius Vanderbilt, the second passed away in eighteen ninety nine, the younger vanderbilt was given five hundred thousand dollars and the earnings from a trust fund worth over one million, the other son Alfred and clearly the favorite child inherited most of his father's seventy, million dollar estate. Still Vanderbilt. The third did well for himself. He held over thirty patents for inventions from his own making including away to improve fuel efficiency locomotives. He also helped form a company that would bring the subway systems of London and Paris to New York City though he had to work a little harder than his brother, be never forgot where he had come from an extremely wealthy and impatient family who wanted for nothing it's what made him so memorable to George SPEC. Moons was a high end establishment and Vanderbilt Eight. They're often however despite his frequent patronage, he never took the time to learn Georgia's last name whenever he asked the waiter to pass a message to the chef, he would refer to him as crumb. George didn't mind too much though remarking once that a crumb is bigger than a speck, the name stuck not only the George by chrome from that point on, he also named his first restaurant crumbs. But that wasn't the only obnoxious habits Vanderbilt's it seems that even though specs food was renowned all over Saratoga County, a certain picky young man from Concord New Hampshire always found something to complain about. According to the legend, Vanderbilt kept sending plates. Of French fries he had ordered back to the kitchen, his problem they had been cut to fix. George cooked batch after batch of fries. Each one sliced a little thinner for vanderbilt but they kept getting returned. Angered by the man's audacity SPEC tried something new instead of cutting up another potato into fries that would be set right back. He sliced into countless pieces as thin as sheets of paper Benny Fried them until they were hard and crispy in loaded them up with salt. The idea was to discuss vanderbilt into leaving at least for the day but the opposite happened vanderbilt couldn't get enough of them. Of course, the legend was just that a legend. The true story was much simpler and gave credit to the food's rightful inventor. SPEC had been in his own restaurants kitchen with his sister by his side. When a thin slice of potato she had cut fell into a pan of hot oil. She fished it out and put it on a plate. Brother happened to walk by popped into his mouth and decided that he would serve it at crumbs. What the culinary world had thought was an act of revenge gone wrong had actually been complete accident either way we all lucked out because without George SPEC Katheryn wicks we would never have gotten. The POTATO CHIP This episode of cabinet of curiosities was made possible by Hendrick's gin made in a tiny Scottish seaside village and deliciously infused with Roseanne cucumber. It's a concoction invented by master distiller, Leslie, Gracie who supervises each batch five hundred leaders at a time and believe it or not Hendrix has its own cabinet of curiosities. There's an actual cabinet to which is located inside the Hendrix Gin Palace. In Girvan Scotland. This lack cabinet is where Ms Leslie Gracie stores, all the curious Jin concoctions she has crafted. There's a Hendrix gin cocktail for all kinds of occasions to this holiday delight your guests with delectable yet easy to make cocktail like Hendrix cranberry phys. Think of it as the perfect refreshment sip on our on the fire on a cold winter day, and it's really simple to make to just one part Hendrix to part cranberry juice and one part sparkling wine. Then you combine all the ingredients that glass filled with ice, stir them lightly and garnished with cucumber slices meant and cranberries consider it for your next holiday party this winter Hendrick's gin escaped the conventional embraced the delectable find more recipes at Hendrick's GIN DOT com. Great cocktails start with responsible measuring. Please enjoy the unusual responsibly Hendrick's gin forty, four percent alcohol by volume twenty, twenty imported by William Grant and Sons Inc New York New York. At some points in everyone's life, they have someone to look up to the it could be a mother or father or an older brother or sister or even a celebrity. Often we look up people because they can do things. We can't think of the garage bands that were started after angsty teens I heard Nirvana on the radio or the kid who dove into magic because she saw David Copperfield vanished the Statue of Liberty on TV. But sometimes, we don't want to be like someone else. Sometimes, we want to be entertained by those with talents beyond our own. Like Sergei Rachmaninoff. The Russian pianist and composer was born in eighteen seventy three to a family devoted equally to both the military and music his father and officer in the Russian army played piano as did his grandfather romanoff started piano lessons of his own when he was only four years old demonstrating surprising talent for a boy, his age he was able to play sections of a piece of music from memory without error. He advanced with a piano over the next several years until his teacher Ana Ornette SCIUTTO got him into her alma mater the saint. Petersburg conservatory. He was ten years old at the time. His family suffered tragic loss during this time as two of his sisters passed away from illness and his father left the family after squandering their money. Rachmaninoff instead focused on his music. He started taking lessons with the more demanding piano teacher named Nikolai Zverev and earned a scholarship at the Moscow conservatory he had hoped to pursue composition, but very told him not to waste his time as Rachmaninoff pressed him further to allow him to compose zero cut ties with his pupil. The teacher had him live with his relatives, the satins in Moscow. These experiences and settings such as the suttons home and the surrounding countryside inspired some of the budding composers. Earliest works you went on to perform his own pieces for the teachers and staff at the conservatory. Graduating in eighteen, ninety, two with one of the highest honors ever awarded, which he'd earned for a one act opera he composed as part of his final exams. Over the next fifteen years rachmaninoff toured Russia, lost almost all of his money and continued to compose. However he was struck with a severe case of self doubt and depression after the premiere of his symphony number one in eighteen, ninety, seven, the reviews were scathing and sent Rachmaninoff into a downward spiral. Piece was never performed again. He didn't compose much after that and resort at the teaching piano privately to make money. It wasn't until he was offered a conducting job at the Moscow private Russian. Opera company where he started to compose again still he was plagued by imposter syndrome punishing himself for work he felt was never quite good enough. It didn't help many of his peers and contemporaries composers he had looked up to learn from also began to pass away at the dawn of the twentieth century. Rachmaninov's life was one of pain but not entirely, he continued to conduct, compose perform, and he even started a family. The composer eventually emigrated to the United States hoping to provide a better life as wife and children far from the war and violence that had been ravaging his home country. He performed concerts all over the US and toured Europe before signing with Victor talking machine company as a classical recording artist. Rachmaninoff settled into life in. America. Surprisingly well, a feats made easier. Thanks to men like Benjamin Kutowski Kutowski was a violinist who hailed from Chicago. He hadn't been born into a life of comfort as Rachmaninoff had but he did have some love of music. It's what carried him through school and into a life of entertainment. However instead of Grande, concert? Hall. Like Rachmaninoff was used to performing in the young Kudelski cut his teeth on Vaudeville stages for seven dollars and fifty cents. A week is talent with the Violin also earned him admiration from up and coming performers such as the Marx brothers. He played Vaudeville for quite some time as he worked his way up to a career in radio in the nineteen thirties, it always been capable violinist and that talented Kudelski guest spots on popular radio programs such as one hosted by Ed. Sullivan, he became a hit and counted among his fans. One Sergei Rachmaninov who found himself in tears every time the man played. Tears of laughter that is. izzy Kudelski realized early on that he got way more laughs. If he played his violin badly on purpose, he built his career on it and Rachmaninoff couldn't help. But cry with laughter every time he listened to his act on the radio. Except he wasn't Benjamin Kudelski back then he hadn't been for a very long time not since he had changed his name during his Vaudeville days. Audiences everywhere, including Rachmaninoff had become devout fans of radio and TV star. Jack Benny. I. Hope you've enjoyed today's guided tour of the cabinet of curiosities subscribe for free on Apple podcasts or learn more about the show by visiting curiosities. PODCAST. Dot Com. The show was created by me Erin Minke in partnership with how stuff works I make another award winning show called Lor, which is a podcast book series and Television Show, and you can learn all about it over at the world of Lor Dot Com. Until next time stay curious.

Sergei Rachmaninoff Cornelius Vanderbilt George SPEC Vanderbilt Hendrick Saratoga County Hendrix Moscow Vanderbilt Eight New York City Hendrix Gin Palace Heart Radio Benjamin Kudelski New York Aaron Jack Benny Saratoga Lake Caroline Wicks Ms Leslie Gracie Concord New Hampshire
Robber Barons!

Stuff You Should Know

1:11:40 hr | 6 months ago

Robber Barons!

"Do, you, towels or clothes still smell gross. Even after you wash them in regular washing just isn't cutting. It well tied one wash. Miracle is a powerful deep cleaning laundry solution. That's got your name on it. It removes particles that are deeply trapped in fibers that cause impossible odors that linger even after washing. You can order yours today from tied one wash Miracle Dot Com. Com and get twenty percents off using our code stuff again. That's tied one any wash miracle dot com. This episode is brought to you by IBM Today. Answers matter more than ever before. That's why IBM is helping. Businesses manage customer questions with Watson Assistant. It's conversational. A I designed to work for any industry. Let's put smart to work visit. IBM Dot Com Slash Watson Assistant. Hello friends. We have a book coming out finally and it is awesome. You'RE GONNA. Make me say title again yeah. It's stuff you should know. Coal in an incomplete compendium of mostly interesting things and get this chuck. You don't have to wait to order until the book comes out. You can do what we in the book. Biz Call preorder ring it and then when it does, come out, you'll be first to get or among the first well, and not only that you get a preorder gift. You get this cool custom poster from the illustrator of the Book Carly Menardo who is awesome. We worked with another great writer who helped us out with this thing? A great deal is named Nils Parker and it was just a big team effort in. It's really really cool. We love how it's turning. We do so anywhere you can buy books. You can go preorder stuff. You should know in an incomplete compendium of mostly interesting things, and then after you do, you can go on over to stuff. You should read Books Dot Com and upload your receipt and get that preorder poster, so thank you in advance for everybody who is pre ordering? That means quite a bit to us, and we appreciate you stuff. You should read books dot Com preorder now. Welcome to step. You should know production of heart radio how stuff works! Hey and welcome to the podcast I'm Josh, Clark! Those Charles W.. Chuckers Bryant over there. Jerry was just here doing the covert setup and then got out of the room, really quick other breath for five straight minutes. To new record. You really new studio record, share and this is stuff you should know does that's no David Blaine record by the way now I mean. That's her studio record. You should see her when she's Pearl diving though. Wouldn't that be something to Jerry? Did have a secret life Pearl diving. That would be amazing. It would. but we're not talking about Jerry Chuck enough about her. Instead I propose that we have a nice pleasant conversation about robber barons. Yeah, this is an interesting topic because depending on who you ask. The robber barons. were either. The greatest thing to ever happen to this country, right or one of the worst things never happened in this country. Yeah, yeah, net I from what I could tell. Historians like immediately after a few decades after. The the gilded age. We'll talk about where the you know. The age of the robber barons worked and operated and lived in really took it to be like their their presence. Their existence was one of the worst things ever, but over time there's kind of been a reformation of them. You know kind of like a revisiting of them has tried to to to revive their image or actually make their image possibly better than it ever has been. Yeah I mean it kind of I. Think a lot of this has to probably depends on what you feel about. You know capitalism to this extent where kind of doesn't matter how you make your money if it's sort of underhanded. You sort of undercut competitors and monopolized things, that's all just free trade man capitalism, and that's how it works out, and then those guys turn gave a ton of money to. Society before they died. And so they it's all The justifies the means. That's the conservative way to look at it. and I ran across. Something I can't remember what it's called, but it's basically a human imperfection. Did you know that the idea that humans are imperfect, and there's really no reason to try to make a perfect society because it will always be imperfect and end in ruin that that is. A cornerstone a hallmark of conservativism. Did you know that? I didn't but I mean. Of course. You can't make a perfect society that makes sense well. They're so. Conservatives are saying that in opposition to all of the liberal efforts to make a perfect society to have government regulation that says no, no, we should all have clean water and we should do it. At the expense of making corporations clean up the wastewater before they they released their waste into the shared common water resources. Things like that right and there's this idea that you can. You can mold society into some perfect form that that's the opposite of human imperfection. That's like what liberals think, and that that is that right? There is one of the main dividing lines between conservative and liberal I've been on the planet for almost forty four years now, and I had no idea that it was just that simple. Really kind of is I think the wordperfect is what's stumbling block for me because I don't know a single liberal thinks that they can make things perfect. Your goal is to make things better. Yeah Yeah agreed I. I don't know that it's it's a great word, either but I think that that's you know I mean. Hey. You can argue with the Stanford Encyclopedia Philosophy I'm not. Bring it on man that thing. Speaking of Stanford, did you know that Stanford University was named out recorded? A robber baron named Leland Stanford. Actually yeah, a lot of universities are named after robber barons. Yeah, there's a lot of problems with some of the early histories of of universities as we'll find out in the coming weeks. So, we should get into the gilded age. We should happen the way back machine because that's the age that we're talking about. And when you hear, gilded age might sound really great because. I mean what's better than a gilded. I Dunno toilet. Gilded, Lily isn't that another one that. Killed I know it's pretty good band name though. Gilded Lilly. Yeah, like a ninety s power pop. Oh, totally you nailed it, not said what about breakfast at Tiffany's. but the gilded age is an Dave Bruce Up. Just put this together and he points out. It's not a term of endearment when something is gilded, that means it's got a thin coating of gold, but underneath it's you know it could be a gilded Kurd. Sure. Hate that word so much love it. It's so great! I mean I hate. I love it and how awful it is! Oh Gotcha, but I think it's so awful. It comes out on. The other side is just plain old. Awful the me, okay. So yeah, that's the that's the idea of the the gilded age that it looked great on the outside, but on the inside, it wasn't so great. So, this was the second half of the nineteenth century, basically from pretty much the end of the civil war. Up until the first decade of the twentieth century, and it was characterized by a huge massive shift in the American economy where I I saw somewhere at some point in the eighteen sixties to some point in the early eighteen eighties in about fifteen years. The American economy doubled. Doubled in size in fifteen years. Well, that's how massive it was. And that's how fast it happened and what it was a transition from an agrarian society to an industrial society, and happened virtually overnight, as far as history goes. Yeah, and it was because it happened so quickly, and because it was such growth, I think the government was like we're going to stay out of this. And kind of just let you you dudes do what you're gonNA. Do No regulation You can be as competitive as you WanNa be, and you can satisfy scratch every capitalist issue want and we're just going to let that happen because we're also kind of getting rich side. Right, so that kind of raises something that I saw that the idea that that. I, it's kind of like a myth of the LASI fair government. During this era, they were definitely laws affair when it comes to regulation and leading corporates run roughshod over Labor. But they were anything but hands off when it came to corporate welfare, political entrepreneurship and helping out the class. At, the expense of the people in general, so in one hand on one hand. They were lousy fair on the other they they were not yet and we're talking about here. Is stuff like snatching resources where you could hoarding them for yourself under like building such a massive business that you could drive out? Every other smaller business drive them right out of business by undercutting their prices. jobs were more scare, so you could have. People work harder for less and less wages. That kind of thing. Exactly, and what's crazy like? It was a dog. Eat Dog. Economy. Yeah it. It was just nuts how it happened, and there was a lot of learning on the fly, and the learning curve was extremely steep. Because I mean this was just basically a country of farmers who had been you know looked down upon by Europe for a century or more and they, all of a sudden were were captains of industry, and the most ruthless among them were the ones that rose to the top. Because like you're saying, there was no rules. There was no regulation. There weren't any standards of business. They were all figuring it out as they were going along. And they went immediately to the worst impulses that capitalism can can raise in person when you're in pursuit of as much possible wealth as you can get, and there's plenty of to be. Be had and then like you're saying not only to the federal government, not get involved. They weren't equipped to get involved. Because at that point, most of the government was focused on local stuff, and now all of a sudden as as the United States is truly becoming a continent wide nation The federal government is kind of lagging behind catch-up wouldn't begin to catch up in the progressive era, and some would say that the pendulum swung the exact opposite way to the exact opposite extreme direction that it had during the gilded age. Yeah, I mean. Let's let's talk about the gilded age in The I guess just. You all the trains, really and trains Yo to steal, so you gotta go back a little bit. steel was. A very big deal in that when they found out Mr Henry Bessemer and the eighteen fifty s found out how to make steel like a lot cheaper. He got a new process going where it was like making vast amounts of steel for a fraction of the cost and speed right and all of a sudden you could open up those local rail lines to stretch across the country, and all these regional specialty businesses and industries whether it was you know. Cincinnati was known for furniture, and obviously in places like Wyoming. You had coal and yet copper Montana, and you had a lot of timber in Oregon. You could get that stuff anywhere. You wanted to go, and that changed everything. Yeah, not only. Could you get it to where you wanted to go? You could do it exponentially cheaper than it used to be. Overland or say using canals, and then also way faster too so now if you were making like really great armchairs in Cincinnati like you're saying like. The, Tau the they're just known for that's their mascot. I believe that the baseball team the. Right not only did you have the tone of Cincinnati and maybe some other regional parts of Ohio as your market, you know how the entire country to supply with chairs, and that that happened at a really great time, the steel coming along and building the railroad because. The United States. Economic engine was kind of idling a really high RPM for a little while before this, apparently the war of eighteen twelve, 'cause the United States to kind of stop relying on Europe and turn inward and become more self reliant than it had been before, so it started to exploit more industry and resources rather than rely on. From Europe that was a big one and then on the civil war. Had brought a lot of factories online in the north that hadn't been there before, and so when the war ended, these factories were already to go, and with the abundance of plentiful steal the that the engine got into gear, and it just kind of took off like a rocket. Yeah, when I was reading this, and I tried to find out, but I couldn't really get a firm. Hold I wondered if back then when this started to happen, you know how people rail against. Global, trade and globalization. I wonder if people railed against nationalization of commerce back then or if they just thought it was all great. No no one of the things I read about. That's actually a mark in favor of the gilded age. Being a actually a good thing for America is that. People, every day people were super involved in politics in the political process and agitating for what they wanted, and so if there were people who were definitely in favor of this kind of just taking off like a rocket, needing the country together that kind of stuff nationalization, then there was definitely opposition parties to too I figure who saw the problems with, but the cool thing is. Is that everybody who involved in everybody was like like like they cared about the direction. The country was going rather than just sitting back and being like well nothing we can do about it. I wonder though it was like if there were business like if they were. Furniture makers in Cincinnati going I. Don't want to sell my chairs out there. That is not what they said. Cincinnati. Cincinnati accident. No okay I might be thinking of Maine. Right but I wonder if. I wonder who was opposing it. I don't know I. Don't know I I haven't seen that one. Some of the things that I saw were one of the big fights. WHO's over currency and whether it should remain on the gold standard. It should be easy money, which of course the so the the farmers wanted I. Think they wanted easy money. I can't remember who wanted to stay on. The gold standard and others wanted you know basically to to leave the gold standard and make money a lot more easy to come by also Rodney dangerfield movie. Easy money man. Movie was, wasn't it? Good though. Yeah. Hey. In the worst Dangerfield Move Niagara ill pretty great. In on that point, real quick I'm sorry. I know we don't like to go off on tangents very often. but I have been watching happy days. In surely lately, man, that is some comfort food, isn't it? Dude, they are, but not only that it's not like junk food. They're like well written. Well acted well directed TV shows like scary marsh. Really it's not at all like throw away or disposable. It doesn't rely on slick special effects or anything like that. It's just good stuff, man. Yeah, I agree, and you know what since we're on this tangent? We should tell everyone that we're writing a book and it's coming out this fall. Yeah, it's called. Stuffy should know an incomplete compendium of mostly interesting things, and you can pre-order it now if you want special used poster. Yeah, you preorder it and you can go and upload receipt at stuff you should read books dot com, and then there's like a little thing that says like get your preorder Gift You upload a picture of your receipt in the mail it to you in, and you will be very happy with it because it's pretty awesome. Yeah, and we want to sell. We do want to sell these books out there. We want to sell these books all over the world. Yes, we're glad that the railroad exists so we can move these books around easily man. Kidding. Ship these things to Cincinnati. Right! So. Where were we so? We were shipping things. regional businesses were becoming national businesses. People were leaving the farms. They were leaving small towns. They were going to the big city. Immigrants were pouring in from Europe. African Americans were going North because reconstruction didn't work out so well and his. Band. Have we done reconstruction? No, no, we really need to. Totally I mean the more I've been I've been reading a lot about that period in history, and yes, we need to definitely do one on that but the point is. There are a lot of people flocking to work this What was called the Second Industrial Revolution? Where we saw a reprieve about forty years, factory output went from one point nine billion to thirteen billion dollars. Right. I mean like this happened like almost overnight. It's a it's astounding. How fast this happened I. Don't think it even happened this fast in the first industrial revolution. You know the the one that that started over Manchester like I. think that it's this is nothing like this has ever happened in the history of the world as far as I know I believe it. So Sure. I was just getting revved up my own economic engines idling high right now, well Take your foot off the gas. Okay, and let's take a little break and we'll talk a little bit about Mark Twain and What these! Economic Stats of the day right after this. She's. Here. We wonder you drowning in a sea of financial information and having trouble keeping track of all your stuff well fortunately quickens here to help you manage it in one nice tidy, little spot. That's right. It's very easy to read. You can take complete control of all your counts from their comprehensive dashboard, and you can make the most of the good times and take charge when things are hard. YEA, quicken is the most popular personal finance software on the market, and it gives you everything. You need to easily review every detail. 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Affleck is a leader in supplemental insurance. Insurance. AFLAC is there for people during life's most challenging moments to help with unexpected medical bills, yeah, F- like gives you an additional layer of financial protection kind of safety net for those unexpected medical bills. That's right in the great thing is athletic. Pays you money directly? Unless assigned to help cover the expenses that health insurance does not cover to see how Affleck can help with the expenses. Health Insurance doesn't cover. Get to know them at Affleck Dot Com. That's eight F. L.. A. C., DOT, com. All right, we're back. Charles I'm feeling much better. That my foot off the gas. That was just good advice. Well. We I mentioned Mark Twain and the only reason we're going to talk about mark. Twain for a moment is because in eighteen, seventy three he co wrote a novel. A satire called the Gilded Age Colon. Today where it followed a poor country farmer who is. Sort of I mean. Does he move to the city trying to get it on the Second Industrial Revolution? Yeah, totally. It's exactly that kind of migration that you were talking about just a few minutes ago. and. It didn't work out so well, right? I don't know I've never read the book, but from from what I can tell No, it didn't work out very well because he is taken advantage of by all manner of bad people like crooked politicians and crooked businessmen and is basically run through the ringer from what I can tell, but for I've also seen that that wasn't. It wasn't exactly the best piece of writing Mark Twain's ever come up with, but the thing is that he releases in eighteen seventy three. Yeah, and this is like at the very beginning of of the gilded age, so he saw it pretty quickly. What was going on and what he saw was this emergence. From a relatively egalitarian society. Of A group of ultra. Mind bogglingly wealthy people that just rose up from the United States and. Through you know cheating and business, Acumen and taking advantage of people, and over working people in underpaying people, but also like having a lot of vision and foresight all these things coming together. Grab control of almost all of the wealth that was being produced by the average American. All of the average Americans put together who had moved to the cities for the promise of better wages, better living than the farm could offer some people were exploiting that more than other people, and those people came to be known as the robber barons, and they were the Lynch pin of why people think of the gilded age as a rotten part of American history. Yes, here's some stats for you. an eighteen, ninety, the top one and this. Should sound very familiar if you're alive and breathing oxygen today right, but in eighteen ninety two top one percent of the US owned fifty one percent of all wealth. Yeah, dude more than half of all wealth. In that nuts, it is nuts, but you're right. It does sound very familiar the twelve percent owned eighty six percent of all white. And the lower forty four percent of the US population, which is about half, the population owned one point two percent. and here's that's even more nuts while I mean all these just top one. Another I think here's the last one in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seven, the richest four thousand families that sounds like a lot of people, but Less than one percent of the population, the richest four thousand had as much wealth as the other eleven point six million families combined. Yeah about that. So, that is what you would call economic inequality right and I think the thing is especially over time, but I get the impression during that age to like the people who resent that liberals typically tend to be painted with this brush. That says you're just jealous. You've never made that much money in your life, you probably never will and it sick and you to see somebody else with that money because you don't have it, and it's that second part that last part about because you don't have it that I think misses the mark and that even at the time during the. Gilded age today when people look at inequality that kind of stuff what they're. What a lot of them I'm sure there are people out there who are just jealous and haters for that reason, but a lot of them say no, no like. That that level that the amount of disparity shouldn't exist where if there are people who are just genuinely suffering who are just pour in aren't able to make it with whatever living they're making If they exist then, you shouldn't have people who have that much amount of money. And that was a sentiment in in the gilding. Gilded age is much, too. It wasn't. Wasn't like they didn't realize this was going on at the time, the sentiment was very much like it is today. Except in the gilded age, they did things like form, labor, unions, and strike and and just basically did something about it. They didn't take it laying down which actually criticism that's levied or has been levied in the past against people today. Yeah and I think there's also a notion that The more left-leaning people are anti success. And that's that's not true either Well that's all I'm going to say about that. That's just not true. It's just not true. They're not. They're not anti success And and I don't think that every conservative thinks. Like yeah, Amanda? Like it's all fair, and you should be able to do whatever you want to get ahead and stop on any one's head that you want to get there right I think these are broad brush Things that keep the country divided. Yeah, absolutely I think that the yeah, I think most. misunderstand each other conservatives and liberals misunderstand each other to a debilitating degree. These days agreed so let's let's get off that and let's go back to the original. The G. Robber Barons. who were not these guys? I'm talking about the term robber-baron, which didn't happen in the nineteenth century for the first time. It happened thousands of years ago in Europe. I don't know about thousands of years, but thousand close to pretty close to eight thousand dollars I'll give you that. apparently along the Rhine River, if you wanted to move goods up and down northern, Europe like that was your your way to go, but unfortunately for you there are places where the Rhine river like really narrowed with high cliffs, and you were easy prey for local nobility who wanted to like set up toll booths basically and said you need to give me some money. If you want to keep going implying your goods along the Rhine. Yeah and you couldn't just portage your steamship. Now up a mountain and over a mountain. You had to pay the Piper. Plus they didn't exist time What steamed much? when it does come around. the early nineteenth century. You have a much better just general world timeline that in your brain than I do. Well, I understand history perfectly and without any. Air, pollution! or any of my opinions, informing my vision of history. I think that's what you're known for. Joking oh no. I always get the time periods confused so I rely on books and research like a big dumb dumb so. Yeah no, but then you keep it in. Your brain just floats out like like. Tunes with birds. Flying Around People's head when they get knocked out. Chuck. I've seen every cartoon that ever existed and I remember each of imperfectly. Doubt any of my opinion coloring. My view of those birds are always above my head. I don't have to get hit with an aunt or a piano. So the Rhine, gorge was one of those really narrow straits and in twelve fifty emperor Frederick. The third died there was no successor and basically that meant no regulation, and believe it or not even way back. A lack of regulation meant that people take advantage of that Chris the same as today, and almost like people are imperfect almost. And so these thieves would move into that gorge. Jam Up those tolls maybe just steal stuff if they wanted to as well and they were named the robber barons. That's where that term came from those people. Yeah because they actually were like low level nobility, and they already were well off, but that didn't prevent them from you know trying to take advantage of the merchant class who were just trying to make their way and make a living that's right, and that became like a really great description for some of the the the most successful business tycoons of the nineteenth century. I think I popped up in an Atlantic article in eighteen seventy. Were didn't directly say that it didn't say that. These guys are the new robber barons. It said that the the old robber barons of the Rhine Valley were actually probably more honest than the new air. Of swindling millionaires earn so. That's a big big time bird. So even in eighteen seventy people were saying like this is wrong. There's something really wrong here. I mean this is within just a few years of the the gilded age, really starting to take off and people had already identified that there were some major issues developing. So weird to look at this stuff. And just how apt it applies to what's going on today and we think I mean some people think that these are all new problems and new issues, but it's it's as old as time you know. YEAH SO WEIRD! It is a little weird to to. It's it is weird. What's even weirder? Though is like I believe if we if we look back. If we zoom out far enough, we see humanity kind of ever going upward, even though there's like peaks and valleys in the line, the line overall is kind of up moves upward toward something great I think toward perfection I was maybe I was in I wasn't alive ten thousand years ago. So who knows maybe that was the the pinnacle of Human Existence. Maybe so should we say? Should we talk about a few of these dudes? A So we feel like we have kind of set this up that the robber barons were ruthless business. And we're going to start with one of the first ones Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt. Who for my money was the G. Robber-baron? Yeah, and commodores nickname that. And as you will see, he later Vanderbilt University is named her for him, and their mascot is the commodores because of him. In a commodore is a naval officer sort of above not quite an admiral, but above captain I think they command fleet. Oh, well, that's actually pretty appropriate. Because he did command a fleet of ships, originally sailboats originally a sailboat I think when he was fourteen and then steamships to ferry people around new. York thought there were showers. There were by this time and you know you know what's ironic. We were talking about seem ships and when they were invented, the guy who invented steam Robert Fulton remember. We did a whole episode on steam. He had a thirty year monopoly. In New York to ferry people using steamships right and ironically cornelius vanderbilt had to overcome that monopoly using ingenuity and his own resourcefulness, and eventually was successful in breaking that monopoly, just through good business tactics that actually resulted in far lower fares for everyday people and companies I think just as I try by improving the the size of the steam engine and using cheaper anthracite coal. He managed to drop the average very price from like seven dollars three dollars in his first try. Because Amazing Yeah so so. I think that's really kind of like instructive. Though Manley think about it, we think of this guy's like a ruthless robber baron. In in many many ways he was is. We'll see, but he. was able to get to that position by by outwitting and outsmarting other robber barons, and that was the climate at the time like it's so easy to sit back from this time and just be like. Just judge Judy judge and it's actually kind of fun to. It's a great pastime. But you also have to remember at the time. that was that was the business climate. That's just what it was and if you weren't willing to do that well, then you were not going to make it in in business, which is fine like? Maybe you'd say this to Cutthroat for me I'm just going to sell out these guys. and there's nothing wrong with that, but the ones who were left standing are the ones that you know history still remembers for better for worse. Yes, and it's worth pointing out in as we'll do with I think we're going to refer these guys but. Some had money born into it. Some started out very poor and Cornelius. Vanderbilt, even though that sounds like such a rich hoity toity name now. He was born very poor. He was born in seventeen ninety four in a farming family on Staten Island. And quit school when he was eleven, and that's when he started working on the boat docks, and he he was literally a self made man starting with that first little ferryboat that you mentioned at age fourteen. He was a big dude, and he was very savvy but also very ruthless. He and this is something that you'll see. With a lot of these men was. A competition and a competitive. Edge and nature right that was sort of the underlying thing with all of them I. think that I watched there will be blood recently for movie crush and. Daniel Plain view was very much based on some of these robber barons. And he has that great great classic line from that movie when he goes I have a competition in me I want no one else to succeed. And that just crystallizes that character and I think. A lot of these guys. It wasn't enough to just get rich. They wanted to devastate competition. Right so it makes you wonder like. Is that just a normal? There's this at any given time. There's a you know a handful or a multiplicity of people who are like that. It's just that these guys happen to be living in a time where they had the freedom and ability to exercise to their to their greatest ability, or was it that these guys shaped? The business world because they all happen to be alive at the same time. I don't know wonder it's. It's interesting, though it's that competition. And again with the plane, you not just competition to succeed, but a compass competition to see that others don't. Right so, did you talk about? The river didn't catch it now, so you know. He started off in the steam steamboats, but if you know vanderbilt, you know, he was a railroad guy, and if you look at the list of robber barons. I'd say easily like a third of them were railroad men. Yeah because there was so much money to be made from the railroads, it was just like printing your own money and one of the reasons. Why was because there's so much stuff being shipped over the railroads that? If you own the railroad, you gotta cut of every single industry because every single industry basically had to use your form of transportation. That's why they all got into. Into it plus it was wide open like there was so much open space and so much room for expansion that was a it was a good time to get rich off of the railroad for sure, so his first railroad ride was at thirty nine years old. He wasn't like in his twenties and early thirties getting into the railroad business. He wasn't even on a train. Lose almost forty and that train crashed. an axel broke and went down and embankment, and he punctured lung broke some bones in against was lying there wheezing out of a hole in his long. Saying this is the future. That was so great. And he got into railroads. It's it's crazy like a year later. Yeah, he did one of the things that he had a really great talent for was identifying like loser railroad, seemingly loser railroads and figuring out ways that they actually had been overlooked. Yeah, a really good example of that is the Harlem Railroad, which is just a short little line that other railroads larger railroads us to connect to New York City but vanderbilt recognized that it was the only line that went all the way into the heart Manhattan, and so he bought that up and. He also at the same time, not only got control of that little railroad. This is a really early chance for him to show how good he was driving up stock prices so when he came along and bought the Harlem Railroad or started buying shares of the Harlem Railroad It was worth in today's money. A hundred and sixty eight dollars share not too shabby, but from what I could tell at the time, not very great at all. By. The time was done cornering the stock he had driven the shares up to fifty, nine, hundred ninety eight dollars. How in just a few years? And so in doing so not only did he make a ton of money for himself, he also. Developed his reputation that made owners of other railroads say I own a bunch of shares in my railroad you. WanNa come by mine and drive my stock price in by me out and so ensure he didn't. He didn't even have to plunder other companies. They came to him and just said here. Buddy biased, please. They were Bluestar Airlines. What is that remember that from? There were no airlines and there will be. No remember wall, Street. That was the one that Martin Sheen worked for. Yeah, did GECKO game in and bought out in I think he's shuttered them. Though that was the difference. Yeah. Yeah, he was a corporate raider. He he an actually the era. The eighties junk bond air is frequently cited, or it was at the time is the second gilded age. So this is not the first time we're living in what's known as the second guility so to put a bow on vanderbilt. He consolidated like you said all these railways. Between New York and Chicago he manipulated stock heap fixed prices he. Like, you said earlier, the government wants to looking so you kind of do what you wanted. And he became very very very wealthy. Man and Michael Guys late in his life, turned into a philanthropist. built grand central station. It was called the grand central depot at the time. which during the recession, provided tons and tons of jobs for people. To and then the Central University of Nashville was eventually renamed Vanderbilt University because all he did was give him a million bucks in that crazy. that right I guess back then. Sure sure like I feel like I could get stuff you should know listeners to pitch in. A university named after us. Let's try that actually stuff you should know. We could do a week. Morgan is the struggling university that. Hey, one more thing about vanderbilt, so we left about one hundred million dollars to mostly to his eldest son William in six years William doubled that my mostly by investing in railroads. That's how much money you can. Real Roads and William was also well known for throwing probably the most lavish party in the history of New York City they spent one point eight million dollars today's dollars on champagne alone yet. That was when he finished his mansion on Fifth Avenue and I looked it up to see if any of these robber baron mansions were still around today. I don't yeah I don't think I mean I. Know this one was demolished in nineteen twenty six. So if you WANNA get a really good idea of just how rich these people were go to. Newport Rhode Island of man visit millionaires route because there was a huge. There's a huge overlooking this cliff. There's a long row of the most astounding mansions you've ever built during the gilded. One of the better walks, you can take in life. Inside, and then these mansions on the other. It's really cool and each mansion. Each mention is so different from the other just touring amazing, you could just be utterly disgusted by the concept of billionaires or robber, barons, or whatever and you can still enjoy taking this tour of these mansions just works of art. You know I really. It's really worth a visit. Plus Newport's is one of the more charming towns in the Newport, or you could take a hate, walk and Just look at those mansions and think about what a wrecking ball would look like. Shake your fist at the dumb waiters, and then you turn around look at the ocean and think okay all right. It's really cool. It's a it's a cool to visit them for sure and by the way a little piece of Trivia if you go. If you in central, park at the hundred and Fifth Street entrance that big beautiful iron gate was from that Mansion Vanderbilt Mansion. They donated a lot of the stuff before they demolished it. Is that right, yeah? So I mentioned Morgan and that's actually named after the next robber baron. We're GONNA talk about okay. Do we break beforehand and know that we break after OK P. How about that? Okay? With that? We're? Okay, so so then we're going to hang in there. Everybody. Don't don't fast forward yet. We're going to stick around and talk about J. P. Morgan Right. Yeah, he was born with money. He did not come from meager means and work himself up by his bootstraps. He was the son of a very successful banker and merchant, and use those connections to get a plum job at Wall Street when he was twenty years old. And then when he was in his thirties, he partied a partner with a guy named Anthony Drexel. Who is a banker in from Philly and created Drexel Morgan and company. And it became one of the biggest investment banks at the time in the world. Yeah and this was when he was in his early thirties. J. P.. Morgan was known as the guy who financed all the other robber barons and he had his fingers in basically every pot that was going on. He also knew that like you can make money off of the railroads ticking cut of all the other industries, so he definitely got involved in them, but his whole thing was What's called Horizontal Integration? Where you you? You basically come along, and you say this industry should be doing way better than it is i. think there's too many competitors and they're all holding one. Another down I'm going to slowly start buying them up and here's the thing. This is how you get control of the full industry. During the Gilded Age, you go to a couple you start buying them up. And then you put all those together and you form a bigger company that's way leaner has much better economies of scale. You can compete better against all the other guys, so you start buying some of the other guys up. 'cause they're facing going out of business now and then you've got left the real holdouts. The ones that are never going to sell you because they hate your stupid face and they'll never give a penny to you. Make sure that you'll never set foot in their offices ever again. And what you do, then as you start selling for less than costs, yeah, you're a big company, so you can totally stay on that for much longer time. Then these holdout competitors, and they face either financial ruin, or you eventually put them out of business and either way you no longer have that competition you literally control an entire industry consolidated into one beefy Mega Company. Company and all of a sudden. You have what's called Morgan Association which is I. Don't know if that was pioneered by J. P. Morgan, but he definitely perfected enough that they named the process after. Yeah, and that's a good example of what I was talking about earlier as it's not enough to succeed in, be successful, but to make sure no one else can be. Like it would be the kind of thing that one company you were talking about. That may be kind of pretty small, even but they might might hold. The have an iron grip on one very tiny region of the United States. And you could just let them have their business, or you could do what you're talking about, and make sure that you squash them by any means necessary and forced them to sell, and that's. I think that's where capitalism four a lot of people has gotten. It's bad name. Is like yeah work. Hard succeed, do well. Not at the expense of every other person trying to do well. Right because it interferes with something, this country's based on which is called the quality of opportunity, which is the idea that at least under the eyes of the law, every single person in America has an equal shot at making it, and making something of themselves of having like a good life and wind. Somebody is cheating or engaging in monopolies or using underhanded tactics to to run out the competition, so that there is no competition any longer that that is problematic that that flies in the face of the idea of equality of opportunity that's right, and if you listen to our monopoly game episode. you might remember that J. P. Morgan was the basis of monopoly man uncle. Yeah we! We talked about that good okay. That makes me feel good. Yeah! He was modeled after all J. P.. Morgan himself. And he was actually one of the first people to be targeted for antitrust and nineteen eighty-four Teddy Roosevelt came after him. Under the Sherman Antitrust Act. and Said Hey this northern Securities Corporation is really monopoly and supreme. Court said it is busted up. Yeah and so today when we think of trusts, we think of like you know a legal entity that that can hold assets at the time. The word trust meant basically a industry that had been. Morgan is where all of the competitors have been folded into one large company and the M-. The market was cornered by this one mega company. General Electric US steel. Both of those were Morgan is companies then apparently US steel was the first one billion dollar company that ever existed because of that that level of consolidation, but then yeah, when the Sherman Antitrust Act was passed in one, thousand, nine ninety. That was a clear sign that that this is not going to stand much longer, and and I think Roosevelt. Was Roosevelt. You said right yeah Teddy. Who busted that up and he ran on that, and actually went against he was a Republican I believe, and he went against the advice of the the you know, the elder statesman in the Republican Party established himself as a genuine president of the people and help set himself up for re election just from that one antitrust act. So. That's JP now. Do we take a break? Oh One more thing, chuck. Yeah I'm not toying with you. I swear so one one of the ways that Morgan one of the reasons he's reviled still, and he did some philanthropy probably more than he gets credit for for sure, but one of the reasons, these revolves because one of the ways. He made it so that he could compete with other companies. WAS in cell for lower than than cost was by slashing wages, slashing the workforce and increasing productivity of the existing workers, and then just making sure that working conditions he didn't spend a cent on improving working conditions to make them safe, and that that is really not not because he amassed a fortune. Some people criticize him for that, but its tactics like that like more like. A A billionaire basically on the backs of people who he wouldn't have spent a sent to make sure could stay alive working in factories. That is the quintessential problem. People have always had with robber barons. Is that kind of mentality? That's right now. I'm done all right. We'll come back right after this and finish up with two more robber barons. Friends for all our sakes. We need to avoid crowds any way we can right now. 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Hey folks, did you know realtors are working with Congress and government leaders to ensure homeowners, small businesses and future property owners are represented in the cares act in any future corona virus support. Yeah, that's pretty cool. While realtors and local associations are sowing masks, providing food and shelter and donating to nonprofit organizations, the National Association of Realtors is concurrently supporting property buyers and sellers during the corona virus pandemic. The National, association of Realtors advocates every day on. On the behalf of the nation's one point, four million realtors, and it's seventy five million property, owners and buyers as America's largest trade association in a are is widely considered one of the most effective advocacy organizations in the country and to help small business owners in realtors. During the crisis, the National Association of Realtors Advocacy Team has worked with Congress to include a provision in the corona virus stimulus package to include unemployment aid for independent contractors. That's right in a are urged lawmakers to recognize the millions of self employed workers of America that lacked the benefits and financial aid, offered to traditional W. Two employees, which were particularly critical for independent contractors, small businesses and the self-employed. That's cool, and not only that chuck, but the help property buyers and sellers during the crisis. The National Association of Realtors is working to ensure remote online notary services are available in all states and advocating for services critical to the real estate transaction to be recognized as essential services to ensure that real estate services can continue safely. That's right and did you know that more than? Than One in four of about one thousand Americans surveyed said they will use their corona virus stimulus checks to cover rent and mortgage costs to help these current property owners and renters during the crisis. The National Association of Realtors has asked for direct rental assistance for families who have income loss due to covid nineteen and requested relief for property owners in the form of mortgage forbearance hats off. You know not all real estate. Agents are realtors. Only realtors are members of the National Association of Realtors in by strict code of ethics and shows so if you're looking for a reliable ally, look for the are. Hello everybody. We're back to talk about Andrew Carnegie. You've ever been to Carnegie Hall or Carnegie Mellon University. I've been to both. The university reviews. That's right. We still job there one time. That was fun. I've been to Carnegie. Hall I would. I assured a show there. didn't assure I passed out the playbills. which meant I got to see the show for free and I saw it show Oh, man! It was one of those special nights I got to see Beethoven's night with the full orchestra and German choir at Carnegie Hall. It was amazing wow something else. That's pretty neat and all I needed was a bow tie. Is that the one that's did it in two thousand, eight, hundred eighty entity leading tainting. Maybe named it wrong. It's the Don Don Dun. Dun and other diehard song yeah the diehard song. I got you. Wouldn't saw die hard and concert. It was great. So Carnegie. We're talking about Andrew Carnegie. who was born in Scotland and they came to Pittsburgh He was very poor He's about thirteen years old and he worked in a cotton factory. And he and this will come into play later. He kind of self taught himself from books that he borrowed from a wealthy benefactor from his private library, which is yeah. Come into play later. His favorite one was flowers in the attic. `Wow I. would've thought great expectations, but that's okay. No, so he He like Vanderbilt is definitely a self made man for sure and I guess he kind of was. He had fingers a lot of different pots, kind like J. P. Morgan at first, and then he, he turned his attention to steal because again, remember. Steel is like the basically the the foundation for the American economy, just blowing up and he was Pittsburgh. Sure, so he he. His name became synonymous with steel and I guess I. Up until about eighteen ninety two, he had a reputation as being a friend of the worker, and that the the workers at Carnegie Steel in in homestead, just across the river from Pittsburgh they. They felt like you know. Carnegie would take care of them. and they found out the hard way that that was not the case when the they went. Went on strike in eighteen, ninety two, during what came to be known as the homestead strike, which will result in the death of ten people, which is not how the they plan things to go and apparently the reason why that happened is because the curtains were called in as strikebreakers. Yeah, I might WANNA. Eventually do an episode on this, but That, that's sort of the overview you bring in the Pinkerton. And then they battle with the like literally with guns, Pinkerton died I think like eight or nine of the ten or twelve people who died road the Pinkerton. No I think it was just one I think. where the strikers yeah, okay well, we should definitely do Phillips then because. For sure I'M GONNA. Get this right. Pope what I read was that the the strikers so the Pinkerton showed up in barges, and they were basically hired on as a private army to protect scab workers, and and bust the strike up but they arrived in barges, and after the initial violence, the striking workers and some of their families surrounded these barges and demanded that the Pinkerton come off. The boats didn't end anger tens that, so the Pinkerton said okay. We'll come off if you guarantee our safety. And they said fine and the picker teens came off and they got. Beaten by all of the strikers, they just completely went back on the word, and then set their barges on fire. I guess the Pinkerton escaped to the factory with their life and the National Guard was called in to quell the violence. Yeah, well National Guard was called in not only to quell the violence, but also called in to act in the interest of Carnegie, so he kind of. Commandeered, his own little personal army to help take care things. Right at the Pinkerton, the National Guard, and it's like this kind of collusion that is also another huge criticism like we were saying. The government is known for being like laws as fair as far as the regulations concerned, but they'll totally send in the National Guard not just to quell violence, but to make sure that the strikebreakers don't attack the SCAB labour to keep the factory going and that that that kind of like government capital collusion at the expense of the workers that is, there's longstanding tradition of. Of of that being almost universally reviled yeah in America over enough of an arc of time, if that keeps up more and more just every day American start to notice and start to resent it, and that apparently is a really good force for social change because Americans don't like that kind of thing after a long enough period of time. Yeah, I think Carnegie tried to distance himself from that strike by saying that he was sort of out of the loop. He was in Scotland the whole time. But they have since found correspondence that Shows that he was very much involved in that and you know there's some speculation that he may have had some genuine moments of regret and guilt over that because he was a big time philanthropist later in life yeah I think he said in his book the Gospel of Wealth The man who dies thus rich, dies disgraced. And We mentioned the libraries coming back into play. He built more than twenty five hundred. Libraries and that's really one of his big legacies along with the arts, the Carnegie Corporation and the Endowment for International, peace. Carnegie Mellon University Carnegie Museum, but the library's really have made a pretty big difference in this country. They really have for sure and he was one of just the all time. Great Philanthropists in American history for sure But he still pales in comparison to the the all time. Top recordholder philanthropist John D. Rockefeller. Who is also a robber baron? But he also is far and away America's most prolific and generous. Benefactor, for sure he was also one of the most visionary philanthropists of all time to yes, and some people say that he was You know if you just account for money and inflation, the richest man ever to live I'm not sure how they calculate that because. His nine hundred million dollar peak in one, thousand, nine hundred, and is about twenty three billion today. So here I saw how ready I'm sure it's yeah, go ahead! If you do his wealth relative to the total economic output. Yes, sir, larger than Gross Domestic Product at a feeling. It was something like that. His wealth represented two percent of the total economic output of the United. States at the time to to have that value today, you would have to be worth about three hundred fifty billion, okay? Just as US as worth hundred forty or something like that yeah! And I think we didn't even mention that was at Carnegie that had. At, one point like one dollar of every twenty dollars in circulation was his. Yeah, that's right. That was Carnegie. I mean. These numbers are staggering. For sure, people like Rockefeller and Carnegie has just. It's unbelievable, but the thing is in in like. Like John John D. Rockefeller was a ruthless, ruthless businessman who put a lot of people out of business, brought a lot of misery and hardship on just small everyday producers of oil, which will see but. Again it's really difficult to overstate the impact that his philanthropy has had on the United States. He peaked at nine hundred million like you said when he died, he had he'd given away everything but twenty six million of that, and he probably felt kind of bad that he had twenty six million dollars left because he he was a very religious man, and apparently he Learned very early on that it was everyman's religious duty to make as much money as you possibly can, and then to give away as much money as you possibly can to. and He. He apparently lived that even before he was wealthy when he was still just a average worker. Yeah, he would give away something like ten percent of all of his paycheck, so he was a philanthropist, his whole life for sure he was still a robber baron, to though yeah, and his whole you know of course. Oil was his business standard oil It was just a a Goliath and there and there were a bunch of big like sort of like the railroads it was. Oil and railroads are industries where you could have a bunch of people that had these huge huge corporations, but standard oil was foreign away bigger than any of them. By the early nineteen hundreds, they controlled more than ninety percent of the oil market. Can, you imagine ninety percent. And the way that he cornered the market. Was You know he did that standard? Morgan Ization kind of thing where you went around and bought it first and then started to turn up the heat on the competition on the holdouts, but one of the ways that he turned up that he was, he colluded with the railroad, the the different railroads in the area. who were shipping all this oil to say not only were. Were were they going to give him a rebate, so he got money back where they wouldn't give money back to other oil shippers, just because you know volume that makes sense, but they also had to get his business. He had so much business that they would do this they. The railroads had tax added tax on all of his competitors, so they paid an extra twenty to thirty cents a barrel to ship not just. Paid more than he did. Because of his rebates, they pay more in addition to that just for not being John D. Rockefeller and then on top of that to keep him from taking that rebate and going around to other railroads and getting a cheaper rebate and abandoning that railroad they actually gave him a kickback of the added tax, so his competitors were getting taxed by the roads, and he was actually getting some of that tax himself to. You just can't possibly compete with that, and it put a lot of smaller oil producers in shippers in refiners out of business. It's amazing. It is Let me see. He gave seventy five million away. To the University of Chicago well it kind of founded the University of Chicago with that money. Also. Spelled two, which was established to educate freed slaves, yeah, he, he a bankrolled spelman for its founding as well, and in one of our best and most favorite episodes. You might remember the Rockefeller. Sanitary Commission helped advocate hookworm. Totally Monette. I, that is one of our better episodes for sure, so those are just four of the sort of most famous in some might say notorious robber barons. Big Long List. You know you can throw Henry Ford in. There John Jacob Astor Charles. Schwab Andrew Mellon Jay Gould Yeah I looked at I, was thinking about J.. Paul Getty but he was later on he he wouldn't have qualified. So. Some of these guys had some terrible quotes to that also just made them despised through history. Carnegie, said that It's not the man who does the work who gets rich. It's the man who gets other men to do the work, which is not very tasteful thing to say when you're ultra, wealthy and breaking strikes with guns that Jay Gould. Guy Mentioned. He said that he could hire one half of the workers in America to shoot the other half to death if you wanted to. Which is another nice thing to say? And Apparently John D. Rockefeller once said competition is a sin. To these guys had some terrible pr and because of that a lot of people have said like well I wonder if some of the ultra wealthy industrialists are innovators are people who basically the billionaires who are leading the world today. Are Are they? Robber barons with better PR and better marketing, maybe and apparently. Supposedly, it's not necessarily the case in here's why. Remember I was saying that like robber barons were kind of being reformed by historians these days. especially conservative historians, well, they point to some like really indisputable things like these guys were ruthless and engaging, horrific anticompetitive kind of anti capitalist tactics to to get those the wealth, and they did it on the backs of workers that they took advantage of, and didn't pay very well and killed in their workplaces, basically but the reason that America is still powerful. Today is because of the work. These guys did of the the industries that they created public schooling came about and was kind of became widespread to prepare people for the jobs that these guys created and you really can't. You can't look away from the fact that some of them were the greatest philanthropists that the country has ever produced to The that flies in the face with the exception of Bill Gates. Flies in the face of the people who are around today that that not only are they not great philanthropists necessarily and looking at Steve Jobs. Who isn't around anymore? But definitely was not a good flame. Through Pistons Life He is now his family is, but he wasn't when he was alive. That's a big big mark against people who have controls significant portions of the wealth in America today, but also even more than that those guys today are. There presiding over a decline decline in wages decline in living conditions whereas these guys, these captains of industry and the robber barons for the nineteenth century there were presiding over a rise like an improvement in the the the way that America lived and the standard of living in the kind of the polar opposite, even though the inequality is roughly the same very interesting. I think so, too. I also wonder though to with this, this inequality will usher in a second progressive era which it seems like it has all the markings to do that and so. We need to do progressive era episode to sometime okay deal. All right well since you said deal chuck, I think it's time for a listener mail Yeah I think I needed to this and another one about the word, marijuana. Yes and that talk about that? Total, but I didn't read the mail right. Not that I remember all right. This is from Jack Glick. Guys Love The show been listening for five years or so and make sure not to miss any new episodes Muslim the one on Macho when he started to talk about marijuana decided to get in touch. I am the lead analyst on cannabis taxation for the Canadian federal government, and we long ago made a decision to refer to the plant by its proper name cannabis. Marijuana has a number of historically racist associations, and I know you guys are always using wary of using appropriate term for things had a good laugh at the question of whether womb was still locate a say in the ultrasound. thought you might like to know that How outdated and implicitly offensive marijuana as Like to encourage you to use we're cannabis when referring to it in the future the best keep it up that is from Jack Glick. That is a great name Jack Great job, great name grade email from a great guy I assume it sounds like a great guy. If you want to show off what a great person you are! You can email US yourself like Jack. Glick did me would create You can wrap it up. spank it on the bottom and send it off to stuff podcast. iheartradio DOT COM. Stuff you should know is production of iheartradio's. How stuff works for more podcasts. My heart radio persist I heart radio APP APPLE PODCASTS or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hi, I'm Devin leary and I'm Carolina Barlow and we're here to tell you to dump him. Break up with your boyfriend and we want you to listen to our podcast true romance every week where we talk about our love lives and the love lives of others. Please join our exes. Who We know will also be listening like Kyle Kyle. Are you there? Hey, babe, how's life? No, you look good though me Oh. My God saw please I. Haven't even gotten a haircut like three months. Okay, please help us pay for Carolina psychiatrist bills by listening on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. To Come, to any Shapiro, host of Family Secrets, these are strange times to say the least, but if podcasting has taught me, anything is that there's nothing more than a deep conversation with someone who understands the power of challenging circumstances to help you become the person you're always meant to be. I hope you'll join me for a very special two part bonus episode. 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Mary Wilmerding

Suicide Buddies

1:16:54 hr | 1 year ago

Mary Wilmerding

"What's up everybody Quincy Brinson? I'm K- Peterman and this holiday season we're bringing you Cisco and tree bird present a Christmas podcast. Spectacular tackler on is where we will be reviewing your favorite Christmas movies from my perspective a Jehovah's Witness who's never celebrated Christmas in her life and my perspective someone who was raised Catholic and has been celebrating Christmas three hundred sixty five days a year for the past thirty years. That's right we'll be talking about movies like die hard a Christmas Carol Christmas story Christmas speak Asian Christmas this Christmas tune in to check it out brought to you by starbucks audio will be found on Apple spotify stitcher era era. PODCAST CHECK US out. Happy Abby starving. Thanks for listening to suicide. Buddies Hampton Yawn. And I just want to let you guys know listeners that we take this pretty seriously. We joke around about depression and suicide dark thoughts but in actuality we really they want our audience to feel safe and secure and if you dealing with those sorts of dark swirling awful thoughts we would prefer if you right now put down the podcast and call one eight hundred two seven three eight two five. That's one eight hundred two seven three talk As the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. And they're great people. They have the resources sources that can help you deal with this situation. And get through it a little bit more medically professional than us and Dave and I are very happy that you're with us. Keep listening You know I like the taxes on my in my in. You know what do you how do you own my in Star Star you. is a pastime activity. I'm coming to your your. What are you on this story you? You cannot write that kind of music without a genocide in your collective history absolutely. That's why I've always wanted to have a genocide what the lyrics are like coded message about the Armenian genocide. And it's like damn totally. It's crazy do because now now when you like when I see the Armenian parade or like Genocide Remembrance Day the language I see posted is like remember the fallen ellen but more than that. It's like just acknowledge it as a fucking genocide that's their whole thing will United States wooden. Yes it's time for weird politics that I don't even understand are like you know. Well we're trying to sell your weapons Turkey or something crazy like that like something. They think we're trying to sell. Were finish her nuclear weapons. It's like we are definitely a horrible country like no. That's not a genocide and the reason we don't believe see that is that we're trying to kill other people now own little makeup. Why don't you wake up? Well that's a song about coffee bad. I've had my system of a down INSTA- The instagram has no toxicity. It's not like no one's like posting a photo of their puppy. Their dime building is named Pandit. Unlike people like Hitler was right like like just weird arguments like you see on youtube or anything where it's like. How did this come about? I know what you're saying. I think that the toxicity does definitely exist on Instagram But it is you can avoid it. You know what I mean like. It's it's Kinda doesn't but you're saying does but you can avoid it yet. Yeah no I knew. That's what you're saying but I've seen it. I've seen like because there are. There's a political side of instagram sir. My instagram discover has some of that Shit and Like literally the more famous person gets the weirder. It gets like Eric Andre if you look at the comments on his shit it's fucking crazy just people people just saying white power and it's just like insane and But but and I'm sorry I didn't mean to smash a theory you have. I just think like I do feel similarly similarly even though I know that's true because when I look at twitter I immediately feel bad I immediately feel like I'm pulled into this toxic of bullshit and I avoided on instagram somehow. Why I think twitter is just like on the service level? It's become yeah we lead toxic. We were just talking about how it's like even with your friends when they post something thing. It's now like out of your feed immediately like I won't see that post that my friend put necessarily right. Whatever like top political tweet? That's getting like retweeted a lot. Makes it always top of din prioritizing hot button issues like sensationalism. The other weird thing it does is. I'll look at my feed. It'll say like so and so who you follow follows this person and then it's a tweet from them with like three lakes aches and it's like Apple Pie greater than Peach Pie and I'm like why was I exposed to this. I don't understand why it decided I needed to meet meet this person in this way. Twitter just seems like hell bent on expanding your circle whereas instagram is like you chose this feed and that's what it is for you like seeing pictures of Pi. Yeah Video Games. I'll say this though. We are men male bodied people men who straight off and I will say that like people who Like women and other gendered people in my life seemed to have a bigger problem with instagram. Like the men I know oh are like more okay with it. But then it's like a lot of body competition perceived competition because of the of the women in their life. They follow or the like the women their instagram discover sense to them or just like shit you see. It's all about body image. I think it's difficult for women. Yeah Yeah I mean there's definitely is like a little little bit of focus more on like it better than it is so positive but it is a ton of people being like just killing it right live on my best life and then my kind of like doing like weird passive stuff. They're like they're looking credible in the photo and they're like I'm just ugly like shut the fuck up like how dare you well. And it's like a you know a thing that we talked about a lot. Maybe not on the show but in general how like Being Pretty is something that America tells women to do in a million fucking ways and so it's more in their brains than anyone that is kind of funny like literally it just watching the west wing earlier and like there's like three women and a scene and I was like and they all have like really long hair. That's like very well taken care of wearing makeup up. They'll have like jewelry on or whatever like earrings. Just I was like just started thinking I was like man the fucking daily maintenance like just looking not lake. If you don't have shit Susan's Mentally Unwell Ed Susan as that has had a mental collapse but then like the other character. You're like the dude you know Press Secretary's Oh I'm late for work shit like right throws on a tire guests there and he's like shaving just in the elevator and it was like damn. It's likes likes assistant. Who is perfect put together is like useful like the inside of whole and like I drink all the buck watch? Killing me woman was like adjusting. Your Bra they'd be like kill her her and I know that's not as again but that was like I was watching a fantasy version of like some sort of working world the pressures of everyday life that made me go man. That's fucking insane. Dislike totally reeks of booze and those other women are like. Are you eating good at your job. You know they have all the scrutiny on them. It's funny the reason I start thinking about this is that is sort of run around preaching the praises of Instagram because twitter makes me feel bad and instagram. I I enjoy engaging engaging in illegitimately do and then a friend of mine who is the front woman of a band she was like. I'm the opposite. I love twitter and I fucking hate instagram. And I was like why and she was like. It's really really. I look at a lot of people trying to be hot people who are very pretty. It's ended language around founded and the way they're acting in the way everyone's talking compares it to me and it makes me feel gross. It makes me feel gross that I'm participating in it and I was like right totally. That sucks though but I just don't have that in my brain. She's like you know where I really get. Peace of mind is when I'm calling people on twitter. That's when I called. This is what I'm banning people trying to get. People docs tin fired from their jobs. I mean it's funny because to me I'm like I can't imagine more toxic environment than what happens on twitter totally. I'm not saying like yeah like just on. Every level seems like people are constantly upset. FACEBOOK is now now more like people just like in the window must be like. Hey who's here like. Are you guys still here. I'm lonely I'm only like lake will also this twitter this opinion of twitter. I found two of my musician. Friends feel that way. Currency James Hatfield. Ah Yeah Kirk James F Field Lars. Hey eight twitter no but they and it was separate times. I talked to them but they both said like I was talking about about twitter. And they're like really interesting. Just follow like people. I agree with and then bands I like and then I realized and talking to them like we do have a unique perspective on twitter later where we feel like we have to follow all our peers and for some reason. Our peers are nightmares on twitter. Now not all of them but a lot of them. There's that but I do feel like it. Twitter has a little bit more of like the news every day. If you sign onto twitter it's like even even if you don't follow a ton of politics shit like you're going to get like this happened today and this tragedy in this awful thing and like literally. You could be on instagram for like weeks and not knowing who do not know anything happened other than that. pugs like Tommy tickled people be like. Did you hear about the messaging in kind of like DJ here. It seems like you're looking at the wrong. Sorry I really not into politics. I'm into politics. uh-huh Dora all right. We're having a serious debate. pogue is versus Pug Butts the butts helicopter helicopter landing on your neighbors folks. You're going to want to look up a a pug dogs if you're going to you're going to want to check out smash noses pug dog failure compilation. Actually you are GonNa want it. You're I'M GONNA. WHOA not a joke? You're going to want to actually look that up on Thanksgiving joke was all and I were Were very funny. COMEDIAN LA share. We're area we. We're watching the fail videos and I was like we're like going down that rabbit and trying to find the best fail videos and I was like wait a minute. Okay okay how about this search for explosion fails and Jogos. Yep that's it that's the one and then we I can. I can loosen fails also I can all. I can only recommend to go to youtube and search for explosion fails have a great night. You're a great fucking it's just like here. Ashim of footage over baby elephant walk. Well here's the problem is that there are a bunch of videos that are just just like fail blog. Weird Explosion Asian but then also when you search for it it's like fireworks factory kills four hundred and just don't watch those videos because those are very sad well I really with You know everyone not everyone but let's say like The the whole so kind of trying to get people fired for things they say or the twitter kind of culture that I'm talking about the like fighting and toxic especially like save Nazis which is a valid thing to call out But I see it kind of get weird with the arguments and I'm always like man the real l.. Nazis are on Youtube like like xbox live like totally like Ben. Shapiro's the problem but like there are like you know like twelve year old white kids saying the n word just nonstop like in the comments in you know in chat rooms. Yeah and it's just like they're all getting mobilized into being alright and now all that shit man it's like you're not real that's a real problem. Yeah no one seems to have any sort of like oversight on no one is getting I mean I guess actually there is something recently with people getting there. Are they getting inning their youtube channels removed. Like if you're like super like Are you thinking of returning to describe of a Secta me. Yes the only nearest to remove to. I can't stream anymore. You got rid of the knocked stream the the dumbest fucking throwing his space. So good man no I just remembered. There's there's spend kind of a little bit of a blow back of like trying to do the right thing and like cancel Nazis with platforms basically online. Yeah it seems like the lowest level thing but like you know like sure none of these billionaires who run these social media companies want to say anything. They're all like well. You Know Freedom Freedom of speech and we're GONNA do the right thing but it's you know it's GonNa be hard. Nobody just wants to be like Nazis have no place on our fucking platform deny the Holocaust essentially calling for a Holocaust. These are bad fucking people like middle ground like everyone's got us Holocaust. No this is patty like it is inherently a threat to think this way absolutely. Yeah exactly and by the way. This is suicide buddy. Hello I'm Dave Ross. This is vaguely no. It's not political guys. Is Comedy Mental Health podcast. That has no political leanings whatsoever positive or negative. We think nothing we think. And that's the problem quite honestly take it all started on lithium and now I know I don't know what there was no comment other than wow it. All kind of sucks and I talk like yeah just like negative fuck in in public behavior happening kind of left and right. Yeah I'm with you a hundred percent. That's why I fucked off at twitter man and it was for a one hundred percent for this reason I was like I you know. I didn't get rid of the account but I needed a way to like force myself to feel okay not looking at it. That's like the entire reason. I set up that to tweet the same thing every day. And you know it's it's a bit that I like and stuff but it's it's mostly to create a separation from it because there is a weird thing it's like it's so hard to describe. It just is toxic and it but it always starts we. I think we're all having trouble getting the language for it because it starts with you reading something you agree with and then another thing you agree with and people you agree with and then you end up down this rabbit hole and you feel bad and you. Maybe you still agree agree with what people are saying. Maybe you don't but you disagree with the tone and the rage and the meanness and it's just like speaking in great extremes streams about very complex things as if we're going to solve problems with were on twitter dot it perfectly. I guess racism off. Aw totally nailed it. Shit I gotTA RE tweeted otherwise it won't be seen during prime our yeah and like and like putting thoughts into people's brains means that are poisonous like if you don't do this thing that I think is good then you're bad. Yeah I mean I you know what's funny is like as a dog Obama realizing it's not a couple of bad apples. It's US young people you give people the ability to talk to each other. This is the worst time in history for us all to be talking to each other. We all lack social skills and we're all getting worse at it like people don't talk to their neighbors or no any. You know what I mean like all people used to be like hi. What's going on my name's bill? I live over there. My wife like they would just constantly give one hundred percent of there. You're right and I feel like people are shying people are really like receding and then we have like online versions of ourselves and it's toxic because we if given the opportunity are shameful greedy. Whatever we all have rival purity's tribal as fuck will that to we'd like to also gang up and it's weird like I've been? This is just a crackpot theory but it seems like you're talking about getting to know your neighbor mhm one of the reasons that you did that is that you only had access to the people that were directly around you right and so you had to make concessions about about how you feel it at least in such a way that you had to like go about your day to day. Now if you're online you can find people that exactly validate your feelings failings to find my neighbor dot com shows me my neighbor but I mean like there no matter how you feel someone feels exactly that same way and you have access to that person and so now if we have people that agree with US completely. Then it's this weird thing where like well. I don't have to fuck doc in concede at all. I don't have to agree with this person. In the least I know I'm right because I'm backed up by these. Ten people. Sure one of them lives in Afghanistan and one of them lives in the North Earth North Pole and two of them live in Mexico where people even Doni than like participate. Oddly twitter like Muslim will lastly checkout cutler feeds like. Maybe they've commented on one person's other post you know like it's not them making a statement but what they do is they start clicking and liking on things that they like and basically the algorithm starts feeding them all those Echo Chamber of news. which is? Here's the thing I'm not saying. Echo chamber has bad values but I think the problem is when you start getting in some sort of like you know only one opinion thing happening why even have like what you already have. That opinion it doesn't really do other than participating India. Yeah other than giving you anxiety. You know what I mean like. I'm against mass shootings. I'm so for gun control against nationals. I know it's Kinda half one foot in a sex traffic elmich. It'd be good. I'm against all traffic. Swiss Swiss Fox got. It took me a second to get that traffic traveling. I'll traffic's ethics so wrong. I'm sorry even brought up sex trafficking. It's like the worst thing about sex trafficking. We were joking around about had sex trafficking casper last episode. I almost threw up friendly friendly through what what an interesting TV show dave the friendly person. No totally we were. You were talking about the echo chamber like you were about to say I think being in an echo chamber itself is toxic. Yes it's like it agreed those are your opinions and those opinions are valid but you kind of being constantly like not even like mobilized you're just being radicalized for trying to make you upset right. You're not necessarily you know quitting your job and then taking up this caused. It's really just causing you a lot of loose anger. Yeah it's just like sanger dressed. Dressed goes nowhere. Well this is the perfect time to say. Follow us on twitter. Yeah guys false at petco on Yahoo we are asked Pod we are. It's funny like as much as I said. I know. It feels like it's harder for women or maybe just some people who aren't me. I still love instagram. I'm on instagram. I like really enjoy away using. Oh guys at least do favor. If you don't have instagram sign up followed just Dave and I I have so much fun posting video posting dump shed dumbest Shit. Yeah it feels like when we all started originally on social media. Joe Is trying to make your friends laugh just megan dumb shit totally also. It's a great way for people to see like show promotions and yeah guys follow us on Instagram. And you know what's great also bands in town. Because I don't know it helps us get an idea of how many people were in like a region totally a lot of people are. It's weird like I posted about that and then they're like well. I live like you know a hundred miles outside of I like it doesn't do me any good. I'm like no but that lets me know like you would drive. Probably in Miami like right or to this tiny town totally. Just let us now because it'll give us an idea of how many people in what part of the countries I also just got my town profile and it's weird it is like cool to know. Yeah it it is funny I think Hampton and I over the course of this year both and it was and I I really like taking your lead have been like I mean you. You've been listen. Isn't this show this whole time. We've been going through it career wise and we've been pretty open about that about having money troubles in wondering where we're at in the industry and stuff and then the result of that for both of us has been well just like every other time. We're just GONNA fucking do this on our own so and it's working it really is. We've we've been selling out shows on the road. You guys have been coming out. It's been so fucking Rad. We pre recorded this episode. So we don't know what our shows in the South in Chicago. You're like but I guarantee you. Those shows were amazing. And you all came out and your love you. I don't care if there's twenty people you guys are getting the full Ham Blam guys yeah. No I'm just saying like normally this would be the episode where it's like. Hey Chicago was last Friday. You were perfect but we prerecorded it so I don't know Oh yes but I. I'm sure you were great. Yeah guys honestly you are the ones who are making all of this possible. You're the guys who are making this podcast grow and you're the ones who show up on the road road. Making these shows incredible. Yeah I think I speak for both of us. When it's like the people who shop from this podcast to be audiences and stand up shows are the best are really the in to having fun? It's cool to me you guys. Oh also at my Chicago show. I sold tapes ED tapes of my album made and I was only going to sell them in person because I don't know it was literally thing like I don't want to over saturate our fans with things to buy bye but then I just realized like if you should be able to buy it if you want. So it's online now. You can go to my website Dave to the DOT com or two especial records and by a tape if you want to Albert others. That'll be there. We should do splice them together. Should tape them together other tape the tapes. I don't follow why not I do. Also yeah I mean and Hampton. I have a bunch of touring coming up in the new year too. I already my January January tenth. Santa Cruz January eleventh. I'm in Oakland. And then at the end of January I am in Tulsa Oklahoma City Dallas Houston and then I go to Toronto so at the very end of the month had really hoped to seal you guys links at Dave to the Ross Dot Com so many days. I'm excited fucking. I'M A so I haven't been in Toronto in so long. I like. I'm excited. That's the problem with your band. I am Banda for the Brown face. Yeah I haven't I mean obviously I've I'm excited all places but I haven't been in Toronto in like two years foot impact. Hell yeah guys bring gravy gravy. Is it a gravy places gravy. Big there in Canada. Oh Putin right everywhere. Everybody looks dude. They don't have water if you're going to take a shower. You should take one in the United States before you go there because it's all gravy. It's true it is all greedy out there. Yeah it is true true shutouts. I said it. We'll have to blow. We're talking about wealthy people who we are talking about an arrest to the vanderbilt fortune. Who took her own life Kinda after a life of of being shit on by her family and her name is Mary Wilmer Ding no way? No folks have an idea what the next half of this is GonNa be about Mary. Wilmer Ding Mary Wilmer Valderrama. Of course Mary will involve deciding Roma Wilmer. Dang is not at all funny and are not GonNa make the name she changed it to used to be Smith Vanderbilt vans lump bump and something going on with Vanderbilt. We'll get into eating you guys. Check out this advertisement for sex or pants. Whatever sex mortgage zere dumped teeth falling out because you live in garbage. And you're like living an Oscar. The grouch kind of existence inside of trash can well guess what. We've made life a lot easier for you by partnering up with Quip. Now let me. Do some of the ad read. This is sexy. Okay here we gal quip makers of quip electric toothbrush wants you to know the one single discovery that matters most for your dental care it is simply this that if you I have good habits you are good. This is very true. And guys the PODCAST. We talk a lot about good habits. It's so funny that hygiene is oddly. this hyper specific thing that Oh my God starts changing your life around the minute you realize. 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I don't I don't think so. You know pretty good. No it as suicide. I don't think so it is the Honda today. It is the Honda days. So you better be nice nice to me in every other time of year you should be mean when I say things like that. Let me ask you guys. Do you buy the things after you hear that ad that plays during the holidays No add we play the POD. Does it work because we make Dick Money off of it. We make nothing make something something so I even bought one toothbrush. Tell us then numbers to not add. Yes David I. It's a town to need your help. Please all right hand and we're talking about. Are we out. Michelle van Mary. Wilmer Dang homered Elmer Dang Rama. Damn that sounds like a name. You're making up at a circus. What's your name? Mary Wilmer being. Do you want to not look around. It'd objects around here and answer me. Man Mary Elephant Jappie. This is my father Jimmy. uh-huh Ma'am please go. Please go yes an heiress to the the vanderbilt fortune. Do you know anything about. The Vanderbilt Stadium started the school. Yeah I don't know I gotta got it. No I don't know anything about Vanderbilt Fuck. I'm sure they did. I mean it's it's like massive. They're basically the first like billionaire family. Okay and they're very nowhere to be found now basically like the fortune as gone many different ways. Wow One is that Anderson. Cooper is technically an air heir to a fortune but he's apparently publicly said that he's not GonNa take any money at all because he doesn't he doesn't like it yeah. I think he's like I'm Anderson Cooper. I got a lot of money. I have enough money. I wonder who is going to be aired to my fourteen. The SEV Ross will reading not of cat toys being dude. We should do that for the holidays. This sure do a live table. Read of my will okay right away Vanderbilt University. You're totally right. I had no idea located in Nashville. Tennessee oh you didn't. Oh Yeah Yeah you know about the school oh not at all. That's the only association avenue. The word Vanderbilt in Nashville and I knew that because I lived there when I was a kid hit Jake Weisman went to college and may loose and Julia Benfield to take care to explain yourself for knowing all all that day. Yeah you're encyclopedic knowledge of your friend. Nice dog man because I want to steal their kid. That's creepy and I hope you don't have anything about me. Loose they loosen Julia. Benfield are two COMEDIANS. Who are so funny? Who have stopped doing it? Well not entirely but like aren't in La Anymore Went to Nashville. And where else were they O.. D. C. for a while to raise kids and have more domestic life But I think about them a few times a year as two of my favorite comedians. Like literally nate to this day as instagram account. That's just just called. I forget his daughter's name is Delia. Or something and it's called D.. Leo's hair and they just the the description of it is. This again is just pictures. Pictures of my daughter's hair down for creepy. Anything I've ever said I know my daughter's unders there. You get into weird like semantic arguments the comments. Your daughter's hair is a little bit like Hitler Dude. Cute cute why can't I just post about my daughter's it's my daughter though. Oh it's my daughter. It's basically my hair. Wow Okay so with me Vanderbilt Vanderbilt University I guess founded by Cornelius Vanderbilt. He's one of the big players of the entire fortune. He left everything he had like thirteen children and he left it all to basically one child You know like the gigantically rich family any founded Cornelius Vanderbilt University. The and this is funny he gets. He provided the first one million dollars to start it off and his hope was that his gift and the Greater Work of the university would heal the sectional wounds inflicted by the civil war. Oh well that's nice nice of him. You know what I'M GONNA do cure racism. Yeah Yeah I have a schoolwork nope we'll be able to go more than likely I mean maybe solve it. Yeah what a weird family. They're very rich. And it's all based in railroad and shipping and then they invest in money right. It's like we bought money right. They just have it and then we kept bigger gotta hate. It's only so much importune. Yeah like where you know. Five generations deep. It's like Oh what do you do with the family like well. I'm philanthropist so you just give the family family money away right. Are you come up with weird scams. Basically that's all that would be weird kind of tax shelter. We take care of a pregnant mothers New York City. Isn't it so funny. I was like well. We should sprinted anyway so we cannot pay taxes. Even your fucking charities Verity is evil guy that amount of well so Mary Winter Dick Lindsey Lowe Wilmer Wilmer Valderrama was. whose daughter was she? Cornelius his daughter. Let's see God God no. Her father was Colonel Vanderbilt Allen Who was son of the daughter of Cornelius alias? Vanderbilt this is like how rich family is like four generations. Deep just had money and it's like yeah like daughter of this right. It's Vanderbilt Allen. Yeah yeah taking on you know because if like your daughter's name Vanderbilt and then she married a guy with an assing now and there you go so it's just so funny that it's like this fortune get so deep that like someone who's such a spin off of almost the family is still like what happened with this vanderbilt girl right you know right. Yeah like a fourth cousin. Three times removed is still just accidental. A billionaire just from being alive. Yeah and her life is like not I mean early on there's wealth but then like towards the end. That's not what's going on at all. Oh you know what I mean like. We know what she did she spend it all in one place. Astore high like your largest news police. No reason no wait. I have a question then. Why do you have this door? Hung himself bad. No one no one will ring me up. Up Brooks zere a great. You have to run ninety then if your name is in in fact when I go myself I write brooks wheel was here There you go mutual friend. The police suspect for a good week. A good week of Brooks's life is ruined. Just pick a person to torment and death. Jeff God Lord Yo. I love rich families and all their money and how they're all like incestuous and they hate each other like it's so funny. How her relationship with her family was extremely toxic? Yeah they basically her father. Colonel Vanderbeck Alan Guy was a huge hole tour and on his third marriage. He's got a new wife and she's like I hate her. You know like right the step mom just doesn't like her and my stepmom or whatever yeah that's kind of yeah you got it. I'm not your mom. Yeah you get what they like you know. Try to put her a boarding school. And then like the stepmom just like worked to get her married off and she hated the guy didn't want to get married to him and was lacked Sorry this is your husband named Jack Man that was his name Wilmer Ding Ding Ding Ding. Ding we'll myrddin Ding Ding Ding. It's out yeah. The words keeps going. It sounds like when they picked someone was just looking at them kinda funny and so they kept talking thank you. What's your name will Mur Ding Ding Wilmer? Dang Oh oh yeah I got one here on Ellis Island I got none of I just stare at you until your entire lineages fucked the surprise. Surprise this guy that she's married off to is a complete piece of shit also damn and it starts abuse and like now. Now it's funny because a lot of these papers of the time are pretty hard to read in a sense of like how they contextualized women Amen. Yeah well she had a stereo so the doctors treated differ ghosts instead of like dude. This is this part of the story is all around like nineteen ninety-seven then and she died in nineteen twenty two turn of the century. Yeah and like yeah exactly like the way that the Detroit or is so much like a child who has no possibility of a will ever own. So there's a lot of that layer to the story but basically quickly she might have been a little off also like there might have been some you know bipolar behavior adding out that no one even knew what to read. There wasn't the language for it or even if they weren't looking at all. Yeah it sounds like she's too independent like they don't even have a way to like frame mental health okay. She's sometimes sad sometimes. Happy put her away Yeah I know it's weird you look. It's funny to read. There's there's like weird language in history books like a lot of times when someone is referred to as silly or Kooky they were gay guy and everyone was like we don't understand him and and then yeah hysterical woman really just means abused person or just like that amount of like trust. Trust in the men's voice exactly Casey over her saying anything right because a large part of her story why it has some sort of interest now these years later later is like she was eventually put on the stand for like two tester mental ability. How competent she was like Are you smarter than a fifth grader. Yeah a little bit. They were really trying to be like. You're too dumb to own your fortune. So it's like yeah like what happened was her dad's starts getting ill Back when she's married off to this guy and the marriage is it dissolved at that point. It's kind of fresh. And she's of course very upset about this. You know like she was forced into it by a lot of weird ways like Jack would also be like. If you don't don't marry me your reputation will be ruined and like you know he's like I'm going to do everything in my power to like. Ruin Your Life so insane like her family trying to be. You like get rid of Mary and so her dad gets ill and she wants to go spend time with him. He's in a place called Capri. I'm not really sure where. Yeah it probably is. Yeah play like overseas okay. She has to go and she's jdr drinking a ton of whiskey. She's kind of. It's not just off the trip but like she's kind of been in the throes of this where she's drinking tunnel Whiskey escape. She's drinking a ton of absence and she's smoking and Kinda hang out with whoever but like the absent and the whiskey or the big things where like her behavior is getting this just like you know. They know that she's probably drinking whiskey and absent. It's funny that addiction really wasn't Lake Jake right something you'd even be shameful about like well. I'm drinking tunnel Whiskey. It's not helping but maybe I should drink more right well. Everyone was always drunk health elixir. Yeah Yeah Yeah well I mean you know that's maybe an extreme but basically like she's acting erratic doc on this on this trip basically and she's like partying at time which is so funny because her dad is basically dying. PSORIASIS ISIS of the liver and this is a trip from America to Italy. Yeah why don't you just go party with like you know her. Dad's dying your SPA. Probably go say your last goodbyes and fucked up at the same time. Getting a ton fucked up. Yeah like it's kind of funny because it was like a bunch of these. Vanderbilt's have like like psoriasis. which is basically? You're drinking yourself. Yeah Yeah Right. They're all alcoholic and you know she has themselves And so like her friends or like you're becoming an impolite woman and stuff like that like you're you're you're off the rails else in. Yeah you're right back I do is please. The funny thing is is like a lot of this is just independent behavior behavior. Oh she's like. Hey fuck off. You're all drinking or like you know I'm fine. People like what a bold woman men to say this to other people might be crazy. Yeah Yeah and I think the problem is this family is like you know so money up that they're like doc and he chance to cut someone out which was probably what her step mom was doing day ones like I don't want like I want you know honey Colonel Vendor Vanderbilt Allen to die and then I'll get money or like or I'll just be kept this whole time I don't want to deal with your fucking gigantic amount of family right so they're trying to like a sewer out of her own money and claim that she's mentally unstable. The starts happening to Mary after she was basically put inside of an insane asylum. After that trip you know she's acting radical is however committed and then they have like kind of grounds to be like she's committed. She's like she's crazy. She can't can't possibly be in control of her estate but throughout the whole process of this little trial about her mental wellbeing. She's like super eloquent. She's kind of a little weird you know but like you know not that weird. She's like she's quiet and she like back doesn't have any friends with her. So everyone's this is again. What I'm saying like they've just kind of seemed to qualifying her right it through these historical texts? How how did this trial come abou this is all do would be with like the Psychiatric Board of whatever insane asylum and probably our stepmom sent her? Yeah Yeah and she's like kind of on the ball she's like it's crazy that I want to get this right but I'll probably get it wrong. She goes. It's crazy that the people who are like trying to you know put me qualify. Me As crazy are also the same people who sold my mother's Tomb. MM her original original mom her. Oh Gee yeah like this family is trying to fuck with me. You being a person you know what I mean like. They're trying to cut me out right. It's very like aware of it. And the whole thing is like traumatizing tossing. Doesn't go well for her will and she starts getting a put in the insane asylum for a while she loses basically que- like part of her fortune or being tied to it. A part of it was that to. Here's what's kind of funny honey. I mean again like she was pretty wild for maybe the time to go take that trip for absent than whiskey. Fueled is not like the normal path for a woman at the time put she sold a bunch of stocks in this very overpay for a big company to go pay for the station so people were like. Why would she sell like stocks in this company that she posted the art of and like? But it's kind of a fair in the sense of like she was like. I hate this irresponsible. Yeah it is kind of like an an odd thing to do maybe roosting. But that's me that's that's me putting that on right. Yeah No. It's interesting to think of. It sounds like her dad gave her a ton of Shit. You know by totally siding with this step mom and basically excluding excluding her from her life. That I'm like it's weird that you you know. I think she's just wanted to have this really awesome party weekend right. Yeah Yeah I'll be honest with you. It doesn't sound that weird to me that she sold some stocks to have money to buy a bunch of Shit. I mean dude if I were nineteen and realized I had something it does actually. I would totally. If that's the thing is like it's erratic. Oh no way. She was like twenty nineteen totally. Like all my dad's like dying all right. Let's a bunch of APPs absent then. Let's go partying Europe. Yeah but the fact is that she like sold stock that probably like Oh. She doesn't know what she's going to do like if she gets all the stocks oxygen ruin the company and then she ended up in an insane asylum for a bit. Yeah she kind of as Saudis. That's the first time I think. And then she goes back again later. Oh so she's definitely insane in the membrane now at this point to them twice Cypress Hill doctors into member Dr Green Thumb absolutely. She went to Dr Green Thumb and found. Does she's insane in the membrane after like she was losing her fortunes she took some some of the money and like was trying to become like a Vaudeville. Sketch and like actress. Like well during this still Vaudeville time so like not. She couldn't get into like talkie films. But I mean it's it's a weird decision again in 'cause Vaudeville was really look down at the time. Oh was it okay. Yeah it's just like Oh you might as well be destitute. Yeah you're basically a fucking stand ended up. Yeah I mean it's Agley imagine was slightly worse audience. Aw Damn this conduct nominee condo doesn't have a microwave being in Laurel and hardy. Now we've come a a long way baby but I mean it's so funny when you hear about old stories of like even like famous people. They're just constantly totally. No one believed served in the comedian. The actor in every period pieces like getting dirt kicked on them and Shit like even play just like a play deadwood and the tombstone and in what else the fuck in gangs of New York every placing is just a room filled with people. Just it's like tossing shoes at the state. Yeah exactly what. Her vaudeville sketch at the time would have been like it. Probably like comedy was so bad at the time it probably was coming on stage and being like I used to be vanderbilt like you. Just say who you are and then like here's a bad story or like yeah. I'll take a question. Well you marry. The show was excellent. Definitely got up therefore the amount of time chew their thank you so much. Yeah yeah totally. So this is after like she was in and out of an asylum one asylum. And then this is kind of like the drinking would kind of come back. Her life would just keep being shady after heard this huge trial that was basically trying to like take away everything her family ever. I wish I had more. Do you have more. And it's okay. If not obviously but do you have more detail on how that happened because it's interesting. It's just like it seems like this is a person who was a teenager married a psychopath. And then that dude and and her step mom just started trying to take the money from her is basically what it is or is it just more like. She's living her life as a rich person and now it's like try. It's like rich people politics like they're trying to fuck over. This one member of the family is led eh a daughter ninety like high up in probably during that she was born into and then like trying to marry her off. And then you have step mom so it kind of smacks of like yeah like almost like Cinderella type. Yeah they don't like her they don't want they just don't like her. Yeah I mean I imagine. This is hugely draining on her mental health because like out. That husband was abusive. Then she like is in Vaudeville. Which I'm sure isn't that glamorous and then sure here I'm reading from this slate article written by Matthew Desam by the way if you WANNA check check out this thing? It goes a little bit more further in depth. But let's see this is how she gets into the next insane asylum She you know she was cast as an extra on Broadway in Charlotte Blair's Charlotte Blair Parker under southern skies. I guess that was some Broadway production but was fired. Reportedly after falling off the wagon. So she We'll because she's insane. Got No brain. Honestly wait you're telling me she's the heiress to the van wilder. She's going to inherit all that pussy so she off the wagon like like whatever successes she was getting she was then showing up drunk for so in one thousand nine hundred to she washed up in San Francisco which is funny way to phrase that here in the article. Where was she washed rush up reported that she was? This is funny to me. This is real of like nine hundred ninety. Two women don't have right because in nineteen you know to. She washed up in San Francisco where it was reported that she was attending downscale parties. UNESCORTED and writing. I shall do as I please again to her horrified Rafael Friends. Wow yeah that really sounds like a twenty two year old girl. Having a life I know so many people that went to parties until until people. They do what they want. Downscale Hardee's I mean it really dorm that's classism re rigidly defined. It's like she's he's rich. Why would she be at a place totally? Just kill yourself person wearing a Crown Zappala hence if you look at a party and you realize that not everyone else's wearing ground maybe it's time to upgrade part totally either that or you're insane got no brain so she was on both times involuntarily all in terribly confined so basically which seems crazy again that you can be voluntary. Ice Check your fantasize China size about that. Now I'm like Oh man so just take a vacation man. I can't handle it. Please take me away. I wish you voluntarily check yourself in anywhere I I mean just walk into a Holiday Inn and be like I'm. I'm having really bad depression so I'm just really gonNA need a room. Don't let me out tarp sharp. A hotel arps. I think this is pretty great she was put in another insane asylum and she escaped show literally using the pillows under the blanket. Trick no way to like. Make her bed like there was a body in it. Yeah she's pillows. WHOA you'll zack? Morris Chris Damn Dude. I've done that trick so many times. It hasn't worked once Mary Wilmer. Dings it gets so fucked up. She does so much absent. It seems like Oh yeah the Wilmer Wilmer dings day off. would be pairs. Euler does APPs it. He realizes that his life is actually pretty nice and that he probably shouldn in rebel. So hard right about that way. Ferris Bueller loves his DAD. This time it is pretty funny. Like all those Afrique who makes others like Ferris Bueller and like you know pretty in pink and breakfast club. Oh Yeah John us that said like everyone you one is like an affluent millionaire person in Chicago. Yeah every movie Steve Martin's in all of planes trains and automobiles these like. How am I going to get back to my mansion home alone? Like MacAulay culkin alone in a mansion home alone is houses. Houses fucking nicest shared. He's got like all the latest computer equipment. Totally man. What is the? What is the message here so true? They are all rich kids home alone so crazy. 'cause the family so rich so inept just like completely incapable group of people relate to keep losing their child and they have so much money I I know it's like I know like part of the problem. There is like they're like. Oh no the plane tickets. We just bought right away to go back to America. Don't leave for like twenty four hours. I'm like Oh so you just bought tickets in twenty twenty four hours from Europe to America like Drain Your Bank insane and also home-loan I think we've talked about this on maybe a Patriot episode but man. It is fucking insane that she does get the mom and home alone gets in touch with the police. Literally is like my child's at home. He's home alone. They do a check by in the copies. Just like I rang the Doorbell Cam. I am by your kids yet. Literally I remember in the movie the COP says into the radio he's like I checked all the doors. There's no one's home and he goes teller counter kids again a math class. Yeah Yeah your kids are all there you fucking idiot. You don't know how many times you've given birth. This is the exact exact opposite of the family. Life belts all of John Hughes families. They just care too much. Yeah these they don't care at all just got too much money well so things weren't into Oh for for all. Mary claimed at that point after the escaping the insane asylum to have only twenty cents to her name which Sean last time I checked less than a million well not by their standards. She basically cut off. All ties is with her family and disappeared well for a while. This is where I'm like. If she had something that was diagnosed right. This is where like man. Yeah if someone was diagnosed I would maybe explain why they're just like I'm gone from everyone. No no one knows where I am you know. And she resurfaces in one thousand nine hundred seven and she had a second husband an English main in English main name. I'm an English main names. Jimmy coates which is a pretty fucking cool. Jimmy coates always warn. It was a piece of shit. She'd never actually divorced her first husband. It's weird other name is never Jimmy. Pieces Shit Timmy. Codes is pretty good. Go Jimmy go room totally yeah. She divorced her first husband and apparently he like in. The press. Like was bad mouthing. Jimmy coates was just like yeah. He's like you know a valet. That she married some well some waiters Shakira. Wow Wow in the press right. It's pretty weird. The product being rich made you famous. Always I guess that SORTA does now. tolley really is is like what I'm saying is like with the vanderbilt thing is like she's so associated with this and that every time she's institutionalized every time she has divorce anytime she has is like public incident with her husband in the papers. Yeah yeah she's continually put in the media and There's kind have an open interpretation of this but it is kind of funny that after she Killed herself basically. That marriage wasn't going very well and then in one thousand nine hundred eighty two. She shot herself a hotel room because her second husband had died and it wasn't even a great marriage but but he was the one supporting her. Yeah I assume so. That's hard to deal with. But it's I like just every one thing after another. You know it was like she doesn't like the guy and now he's dead right now. I've got to worry about feeding myself offend well. Yeah extra problems so yeah she does take her life and the crazy thing is the paper that kept reporting on her all the time. The enquirer are we constantly be like Vanderbilt Arish in trouble again right. After she died they were like. This is the headline go woman suit suit women suicide in note asserts relationship to Vanderbilt family. They're just like crazy woman thinks she's a vanderbilt. It's like you've been saying. She is in her role live how much he read the papers but like every time something happened they'd be a crazy woman grazie. Yeah you're like what is this woman either. No Vanderbilt. Damn because you're just such pieces of shed the wireless fearless hope brutal well especially to women. I mean yeah throughout time Yup for sure you know what this one's for the ladies tammy realized history hasn't really been cursed. This is where you're right you're right it's so yeah that's the thing I keep it's insane. I'm like well clearly. The man should make the decision of how best to spend her money or how. How is macaroni? And like there's so many things like that like you read old news stories about crimes and Shit. It's like we got a report from a woman that her husband was hitting her so we asked the husband and he said he wasn't and that's that that man came chester a Arthur. Our greatest president ever. Yeah he was good. I remember the good. The Great Ones Only just Ray Arthur Gerald four sure. Yeah my Mount Rushmore. There's a lot of interesting stuff in this slate article. I really do recommend people check it out because the kind of add a little bit more on the drama of say like how she kind of appeared at the trial and also like just how her family I was repeatedly treating I feel like she also has a lot of insight like she would bring up all the time. She's like okay. So this is my stepmother is is trying to cut me out of the will like she would tell people during the trial like this is what's happening will and they still are or like she. Is You know crazy. She's building a conspiracy Internet man. He's being very automated. She's like my stepmother hates me. Yes yeah she married to a brute right like she she just would. She recounted her whole life story. So this is what's kind of interesting to to that story is like you know the whole thing is getting sensationalizes. Like woman is crazy but one of the things that kind of refuted that sort of thing at the time is like she had just perfect perfect recollection of everything and could speak completely eloquently right and maybe she'd be sad or like a little nervous but like she's like no I I went there. My mother was very mean to me. Like yeah and like a lot of that is flies in the face of mental illness. Hot so much now because is now we know how crazy people can be. You know I mean yeah you can be like completely psychotic but I don't think that was what was happening. I think she he was just right. You can be dealing with a very serious mental illness problem and and also completely have your mental faculties at the same time. Oh yeah about the people that are like yeah sympathetic to who are dealing with. I just mean like in the same way like we really didn't know what serial killers were until the last hundred years right so we have the definitions of what that is. It's so weird right like for the longest time like say we would just anybody who was like. Yeah I did it. We'd be like cool. Got Him right mortgage right. So it's like we just didn't know how to address people people maybe having a complete psychotic break but what I'm trying to say really is with. This story is that she's clear she's focused. And that's why in so much of the reporting doesn't really make sense. I mean she's crazy but she talks normal. Anyway throw our way. Here's an oddity to the story. The like The the sad is type of story. Is someone who just gets chewed up and spit out by life some people. I have an odd attraction to this story. Yeah right I mean. I think it's true it's like it's sad to me and it's also sad to me when people really just didn't have any infrastructure structure for mental health. Yeah she's like getting into lake sanitariums at a time when it's like right anybody with any sort of mental disorder is just thrown thrown in this room. The world just doesn't want to deal with them. Yeah there's no like group therapy mazing that they're not just put in jail. It's a type of jail right and I think that a lot like I think there's a ton of times where it's like. Oh this is like the family didn't want to deal with this person for whatever average. Yeah sometimes it is like the families just incapable of dealing with that person like it is a clear message of like a lot of times people getting set in who are just like disagreed. Too much with their powerful family. Yeah like too much independent spirit. Right he's got hysteria jacker off and throwing her in prison right now you know. We tried to owner prison then. We dragging her off inch man. Fuck that's so fucking dark come win it now. That's a great story man. Thanks for bringing it in all thanks guys. That was a suggestion from somebody who loves a Pie. And thanks guys for any suggestions that he's buddy-buddies g mail. This was just one of those crazy stories in a really recommend people check out this slate. Article Written by Matthew Desam. Yeah we find thing is like This this is one of those ones where it's like not a ton of information you can find this person other than going through this story and others shared versions of the story right. It's like I don't know what it's like. There's no record of her in a lot of ways you know because the Internet so oh vast it feels like there should be an detailed record every fucking person ever and it just is. I mean you know it's funny I every now and then I'll like I wonder what that local band I was into in highschool is doing now and every time I do that. There's less Seles of a record of them online and there are bands that I loved in high school that literally. There's none of their music is fucking anywhere. There's no record of them existing and it. It was really important to me and the people in the band was important to them. Yeah I would imagine okay guys. This is hitting a very nerve big for me. I've often tried the shot this out on social media. I am constantly trying to track down this these music files. This was like twenty years ago. Artists was call Bristol for crowder. He did like six covers if anybody has copies of these. MP Threes. Get in. Touch with me Dan. I have scour Internet. I am good at finding yes. Cure Shit it's plagued me for like ten years you know Ma- mention listen why he went on to form the ban mansions which is really good. Oh yeah yeah Bam before that coke good driver and it's just can't find the shitty made when he was in college under the Navy Lakes to for crowder guys do you have. Have you emailed the band. Yes go under present literally. I wrote him. I was like Hey I will give you one hundred dollars to for this This thing in the world to me just Kinda was like what would make me as is an artist like actually send someone a file right. I'll pay you. Yeah because I could understand him being like. Oh these are covers. Maybe there's some sort of clearance issue so I was like. What would this be worth for the rest of my life back? I was like a hundred dollars for the album. Can I get it. No response to the other account numbers. I get it damn. Somebody's got it will. Yeah so this woman was like almost lost lost a time. It seems like except for this article is a story man like she's gone like for she's set sane asylum because of all gone to act with her family and good. She's probably dad. Thank God good. We don't have to deal with her And you're not wrong man. I'm really so glad that we are at least trying to give a fuck talk about our mental health. I'm so glad we live in present day. Totally what her problem was. She didn't get on the facebook group. That's her problem your dad. She didn't do Morse code together on the facebook. Yeah thanks you guys so much for listening. Yeah we have a Patriot bonus episode up this week in other bonus content. We put up this month. That's Patriot dot com slash suicide buddies I have some tour dates. Coming up in January in northern California Oklahoma Texas in Toronto and tickets to that of David of the Ross Dot Com. Guys you can check us out just to help us honestly like you guys helped make us in this podcast. Be Any sort of success. You make us and if you want us to perform you know or it is see several performed. Follow us on bands in town honestly and this is dumb but follow us on Youtube. Follow if you have of a youtube channel or subscription just follow us because I have big plans and like a big boobs you all right I will have but that could be fine like I really. We Wanna see that expand and everything so I agree man. These holidays ways. I like I totally back up and saying saying follow us and all this stuff I I like Fuck with my spotify. Page a lot foamy on spotify claim your Shit you did hell. Em in formulating violating playlist. I'm kind of waiting all right. I'm trying to make some other moves right all right trying to get this off. We'll shit hey y'all l.. Listen so we are for the holidays Because Christmas is next week and we love Christmas. We're we're on that side of the war. I'm we are taking the week. Off of regular episodes are bonus. Episodes does will still be going up on the Patriots on We WanNa make sure we get you. All of the bonus episodes you deserve deserve for the month of December unpatriotic. I'm so suicide buddies but Yes so we're taking the week off for Christmas week after that we're back we have new year's and that is going to be our nine eleven Chris for Twenty episode so get ready to talk about hijackers and Jack Komo quickly Yeah you guys are the best. Glad you're alive Badger. Thank you so much for listening to suicide side buddies. You are the absolute best. We love. You were glad you're alive and remember we joke around about suicide suicidal thoughts on this show. Not because we take suicide lightly leap because that's how we deal with it so you're experiencing suicidal thoughts. Please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. At one eight hundred two seven three talk. That's one eight hundred a two seven three eight two five five. They will hear you. They know what you're going through there is help out there. Please stay with us and have a great night Starving podcast network.

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Dead Celebrity Ep 6  Women and their Finances: Gloria Vanderbilt  With Guest Michelle Smith, CDFA

Dead Celebrity

26:39 min | 1 year ago

Dead Celebrity Ep 6 Women and their Finances: Gloria Vanderbilt With Guest Michelle Smith, CDFA

"Welcome to the dead celebrities. PODCAST in this podcast. We breakdown high profile celebrity estate planning cases for advisors and their clients most celebrity estate catastrophes. These are based on the same issues that everyday people face just with the volume turned up. Our goal is to identify and extract the Individual Estate Planning issues that lie at the heart of each story. We then discuss what advisers should expect and how to avoid common pitfalls hosted by Wealth Management Dot com senior editor. David Lennick over one. Welcome to the latest episode of the Celebrity Estate Planning podcast presented by Wealth Management Dot Com by name David Lynch senior editor with wealth management untrusting estates. Those of you who are new to the PODCAST. Each episode focuses on a single celebrity estate planning snafu familial fight or even just a good example of the power proper planning and from that high profile and often ridiculous example myself in a guest attempt to boil down one example the some lessons that advisers can use with their more. Typical clients The idea being that celebrity states of the details are often more bombastic stick generally face the same obstacles and issues as those of regular people just with the volume turned up in the interesting and valuable case studies. A today's guest is Michelle Smith and Michelle is the CEO and founder of source financial advisers. In addition she's also one of the most sought after divorce financial specialists socialist the country holder of the certified divorce financial analyst credential and a divorce mediator a regular contributor to national and financial media. Michelle is co author of the book divorce and your finances. Thank you for joining inches. A lot to say about women and money. Thank you for joining US show. Thanks for having me. Your main topic today is is women taking their into their financial lives as you can tell from my very slick insertion there because of death divorce or it's simply being time on the celebrity. Who's going to take us? There is the wealthy glamorous and multifaceted Gloria Vanderbilt on usually for this podcast. We're more focused Chris Today on her life than her death but have no fear it will return to our morbid routes soon enough. Gloria Vanderbilt was an American artist actress author and financial designer very recently passed away at the age of ninety five as a result of stomach. Cancer she was the great great granddaughter granddaughter of the Railroad tycoon. Cornelius Vanderbilt tycoons. Such a fun the word. But here's a really actually get to use it in a sentence on vanderbilt in the public eye basically all of her life. She was initially dubbed the poor little rich girl by tabloids in the nineteen thirties thanks to a very public custody battle waves by her grandmother. An aunt against her birth mother should a bevy of high profile relationships including Alexa Frank Sinatra and Marlon Brando the original Queen of New York society and it's rumor that her friend Truman capote based breakfast at Tiffany's holly golightly on her. On Vanderbilt's thirties and forties were marked by four marriages and the tragic death of children by suicide but despite being a member of one of America's most notoriously families and heiress to her father's fortune or for whatever remained after Jambo most of it. She also built her own empire. She maintained various gigs as a model actress and artists and wrote numerous articles novels poems and memoirs throughout her life a big break however came in the form of designer denim which was having a major injure moment in the nineteen eighties after folding address. Business and going to work for Indian designer Mohammad. Johnny Glory proposed to launch a line of genes for the brant embroidered with her signature. Swan logo a learning that. The corporation had access to a excess denim fabric sitting in a factory in Hong Kong leveraging her name a and social status she modeled the collection herself. The long took off and became the highest selling denim brand reportedly generating some one hundred million dollars annually and earned glorious on seventeen million dollars in profits between nine hundred seventy eight nineteen eighty four other apparel perfume while also followed a nine West just holdings acquired the rights to her name in two thousand two and the Gloria Vanderbilt jeans line still exists today though luckily newest profitable as the rangers offered offered at discount chains like JC penny and Costco so Michelle. There's an awful lot to unpack there. But what are some lessons we can glean from Gloria Vontobel's story ORI advisers can use their more typical female clients take their financial lives by the horns. Couple things I I think. The first thing that everybody has to understand is money can be a foreign language women if they haven't had the control and it's not made particularly engaging or exciting and talking about your state plan. You also have to talk about what what's happening when you're dead. And so we've got a really make a an effort a conscious effort to make money and very serious things such as your estate plan for after you're gone engaging and clear ray engaging and clear is very important to women it's it's understanding do things in their terms aligned with their values and you could sit down with the most competent technically competent legal advice estate planning expert expert in the world and if they start the conversation with tax savings there's already is gloss over. It's not about tax savings. That's a by I product of the process so you mentioned that these are particularly important things especially to women the women I have particular ways that things need to be expressed differently than men to financial advisors financial advisors are by large more heavily used to dealing with men certain techniques that they've been using their entire careers word. Those go wrong. Well I mean I think that you just have to understand. All people are different. Everybody has a different communication style. It's reading body language. It's understanding it's listening. If people in general are using words constantly on a conversation with you like I feel. Here's my sense. They're telling you that they're in tueting things. Maybe they're not you know auditory visual. They're intuitive so there are going to respond to you expressing how think how this plan is going to make them feel and what it's GonNa do to make them feel comfortable so it's listening to all all people and how they are responding and watching for body language where you losing them. Why did you lose them? Stop the conversation right there and say I sense I I just lost you. What happened right and so Women may take a little bit longer to make decisions that might be frustrating but it just is what it is and we all have to understand that there is a massive demographic shift happening here with women and money in this country. We're in the middle of it. You know I I feel like I've been talking about this for twenty years and Bam here we are all of a sudden. The X chromosome is super popular. Fashion very invoke. So lucky I was born in so many ways. I think different things that could that could drive this. This need to sort of take the bull by the horns so to speak in. Just Gloria Vanderbilt store. She had we had four divorces several high profile. Deaths divorce is one of your big specialty. We're all marriages end. What did you see the people who come into you? Mistakes they make and the most common things that you could easily rectify. If you just knew what to look for Nope I think having communication about your money during your marriage is critical. It is one thing to willingly with Eyes Wide Open. Say I I don't enjoy this and I don't WanNa deal with the finances. It's different to do it with Eyes Wide Open though you've got no you don't WanNA learn money in a crisis you don't WanNA learn money if you're going to be a custody battle you're going to have to do everything initiation by fire. That is no way to learn by drinking water out of a firehose so everybody should at least know. Make a conscious decision. At least if you're willing to say I'm not going to do the money stuff. I'm going to do everything else. I'm going to run the household. I'm GONNA run other things in this marriage do it at by at least understanding where your money is what am I signing at eleven o'clock walk at night on this tax return right tax returns look scary. They're not they're just a little roadmap to assets and income understand how the marriage is getting paid paid regardless of WHO's earning the income understand where that income is going. Both how you're spending it how you're saving it and I still see far too much women land in my office and they only have a small checking account in their name which may have been their allowance. They're week-to-week two week daily working capital and while the law may not care how something is titled. You can't call your financial advisor if if your name is not on an account and say in how he just took one hundred thousand dollars out last week send me my hundred accounts in your name is mentioned. Communication is already come up a couple of times. I imagine it's come up a couple more left. Imagine if someone's coming into your office in the throngs of a divorce that maybe communication communication is kind of an issue relationship communications an issue in every relationship. What when we're talking over each other or not talking being? I mean. That's what makes relationships fail business relationships to not having good healthy communication letting communication become toxic. That's it kills relationships and marriages and if you think your communications going to get better than it was in the marriage during divorce it's GonNa get amplified and so I always say how to kind of avoid this train wreck it's sort of like okay. What would I tell my daughter about her money? Now that I've been in the train wreck you know. Don't be afraid to have the money conversation. It's actually a sign of a really healthy relationship to be able to sit down and say I'd like to understand it right at an for the person who is controlling the money. Maybe that'll feel a little threatening. Maybe that will feel like what do you mean you. Don't trust me all of a sudden WanNa know where everything is. Maybe there is something to hide. You have to understand it. It doesn't mean you WanNa take the power away from somebody who might be really good at it but not in in a vacuum a lot of these things it seems are similar to what makes a pro shoal agreement valuable right and just an obviously it's valuable it turns for how things are going to go but also more so what I'm talking about is that it forces you right up front to have that conversation interest. We're doing this right now. We're doing this right now. And you know prenup isn't a dirty word go and you get to choose to scrap your pre-nup by the way what people don't realize realizes that you know that's a piece of paper that you hope you'll never have to pull out but if you do pull it out you can. No judge is going to make you keep in agreement with the pre-nup terms if the two of you decide that twenty years later. It's unconscionable based on but you know women don't realize it also protects you if you WANNA go start a business business if you're coming in with kids from another marriage and he has kids. This can be a really protective document on the children that you may not have kids with this new husband. You may not want your money going to his kids. You may not want your money going to his third wife and so- prenups are springboard for a way to talk about money period. I think especially with a lot of relationships with your people are coming in with unequal amounts of assets. a lot of times the advisors will just default to being the advisors of the wealthier. Person Wow I don't WANNA lose an account exactly pre-nup the woman in question probably doesn't realize because that pre nup went directly into this lawyer into his lawyers for us. You never saw it again. So there is some value a lot of value and having realizing that your advisers are your advisers both of you. Yeah and not just as his lawyer his financial adviser. It's our lawyer and there has to be some worked on both on both parties. Parts to sort of form a relationship. Yeah and and you know sometimes the women can feel that they sort of have to sign this prenup or they're going to appear greedy if there's inequity in the amount of assets you're coming into a marriage with an it's not about being greedy it's about understanding what you're signing dining and how life changes every year let alone ten or twenty years down the road and you know I had a situation last year where this couple ended up with. Two severely special needs. Children was signed fifteen years ago was is unconscionable now because because she couldn't work she could she had to stay home so why was it fair that she was locked in. You have to talk about what if so so I say if you can approach money conversations with your significant other and say let's just play. What if what if you die? What if I die? What if we have special needs children? What if something happens to one of our perfectly healthy children in a car accident? What happens if we don't talk about the? WHAT IFS CBS? It's a really great launch because it can be scary to bring up money conversation. If you're like already have controlling spouse or a controlling boyfriend it's heart it's like you don't WanNa be Butte as that woman who's either not trusting or greedy or calling somebody in capable of doing it you there's ways to bring this up take ease yourself into the conversation. How important is the financial adviser in facilitating this? How much role should they be playing pushing for this or should they be greasing the wheels or different you know it depends on who you want is the client? That's actually interesting way to put it. It's it's it's honest and for the clients that have an adviser you better understand if you're the client or if you're not and so it's you know I have you know I'm I'm in this business going on three decades you know. I'm coming up on my thirtieth year in this business. And I there are plenty of advisers. Who say you know they just? They're going to focus on the mail client. Who earns the money because that's always going to be the client and that's the referral source and there's no shame in that but be honest about it? Don't pretend to be there and what women hate. What female clients hate is all of a sudden towards the end of the divorce the guy biased calling her going? We should really sit down and help you. Make sure you're going to be okay when this is over that is middle finger both. Let's also questionable if that's even the the best long-term business approach right him and there's the old adage that women inherit twice ask once the husband's from their parents absolute so ill ultimately and that's I think how a lot of both getting more opportunities than through sort of that fact that women live longer down shift that's pretty soon women of a trough majority well. It's absolutely tapping it's happening. So that's a question if that advisor should maybe take another look at WHO's my client and who's making the money now is maybe not ultimately going to be who ends up all the money and I also think advisors have to realize when you're join join account ends up in divorce and you've only been talking to one party that's problem and that could be a legal problem and there are lawyers and forensic accountants looking at every single statement back seven years as long as they can grab paper copies to see what kind of decisions were people have signed things. Call me crazy. But people have signed other people's names on tax returns on on letters of authorizations journaling money opening accounts that maybe one spouse doesn't know about you have to really this is your career and this is your reputation. TATION fifty percent of marriages are GONNA fail. Which means at least one quarter of your joint accounts are up for legal observation and as you mentioned all released marriages eventually marriage divorce a little bit as far but I mean you know? Sudden death is equally equally as big as we were talking before we went on the air. All about my own mother's little more Dave Lennox Laura for you guys. You know who my father died. Suddenly at age fifty I five and he was a CPA so he was really just by the nature of it in charge of the finances and I was twenty three in law school and my mom all of a sudden in just doesn't know anything about this woman college educated but she just wasn't clued into a lot of the stuff she's looking at me to Alpe. I can't help you now. I'm more helpless in this than you really that. Really put the onus on her to sort of take charge and her credits you really did and I mean we're ten years. I don the line now and she is a different person. Who has a seizure sitting there yelling at the financial advisors? It's like who is this. It is I I say this to women all the time time you may not feel it in the moment but when you get on the other side of the chaos and the confusion and lack of transparency to the confidence the clarity of getting an owning it. It's life transformational. I say I'm in the life. Transformation business for me you know. It's Y trademark from from wife to CFO that transformation is palpable. It's visible. It's usually nine months at the nine month. Mark you really see someone stepping thing into their power but it is on its remarkable. It's a remarkable transformation lucas four. We've kind of talked about. Obviously the prevention is the best secure the Doomsday prepar scenario. That's not always how it works out. So if you're an adviser to a client or if your client experiences all of a sudden this sudden separation via through death or via through other circumstances or divorce are there any ways to use that nine in months to get a head start there. What are the first things to prioritize? When you find yourself lost all of a sudden thrown into this new world that you didn't understand would you grab onto? I think we're talking about. What are the advisers how they help and how they help? A woman advisors offer. God's joke jolt first piece of if this woman did not control the money do not start by explaining her asset allocation. That's not the investments. Are the the last piece of this start by understanding okay. What is the cash needed to fund your life for? How long is there ever going to be income? Earning ability will there be a desire. Will it be significant. Will it have an impact. Let me first start. Let's first start by wrapping our heads around. What is life going to cost you in this transition year and maybe in the transition three to five years? What's life going to cost? Start by helping helping her ground in something that she does understand. which is what is my lifestyle right starting in that way versus well we've got forty two percent and US equities and of that we're going to allocate to the no that's last that investment education don't lead with it lead with listen you bet you could do thirty thousand feet above? Look here's what this money's earned blache last three five and ten years or last one three and five. We're GONNA go there later. Please know that it's safe in all kinds of markets. And you're good. We'll that's later. Let's attend to. What's on your mind right now? Now and ask. What's on her mind? Write it down and make sure that every single time you talk to this person for the foreseeable future you are. That's a goal. That's a financial goal. What's on her mind? Is the number one financial goal that you have to be tracking against that brings up a ver important point. That really needs to be hammered. Home is gas listen to her. Yeah by the way. You don't have all the answers and you really don't have such good questions that a little bit. You're nominally financial professional here but also a little bit and therapist mode here. We need to figure out we'll scoring on ninety percent therapists mode right now. You're ninety your ten percent technical competency and you're ninety percent empathy and listening other. This is something that it'd be estate. Planning attorneys are little further along and dealing with I waited grand your average financial advisor but even then more recent development with the tax changes and stuff because they used to be hard number number Scott and now they're realizing the value proposition in the new paradigm is Alkali. Make things smooth a lifetime guidance and make the family happy. I think initial advisors to come to the situation with a little bit more of that and a little bit less of the playbook. Yeah I say you know. The Insurance Industry and the insurance profession insurance professionals who are financial advisers that claim to be wealth managers. There are a lot of them but they af stay actually get it right in that. They lead with cash flow that that's how they were trained and bought up and that's how they learnt you. You lead with cash vote right backing into what face value does your life insurance needs to be. It's a multiple of the income that would be lost. They got that part of the model right. Unfortunately fortunately there was too much of a ship to insurance sales and you know not the best kind of reputation to deal with but they got that piece right and I always say you know so. Let's strike the word budget. It feels like Diet. What is what is life going to cost this year? Let's list out all those things. What do you envision? Do you envision wanting to keep this house now. Do you want to keep the second house right now. What are we tracking for and Dan give her permission to have a decision free zone for a period of time if you see on paper that her life costs there won't be a negative long term impact to the financial situation if you do nothing for a year give her permission to not make big decisions for a year because they will be bad ones until she's ready right joan ever use the word you're going to need to downsize your house? Let's replace that with what. What is right sizing look like for you? The words matter the words really matter women don't WanNa feel scared they don't WanNa feel scared is really what this is about to affect. Maybe that's why the death guys have a little bit of a leg up because the question is how am I gonNA live. Or that's the way everybody. Nobody wants to know that. Am I going to be then. Then you start worrying about lifestyle regular home to the first question is always held like live and I and I always say hey these women in that first initial couple months. Like don't do anything different right now. I already stressed tested. Even if you're temporarily overspending these next few month's aren't GonNa make a dent in the forty year plan as long as you know that it won't get them out of fear. I also also mentioned about the no decision zone. The is up as an estate planning attorney by trade who creates a lot of content for financial advisors. I'm all about multidisciplinary collaboration or assuming that either in a death or particularly in a divorce that the advisers are GonNA end up splitting once either his whoever had the most money kind of established. They're likely is advisors. Well and and women are likely not going to stay with advisors. you called them during the divorce and haven't talked to them in ten years. At what point is it too soon to start trying to build the team that this person likely eventually going to need. Is that so many women are going to immediately WANNA hire a new chance chance because now I wanNA control that. Yes for quality control for the client as well but for preservation of the long-term longterm relationship also absolutely. Well I am all of the questions are Michelle. This has been really fantastic Do you have a website or anything. The Plug my wife to. CFO Program as out to nationally launch. But for now I'm at. WWW DOT source fa like like financial adviser Dot Com. This is great. Thank Michelle Smith for being such an excellent Gusta this week and we'll see you guys in a couple of weeks in the next episode of the dead celebrity audits. Thank you for listening to the dead celebrity podcast. Click the subscribe button below to become notified. When new episodes become available the information covered and posted represents the views and opinions of the guests and do not necessarily representative views or opinions of INFORMA- wealth management dot com the content has been made available for informational and educational purposes? Only the content is not intended to be a substitute for professional investing advice always device of your financial advisor or other qualified financial financial services provider with any questions. You may have regarding your investment planning uh.

advisor Gloria Vanderbilt Michelle US Michelle Smith financial analyst Cancer Wealth Management Dot Com Cornelius Vanderbilt CFO Wealth Management Dot David Lynch David Lennick Chris Today senior editor Hong Kong Gloria Vontobel Johnny Glory
11 | The Sheep and the Ghosts

Unobscured

51:40 min | 1 year ago

11 | The Sheep and the Ghosts

"Welcomed and obscured production of iheartradio. Aaron Monkey Kate Fox was was in London in love and the first in line. The Brilliant Chemists William Crookes was investigating spiritualism and where better to begin than with a girl role who started at all after Leah's celebrity appearance at the London Art Gallery. Her wealthy friends put their heads together and determined that cates needed to be pulled away. From Maggie's influence they agreed there could be no better change of scene for her then British high-society their money rolled out the red carpet. It for Kate. Travelling companions and pocket money were hers to command. G arrived dressed in fine new clothing. Partying from Maggie might have been painful but the optimism commisons of her friends lifted kate spirits and the sensation that greeted her only raise them. Higher Society receptions brought with them some very welcome attention foremost among cates. New Admirers was the British lawyer. Henry yung-chen strikingly handsome and accomplished spiritualist writer. He had a magnetism that Kate couldn't deny but even she held seances appeared in London spiritualist newspapers and saw more of Henry. Well cates also found a glass back in her hand. That was the brandy there was always the brandy but there was no time to fight. It hate began a series of tests with the scientist. Assist William Crookes. He had once hired Henry for legal advice on some of his business ventures and the two men were friends. Now William Crookes was on a hunt to identify the spectral energies that flowed. Through a seance soon enough. Kate was navigating not only Henry Jenkins overtures but also Williams prime. The scientists tried to stop her from giving any seances without him. He didn't mind that she was an alcoholic. He may have even agreed with her opinion that when the alcohol shattered her conscious mind it made her more open to the spirit's the results as he would record them were astounding for power and certainty. I have met with no one who at all approached Miss Kate Fox he wrote in a rush of enthusiasm. It seems only necessary for her to place her hand on any any substance for loud thuds to be heard. I have heard them in a living tree on a sheet of glass on stretched iron wire on a stretched membrane a tambourine marine on the roof of a cab and on the floor of theater. I have heard them on a glass harmonica on. I have felt him on my shoulder and under my own hands. Things came to a head though when crooks tried to push henry away from Kate because it forced her to choose. Did she want to continue submitting into the chemist badgering and drink away her frustrations or did she want to choose a life with Henry who offered her his arms and his opulent townhouse. As refuge one spring afternoon Keeton Henry were walking together through a friend's manicured gardens drop to a knee and took her hand he. We asked her to marry him then. Response Kate burst into tears. She confessed her addiction and the cycles of recovery and relapse that had kept her going back to the Swedish Swedish Movement Cure Hospital for as long as she had lived in New York but Henry was insistent. Kate followed and Leah's footsteps. The New York Herald reported that Kate's wedding joyful spirits raised the banquet table from the floor in salutes. Kate Sat with William Crookes for a few more tests but not long after her marriage. Kate had a good reason to finally cut them all off together. She was pregnant. So William Crookes had to turn his investigations to others. Fortunately for him. There were plenty of other mediums with wealthy benefactors willing to fund his experiments in eighteen. Seventy three Cora arrived lived in England and she began to appear in the chemist records assisting with his experiments assisting that is because William crookes had already focused his attentions. John's on another medium Daniel Hume he had been the favourite of the wealthy and powerful for years and his displays had gone from eye-catching the downright it's establishing Daniel had been examined by a slew of professionals he had lost court cases and fortunes with them. He'd been ridiculed by the poet. Robert Robert Browning and perform seances in France for Napoleon. The third he had even married into the Russian nobility before losing his wife to to Burke Yellow Sus in eighteen. Seventy three. The earl of done Raven had just published a celebration of Daniel's medium ship now crooks was publishing astonishing reports about measuring in Daniels Psychic Force claims and counterclaims that rose up in response Catt London buzzing those debates went on even after Daniel Hume left England he returned to Russia where he married a second heiress and like so many others. He retired from medium ship storms contests arguments MENSA and investigations. Would go on stirring the public interest but Daniel had risen into the upper echelons of European nobility now. He considered himself above above spiritualism as well his last years in Russia France and Italy were spent in comfort and that final retirement into a life of ease was just one more reason. The Daniel Hume was remarkable. This is obscured. I'm Aaron McKie In New York City was a boiling cauldron. Pretoria woodhall had beaten the Wall Street casino when she made her run on gold at the end of eighteen in sixty nine but she didn't take her fortune and withdraw from the public debate. The public had tested spiritualist mediums for decades. Now she wanted to turn the tables so when the New York Herald excited by the novelty of the first woman stockbroker offered Victoria a weekly column. She accepted and her first article she wrote while others of my sex devoted themselves to crusade against the laws that shackle women in this country. I asserted my individual independence attendance believing as I do. The prejudices which still exist against women in public life will soon disappear. I now announce myself as candidate where the presidency. That's right Victoria. Woodhall was running for president. She decided to live the part to Victoria. Left the house where the spirit of Demosthenes has sent her. She took her family and moved into a mansion. In New York's Murray Hill just off Fifth Avenue. It was a massive and luxurious currying home with columns high windows but if it all made Victoria feel more legitimate. It didn't sway. The opinion of New Yorkers most still thought her announcement it's meant was only a joke as the pages of the New York. Newspapers Testified Soon Victoria realized she needed to do more than just make money and make pronouncements she needed to make friends and build power and she needed a newspaper of her own to do that. So in May Victoria and her sister. Tennie launched a new magazine called it would hall and Cleveland's weekly raising a banner like that brought allies. One in particular who's wild writing. Gene was just Victoria style. He considered himself a planetary grand master of all the freemasons his words not mine. You wanted to bring down the powers-that-be powers-that-be and install himself as Pantai Benevolent. Ruler of the world most people though just called him Stephen Pearl Andrews. Here's author Mary. Sorry Gabriel you was one of these fringe figures in the United States who dabbled in everything. Philosophy journalism academics a bit of politics politics and so he came to her as a journalist. And said you know I can help you edit this paper and in fact. She was so busy launching her political career and juggling so many things that she handed it off to him with blood supervising and Stephen Andrews under his direction the Woodhall and Cleveland's weekly became an incredible muckraking cranking Oregon. He was afraid of no one. No one else was publishing articles attacking marriage as the shoals that wrecked American women. No one else in polite society was publishing articles about the New York police working as hired guns for its brothels no one else was perceptively exposing the frauds in hijinks Hi Jinks of wall. Street's capitalists after all what other papers were helmed by Cornelius Vanderbilt's personal medium. Victoria had the inside scoop on the predatory predatory schemes of the insurance company boardrooms and the railroad tycoons. So Stephen and Victoria came out swinging by the fall of eighteen. Seventy the paper was flying out to twenty thousand readers. Still Victoria was candidate without a party. She was an outsider to spiritualist circles and a newcomer comer to the cause of women's rights but with Stephen Pearl Andrews Guiding the magazine Victoria could set her mind on Washington and she finally found an ally there as well soon. Enough Massachusetts Congressman Beast. Butler strolled into Victoria's luxurious mansion to make her acquaintance he had seized New Orleans with the Union army. He had impeached a president with his radical Congress. Now he'd heard new call one that demanded votes for women and he came to lend his aid Vittoria and Butler plotted ways to put her in front of a congressional committee to read an argument for women's suffrage. The newly passed fourteenth amendment recognize the rights of all people born or naturalized in the United States and because women were people they had the right to vote as well. It was that simple. When Butler introduced Bruce Victoria to the House Judiciary Committee in January of Eighteen? Seventy one she was joined by Susan B Anthony and she was the first woman to address a Congressional Committee in American history and that success brought others. The first invitations came for women's rights groups. Victoria started speaking to gatherings around New York. Doc soon some newspapers were calling. Women's rights activists would halls women much to the frustration of longtime leaders like Elizabeth Katie Stanton. But but others wanted Victoria's novel and inspiring presence. She spoke at the Cooper Institute to a Labor meeting that Spring and as she made circuits through various reform groups CBS who saw her new prominence as a sign of hope Victoria started to imagine a new political party that could unite them into something. Real in fact Act Victoria was elected president that fall when she arrived at a meeting of the American Association of spiritualists found group. That was hardly as large as their name promised. It seems that battles between Trans Speakers and materialization mediums throughout the eighteen sixties had whittled down their numbers but Victoria spoke anyway eventually. Her lecture brought her to her favorite subject. The toxic institution of marriage and the double standard that crushed women for things their husbands did without shame. a heated debate followed at the meeting. Both over changing the meaning of marriage and about Victoria herself. Why she the spiritualist whispered a free? We love her still despite the controversy. And despite Victoria's visit among them being her first they decided she was now the right person to lead them when their votes came Amen. Victoria was president of the American Association of spiritualists. The choice sent ripples of concern through spirit circles around the country Victoria travelled to speak across Pennsylvania Ohio and Michigan in the fall of eighteen. Seventy one she was met with and trailed by hushed voices gained followers along. The way to the rumors also grew word had gone round. That Victoria was living in her New York mansion with both of her husband's and James Blood and canning woodhull a fight between James and her mother had reached the courts and the press had published the revelations of their unusual home life for decades concerns over free love. ISM had kept some women's rights activists from embracing spiritualism and it's radical impulses. Fever came to ahead that November when Victoria took the stage at New York's Steinway Hall and gave a talk. She advertised as principles of social freedom. The hall was packed. Thousands more milled outside Victoria took the stage and began to lay out in stark terms. That women needed the same freedoms as men the freedom to end a bad marriage the freedom to start over without being condemned by society. In fact she said marriages without love were adultery and marriage laws should be repealed repealed. This message shocked the crowd into an angry upheaval. But that's because it wasn't direct enough. They wanted something more someone in the crowd. Ouch shouted the question they all wanted answered. Are you a free lover. Here's Mary Gabriel. Once again Victoria flared in reply. Why yes I'm a free lover? I haven't inalienable constitutional and Natural Right to love whom I may to love long or short a period as I can to to change that love every day if I please and with that right neither you nor any law you can frame have any right to interfere so with that statement Victoria. It became really. I would say without doubt the most notorious woman on the speaking circuit in the United States. The Torius words dropped like a hammer hammer on her political aspirations. The New York Herald called her speech. The most astonishing doctrine to ever be heard in America Victoria had admitted to being the thing. Her accusers shouted about the loudest the president of the spiritualist who wanted to be the president of the nation was a free lover for the women of her world. This was a radical liberty by the question now hung in the air could Victoria continue building power or would this public public confession of something so hated shatter her life into pieces The land of the free sojourner truth still saw that vision of a future held out to black Americans the political radicalism the spiritualists in New York was shaking. It's lecture halls and printing presses that was sojourner truth style just as she had done decades before by now though sojourner couldn't keep the same pace of lecturing and as she called. It's agitating but she had lived long enough to see emancipation. Still following the voices of the spirits and the Voice of God. She knew the work wasn't finished quite yet. Like so many spiritualists. She supported the work now to get women the vote and something else else that was just as close to her heart. She wanted to see a place in the United States where black-americans could live in peace so journal had found places for herself in the the American landscape. She had purchased land in Rochester New York as well as in Battle Creek Michigan they were homes. Were her daughters now. Lived ever since the end of the civil war. When she worked with Amy Post to shelter free people around Rochester she had kept up a search in the eighteen seventies even as she approached the threshold of her own indepth? She pressed on in her work. Here's historian Margaret Washington. I think that is the culminating point of her life although she continues to be active she's very active in the anti capital punishment movement and the temperance movement but I think that in terms of her service service to African Americans it is the petition movement to create a black homeland in the West. 'cause black homeland is the mantra right at first starts with trying to get them settled in the West and there's no question that she saw the need on a visit to Washington in eighteen seventy. She saw how many many freed people were still without homes jobs in the capital elsewhere across the country. Government was carving open land for the railroad magnates and offering ownership to white homesteaders. The government has given land to the railroads in the West. She told one audience. So why couldn't it do so much for the people whose Labor had built built the country's wealth with that in mind. She traveled throughout New England selling photographs of herself and asking her fellow reformers to add their names to her request. They Congress should provide homes for black Americans on federal land after being invited to a meeting of the American women. Suffrage Association in Boston Austin Sojourner gave a fiery speech defending women's rights votes and included a call for land and education for the freed people when one of the leaders of the meeting meeting ask so Jenner. To be brief. She shot back that she would speak when the spirit moved her. Not when people move her. which in her defense had always been sojourner way away? The spirit moves sojourner into the halls of Congress to see her petition brought up for discussion but despite the number of people who had signed it he was let down on Benjamin Beast Butler her trusted radical never even brought the motion to the floor even without a bill to support them though. Black southerners were leaving the south to settle in the western states. In the years that followed sojourner said she traveled to greet them in the land of John Brown as she called it and it was was into Pika. Kansas that sojourner found a movement of people arriving to start over they had begun their move in Louisiana the years after the mechanics institute suit massacre in eighteen sixty six had not been easy in New Orleans but while some black southerners marched north and west to settle at a distance from the trials of the city. Others like the cirque harmonic stayed put and the spirit moved them as well to continue remaking their city itself into the land of the free when J B velour died in eighteen sixty nine the cirque harmoney shrink by one member but of course he didn't leave them on re who brought the circus together before the war war and reunited at after it was over recorded messages from his dead friend. He wrote the events more came back in part to forgive me for any tensions in their partnership partnership and to urge the circle to continue their work so no losing one of their leaders. Didn't slow the CIRQUE harmoney down. In fact it was in the first I years of the eighteen seventies that re- and the other spiritualists in the circle were at their most active. One of their members who owned a cigar shop began hosting their seances and the fate. Eight of the city again came to the fore in the messages they received from spirit visitors while the spirits of loved ones like unreas- father and now JBL more continued to visit their say on stables. It was the warnings against the greed of materialism rose to the top of their concerns over and over. The spirits emphasized that the politics of greed created unfair divisions between the rich and the poor as the spirit of JV. Val More reminded the circle. He had been a humble blacksmith but circle of harmony his love and charity pave the way for him to be a true apostle he was a reminder that Anri would take to heart as his position. In in the city continued to rise in eighteen seventy he was appointed to be the tax assessor for the city's third district and then director of a parish. School board while sojourner work worked to secure education for the free people of the West on re did the same for the black community in New Orleans. Here's historian Emily Clark. He you serves a term in the Louisiana legislature. He served on a school board now the school board of his father but for public schools. They've got a pretty respectable respectable home in the Tremaine neighborhood. kind of living a New Orleans middle class what we might call middle class for the reconstruction auction period life. As on resettled into the city's public life. The spirits continued to urge him and the other members of the cirque to remember the poor. The message came from them from the spirit of Senator Daniel Webster who inspired unreas- ambitions but it also came from anonymous spirits. It's who drew his sympathy. Once the spirit of a woman arrived at a seance and simply said that she was one who suffered the explanation that suffering it could have been printed by Victoria woodhull. This nameless woman was born to a wealthy family. She told the circle but she married a Predator. He scooped up her inheritance tints and then abandoned her in the years the followed she had supported herself through sex work but found no one to help her until she crossed into Neth now. She said she was comforted by Mary. Magdalene New Orleans. At the seance table of men her radical message came across clearly a society that would judge and punish women for surviving surviving abuse was unjust a society in harmony however with look like something new not a hierarchy but a circle where the poor were lifted up and men and women joined hands to seek out the wisdom of the past and map out the future and it was a future on re and the others. There's were still willing to fight for Theodore. Tilton knew what the future looked like. He had fallen in love. I with the writings of Karl Marx who inspired his belief in democracy that could overthrow the rich and powerful and second with fierce woman who was determined to do the same. A woman by the name of Victoria woodhull through eighteen in seventy one while Victoria was campaigning for president and publishing the dirt on her enemies among the rich and powerful. She also spending a lot of time with Tilton Tilton in had flown into the public eye as a journalist and as a protege of Henry Ward Beecher. New York City's celebrity pastor and that year his journalistic. I turned toward a conflict that that would grow more important over the coming decade. Here's Mary Gabriel. Once again the kind of conversations that were murmured before the civil war in the eighteen forty s and the kind of revolution had occurred in eighteen forty eight and discussions and the political arguments that began to heat. Up erupted erupted in civil war on the United States but afterwards they didn't die down in fact groups coalesced and two of the most powerful groups to call us were labor unions and this was something that was happening in Europe and in fact once again we can talk about Karl Marx because he had formed in eighteen sixty forest under called the international working men's association and the International Working Men's association had already made its mark on history marks was in London but some of the group's French members had joined a revolution in France. They had seized Paris and ruled for two months in the spring of eighteen seventy one. They called their governments. The commune anxiety about the same thing happening in the United States bubbled from the New York newspapers but the spiritualists worried in fact. The banner of light proclaimed to its readers that the principles of the commune were the same. As the principles of spiritualists seedbeds is like hope Dell to a reformer like Hilton. Their argument was extremely convincing with Tilton. Now on their team Victoria antennae decided to make their newspaper. A mouthpiece piece for the international as publicist Victoria became an organizer for the International in New York to gathered workers to her meetings and sent word to marks that he had followers whereas in New York City. Soon Enough Victoria's cohort. Were recognized as section twelve of the international working men's association and if they were going to turn their weekly newspaper into the mouthpiece of the working man's movements they were going to go. All the way Victoria had never done anything less. So on December thirtieth of eighteen seventy he won woodhall and Cleveland's weekly published the Communist manifesto in English for the first time at first Tilton was introducing Victoria at lectures then. He was is defending her in his articles. And he was there by her side. When Victoria's kaleidoscope of radical allies announced that they were forming a new political movement the equal rights party ready? They took Victoria as their presidential nominee. And invited Frederick Douglass to run as her vice president. Tilton even wrote a glowing biography of her that was rushed rushed to press to support her presidential run. It was very good for Victoria. It may even have been the main reason. She was elected president of the Association of spiritualists but even as Tilton and was learning the story of. Victoria's life she was learning his as well and this is where gossip turned to scandal because Theodore Tilton was rowing with Victoria on the river over he was eating late dinners of chicken cake and champagne inside her bedroom he was spending nights alone with her on her mansions roof and what she learned. Well it made her angry. Because among Tilton stories was the revelation that for years Henry Ward Beecher had carried on an affair with Tilton wife in fact it was one of the events that had driven Tilton into Victoria's arms and I hope you can see why she was so enraged Victoria had declared to the world that she was a free lover and it had sent a storm warm hates and judgment to rain down upon her heck political cartoonist. Thomas Nast even published a cartoon about her that called her Mrs Satan but now she had learned that. New York's Darling Minister the man who could do no wrong in the public eye. It actually committed a much bigger sin. Naturally she was livid and so she did the only only thing she knew she published. Here's Mary Gabriel. Once again and so in her newspaper in October eighteen seventy two so she decided to tell the story of the Beecher Tilton affair and in black and white in this newspaper she went into all the gory details and and exposed him for who he was and brought down this house of cards. which was the beecher family? The Congregational Church in Brooklyn the the religious pillar upon which so much of the moral American myth was built. She brought it down. In that article and the issue you flew off the stands in response to the Beecher family especially Henry Sister Harriet Beecher stowe went into overdrive overdrive to defend him court battles and published attacks Rack Victoria and eventually drained her fortune. Worst of all Cornelius Vanderbilt withdrew his support. She had become a liability to the women's movement. Too in the months that followed the Toria was set adrift. An so Victoria in taking that rash step basically ended her political career. Ironically it was the month before she was on the ballot as a presidential candidate that she wrote with this piece or that you allowed this piece published in her newspaper and on the morning of the election day she was in jail for having distributed that newspaper through the mail thereby violating US obscenity laws and it wasn't just the political support in the United States that was pulled out from under her when Karl Marx called a meeting of the international working. Men's association later that year they looked right at section twelve in New New York and made a decision. Any section of their organization had to be strictly materialist. Not only was. Victoria's New York Chapter Awash in scandal and fighting for women's rights but it was also heated by the fires of spiritualism and guided by the voices of the dead as far as Marx was concerned section. Twelve twelve was an embarrassment as a result. The leadership of the working men's association kicked them to the curb looking back. It was more than a little ironic nick. After a seemingly endless run of success Victoria woodhall had been defeated by the one enemy she had never thought to prepare for herself in September of eighteen eighteen. Seventy three another panic swept Wall Street. Overdrafts on railroad credit led to a spring of bankruptcies and the domino effect of a crash followed five two thousand businesses closed. A quarter of New Yorkers were unemployed. That was also the month that Victoria close the doors on her own brokerage firm but it didn't extinguish wish any of the fierceness. In her voice she took to the stage at the Cooper Union in fury railing against the banks on behalf of the lower million as she called them who were always. He's exploited by the upper ten in the months that followed her historic address to Congress. Victoria's most prominent followers had been Isabella. Beecher hooker her. Isabella went so far as to call her new friend and inspiration no longer a banker or businesswoman but a perspective Queen now though that kind of talk was gone and not just for Victoria but also for other people whose stories had been at the heart of spiritualism in eighteen seventy two Isaac post passed away and for a while his widow. Amy Left her home in Rochester defined comfort with an old friend. She visited Maggie in New York. The two women were both bereft. Maggie was missing her sister Kate hanging on the news about her nephews that would travel across the ocean from England. Organizing support for suffrage was still still appetite of AMY's mind but the loss of Isaac had cut her loose again leaving her to search for where she might belong and after her dramatic public fall from from grace. So was Victoria. Amy Post arrived in New York just as Victoria was leaving in eighteen seventy four. She traveled West lecturing as she went. She had to return frequently to New York. Though to face a series of snarls in court charges of libel and public obscenity but also to provide testimony in the case launched between between Tilton and Beecher in the wake of the scandal the respectable circles of wealth in prominent families. No longer wanted to have anything to do with Victoria. But for a traveling speaker a bad reputation is a great advertisement in fact the widespread hatred of her ideas was exactly what made her popular and it provided. Just just the right amount of cover for anyone who did want to come and listen to what she had to say but there was one group who didn't cut their ties but Victoria. They were used to be in the outside outside. Force that put pressure on American life from the margins. They were used to being mocked by conservative moralizer while they offered their own alternative moral vision for the nation and so in eighteen. Seventy five the Universal Association of spiritualists reelected Victoria as their president for the fifth time in a row but even that connection to the spiritualists wasn't enough to keep Victoria mood to the nation where she lived and fought for and had tried to change. It had chewed her up but it had also given her a platform a fortune which she had won and lost and after all of that one last mountain came her way that needed to be overcome. Cornelius Vanderbilt was dead. His son had taken over and he was determined that his father is disgraceful. Connections would be out of the way when it came time I'm to settle. Vanderbilt's will according to one report. He came to Victoria antennae with one hundred thousand dollars in hand. The money was there's if they would disappear. You're with a brokerage firm newspaper and her political aspirations. All at an end Victoria said goodbye to James Blood. And life they'd had together dench dench climbed aboard a steamer with her two children along with Tenney and their mother and then set off for England in eighteen. Seventy five core tape in gave a Trans Lecture on the topic of Spirit Materialization 's heaven she said was coming to earth and the spirit who spoke through. Her was one of her oldest guides. Augustus Balu he was still remembered as the bright flower of the hotel community. who had been cut down in his youth after? Victoria's fall from grace. Augustus came back to cora he wanted to encourage spiritualists that the world they were working toward was just around the corner. The marvelous new manifestations of power he told them were an indication of a new golden age. They were sure signs that heaven was coming to worth that justice would be done. And the power of that justice would be made manifest but the two years later after Victoria had been toppled from her lofty perch and chased from the country. The tone was different. spiritualists were beginning to ask. If the fight for the future might be lost. And when Cora and Samuel Taping divorced in eighteen seventy six it only added one more name to the list of disgraced mediums after all Samuel had been her third husband and the second she had divorced but there were other problems on the horizon. It seems that Victoria's escaped to England wasn't the only exit is it that mattered for the nation in the south federal troops who had been part of reconstruction began to return north and the newly elected president was already wheeling and dealing with the southern powers to keep political control in white hands then after waves of wage cuts hit railroad workers in eighteen seventy seven the largest American labor uprising of the nineteenth century began the US secretary of war viewed the strikes as insurrection in response army units in the South including the troops that regarding the Louisiana State House were withdrawn everywhere. The railroad workers put down their tools and held up their fists. Their neighbors showed up to help them craftsmen shopkeepers and farmers alone. The rail lines fed their families and cheered on their fights with the robber barons in tycoons. who were gobbling up? So so much of the American landscape and the Prophets of enterprise in Pittsburgh miners and steel workers followed suit striking to show support for the rail. L. Workers who refuse to make men like the vanderbilts any richer more amazingly the militia often supported the striking workers. They had been sent to aim their guns at turning their are anger back on the tycoons instead when the militia and hired guns did attack the striking workers though things spiraled out of control when when hired gunmen killed twenty strikers pittsburgh the rail yards were set on fire over one hundred locomotives in two thousand railcars. Were torched strikes in Chicago in Saint. Louis Louis only added fuel to the fire. And what did these angry workers want. Nothing more than an eight hour workday. An end to child labour and for the government to take control of the railroads Sanyal tapings view of railroad monopolies was finally taking a hold among working people. The New York Tribune wrote that public opinion is almost most everywhere in sympathy with the insurrection to fight that threat and to defend practices like child labor that made the railroad tycoons obscenely rich. The project to defend black freedom in the south was abandoned. Other changes came as well to the north militias were disbanded in their place. Cities began to recruits and armed police forces in greater number. They traded out unreliable citizen militias for well trained professionals people who wouldn't blink at using force to put down a Labor strike from Europe where he was resting after leaving office former president ulysses s grant wrote words that seemed to Echo sojourner truth he wrote about about how strange it was that officials who hated him for using the army to defend black Americans in the south now showed and I quote no hesitation about exhausting the whole power of the government to suppress a strike it was hypocrisy plain and simple and sign that there was one spirit more powerful than and most in control of America the spirit of greed William Crookes satisfied none of spiritualism critics back in America. His defensive British Sanchez didn't even satisfy spirituous themselves as far as believers were concerned. There was so much more work to be done and that included Henry Seibert wealthy. Philadelphia industrialist who knew just what he wanted wanted to do with his money you see. The police were professionalizing. So we're doctors. Who are now working to purge the public of counterfeit practitioners like the Kennywood halls and but claflin laugh? Winds of the eighteen fifties after so many tumultuous years all kinds of groups were organizing themselves into stable societies with training guidelines and rules. Here's here's historian Molly mcgarry. That was very much an impulsive. The era historians have described. That air is an age of Corporation Inc Chan when Americans become more likely to build institutions and move away from the kind of Anti Thoraya. -Tarian communal impulses of the the fervent of the antebellum years. Henry Seibert had a vision of that impulse sweeping in to clean up the anarchy of spiritualism. He'd actually been curious about spiritualism elitism for years back when Robert Dale Owen published his seances with Lia Henriette realized that someone needed to create a center for spiritualism in Philadelphia a home base if you will so he made an offer to a medium. The city knew all too well Maggie Fox. She should come down and live in his spiritual mansion. He said once there she would hold seances for him and his clients and he promised that her salary would be generous to something that made deal hard to resist it. It seemed like the perfect retreat from the public seances. She'd been holding in New York City so Maggie agreed. She would be the high priestess of his new temple but she didn't stay daylong. That's because his request quickly moved from the mundane to the downright awkward. You see he had been spiritualist. Long enough to know that pious mediums could hold conversations conversations with just about anyone so he started to ask for others George Washington and Benjamin Franklin were one thing but Henry Seibert had his mind set on the eternal final soon he was asking for conversations with every martyr and Saint in the Protestant calendar and he didn't just want American leaders either but famous sages his and rulers of the ancient world. He asked to talk to Saint Paul about the way the Bible had been written. He even asked to talk with the Old Testament Prophet Elijah when he insisted that he talked with the angel. Gabriel Maggie said. It was too much. She was still a Catholic believer after all she wanted cyber. It's money sure. But not at the cost of her soul but if Maggie thought a retreat back to New York could give Seibert the slip. She was sorely mistaken. Neither did his death because when his will was read in eighteen eighty before the University of Pennsylvania found itself with two gifts of sixty thousand dollars on their hands. The first went toward the university hospital while the second well they had some conditions attached to it. I know a large donation with strings. Attached sounds very very unusual. These strings insisted that at the university. Appoint a new professor to investigate spiritualism but if cyber had an agenda for giving his money to establish the commission the investigators on the commission in had an agenda of their own. It seems the chair of the Seibert commission was a man who resented being told what to believe for cash publicly. He followed cyber instructions privately though. Well let's just say they didn't exactly apply the scientific method and that became only too obvious when the commission decided to investigate a series of mediums. deums who had already been exposed as frauds in his private letters. The chair of the Commission didn't bother to pretend he wrote that he was a viper warmed by the spiritual nonsense. He said that he wanted to use the cyber commission. To poison spiritualism is lifeblood and then strike at dead sometime during the first year of the Commission Commission. He decided just where to sink his things in November of eighteen eighty three. He invited Maggie Fox to travel back to Philadelphia. Once more she agreed to have her or spirit rapping tested by a committee but things didn't quite turn out as planned. That's because Maggie came with her own agenda her opinion of Seibert had soured Lord over the years and she'd had enough of trying to prove herself to others now. Her only goal was to confound the commission she arrived at the Chairman's house and settled settled in for the investigation in his dining room. The Cyber Commission began with a few tests that produced the knocking sounds. They all expected but then Maggie suggested a test she he had never passed before she should stand on glass tumblers she said and then produce the wraps on the floor when they lined up for glass tumblers for her to US news. Maggie climbed on board stood there holding the hands of two of the men but were met with only silence. The men move glasses and try it again but failed just just as before. The commission published their report to little fanfare problems with their methods. Were obvious but they weren't the only prestigious investigators taking on mediums that decade in fact the British Society of psychical research which took on not just spiritualism but also claims of telepathy uncanny dreams and haunting huntings had also spread to the United States. Here's historian Kathy Gutierrez. So there's an American off shoot put that begins. And William two M's is its most famous investigator. Unbeliever and James does not bye into spiritualism wholesale at all but he does think that the unconscious can communicate with spirits greater than and he finds this one woman who sex detective on for years. And she's just infallible and so he thinks it's possible but he also also concedes. There's a lot of chicken going on. But he's this amazing name and his dad was Swedenborg mystic so they clearly early come from this very religious family but yes he gives a real intellectual imprimature to the entire spiritless cost in fact. William James was one of the observers. Who took the Cyber Commission to task for its mishandling of their obligation to study spiritualism with a serious objective attitude but there was something else when the chair of the commission had faced off with Maggie? He had asked her whether she claimed the knocking sounds were independent of herself. She said we never made that claim. The astor how she influenced the sounds that had followed her throughout her adult life. Only answer was I cannot tell But that it turns out wasn't quite true. They had birth religion at the edge of science. They had crafted their beliefs from communal impulses they had given rise to a kaleidoscope of if ideas beliefs newspapers communities and visions of the world and as the end of the century drew near the mediums. Were finally professionalizing into 1883. Andrew Jackson Davis graduated from the United States Medical College with his MD.. He would go on healing visitors now with the proper credentials to justify himself to others. At least that was the hope but rather than give his reputation to boost he ended up making it worse just two two years later. He announced to his wife Mary that he had been wrong all these years. She was not in fact his spirits affinity he had is on a classmate Asmi from his medical school. Fifteen years younger than Mary. They would have confirmed all the worst estimations that any outsider had about spiritualists and free love but it even took his own people by surprise years. Historian and Brody spiritualists were shocked by this and it really. It was very detrimental to Andrew Jackson Davis standing in the community. And it gives you some of the irony of these ideas that a sexual liberation in the nineteenth century was a much more complicated idea given the legal climate regarding divorce divorce regarding child custody and the lack of birth control. It was not what we think of as the sexual freedoms of the nineteen sixties eighteen seventies now sixty years old. The seer of Poughkeepsie had witnessed decades of spiritualism he'd watched the movement rise blossom one thousand different colors and also whether the storms of accusation opposition and infighting but now it seems to many that he had abandoned it just has he had his wife and sure he would continue to practice medicine and sell books into his twilight years. He had always wanted others to believe that he was a man of peace envision after all but the sour cord he struck. After medical school disrupted the legacy of his harmonium philosophy. Unfortunately for spiritualism awesome wouldn't be the only one by eight hundred eighty eight cates in Maggie had switched places cates. Marriage brought her two children and ten years of happiness but when Henry Yankin died eighteen eighty one. He left her with little to go on. Here's author Nancy Stewart. She still drinking. It's not terrible. And they seem to be happy and then suddenly he dies and Dan she discovers that his legacy Z. is money he's originally from Germany. I mean it has to go back there. She's not going to get any money for. Despite her time time in the limelight. It had really been Henry who had been her home in Britain his death send her back to New York City. Back to the Taylor's and the Swedish Movement Cure. Here's here's Nancy Stewart once again Katie has come back with these children and she's drinking again and the children are neglected or at least they're seized by the authorities and she's accused of being an unfit mother. Maggie meal has gone to England and is doing seances there and she is extremely upset about Katie and she decides besides that she is got to confess she started with announcements in the newspaper word began to spread that in the wisdom of her maturity Maggie Fox the woman who had given spiritualism to the world was about to take it back again and New York eagerly awaited her arrival on October twenty first at the New York Academy of music she took the stage before an audience of over three thousand people. She had helped start start a movement that had given so many people feeling of purpose and hope it had given them life but her message that night from the stage in New York would be different this time because her next words would deliver spiritualism a fatal blow. That's it for this week's episode episode of UN obscured stick around after this short sponsor break for a preview of what's in store for next week. This episode was made possible civil by the mobile game. Best fiends I spend a lot of time reading about the dark stories in history and a lot of people often wonder Aaron. How in the world do you unwind? After all all of that the answer best means best means is a puzzle game that you can play right on your phone and it's really cool because you go through all these levels solving puzzles that actually engage your brain but it's still a casual gain that anyone can play and it's really really fun. I travel a lot so I love how easy it is to kill that airport downtime with best scenes and you don't need an Internet connection to play it so that means that the fund doesn't stop me after takeoff and as a former designer. I love how visually stimulating it is is with its bright colors and cute characters and best fiends updates the game every month with new levels and events so it never gets old. Maybe that's why it's been downloaded over one hundred million million times. Engage your brain with fun puzzles and collect tons acute characters. Download this five star rated mobile puzzle game on the apple APP store and Google play for free. That's friends without the our best fiends. Next time on on obscured spiritualism had always threaten the priest politicians and profiteers who benefited from the status quo. It had given spiritual and moral authority to people who'd been stripped of of their rights pushed to the margins and burdened with work while others reap the rewards the last thing spiritualists wanted to do even in the eighteen nineties. I was to give up on their labors and return to a world of the strong crushing the week but in the coming decades Cora and the Chicago spiritualists weren't the only ones who saw a spiritualist feature finally taking shape. It just wasn't the future they'd expected On obscured was created by me. Aaron Minke and produced by Frederick Alex Williams and Josh Tain in partnership with iheartradio research and writing for the season is all the work of my right hand. Man Karl Nellis and the brilliant Chad Lawson composed the brand new soundtrack learn more about our contributing historians source material and links to our other shows over at history obscured dot com. And until next next time thanks for listening on obscured it is production of iheartradio and Aaron Monkey for more podcasts. From iheartradio was heart. Radio APP APPLE PODCASTS. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows

New York City Victoria United States president Gabriel Maggie Victoria Mary Gabriel Bruce Victoria New York Herald Victoria Aaron Monkey Kate Fox New Orleans William Crookes Victoria woodhall Henry yung-chen Victoria Cornelius Vanderbilt Theodore Tilton Maggie Fox Cora
10 | Invisible Hands

Unobscured

47:01 min | 1 year ago

10 | Invisible Hands

"It welcomed on obscured a production of iheartradio and Aaron Monkey. A bloody flag hung over the door. Cora stepped up onto the platform surrounded by black drapery that covered the columns of the mechanics institute after all they were in mourning for the honor. Dead the flag didn't represent the civil war. Though and the blood on the flag wasn't decorative it was a relic from dark event. That took place a year before America's first black daily newspaper Apor. The New Orleans Tribune had called political convention. The Tribune had been founded by an Afro Creole doctor named Louis Charles Rudini as rallying point I Louisiana radicals and it commanded respect among the states reformers. They met to confirm an eighteen. Sixty four state constitution that had stripped power from. I'm the planter class and abolish slavery the backlash though was vicious white. Planters had the ear of general banks. The Union Army Commander Ender governing the state they said Louisiana should have an I quote a government of white people for the exclusive political benefits of the white race. Yeah they weren't subtle about it at all. The planters were powerful though they convinced banks to keep the plantation system and he I used the Union army to force Black Louisianans to keep working the land of any plans or who would declare loyalty to the United States. His soldiers marched the roads capturing anyone who left their work meanwhile he let imprison confederate soldiers walk but the black folk on the sharp appended. These policies didn't go quietly. The Tribune started by publishing articles showing how banks was forcing workers to keep living in slavery. It was a voice that would echo back across the Atlantic or Victor Hugo would return with the letter to the tribune encouraging the radicals to keep fighting for justice messages came from across the last horizon. As well the spirit of John Brown appeared to honoree and the Sircar. Monique with a word of celebration. He praised the tribune for its defense of black equality so in eighteen sixty six when the Tribune announced a convention to amend the earlier constitution. Touche's and finally give black men the right to vote in Louisiana people came in crowds. The meeting started on a hopeful note to that first night. The cities police fought with a group of armed delegates who were defending the convention and killed two of them sadly it was a dire omen of what would happen the next day when black delegates to the convention arrived at the Mechanics Institute the next morning for the second day of the meeting. They were confronted by a crowd of white opponents that that was swelling with anger. Here's historian Emily Clark. The day begins with some fanfare. There's a little parade of black. New Orleanians begins marching to the mechanics institute to celebrate this. This is GonNa be a great day but it's not it ends up being an absolutely horrid horrid day because a white mob job aided by local police and firefighters storm the building and massacre many of the delegates inside most of the delegates were unarmed but that white supremacist mob was heavily armed over. Forty people died that day almost all of them. Black violence like this in eighteen. Sixty six ended up galvanizing nizing new brand of reconstruction politics nationally which then worked harder to promote black civil rights in the wake of the violence. Someone someone had collected the tattered flag and tucked it away when the community gathered a whole the memorial service for the convention. They brought it out again. It was a stark reminder of the nation they were working to build and of the courage and sacrifices some had made to bring that nation that Louisiana that New Orleans into being exactly a year later that chorus stepped into the mechanic institute to honor those who were killed that day afterwards. The Tribune published her poems call for solemn mournful bells to ring out over the city. Nathan must've been proud but when he wrote to the Rochester Express to give them news who is on the progress of reconstruction he wasn't praising chorus powers of oratory instead he was reporting on a new scourge in the city people were fleeing in New Orleans in the face of deadly diseases cholera and yellow fever Nathan so often traveling. Those streets as he rallied for change came home one night in late. September feeling dizzy and shivering fever by October I had burned through his body. Henrietta less less than a year old wasn't strong enough to fight off the infection by October fifteenth. They were both dead grieving her losses. Cora retreated back to the northeast. The future that she had envisioned with her radical husband had been taken away away. If Cora was going to find peace as so many others like her had wanted it would have to come from the most unusual places the spirits of the dead this is on obscured. I'm Aaron McKie. uh-huh uh-huh Benjamin Butler led the charge during the war. He was the general in command of the Union forces that sees New Orleans when he returned to Massachusetts he was elected to the United States. Congress during the time. That Nathan Daniels was in Washington he had connected with Butler who had once been his superior officer in Washington the the two men lobbied together for reconstruction but they were opposed by Andrew. Johnson like General Banks Johnson's opinions were swayed by the a powerful interests of southern planters. Who still wielded enough influence to reach into the White House? It was the compromises that President Johnson made and his veto towa bills supporting the newly freed black Americans that put him in general Butler's crosshairs after all Butler had never been shy about fighting southern white leaders. He considered traitors to the nation. They considered him evil. They call him beast Butler. When President Johnson was impeached beast? The Butler was the ringmaster who cory graff the events. In the years before she went to New Orleans Cora had been the spirit advisor to radical congressman in just like Butler they pushed for reconstruction policies that put the government of the south. In the hands of northern reformers. Lincoln Spirit had spoken through core frequently and guided their approach to policy alongside. Dead Boston abolitionist. Ministers and the spirit of William Wilberforce now that she'd returned to the capital with grief stripping her of any shyness she might have had. She took bolder steps than she ever had. Before in September of eighteen sixty eight she joined a spiritualist originalist newspaper editor in confronting President Andrew Johnson directly barging right into his White House office as soon as the door closed behind them. Cora Open her mouth in laughed but the voice wasn't her own as the papers reported it. Johnson was and I quote dumb with astonishment because the laugh was Abraham Lincoln's the voice that followed said let him laugh who wins no one in the room not cora not the reporter. Not President Johnson explained what the phrase meant but it was just months after Andrew. Johnson had been impeached by the house and the country was facing the new election. That would put grants in office. Chorus spirits addressed to Johnson was cryptic. There was no doubt that she wanted to confront the president. With knowledge knowledge that the spirits had not given up on the nation and anyone who opposed their vision for reform was destined to fail in May of eighteen in sixty nine coral was still thinking hard about that nation and she was seeing it with more and more distress after morning the violence of white supremacy in New Orleans. She came back to Washington with new words of rebuke. She spoke at a meeting of the Universal Peace Society and she wasn't gentle a government mints that has for nearly a century and slave the African race. She said that proscribes. The Chinese race proposes to exterminate the Indian race an persistently refuses to recognize the rights of one half of its citizens. Women cannot justly be called perfect if cora was thinking thinking more expansively than ever before about how the US government treated and control. Its people we can see why she had just married for a third time. Her new husband Samuel Taping was spiritualist a journalist and a soldier who had been deeply involved in uncovering the truth of a brutal mass murder of the Cheyenne and Arapahoe people in Colorado known as the Sand Creek Massacre Samuel had investigated the killing for the federal government. He determined that the commanding officer of the Third Colorado volunteer a methodist minister nicknamed the fighting Parson had deliberately carried out the slaughter in cold blood as far as Nathan could tell. This was a minister who had hoped that. By killing enough of his indigenous neighbors. He could raise his public profile high enough to make a run at political medical office. Nathan's reports went back to the federal government and they went to the spiritualist press as well. His opinions resonated with Chorus Christians he wrote professing to be followers of the Prince of peace had instead attacked native nations with sword and cannon creeds and whisky ASCII Bibles and Boeing is then he wasn't just talking about one incident. Either in Samuels is if it wasn't the steel of Sabres and rifles threatening being the indigenous nations. It was the steel of the railroads. Cutting through the land monopoly. He wrote is fast turning this Western Garden of the world into a moral roll wilderness over the next few years his opinion would be published frequently by the banner of lights. His stature rose within the government at the same time ever since his work investigating and testifying about the Sand Creek Massacre Samuel had served on the Indian Peace Commission in that role he helped negotiate. Ta Treaties with the Plains nations. After that he joined a separate commission one tasked with making sure the United States government followed those treaties. He had little success though which only made him more angry. When Samuel Taping married Cora she was reporting messages from native spirit guides like Weena together? The couple joined their voices to shape spiritualist opinions about the ongoing seizure of native land across the West. In fact some say on circles even reported messages from from Cheyenne and Arapaho leaders who had died at Sand Creek. Here's historian and Brody. spiritualists are always reformers and they are very active in Indian rights reform movements. They are extremely critical of massacres occurs of Indians they protest against them Samuel Tappan in particular who is an Indian rights reformer with leading spiritualists speakers like Cora regularly giving addresses on Indian rights and government officials Samuel tape in publishing in the spiritualists newspapers. APOR spiritualists continued to find themselves. Criticizing violence that was widely accepted in white communities across the nation spiritualists. Louis are in an odd position in my view where they are espousing Indian rights but they are also so perpetrating stereotypes that place Indians in the past in a romantic past where Indians these are appropriately living in the spirit world and providing support for spirit mediums rather than exercising offering offering t in the present but if the early seances portrayed native spirits as guides and healers for white spiritualists. What's the tone changed? As reports of more violence reached say on circles in the east when murdered leaders arrived to speak at seance tables during the reports of genocide and dispossession possession of the eighteen sixties and seventies Indian blessings on spirituous were replaced by Indian curses curses on a nation who soldiers and citizens sends had murdered them but his other newspapers fell in line with the white supremacist. Rhetoric of writers who pushed the idea of manifest destiny. The banner of light continued to print criticisms of that message. It was their responsibility to heed the voices of the spirits. After all and report their messages to the reading public something was happening spiritualist who had viewed slavery as a sin that left a stain on the nation had begun to see America's westward advancement into the territory of native Americans as just more of the same their editorials called. US policy a fraud and a swindle at a time when few you other voices would as violence piled on violence Cora and the radical politicians who heated her spirits. Were sure that this was just one more way way that the nation needed to be knocked down and made new again. Take those stains away. They needed more than hope. The letters burned so bright that they lit up the whole room room. They were right there. Scrawled into the very surface of the table. Too many spirits had spoken through so many tables over the years to even count this marble. Surface looked like it was inscribed with fire. The word was a single Greek name Demosthenes. It glowed as a calling card for the stately figure dressed in a tunic solemn and graceful who stood before Victoria woodhall. She recognized him. Of course it was one. Ah The spirits who had appeared to her from time to time over the years and he'd always told her that she would rise to great distinction city of ships at last asked he had arrived to reveal his identity to her because the time had come for her to lead her people just as he had the ancient Athenians journey to New York. The spirit told her there was a house waiting for her there along with the future. He'd always promised at least. That's how Victoria told the story that marble marble table had been in a Pittsburgh apartments where Victoria had been stain. After years of traveling with James Blood she had even been to disease-stricken New Orleans arriving justice just as core left and shortly before Christmas in eighteen sixty six Victoria and James had published an advertisement for their powers of healing to the city's alien residents since they'd been to Memphis Tennessee which had also been plagued by white supremacists violence that year. Then they returned to Saint Louis before moving on to Chicago Go where the courts were more willing to hand out divorce papers than anywhere else in the mid West but now in eighteen sixty eight. Those trips were coming to an end. It was time for Victoria and James to build something. They weighed their options. Following the spirit of Demosthenes to New York was one but there was. There's another leading light. That they considered Victoria reached out to some friends. In high places she traveled to Galena Illinois and visited one of the officers who had commanded. He ended James Bloods troops during the war. Since then Victoria and James had spent time with that officers father in Cincinnati and become friends with his family and Victoria. I thought it would be nice if he took on James Blood as his personal secretary. Because you see that man was ulysses grant and he had just won the presidential election and he was headed to Washington. We can't blame him if he didn't want to bring blood with him to the White House. Though you see. His escapades with Victoria had already hit the papers. Where they were saying that the gallant colonel had abandoned his family and thrown away his money to travel the world with and I quote the witch of Washington Avenue when grant decided against taking James Blood with him? It settled the matter James Than Victoria. Set Out For New York instead but the choices that grant would make while in office would still prove crucial to lifting. Victoria's fortunes I though there were connections to be made in Manhattan. Here's author Mary. Gabriel when they arrived in New York you know they had no connections there and it was as you say. The entire Claflin clan followed and saw Victoria antennae. Got To work doing what they did best. They're only sure way of making money which was working spiritualists. Antennae was an expert of laying on of hands and Victoria was the spiritualist adviser and but Claflin did what he did which was go out and try to recruit clients. New York had plenty of possible subjects. Spiritualism was strong in the the city after all but it wasn't just spiritualism that interested Victoria. She didn't want to spend her days entertaining a line of tourists. She wanted to finally put her political vision vision into practice for that. She needed a patron a dedicated supporter with money. And there was one person whose name was floating around the city with the echoes of cash. Following after it Cornelius Vanderbilt. His is a name. Many of us have heard before his shipping empire had brought him mountains. Sins of cash. But in the years before Victoria arrived he had felt the sting of personal losses. His wife Sophia had recently died and he'd lost a fortune in in a battle with a fellow. Wall Street speculator over control of Western railroads. All of this was well known. But Victoria's father but Claflin and the rest has to the clan. That was settling in New York. Learn something else through their spiritualists network. Cornelius Vanderbilt was willing to hear from the spirits. Spiritualism may have come into Vanderbilt's life through his daughter who had been a believer for years by eighteen sixty four cornelius was trying to contact the spirit of his dead father through New York City mediums by eighteen sixty eight. He was feeling old himself and had already been turning to magnetized and spiritualist healers for relief from his aches and pains so when Victoria and her sister Tammy arrived in New York. The wealthy industrialist found comfort in a young woman whose mode healing was the laying on of hands soon. The sisters were spending a lot of time with Cornelius. The often invited tenny to his office and called her. His little little sparrow while she joked with them read to him and laid on hands in Victoria. He got a personal medium then as their conversations multiplied lied he found in her an unusual and inspiring energy and intelligence he also started to hear investment advice from the spirits and he would give its intern along with hefty fees for their services. Here's more from Mary. Gabriel and so became confidence of Cornelius Vanderbilt. One of the most important and wealthiest man in America. And you know it's one of these incredible American stories that you know. They went literally overnight from being no one in New York to being with in the circle. Where all the powerful decisions are made? Demosthenes hadn't steered her wrong. And neither had cornelius. James Blood took the money Victoria made from Vanderbilt and invested it. According to his advice and as those investments blossomed James News and Victoria put their heads together to decide how they could put this growing fortune to use the spirits. It seems weren't just ghostly visitors from another world world they also knew. Just what made this world go round Trouble was brewing in eighteen. Sixty eight the banner of light published a report from the Third Annual Convention of the Illinois State Spiritual Association with a foreboding warning. They said that there was an a quote. Lack of harmony among spiritualists for a movement built on the foundation of Andrew. Jackson Davis Hormonal Philosophy. This was a dangerous thing to hear. Every seance required harmony among the participants in order order for the spirits to be heard and if they hope to keep growing into an enduring cultural force they would need that harmony. The reformers might have seemed seem to win the day and motivate the victorious army through four long years of war. They might even have been able to claim legions of new converts as the Widows and mourning. Earning mothers found their way to the sand table but their new world had not yet clicked into place in fact cities all across the country were still filled with conflict And that included the capital but with President Grant and office. There were some among the reformers who saw a clearer path into the future in eighteen. Sixty nine sojourner truth was headed back to Washington. DC To be present for the ratification of the fifteenth amendment. Finally ensuring that black men had the right to vote to cross across the entire nation on the way there. She stopped in New York City where she stayed with friends. Including a visit to Leeann underhill's thirty Seventh Street Brownstone and although she had retreated from the public stage Lia had lost no stature among spiritualists and would still give private sittings too friendly visitors especially when have visitor was sojourner truth she also stayed with Theodore Tilton the editor of a powerful liberal religious newspaper Tilton was well known for printing nineteen the power of God and the rhetoric of reform. He was a natural friend to sojourner but he and his wife Elizabeth were going to become very familiar with Victoria. Woodhall in the coming coming years. Also while in the city sojourner spoke at one of the most popular pulpits in the Nation Plymouth Church where the preacher Henry Ward beecher feature held court. The sojourner wasn't the only one on the road to Washington that year in January the city played host to the first national female suffrage Fridge Convention with money in her pockets and determination to join the cause Victoria. Woodhull was one of the many to arrive. There is hope in the air. You're with the war. One and grant elected surely it was time for every reformer who had served in the cause of abolition to now turn their interest toward the cause of women organizers. who expected it to be that easy? Though were deeply disappointed. Some leaders like Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B Anthony wanted wanted to push for a sixteen th amendment that would give women the right to vote but others thought a more gradual approach that pushed for suffrage state by state was the only way to achieve if that goal and this difference in approach led to some ferocious arguments it seems that advocates for women's rights. Were no more united than the spiritualists were and no no surprise. They were often one and the same Victoria made her way back to New York thoroughly unimpressed to her. The battles between the reformers were what she called teacup. Hurricanes women needed to gain real ground and fast so she decided that at the first opportunity she would lead by example an and opportunity that swiftly came banks to Cornelius Vanderbilt and ulysses s grant. Here's more from Mary. Gabriel two of the biggest. You traders on Wall Street Jim FISK and and Jay. Gould knew that every week grant sold a lot of gold on the market to try to keep kind of keep the coffers Unisys discovers government coffers full and it was a weekly sort of release of precious metals to enrich the government few an acquaintance. They decided decided to try to convince grant not to sell. And so that would drive up the price of gold and it would become even more precious than it normally was well that happened but then grant learn of the scheme and so in a counter move. He opened the flood again and the gold started pouring out onto the market random bill bill had been privy to all of this and so he told tenny in Victoria. This was going to happen and so on the day. This black Friday and eight hundred sixty nine occurred Victoria was. They're buying hangup gold dropping in price dropping like a stone and in that day. She amassed a sizable fortune by the end of the day. Victoria antennae had made a stunning seven hundred thousand dollars in profit. Their names were splashed across the pages Queens of finance. It's Vanderbilt's proteges. With their new fortune as balanced Victoria antennae through open the doors of Woodhall Claflin and Co the first woman owned brokerage brokerage in the city Victoria would later rights. We had been instructed by the spirits in the administration of public affairs now. It was time to to apply that knowledge though then when it came to striking a claim for the place of women in society she said there could have been nothing else in legitimate business that would attract the comments of the the press more than the establishment of banking house by two women. Victoria woodhull had begun the year as the witch of Washington Avenue. Now now she was something more. She was the witch of Wall Street. Gold was good by. Victoria's vision for the future wasn't the only way the spirits were putting flash lashawn the bones of the movement in eighteen seventy Emma hardin would put spiritualism on paper with a landmark history. She called Modern American spiritualism a twenty years record of the communion between Earth and the world of the spirits. It was a sweeping history that collected stories from across spirituous networks. Newspapers papers telling local stories at hit the public from the moments I days but this was a project with much larger ambitions. Here's historian Kathy Gutierrez. Emma started off with doing translators and she was very erudite and very articulate. Let and she over time became what I consider to be probably still the most important historian spiritualism and she wrote this massive passive compendium using primary sources which how she collected all in the nineteenth century. I have no idea and put it together. In and went. SERTA created a coherent narrative of spiritualism. She laid out a picture of the movement from its first steps to its full strength. I think it was a play for legitimacy but it was also a play for authority. If Emma's book was a landmark driving home the history of spiritualism for scholars the year it was published was also a landmark in Emma's life. She married a man whose name might sound familiar from the years before the Civil War William Britain. He was the spiritualist whose kindness had made him stand out from the crowd when he helped Cora to escape the clutches of Benjamin Hatch and it was as Emma harding Britain that the English pianist turned trance. Medium turned religious. Historian would go down in the record books. But she wasn't the only one making a bid to put themselves elves in the author's chair when it came to the story of spiritualism in the books of one Boston writer who wanted palpable proof of immortality. The question of testing the spirits took on more weight sometimes quite literally in fact when it came to the evolution of spiritualism the eighteen seventies were the decade of materialization nation. More and more seances weren't just filled with tapping sounds turning tables and flickering lights instead. Mediums were bringing something more into being physical objects called a ports. Were arriving in the room. And then the ghostly hands that had so often been invisible to previous sitters began to take on material form but if a hand why not more. Here's Emily Clark once again you'd find these descriptions from from people who are out of materialization seance and they might notice by their feet. What looks like a small white handkerchief has appeared and very slow Lee? The handkerchief grows and it turns into something bigger and bigger and bigger. And the next thing you know the spirit of your deceased wife has materialized right next to you and then she hugs zero or she kisses year. She grabs you can feel her material body. It was spiritualism second wave and it up up ended. What people expected to see when they went to a seance? Here's historian John Butcher. I think about that as part out of this notion that the process was going on in this new era was the elevation of earth to have Amadora down on heaven to her tapping sounds could be misinterpreted. Trans lectures could be explained away but when a medium conjured gauzy object into the room. That could be seen. That could be felt. Well what could explain away something. So tangible in eighteen seventy two. The reformer Robert. Dale Owen published a book on spiritualism that hit the shelves just as new waves of materialization. seances were putting the movement back into the headlines was published by a big non spiritualist publishing house to and it was a smash hit. That's because Robert wasn't just some unknown. He was the son of the Scottish. Reformer whose Utopian towns had inspired so many spiritualist communities in the eighteen forties and he'd spent the eighteen sixties in Washington in DC where he had served on the commission for establishing government aid to the newly free black Americans. Working alongside Nathan Daniels. He helped lay the foundation. Nations for the Freedman's bureau. That would oversee efforts like sojourner truth's work on the Friedman Hospital in his new book though he was stepping deeper into the world of spiritualism by publishing fascinating stories about his experiences with a medium who had been off limits to the public for years in fact. He participated participated in private dramatic sittings with her right inside her fancy New York home and the mediums name the oldest Fox. Sister Sir Leah underhill. They answered the questions on his mind in the very first say on Robert remembered seeing lights that floated around the room as they did though they also slowly league grew larger and at the same time they took on the distinct shape of hands. One of those hand shaped lights he later explained grew as large as a human ahead before it lowered itself to the floor and began to pound out those infamous knocking sounds that had become so commonplace in the movement. Finally that which which had been invisible and now revealed to his is a smaller more intimate. Say on the following summer Robert had an even closer encounter are they had retreated to Leah's bedroom. For the seance Robert Leah her husband Daniel and one other close friend. Everyone took a seat around a small intimate rectangular table and knocking started almost immediately so they turned on the lights and started to sing again. A light appeared eared. Roberts said it took the form of a small hand but covered with shimmering veil. You watched it approach him and then felt a light touch like fingers on on his shoulder when he asks the spirit to move to the door and knock on it. The light wandered off knocked and caused in response a lapdog outside in the hall hall to start barking at the sound. The light return and brushed owens hand and then caressed his head. He later wrote that. It felt as if a soft and fine piece of gauze press gently against the back of my head and neck. Not once however did Robert detect the footfalls or Russell of clothing. That might would have been caused by a body moving around the room. No one in the small group before ever moved or let go of each other's hand around the table and Robert was convinced the spirits bringing heaven to earth one material body at a time. They were literally reaching out to be touched publishing. This story made Robert Dale Owen. The Darling of the spiritualist world so much. So in fact that he decided to lean in he wanted evidence of eternal life life. That was irrefutable so when he heard that a spirit whose whole body had materialized in a Philadelphia seance had asked for him by name. Well he couldn't refuse the seances were enchanting. He sat with two mediums. A husband and wife for a series of meetings with the spirits as has they lowered the lights and went into their trance. The Promise Specter would appear. She seemed to grow out of nothing like the spectral hands. She would start out as a faint light loading through space until it took form and strode into his presence the spirit called Herself Katie King and gave Robert Everything he it was hoping for. She audibly spoke with him calling him father Owen and then kissed him over the course of their meetings they even traded gifts. He would eventually really possessed a lock of her hair. He cut from her head pieces of fabric cut from her dress and veil a bouquet of flowers and small tortoiseshell box owen rush to write a report to the encounters. The mediums never moved. He said there was no chance that one of them was impersonating the spirits of Katie King. While ah she was manifest in the room he explored its corners and the spirit cabinet from which she had emerged and determined that everything was as it seemed with his book flying into hands around the country. The Atlantic magazine agreed to publish his account. He sent it to the editors under the title touching spiritual visit since. It's from a higher life but that's when things went south before his article could be published. Robert had a shocking revelation. A young woman went public. Look with confession that she was the person who had been Katie King in that darkened room. He had given her gifts. During the seance eventually Owen met with her in the light of day and she gave those gifts back. She was in fact an actor who conspired with the mediums to trick their visitors. Robert even had some help digging up the evidence evidence of the fraud his agent and pulling together the facts of the case was none other than Henry. Steel Alcott's the man who helps solve Lincoln's murder alcott question. How reliable the woman actually was because plenty about her story? Didn't add up. Even so confession was devastating. Roberts article was eventually published alongside. It was a note that made it clear that it was all humbug and it turned Owen and Spiritualism by association Asian into a laughing-stock too many spiritualists though the events only served as evidence that materialization were fraudulent. They remain convinced that it was the result of the Predator is taking on what was good and true about spiritualism and exploiting it for their personal gain. BANGS didn't end well for Robert. Dale Owen unafraid in the aftermath of the ordeal. His own family demanded that he turned away from the beliefs that had led to such public humiliation but he refused leaving them with the difficult choice of having him declared insane when his children were through with him his life was effectively over they had in placed against his will in an asylum. Her Gallery opened in the heart of London. That might not sound an unusual at first after all. It was full of bright pieces of artwork. Watercolors acrylics pencils all of which are familiar mediums. But there there's another layer to the display. All one hundred and fifty five works were created by the woman who had opened the gallery a middle aged spinster named Georgina Houghton and in the previous decades of spiritualism in London Mo- Spirit communication was the kind we know there was plenty of table tapping table tilting gene trans lectures and spirit writing. But every one of these modes had become old hat now though mediums and their followers were looking for new manifestations of spirit power and Georgina gave it to them her wild swirls of color she said where the physical representations of spirits through her the invisible world took on vibrant form. Georgina didn't start out as a public medium. Though when the British press was still calling hauling out mediums as frauds for the simplest table wrappings. She had gone with her cousin to a seance so that she could judge for herself. If any of it was true at the first say on one one spirit singled her out claiming to be her dead sister. Zillah the things that said apparently shot Georgina into belief. Soon after she we started to read spiritualist books. She talked with her mother about the possibility of eternal life and spirit communication and together. They started their own seances at home. One historian called Georgina. Sincere and reverend. She seems to have held her seances. In an attitude of quiet prayer by the CIRQUE harmonic Ramonic- in New Orleans. Her seances were private. Devotional and deeply felt this was far from the stagey. showmanship of townhall demonstrations or or the red carpet rolled out that the entrance of Claflin Hospital House. After one seance held at Pentecost. Georgina wrote that. The experience of spirit contact with simply canoe. Outpouring of God's spirit rather than being a means of raking in cash her spiritualist practice almost became a ruin as has the spirits became her muse rather than just receive messages through taps on the table she began to paint and soon the spectral hands of masters like Titian and Correggio were guiding her once she even claimed to fall under the control of Joseph. The husband of the Virgin Mary with him she said the colors were laid on with much which more strength when other started to see her. She got some of the same unwanted attention that hit Robert Dale Owen. There were whispers that she was mentally to lead disturbed. The weird shapes filled her paintings were unsettling to some. They wanted to get her medical attention. Fortunately for Georgina she avoided. Owens joins fate that eighteen seventy one exhibition in London was put on at your own expense. Her ambition was to make spirit drawings more popular to spread her work as an example for others to follow by that measure. It was a complete failure but there were few newspaper reviews that urged people to go and see her work and to be astonished. But there was also plenty of contempt to you and even horror at the hallucinations that she produced and while many visited almost none came to buy before it was over she was nearly bankrupt and seeing the lengths that she went to to advertise the exhibition to Victorian High Society. It's no wonder she created an elaborate catalogue and distributed to notable names. What's more she even created a special edition for Queen Victoria? Korea made a pink satin white calf skin and gold g distributed all kinds of advertisements and hired an army to help her with the exhibition. Heavy was the loss she later wrote. But never for one moment have I experienced shadow of regret for having undertaken. It's I threw myself and my substance since heart and soul into God's treasury and not one fraction what I wished to withdraw. There was one bright spot. Though all that advertising tasing spread that even reached America and caught the attention of a few dignitaries from the spiritualist realm perhaps none more significant than the woman who had helped give birth to the very movement. Georgiana painting celebrated Leah Fox. Underhill Leah arrived in London just before the exhibition began in fact it was her very first. Stop in the city as she and her husband Daniel Strode into the gallery. Daniel Found Georgina and told her motioning toward his wife. There goes the first medium in the world. Georgina leader wrote that. The two women spoke although she didn't record what it is they discussed as other American waken streamed in. They told her that. News of her new manifestations had been printed as far away as California. The exhibition might have been a financial failure here but it brought a wave of spiritual seekers to England from the troubled United States and it was just one of the many attractions that would make the trip across the Atlantic so popular peeler in the coming years after all if spiritualism truly was for everyone then there was no chance it was going to stay put. That's it for this week's episode of on obscured stick around after this short sponsor break for a preview of. What's in store were for next week? This episode was made possible by hellofresh. hellofresh is America's number one meal Kit Delivery Service. That shops plans and delivers your favorite favorite meals. So you can just cook eats and enjoy. hellofresh makes cooking delicious meals at home a reality regardless of your comfort in the kitchen from step by step recipes to premeasured ingredients ingredients. You'll have everything that you need to get a wow worthy dinner on the table in just about thirty minutes. There's something for everyone to from family recipes to Calorie Smart and Vegetarian and fund menu series like Hall of fame and Craft Burgers. And you can even add extra meals to your weekly order as well as delicious sides like garlic bread and cookie dough and those meals are absolutely delicious. US My pick this week. Is The crispy Parmesan chicken with garlic herb couscous and lemony roasted carrots. It was delicious and so easy to make for eighty dollars off your first month of hellofresh. Hello fresh go to hellofresh dot com slash unobserved cured eight zero and enter the Promo Code and obscured eight zero. That's hellofresh dot com slash UN obscured eight zero offer code on obscured eight zero next time on on obscured once the spirit of a woman arrived. At a seance and simply said that she was one who suffered the explanation of suffering could have been printed by Victoria woodhull this nameless. This woman was born to a wealthy family. She told the circle but she married a Predator. He scooped up her inheritance and then abandoned her in the years that followed she had supported herself through sex work but found no one to help her until she crossed into Neth now. She said she was comforted by Mary. Magdalene in New Orleans. At the seance table able of men her radical message came across clearly a society that would judge and punish women for surviving abuse was unjust. A A society in harmony however would look like something new not a hierarchy but a circle where the poor were lifted up and men and women joined hands to to seek out the wisdom of the past and map out the future and it was a future on re and the others were still willing to fight for On obscured was created by me. Aaron Minke and produced by Matt. Frederick Frederick Alex Williams and Josh Sane in partnership with iheartradio research and writing for the season is all the work of my right hand. Man Karl Nellis and the brilliant Chad add lawson composed the brand new soundtrack learn more about our contributing historians source material and links to our other shows over at history on obscured dot COM com. And until next time thanks for listening obscured production of iheartradio Aaron McKie for more podcast iheartradio posed by heart radio APP apple podcasts. And wherever you listen to your favorite shows

New York City Cora Victoria Washington Victoria New Orleans Cornelius Vanderbilt United States Nathan Daniels America Robert Robert Dale Owen President Andrew Johnson Georgina Houghton Victoria woodhull Gabriel James Blood Victoria editor Emily Clark
Ladies' First (ep. 122)

Your Brain on Facts

31:15 min | 5 months ago

Ladies' First (ep. 122)

"Today's episode is brought to you by the your brain on facts book available now. Want the facts without my voice, get the your brain on facts book. But if you want my voice without the facts, I am available for hire for voiceover work no job too small and my listeners get fifty percent off email me at Moxie at your brain on facts dot com. Valentina Tereshkova was twenty two years old when she made her first parachute jump with a local aviation club in nineteen, fifty nine and she loved it. unbeknownst to her this exhilarating pastime was giving her skills that would bring her to the attention of the Soviet government. The Soviets needed someone who could handle themselves jumping from twenty thousand feet. The mandatory ejection altitude from the re entry of a rocket capsule. One of the many facets of the space race to the Soviets wanted to win was to have the first woman in space in February nineteen, sixty, two Tereshkova and four other women, three parachutists and one pilot began the intensive training to become cosmonauts. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. We're headed toward another presidential election and it seems like both a minute ago and an attorney ago that we had a female candidate for president would most people don't know is that the first female candidate? Rian before she was even allowed to vote. Victoria Claflin later, Victoria Woodhall was one of ten children born to illiterate mother and a petty criminal father. Would Hell attended school sporadically for a few years. At Age Fifteen, she married a doctor who soon revealed himself to be an alcoholic philanderer. To make matters worse the sixteen year old woodhall gave birth to a mentally handicapped son who would need extra care in eighteen fifty four. Three of would hold siblings had died as children. And she claims she had clairvoyant powers to communicate with them. Always looking for a new scam, to run. Her father put her on the road with her sister Tennessee as a faith healing and fortune telling act selling elixirs that promised to cure everything from asthma to cancer. They didn't. In fact, Tennessee was indicted for manslaughter after one of her patients died. By some good fortune that I don't know the sisters found themselves with a wealthy patron in the form of railroad magnate Cornelius Vanderbilt. He and Tennessee were rumored to be lovers. Stock Tips that she picked up during their relationship came in pretty handy during an eighteen, sixty, nine gold panic during which the sisters supposedly netted seven hundred thousand dollars. With. Vanderbilt's bankrolling Victoria and Tennessee then opened their own highly publicized firm named Woodhall Claflin and company becoming the first female stockbrokers on wall. Street. However they were never granted a seat on the New York Stock Exchange. It would take another near century before Muriel Siebert did in nineteen, sixty seven. In the same year that she became a stockbroker would attended her first suffragette rally and immediately became a passionate devotee of the 'cause. She befriended or beguiled a congressman to get her an invitation to testify before the House Judiciary Committee. She argued that women did already have the right to vote under the fourteenth and fifteenth amendments those granted persons born or naturalized in the United, states citizenship and prohibited voter discrimination. But the house declined to enact any legislation on the matter. Even still the appearance made her a celebrity among suffragettes. In. April. Of Eighteen seventy, just two months after opening her brokerage firm woodhull announced her candidacy for president of the United States on a platform of women's suffrage regulation of monopolies nationalization of railroads, an eight hour workday direct taxation. Abolition of the death penalty and welfare for the poor what whole helped organize the equal rights party. which nominated her at its May eighteen, seventy two. Famed abolitionist Frederick Douglass was selected as her running mate and told about eventually he never acknowledged it officially, and in fact, he campaigned for the incumbent Republican Ulysses s grant. What else name appeared on ballots in a couple of states. Knows for certain votes she received because apparently they weren't counted. All of this was essentially moot. Though considering that would hold did not reach the constitutionally required age of thirty five until six months after the inauguration. It would be nineteen, sixty four before a woman was actively considered for a nomination of a major party. When Margaret Smith qualified for the ballot of six state primaries even coming in second in Illinois. The only female candidate other than Clinton was faith spotted Eagle a native American activist who received a vote from Robert. Sexual. Junior. WHO's referred to as a faithless elector for not voting has pledged section also voted for why known Luke for vice. President. Luke is executive director of honor, the Earth a native environmental organization, which plays an active role in the Dakota access pipeline protests. The first American woman to win gold at the Olympics passed away fifty five years later never even realizing she had competed in the Olympics. At the nineteen hundred Paris Games Margaret Ives Abbott born in Eighteen, seventy eight won the women's nine Hole Golf Tournament on May Twenty second narrowly beating out England's Charlotte Cooper who won the tennis singles event on July eleven claim I t's. She was awarded a Porcelain Bowl rather than the medals that were used to. Something not done before or since at a Summer Games. Nineteen. Hundred was the first year in which women were even allowed to compete seeing eleven female athletes in the more lady like sports of Golf Tennis and yachting. The Olympics were held as part of the nineteen hundred Paris world's fair but due to staggeringly poor organization. Many of the competitors including Abbott didn't realize the events they participated in were part of the Olympics and not part of the wider world spare. Other events held at the fair but not approved by the. Included kite flying motorcycle racing and firefighting. The. Official competitions included cricket croquet a variation of handball called Basque Pelota. Tug of war and swimming. for which one winner was awarded a fifty pound bronze statue of Horse. This was also the only Olympic Games in history that used live animals specifically pigeons during the shooting events. Some ten million people were glued to their television sets on Saturday nights in nineteen ninety-three to follow the trials and tribulations of pioneer and pioneering female physician Dr. Quinn Medicine woman. Little. Fans know the first female doctor in America had received her license a scant two decades before that show takes place. Elizabeth Blackwell was born in a then prosperous British family the third of nine children in eighteen twenty one. Blackwell loved education and learning and help to support her family working as a teacher alongside her mother and two sisters after the death of her father. The inspiration to study medicine came from a friend who was dying of cancer and complained of the difficulty of being examined by a male doctor. Blackwell's pursuit would be no mean feat as women were considered not only intellectually but morally unfit to practice medicine not to mention little higher education was available to women and medical school was then as it is now, very expensive. Blackwell read medical textbooks in her landlord Dr Reverend John Dixon's library while continuing to teach and save up money for tuition after being rejected by all twenty nine medical schools in Philadelphia and new. York. Blackwell began applying to lesser known schools eventually being accepted at Geneva Medical College in western New York State. The. Administration had actually let the students decide whether or not to admit a woman the boys thought it was a big joke and voted yes. A woman studying medicine was such an aberration of the time that people would stop and stare at her on the streets. Blackwell stayed focused and devoted herself utterly to her studies. Even though she started mid-term, she became the head of her class and stayed there until she graduated in eighteen, forty, nine at age twenty eight. A medical degree was no blank check however. When Blackwell went to Europe to broaden her studies, no hospital would accept her except for one in Paris. On the condition that she be a student midwife and not Dr. Her dreams of being a surgeon would be taken from her completely along with one of her is by Pearland up the Malia, a severe conjunctiva itis often arising from gonorrhea what she contracted from handling a patient. Germ theory and widespread handwashing doctors were still a decade away. Moving back to New York Blackwell determined to open her own practice. But no landlord in the city would rent space to her for it. Eventually she hung out her shingle in Jersey City where business was initially pretty slow. To get her name out, blackwell began giving lectures on women's health and wrote articles on the importance of good hygiene exercise and Physical Education for girls in schools. Her sister emily. Her degree in eighteen fifty three. And the to open a women's and children's clinic in the slums of New York along with German midwife turned Dr Marie Cocco. Scott. After their first clinic closed they opened the New York Infirmary for women and children, which still exists to this day as Beekman. Downtown, hospital. It not only served the poor but provided a training facility and positions for female medical and nursing students. Blackwell would return to to lecture become the first woman to have her name entered on the medical register of the United Kingdom. A constant advocate for sanitary conditions, blackwell helped to establish the US sanitary commission in eighteen sixty one, a private relief agency created by federal legislation to support sick and wounded soldiers of the American civil. War. She also contributed by organizing a unit of female feel doctors and nurses. In eighteen, sixty eight, she founded the woman's Medical College of the New York Infirmary. One of the school students with Sophia Checks Blake who would later open a medical school for Women in London. Among the infirmaries I residents was Dr. Rebecca. Cole. Only the second African American woman to become a doctor in the United States. Coal received her degree in eighteen, sixty, seven, two years after the end of the civil war and three years after Rebecca Lee crump limited. Elizabeth, Blackwell overcame many hurdles that society had positioned between her and her desire to become a doctor. For Rebecca Chrysler, the journey would be even more difficult. Born eighteen thirty, one in Delaware crummer was raised by an aunt in Pennsylvania. Spent much of her time caring for sick and invalid neighbors. At Age Twenty one, she moved to Boston where she would work as a nurse for a year. Crummer had to train on the job as the first formal school of nursing wouldn't open for another twenty two years when she was admitted to New England Female Medical College in eighteen sixty on a scholarship from the Wade Scholarship Fund which was established by the Ohio abolitionist Benjamin. Wait. At that time of the fifty, four thousand physicians in the United States only three hundred were women and exactly zero of them were. African American. As late as nineteen twenty, there were only sixty five African. American. Women doctors in the United. States. On March first eighteen, sixty four, the board of trustees named her a doctor of medicine making her the first. African. American woman in the United States to earn the degree. And the only African American woman to graduate from the New England Female Medical College until it closed nine years later. After the civil war ended in eighteen, sixty five, she moved to Richmond Virginia bleeding it to be quote a proper field for real missionary work and one that would present ample opportunities to become acquainted with the diseases of women children. She also provided medical care to freed slaves under the US Bureau of Refugees Friedman and abandoned lands unpopular agency that was only intended to last for one year after the end of the war but lasted for seven. It will come as no surprise that crump ler was subjected to intense racism and sexism according to one source. Men Doctors snubbed her druggists bulked at filling her prescriptions and some people wise cracked that the MD behind her name stood for nothing more than mule driver. In eighteen eighty three grumbler published a book of medical discourses from the notes that she kept over the course of her career. One of the first books by an African American author about medicine. It was dedicated to mothers, nurses and all who desire to mitigate the afflictions of the human race. And focused on the medical care of women and children. Crumlin described the progression of the experiences that led her to study and practice medicine. It may be well to state here that having been reared by a kind aunt in Pennsylvania whose usefulness with the sick was continually sought. I early conceived a liking for and sought every opportunity to relieve the suffering of others. Her book also contains much of what we know about Chrysler in its introduction few records only one possible photograph of her have survived. This is where I was going to do a clever segue from Rebecca crump crummier to my Patriot supporters but I couldn't anything that didn't sound really shallow. So. Thank you to my Patriot supporters our newest supporters joining in the past month dawn and Gwen recently got to hear a bonus mini episode about the traditional folklore origin of a number of your favorite pok. Mon and you know you want to hear about that and don't forget that until we have found a way to reopen safely and we can call the Kobe crisis under control. All tears at Patriotair Dot com slash your brain on facts are receiving all levels of rewards. And also a big thanks to recent reviewers both of the podcast and of the your brain on facts book. You do have your copy of the book write. This reassuring review comes from Bill S. You're in the right place friend this is your source for the coolest little known facts in corrections on everything you thought you understood. The author writes this she speaks with a delightful blend of humor, wit and intelligence. Thank you so much bill and thank you to everyone who is leading reviews because it helps to please the mysterious Amazon Algorithm. So when somebody looks for a book similar to mine, it might show it to them. And thanks also to Jen Gen or not, or maybe John Again sorry. Who reviewed the podcast saying love love love this show can't get enough of the great writing and Maxi's rich voice like chocolate for your ears keep it up girl I bought the book to fantastic. No your fantastic. And don't be surprised if you ever see merch with the phrase chocolate for your ears. Hey let's brainstorm this would if it was chocolate for your ears and something for. Your. Brain. Okay hop over to our social media facebook instagram slash your brain on facts and twitter at brain on facts pot and fill in the blank. Chocolate for your ears blink for your mind. and. Speaking of chocolate have you tried the smart for life's Morris Bar yet? It's got a toasty Graham Flavor and nice and krispies on the inside and it's covered with. Like a proper tasting chocolate, not the sort of thing you get on a lot of diet or meal replacement bars. If you're not a big chocolate person, the lemon bar was also really tasty and if you want something savory, there are soups the whole nine yards. Pretty much everything I've tried in the smart for lifeline I've really enjoyed. And what's cool is it was designed by Dr who realized a busy lifestyle easily prevents you from eating properly and all the foods are designed by an award winning chef. So you get like a convergence of the best of both. and. Wait made that three worlds because you can also save money. You can go to smart for life dot Com and use the coupon code Moxie ten M. X I e one zero to save ten percents off your next order smart for. Life Dot Com. Three years before the death of Rebecca crummer in eighteen ninety, five, bessie Coleman the first female African American pilot was born the tenth of thirteen children in rural Texas. I wonder if they ever figured out what caused it. Her father was a tenant farmer who along with her older brothers abandoned the family leaving Coleman to care for her younger sisters as her mother struggled to provide for them. Even, through all that Coleman still manage to make it to the one room schoolhouse for miles away most of the time or at least borrow books from a traveling library wagon when she couldn't. And that's a service I. Think we need to bring back to sweep. Coleman was able to pay her way through one semester at Langston University in Oklahoma while working as a laundry s but couldn't afford to continue any longer. Coleman moved to Chicago where two of her brothers lived. Both had served in World War One and told stories of French women who could be pilots. Seeing no reason why she couldn't be a pilot as well. Coleman sought out every flight school she could find. Everyone turned her down whether it was for being a woman African. American or both dealer's choice. Undeterred Coleman figure that if women France were allowed to fly. than she should go to France. So Coleman found herself the only female and only person of color. At the CADRAN brothers, School of aviation where she completed the ten month course in seven months. On June Fifteenth Nineteen Twenty One bessie to the test for her pilot's licence and passed, she received her license from liberalistion aeronautic in Toronto's you know. Which I didn't need to over pronounce but as Now that she had pilot's license, she had to find a way to earn a living with it. Widespread commercial air travel was still a ways away but world war one produced a surplus of small aircrafts and pilots. Which created industries like giving pleasure rides or acrobatic flying shows prompting Kuhlman to return to Europe for six months for more advanced training. Debut in the US in September of Nineteen, twenty, two, the diminutive Coleman wore a military uniform. Tell her seem more important and official as she boarded her plane. The crowd was amazed as she performed figure rates loop de loops, barrel rolls, and other barnstorming stunts. quickly. Became Queen Bess Daredevil Aviatronics. The legend of Queen best spread and Coleman began to draw huge crowds of both black and white audiences wherever she went. When Coleman returned to her home state of Texas to perform in nineteen, twenty five, she refused to perform at venues with segregated gates. But for even the most successful performance aviator it's an expensive career, there's plane repair she had doctors bills from a bad crash and had to purchase a whole new plane. In addition to this, it was Coleman's dream to open a school of aviation specifically for African American students. Saving for that school was difficult. So Coleman began to supplement her pilot income with lectures as well as getting out of her comfort zone by getting out of the cockpit for parachute jumps and wing walking. On April Thirtieth Nineteen, twenty six while preparing for an air show in Jacksonville. Florida. Coleman and her mechanic went to scout locations for parachute jumps the following day. Observers reported the plane went into a dive and flipped. Coleman was thrown from the plane and died immediately. The plane crash to the ground killing the mechanic. It was later determined that a loose wrench had become jammed in the plane's controls. Over. Ten thousand people attended Coleman's funeral in Chicago. Three years later, the Bessie Coleman Aero Club was established. The School Coleman dreamed of trained many outstanding African American pilots including Willa Brown and many of the Tuskegee airmen. For years afterwards, the Challenger pilots, Association of Chicago, and later the Tuskegee airmen did a flyover of Lincoln cemetery on Coleman's birthday. While barnstorming was the thing to see in the roaring twenty s if you ask a member of generation X. or older to name a famous stunt performer, they would probably say evil knievel the motorcycle jumping holder of Guinness World record for most broken bones in a lifetime no joke at four, hundred, thirty, three. But when it comes to originality knievel pales in comparison to any Edson Taylor. The first person female or male to survive going over Niagara Falls in a barrel in October nineteen o one. This was a dangerous and exciting feet of derring-do pulled off by a very proper and arguably bland person. Widowed by the civil war, Taylor was having trouble making ends meet on her schoolteacher salary. Just. Nothing new under the Sun I guess. From, her home in Michigan she read about the Panamerican Exposition, a world's fair type event being held in Buffalo, which would later be remembered primarily as the scene of president McKinley assassination. Taylor was struck with an idea for what was essentially an absolutely bonkers retirement plan. With hundreds of thousands of people in the area for the Expo Taylor, set her sights to fame and fortune. With the sometimes reluctant help of to assistance. Tailor made a modified pickle barrel five feet tall by three feet in diameter and outfitted it with cushions including her lucky heart-shaped satin pillow and a leather harness to hold her in place lead weights would keep the barrel. Upright. She tested the barrel I with a cat who thankfully survived, and if it was her cat I, assume threw up in her shoes for the rest of its natural life. Look online you can see a photo of Taylor posing with the barrel and he's surprisingly calm looking capped. The plunge was set for October twenty fourth Taylor's sixty third birthday though she told the press, she was forty three. Even with everything in place the stunt almost didn't happen. The crew of the boat that had been hired to tow the barrel to the middle of the fast flowing Niagara River was reluctant to help what seemed like a nice lady suicide. Finally at four PM Taylor was sealed into the barrel towed to the appointed spot in cut loose. The rapids knocked the barrel around violently for nearly twenty minutes before it plunged over horseshoe falls. Taylor emerged from the barrel badly shaken with a small laceration her scalp. But otherwise unharmed. Fame came immediately. And left almost as quickly. Photo OPS and speaking engagements were set up for the woman dubbed Queen of the midst. But Taylor reportedly lacked any kind of charisma as a public speaker. Audiences found her some Nambu lent. The public quickly lost interest and moved on. Making. It that much harder to pull in a crowd Taylor's manager Frank Russell obscure ended the famous barrel, the key visual of her presentation. He also took much of her earnings and Taylor spent the rest hiring private investigators to try to find him. Though Taylor would die penniless in a nursing home at age eighty two. The name Queen of the mist lives on in the form of tart barrel aged beer from Martin House brewery in Texas, as well as an off Broadway musical from two thousand eleven. Taylor was even the subject of an episode of the NICKELODEON. Game. Show legends of the Hidden Temple and if that's not immortality I, don't know what is. She's buried in the stutters section of the Oakwood cemetery in Niagara Falls. New York. The first man to survive going over the falls was bobby leach who made a custom metal barrel that looked rather like a submarine in in which he fractured booth kneecaps and his jaw. Leach was able to parlay his accomplishments into a lucrative career. Until he died from injuries sustained from slipping on an orange peel. Taylor nearly didn't have the title of first person to survive a barrel born trip over the falls. Only, a month earlier, an attempt was made by one Maude Willard. But disaster struck early on her barrel became caught in a whirlpool and was stuck there for hours. When it was finally pulled from the river, Willard was found dead of apparent suffocation. She had decided for whatever reason to take her pet Fox terrier with her and the dog having much better survival instincts than its owner head lodged its nose in the barrels only. Air Hole. While going over Niagara, falls may seem about as current as barn dances and chasing a metal hoop with stick as recently as nineteen ninety-five, a man named Robert. Ever over horseshoe falls on a Jetski. In case, this story has planted the germ of dangerous idea in my listeners mind. please. Be Aware that of the fifteen people who went over the falls for reasons other than suicide. Five died. Also going over the falls with a vessel is illegal on both the New York and Ontario. Despite inspiring more than a century's worth of copycats Taylor herself was not an advocate of anyone else ever going over the falls. If it was with my dying breath. She was quoted as saying I would caution anyone against attempting the feat. I. would sooner walk up to the mouth of Canon knowing it was going to blow me two pieces than make another trip over the false. And that we run out of ideas at least today. But back to Valentina Tereshkova who in nineteen sixty three was chosen to take part in eight dual flight in the Vostok program. Well Cosmonaut Valeri because ski was circling in Vostok Five Tereshkova was launched in Vostok six. The. Two space craft came within three miles of one another allowing them to communicate over their radios for a brief time. Tereshkova craft was guided by an automatic control system. So she was never actually flying the rocket. After nearly three days in space. Six reentered the atmosphere and Tereshkova successfully parachuted to earth and into the history books as the first woman in space. Thanks for spending part of Your Day with me. Stay safe out there.

bessie Coleman New York Edson Taylor Elizabeth Blackwell United States Valentina Tereshkova Olympics horseshoe falls Paris president United Margaret Ives Abbott Muriel Siebert Tennessee bobby leach Rebecca Lee crump New England Female Medical Col Cornelius Vanderbilt Europe
11 Trivia Questions on Tri-Villa

Trivia With Budds

13:01 min | 11 months ago

11 Trivia Questions on Tri-Villa

"It's eleven trivia questions on tree villa. That's right it's a play on words of Trivia and Villa and it's all about houses picked by Patriot Subscriber Matt Pollick. This trivia with buds won't be and welcome to another episode of the Trivia. The Buds podcast. I'm your host Ryan Buds. Thanks checking out the show at Dick's relieving I tunes reviews. If you dig the show or don't dig the Shell Leave Review and let me know an email so I can send you some cool stuff in the mail. Just send me an email Ryan Buds. Gmail.com say hey. My name is goat sleeper sixty five and left review the other day and I would like a bottle opener or whatever and I will send you some cool stuff in the mail. I might even send you a thank you card or one of these very interesting cards that I'm GONNA show off on Youtube. You might get a kick out of just hearing them as well on the podcast. These are from a store at the mall by my house and at store is called. Ooh I forget. What the heck is it called? It's like papyrus but it's not papyrus something with fun cards. They have notebooks and cards and backpacks and stuff so they have this big section of the back that has all clearance cards and some are birthday anniversary etc. So I thought these were fun. This just says Pizza Party bed pizza party bed. You could send that to your best Pale if they like pizza party in bed Best wishes to you and your wedding day. Just a nice traditional kind of card. This one's great says Happy Birthday Old Chap and you have a nice guy in black and white from way back in the day with a slick Haircut Lincoln. Antea happy birthday old. Shep cheers to the king and you have the king from a deck of cards. This is how much I love you. This is pop card and I haven't even opened it yet but it a gets really really big and wide. So it's like this is how much I love you This is great. I'm really gonNA miss your face. That's going away card and get a big gorilla there with some cool pop art effects and cheers the amazing couple. That's if you know somebody get married. Cheers to the amazing couple. Here's to laid on your birthday. There's a nice old sixties picture of a guy and a girl in Hawaii or some sort of Hawaiian set and merry Christmas to my favorite wizard. That's a great Harry Potter licensed card so I thought I would share those just a few fun ones. If you have some events coming up go check out this store them all that. I don't remember the name of you will. I think it's it's called TYPO. Typ TYPO is the name of that store and they have it at the Anterior Mills Mall Ontario California. But maybe they have one at your mall to today's episode is a Patriot topic. Pick from the old Patriot spreadsheet if you WanNa know what that is the Patriot dot com slash trivial with buds and donate five dollars or more. I give you access to an ongoing Google sheet that we have and you can enter any topics you want for every month. You are a patron of the show my friend Jordan and wreck my podcast. He's gone on there and he has filled in the entire year so he's got a lot of good picks up. Jen. What did that too? She wants. Moulana in March two thousand ten's music two thousand and ten musicals Or the decade of two thousand ten. That's what she's saying. Musicals from the decade two thousand ten to twenty the greatest showman specifically Captain Marvel and more. So you can go on there and you can do that. You can pick whatever you want to do as a topic on the show and if you are at the twenty two year or higher get to be a guest on the show. So that's something that interests you. If you have something you want to promote or you just like answering Trivia questions on skype or in person if you live near me in southern California you could be on the show getting ready to record a bunch episodes with Chicago Zone Brenda Martinez in the next few weeks to catch up on the ones that we've missed for her rewards over the last few months on. Today's topic is for Matt. Pollock and for the first topic he picked last month he did tree via which was a play on words about treat related. Trivia. And he's done it again this month. It's three villa and it's like a house house related thing so it's GonNa be a ton of fun houses and Building Related Trivia. I think you will have a bunch of fun with these. We're going to jump into these eleven questions right now. Here we go all right. Here's the first question in your famous houses quiz written by Mike Maximum Chuck. Mike says there's no place like home especially these humble abodes a quiz on famous houses. Some real in some from movies. Here's number one. Falling water is a house built partly over a waterfall on bear run in Pennsylvania. Who designed this house question number? One Who designed famous house called falling water question number two this one thousand nine hundred eighty six movie stars. Tom Hanks and shelley long as a young couple struggling to repair a hopelessly dilapidated house. What is that movie from? Eighty six number two question number three this historic Chateau esque style mansion was built for George Vanderbilt the second and is in Asheville North Carolina. What is that famous historic mansion number? Three number four this fantasy slash romance movie is about a relationship that forms between an architect and the doctor who lived in his new house. Two years previously only able to communicate bypassing letters in the houses mailbox the pair begin to fall in love. What is that movie number? Four number five this other vanderbilt Italian Renaissance Mansion is located in Newport Rhode Island. The Mansion was built as the Newport summer home of Cornelius Vanderbilt. The second what was the name of the mansion question number six when George and Kathy Lutz. Move into a beautiful new house in a small town. Upstate NEW YORK. They think the places to to be true. In what movie do they find out? The cheap price tag is thanks to the houses sordid history. The former tenant murdered his family after supposedly being possessed by the devil. What's scary movie? Is that number six question number seven. This House and estate was the primary plantation of Thomas Jefferson the third president of the US began designing this house after inheriting land from his father at age. Twenty six what is that famous state number? Seven and question number eight. What Steven King Book turned movie? Features a psychology professor a team of psychics and a gifted girl who awakened spirits in a supposedly dormant haunted mansion. What book is that number? Eight question number nine. This nineteen thirty painting by grant. Wood is in the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago would was inspired to paint a house. Elden Iowa along with the kind of people I fancied should live in that house. What is the name of that House and Painting Number Nine and question number ten? The House of the seven gables is a sixteen sixty eight colonial mansion in Salem Massachusetts named for its Gables. The House was made famous by American author who wrote the House of the seven gables in eighteen fifty one who wrote the house of the seven gables and eighteen fifty one and number eleven. What mansion located on a Louisiana plantation is named for its distinguishing visual feature an eight hundred foot long alley created by a double row of southern live oak trees planted in the early eighteenth century long before the present house was built. What is the name of that famous location? Those are all your questions for today's quiz for Matt. Pollock Matt help. You had fun with these House Related Questions and Mike Maxim Chuck. Thanks for right now. We'll be right back in just a second with the answers. We are back with the answers to treat villa which is a fun. Little thing Matt pollock came up with thank you Matt and thank you Mike for Right in the questions years number one falling water is a house built partly over a waterfall on bear run in Pennsylvania. Who designed this house? That was Frank Lloyd. Wright's when in doubt Frank Lloyd Wright as famous designer of a famous house number one number two this nineteen eighty-six movie stars. Tom Hanks and shelley long is a young couple struggling to repair a hopelessly dilapidated house. That's the money pit number two the money pit number three historic Chateau ask style. Mansion was built for George Vanderbilt the second and is Nashville North Carolina that is called the Biltmore Estate. The BILTMORE ESTATE NUMBER FOUR. This fantasy romance movie is about a relationship that forms between an architect doctor who lived in his house two years previously. That movie is called the Lake House with Kiana Reeves and Sandra Bullock. And I remember they built the set the house for it. On a small Little Lake in Willow Springs Illinois not farmed for Not far from where I grew up in a place called the Ashbury coffeehouse where I did some of my first standup shows in Chicago land. So we used to go and look at that around two thousand four two thousand five. I think it was. We would drive and go try and find the Lake House from the Lake House number five. This other vanderbilt. Italian Renaissance Mansion is located in Newport Rhode Island. The Mansion was built as the Newport summer home of Cornelius Vanderbilt. The second that is called the breakers the breakers number six when George and Kathy Lutz moved into their beautiful house. They didn't know why it was so cheap but it was because the last guy killed his family their amityville horror. Is that movie number six. The AMITYVILLE horror remade in two thousand and five or so with Ryan Reynolds. That's the only one I've seen actually number seven. This House and estate was the primary plantation of Thomas Jefferson that was called Monticello. Monticello home of Indiana Beach Monticello. Indiana which is closing just saw not too long ago. I may have mentioned on the podcast but that was where we went on our family vacations every year. Indiana beach to Monticello Indiana. Also the name of that state from Thomas Jefferson Number Eight. What Steven King Book turned movie? Features the psychology professor at team of psychics and a gifted girl who awakened spirits. Rose Red Rose Red number nine. This nineteen thirty painting by grant. Wood is in the Art Institute of Chicago. And it's about an Iowa out. It's called the American Gothic House. American GOTHIC and number ten. The House of the seven gables is a sixteen sixty eight colonial mansion in Salem Massachusetts. Who wrote the House of the seven gables? In eighteen fifty one nathaniel Hawthorne Nathaniel. Hawthorne and your final question answer what mansion located on a Louisiana Plantation. Has that eight hundred foot long alley that is called Oak Alley Oak Alley a famous staple. You've probably seen pictures or maybe in real life and there you have it eleven questions and answers for Matt Pollick. I hope he had fun playing along with those Matt and everybody else who listens to watches the show. If you WANNA support the show like Matt does go to Patriot. Dot Com slash trivia with buds and sign up for one of the tears between one and fifty dollars for fifty dollars a month you could access to all of my life. Trivia slide that I use it all my life trivia nights so if you're a trivia host that may be the one for you and for just a buck you could access to our discord APP chat or you can chat with other Trivia minded folks and have some fun interacting with pop culture. Things I post on there extra puzzles and games and links and blogs and thanks so go check that out y'all GonNa thinks in all these show notes of every episode and sometimes give you a verbal. Thanks on the show by reading. Those names out loud guys. Thanks for listening to the show. Thanks for telling a friend about the show but before we get out of here we have a question of the day brought to you by me and that question today is which ingredients are used for making ants on a log. What ingredients are used to make something called ants on a log? Tweet me your answer. It Ryan buds or email Ryan buds gmail.com to be eligible for a prize. Yesterday's question that a answer was the devil's rejects and your Trivia team. Name of today is menace to sobriety. Thank you for listening to the show. Thanks for telling a friend about the show. And we'll see you tomorrow for more. Trivia with buds cheers

Matt Ryan Buds American Gothic House Matt Pollick George Vanderbilt Matt pollock Cornelius Vanderbilt Lake House Lake House Thomas Jefferson vanderbilt Italian Renaissance Mike Maxim Chuck Tom Hanks Chateau esque style mansion Newport summer Steven King Art Institute of Chicago Salem Massachusetts shelley long
William Walker usurped Nicaraguan presidency - July 12, 1856

This Day in History Class

07:37 min | 1 year ago

William Walker usurped Nicaraguan presidency - July 12, 1856

"From fireworks on the Fourth of July two long holiday weekends away there's plenty to look forward to during the summer but why way to celebrate new deliciously spreadable could Khanna cheese singles is giving you a reason to celebrate every single day with their their single best. Stay sweepstakes visit create with Kana Dot Com for your chance to win fifty dollars daily prizes and a grand prize of one thousand dollars plus get tips and inspiration to help make every single day the best day ever this day in history class is production of iheartradio. Welcome to this day in history class where we bring you a new tidbit from history every day. Today is July Eli Twelfth Two Thousand Nineteen. The Day was July twelve eighteen fifty six American filibuster William Walker. Walker was inaugurated as president of Nicaragua Walker was born in Nashville Tennessee in eighteen twenty four. He went on to study medicine in law and later he became the CO owner and editor of the New Orleans Crescent Walker Walker wasn't inherent of the philosophy of manifest destiny. A nineteenth century believed that U._S.. Territorial expansion across the North American continent was inevitable and destined by God. It was a belief that encouraged the displacement and persecution of many indigenous people and people of color on the continent after moving to San Francisco then Marysville near Sacramento Walker began devising a scheme to conquer parts of Latin America to create new slave states to add to the United States. This was not a new idea filibustering or freebooting was the practice of engaging in unauthorized warfare against countries that the U._S. was at peace with the government did not approve these armed expeditions and they were a violation of federal a law that said it was illegal to wage war against countries that were at peace with the U._S.. In the years before the civil war many foolhardy Americans set out to seize territory in central and South America Walker made his motivations clear. You're saying the following that which you ignorantly call Filibuster ISM is not the offspring of hasty passion or ill regulated desire. It is the fruit of the shore an airing instincts which act in accordance with laws as old as the creation they are but dribblers who speak of establishing fixed relations between the pure white American race as it exists in the United States and the mixed Hispanic and Indian race as it exists in Mexico and Central America without the employment of force Walker I look toward Mexico. He tried to get permission from Mexico to create a colony there under the guise that it would serve as a fortified frontier but when Mexico said no walker decided to just plan an invasion he went back to San Francisco and began recruiting people for the invasion who supported slavery and manifest destiny and who were looking for some sort of success in eighteen fifty three he and his crew captured Lopez the capital of the Mexican state of Baja California and called it the Republic of Lower California later called the Republic of the Nora he declared himself president and adopted Louisiana State codes which made slavery legal though more Americans joined him in Mexico supplies were lacking. And neither Mexico nor the U._S.. Government were happy with his actions by eighteen fifty four walker and the band of invaders were forced to surrender and leave Mexico still when Walker went to trial in California for starting an illegal war and violating getting the neutrality act of seventeen ninety four the jury acquitted him and just eight minutes so walker continued his filibustering efforts could took advantage of civil war in Nicaragua to bring mercenaries in the country and captured the city of Granada U._S.. President Franklin Pierce recognized walkers regime as legitimate and on July twelfth eighteen fifty six walker became president of Nicaragua Walker reinstated slavery declared English the official language and encouraged immigration immigration from the U._S.. Through changes to currency and fiscal policy. He promoted the filibustering expedition as a way to expand slavery to win the support of U._S.. Southerners but Walker had already earned the anger of Cornelius Vanderbilt who controlled transit businesses in Nicaragua Costa Rica El Salvador Honduras and Guatemala also opposed Walker and his plans of military conquest Walker surrendered to Commander Charles Henry Davis of the U._S. Navy on May first. I eighteen fifty-seven Walker was welcomed back when he returned to the U._S.. But when he went to Honduras on another filibuster in eighteen sixty the British government had too much strategic and economic interests in the region to tolerate his ploys and they shut the operation down a commander in the British Royal Navy sent him to Honduran authorities instead of Cindy come back to the United States. Walker was executed in Trujillo on September twelve eighteen sixty once the U._S.. Civil war broke out in eighteen sixty one filibustering died out before the end of the war Walker was remembered. Fondly in the southern and western United States for his exploit dubbed the Gray I'd man of destiny by his admirers many northerners on the other hand saw him as a pirate Central American countries viewed his defeat with pride but walkers recognition soon faded into history. I'm Eve Jeffcoat and hopefully you know a little more about about history today than you did. Yesterday you can learn more about history by following us on twitter facebook and instagram at t the I H C podcast. Thanks for joining me. On this trip through time few here and the exact same spot tomorrow for more podcasts from iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows creature feature looks at some of the most mind blowing animal and human behaviors on the planet it tries to get inside the heads of animals and explores the world from their point of view host Katie golden studied psychology and evolutionary biology at Harvard. She runs a popular parody account called bird rights activist at propert rights that answers the burning question what if a bird was a political political pundit each episode features a new guest comedian as they explore incredible animal and human behaviors. Some of the specific topics of discussion in this season are dodd behavior like studies that show dogs fill jealousy when another dog receives better rewards for the same tricks and weird animals that seem like they come out of science fiction like sea squirts that undergo retrogressive metamorphosis and auto cannibalized their own brains every Wednesday Katie introduces.

Nicaragua Walker New Orleans Crescent Walker Wa United States Mexico Sacramento Walker walker president Nicaragua San Francisco Kana Dot Com President Franklin Pierce Nicaragua Costa Rica El Salvad twitter apple Central America Nashville Honduras Katie golden
Why are French Fries called French Fries?

Everything Everywhere Daily

08:26 min | 5 months ago

Why are French Fries called French Fries?

"Everyone loves French fries. It's one of the few things which most people can agree on the world today. The average American consumes over sixteen pounds of them every year, and they've become a staple part of the cuisine in countries all over the world yet why do Americans call them French fries? What do the French have to do with it? Learn more about the history of this ubiquitous food and learn what the French did or did not have to do with it on this episode of everything everywhere daily. This episode is brought to you by audible dot com. If you're interested in the history of what we eat and how it came to be that way the book I'd recommend is considered the fork a history of how we cook and eat by be Wilson. In it she goes into detail of how the techniques and the kitchen shaped how what we eat everything from the twenty thousand year old mortar and festival to the microwave, oven You can get a free one-month trial to audible and to free audiobooks by going to audible trial dot com slash everything everywhere or by clicking on the link in the show notes. Before we can talk about the French fry we I have to back up and talk about the origins of the potato. The potato originated in South America where the people there have been cultivating it for thousands of years it was first brought to Europe by the Spanish in the late fifteen hundreds were they found it to grow quite well and fun fact the Monastery Garden in Guadalupe Spain was the first place outside of the Americas where the potato was grown. Potatoes were probably brought there because it was where Queen Isabella was staying and I was told this because I took a tour of the monastery two years ago. I'M NOT GONNA go into too much depth because believe it or not. The story of the potato is actually really important and it was responsible for much of the growth of Europe in the eighteenth and nineteenth century and I may dedicate an entire episode to it in the future. The potato wasn't accepted at first many people thought it caused diseases like leprosy and it was mainly used to feed pigs. The popularity of potato was largely due to one man. Antoine Augustus Parmentier. During the seven years' war, he was captured by the Prussians and spend time in a Prussian jail where he was given potato seat, he found them to be extremely edible and realize that the beliefs held about potato is back in France we're faults upon his release. He began heavily promoting potatoes. He did publicity stunts like holding potato themed banquets for the nobility and the king and growing potato patch, and putting heavily armed guards around it to make the crop seem more valuable. He then told the guards to accept any bribes from people who wanted to steal the potatoes and turn a blind eye to anyone who snuck in in the middle of the night to take them. By the French revolution potatoes were really taking off in France, there were street carts serving fried potatoes, which became known as fruits, which is what they're known as today in French. We can pin down a date. Thanks to Thomas. Jefferson. Who in eighteen to had his chef a Frenchman named on Julianne, prepare a menu for a White House state dinner with does served in the French manner they were described as potatoes deep fried while raw in small cuttings. That's pretty close to describing French fries as we know them today however, while we can confidently pin down this eighteen to date as a first instance of the word French and fried being used for potatoes that doesn't mean idea originated in the late eighteenth century France. One popular version of the French fry origin story holds that in the late seventeenth century and what is today the Muse Valley in? People regularly would fry small fish is one of their staple foods. When there was no fish, they would cut up potatoes into thin strips to mimic the shape of a small fish and then they would fry those. This technique according to this version of the story then spread to France when potatoes finally became a popular and acceptable food one hundred years later. This seems to be the best evidence of where the ideas of fried potatoes originated from somewhere in what is today France or Belgium people began frying potatoes around the end of the seventeenth to late eighteenth century. But why do Americans call them? French. Fries. There is no universally agreed upon explanation, but there are several competing theories. The first is why mentioned above? Thomas Jefferson and others began cooking potatoes in the French way. This implies an early adoption of what was called the French technique which was frying. The second explanation comes from Ireland. In Old Irish to French something means to cut into small pieces. When the Great Irish migration to the US occurred starting in eighteen forty five due to the Irish potato famine they brought with them to the United States the dish of French potatoes which were fried. They then became French fries. The country of France really doesn't have anything to do with. The third explanation and the one which is championed by the Belgians is that in World War. One. American soldiers were served dish in Belgium where they were called Fritz. Because the Belgian spoke French the American called it French fruits which quickly got Americanized into French fries. The World War One story as enduring it might be is almost certainly not true. The first written occurrence was in eighteen, fifty six in the book cookery for maids of all work by British author allies. A WARREN There are also several other mentioned French fried potatoes in the United States in the eighteen fifties as well. Americans also have a bunch of other words, fried potatoes, thicker cut ones called steak fries which are closer to the British ships. American fries are just fried chunks of potato, and of course, there is also the self-described waffle and curly fries. So if Americans call them French fries, why do the British call them chips? This is actually a much more straightforward story a cut piece of fruit or vegetable was called a chip. Fried. Fish and fried chipped potatoes were separate dishes but eventually combined to make the staple known as fish and chips. The first known fish and chip shops we're in London in the eighteen sixties. Fish and chips is undoubtedly the national dish of the United Kingdom oddly enough fried potatoes have that distinction in several other countries as well. In the United States, a hamburger with French fries is pretty much as classic American cuisine as you're going to find. In Canada, the national dish is Putin, which is really a dish that originated in Quebec which is French fries covered in gravy and cheese. Kurds. Finally. Belgium has never given up the tradition plain old fruits and a paper cone with Mayonnaise is probably the most well known food in the country. Belgium to this day has the highest per capita consumption of fried potatoes in the world. While I'm on the subject I should give a shout out to the potato chip or whether. British, call crisps. The American legend is that an African. American restaurant owner George Crumb from Saratoga Springs New York invented them in eighteen fifty three according to the story. One of his customers was served fried potatoes and sent them back because they were too thick. Chrome. Angry. At having to prepare another dish this time cut them so thin that they couldn't be eaten with a fork. Surprisingly they were a massive hit and we're soon called Saratoga chips. In some versions of the story that customer was Cornelius Vanderbilt. Sadly, the story is probably Apocryphal as there are mentions in cookbooks as early as eighteen, twenty two. ND potatoes fried in slices or shavings. Whether, you call them. French. Fries, chips or palm fruits. The Fried Potato has become one of the few staple dishes. You can find almost every country in the world today. Executive producer of everything everywhere. Daily is a Makhala. Today's review comes from Emma fern who left to review over at Apple podcasts they. The greatest podcasts and sliced bread Gary has created the greatest podcast since sliced bread as matter of fact, he is an episode on the greatest thing since bread. Thank you very much M fern and indeed I do have an episode on that that is episode eight. So if you haven't listened to it, please go back and a big thanks to all of you who've left review to all of you who have supported the show over on Patriot on dot com.

France French Fries Belgium United States Thomas Jefferson Europe Wilson Antoine Augustus Parmentier France Queen Isabella South America Muse Valley United Kingdom Executive producer Emma fern London Monastery Garden Julianne
260 | Root of the Matter

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

11:00 min | Last month

260 | Root of the Matter

"Welcomed aaron mckie's cabinet of curiosities production of heart radio and grim and mild. Our world is full of the unexplainable and if history is an open book all of these amazing tales. Right there on display just waiting for us to explore. Welcome to the cabinet of curiosities. The attempted murder by poison case grabbed the nation's attention in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine in fact even the most seasoned investigators in austin texas had never seen another case like it. The victim simply referred to as treaty had been one of austin's oldest and most beloved residence the last living survivor of a legendary council. The intended victim spent their days in the city's historic district where they stood witness to a lot of history over the years from the rebuilding of the state capital in eighteen. Eighty eight or the austin dam failure to the construction of several bridges and airports and the first days of the dell computer corporation and throughout all this elderly citizens serve the community. Well in the early years negotiations and other pivotal meetings had been treaties thing hence the nickname although to be fair councilmen and other leaders weren't the only ones to sit in the company of such an esteemed citizen rain or shine heat or cold austin's oldest resident was always there for the people of the city. Try as they may. No one could figure out why someone would want to poison such a truly outstanding member of society. Investigators couldn't ask either because treaty was dying and incapable of talking as the news spread. Get well cards from children. Poured in small gifts began to pileup. A local spiritualist even tried her healing powers by transferring positive energy during which time she claimed the treaty had once in another life ben in addition woman named alexandria lacking scientific or spiritual abilities of their own. Most citizens just wish treaty. Speedy recovery others sent in chicken soup. Texas resident and industrialist. Ross perot wrote a blank check for all care and treatment as well as funding for the investigation telling officials that no matter how much it cost or how long it would take just sent him. The bill with generous funding specialists were called in and extensive round. The clock work begin. Nationwide news reports sparked outrage across the country. An innocent victim was barely clinging to life. The story even appeared in people magazine as word spread so too did offers to help. The manufacturer of the chemical used in the poisoning offered a ten thousand dollar reward for the capture of the assailants. On june twenty-ninth police arrested paul. Cullen who had been bragging about the attempted murder and while we might imagine he'd poison treaty because of an outcome of one of the many negotiations in the past collins said it had to do with a spell he'd been in love you see and no not with the elderly residents. It seems that he'd been infatuated with a counselor who hadn't returned. his affection. Treaty was just available after the poisoning. Colin return to the scene of the crime to him watching his victim. Fade represented the death of his love for the counselor. While heroic efforts underway to save treaties life jurors in the case debated on life imprisonment for colon. Although they eventually agreed on just nine years he'd go on to serve three of those and paid a one thousand dollar fine and while it seems justice wasn't served treaty not only survived but also managed to outlive. Cullen who died a few years later of course healing took a lot of time as you might imagine a powerful poison had been used an early side facts enough to kill one hundred trees today. Treaty is thriving in fact for the first time since the poisoning. Acorns have been gathered. You see treaty is an oak tree. More appropriately species called a texas live oak and according to the national forestry association the most perfect specimen of type of tree in north america austin's oldest living resident is over six hundred years old treaty and another thirteen. Texas live oaks. Were once called the council oaks and were the sacred meeting ground for native americans long before settlers took over the region. There's no doubt that the attempted murder case is certainly bizarre. In fact i can't help. It agree with the people of austin. Why would anyone want to kill the treaty oak. And why couldn't they just leave them alone. This episode of cabinet of curiosities was made possible by hendrick's gin made in a tiny scottish seaside village and deliciously infused with roseanne cucumber it's a concoction invented by master distiller leslie gracie who supervises each batch five hundred leaders at a time and believe it or not hendrix. Has its own cabinet of curiosities. There's is an actual cabinet to which is located inside the hendrick's gin palace in girvan scotland. This lack cabinet is mislead gracie stores all the curious gen concoctions. She has crafted. There's a hendrickson cocktail. For all kinds of occasions to this holiday delight your guests with a delectable yet easy to make cocktail like the hendrix cranberry phys think of it as the perfect refreshment to sit on round the fire on a cold winter day. And it's really simple to make to just one part hendrix to park. Cranberry juice and one part sparkling wine then. You combine all ingredients that glass filled with ice. Stir them lightly and garnished with cucumber slices. Mint and cranberries considerate for your next holiday party. This winter hendrick's gin escaped the conventional embrace the delectable find more recipes at hendrick's gin dot com. Great cocktails start with responsible measuring. Please enjoy the unusual responsibly. Hendrick's gin forty four percent alcohol by volume twenty twenty imported by william grant and sons inc. New york new york at twenty six victoria found herself in a scandal. There would be others plenty of them. In fact i involved or marriage or more appropriately divorce you see in eighteen sixty four women who divorce their husbands were not only blamed for the marriage failing but they were also socially shunned. It didn't matter that victoria was the sole financial supporter while her husband spent his days. Either drunk or womanizing so with two children in tow victoria divorced him leaving a trail of gossip behind her. The talk didn't bother her though she'd grown up with worse her father had been an abusive con artist but instead of going along with the social norms that women didn't disclose such things victoria talked. Women's rights became her passion and she believed women shouldn't have to stay in abusive marriages and that their role in society was far more than wife or mother. She married again a couple of years later. This time to a former union. Army colonel james harvey blood who was also a free thinker the to settle down in new york where he introduced victoria to others. Also taking part in reform movements soon. Victoria's sister tammy also moved to new york. Women's rights were the only subjects near and dear to the two sisters hearts though they also believed in equality and restore stanchly anti-slavery victoria quickly became interested in politics and attended rallies where her own speeches of equality were considered radical by eighteen. Seventy victoria antennae. Well known for spiritualism soon becoming mediums for the wealthy cornelius. Vanderbilt railroad tycoon was so taken with the two sisters that he set them up in their own business. A stock brokerage firm making them the first women stockbrokers in america. And here's the thing. They were good at it vanderbilt. Made millions from victoria antennaes recommendations. It made them wealthy to prompting the new york herald to call them. The queens of wall street the idea that women were holding down such a position much less out doing their male counterparts. Didn't go over very well soon. Men's journals published articles depicting the to as immoral on chaperoned women. They underestimated victoria though and she decided to fight fire with fire. That's when the sisters sold the stock brokerage firm and founded their own newspaper aside for women's rights and suffrage they printed controversial articles on spiritualism human rights birth control and even vegetarianism mostly though the paper set the stage. For victoria's run for higher office the american presidency and this was well before women were even allowed to vote outrageous for the times. Sure but victoria was just getting started. Victoria chose a running partner. That most of us would recognize today. Frederick douglass but in a world where the public feared the mixing of black and white citizens a woman running for president had to be one thing choosing a black man for a vice president sent much of the public really friends and supporters of incumbent president ulysses s grant quickly attacked. Her character. victoria woodhull was wicked. They said one accuser. Prominent minister henry ward beecher claimed that aside from being twice married and a promoter of free love vittoria had also engaged in numerous affairs with married men when victoria learned that beecher himself had been having an affair with a married woman in his congregation. She exposed the minister as a hypocrites publishing the details of the affair in her own newspaper. The story quickly became a national scandal and as a result victoria was arrested or crime publishing obscene content. She was eventually cleared of all charges on a technicality. By then though the election was over and all the controversy surrounding her had inspired. Harper's weekly cartoonist. Thomas nast the publish. A sketch of her. It showed a woman carrying multiple children and strapped with an angry drunken husband on her back as she struggled to walk up a treacherous mountain. In the sketch victoria holds a sign that reads save yourself with free love and the caption beneath it read. I'd rather travel the hardest path of matrimony than follow in your footsteps. Nast had depicted victoria as the devil. Incarnate spurring another nickname mrs satan. Although today we call her something else a trailblazer. I hope you've enjoyed today's guided tour of the cabinet of curiosities. Subscribe for free on apple podcasts or learn more about the show by visiting curiosities. Podcast dot com. The show was created by me. Aaron mckie in partnership with. How stuff works. I make another award. Winning show called lor is podcast book series and television show and you can learn all about it over at the world of lor dot com and until next time stay curious.

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Tuesday 3/3/20 - What'd They Do: John D. Rockefeller

Chicago Dog Walk

20:41 min | 11 months ago

Tuesday 3/3/20 - What'd They Do: John D. Rockefeller

"Are Epidemic today. S Tuesday march third buckle to the dog walk presented by Barstool sports chief. How you doing today? I'm doing great happy back in Chicago. Happy to be back on dog. Walk on Tuesdays. Yeah it's great to have you back as ask people now as we talked about on radio all week. You're in Toronto at the Pond Hockey Tournament Lake Muskoka. It was great and met a lot of people who love dog. Walk so shout out to those guys in no. You're listening so that was an unusual. Have I didn't never occurred to me that people up in the Hell Lake Muskoka Northern Ontario would be like. Oh my God. I love dog. Walk get when we changed the name. That's all start funding in these said that they went back all the way to the summer. Listen through the whole Cadillac. What's Ed Lake? What's a good guy? Yeah Ed's a good guide. You guys really liked API. We'd loved him so they're out all the standard dog law questions But speaking of that you probably I would assume had a good Miller time moment there. I mean it's the best. There's nothing better than you store. Those Miller's in the coal on the side of the rank you pop them with your buddies like that is something that you will remember those mealtime moments upon hockey definitely fits into that. Yeah no social media. You're not going to remember that you're going to remember. What kind of cooler do we go with? I didn't even bring a phone down to the rink really so it was just about experiencing it. Having those Miller lights on the sidelines are outside the boards. And just sitting there your cold but you feel good. It's like a weird sensation and Yeah Miller was that is to me like Miller time moment. Yeah you didn't miss a plan because you're on your Franz scrawl on twitter. Whatever you were sitting there you have Nice Miller time moment with talking to people you know cheers and talk and Chattan all over Miller lite and that is you know. We need more of that in this day and age for sure. So there's a great tasting ninety-six Calorie Miller lite. French should always come before followers. Here's to the original light beer. Here's the original social media. It's Miller time celebrate responsibly. Miller brewing company Milwaukee Wisconsin Ninety six calories and three point two carbs per twelve ounces chief today. I believe we are doing What did they do? Yeah what did they do so we decided to do John Rockefeller because this is the anniversary of actually his son being like fuck everything. I quit From from running standard oil and he wouldn't become a full full time philanthropist donated. You've heard Rockefeller Center in you. Are you okay? So that's them they. Have you ever heard of the UN building not night? Okay obviously the night nations. You know how that site came to be. The Rockefeller family was just like here. Six blocks do whatever you want with it. They owned like they had so much money and they just could just piss it away. Just give it away like how much six blocks are. Real Estate Manhattan has to be worth like an insane amount. Craig I think about people who own one property apartment there. It's blocks and they're just like you can have it. That's credits donation. Infinite amounts of money. Because that's where people would know him by. It's like I would. Who Do you think I ever Rockefeller Right? So it's money of Rockefeller but but it's but no one I feel like there's certainly people our age because the name has now Kinda like there were grandsons and things over senators and congressmen and But the family name isn't as prominent as it was probably in our parents generation certainly not In our grandparents so maybe people today in our listeners. Don't really know where that came from for sure. I guess the other time we've talked about have on the show. Was THE STREETCAR Conspiracy. Yeah he was a part of that so he wanted to keep you know gasoline going. I think that was actually one of his sons or his legacy but yeah he was the Rockefeller family has. And maybe we'll do that later. This week maybe tomorrow get into some of their conspiracy theories around that family but today is more about just like how this family came to be. Yeah sorry WHO's Yanti? Where do I start here? So I'm start at the beginning so you were born in upstate. New York To like a legit conman so his dad. William huge scumbag. He would like go around like here. Like have this tonic. Have this elixir. It'll cure your cancer. It'll cure your burns. And like he would just disappear. He was like a traveling salesman but was known like they couldn't stay anywhere very long as a family because the townspeople would catch on him. So if they're an awesome New York or buffalo like he had like a very limited amount of time where he could sell his product before people. Hey Fuck you man like none of this stuff. Works like your like. He's legit like a snake oil salesman and to the point where like I said he would disappear for months of time so like a young John. D. Rockefeller was supporting his family financially. I see in a lot of ways. He made his own candy and sell it he will raise turkeys like he was very entrepreneurial from a young age and then like his dad. We actually come back after like he had like a whole separate family and then eventually took his kids from that. Other woman like merged it with his family. He would come in and like. Oh Hey John. You made like thirteen dollars. Whatever selling candy steal it from him and hit back on the road so like the guy like his dad? A huge huge comeback. So dirtbag but Rockefeller himself. Who's a hustler get by big time? Hustler big-time hostile and like smart. So kind of self educated like went to school but not really Never went to college. Moved TO CLEVELAND. As a teenager and Kinda just had like a menial job as a bookkeeper for for like you know as an early adult he was just like you know an accountant not making very much money but like starting his own family and then they wouldn't give him a raise so he kind of just started his own firm and was very successful at it. So but it's still not like the Rockefeller tight money. But he was like making a good living and And could have could have been like that you know upper class person in Ohio for the rest of his life and then he saw like he felt that church allegedly and like felt like an oil boom like someone struck oil near his church and he's like Holy Shit like there's money to be had on this so it was first one was in Pennsylvania and then they started like digging and drilling all over like that area like you know like that. Ohio State Penn state but that part of the big ten big time oil country or or used to be and he's like man like this big money in this like how do I get involved. How involved we studied it. He's like there's so many people who are out there trying to strike oil. Who just go broke. He's like this is Fox. Like I'm never liked the odds of actually making it from striking. Oil is very limited. So he's like. Why don't you guys bring your oil to me? And then he would like refine it so he would refine it and he eventually like turned it into the product of the day was Cassie so kerosene was Ucla lighthouses. But it was still like a relatively new thing. You know what it was like before that rate is like they would ever heard like moby. Dick go out and kill all these. Wales and like the blubber on fire. So that's that's how they would lighthouses back in the day was from like whale blubber you've heard of Moby Dick Right. Oh yeah sailor's sailor. You're out in a boat often. The Atlantic hunting whales. And you're doing it to harvest their blubber for for oil lanterns. Did you know that before you did the research on this or did you? Yeah Yeah No I. I can't say that I don't like boys. They've sent my couch. Donate like you knew that. Okay so hotta here Dave. Dave said everybody knows that. So that's like we're the whale blubber. That's what it was. And you know the big ass Wales so it was like not exactly feasible so there wasn't like light like at night all over the country like you think about it was like man we need more consistent like maybe less people like sinking and dying on the ocean. We need a safer way too late homes and kerosene what became that product. But when Rockefeller was getting into it it was like it was still so new. That you know you'd like light one kerosene lantern. Blow your face off okay. So is still like an unstable On stable product and like people don't really know didn't really trust it and he created the name and the brand standard oil so he like he had a chemist as a partner who they got like the formula exactly right and the refining process. Exactly right so like any moron can do it. You could light it and it will let your home and that was like the standard oil brand and That's like this begin began. The conquest of Rockefeller in this oil industry. And this now we're into like the eighteen fifty eighteen fifty eighteen sixties. Like the start of when he really starts to seize control of that so great businessmen. She's everybody fallen on their face. Going to look for the oil. Yeah he's like. How could I kind of find my avenue here? And that's what he does. He kind of yeah brings it in and makes a new invention instead. Snow fucking whale blubber right interesting very very interesting but now like Ozzy's very smart guy but it's not like he's the only one who came up with. I'm going to be the refinery guy. There's lots of people lots of people even in Ohio. So he's like how do I you know? Get a leg up on the competition. So you ever heard of Cornelius Vanderbilt University Vanderbilt University. I have vail cash so as the Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt. Who is like a at the same time like one of these titans of industry but he did all the railways and saw a young up and coming rock afire. Went to meet with the old man. Vanderbilt was like hey I need a discount on prices. And he's like well fuck yourself and he's like nope. Here's why you're going to give it to me. I'M GONNA fill all of your train. Cars all of them with oil. And he's like that's at the of sixty Carlos Sixty trainloads aday. And it's like if I do that. We Pricey goes yes they have a handshake deal and Rockefeller leasing goes faulk. He can only do thirty okay so he was just like. I know. I need this price to win. I know I can't supply it. So then. He took that deal and basically like went around and intimidated some other competitors and then he also like made his business a little. Bit More They they produce a little bit more and got to that threshold so he got the price but now that he is like he has that price he has the lower transit prices now he can go and like just choke out everyone all his competitors. Okay so he did that to get to get mobile to hit all around the US. Yeah and just you know. So now. He's able to grow and he has more and he would go and have these meetings with his his biggest competitors and be like look. I'M GONNA cut my prices because I can because I got this deal on the railways. You guys can't compete with me so I'm the consumer you're trying to let your home. You can have standard oil for for. Let's say a buck and the next next one on the shelf is a buck fifty again making up the prices. You'RE GONNA go with the one. That's a Buck. And because you trust and oil not to blow up so he had those two things and there's like I can operate at these prices for a year or two. And if you try to combat me you'll be bankrupt in six months. So why don't you just let me buy you out and I'll give you a job so genius deal broker a genius marketer. Yes answers well right so he but he was basically that is illegal practice by today's standards so like it's it's price wars and he would just drive down and be like. I'm going to lose money. I can afford to lose money. You can't sell out and he did all all of its competitors. Did to the point where he owned like ninety to ninety five percent of all refiners in the United States monopoly monopoly big time. There's you know. No price matching those days. Folks can't do it all of that. None of that. So Dave price sharing so then but like people starting to get pissed off because now it's like they control everything now they can raise the prices. And you don't really have any other options because they're the only game in pound but you can't just go back to living in the fucking dark so you're just going to hand over your money to standard oil and it got to the point. When they were at their peak the company itself was worth in today's money a trillion dollars. Oh Okay so you think about like the biggest companies now. These tech companies Amazon Apple. All these things this is like they would Santa Royal Dwarf Them Dwarf them at their at their peak like he would faulk in smoke. Bezos is super yacht. Tasers would be his okay. He could buy Basil's six times over. That's unbelievable and yeah EXAC- they had so much money and it started to like now but it became started becoming problem like the press will go after him they have. You can look up these old cartoons where he's like an octopus or squid choking the life out of like the common people and you know. He's in the pockets of politicians and he was. So there's an election in one thousand nine hundred between William Jennings Bryan who is like back in the day us from Nebraska but like of like Bernie Sanders tight like Yay for the people of a revolutionary wants a very public about one to break up these companies and then on the Republican side. You had teddy. Roosevelt and William McKinley and Roosevelt was kind of on board with the other side. Saying like yeah. These companies are not good for business. It's not good for growth. Like competition is capitalism. While that so like fuck like we don't want William Jennings Bryant. We definitely don't want Teddy Roosevelt. Let's make Teddy Roosevelt the VP. And we'll prop up this other. Guy William Mckinley so like you. You put Roosevelt in a position of no power but it has the prestige. And then William McKinley is your guy. He's your guy in the White House. He won't fuck with Your Business. You won't try to pass any laws. You won't act on any of the laws on the books and they're like this works. Mckinley gets elected Roosevelt's VP. Mckinley promptly gets shot in the chest twice at a at a at a rally and now they're like Holy Shit. Now it's like now. Our worst nightmares come true. Teddy Roosevelt is He's the guy he's the guy and he starts acting on on this thing. They had in the book since eighteen. Ninety Sherman Antitrust Act take. Rockefeller Rockefeller was on the Lam. Like he's like I'm not going. I'm not going so he was like a future. The law Johnny Rockville. The richest person in the world. Not Going to court can't do shit to me can't touch me. He misses like his childlike. His grandson's birth fucks with his head. Because he's like now. I feel like my dad and like I'm an absentee father. So eventually like go to court. He basically gives to middle fingers to the US justice system. And they're like okay. Well we're breaking up standard oil. Now Sharia was he wanted because he was paying politicians like that. Oh it was like this antitrust. So it's like they're going after him just for having a monopoly okay. So he's like semi retired at this point and it's like hey like I just don't want to like I'm not GonNa let you guys tear down my business. I'm not showing up to court for this case. And then he eventually like said. I don't WanNa be an absentee father grandfather so I can't just be on the run forever. I'M GONNA go to court. He like his very like defiant in court to like the the judges and the and the court and they break up the break-up standard oil and they break it up into these thirty four different companies. Well Rockefeller is a shareholder in all okay and at that time is right when people start like Henry. Four comes along bills a car so he switches from making kerosene which is kind of already been replaced by electricity to making gasoline. And now now his wealth just like takes off so his own personal wealth because now he got the kerosene boom and then now he liked the timing was right and he had all these thirty four different gasoline companies all over the country which he owned all of our piece of all of them like he couldn't control them but he had like shares them so they're all paying dividends. Shit back his own personal net worth four hundred billion dollars. Oh my okay. So that I think Basil's is worth around one hundred million or a hundred billion right now so we've four times as wealthy by himself. All personal assets not just assets not the company his own worth four hundred billion dollars in in a sense to he was just. His product was at the perfect time. Oh Yeah I mean. Timing is everything. So he saw the market. He was in chaos. He's like I can come in here and like choke people out stabilize. It make a better product and just control everything he's like. This is enterprise because Bazo S- I mean I I don't know why we I guess it's okay to compare them because he's he's the guy in all right. Dana changes the game. Yeah Yep he definitely did and so did. I mean there's maybe you can make a lot of APP. Comparisons there because all these mom and pop shops who were trying to like exist in ECOMMERCE Basil. Swallows THEM UP. Yeah and And Rockefeller does the same. He swallows up all the competition and and that was that was it so he he got out effectively okay and his family. Kinda got out but they just because they had so much. It's all in. It's all those companies like they kind of like remerged but it's like British Petroleum as part of that was a descendant of Standard Oil Exxon Mobil Chevron so like all the big gas companies that you still think about today. They're still like you. Pump your gas. You still getting a little something back. The rockefellers wow that's it's wild. I started with one guy. It's very while. Yeah it's very well and you said he got out of it because he was gone. Yeah so at the time. When he was in court he was an old man. So this is now I think the court case was in like nineteen ten eleven something like that and so he you know he was born in thirty nine. So he's like you know maybe over seventy maths bad but over seventy years old but But he was like. I said semi retired but he just knew how to shuffle. The chess pieces around with make shit happen and no one was better at it than him. And like you said you know timing is everything but there are a lot of guys around that time and he started with basically nothing and became the richest man in like. Maybe it all of history. The said like there's one guy like a Roman emperor who might have been worth more money technically in his day. But that's it. It's like one Roman emperor and John D. Rockefeller the wealthiest American of all time. The richest person in modern history. Is What Kapadia? So there you go died in nineteen thirty seven okay. He's widely considered wealthy all time and the richest. It's tough because like you don't because it was a private company for so long you don't know what the dividends were. He was paying himself exactly and like the money conversion like with interests and things like that. That's a little bit different but the way if you do the math of all the people say like the what like you said. The wealthy person ever personal wealth of four hundred billion dollars crazy do fucking insane great and then he died in nineteen thirty seven. Yeah the family legacy still lives on with all the buildings the UN like we talked about but grandson was Prominent US senator from West Virginia for a long long time And they're still you know. There's all kinds of mysteries around those Sanford around. Yeah it's not like the vanderbilts now are completely broke. Okay Paul really calm like they buy the fourth generation there is not one single Vanderbilt that was worth over a million dollars until Anderson Cooper but he made it all on his own Anderson. Cooper was the descendant Vanderbilt's had no. I learned all kinds of very informative. And it's this is now you know. I mean if he didn't know now you know Johnny Rockefeller News ritziest guy the oil guy. Yeah and I've seen through pass podcast. I knew he was the only allowed to this extent that these Saudi princes now like they have all this money he had way more money than craze insane amounts of money never ending and still never ending like he still has. That family still has so much money. Influence filed was that anything else. I think that's until maybe tomorrow into the into the weeds. We'll end the conspiracies. Tomorrow's get US pretty interesting. David I think for you to add. You're looking over here like you know everything that's going on and whatnot. If you extrapolated his net worth Extrapol- it with inflation from like the eighteen hundreds when he was alive today he'd be worth trillions unbelievable. Thank you lights accident big money. That's good fact that was big contribution. Berry. I appreciate. Yeah I liked it too all right. That's different than everybody. We will cut you tomorrow.

Rockefeller Rockefeller standard oil Miller Teddy Roosevelt US William McKinley Dave Rockefeller Center Vanderbilt Ohio UN Wales Rockefeller Rockefeller Johnny Rockefeller Toronto Basil faulk Barstool sports
Scandal 51: Black Friday

Political Scandals

48:09 min | 1 year ago

Scandal 51: Black Friday

"In the year leading up to the two thousand twenty election we're counting down the biggest scandals in American political history. This is number fifty one. The the Black Friday scandal the stock market is in Free Fall dropping twenty percentage points in one day brokers are going bankrupt left and right even farmers are losing their livelihoods with the the price of grain plummeting by half in a matter of hours. No this isn't the Great Depression. It's not the two thousand eight recession or even the stock doc market crash of nineteen eighty seven. It's long before any of these in eighteen sixty nine two men and their get rich. Quick Excuse wrote the US economy to its knees and tainted the legacy of President Ulysses s grant forever in the midst of this crisis. US President. Grant's administration made what might be the single most expensive mistake in presidential history and it all came down commits placed. Trust today. We remember it as Black Friday. It's got everything that makes for a good scandal rivalry greed corruption sex murder and a mind boggling sixty million dollars worth of solid gold in eighteen sixty nine though it was just Friday September twenty fourth. That morning when Americans woke up to news of rapidly rising gold prices they had no why dea a disaster was coming the likes of which the world had never seen welcome to the political scandals. A park cast original. I'm Richard and I'm kate in the lead up to the twenty twenty election. We're counting down the fifty four biggest biggest scandals in US history every week until November third twenty twenty. We'll look at how each of these moments shaped American politics and culture and what we can learn from the failures of the past. You can find all episodes of political scandals and all other podcast originals for for free on spotify over ever you listen to podcasts to stream political scandals for free on spotify just open the APP and type political scandals goals in the search bar at par cast. We are grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook. Look an instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network. And if you enjoyed today's episode the best way to help is to leave a five star review wherever you're listening listening. It really does help. After the civil war ended in eighteen sixty five the reunified unified. USA was in dire economic straits although industries in the north had prospered thanks to the war effort the high taxes imposed to fund. The fight left the economy depressed and the formerly wealthy south was in far worse shape than the north. The only people really doing well where the ultra rich business elites sometimes called Titans of industry or less flatteringly robber barons the civil war or created lots of opportunities for big business in the north to cozy up to the federal government which needed their support to supply the Union army after the war for those relationships continued even the most well meaning politicians knew they needed to curry favor with the biggest tycoons of the day. John D. Rockefeller Andrew Carnegie J. P. Morgan Henry Ford a WHO's who of dead white guys. Whose names are now on? Buildings adjusted for inflation J. D. Rockefeller alone would have been worth three times more than Jeff bezos is today. Hello to names. You probably haven't heard though are Jay Gould and James Fisk junior for a while. It looked like like these two were going to take their place. Among the richest men in history born in eighteen thirty six and eighteen thirty five respectively Fisk risk and Gould made a small fortune during the civil war by trading gold government bonds. But nobody's ever satisfied with a small fortune. Chen Fisk and Gould wanted more by the late. Eighteen Sixty S. The two men began investing in the Erie Railway Company which controlled then end the longest railroad line in the world soon. They owned enough shares to get seats on the board seats which they immediately began to abuse. WHO's by manipulating stocks? And diverting profits into their own wallets in with them on this scheme was the third man Daniel drew of of course they faced some pushback from the rest of the board when they started to serve their own interests and they drew attention from their competitors to their worst enemy was rivaled. Railroad tycoon Cornelius Vanderbilt owner of the New York Central Railroad. He was richer than the three cheaters is by far in eighteen. Sixty eight vanderbilt decided to add another feather to his cap by staging a hostile takeover of the Erie Railroad. You'd and pushing out Gould. Fisk Andrew Antitrust legislation didn't come along until much later in American history so there was nothing to stop railroad company from creating a monopoly by buying up. Its competitors nothing. That is except three unscrupulous. LS Robber Barons. Who refuse to let go without a fight? If Vanderbilt was so determined by the Erie Railroad Stock Doc Well Gould Fisk Andrew intended to let him using their own personal printing press. The three men issued thousands as of shares of fake Erie Railroad stock the more shares they printed more their rival would need to buy in order to gain a majority like the old brain teaser about a man who walks halfway across the room with every step vanderbilt would think he was making progress towards his goal but would would never quite reach it yes that was illegal even in eighteen sixty eight of course so was embezzlement and these three had no problem problem with that they were called robber barons. For a reason this scheme worked Cornelius Vanderbilt spent more than seven in million dollars buying Erie railroad stock but not only did he fail to gain a majority stake in the company. The value of all those shares was plunging fast basic supply and demand with Fisk Gould. Andrew flooding the market with funny stock certificates demand dropped quickly and with it went the price of Erie Railroad company shares. A battle ensued in the courts and the Legislature First Vanderbilt got got an injunction from the New York Supreme Court barring his opponents from issuing anymore stock certificates then when they kept it up he got the judge to the whole drew fisk and Gould in contempt with police on route to arrest them. All three scoundrels fled across the river to New Jersey. Of course this was all extremely entertaining to the public. It became known as the Eerie War. And for a brief time it dominated the headlines. James while in exile in New Jersey James Fisk sent for his mistress Josie Mansfield. She was a failed actress whom he first met at a brothel fisk figured might as well make the best of his stay in the garden state far away from his wife as for how long they were going to get back to New York without finding themselves in lockup they had a plan for that too they just by the New York state legislature. Gould snuck back over. The state border traveled to Albany and started handing out cash at the capital in exchange. He wanted a bill passed. That would legalize the fake stock certificates overriding the court's decision. The only problem was commodore. Cornelius Vanderbilt had the same level of comfort about greasing palms and he was even richer whatever gould gave a legislator Vanderbilt would swoop in and top it. Gould ferreted did out Vanderbilt's associates and paid them off to join his side of the battle vanderbilt. paid him back in kind. And the legislators the people who'd sworn worn an oath to uphold the state constitution were all too happy to play ball for cash. Men didn't become politicians in the age of robber robber barons for the piddly legislative salaries. That's for sure. Vanderbilt eventually became so frustrated with the entire charade that he stopped upping upping the ante when his bribes dried up the legislators all move to Gould's side of the aisle the bill legalising eary's fake stock asked. Ask One hundred one to six. I'd like to know how the six holdouts got stiffed. Or maybe they were the only New York. Legislators who were above above taking bribes with the fake stocks legalized the trio had a new problem vanderbilt. Still own ten million dollars worth of eerie shares. Not a majority but enough to make him a very loud voice as a shareholder vanderbilt had lost but he also so knew he had the resources to make life miserable for Gould Fisk and drew he proposed a settlement between them in the end. The cheaters cheaters bought back half a vanderbilt spongy stock paying him back nearly five million dollars of what he initially spent after settling up with vanderbilt and throwing some money at the board of Directors Gould and Fisk respectively became president and vice president of the Erie Railroad as of October thirteenth eighteen. Sixty eight as the new president and vice president of the longest railroad line in America. They probably could have made all the money they could ever want just by keeping the company profitable but that wouldn't be any fun for our boys in early July July eighteen sixty eight. They sniffed out and opportunity for another scheme. This time Fisk Gould. Andrew tried to lock up all of the available cash in New York by withdrawing it on mass from the banks during the summer when a great deal of capital was tied up in agriculture. This would lead to a market crash allowing them to buy a massive amount of stock and assets at rock bottom prices when the market rebounded. They'd a beef filthy rich. But this time the cheaters got cheated. Drew broke with the gang by withdrawing far less cash from the banks then he'd agreed to and he used the savings to short IRI's stock ordinarily the buyer of a stock doc that the value of their shares will increase shortsellers on the other hand are betting that accompanies value will drop over time instead instead of buying and holding stock the buyer borrow shares from broker an sells them immediately at the current price. If the stock's value decreases races than the investor can buy back at a lower price and return the now cheaper shares to the broker but if the stock goes up the investor will have to repurchase purchase them at a loss in order to return the shares to their owner. It's a complicated and risky way of playing the market. short-selling short selling is scorned by many even on Wall Street. Mostly because it's just plain rude to make your money by predicting others misfortunes. It's even worse when those others are your own partners in crime. Drew for example stood to make millions at the expense of his colleagues colleagues to make things worse for everyone. As soon as the federal government got wind of the cash shortage in New York. They stepped in and threatened to release money from their reserves to stabilize the banks when investors heard that government cash was on the way the market promised to rebound earlier than the scammers anticipated cutting off their chance for future prophets. It was curtains for scam number. Two Daniel drew who shorted the stock lost. Lost nearly a million dollars as Erie. Shares bounced back and Golden Fisk. Were left holding onto massive loads of stocks. That wouldn't don't turn a prophet. There was still one moved to make during the bear. Market caused by the cash lockup Gould Gould and FISK released their cash and purchased oodles of Erie stock at thirty five dollars after the market rebounded Erie. Stock rose is to nearly fifty dollars per share Gould and Fisk then bribed IRI's board of directors to buy all their stock back using the railroads cash reserves so in other words. They alluded their own companies savings account to earn a modest personal profit in the end. The biggest loser was the railroad road itself which ended up so deeply in debt after the stock buyback that it wouldn't become profitable again for seventy years his after that episode Daniel drew was cut out of any future scheming and the others socialize. He never got another invitation from Gould. Or fisk which by the way was quite a loss. Fisk owned a steamship line that provided him with a fleet of steamships he he sailed these up and down. The Long Island sound throwing huge parties on board. He even kept two hundred fifty singing canaries on each ship to entertain his guests. FISK had another expensive hobby to and her name was Josie Mansfield. He bought his paramour town. Home outfitted her with the designer wardrobe and paid her an allowance of up to three hundred dollars per week. That's five thousand dollars in today's money and as if keeping her in the lap of luxury wasn't enough fisk. Eventually openly moved in with Josie without divorcing his wife. As Gould he had a different. I love money. He spent it when necessary but he liked hoarding. It for its own sake and what he like. Most was gold. One of the biggest political issues of the day was the value of paper currency called greenbacks during the civil war. The United States went off the gold standard in order to print four hundred and fifty million dollars in paper currency for the war effort. This created an unstable able to currency system most goods and services could be purchased either in gold or in greenbacks and the two could be used to buy one another however the value of each currency fluctuated separately for example one day gold coin might be worth eighty greenbacks. Six and the next day it might be worth one hundred. Investors didn't love this new system. They were afraid they're greenbacks could suddenly become valueless with no federal goal to back them up by eighteen sixty nine gold and paper money were both used as legal tender in the the United States. There was even a process for trading the two on Wall Street Jay. Gould spotted a flaw in the system. If someone with millions of greenbacks traded them in for gold he could cut off the supply of available gold in the small world that was reconstruction -struction Era Wall Street. A gold shortage would send prices skyrocketing. Then the hoarders could sell their gold back for profit. It was an obvious strategy but there was one big problem that stopped other investors from trying it the federal government might not be holding enough if goal to back up the entire national supply of greenbacks. But they did have enough in their coffers to rebalance the market if gold prices got so high hi that they threatened to destabilize the economy the president was sure to step in unless somebody could make sure. The president stayed out of it. Somebody like say the President's brother-in-law after this Gould Dan Fisk by a president or so they think now back to the story in March of eighteen sixty nine general ulysses s grant took his oath of office and became President Ulysses s grant the widely beloved. Civil war. Hero was America's Erica's first four star general. He was also just forty six years old when he took office making him. The youngest president in American history at the time President Grant knew right away that he had his work cut out for him. But if anyone was up to the challenge of reconciling the North and south it was the man who personally accepted the surrender of Robert e Lee though. He ran as a Republican grant. Wanted people to think of him as a post. Partisan president didn't he couldn't afford to be seen as biased not when he already faced so much mistrust from the former confederate states so he tried to avoid surrounding himself with partisan wonks ideologues instead. He relied on the advice of his friends and family. Yeah that add always works out great. One of the family members grant trusted was his brother-in-law Abel Corbin who was married to grant sister. Jenny Corbin was a dumpy sixty. Something widower who wanted nothing more than to be in the inner circle of Commander in chief but his brief career in Washington ended in eighteen fifty six after he was caught accepting a bribe while working as a congressional staffer as for Jenny. She was thirty seven when she met Abel Corbin that was well past marriageable age in the nineteenth century but when able spotted her at a ball in early eighteen eighteen sixty nine. He saw something in her that others had missed specifically her older brother. The president elect Jenny was is widely known to be ulysses favorite sibling so corbin made a beeline for her and began plying her with compliments that would make a poet lush rush despite his old bribery scandal. Corbin was well liked in New York Society Jenny who spent most of her life in her native Illinois had few friends in high places but wanted to make some in exchange for an introduction to society circles. She could offer Corbin an introduction into the president. It seemed like a fair deal to both parties by May of eighteen sixty nine. They were married. Jennie made good on on her. End of the bargain. Ulysses welcomed Corbin into his inner circle and began listening to his advice. One area of particular concern Sern for president grant was the currency buyback program the US Treasury plan to use its gold reserves to buy back greenbacks from the public which would appease the investors who are still angry about the government's move off the gold standard. That was also an area of concern for notorious Robber Barons Jay Gould and James Fisk who were plotting to corner the gold market and make a killing. They just needed president grant to stop selling Gough Treasury gold so that they could buy up what was already in circulation and they needed assurance that he wouldn't flood the market with more gold to to stop their scheme. Once it started after their previous Scams Gould and Fisk were experts at sniffing out a man susceptible label to bribery. Not that it took much sniffing to make their way to Corbin with his checkered past. In the spring of eighteen sixty nine gould began again. cozying up to the president's brand new brother-in-law at first it was about railroad business. Gould stopped by Corbin's property in New Jersey Z.. To ask if he could place a railroad track across his land. They negotiated a deal and Gould was on his way. Of course he'd gotten in what he really came for a warm start to a friendship with Corbin these two were. Both savvy capitalists. Who knew exactly how things worked worked in? Washington Corbin detected a payday in the future and decided to accelerate the process by asking Gould for Investment Advice. Goal rule new. The gesture meant they were on the same page. It was time to do business. A deal was soon struck gould and fisk pitched it as a plan to help farmers and industrialists. They wanted to force gold prices through the ceiling and told Corbin that this would create a booming export market for Americans. Of course that wouldn't be the case at all. unsubtle currency manipulation generally leads to more bus than boom but Corbin was a Washington Palm Greasier not an economist. He was nowhere near as rich as gould ruled fisk. He trusted that their scheme was going to work for. Everyone and Corbin wasn't about to be cut out of the Lute Gould agreed to deposit deposited one point five million dollars in gold into Corbin's bank account in exchange for his influence over President Grant. That's about twenty eighty eight million dollars in today's money not bad for a summer job. First Order of business was getting Gould and Fisk into the president's inner circle gle the closer. They got to him the less likely he beat a suspect them of anything. Untoward Fisk and Gould knew how to make friends with Corbin's help they convinced president grant to enjoy a day out on one of fix famed steamships the SS S. Providence. Starting from Long Island sound the vessel would sail to Fall River Massachusetts. This gave the two robber barons of full twelve bowers to gain the affection of the president. Jim Fisk pulled out all the stops. He had the entire vessel cleaned and repainted painted. He laid in plenty of liquor and a store of the finest foods in New York. There were enough cigars on board for an army also on board were we're a WHO's who of prominent capitalists none however were richer younger or smarter than Fisk. He curated the guest list to ensure for it at dinner. Gould and Fisk tried to persuade the president with their ideas about the gold market but they were disappointed to find him firm in his convictions. Che's about the paper currency buybacks worse yet. Grant took not a single drink all night. Loosening him up with liquor was not going to work On to plan B. They need to make another big bribery purchase. If this was going to work this time they went shopping in the US. US Treasury Department Corbin located a family friend General Daniel Butterfield. Who already had president grant's ear during the civil war? Four butterfield played a key role in getting grant a large cash reward for his performance. Now Corbin urged President grant to appoint Butterfield As US sub treasurer in New York. It didn't take a lot of convincing rewarding. An old friend with a cushy government post sounded pretty pretty good to grant and Butterfield was qualified for the role Corbin's endorsement seal the deal with the job offer secured Gould and and Fisk swooped. In to enlist the new sub treasurer's help. Butterfield agreed to accept the promise of one point. Five million dollars of the profits profits from the gold corner as well as an immediate interest. Free Ten thousand dollar loan against the future pay that loan by itself would be worth nearly two hundred thousand dollars today. It was more than Butterfield's annual salary as a sub treasurer. But it was chump change for the two captains of the Erie railroad butterfield's role was simple. All he had to do was pay attention to Treasury Department communications and look for anything that indicated federal gold was about to be sold if he got wind of a pending sale. He would notify Fisk and Gould immediately and they would would hold off on their plan. Meanwhile Jay Gould and James Fisk took advantage of the New York summer to lay even more groundwork for their scheme team while most of the city headed out to the catskills or the Hamptons to escape the heat. Gould bought a controlling interest in a small bank known own for shady dealings. Meanwhile fisk used his steamship cruises to strengthen his relationships with the business elite has they wined wined and dined on his vessels. He pressed them for gossip about the gold market as the summer dragged on the schemers. Got Two a big stroke of good fortune. First gold prices were in free-fall by early August of eighteen. Sixty nine an ounce of gold could be bought for just one hundred thirty five dollars in greenbacks the lowest price since the US. I went off the gold standard. Second Grant was softening on the issue of federal gold sales through his conversations with Corbin he fell for the same shoddy logic that higher gold prices might the help American farmers of course greedy. Gould couldn't wait until grant was all the way on board to start tipping his hand on August twelve wealth eighteen sixty nine. He bought up three hundred. Seventy five thousand dollars worth of gold at rock bottom prices. That's about seven million dollars dollars today. Conveniently the White House was being remodeled that summer including the presidential living quarters to get out of the way. President grant took an extended tour of the eastern seaboard. Had he been less distracted. He might have noticed Gould and Fisk stockpiling gold throughout throughout the month of August. They were careful to purchase their gold in small installments at least by robber barons standards so as not to spike the price. It's too early. Gold sank as low as one hundred thirty two dollars. An ounce by August twentieth. Gould felt the time was right for a bigger by. He recruited two more millionaires and the three of them each agreed to buy three million dollars in gold. They all promised to hold their share until title prices rose significantly price-fixing on perhaps the grandest scale in history. That nine million dollars spent on on gold would be one hundred seventy million dollars today and on September second. There was more good news for the Gould Fisk partnership in in a meeting with Abel Corbin President Grant let slip that he planned not to sell any treasury gold in September. When fisk and Gould got the news? WHO's they swung into action? Fisk alone invested seven million dollars in gold to disguise their scheme for as long as possible. They placed laced their buys in pieces concealing themselves behind brokers nobody knew who was behind the sudden bullish movement on gold. The price began to arise and by mid-september gold was at one hundred. Forty one dollars by this point. The gold fisk ring controlled a staggering. Sixty a sixty million dollars in gold or the equivalent of one point one billion dollars today to put things even further into perspective. Active sixty million dollars in gold was three times the amount of the total public gold supply in all of New York. Whenever there are winners in the financial markets there must also be losers and in this case the losers were the unfortunate investors who shorted gold? When the price started falling unlike ordinary investors shortsellers can literally lose an unlimited amount of money any even more than they originally invested as prices rose to unsustainable heights pressure mounted for the US Treasury to begin selling off its gold to stabilize the market Abel? Corbin got nervous and sent an urgent letter to President. Grant begging him to reconfirm firm that his administration would not sell gold instead of prompting reassurances. The letter raised grants hackles. It became became clear to him that his brother in law was abusing. His presidency. For personal gain. Grant was so angry. He refused to even respond onto the letter himself. On September Twenty Second Abel Corbin received chastening reply from the first lady. Warning him that President Grant. It would do his duty to the country. Corbin warned Gould immediately. But we're Corbin saw a threat. Gould old spotted an opportunity for a prize winning double cross. He didn't share the news with any of the other speculators not even with Fisk instead he encouraged the others to keep buying while Gould himself secretly began selling on September. Twenty four gold hysteria reached its peak fisk. Who still had no idea about the coming crash bragged to reporters that the price of gold would soon soon reached two hundred dollars? FISK had been right so far and investors were listening to him. They bought driving prices as high. Why is one hundred sixty dollars poet? ABC stegman penned. A witty verse about the situation. One hundred and sixty can't be true. What will the bears at forty do? How will the merchants pay their dues? How will the country stand the news? What all the banks but listen hold in screwing up the price of gold to that dangerous last particular peg? They had killed their goose with the Golden Egg. It was true the gold corner had killed. Its own golden goose on September. Twenty four which would go down in history. As Black Friday investors became convinced that the rising gold prices men greenbacks. Were about to collapse and if that happened. Banks would start folding leaving depositors high and dry investor storm New York's banks demanding to withdraw their gold things he's got so violent local militias had to be deployed to prevent riots. No Bank could survive all of its depositors demanding their money at once and at any given time most of banks reserves are lent out they hold only enough cash reserve to service an ordinary number of withdrawals calls each day. That's why we hear about the threat of a run on the banks. Whenever the economy heads into a tailspin president grant knew it was time to whacked before noon on Black Friday? He met with Treasury Secretary George Boutwell and ordered him to bust the gold corner within minutes. It's about well. Put the word out by telegram that the US Treasury would sell four million dollars in gold the next day. Here's is the problem with that plan. The Treasury didn't have four million dollars in gold boutwell later. said he meant to say four hundred thousand dollars in his telegram and accidentally added the extra zero but he just met with the president and received clear orders to stop the price price of gold from rising. He might well have added the extra zero on purpose to make sure the plan succeeded. It didn't work by the end of the day. The gold boom became a gold bust. Prices crashed all the way. Back Down to one hundred and thirty-three dollars leaving giving everyone who got into the gold market since late August ruined and the repercussions didn't stop there up. Next Golden Fisk greed throttles the US Konami and stains presidency now back to the story on September twenty fourth eighteen sixty nine now remembered as black Friday. Gold prices surged to one hundred. Sixty four dollars per ounce then crashed to one hundred thirty three three dollars after the. US Treasury announced plans to sell more gold ended actually had the repercussions devastated. The entire American economy as investors lost their shirts on gold. They sold off stocks in a desperate attempt to cover their losses. The stock market dropped twenty percentage points in a single day. As soon as the click of bulls began to unravel other investors. Started to realize who'd been behind behind it all along a few hours after. The gold market crashed a speculator marched up to James Fisk and bloodied his nose like a true robber. Baron fiske just stood there and took the punch at least he thought he and his partner Gould. We're in this together. He looked forward to drinking away the pain of his losses with his old friend but Jay gold had a secret. He'd learned two days ahead of time. That grant was planning to bust the gold corner. Instead of sharing the news with his partner he secretly sold as much gold as as he could before. The bubble burst on Friday since Gould hit is trades behind various brokers. It's impossible to tell exactly how much he he made. While hanging his partner in crime out to dry but some historians estimate he netted as much as twelve million dollars in two the days. This kind of betrayal would end most friendships. But I'm black Friday. Gould and Fisk became closer than ever before these two men understood each other. They shared the same moral code or lack thereof Fisk saw gould's betrayal as an impressive. Save chess move not a knife in the back. They left the stock exchange in a carriage. Together and road to fix personal opera. House wants since there. They put their heads together. Gould admitted he'd made a mint by selling in secret over. The last two days fisk on the other hand didn't even know l. how much he'd lost but he knew it was in the tens of millions. Maybe as much as thirty million if all of his last minute. High priced trades. Went through gold old. Had an idea if they could somehow get fiscus buys reversed but also convince their brokers to honor Gould sales they could both both come out whole the two men decided to make scapegoats of two of their fellow. Gold speculators William Belden an Albert spires. Neither were well liked and spires was widely believed to be going senile fisk called his brokers and claimed that none of his his buys on Friday where for his own account they were all supposed to be placed for Belden inspires now honor among thieves. As the saying goes there was one other enemy Goulden Fisk could agree upon Abel Corbin. The suspiciously timed letter Corbin Consent to grant had unintentionally alerted the president to their scheme if Corbin had just sat on his hands and let the president make up his own mind and they might have pushed gold over two hundred after all fisk and Gould summoned Corbin to meet them at the Old Opera House. He answered their call if only because the two men had after all paid him one point five million dollars for his services when Corbin arrived fisk lit into to him calling him a damned scoundrel and other colorful epithets after venting his rage Fisk disclosed the real reason he wanted to see Kurban. He wanted the president's brother in law to help the two robber barons escape prosecution. Of course Corbin would need the proper motivation but instead of a bribe this time Fisk delivered a threat if Corbin couldn't help fisk would drag the first lady down with him. He planned to claim that Mrs Julia Grant had accepted. Twenty five thousand dollars to influence the president on the matter. There Corbin knew that if his wrongdoing led to an attack on the first lady's integrity it would not only end his relationship with the president. It might end his marriage to the president's sister Jenny. The whole family knew perfectly. Well that the first lady never had anything to do with the crooked scheme but that wouldn't matter to the traders who were out for blood after the gold crash if they heard even the faintest whiff of scandal Dade believe it. They were already beating bankers in the streets. Rumor had it at least one banker was hanged after the crash though he had little credit left with President Grant Corbin agreed to do his best to convince the president not to pursue a formal investigation into Gould. Food and FISK for the price of one point five million dollars in dirty money Abel Corbin now realized he had not only sold his so but the rest of his life if he ever turned on fiscal Gould. They just blackmail him again. The two scammers jammers were well on their way to yet again coming out on top. As was often the case in the age of robber barons a rich man could do almost anything even topple the entire economy and get away with it. Meanwhile the run on the banks continued for several days. Armed guards were stationed to protect bankers as they serve their customers. Depositors withdrew as much as they could leaving the banks with nothing left to lend as a result the credit market titan significantly setting the stage for a recession when Gould and Fisk tried to sell president grant on on their scheme they'd claimed a rise in gold prices would help American farmers by stimulating the export market but when gold crashed farmer or suffered more than anyone else crop. Prices dropped by half mostly because the usual investors in agricultural products. We're all broke after losing money. On gold and stocks. President grant was furious that he's allowed this to go on for so long and that the repercussions were hurting American industry. He ignored Corbin's intercession and encouraged Congress to launch a formal investigation into Fisk and N Gould. But it was too little too late by the time Congress began looking into the matter. The scammers had successfully collected millions of dollars. There's in ill gotten gains. And now that they were flush again. They did what they'd always done. Best distributed bribes after a few visits visits to Congress the investigation mysteriously ceased Gould and Fisk ultimately disappeared from the public eye retiring to spend their money in peace if only the economic repercussions were as easy to erase. Sadly the nation never fully recovered the contraction in the stock market after Black Friday continued until eighteen seventy then after a brief and tepid recovery every another stock market crash occurred in eighteen seventy three causing a recession not just in the USA but in much of continental Europe. This might be about the most damage to people have ever done to the global economy not to mention the grant presidency. You're after the black Friday disaster. The media discovered grants previously friendly relationship with Gould and Fisk. It wasn't hard the uncover thousands of people at seen him aboard fisk steamship. Even though poor president grant had been cheated by one of his closest advisers observers the public came to think of his administration as corrupt the loss of trust hampered grants efforts at reconciliation between the North and south grants heart was in the right place unlike many of his peers. He believed in a moderate middle road approach to reconstruction he wouldn't be overly conciliatory towards the states. That had seceded but neither would he punish the innocent southern citizens who'd been caught in the war pat he he passed laws to protect the Friedman. Who'd been emancipated in the south yet? went out of his way to ensure that non slaveholding whites receive the help they needed to. If it weren't for the Black Friday scandal grant might have been far more effective in reuniting the USA after the civil war but as things stood black. Friday stained his reputation forever. President Grant did manage to limp his way eight to a second term on the goodwill leftover from his time as a war hero but when another major financial scandal hit grant in his second term that goodwill evaporated although presidents could at the time run for as many terms as they liked grant left the White House in eighteen seventy seven. He's remembered today as a well intentioned but bumbling leader with an administration full of crux. It's hard to say if any president could have done a better job the years where the height of what would later be dubbed the gilded age a period read dramatic wealth inequality the likes of which was never seen before nor since like Gould and Fisk. The rich simply did did whatever they wanted effectively. The president during those years was not grant but the so-called Titans of industry who were rich enough to buy any legislator they wanted and as for the gold standard. It's still a hot button issue today. The USA now depends is almost entirely on Fiat. Currency in other words money not backed by precious metals. Some investors say this means we're on our way to another dramatic crash others see gold as an antiquated currency and point to new forms of money like bitcoin. As it's the way of the future we'll just have to wait and see but we can hope that future presidents will be a little more careful about taking the advice on economic policy from their in laws. Thanks for listening. We'll be back next week with number fifty on our countdown. The Jack Abramov scandal we all know. Washington lobbyists are sleazy. But you won't believe Steve. How Low Abramov was willing to go to line his pockets or how many White House officials helped him defraud his own clients? You can find all episodes pasos of political scandals and all other park has originals for free on spotify. Not only does spotify already. Have all of your favorite music but now spotify is making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcast originals for free from your phone desktop or smart speaker to stream political scandals finals on spotify just open the APP tap browse and tight political scandals in the search bar. We'll see next time political. Oh scandals was created by Max Cutler and is a podcast studios original it is executive produced by Max Cutler. Sound design by Anthony Val sick with production assistance by Ron Shapiro Carleen Madden Travis Clark and Joel Stein. This episode of political scandals was written by Yellen Awar- war with writing assistance by Kate. Gallagher and stars Richard Roster and Cape Leonard.

Gould Gould Gould Dan Fisk President Grant President Fisk president Washington Corbin US New York Fisk Andrew Gould Fisk Abel Corbin President Ulysses s FISK federal government Erie Railroad President Grant Corbin
Victoria Woodhull Born / Nintendo founded - September 23

This Day in History Class

15:14 min | 4 months ago

Victoria Woodhull Born / Nintendo founded - September 23

"Today's episode is brought to you by oxy clean. So I just moved to a new home, which means that I just did a lot of cleaning and one of my least favorite places to clean is the bathroom shower. Fortunately, I had oxy clean versatile stain remover which meant getting in those next in crevices and getting into that dirty grout made the job super easy. You've got to try oxy clean versatile stain remover. For yourself to work your magic with oxy clean, go to oxy CLEAN DOT COM slash. Try Me in order a free sample that's oxy clean dot com slash t. r. y. m.. E.. For a free stain finding sample while supplies last I gain what's going on I know it's been a while since you may have been out of the house living life like you used to but you know what there is the Open road that still is out there and you should probably reintroduce yourself to it in a Mazda. I was lucky enough to drive around in nine the last couple of months and I have to say the C. UV lineup by Mazda is pretty wonderful. These vehicles are masterfully crafted. They have elevated design that's reflected in every detail from the the controller knobs to the steering wheel. It's all there. So if you want. More. Information on the MAZDA SUV lineup including the first ever see thirty Goethe Mazda USA dot com slash iheart, and don't forget to explore their strongest finance options. Hello everyone. It's Eve's checking in here to let you know that you're going to be hearing two different events in history in this episode one for me and went from Tracy Vivo thin they're both good if I do say so myself on with the show. Welcome to this day in history class from how stuff works dot Com and from the desk of stuff you missed in history class. It's the show where we explore the past one day at a time with a quick look at what happened today in history. Hello and welcome to the PODCAST. I'm Tracy Wilson it September Twenty Third Victoria woodhull was born on this day in eighteen thirty eight. She was the first woman to run for president in the United States fifty years before the ratification of the nineteenth amendment eighty women the right to vote nationwide she was from Ohio named Victoria Claflin after Queen Victoria her family also called her little queen because she was very proud and she Had An uncanny ability to concentrate her family background was also a little odd her father buck Claflin had a whole range of jobs and schemes to try to make money. He decided to take advantage of the growing interest in spiritualism and to set Victoria and her sister Tennessee up as mediums to have them travel around as a sort of spiritualist medicine show they had varied and chequered career as spiritualists and mediums Victoria got married. In the middle of all this, and that's where she got the last name woodhall she eventually though divorced him and married someone else and kept the last name Woodhall, which was highly scandalous in eighteen, sixty eight, a purported vision lead would and her family to move to New York City where she and her sister continued to work as clairvoyance. One of their clients was Commodore Cornelius. Vanderbilt who gave them investment advice which worked out Very well for them later on, he financially backed the two you sisters opening up their own brokerage firm which made them the first women stockbrokers on Wall Street. This made a lot of money would hole was finally able to do something. She had wanted to do for a long time which was to focus on social reform really hard as a woman to be a social reformer unless you also had money to support your work. In April of eighteen seventy started publishing a series of articles in the New York? Herald including one where she announced her candidacy for the presidency. It was expected that Republican. President Ulysses s grant was going to run for reelection. She knew she was not at all likely to earn the Democrats nomination. So to run for president, she would need to nominate herself and get enough support to make it onto the ballot. So she bought a newspaper the newspaper obviously endorsed her candidacy. She also moved to Washington DC and started working as lobbyists and she befriended Congressman Benjamin Butler together. The two of them worked out this argument that there needs to be a constitutional amendment giving women. The right to vote that women already did have the right to vote under the fourteenth and fifteenth amendments. She was allowed to deliver that argument before Congress on January eleventh eighteen seventy one making her the first woman to do so although suffrage ists were very interested in hull and she was invited to join the National Woman Suffrage Association Women's suffrage wasn't really her key political issue. She was a lot more focused on education reform and assistance for the poor and reforms of marriage laws so that men and women were equal partners something that was described at the time as free love is not at all the free live of the hippies. She gave a speech about this free love idea on November twentieth of eighteen seventy one in this absolutely tanked her candidacy. It was viewed as too radical and immoral, and she was widely denounced most of the separatists cut ties with her only the most radical stayed by her side and helped her found the equal rights party which nominated her for president in eighteen seventy two also nominating Frederick Douglass President though he declined that nomination at this point though things were really falling apart. For Victoria, Woodhall, all the controversy lost her clients on Wall Street and her stockbroker business failed and. She lost all of her many. Then she tried to stop a big scandal with her sister involving Catharine, beecher and Harriet, Beecher Stowe, and their brother. This didn't get them anything positive Victoria and Tennessee wound up being arrested for distributing indecent material through the mail. So on election day they were in jail. That's a pretty unspectacular end of the campaign for the first woman to run for president, and there is some debate about whether her candidacy even really counts. The constitution requires presidents to be at least thirty, five years of age and Woodhall turn. Seventy five on September. Twenty third eighteen, seventy three, which was nearly ten months after the election and six months after inauguration day of Eighteen, seventy three. You can learn more about this and the March Twenty Eighth Twenty Eleven episode of Steffi. Missed in history class little queen for President and you can subscribe to this day in history class on apple podcast Google podcasts. Wherever else you get your podcast. You can tune in tomorrow for one of the United States, most infamous traders. Hey Miles. It's Jack. How's it going man good man. You know just taking in that new car smell as much as I can help helps open my lungs a bit cooped I'm feeling cooped up man I gotta get I gotTa get out of the how you don't see that's probably not cooped up. You need to get see you vida crossover utility vehicle up. So, truth be told at the beginning of this I was driving around in a Mazda C x nine, the twenty twenty they were laying miles we love what you're doing. Please try this car out at. Let us know what you think I'm driving in this thing it is the handling I gotta say is so smooth. You're already fans of your driving period they. knew out there on the roads and they were like we gotta get this guy behind the wheel of the new. It can do anything it intuitively response to me as a driver. So like you know how you oversteer like if like going down a straight away, maybe you you start doing these adjustments with the steering wheel, it's actively trying to make sure you're being as efficient as possible with your steering wheel the exterior design that is so sleek yet aggressive I pull up they say, oh my gosh this man is probably a one percent and they go you know what? No, he's probably sensible, and that's why I believe this car really was built for me why yes. I'm a black person who likes styling who likes efficiency who likes minimal. Minimal flexing if you'd like to say but still enjoys a bit of elegance. They truly design it like there's an art to have a designer it's not just a science. No. Is An art. It's for people like me I like to drive. No I'm not someone out here who needs to be doing three hundred miles an hour but I liked the handling of a good vehicle and I love great bose sound system which these vs can come equipped with. So if you want more information on the Mazda C UV lineup including the first ever see X. Thirty Goto Mazda you'll say dot com. Slash IHEART and don't forget to explore their strongest finance options. Good Morning. This is Laura Vendor Kim host of the new corner off a podcast where we share strategies for thriving in the new world of work I just put out a new episode about how to light a fire under your career by making your Mondays matter the episode was fueled by Nature Valley pack sustained energy bars. Here's a clip from the episode. So, here's my suggestion if you're working at home these days because of the pandemic use the time on Monday morning that you would have spent commuting. To tackle some big speculative project that you claim, you never have time for tackling something big and uncertain can light a fire under your career and doing this important but not urgent task. First thing means you start the week with a sense of victory. Brought to you by Nature Valley Pat Sustained energy bars for more tips on how to start. Well, sustain your energy and win the week check out the new Corner Office podcast available on the iheartradio. APP APPLE PODCASTS or wherever you get your podcasts. Greetings everyone. To this day in history class where we learn a Smidgen of history every day. The Day was September twenty, third eighteen, eighty, nine. Facade Yamaguchi founded Nintendo Pie in Kyoto, Japan to manufacture Hannah Fuda, or Japanese playing cards. Now known as Nintendo, the company is a major international player in the video game industry. CanNot Fuda is a Japanese word that means flower cards a deck. Contains Forty eight cards including twelve with four cards each. Each food is named after a month and each month is associated with the flower that is illustrated on the cars in it suit. PANATTA Games developed in Japan after western-style playing cards made their way to the country with European. The accuser. CANASTA in their illegal gambling parlors. Besides was an artist and entrepreneur who lived in Kyoto with his family. For a while in Japan many card games were banned to put an into illegal gambling, but the government did end up relaxing some of his restrictions and enough woulda games were allowed. So facades decided to create enough without cards from crushed Mulberry Tree Bark and paint images on them. He opened his own Hanafi Dot card shop called nintendo compare. And I had not been a huge hit before this poised but. handcrafted cars were extremely popular. He hired people to help make cards and eventually he began mass producing economic dot cards and making Western style cars. intendo became a hugely successful playing Card Company and by Nineteen Twenty, nine, he retired and his adopted son in Law Acadia Gucci took over as President of the company and. Two. Decades later had OSHII Yamauchi took over as president and the name of the company was changed to Nintendo Playing Card Company Ltd.. Nintendo became successful at mass producing plastic playing cards in Japan and by nine hundred, sixty, three nintendo began branching out into other industries like taxi services, hotel chains, and Food Company. It also started manufacturing games. All the other business ventures weren't that successful but the electric toys and games they began producing were a hit. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy Nintendo began selling the beam gun a solar-powered light guide. Realizing success with electronic toys and the decline of playing cards sales Nintendo. Began producing home and arcade video games. Engineer and product developer Gun Pie McCoy, as well as video game designers. Shigeto Miyamoto played major roles in the company's success with video games such as donkey Kong and jump man better known as Mario. At that point Nintendo continued to make waves in video gaming creating handheld video games and? Game Consoles. The nintendo entertainment system was released as the family computer or FEM calm in Japan in nineteen eighty three. It was last in North America two years later. The gameboy was introduced in Japan in nineteen eighty nine. Nintendo still makes playing cards but is better known for the strikes it has made in the video game industry. Eastep Code, and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday. And if you'd like to follow US Social Media, you can find us at T. V. I eight podcast on twitter instagram and facebook. Thank you so much for listening and I. Hope to see you again tomorrow for more tidbit of history. For more podcasts from iheartradio visit, the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Xijiang. What's going on? I know it's been a while since you may have been out of the house living life like you used to but you know what? There is the open road that still is out there and you should probably reintroduce yourself to it in a Mazda I was lucky enough to drive around in. Nine the last couple of months and I have to say the C. UV line by Mazda is pretty wonderful. These vehicles are masterfully crafted. They have elevated design that's reflected in every detail from the controller knobs to the steering wheel. It's all there. So if you want more information on the MAZDAS UV lineup including the first ever six thirty GOTO MAZDA USA dot com slash iheart and don't forget to explore their strongest finance options. What if I told you that UFO's haunted houses and even inexplicable magic tricks are all caused by the same creature and what if I told you these powerful and ancient beings are meant to be feared the hidden Jin a new podcast from iheartradio Aaron. Manque is grim and mild explores the legends of these ancient and terrifying creatures. Join me rub each other as we step into the world of the Hidden Jin. Listen to the Hidden Jin on Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.

Mazda Nintendo president Japan oxy woodhall apple United States Tennessee Kyoto Victoria woodhull Goethe Mazda USA President Ulysses s Tracy Wilson Victoria Victoria Vanderbilt
HBM134: Questionable Hobbies of the Socially Isolated

Here Be Monsters

19:50 min | 10 months ago

HBM134: Questionable Hobbies of the Socially Isolated

"All streets my dad called me the other day to talk. He asked me what I thought the world right now and what I was working on and I told him I didn't know he thought I should episodes about the virus about fear and uncertainty. But I said I didn't feel like I had anything to say. That hasn't been said already. Just that every sneeze. I have every cough. I hear every time someone on. Tv doesn't wash their hands the right way. It seems like a disaster waiting to happen. The thing I do know is that the birds in my neighborhood chirp loudly twice a day for a couple of hours and I like that and ever since last week. There's been this old Santa Hat on the street outside. It's never in the same place for long because the squirrel who comes by and moves at somewhere else on the block and I like that too so much being a person is about learning what you like and then learning how to stop apologizing for best is all the cracks in the armor that we were like we all have our protections right and all those protections have little cracks and beneath those cracks soft underbellies. We try to hide them. But we can't because of the world is a ridiculous arbitrary place that doesn't ask us before it submits US distresses and that leaves us. Whenever we are oceans meet baffles or just a bunch of armadillos wandering around the planes waiting for the day when a Fox fines US flips over us Anyways I've got the small pile of cassette tapes that I've been meaning to digitize for a long time nothing special just homemade cassettes that I find at thrift stores and yard sales and whatnot so lately I've been playing them one by one and recording them onto my computer and it's the first time that I've listened to most of them in there mostly either like music or bootleg self-help books from the library uplift inspire delight. Sean uncomfortable the beloved presence within in Egypt. And it's probably just my age but I actually think something compelling and stuff like that so I've been taking that audio and I've been turning it into like blackout poetry. You know where you take some long form taxed and bought out big parts of it to make something new you know. Find the words in between the shapes. I mean I've been looking for hobbies right and this seemed like a new and fund way to pass the time but also found something interesting in that pile. It was a tape with my name on it. Written a fifth graders handwriting. And I remember making this tape. I used to play nonstop in my Walkman while I did chores. I made the tape in one thousand nine hundred nine and it was the product of diligently waiting by the boom box in the basement with my fingers hovering over the record button waiting for something good to come on. I remember that clearly would i? Don't remember is how I wound up being in possession of this tape twenty years later. I guess it must have just kind of wound up in the bottom of some box whenever I moved so for the first time in a long time I actually listened to the tape again last week and found something kind of wild. I think I found my first ever audio cut out definitely remember lining this out taking the start of this song. I think it's backstreet boys. What could be wrong but yeah I want to take the start of this song and then try and cut it seamlessly into another one sale. Had later so yeah not my finest work but again. I was ten years old at the time. It made me realize something right like I often tell myself this story of how I'm changing as a person and I can't change I do change. I think we all change but more often. I think what happens is I. Forget the ways in which stay the same. I think that explains a lot of things so this. This is my corona virus episode for you which has nothing to do with veracity except for how it relates to the perverse hobby of one podcast. Or WHO's been needlessly mining for meaning in his small collection of thrift. Store cassettes just twelve or fifteen or twenty five or two hundred and fifty thousand short poems or proverbs just for you Roy Moore after the break candles burn. I reflect on my personal journey. An old fear released from an old pain. I sip a glass of from my Authentic Self. And of course it's the perfect president Here be monsters. The podcast about darkness. Where the illusion of darkness? The podcast about the unknown Bell ringers Bell ringers. A string a string with a bell attached to it. Listen for the sound of the bell. Ringing her a faint peeling sound darkness and silence. The bell moved back and forth in rhythmic dance of Death. Very Taught Joan snap. Maybe you feel the same way to sharp decibels of the demands. Deafening a lot of you in this room elastic plastic goo that everything is made of and held together with darkness is just more of that. Elastic plastic google made up in a particular way considered this. What if original sin possesses an exquisite extraordinary gift when we choose to honor this priceless gift? We experiment with truth. Drift Dreamt last night that I had wings. I took off just a couple of off the ground and no no. I didn't dream I had wings. You gathered together. The fruits of the earth flowers next to the reading lamp. Benediction there is sacred mystery in the mundane the goddess knows what it takes to run a household. So should you Maggie Maggie? I have to talk with you about something important. Maybe I'm crazy or just an old suspicious fool but it has been a long and stressful week. Maggie's face flowed into a private corporation that retained the family name and hired a manager to run it. I heard that you can reach the point where you can totally unaffected by any of this. But I haven't discovered that place yet. It's painful to be in the presence of your judgments your expectations. And your and I'll tell you even the dark force on this planet are your spiritual brothers and sisters locked into a mode where they can really only support darkness where the illusion of darkness. Marion Williamson discovered a forty five dollars lifestyle. I thought I wanted. I headed for the farmers market for flowers. The home is a sacred place where you can communicate with the four elements of the universe. Chocolate in yellow covers all right. He's was a a silver man with an erect posture rushed into the living room. He made an imposing appearance that concealed a troubled mind outta lock the bid out of breath and rather pale. How horrible for you grandmothers can be conjured up with French linen? Details and with lap size napkins pottery plates oversized water goblets votive candles and a small bouquet of fruit and flowers. You're really performing an invocation and remembrance. This is three. Today's best new music rooms going to get hot now feeling okay woman in Seattle Washington. Who had her hands groans and the bones in her head. We're starting to grow. And she came to me and she was a disembodied spirit so that's an extreme phenomenon. Yes how to spot a bad girl wine red mouths and nails the baddest girls. Capri Pants. Good for you girl. Your lover can have a special photograph of you and that's certainly something worth celebrating in grand style. Heaven News you deserve it. Eat FOOD HAVE SEX. Feel stronger feel happier make more money be whatever your body's no big deal being possessed might even be useful. 'cause nobody's keeping an eye on it. There is just one thing that maybe we ought to explain. The random violence today claims so many innocent lives. I don't think it's such a hot idea. Of course I have sufficient death masks. For example few people realize that a death mask exists at the very dry Martini in combination kitchen. Dinette DO I want to sell it. I wouldn't sell it. Oh Neil it's so good to see you owe gina. No Oh well. Maybe I owe you an apology but I. I don't think you've ever met my son. Neil I shall grow into a dead body. What an ugly word to describe such a creative chapter in a woman's story. Her eyes narrowed with secret pleasure sipping tea nibbling on some shit she found in the cupboard. She tugged at the handle sarcastically. Three hours later. She had an impressive number of trash bags. Lined up in the corner of the room. Barbara Maggie Malcolm Malcolm Barbara Barbara Janice Maggie British. Shipley Maggie's Greta Shipley Shipley Greta. Constance van sickle rhinelander. Somehow we became the people driving the car events me and I was an old woman and I fell asleep while I was driving back to the mansion. And when we when we and so very often in sometimes it was This is real. This is true breath managed Preservation Society marvelously ostentatious American palace breathtaking example of driving ambition. Cornelius Vanderbilt smiled. You know I know who you are. And that's not you. I've never seen you look like that blue. Is that in there? Who are you? What are you doing in there? You know g power struggles. You know. Resist not evil resist. Not Evil closure is or leave them open following not what I say. This doesn't have to be serious. Put on roller skates or something. Have a party. Well my name is Jeffrey Mann. And I made whatever that was many thanks to all the makers of these bootleg cassettes. Who kindly donated them to thrift stores in New England and Beyond and also a big thank you to their original makers of the content. I don't know who most of you are. I'm sorry but the three main tapes you heard on this episode were labeled S. A. Transcending the fourth dimension in Moonlight. Our website is H. B. M. podcasts dot com. Where you can find a picture of me as a ten year old and you can also find a link to our page on apple podcasts. Where we encourage you to write us a podcast review in the form of an absurdist poem again were at H. B. M. podcast dot com. I had editing help. On this episode from Bethany Denton. You heard music by the blackspot. August blaker freeze and a number of choice fines from all the other cassettes including this one. That's just labeled LSD HERE. Be Monsters distributed by kcrw our senior editor there is Kristin Lepore. We get additional support for freelance contributions from KCRW's independent producer project. Thanks for listening more episode soon

Maggie Maggie Barbara Maggie Malcolm Malcolm H. B. M. cough Neil US Greta Shipley Shipley Greta Shipley Maggie google LSD New England Sean Roy Moore Jeffrey Mann KCRW Bethany Denton Constance van sickle rhineland president Joan Marion Williamson
17 | INTERVIEW 5: Mary Gabriel

Unobscured

1:46:35 hr | 1 year ago

17 | INTERVIEW 5: Mary Gabriel

"Welcomed on obscured production of iheartradio and Aaron McKie. Today's guest interview who is author and journalist. Mary Gabriel her books have been finalists for the Pulitzer Prize the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award for nearly two decades. She worked in Washington and London as an editor for Reuters. Her biography of Victoria woodhull. Notorious Victoria isn't the only book that set Mary. Gabriel into the past though. She also wrote a dual biography. On Karl and Jenny Marks and win researcher. Carl Nellis talked with Mary. They explored beyond the life of Victoria would holes radical comrades adds to discuss how Mrs Satan's political career fits into the bigger picture is a fascinating interview and I can't wait to share it with you so without further ado. Here's Mary. Gabriel this is the unexcused interview series for season two. I'm Aaron Minke. uh-huh uh a spiritual issue no I I think. From our point of view you think of someone raising tables and sitting in a darkened room with a group of people communing with the dead and that was part of it but really interestingly Spiritual th century was a way for people who didn't have a political or social voice I e women to have one and So that's in the case of Victoria. Woodhall that that's what spiritual spiritualism was for her and what that meant was that she she could almost act as a therapist or any of the spiritualist healers who were traveling around. The country almost acted as spiritualists. Sorry as as therapists to the working working class or the poor or the the firm farmworker who they would roll up in a caravan and say you know. Would you like to speak to your dead mother well. Everyone wants to talk to their dead mother about the problems. They're currently having in so in the course of that dialogue someone like Victoria would hear the concerns of these people. Aw and then not necessarily having tapped into the dead mother's ideas are I the dead mother's advice but she herself within off her own advice would which would be based on her on experience which was troubled but also based on the people she she'd met along the way so so basically spiritualism was was a big communications network not necessarily with people from the beyond but very much among a disparate crowd within the United States eight. I'm at that time and it is really. It was probably one of the colonels or one of those seeds for the entire. US Women's rights movement because these women started talking among themselves about themselves and discover that they all sort of had similar malar problems and that they'll similar problems were all based in in repressive or oppressive. Social Situations I e marriage So you've already touched on this a little bit but When's people were coming to a sounds? What kinds of questions were they asking her? What were they looking for to get out of it There are all kinds varieties there. But what are the things that you really picked up on his. You read these documents in the periodical and the things that were recording spiritualist experiences. Yeah it was really avenue. There are two kinds. They were the same as in in spiritualism had the bart literally the Barnum and Bailey kind of aspect where you had a woman or a woman with a group of people in a room and they'd hear tapping and and the tapping would indicate communication with the spirit. You Know Spirit with a bizarre named Mike Mr Split Foot was one and and he would offer advice on you know are are dead family members. Happy now are they. Are they still with you. Do they approve of what you're you're doing but the kind of spiritualism that a woman like Victoria would hold practice as she traveled around the country. Hearing People's troubles was a much more basic kind of almost like a advice. Columnists that you might have in a newspaper today. You know she she would set up in a hotel. Oh tell. And she didn't have seances per se. She had one and one one on one encounters with people who had come in with maybe physical maladies or Problems in their marriage problems with their children's financial problems. You know just the basic things that that person would go to a priest aura. A A therapist or a You know a politician if they so dared and and and you know described their situation and ask for help. These people knew Victoria wasn't equipped to provide them with actual help but in many cases it was just enough for just to have someone to listen to what they had to say. And that in itself was empowering both for them and for her and for spirituous That kind of conversation nation. You can imagine the the experience that they would. After a few years the experience they would build you know and the the kind of advice that they could then offer and how it became very social and very political because they knew so many people were suffering from the same problems and so It was very much the kind of thing that you see in films where people go in and expect miracles and have apparitions appear and you know a lot of kind of smoke and mirrors literally. I was crystal balls etc but but there was also a very basic very human and a very very warm and generous spirit Behind the kind of spirituals and that woodhall practice and that was one person helping another person now the reason it was called spiritualism and the reason why a woman would have to resort to something as as kind of outlandish as that rather than just say. Tell me what your problems albums are. And I'll tell you what I think was because women weren't supposed to have a political voice or a social voice. They weren't supposed to extend themselves to that extent. And and for a woman to set up a shop darkened room in a hotel and have strangers come in and give her a dollar and then she would offer advice if she said at that advice was coming from her. Without the guidance of a spirit it would really be It would be outrageous. It would be it would be it would be more than society could bear because that was not the role but woman but if she said I'm hearing the voices you know from your dead mother and she's telling me to tell you you know. Your husband is a drunk. You have to leave him. It's good for the children is good for you then. Society could could a sanction that and the woman who was hearing the advice could then say you know okay and act on it if she wished to so. It's really interesting. Isn't it that it was it was kind of charade that it was allowed to play out that a woman like Victoria could give advice. Who just about everybody knew was giving advice based on her own experience As woman to woman but they but people would pretend that this voice was that does it for this advice was coming from the you know another world and other another the kind of As a spirit world beyond one that we could see and that this charade was laid to play was allowed to play out so that she could have a voice in that women could hear it so it it was a fascinating period and one of the other you mentioned The priesthood and some of the roles that traditional religious legis figures would would play in this kind of Almost therapeutic kind of mode for for people who would come but one of the other kind of movements since that was happening at the time and leading up to the eighteen forties was the practice of Animal Magnetism mesmerized them some of those Discourses that were considered to be kind of horizons of of science about mind and the person that also were were practiced and often demonstrated publicly publicly in a kind of a therapeutic mode. Can you talk a little bit about how those practices set up a foundation for what became spiritualism. Yeah that's very interesting because it was one of the fascinating fascinating aspects of what you're talking about and also the spiritualism I was speaking with Victoria's at this all occurred in an in a climate of technological and industrial advancement in change. You know. Suddenly you know trains were speeding through virgin countryside at unheard of speeds and a telegraph could be sent from one place to another. You know without anyone actually physically carrying it and it was It was a time when people didn't quite understand what was happening to them that the society and the the the industry and the manufacturing in the way of life was changing so radically that people sought explanations for that through either through either spiritualism or through the sort of laying on of hands and things that you describe and and so one actually was a physical manifestation of these these social and industrial changes and the technological changes occurring which was the laying on hands mesmerized him and the other was just actually helping people cope with the changes the massive changes in their lives and one of the reasons why both of those were more readily accepted than perhaps they would have been thirty years thirty years previously. Who because because people could see in their everyday lives changes massive changes that that amounted his speed and ways of communication that had never existed existed before in? And so that could happen. Then maybe it was actually possible for for people to heal by just touching you or for someone to give advice from a figure who existed tested outside a realm you could see And one of the technologies that was so crucial to the spread of of all. These ideas was The explosion of cheap fast printing. And there's all these periodicals that just kind of a burst onto the scene and they were crucial to to mesmerizing to those scientists. But also to spiritualism. Can you talk a little bit about the role that periodical is is played in American life. in in the middle of the nineteenth century but a kind of a cross that period. Yeah it was really fascinating and it. It wasn't just in the United States. It was in Europe as well. Suddenly you know trains would could carry periodicals from one place to another so you can carry news so you could. You could assemble a periodical in Dayton Ohio. That would have news from New York City or news from London or news from Cologne Germany. And it wouldn't be that old. Did you know it might be two weeks old and People were learning. Their horizons were literally expanding in every organization. Every political party Every group the farmers groups the coal group coal miners. Everyone had a periodical so it was almost I guess a little bit. I I mean I suppose it's a little bit like our blogs fear now that there were there was a new way of communicating through technology and through the printed page. That allowed allowed people to speak to each other and learn about each other and learn about what was happening in the world much more quickly than they ever had before and it was during the civil the war in fact in the United States. The the Newspapers we're an absolutely crucial way for you know the country to stay as the country was splitting physically. You know through war. It was actually kind of the thread that was keeping it. Together was the exchange of newspapers and that information and also into the seventies when when out into the eighteen seventies when the kind kind of later industrialization occurred when there were miss more serious class divisions and when the labor market in the labor union movement was heating up the role of newspapers in those radicalization of workers was immense and You know people joke Europeans would come to the United States and joke that if if you were a prisoner in being held in jail in New York City you may not have anything you may not have food you may not have water. You may not have proper clothing but every morning you'll have have your newspaper. It was considered an absolutely essential tool to being alive in the nineteenth century. which is a you know kind of fun? Considering that newspapers in our world are are going away of well the the normal telephone the dial telephone. Right as I've been as a bit spending time making aching this podcast. I haven't been able to avoid making these connections between periodical then and kind of podcasts. Now with the way that they're growing in and like you said everyone one is starting one every interest group every political party or yeah So as you have have researched researched and written you you've worked in journalism for for a long long time You've at times turned to books and you've written a book on Victoria Woodhull Hole. Which I'm so glad we're going to be talking about today? You've also in books on the cone sisters On Karl Marx and his wife Jenny which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize the National Book Award The National Book Critics Circle Award And recently published a book on the Ninth Street Women before we really dive into. Victoria's story I I love to hear. Is there kind of the comments. Read between the kinds of people that you take the subjects of your books. I think what I try to do is I take periods of history That most people would say have been written about to death. You know for example Was Karl Marx. You know I remember when I said I wanted to do book on him. Neighbor alright was living in Italy at the time and an old older British woman said to me. You know who on earth you know. Why on Earth do we need? Another book curl marks the point. Is that the the parts of history that have been told so far that have been told and retold actually are usually only half the story. It's sort of the man's point of view that's the it's been the man's story story so what I try to do is go into areas where Luckily you know for a writer a researcher today. The the numbers numbers of neglected women out there in history are vast and so this there are many many stories to be told and so as Victoria. I tried to look at the nineteenth century Through her her perspective I mean how many people know growing up in the United States. How many people learn that? A woman actually ran for president in eighteen. Seventy two you know. She was written out of history so I tried to resurrect her place. Her where she belonged was a cone. Sisters They were among the most important modern art collectors in the world at the turn of the century at the beginning of the nineteenth century. I'm sorry the beginning of the twentieth century and their story was written out of history because of a personal Pique When Alice Toko wrote the story of Gertrude Stein? Or I'm sorry when Curtis wrote the story of Alice veto close but The concerts were written out of history because collecting became something thing. That men did women shopped for paintings but men collected them. And so I wanted to show what the coens down which was build one of the major Matisse Jason collections in the world. Not just in the United States They were these two eccentric Victorian Sisters And then with marks mark story has been told primarily as a story of a man from his neck up in other words the brain of Marx And I wanted to describe the man marks end to do that. I thought it was best to put him in the environment of his family with his wife and children and so I started by thinking I would tell just their story but you know marks was the elephant in the room and I needed to tell his story if I could describe their story and so and then with the Ninth Street. Women is the story of five abstract expressionist women painters and and and again you know that. The biggest revolution in American art history occurred in the forties and fifties in New York and that has been the story of a handful full of men when in fact it was teaming group of people and among them were some really important women who with out without home the movement. When wouldn't have occurred so when I try to do is go back into history and and kind of if if we've seen how you fill the cup we've got half the cup so far let's get the rest of the couplets fill it up and that's usually the story of women so that's kind of the thread that runs through all of these books So let's on that. Let's dive in to Victoria Would whole story and just start with How would you answer the question? Who Was Victoria? woodhull Victoria Woodhall was really really one of the bravest American women to surface In the nineteenth century and one of the women who we know least about who studied the least she was the product of a Ohio. Family fairly dirt poor. Her father was a Petty Criminal Her mother was probably certifiably insane and had children. Every two years is for a twenty year period in Victoria was her sixth daughter. And the story was one you know sort of that's been it could've been repeated throughout the country by hundreds of thousands of families Struggling to make ends meet No true prospects. No property property. They didn't own any property they had no future in. This child Victoria through a vivid imagination. Incredible drive created one. She created her own opportunity and she carried this family with her. And so what she did was go from absolutely zero on I talk about the show where she was born which was a shack on the side of a hill and a small town in Ohio. She went from there to do a series of I that were truly remarkable. She was the first woman to have a Wall Street brokerage firm. She was the first woman to address a congressional committee in Washington. She was the first woman to Are Run for president and she was completely neglected in historically because she was literally too hot to handle. She was so far advanced of her time she would still be considered radical today she would kind of fit more comfortably in the one thousand nine hundred seventy s feminist period than she did in the nineteenth century so Victoria would hold quite quite simply someone we should all know about because the issue she spoke to and about in those days or ones. We're still Indiana with today So in that early life that you've started to touch on what kind of a religious background background or upbringing did she have in this struggling family. Yeah her her mother was a religious zealot and I would imagine based on where they were in Ohio. Oh I could never pin down. What exactly congregation? They were hard of but it would have been some sort of no-doubt Protestant probably Lutheran and Tradition and but it was bordered but it bordered always on the always spiritualism not that her mother ever practice spiritualism those were she did later in life but when when victory was growing up although the mother always thought she commune with spirits and so that's where Victoria got that idea. Basically the mother would Go out and kind of have hallucinations. and you know shout to the sky is her problems about her husband and called her. You know said what she was doing was speaking to two two spirits from another world are dead relatives or her dead. Children and Victoria absorbed that idea but so that the the family was not traditionally religious. It was very eccentric clan as far as that goes but but Victoria absorbs those ideas ideas and and built on them and she had a real flair for drama so she would regale the the local children in the town with with her ability to speak to spirits and orate and profound matters and then as I describing the book when she when her Kurt Krause started getting restless she would change the subject and start talking about cowboys and Indians. She in other words she she always knew how to play to the crowd But the family was mainly Claflin. Her father was a notorious thief. Arsonist e- called himself a lawyer but his main scene His main connection to the law was breaking it and they were always they. From the time she was a little girl they would have to escape. The law for various various reasons and usually buck was behind whatever scheme was illegal and whatever scheme for some to leave so I wouldn't say that Victoria was ever a religious person in the traditional sense as in pious. But she had a great respect for surprisingly growing up with the father she she did in the household she did. She had very great respect for morality which is also very ironic because later in life would did her in was charges of immorality MHM morality. But she had this real From the time she was a young girl she had a very strong sense of justice. And that's what actually was the start of her political life is some of your work has been kind of on transatlantic connections between radical groups. And when Victoria is ten we come to the year eighteen forty eight which his spiritualism Look at for for what happened in Hides Vol New York with the Fox sisters but it's a year of ferment across nations borders oceans Can you talk a little bit about transatlantic context for eighteen forty eight. What was going on in Europe in that year? What else was going on in the United States Yeah eighteen forty eight. It was one of those years in history where it would be difficult to find a place on the planet That that's something major wasn't happening. A Europe was on fire. It was the only Eighteen forty eight was a movement. Called springtime of the people and the People in Europe actually revolted against their kings their governments and It was the first and only european-wide revolt of the people against their rulers and this was the result result of again. This idea that society was changing fundamentally under People's feet and yet the rulers the kings couldn't see that they couldn't or didn't want to seize see chose not to see if they were happy enough to fill their coffers with the proceeds of industrialization but they didn't want to make the social changes that were required they didn't to allow business people into government for example in order to legislate What the terms industrialists needed to to to to expand to do cross-border trade And in in the United States part of the background to this what would become the civil war the in Twelve years after was was this notion that the the tensions between the agrarian south and the industrial north and that that they're they're the inability to reconcile what was an the old way of living in a new way of living. You know the obvious path of the future and so in eighteen forty eight the people who are caught in the middle of this The everyday folks you know the the farmers Z.. Small Trades people. The people who were forced off their land and moved into cities were being buffeted by forces that were so much greater than them in Europe they fled to the cities and started filling. You know tenements and factories with with their work but in the United States that sort of development hadn't really occurred yet and so We didn't have that kind of mass movement but but definitely there was an earthquake happening under people's feet. A societal change that was was was so profound that people sought relief and answers and shelter literally enlarge tense At the front of which was usually a preacher shouting about you know. Don't worry about this life. The next one's going to be better and so that was a the very top down. That was a very patriarchal kind of response to the changes in society Shoot through more traditional religion and through these Itinerant preachers where the spiritualist came in was This sort of one on one woman to woman much more domestic kind of response to the changes changes and in a way. I think you know there was this show. There was the weekly show in the tents with the preachers and the songs and You know Falling lying down and thrashing around but the the actual what spiritualists cut offer was was a much deeper and much more immediate sort of help you know an actual earthly help Whereas the preachers could promise you know something a pie in the sky and the the Fox sisters in New York where a phenomenon al-anon that they were part of the Barnum and Bailey tradition that I described earlier they were they were able to hear A A spirit in a house. They lived in a house where I think it was a traveling salesman had been murdered. And so they could they. They said that they could hear spirits. And and they're the the spirit would tap on the table and this started they got the publicity around them was so widespread that they started sort of phenomenon that appeared in every state in the country was multiple so-called Fox sisters hearing tapping and it was really just a way for poor families to make money they charge a dollar cholera visit. and which was a huge amount of money in those days and it was also a way to To eventually it was also a way for this sort of spiritualism to develop this the kind of therapeutic spiritualism and so there was the the Barnum and Bailey Fox sisters tapping the very kind of dramatic communication with dazzling spirits. And then the offshoot of that much more practical the much more practical development that arose out of that was the spiritualism that Victoria woodhall practice. Her father was thrilled old about the when he learned about the Fox's because he had two daughters Victoria and her younger sister Tammy who Tennessee who but Claflin offline decided. Great you know they. They can both commune with spirits. There's no problem about that I can set them up in a hotel charge dollar a dollar a visit and they can you know make miracles in his. His advice to Victoria was be a good listener child. and which is what she did. She started when she was. I think. Thirteen and And started entertaining adults listening to adults problems and by the time she was fifteen she was an expert on what ailed Mostly women who came to hear her and and so so that's really There were sort of two levels of Two levels of religious experiences in and the revival movement and spiritualism that was available and widespread through mostly the middle of the United States through the middle of that century but eighteen forty eight was really the pivotal year because it was when the Fox sisters emerged. It was also. When the women's Women's rights movement emerged in Seneca Falls New York also upstate New York and that was where women again started talking to each other and and deciding that it wasn't just a matter of getting the vote that there needed to be a fundamental declaration of rights for women Drawn up and and and hopefully decimated in a hopefully brought to the attention of Congress so that women could once and for all Have the rights equal to men in this country so it was a year that of profound change and and fascinating and revolutionary and you can see exactly why it happened because the plates under society were shifting and the fallout was going to be enormous both socially and politically and people had to go somewhere to look for answers and so as they always did is Karl Marx said religion is the opium of the people and so they sought solace in religion. And as you just said Victoria it kind of took part in both aspects of spiritualism. There were times when she was working. Especially under buck in the kind of spectacle of spiritualism But she also also over the course of her life recorded that she heard from the spirits and they guided her and they directed her. Can you talk a little bit about that more. Private side of Victoria's belief in spirit communication Was it real was a true. Did she really believe she was hearing from spirits. And how did that influence her decision. who were they? What did they say to her those kinds of things? I think she really did believe it. You Know I. I've thought about that. And she was very smart woman woman but she also had I guess it was. I mean who knows. Maybe she did. You know I you know. Aw My instinct is that she didn't but she really believes she did and I think it stemmed from a as I said her mother's experiences with speaking to the spirit world but also I think it was just a way of retreating. Her home life was so utterly dysfunctional father was violent. Her mother was insane. Vein were children crawling out of every covered They had no money and I think when she was a young girl to escape she would sometimes try to have conversations with two of her sisters who had died As children and you can see where that would happen. I mean she. I had nowhere to go and no one to talk to you. So she sought solace in in what she thought was a conversation with dead people And then when she it different times of her life she spoke she different kinds of spirits and one time She was in San Francisco. She eventually married a fellow who I'll describe later but she needed to decide whether she should go back to Ohio or stay in San Francisco which was a very difficult place to her. To live in her situation was extremely remotely dangerous and trying and Batori. It felt that she heard her sister. Tennie call her across those miles and speak to her and spirit for him and say come home and so she followed that advice and then the most famous case was when Victoria was at her. Wit's end you you know. She was. She'd been traveling around. After the civil war through the United States giving advice seeing the horrors the absolute devastation of what was left in. Its wake and she knew she needed to do something because by this time. She has completely politicized and she thought she heard the spirit of the Greek Order Demosthenes and she said that he spoke to her and gave her not just the the idea. Go to New York but an address where she should go to a New Yorker Pacific House on Great Jones Street and Victoria did and and she said when she arrived. You know The House was ready waiting for her so at various points in her life. You know really crucial point. Some some might say points of breakdown. She thought she was speaking to the spirit world. You know maybe she thought she was. Whatever happened helped her get to the next place and helped her survive and as S.? She never found herself. Despite in a life that was difficult in the extreme that lasts a long time She never got to the point that she gave up. You know. She lost her her her strength or she gave into some kind of collapse and so it could be that she believes that these spirits helped her through Can Can I say one thing I want to go back to The whole idea of does the that the purpose of religion in kind of a greater greater people's Apple's lives in the beginning of drinking century. Okay the idea that religion was a was a safe place for people to have difficult consideration or difficult discuss. Ah discussions is a really fascinating one at this period the beginning of the nineteenth century. Because it wasn't just that it was a place where you could confess. Confess your your sins or confessed your troubles. It was a place where people like Karl Marx. Even you know politicians in great thinkers would would couch their political Nicole discussions because at this time the things they were saying that changes they knew that had to occur in societies in order to make the step to a fully. Industrialized is a fully capitalist world. They couldn't say publicly because they would be against the law. You know they would be treasonous to the King Lee considered treasonous to the king so marks for example had a Had A newspaper in Cologne in mid late thirties early forties eighteen forties that was supposedly ostensibly a discussion of theological article subjects. But anyone who knew the words that he was using our new the language you knew who he was scratched the surface just a little bit and see that what he was talking about was revolution Lucien political revolution having nothing to do with religion in fact quite the contrary so it's fascinating that people from all levels of society used use is religion as kind of an umbrella to either hide under to seek solace from order to us as a mask to to To cover what they were actually eh going after which was massive political change and the two kinds of modes of spiritualism. You talked about all of us. Have that dual nature where there are people who are coming to it for the private The kind of the solace and then there are those who use it as a vehicle for a show to make some cash That kind of thing that's really fascinating Jumping can we jump back into the story of Victoria shortly after her years into her teen years living under But Cleveland's thumb Making money for the family in the way that he demanded She meets canning. Woodhall right can. Can you talk about who he was and how they met and what came of it. Yeah by by the time Victoria was fifteen she had three years of education. So she she was. She was not illiterate which is interesting. I'm not quite sure who taught her how to read but She had had no formal education. She'd been living in the household household that I've described with the father and abusive father and insane mother and she was looking for a way out. While traditionally in many societies to this day the easiest ticket out of a dysfunctional family is marriage. And that's what happened. Caning woodhall was a supposedly a medical doctor who rolled into Mount Gilead Ohio where Victoria was living with her family and set up a practice in Victoria. Was Ill and went to see him. And That's a caning. Would hole was in his early thirties. In Victoria was fifteen and he started wooing her and told her that he was related to the mayor of New York City and was a relative of a judge in New York and that he was a practicing doctor and in other words he was everything. Torey woodhall wasn't in fact. Everything Victoria Toria woodhall had dreamed of and he was an escape hatch from the life she lived and so when she was fifteen and she was just had just turned fifteen he he was in. I think he was thirty two at the time they married and Victoria soon discovered that the bill of goods he sold her was a a a web of lies. She he was not a practicing or in any way qualified doctor. He didn't had never met the mayor of New York. He wasn't a relative of the judge what he was was a philandering drunk and she was settled to him because law. The Time said that when a woman married a man she became his property. Pretty so Victoria had no way out and so she went from the household of Claflin which she'd been supporting she. Antennae by their spiritualist endeavors to the household of a thirty year old drunk. Who is now her husband who would be her master for life and at the age of fifteen eighteen? That must have been quite a cruel awakening. Will it only got worse. Because within a year she was pregnant and gave birth to a son. Who is mentally retarded in Victoria? That was the moment that was the seed of the Victoria. Woodhall who ran for president in eighteen. Seventy two That marriage in that birth taught taught that young girl that uneducated young girl that there was something drastically wrong with a system that would sanction that marriage and that would not teach. Teach her what she needed to know about taking care of her body and insurance in order to ensure that the child she gave birth to a healthy one so victorious Torius story with caning sort of went downhill from there and she as she had with her family and in fact with her family toll largely the two of them sat on the road. Continuing her her spiritualist Counseling and you can imagine with that experience how much richer the advice she would have given given. The women she met on the road would have been Victoria. Came became an expert at many things and she was tremendous many things but I think probably if we had had a tape off of the conversation she had with the clients she can who were consulted her as a spiritualist it would have been fascinating. You know she would have been You know a therapist of You know of the highest calibre she. She was empathetic in the extreme. She was loving. She was warm. She was exceedingly intelligent and and I think it would have been. I wish I had always hoped that there would have been at least one transcript somewhere that existed of a conversation conversation between Victoria woodhall one of the people she can who consulted her Now after she married King They she's separated from her family the two that she they moved to Chicago she in canning. And that's where she has Byron that that child that first child And then from Chicago to San Francisco and you describe that so evocatively rockabilly in your book. Can you talk about and you mentioned this earlier. Why San Francisco was such a dangerous place for someone like Victoria at the time What was going on in in that city? which wasn't even quite a city yet? that made it a place I the Victoria would go and then at a place that she would leave. You know. It's amazing amazing San Francisco. It was another eighteen forty eight Moment gold was discovered in San Francisco in California and people flocked from all over the world they rushed to California to get in on it and the first wave of people who went because it was such an unknown where men largely men But Victoria soon joined them in. Her decision was based simply it was very pragmatic. She couldn't continue as a spiritualist ritualised and make the kind of money she needed to support caning Byron and her entire family and in fact by this point she wanted to get rid of her family because buck had had some more run INS with the law and and Victoria was old enough now to realize that he was a scoundrel and always would be so she broke away and went to the one one place that promised possibly the hope that caning could in fact resurrect some kind of medical career in a in a town like San Francisco which was barely discernible as a town. I mean it was. It was just beginning to have cobblestone streets it was a place where I think that the ratio of men was ten to one ten men to one woman. It was lawless. It was The main main motivation for people there was a self enrichment. That was the only thing that drove them. That and pleasure and so into this was into this came sixteen eighteen year old. A Toria woodhall. Her Child Her one year old child and this drunken loud she carried around with her husband and she once again you know she did the best she could. She went door to door trying to find employment because caning with so many bars in town. there was one area called the barbary coast which ages where It's most notorious early. Early claim to fame was where the topless waitress was born so caning. This was irresistible to him. He had ad bars and he had women and so he was a happy man. Victoria Got To work in order to support them and so she went door to door I worked as a cigar girl for a little awhile and the story is that the proprietor told her she was to find to do that kind of work which is essentially no doubt probably some kind of form of prostitution and so Victoria then found job sewing for an actress. And the actress said you know. Why don't you go on the stage? which is what Victoria did now? She was quite dramatist. But I don't know if she would have been a very good actress because I don't think she could have memorized people's lines. I think she was too much of her own personality. And so so at a certain point though she was in several productions and said she made money that was when she heard the call from Tanny to come back home and it could have just been and that San Francisco on the life. There was overwhelming. You know it was. She was a small town girl from Ohio on though she'd lived in Chicago which was one of the major cities in the United States She he's still was. I don't think prepared at that age. I mean what sixteen year old could have been for what she encountered. They're given the responsibility she had for her for her husband and child and associate heard tanny speaking to her in. Victoria's telling she dropped everything on the stage left. Inner costume grabbed caning woodhall and Byron and took Gov back to Ohio to be with her family and resume her career as a spiritualist and during the civil war years So this is late eighteen fifties if he's in the during the civil war years she antennae are are doing this work as they travel around the border states and the mid West so after a few years years of traveling with the family and sometimes stepping away from them when she says that tennis talents are being prostituted and she's still committing crimes for buck there's a point where Victoria ends up in Saint Louis and she meets James Harvey Blood. Can you describe who James Harvey Blood was and how his relationship with Victoria became so important for both of them so in the years after the sore Victoria was Brown yourself in Saint Louis at one period which was really interesting place for her to be. Because it was kind of a hub of It was a hub of spiritualism but it was also a hub of radicalism awesome. There were a lot of German immigrant and one of the things that happened after eighteen. Forty eight was that a lot of the people who fled the the conflicts in Europe landed in the United States and a lot of German radical. Michael surprisingly went to Saint Louis so Victoria found herself in this kind of Stu of of people who were engaging spiritualism listen but also political reform and she got her first kind of introduction to revolutionary politics there but one one afternoon she was it in the hotel in a room where she'd rented to work at a spiritualist and a civil war veteran named James Harvey Blood walked in and he had had had some he had. He was a decorated soldier. He was a important spiritualists in Saint Louis he was also A very free radical reformer. Though he was part of city government he was elected city auditor of Saint Louis and he sat down because he was having personal problems with his wife no doubt and started confiding in Victoria and I think Victoria saw in this man who physically and and intellectually was so superior to any of the men who are involved in her life as as either her and her husband or her family her her her brothers in law who are all absolute cads She saw Colonel Harvey Blood. Someone who was a wounded veteran. Who had suffered through that war could come out of it and continue to make something of himself and also was questioning questioning in the way she did the basis of society and the fairness of society society in the fairness of marital relations in the fairness of of The class system in the United States. which you know really is something that Americans there's always deny but was part of the actual problems that were were were arising in the mid eighteenth century and really came to to the forefront in the late nineteenth century and James Harvey blood in his discussion with Victoria must have absolutely won her over with whatever he said because by the the end of the session she heard from one of her spirit friends and this time the spirit told her to tell James Harvey blood that she saw that the two of them their future was connected acted and that they would that they would marry now? This was quite an interesting thing to say because he was married and had a child and she was married and had a child in mid century. America saying that kind of thank strange man in a darkened room would only lead to one conclusion. which would be that? You were some kind of prostitute but in fact Victoria was sincere. She saw that she could actually do with this man something she wanted to do. which at this point was actually starting to kind of occuren- was forming in her mind that she wanted to be somehow involved in a social movement that that tried to reform the marital relations which she thought was the actual fundamental problem in society? She thought that all of all social problems were rooted in bad marriages and so blood. Luckily for Victoria who probably blood was probably as as kind kind of swept away by her as she was by him left the room and agreed and was in a very short time. They had each left their re- their respective spouses And when travelling together in a caravan which was basically kind of getting to know each other trip She worked as a spiritualist but it was. It was a completely different. The environment from anything she'd experienced before there was a freedom to their relationship and I an intellectual exchange that she had never had with anyone and I think that this was the moment when Victoria Wood as we came to know her as as a world came to know her was born in actually Blood was her first teacher. She had several several teachers who hurry her through her life but he was probably the most important because he gave her the history of historical knowledge edge and the The political sort of lessens the political science lessons she needed to give words to the sorts of things that she was feeling. That the the inkling she had she knew something was wrong but Victoria didn't have a means of expressing it and blood gave her a way of doing them. And it's that Victoria would halt now in conversation with James Blood Taking a building up a critical vocabulary for the world around her who ends up going to New York as you mentioned earlier. Demosthenes Speaks to her gives her a D.. An address and she she and Tenney and then the Claflin clan following along arrive in New York and it's not very long before they meet. Cornelius the vanderbilt which is a wild turn of events for them. Can you talk about Their life in New York and how they ended up getting hanging with vanderbilt when they arrived in New York you know they. They had no connections there and so and it was as you say the entire Claflin clan followed and and So Victoria antennae. Got To work doing what they did. Best they're they're only sure way of making money which was working as spiritualists. Antennae was an expert. Spread of laying on of hands and Victoria was the spiritualist adviser and But claflin did what he did which was go out and try to recruit clients they. It's it's difficult to imagine someone like Cornelius Vanderbilt. Actually being accessible to someone like Brooklyn but in those days The world was so much smaller and New York was so small and and and actually a guy like vanderbilt though he was financially you know fabulously mostly wealthy. Socially he wasn't that much further up the social scale than than the Claflin kind of the robber barons of the of the late nineteenth century in America America were pretty much How can I say this politely? They were pretty much conman and and really they weren't. They weren't the kind of They didn't have a sort of noble they were they weren't they weren't in aristocracy. Let me say that the the The rubber appearance of America were were were the product of Jacksonian America. Actually they were. They were men. All men who literally pick themselves whether puts with strapped found a way to make some money and by Hooker Crook legal or illegal amassed a fortune and so- buck found Cornelius Vanderbilt new somehow through whatever spirituals grapevine that he believed in spirits and he went to see them because he also knew that vanderbilt had just lost his wife and so he was he was chagrined and lonely and he was in his seventies and buck could offer him. The services of his daughters Victoria to to soothe his mind signed to calm his mind talked to his dead wife who could then communicate with vanderbilt antennae. To Take Care of the old man's physical Loneliness which is what she did. And it's it's absolutely hilarious. When you think about Vanderbilt would have been in his in his seventies tenny was in her early twenties? He's and she was this rambunctious vivacious wonderful creature completely mad full of life up for any adventure and she revived his spirits. Probably just by laying is honor was enough for him and Victoria then spoke to her from this vast experience she had and what she shared with him. Am was not only a belief in spiritualism but he too had a son who he believed was not one hundred percent well as a result of out of the fact that he married his first cousin in so vanderbilt had always blamed himself for his son His sons problems and Victoria could council him him from the position of her own experience with that in that regard and so they became confidants of Cornelius Vanderbilt. One of the most important in wealthiest man in America. And you know one of these incredible American stories that you know. They went literally overnight from being no one in New York to being with in in the circle where all the powerful decisions are made and Vanderbilt began to give them financial advice which led to one. Of Victoria's I I I you know the this Wall Street brokerage firm that she antennae opened yet. Can you describe what the steps were for them. Getting to that point and and maybe how the gold ring and Black Friday of eighteen sixty nine played a role in them becoming successful stockbroker. The the whole cowboy atmosphere of Wall Wall Street. It was an entirely male universe. The idea of a woman being a Wall Street trainer was unthinkable. And I think sometimes I in researching this yes in in in writing about it and reading going back and reading this book again I think for Bandra built may have been just having a good laugh. You know sending the likes of Tenney and Victoria Into that atmosphere you know del. Monaco is which was the the restaurant where they all the traders aid and where there was a stock ticker you know going at all at all hours and to have them. Sitting in a carriage outside the stock exchange exchanging tips with the brokers. It was all great theater but Victoria took it very seriously seriously because she knew this was a way I mean. This was a paradise for her because this was away she could make a lot of money in a very short time. And so- Vanderbilt. I'm started giving them tips. which they couldn't go into the Stock Exchange to actually make the transactions they would have to have a man go in and make it for them in one particular Friday which was In eighteen sixty nine there was a scheme court. Ulysses grant was the president of the United States at the time when he was His administration was exceedingly corrupt and two of the traders Two of the big traders on Wall Street Jim FISK and Jay. Gould had New New every week grant sold a lot of gold On the market to try to you can keep the coffers. The United States government coffers full and it was a weekly sort of release of of precious metals to enrich the government hugh a an acquaintance. They decided to try to convince grant not to sell. And so that would drive up the price of gold and it would become even more precious than it normally was and so Jay Gould. Jim Fisk knowing that this was going to happen could buy up a lot of the gold and have it at a lower price price when the speaker was turned off when when grant was stopped selling well that happened but then grant learned of the scheme in so in a counter move. He opened the flood again in the gold started pouring out onto the market vanderbilt had been privy to all of this and so. He told Ken ten in Victoria. That this was going to happen and so on the day this black Friday and eight sixty nine occurred Victoria was. They're buying up gold. It was dropping in price dropping like a stone and and in that day. She amassed a sizable fortune in fact such a fortune that she could use it to finance. Not only her crazy family and her life in New York but she could start a newspaper newspaper she could start a brokerage firm she could she basically set herself up for for what would become a political career at two years later three years later. And there's also didn't Put us in my mush and see but I realized after I send them to you that we should talk about this Eighteen sixty nine. There's also the women's men's rights convention in Washington. DC and Victoria goes. Can you describe that little bit Victoria was basically a communicator. And she she. She knew the message that the most important message that she had learned to her own experiences in life to her relationship with blood through all of the women and men that she met as a spiritualist through the many years she traveled throughout the United States. was a need for fundamental social reform personal criminal uh-huh reform at a personal level between a husband and a wife that could only occur through legislation if women had equal rights and so- Victoria was scheming with blood. They needed to have some kind of a political platform. They needed to have a proud. Possibly a newspaper. To disseminate this information they needed needed to be aligned with the political party but none of the parties that were available at that time or or had any power at that time would have been radical enough for them and so- Victorian new of the women's Women's rights movement but she had had actually no exchange with them at that point in eighteen sixty nine and so there was a convention of Women in Washington DC in annual convention. And she went there just to get a lay of the land just to see what was happening. I'm she went purely as a spectator and what she saw was a lot of ernest women speaking speaking to each other about each other but having absolutely no impact on Capitol Hill you know on the US Congress which was just a few blocks away from where they were meeting in so Victoria left. That left that That session realizing that these women could talk to each other. You know until will the Until these women could continue talking to each other but would never have any impact because no one was paying attention and Victoria knew she was a great propagandist and she knew that in order to get the attention of Congress she would need to make a huge splash and so she left that meeting not having actually made any connections with the the women's The women's Movement Leaders back to New York is blood and decided to To create a newspaper. What Hong Classrooms weekly because that would be her voice race and in in doing so Victoria announced what could only be reckless? If not crazy that she was going to run for president accident a woman was going to run for president. The woman who had been the fruit Woohoo by this point was a fresh broker on Wall Street a woman who had the backing of Cornelius Vanderbilt. Who had her own newspaper in New York This caught the attention. This was irresistible to the New York. Press and the stories were carried all the way to Washington at at this point. Nobody really paid attention to her but she was deadly earnest and you know whether she thought she was actually going to be. President is another question. I don't think she ever really assume that that would happen happened but she just needed to make a statement that was bold enough and broad enough and loud enough that she could get the attention. Not only of people in New York but the women's movement and hopefully Ask Pete members of Congress. Can you say a little more about Now we're into the eighteen seventies. Can you say a little more about the breadth of the women's movement and its work kind of what was going on there and put it maybe. In conversation with you mentioned at the beginning of our conversation growing labor radicalism. And Yeah and how. These forces were impacting and shaping. Each Other and what Victoria saw in the political landscape when she looked at what was going on in American life. Yeah one of the interesting things that happened at the EVOLA. Victoria's own personal evolution from a spiritual is talking one on one to people To who a woman WHO's out on a platform declaring herself president candidate for president actually mirrored. What was happening? More broadly socially in it's really fascinating because the kind of conversations that were murmured you know before the civil war In the in the in the in the eighteen forties and the kind of revolution had occurred word in eighteen forty eight and that discussions in the political arguments said began to heat up erupted of course in civil war in the United States but afterwards they didn't die down in fact groups coalesced and one of the most powerful groups two of the most powerful groups to call us were were labor unions and this was something that was happening in Europe. Been in fact. Once again we can talk about Karl Marx because he had formed in eighteen sixty four Sunday. Call the international working men's Association and the goal was trade it had become cross-border and corporations and industrialists were working as kind of a party or almost a union among themselves to keep money and power consolidated across borders but at the level of industrialists and unions started. Forming marks was among the most I vocal and prominent supporters of labor unions. And that idea their idea and his idea was if industrialists are going to form associations to protect one another across borders and across industry than workers had to do the same and so He started this international working men's Association which which had sections throughout Europe and the United States and Victoria became part of that and which is such a wonderful. The idea that the idea that Victoria would hold teaming up with Karl Marx Karl Marx knew nothing. Victoria woodhull a Sheila's she was part of the New York section and in fact she was of course head of the New York section section twelve but This was all unbeknownst to marks. Marks had his own he had troubles of his own without dealing was Victoria woodhall but but at the same time the women's movement that was another center of political and social power that was emerging and there were factions within the women's movement movement. There was a the veterans out of eighteen forty eight out of the Seneca falls meeting who were pushing toward the vote. They thought that the way path to women's liberation and to equality in society was through giving women the right to vote. There was another section. That thought that that was much too bold that women shouldn't wouldn't be in the political arena that that was a dirty place for men and that they should that women should more quietly behind the scenes. Try to influence their husbands toward equality. Will Victoria coming out of that. Eighteen sixty nine meeting said neither would do the work. Neither would be good enough or strong enough or would actually touch the the core. Who are the problems? She said that until women actually owned their own bodies actually owned the right to their own bodies There could would be no such thing as women rights and women's rights if they had the vote it wouldn't make any difference as long as they were still the property of a man whether it'd be their father or their husband and so she came in with an an incredibly radical platform and talked about Women in a way that really polite society had never heard and certainly had never been discussed by the women's rights movement. So she was sort of this meeting place through her newspaper as your her work. In New York kind of the place where radical labor and radical women's rights came together. And she was you know became The sort of titular sure head of that and she wasn't Declaring herself a candidate for president On her own she was a member of the equal rights party. Can you talk about the equal rights party and how it relates to the I. W. A. and some of the other things that were going on the equal rights party was We actually just formed out of the Labor movement the spiritualists it was kind of an umbrella party for radical reformers and these were the people who would never fit comfortably in the in the parties as the political parties as he existed and Victoria it once again. They were sort of they were the same constituency constituency. She would have talked to as a spiritualist in the earlier years. They were the working people they were they were the the laborers they they were the people who you know whose bodies filled the tenements. They were the people who were at the losing end of this new industrial system and the the very system that the industrialised and the religious leaders the preachers like Henry Ward Beecher. Who will talk about the people who are the politicians in Washington who who supposedly represented who supposedly? We're looking out for but in fact had absolute disdain for so victorians victorious party gave gave voice to these people on gave power to them and and she said you know I will be your leader and where she thought she was actually going to lead them or where they thought you was gonna lead them was never very clear but it was just enough that someone was speaking for them and speaking so boldly she was a young woman still? She was in her thirties early thirties and she was out on a platform platform. Speaking in the kind of English that That the the working classes could understand speaking of her own travails so she she imparted to them. The idea that she wasn't speaking at them shoes speaking with them and for them and so she she became an extremely powerful figure and and in fact some of the members of the women's movement the old guard Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B Anthony who were very actually very Radical in their own way would never have gone as far as Victoria but they saw in her a generational shift. You know she was. She was about thirty years younger then. Susan B. Anthony and and so they saw in her the problems of the future and in fact they saw that rightly because the women they spoke to where the wives lives of Sort of gentlemen. Farmers you know the wives of business small business owners. The wives of ministers the the wives of academics. The women victorious spoke to were why for women who are actually working yet. You know who had been forced to join this industrial workforce who were the new telephone operators telegraph operators and the tight we know who man the typewriter and they were a new labor force who no one had had to deal with before and no one quite knew what to do with and you know so they had all new issues which we are talking about today you know child care and maternity leave and all those kinds of things I mean and this was brand new. Victoria saw saw all of those problems because she had lived them and so it was just as she was a really wonderful kind of unifying figure that anyone with the foresight to to recognize. It could've seen that she was. She was where politics had to go. She was where the women's movement and had to go and yet she was very threatening as you can imagine to the powers that be because at this time. Victoria's political career kind of began on eighteen. Seventy eight hundred seventy one really blossomed in eighteen seventy two. This was another time in Europe where the streets were exploding am in eighteen. Eighteen seventy Peres had had been under bombardment. There was a Franco Prussian war. which I won't get into but it had left Paris besieged and and the French government Basically the Europe the powers in Europe left the Parisians to their own devices. They jerk the pressure had one and Prussian forces were surrounding Paris and the Parisians had to decide. What do we do you know? How do we survive? How do we keep literally the pressure out of the city and so they formed? What was a commune? And within this city a rebellion occurred Peres often. The the the home of Revolution Lucien and this was another case of that. Where a seed among people who had absolutely nothing? Who'd been starved you know? Were eating rats at this point. A seed seed of rebellion. Rose that actually Threatened was so threatening and so powerful and so violent that they a headlines around the world including in the United States. Try were were full of fear and trembling over this new populist us this working class this class associated with marks in his international working man's association who were who were rising up and taking control of this city and who threatened the stability of France Post Post. Pression were proscribed Franco Prussian War France and they were wild rumors in the United States and throughout Europe about the spread of this revolution and so against that backdrop betrayal was actually preaching revolution. Now some of this was coming from blood. Some of it was coming from the international working. Men's association that she was aligned with And some of it was coming from our own experience and what she was saying was absolute catnip to the audience. She was speaking to because they wanted nothing so much as a revolution because they were suffering and they were starving and they were working working seven days. A week For for for wages that didn't v them did it could with which they couldn't feed their families. And so Victoria's Victoria was exceedingly dangerous. Not only was she out there. Speaking to large audiences in accumulating greater and greater crowds. But she did so with flair and beauty and intelligence and and and she started to become very threatening some of her Significant well-known collaborators Were Uh were men were Stephen Pearl Andrews and Benjamin Butler. Can you talk about how those two guys play a role in her her politics publishing shing What they brought to their collaborations with Victoria and and what she took from from them? Yeah Yeah it's your betrays res life. She's had each had several really important measure so one was blood The other in finance was Cornelius Vanderbilt. Stephen Pearl Andrews was her works kind of genius For publish in the publishing sphere. She had she had started the newspaper with blood and and it was open to all kinds of radical ideas has and it was really a clear it was it was kind of what we know today. in an aggregate she would allow anybody to print whatever they publish. Whatever they wanted in her newspaper she was all fall? Press freedom and letting any kind of voice who wanted to be published speak. In fact she was the first. Her newspaper was the first in the United States to publish the Communist manifesto so she was not She was not afraid of diverse and radical voices. Inter Inter newspaper. Stephen Pearl Andrews had been kind of in semi-retirement for a while he was one of these fringe figures in the United States who would dabbled in everything in philosophy journalism academics a bit of politics and he saw in this newspaper but he he had a lot to say. He had a lot to get off his chest chest and he saw this newspaper in Victoria. Circle a place where he could do that and so he came to her as a journalist and said you know I can help you edit this paper and in fact she was so busy launching her political career in juggling so many things that she kind of handed it off to him with blood supervising and Stephen even pro Andrews under his his direction. The woodhall Caffeine's Cleveland's weekly became an incredible muckraking Oregon. He was afraid of no one. Of course he had had nothing to lose. It wasn't his newspaper. All he rest was being thrown in jail for libel but he went after corporations he went after industrialists he even went after The most important preacher in the country Henry Ward Beecher. Who was this sanctimonious powerhouse else in Brooklyn of the head of the the famous Beecher clan? Who who who who were on the right side of all issues and above reproach Stephen Pearl Andrews was the first one to kind of hint at in her newspaper. That Beecher was not all he seemed and so- Victoria through him Victoria. Learn kind of the art of unmasking these hypocrites which which was also something. She really understood because she thought society was hypocritical to its core that men were given liberties and rights that women could never exercise and and she couldn't understand you know. Oh how they could be allowed in what was called democracy so Stephen Pro Andrews was her her man in publishing. Benjamin Butler was her mentor in all things Washington Washington politics. He was a Massachusetts Congressman. who was kind of one of these figures I? I often try to think of who he would have been in contemporary terms. And when I was writing this it was the heyday of the Clinton the Bill Clinton administration and I kind of thought of me has as a left-wing Newt. Gingrich type figure. You know he was someone a real polemicist west who everyone knew about. Nobody was at crazy about on any side of the issues. But you couldn't ignore him in. So Benjamin Butler gave Victoria access to Congress Access to the House Judiciary Committee where she delivered a speech demanding women's rights and became the first woman to ever do that in US history. And and he. He gave her a quick tutorial in in the in the in the workings of Washington in lobbying in the power structure in who she had it Torri in who she had to reach in order to make a difference and and she it eighteen seventy one. She went to Washington address. The Committee unbeknownst to address the House Judiciary Judiciary Committee with Butler's with Butler's help and unbeknownst to the women suffragettes who you're the women's rights movement who were gathered in Washington at that same time to once again have their convention to once again speak to each other Victoria out of nowhere had gained access is to Congress something that they had been able to since eighteen forty eight and so this was another way of her making a huge dramatic move that the thrust her into the limelight light and in fact see the top of the she went from being no one in the women's rights movement to being you know One of the most important players and so Butler helped put her there. Can you say a little more about the relationship between the women's rights movements and spiritualism at this point in the in the eighteen seventies especially I'm thinking about the advocacy from some spiritualists. Like Victoria for what they were calling. Free Love can you talk about what free love I and how it either created friends or enemies in the women's rights movement. Yeah so what one of the one of the The third rail of American Politics Of actually American social life or social discourse chorus was. Something called free love at that. Time and Victoria was accused of being the high priestess of free. Love and spiritualism racialism had sort of evolved spirituals and became by the eighteen seventies became a huge tent. That accepted all manner of reformers and Victoria. Korea was one of them in Victoria. Specialty was of course social reform and the social reform. She preached was one in which she said you. You know every individual should have the right to love who they want when they want for however long they want without society having the right to pass judgment human on her or her or him or in any way make that illegal. In other words there should be divorced. Laws women should be able to get a divorce. Women should have a property rights Men should be able to leave abusive relationships as well without any kind of without any kind of stain Victoria spoke the kind of language anguish. That we speak today. You know the society she envisioned was pretty much the one we have where well to a certain extent. Where is it where governments stay as much his possible out of out of a person's personal life? Where would she would call out of a person's bedroom her critics who by now were growing because she they were so terrified of her for political reasons? Reasons were were quick to label that free love and in fact. The spiritualist often denounced as being free lovers. Now you know that phrase free love have you can imagine what Middle America would have thought of that. You know America was still a very pious country a very Christian country and a very supposedly moral country even though Oh you know prostitution was rife You know a marriages were full of abuse sexual and physical. You know. It's it's the same old all story where there's a surface narrative and then there's actually happens behind closed doors and so The free love handle was someone that was given Victoria in order to discredit her and she never really shied away from that in fact in one of her most famous speeches she said because of the hypocrisy of that you know because because of the progress you the people who are calling her reliever who she knew you know were men who were engaged in extramarital affairs you know who frequented Senate prostitutes who were drunk or ledges and she declared in one of her most famous New York speeches. You know yes. I'm a free lover you know and no. No one has the right to tell me that I can't be and when you think about it it's such a basic claim. It's such a basic human right that you should be able to love whom you choose was and she wasn't even talking in those days about gay rights she was just talking about the actual the actual ability of a woman to declare herself. Alf To be to be to be in a relationship when she wanted without any regard for the legal Legal limit limitations are strictures and and so Victoria Victoria and the spiritualists because a spiritual eyes were also becoming part of the a political reform movement the Labor movement although albeit at kind of the nutcase side of it you know the the Marx's of this world were appalled by the idea of spiritual Louis embracing The tenants of the international working men's Association. Because they they were so marked with soft prayed of being discredited by this group which he of course had no truck with because he was much too much materialist to think that he was? Anyone could get any kind of message from someone beyond the grave whether it be a A dead spouse or a God and so The the spiritualists though to the normal mainstream politician Titian the United States where a dangerous group. They were an outlying group. They were growing group and a growing political force and Soda Tire Them With Label. Free Lovers and Tatar Victoria Tori without label when a long way to discredit them among people who might have been listening. You know but we're taken aback by that and certainly wouldn't want to be associated with come to to Victoria and clans or would hole and Cleveland's weekly publishing the Beecher Tilton affair can you talk about Maybe in the life of the publication you talked about how it was kind of an aggregate or a grab bag all kinds of things were going into it. Can you talk about what what hit those pages. That was such a big deal and why Victoria in the in the eighteen. Seventy in the early eighteen seventies eighteen seventy one She was under so much pressure and under so in being so criticized from so many quarters because because as soon as she became a radical radical politically all the people who operated her the wall streeters. The vanderbilts of this world The kind of upper across New York society who thought of her as a novelty. You know a lovely novelty was you know with an engaging personality and a curious message of women's rights. It's starting to abandon her because she became politically dangerous. An infuriated her because she knew all of their secrets and she knew do that she was going to go down because she had no. She had no backers. She had no Supporters within the establishment to help her or defend her and and she had come across Henry Beecher's out sorry Henry Ward Beecher. who was the probably the the most beautiful of the Billy Graham of his time? He was most prominent preacher in America. Absolutely an untouchable figure and she knew from the women's rights. Great Pride and from The Grapevine in New York that not only had he been having affairs with his parishioners for decades but that he had actually had an affair air by his closest associate had an affair with the with the wife of his closest associate Theodore Tilton and had impregnated her and the wife either her had a miscarriage or an abortion. Now that kind of a scandal in that period of America when not only was the power our structure kind of under siege with the with the threat of the commune but it was also the period of the Grant Ulysses Grant Administration which was rife with corruption eruption and And so the stability that might have come from Washington wasn't there so all all aspects of American life were under threat. The idea that the top up religious figure in the country was also fallible. In fact not just fallible you know but but but a liar and Aletsch was would be would be a powerful statement for her to make but she hung back. She didn't she didn't use that information against him until it got to the point that Victoria was absolutely desperate and so she didn't expose beecher what she did was. She wrote a letter in the New York Times to describe the hypocrisy of American culture and and she said that she knows personally of a powerful preacher who practices free love but is too timid to preach it to declare it. And that she she wishes that the people who believed as she did that men and women should be free in the in the domestic and social and personal arena That they should come forward if they did that. Then then you know her. Her position would be more secure Of course that threat. So call that adv very veiled threat was met by Beecher in his group with with absolute terror beaches sisters were were. Harriet Beecher stowe. Oh the author of Ogle. Tom's cabin and a woman in Catharine Beecher who had written although she was unmarried childless had written was which was considered the kind of doctor actor Spock's Manual on child rearing at that point in American history and so these were women with exceedingly powerful voices so the three of them got together to to destroy Victoria and Victoria Harriet beecher still ran. A cereal in a magazine called doc anyway. There was a character in the Harriet. Beecher stowe ran ran a cereal in a magazine I was a character called audacious. Dang your eyes in the end. The person was absolutely recognizable as Victoria and it was mocking and it was cruel and Victoria There were there was a lot Victoria. What's good swallow? That went too far so Victoria decided that she would challenge Henry would feature. She was going to give a speech on free love. The one I mentioned should earlier where she declared herself a free lever and she said to Henry Ward Beecher. If you present me in this speech if you come out on the stage with me I won't. I'll keep your secret. I want you to declare who you are presenting me and Henry Ward Beecher in his snivelling according to Victoria snivelling on his couch said I can't do do that and but I'll pay for the pay for the the evening I'll give you two hundred thousand dollars or or no. Sorry I'll be twenty thousand dollars to pay for the evening At for you to rent Apollo Hall after the event. But I can't be there myself so she said I'll I'll I'll. I'll assume you're going to come. She didn't take no for an answer. Also you're we're gonNA come and if you don't come that I'm not responsible for the consequences and so Henry Ward beecher proved himself not to be courageous enough to do within she proceeded needed to do which was declared a free lover and The wrath that fell upon Victoria after that was sensational and so in her newspaper in November. And I'm sorry in October. Nineteen eighteen. Seventy two she decided to tell the story of the Beecher Tilton affair and in black and white in this newspaper She went into all the gory details and exposed him for who he was and brought down this house of cards. which was you know the the Beach Your family the Congregational Church in Brooklyn the religious pillar upon which so much of the moral American myth was built? She brought it down in that article and the the issue flew off the stands. They couldn't keep it Everyone wanted to read it. No one wanted to report it but everyone wanted to repeat it and so- Victoria in intaking that rash step basically And it her political career. Ironically it was the month before she was on the ballot as the presidential candidate that she that she wrote this piece or that you allow this piece republished in her in her newspaper. And on the morning of the Election Day she was in jail for having distributed that newspaper through the mail thereby breaking US violating US obscenity laws by mailing obscene material obscene material being the story of the Beecher Tilton affair which everyone was trying to cover up so it was a bold and reckless move. Move on her part but she did what she set out to do. which was exposed the hypocrisy in American society? No it's it's an aging seventy seven a couple years later. The Victoria leaves the United States. Can you talk about what her life was like intervening years those couple years before she finally go yeah. Victoria was fairly discredited. It'd politically among the society. She had come to know in her early years in New York and the women's rights movement really wanted nothing to do with her because with exposing the Tilton to Beecher scandal she she had. She had gone too far and she was a liability political liability for the women's movement and and so betrayal was on her own and she retreated where she knew she was still be welcome which would be to the spiritualist and so she became one of the great speakers on the spiritual circuit and and she was more bold than she ever had been and she basically had nothing to lose because she had lost just about everything and she told it as she saw but and her speeches were You know fill to capacity wherever she went but by eighteen seventy seven she was really exhausted. And so Cornelius Vanderbilt had died and his sons her family was so afraid. That Victoria or the Tenney who had been the old man's lover was going to try to claim some kind of of money from him or that they would then go and expose vanderbilt for for what he was That they paid literally paid Victoria antennae. To leave town and so- Victoria decided to take that whole crazy claflin client with her to England And there she went to reestablish herself sought to leave the United States to go as far as England because she he needed to escape the the Tilton Beecher scandal she had emerged from it. You Know Wounded Devastated A. She had lost everything. Henry Ward Beecher had not he was still as powerful as ever had been in fact he had been working on a book on the life of Christ so he was still The figure of the moral authority in the United States so Victoria in retreat. It was one of the few times she actually ever retreated but it was just exhaustion on her part she. She went to England England. And and try to reestablish yourself there among the spirituous As as a as a speaker In that country and in the audience I mean as happened to her time and again she was such a such a Such a magnetic figure that in the audience there was a gentleman in a banker from an old well established British banking family A man named John. biddle th Martin. Who heard her? It was so removed by what she said that he began to court. Her and this was exactly the kind of sanctuary sanctuary that Victoria needed. Luckily for her John Martin was not your average banker. His closest relative had been assistant who had just died and she had been a spiritualist and she had been a women's rights advocate and John Martyn himself was a was a social reformer so victoria literally fell all into this man's arms and and they they were married and she became now. I wouldn't say a pillar Hiller of British Society of British kind of upper class society but she became one of those American women who appeared Out of nowhere out of New York. Usually they came with a bundle of cash to try to to in order to Save a dying errors critic. Family are to save them from ruin. Victoria came to save a lonely banker from his solitude so she lived in England For for many years until her death in nineteen one thousand nine hundred eighty three and in nineteen twenty three and and she lived a retired existence in comparison to how she lived in the United States but one that was actually befitting a woman of her age in those times but she was no way less radical and in fact She was part of the spiritualist movement on and she was also part of the movement which was very interesting and it makes sense why she would be because when you think about what motivated her. When she was a fifteen year all girl the her first political lesson was that women should women should be instructed how to take care of themselves physically so that they can make sure that they have a child who is healthy and that that little colonel was something that followed Victoria all her life that life lesson that was her mission and even as an older woman when she was in London in the in the beginning of the twentieth century she? She was an advocate of eugenics because because she thought that until people understood actually the mechanics of their bodies and still really understood health and wellbeing that society would always produce an underclass that was poor and it wasn't that she was trying to create a master astor race by any means which she did was she just used that information she had gotten all those years as a spiritualist and and and the the tales tales of woe. That parents told her parents who had no money in and came and you know describe their children who were dying young who were dying at birth or who lived with Physical or or or mental ailments and in Victoria in her own self education had come to learn and also when she got to England. She learned she studied more the idea that if people understood health physical health then and if poorer women could be told and given healthcare and could be told how to take care of themselves and given proper nutritional information that this the group of people this underclass might not be condemned to generation after generation of poverty. And so. That's what what what you Victoria to that movement in it's absolutely understandable is the thread throughout her political life throughout her spiritual life and into her into into her old age though that year. Eighteen seventy seventy seven when Victoria does leave the United States It's also a critical year for for the movements in America that had wanted to build. The World Victoria envision. Can you talk a little more about what happened in that year. When Victoria had like she lost and was leaving what else happened in her radical circles that that shaped how much of that world imagined they would achieve in the evolution the labor movement and the radical political movements in Europe and the United States by the late eighteen seventies the second generation of labor radicals culls? Who would have been kind of? Victoria's age I'm you know. She's a second generation Feminine Neck Feminists and call themselves bonus of a second generation women's rights advocate the second-generation Labor activists in Europe and the United States were much more radical than the first generation worthy not. Then let's say Karl Marx Generation Integration. They were the the second generation who are operating in the eighteen seventies. Were taking their fight to the street and part of it were lessons that they learned. I'm from the commune from the Communist in the early seventies in Paris but part of it was just the frustration of the The working the Labor movement which saw its its efforts to combine and to grow as a political force being stifled by this powerful beast which was called capitalism which interestingly enough had only actually begun being called capitalism in the in the mid century so this was an entirely new phenomenon a non that people only were beginning to grapple with this this mammoth force that was controlling people's lives and chewing workers up and spitting them out without out shouting tier and so the Labor movement became very radical in the seventies in the years between eighteen seventy seven and eighteen ninety three when betray very was in England. She lost touch with what was happening in the United States and she had been off the stage she had been off the Off the kind of political cla radar and the women's rights radar At an actually taken refuge in this kind of bourgeois existence. She had in London with her new husband and she went back to the United States. She decided that she wanted to get back on the circuit because she has revived herself and she there's certain things happen to she Had had a a a brush with the with the The British Museum a libel suit where she She had sued the British Museum because it contains several several pamphlets re pertaining to the Beach Tilton scandal and and Victoria wanted that out of her life. She had moved to England England to get rid of that. And so she she. She sued the British Museum for Libel because they had these pamphlets and so the result of that lawsuit was mixed. I am a judge rule that yes Victoria had been libeled by these pamphlets that she was not this free lover in this. Wanton woman described in these brochures These documents that came out of New York That were in the British Museum's possession but that the museum itself was not guilty liable. We'll Victoria in her way declared a victory entirely early for her for herself and so she felt now that she had finally put that scandal behind her. She felt that that was kind of the bookmark. at the end of the Beecher Tilton scandal she could go back to the United States and maybe revive not a political career but at least speaking career become irrelevant voice again but she arrived in the United States in 1893 to an entirely different scene it had moved beyond her argument. The women's rights movement was now focused entirely on getting the vote for women The political movement was the the was radical and looked at her as a kind of a middle aged wealthy woman. That's how she appeared in fact that's who she was. Her Spirit was still Victoria woodhall but people had also forgotten her so the audience she had previously Ashley was not there and it was kind of sad CODA to her to her career because her one and only lecture there fell flat and so she cancelled she made some excuses and cancelled her tour and retreated to England and John Martyn. Her husband had family property In the in Gloucestershire in the West of England and she she she literally would move there and live in his grand house up on a hill and wage for the rest of her life wage. Very Small Mall Battles for education for Driving for drives for women's rights to drive of all things She got involved and in In minor scuffles with local authorities. She was still that fighters still Victoria woodhall but her days of of trying to change basically Klay America and bike and and the world. Where we're we're well past her? So in kind of thinking from the end of her life back second summing it up do you do you see any. Here's for Victoria in kind of this week of American history. I mean with all these firsts swith. You mentioned her courage with sensitivity with being so far ahead of her time She's a remarkable person Are there any UH others were kind of stand with her. Does she have stand alone to you. In my mind. She stands alone. You know when I was writing about her. Whenever you write history you oh you you refer to your own experiences and people you you contemporary? At this time when I was writing it was during the Clinton administration and Hillary Clinton was out there tonight. Sometimes thank you know is she a Hillary Clinton type of figure but no I mean Victoria was really there are there are in and as I said before there is a. There's a wealth of of history that hasn't been told and most of it. Is You know minorities and women stories but And so no doubt there are other Victoria would hold out there But in my mind she's unique in that she was such a singular figure that was powerful on her own. I mean when you think about it. She had had people who educated her along the way but the energy that propelled her for decades was her own based on nothing but let her own will her own spirit her own sense of justice her own sense of writing wrongs wrong on a massive scale and and the fact that that she was able to do that and and to have the courage and and to make such an impact at a time when women didn't even have the voice so it's not just that she was about breaking barriers. She actually broke the barriers now. You know she was reckless. She wasn't shrewd dude politically and so she was easily dismissed by you know because she went too far. She wasn't a very good chess player. But I think as I struggle figure in American in the American feminist history. I think that she stands alone and And I think that she someone who deserves even more more research than I did. I did look at her. You know kind of as you're kind of talking about it across disciplines. It's not just as a spiritual snot just as a politician. It's not just as women's rights yet to really embed her in what was going on at the time makes you appreciate her even more and and I think that for what we're going through today You know we're at a place now where we're going to another revolution that's really comparable comparable to the industrial revolution in scale and profound impact on society. And and one of the interesting things. You know that historically when people are scared because of changes they have no control over or they don't understand they seek solace in you know spiritual is and we're religion or something. I don't really see that happening now. And I. Maybe maybe you do I. I was racking my brain to think that if there's kind of a revival now but it's interestingly I don't think it's happening but But Victoria Toria kind of speaks to us again because unbelievably the very right. She was talking about you. Know while women can vote and while women do have rights to property ownership and they're not the property of their husbands. You know we're still talking about abortion rights and we're still talking about God you know gay rights we're still talking about government interference in personal lives. And so the the the war she was waging then she could be waging. Today you know basically almost using the same language which is really both sad and kind of interesting You you know and so I think that she's a very pertinent figure for us to study at this moment in that period of history is is is a fascinating one for us to look at because of the because of the changes that were occurring in the fact that you know where society wasn't eighteen forty eight no one could have predicted where it would have been even in eighteen seventy and so where we are today. Twenty nineteen you know. We sometimes think. Is this over you know. Is the mayhem. The kind of the social mayhem the technological breakthroughs throughs. Is it over. You know. It's far from over and we've got a long way ahead and so It's it's interesting to see who the Victoria would halls might be today in. Who What are they saying? And and how and where push should we listen to and what directions are they pointing pointing in And you know she came out of nowhere and and maybe the next Victoria would halls just out there writing a blog somewhere. Hey folks it's Aaron here. I hope today's interview helped you. Deepen in your understanding of everything involved in the world of spiritualism. But we're not done yet. We have more interviews to share with you so stick around after this brief sponsor break back here a preview of next week's interview you next time on on obscured. I think I've always been. I don't know if you'd say gifted but at least fascinated by outliers these these were wildest of the Weil folks. I think I've always been able to walk along a beach sand and find some odd odd thing that people don't notice or piece of glass looks shy. These are definitely those kinds of people ball. You know within the wide range of the spiritual movement I seem to be able to find you know the toad the whole or the serpent in the garden. If if you might say and I think by looking at those outliers you can see stuff. That's true within the movement but maybe harder Chrissy of true in potential. And that leads you into questioning may merit about what spiritualist On obscured it was created by me. Aaron McKie and produced by Matt Frederick. Alex Williams and Josh Vein in partnership with iheartradio research and writing for the season is all the work of my right hand. Man Karl Nellis and the brilliant Chad Lawson composed the brand new soundtrack learn more about our contributing historians source material and links to other shows over at history obscured dot com. And until next time. Thanks for listening on obscured production of iheartradio and Aaron Monkey for more podcast. My heart radio was radio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows

Victoria Victoria United States New York City Karl Marx Ohio Victoria woodhull Victoria Woodhall president Torey woodhall San Francisco Victoria woodhall practice Europe Victoria Woodhull Hole Victoria Toria woodhall Washington Victoria Wood Aaron McKie Pulitzer Prize
Full Episode: Monday, June 17, 2019

World News Tonight with David Muir

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Full Episode: Monday, June 17, 2019

"Hey, I'm Brad milkey from ABC news. And if you like world news tonight, I wanna let you know about another podcast that I host called start here. Every morning in twenty minutes. We'll give you a whip around the biggest stories driving the day with context from the people who are covering them up close that includes David Muir, Tom yomas, the whole world news tonight team so start smart and subscribe to start here brought to you by indeed used by over three million businesses for hiring where business owners and HR professionals can post job openings with screener questions, than sort review and communicate with candidates from an online dashboard. Learn more at indeed dot com slash tonight. Tonight, the deadly shooting at the courthouse. A gunman wearing tactical gear firing several shots into a Dallas federal courthouse. Authorities were turned fire with deadly force witnesses describing the scene as he was firing trapped inside the massive explosion destroying a home in off duty police officer sprinting to the scene among those who helped pull a survivor from the debris. Three investigators before the cameras just moments ago millions tonight, bracing for major rain and flooding from Colorado all the way east to the coast, from DC through, Philly a week of dangerous rain ahead for the east coast. Ginger times it all out outrage officers accused of excessive force guns drawn after a child had allegedly stolen adul- tonight with the police chief is now saying the family says it is not enough. The new threat from Iran tonight, what they say, they'll do within ten days and the Trump administration pointing to new images tonight what they say they prove Martha Raddatz is here live third shark attack off the east coast. Tonight at eight year old boy, the extreme turbulence, the flight attendant, violent enthrone passengers injured and celebrating Gloria Vanderbilt she came from a famous family, but she was determined to define herself at that she did from Vanderbilt jeans to poetry or paintings. Her son Anderson Cooper remembering. This is ABC news tonight with David Muir, good evening, and it's great to start another week with all of you at home, and we begin tonight with the deadly shootout unfolding in broad daylight outside a federal courthouse in Dallas. A masked gunman armed with a rifle firing into the building. Heavily armed police swarming. The scene today taking them down in the parking lot. The gunman in tactical gear, wearing body armor, federal authorities said he had more than five thirty round magazines on and witnesses in windows, watching the harrowing scene unfold and late today. Police now revealing new details about the suspect ABC's Marcus Moore's in Dallas, leading us off shots fired shots fired. We got swat coming through. Tonight, a masked gunman in tactical gear, firing on Dallas federal courthouse just before nine o'clock this morning. One person seen just to the right of the suspect taking cover just feet away. We were all in a room together in a meeting when we heard the shots, maybe ten fifteen shots all all this rapid people just start running out of the building, a photographer with the Dallas Morning News, cantering this chilling image of the gunman from just feet away the suspect now identified as twenty two year old Brian Isaac CLYDE runs to a parking lot across the street exchanging gunfire with federal authorities he is shot and killed a thorns discovering. His car nearby. The bomb squad out of precaution conducting a controlled explosion. We were on the scene just a block away and could hear the sound. And you just heard them detonating the an object where the suspect vehicle was found here downtown, multiple FBI agents rating Fort Worth apartment, where neighbors told our Dallas station. W FAA, the suspect had been living and tonight, the US army, telling ABC news private first class, CLYDE served as an infantryman from August two thousand fifteen to February twenty seventeen authority saying tonight there is no indication of other shooters or threats to the community. But for the actions of the federal Protective Service officers, this likely would have been a very deadly incident and Marcus more with us live tonight from Dallas and Marcus just incredible really that no one was seriously hurt in this in the thirties tonight, are telling you, they are working to determine a motive. David authorities told me they have more than two hundred FBI agents and partners. Fanned out across the state is they try to connect the dots here and they are tracing. The suspects weapon as well as interviewing those who knew him trying to figure out a motive for this shooting, David. Marcus more leading us off tonight, Marcus. Thank you. We're also following breaking news, just as we came on the air tonight, we're at the US is sending one thousand additional troops to the Middle East amid these rising tensions with Iran and tonight, the new threat from Iran, that country saying, within ten days, it will exceed the limit of its uranium stockpile, violating the nuclear deal. That deal the US had already pulled out of tonight, the Pentagon, now, claiming it as new evidence, proving Iran was behind the attacks on two oil, tankers US central command releasing new images of Iranian Revolutionary Guard patrol boat near one of the tankers. So what does this all mean as the US now sends these troops ABC's chief global affairs? Correspondent Martha Raddatz tonight with lake reporting. It is a threat that could unquestionably bring Iran and the US closer to confrontation, Iran saying in ten days, it will violate the joint twenty fifteen nuclear deal by exceeding the limits on nuclear fuel unless Europeans provide relief from crippling sanctions, but the US which withdrew from the deal last year fired back calling Ron's threat nuclear blackmail saying, President Trump has made it clear that he will never allow Iran to develop nuclear weapons, although the additional one thousand forces, the US is sending are said to be for defensive purposes, largely reconnaissance and surveillance, and today, more images now declassified from that tanker attack in the Gulf of Oman, which officials say shows close up the Iranian Revolutionary Guard corps removing an unexploded mind from one of the tankers. But the far no evidence has been released publicly of the Iranians placing the mines on the ships. The military also saying the Iranians attempted to shoot down US drone that was tracking one of the tankers, but the Iranian surface to air missile. They say missed by nearly a mile both the US in Iran thumping their chests. They're trying to show that they're tough enough. If it comes to blows that they can take it, but neither wants to step across the line, and actually have it come to a military conflict, another week of this Martha with us again, live tonight and Martha, you reported there on these additional US troops being sent in tonight, the European saying that they need more evidence to convince them the Iranians were behind all this. They do. David secretary of state. Mike Pompeo has said the evidence against Iran in the attacks is unmistakable. But the European Union wants further investigation David Martha Raddatz with us live tonight. Martha. Thank you in backyard. Home tonight, and the horrific scene today, a massive explosion destroying a home in Ridgefield, New Jersey being images come. All day, take a look the blessed leveling the home an off duty police officer among those helping to pull victims from under the rubble neighbor say the explosion, knock them off their feet, ABC's, even pilgrim is at the scene force tonight, a home obliterated, like a like a bomb. I mean, literally like among a suspected gas explosion leveling a Ridgefield New Jersey house, its roof crashing to the ground took me off my feet, and I went to look over my fence, and there was no house. He explosion blowing out windows throwing debris hundreds of feet away. An off duty police officer a block away ran to the house, helping dig one person from the rear of the collapsed home that person rushed to the hospital tonight in stable condition as a party was trying to exit on, on his own. They assistant moving debris and we're able to extricate him out of the building. There was a gas leak that had to be shut off. So firefighters could put out the flames. That. Song through debris others on ladders spring water on hotspots. The rising smoke could be seen for miles just incredible pictures. Eba with us live from the scene of the explosion, and even officials investigating the cause and say crews from six different towns work to put out the fire Damon. Those dire fighters were still here tonight. Keeping watch over any lingering hotspots, as for the investigation authorities say, they aren't sure if the gas leak caused the explosion, or was the result of it's still a lot of questions tonight. David pilgrim, live in New Jersey. Eva, thank you next tonight. Millions bracing for major rain and flooding this week from Colorado all the way to the east coast from DC up through Philly in the next twenty four hours at least twenty reported tornadoes across eight states and destroying church and Bentonville, Indiana. Strong winds tearing apart a roof and Fort Worth this system stretching all the way into the northeast through the end of the week and the amount of rain, we're talking about as serious. So let's get right to chief meteorologist ginger Zee who was timing. This whole thing out for us. Hey gender. I hate David tonight. A severe thunderstorm watch just to our south has parts of Maryland. Reporting nearly golf ball sized hail. That's just one of the threats, if you're anywhere from Philadelphia to Atlantic City down to Dover in Baltimore even DC watched tonight for damaging win now. That's the severe weather part of it. But a lot of this is forming along the stationary front, plenty of tropical moisture fueling a couple of lows that will act like little impulses over the next couple of days. What that means to you from Kansas, Missouri. Southern Ohio, West Virginia all the way through New Jersey is that you'll have rain and some places a lot of it. Overall one two three. But some spots up to four inches. David. With us tonight ginger, thank you. And now the growing outrage over police, accused of excessive force in Phoenix tonight officers with guns drawn on a family, including a pregnant mother and their daughter take took a doll from a store, the mayor and police chief apologizing. Now the family saying it's not enough. Here's ABC's Adrian banker. We'd be images that drew outrage. The couple held at gunpoint by Phoenix. Police in this now viral video tonight, demand. The officers be fired is basically a slap in the face everyone knows. They are not fit to be policing drive on aims seen cuffed then kicked by police responding to a report of shoplifting. Doing. His fiancee, who is six months pregnant pleads with police trial. After their four year old daughter walked out of a store with a doll. But my one euro engine from the opposite. You could see them video grabbing her arm. You know, force police claim the couple was shoplifting refused commands, and that officers feared they were armed tonight. The family says apologies from the mayor and police chief aren't enough. I apologize the family of politics to the to the community. But at the end of the day, there's more to the story David, the store behind us, not pressing charges those officers on desk duty pending an internal investigation. The family says they've never received a direct call of apology and says, they'll sue the city for ten million dollars. David Adri banker reporting in Adrian. Thank you to the White House. Tonight, President Trump on the eve of officially kicking off his reelection campaign. The president now says he's gonna take another shot at healthcare telling George, he will roll out a quote, phenomenal new plan within the next two months. Many Republicans tonight, signaling, they wanted to steer clear of this issue that hurt them so much. Midterms. Here's ABC's senior White House correspondent Cecilia Vega tonight. Just as he is about to officially launch his reelection campaign. President Trump now says he has a plan for the issue. Most important to American voters healthcare produced a nominal healthcare, and we'll have the concept of the plan. And it'll be Christian with the planet. We'll, we'll be announcing. About to be less, but White House sources tell ABC news there is no legislative plan in the works. Instead, the administration is drafting a set of healthcare principles, ever, since Republicans tried and failed to repeal and replace in two thousand seventeen party leaders have been reluctant to take on healthcare as a campaign issue in the race for twenty twenty today. Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell said he's anxious to hear more. We're looking forward to seeing what he recommend the president insisting we're going to have a great healthcare plan. It was all part of that exclusive interview with George Stephanopoulos and tonight, this moment in the Oval Office, getting attention acting chief of staff. Mick Mulvaney coughing as the president discussed his own personal finances. President Trump not happy, some point Puerto hope they get it 'cause it's a fantastic financial statement. It's fantastic financial seven and let's do that over. He's coughing in the middle of my aunts. Yeah. Okay. I don't like that. You know. Your cheapest you get a cough pleads shot over here. This kid you just can't just to change. Sorry. So he bigger with a slot tonight from the White House and Cecilia, President Trump also making news from that interview when it came to the poll numbers poll numbers, he said, were untrue. He was not happy with, I know announces his campaign tomorrow. But there's news tonight involving some of those posters behind those numbers, exactly. David, this came after these internal pulse from the president's reelection campaign leaked. They showed him back in March trailing behind Joe Biden, some key battleground states, as you just said in that interview there with George the president denied that these polls, even existed. But David, we have learned that tonight, the reelection campaign has indeed cut ties with some of these posters Cecilia Vega with us on a Monday night. Thank you Cecilia next tonight that new shark attack North Carolina, the state's third this month alone. The latest victim. An eight year old boy bitten on the leg while swimming right off the coast. Why do there seem to be more attacks with authorities are now saying tonight? And here's AB. Sees GIO Benitez tonight, yet another shark attack off the coast of North Carolina. The third in just two weeks. Hi, I'm I'm on bald head island and someone got the by shark this time an eight year old boy near bald head island, a shark biting his leg leaving puncture wounds. But doctors believe he'll make a full recovery. It was just last week when nineteen year old surfer Austin Reed was bitten at nearby, ocean isle beach and two weeks ago. Seventeen year old page winter was attacked by a shark near Atlantic beach, losing a leg above the knee and some of her fingers this afternoon. Winter spoke exclusively with good Morning, America's Robin Roberts. You never lost consciousness. What kind of pain were you in page my body went into shock? So I couldn't really feel anything I just knew it was bad, and David incredibly while we usually see about nineteen shark attacks every year here in the US, we've already hit that number so far this year. Some experts say warmer waters are bringing sharks closer to shore and more people are flocking to the coast. David RITA bananas with us as well. Thank you GO in next tonight here. Supreme court making news tonight, not just for today's rulings. But how the justices cited today, the court, upholding an exception to double jeopardy in this country. Meaning you can be charged them both the federal level, and the state level justices Ruth Bader, Ginsburg Neal Gorsuch, the loan centers in another case Justice Clarence Thomas joining Ginsburg and Gorsuch on a five four ruling rejecting Virginia. Republicans appeal over alleged racial gerrymandering and the justices handing a temporary victory tonight to the owners of a bakery in Oregon erasing. A ruling against them for refusing to make a wedding cake for same sex. Couple over religious beliefs. A lower court will now reexamine that case. There were still a lot more head on world news. Tonight this Monday, celebrating the life and legacy of Gloria Vanderbilt also the extreme turbulence, the flight attendant violently thrown the passengers who were injured more on this flight at the moment, also the recall tonight, involving several flavors of the popular pasta sauce, why the company is concerned and then that shooting scare in downtown Toronto today. More than a million. We're in the middle of celebrating the raptors championship. When gunshots begin the scene from Toronto in just a moment. A lot more news ahead on a Monday night. When you're hiring, you don't wanna waste time sorting through dozens of irrelevant resumes. You want an efficient way to get to a shortlist of qualified candidates. That's why you need indeed dot com post a job in minutes. Set up screener questions, based on your job requirements, then zero in on qualified candidates using an intuitive online dashboard. Discover why three million businesses use indeed for hiring post a job today at indeed dot com slash ABC. Search for greatness. Search indeed better help offers licensed professional counselors specialized in a wide array of issues, like depression, anxiety, and grief. Connect with your professional counselor in a safe, private online environment. It's a truly affordable option and listeners can get ten percent off your first month by going to better help dot com slash tonight. Fill out a questionnaire to help them assess your needs and get matched with a counselor. You'll love we're going to hear next tonight to the terrifying scene in. Inside a passenger plane. Turbulence violently rocking the jet throwing a flight attendant and her drink cart right into the aisle. Several passengers were injured in ABC's David curly covers aviation tonight. One of the most extreme cases of turbulence on camera, a flight attendant picking up empty beverage cuffs slammed to the ceiling of the seven thirty seven the suddenness and strengthened the turbulence highlighted by how much is thrown to that ceiling, including the beverage cart as the jet drops significantly the car crashing onto passengers, some scalded by hot water. According to those on the Bulgarian jetliner from Costa, voters, Switzerland, ten passengers transported to the hospital. Even though the airline said the turbulence was expected, the flight attendant was up collecting, glasses, anyway, there are about twenty seven significant turbulence events in the US each year with fourteen serious injuries, and seventy minor on average in this case despite being slammed to the ceiling. The airline says the flight attendant was. Injured. David David girly tonight. David, thank you to the index in shooting at the Toronto Raptors victory parade. Video showing fans running in panic Toronto police reporting four victims with non-life threatening gunshot wounds. At least three suspects are in custody tonight and a pair of firearms have been recovered. Overcrowding wasn't concern all day with an estimated one point five million fans packing downtown Toronto the gate scare for passengers aboard a southwest flight in Pittsburgh. The plane set to depart for Denver was struck by vehicle driven by a southwest ramp agent, there were a hundred and eighty people on board. No injuries. The driver was taken to the hospital that plane did not fly a recall tonight involving pasta sauce misconduct. America makers of Ragu, brand pasta sauce, recalling the products over concerns. They may contain plastic fragments forty five ounce in sixty six ounce jars of chunky tomato garlic and onion, and sixty six ounce jars of old world style traditional and meat sauces or all affected. We have much more on our website for you funding tonight, here, she was born into a famous family, but she was determined to define every chap. After of her life herself. And she did celebrating Gloria Vanderbilt. Gloria Vanderbilt was born into the famous Vanderbilt family, the great, great granddaughter of railroad and shipping tycoon Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt she lost her father, when she was just a baby. And at the tender age of ten she was the subject of a bitter child custody battle between her mother and her aunt the newspapers covered every step the battle, she was married four times she had four children. She would act as a young woman, and over the course of her life, she would write and paint to ABC news. At the opening of her art show in nineteen sixty nine in New York City field, personally, having your work, Hugh, I'm delighted I love to work and. And long and this is going to keep me going. And I, I I like that. So I'm delighted with it. Many. And you're. Member which you turn the family name. It will fortune for I jeans. This is Gloria Vanderbilt the woman who invented designer teams and almost overnight changed the way America dresses. They were everywhere invitation candidate teams that were built fee figure Vanderbilt for your figure, but Gloria Vanderbilt would navigate her share of loss to in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight. She lost a son Carter to suicide and she wrote about it. He was just twenty three but she would remain an optimist once saying be kind to everyone. You meet for everyone is fighting a great battle. We all are everyone, and it was her devoted son Anderson Cooper, who announced her passing today. You could hear it in his voice, the last few weeks, every time I kissed her goodbye. I'd say I love you Monir. She would look at me and say I love you too. And in the end the greater gift, get a mother give to her son Vanderbilt. Was ninety five what an extraordinary life, what an extraordinary mom, and what an incredible woman thoughts are with Anderson, and his family tonight, we hope she's painting already. Brought to you by indeed used by over three million businesses for hiring, where business owners in HR professionals can post job openings with screener questions, then soared review and communicate with candidates from an online dashboard. Learn more at indeed dot com slash tonight.

ABC David pilgrim Gloria Vanderbilt US Iran president Martha Raddatz President Trump David ABC Cecilia Vega Marcus Moore George Stephanopoulos Anderson Cooper Dallas America Toronto David Muir officer